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Sample records for poliovirus vaccines

  1. Vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Burns, Cara C; Diop, Ousmane M; Sutter, Roland W; Kew, Olen M

    2014-11-01

    The attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) has many properties favoring its use in polio eradication: ease of administration, efficient induction of intestinal immunity, induction of durable humoral immunity, and low cost. Despite these advantages, OPV has the disadvantage of genetic instability, resulting in rare and sporadic cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) and the emergence of genetically divergent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs). Whereas VAPP is an adverse event following exposure to OPV, VDPVs are polioviruses whose genetic properties indicate prolonged replication or transmission. Three categories of VDPVs are recognized: (1) circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs) from outbreaks in settings of low OPV coverage, (2) immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs) from individuals with primary immunodeficiencies, and (3) ambiguous VDPVs (aVDPVs), which cannot be definitively assigned to either of the first 2 categories. Because most VDPVs are type 2, the World Health Organization's plans call for coordinated worldwide replacement of trivalent OPV with bivalent OPV containing poliovirus types 1 and 3. PMID:25316847

  2. Cessation of Trivalent Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and Introduction of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine - Worldwide, 2016.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Farrell, Margaret; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Menning, Lisa; Shendale, Stephanie; Lewis, Ian; Rubin, Jennifer; Garon, Julie; Harris, Jennifer; Hyde, Terri; Wassilak, Steven; Patel, Manish; Nandy, Robin; Chang-Blanc, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1988 World Health Assembly resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis, transmission of the three types of wild poliovirus (WPV) has been sharply reduced (1). WPV type 2 (WPV2) has not been detected since 1999 and was declared eradicated in September 2015. Because WPV type 3 has not been detected since November 2012, WPV type 1 (WPV1) is likely the only WPV that remains in circulation (1). This marked progress has been achieved through widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs), most commonly trivalent OPV (tOPV), which contains types 1, 2, and 3 live, attenuated polioviruses and has been a mainstay of efforts to prevent polio since the early 1960s. However, attenuated polioviruses in OPV can undergo genetic changes during replication, and in communities with low vaccination coverage, can result in vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) that can cause paralytic polio indistinguishable from the disease caused by WPVs (2). Among the 721 polio cases caused by circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs*) detected during January 2006-May 2016, type 2 cVDPVs (cVDPV2s) accounted for >94% (2). Eliminating the risk for polio caused by VDPVs will require stopping all OPV use. The first stage of OPV withdrawal involved a global, synchronized replacement of tOPV with bivalent OPV (bOPV) containing only types 1 and 3 attenuated polioviruses, planned for April 18-May 1, 2016, thereby withdrawing OPV type 2 from all immunization activities (3). Complementing the switch from tOPV to bOPV, introduction of at least 1 dose of injectable, trivalent inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into childhood immunization schedules reduces risks from and facilitates responses to cVDPV2 outbreaks. All 155 countries and territories that were still using OPV in immunization schedules in 2015 have reported that they had ceased use of tOPV by mid-May 2016.(†) As of August 31, 2016, 173 (89%) of 194 World Health Organization (WHO) countries included IPV in their immunization schedules.(§) The cessation of

  3. Multiplex PCR Method for Identifying Recombinant Vaccine-Related Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, David R.; Ching, Karen; Iber, Jane; Campagnoli, Ray; Freeman, Christopher J.; Mishrik, Nada; Liu, Hong-Mei; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen M.

    2004-01-01

    The recent discovery of recombinant circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (recombinant cVDPV) has highlighted the need for enhanced global poliovirus surveillance to assure timely detection of any future cVDPV outbreaks. Six pairs of Sabin strain-specific recombinant primers were designed to permit rapid screening for VDPV recombinants by PCR. PMID:15365031

  4. Will containment of wild poliovirus in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production sites be effective for global certification?

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, Walter R.; Wolff, Christopher; Sanders, Raymond; Lambert, Scott; Best, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    The absolute laboratory containment of any virus cannot be guaranteed, but a wealth of experience indicates that effective containment of wild poliovirus materials for global certification is technically and operationally feasible. Effective containment is based on the principles of minimal wild poliovirus infectious and potentially infectious materials in laboratories; minimal risks of operations in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production facilities; minimal susceptibility of workers to wild poliovirus infection and shedding; and minimal susceptibility of populations to wild poliovirus spread. Each principle alone is imperfect, but collectively they greatly minimize the risks of transmitting wild poliovirus from the laboratory to the community. PMID:15106302

  5. Circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses: current state of knowledge.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Olen M.; Wright, Peter F.; Agol, Vadim I.; Delpeyroux, Francis; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nathanson, Neal; Pallansch, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Within the past 4 years, poliomyelitis outbreaks associated with circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) have occurred in Hispaniola (2000-01), the Philippines (2001), and Madagascar (2001-02). Retrospective studies have also detected the circulation of endemic cVDPV in Egypt (1988-93) and the likely localized spread of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV)-derived virus in Belarus (1965-66). Gaps in OPV coverage and the previous eradication of the corresponding serotype of indigenous wild poliovirus were the critical risk factors for all cVDPV outbreaks. The cVDPV outbreaks were stopped by mass immunization campaigns using OPV. To increase sensitivity for detecting vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs), in 2001 the Global Polio Laboratory Network implemented additional testing requirements for all poliovirus isolates under investigation. This approach quickly led to the recognition of the Philippines and Madagascar cVDPV outbreaks, but of no other current outbreaks. The potential risk of cVDPV emergence has increased dramatically in recent years as wild poliovirus circulation has ceased in most of the world. The risk appears highest for the type 2 OPV strain because of its greater tendency to spread to contacts. The emergence of cVDPVs underscores the critical importance of eliminating the last pockets of wild poliovirus circulation, maintaining universally high levels of polio vaccine coverage, stopping OPV use as soon as it is safely possible to do so, and continuing sensitive poliovirus surveillance into the foreseeable future. Particular attention must be given to areas where the risks for wild poliovirus circulation have been highest, and where the highest rates of polio vaccine coverage must be maintained to suppress cVDPV emergence. PMID:15106296

  6. Environmental Isolation of Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus After Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Transmission - Nigeria, 2016.

    PubMed

    Etsano, Andrew; Damisa, Eunice; Shuaib, Faisal; Nganda, Gatei Wa; Enemaku, Ogu; Usman, Samuel; Adeniji, Adekunle; Jorba, Jaume; Iber, Jane; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Nnadi, Chimeremma; Wiesen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, more than 1 year after reporting its last wild poliovirus (WPV) case in July 2014 (1), Nigeria was removed from the list of countries with endemic poliovirus transmission,* leaving Afghanistan and Pakistan as the only remaining countries with endemic WPV. However, on April 29, 2016, a laboratory-confirmed, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) isolate was reported from an environmental sample collected in March from a sewage effluent site in Maiduguri Municipal Council, Borno State, a security-compromised area in northeastern Nigeria. VDPVs are genetic variants of the vaccine viruses with the potential to cause paralysis and can circulate in areas with low population immunity. The Nigeria National Polio Emergency Operations Center initiated emergency response activities, including administration of at least 2 doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) to all children aged <5 years through mass campaigns; retroactive searches for missed cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), and enhanced environmental surveillance. Approximately 1 million children were vaccinated in the first OPV round. Thirteen previously unreported AFP cases were identified. Enhanced environmental surveillance has not resulted in detection of additional VDPV isolates. The detection of persistent circulation of VDPV2 in Borno State highlights the low population immunity, surveillance limitations, and risk for international spread of cVDPVs associated with insurgency-related insecurity. Increasing vaccination coverage with additional targeted supplemental immunization activities and reestablishment of effective routine immunization activities in newly secured and difficult-to-reach areas in Borno is urgently needed. PMID:27490081

  7. Polio eradication. Efficacy of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in India.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hamid; Deshpande, Jagadish M; Sutter, Roland W; Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Ahmad, Mohammad; Kunwar, Abhishek; Vishwakarma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Jain, Shilpi; Estivariz, Concepcion; Sethi, Raman; Molodecky, Natalie A; Grassly, Nicholas C; Pallansch, Mark A; Chatterjee, Arani; Aylward, R Bruce

    2014-08-22

    Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is efficacious against paralytic disease, but its effect on mucosal immunity is debated. We assessed the efficacy of IPV in boosting mucosal immunity. Participants received IPV, bivalent 1 and 3 oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV), or no vaccine. A bOPV challenge was administered 4 weeks later, and excretion was assessed 3, 7, and 14 days later. Nine hundred and fifty-four participants completed the study. Any fecal shedding of poliovirus type 1 was 8.8, 9.1, and 13.5% in the IPV group and 14.4, 24.1, and 52.4% in the control group by 6- to 11-month, 5-year, and 10-year groups, respectively (IPV versus control: Fisher's exact test P < 0.001). IPV reduced excretion for poliovirus types 1 and 3 between 38.9 and 74.2% and 52.8 and 75.7%, respectively. Thus, IPV in OPV-vaccinated individuals boosts intestinal mucosal immunity. PMID:25146288

  8. Development and introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines derived from Sabin strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    During the endgame of global polio eradication, the universal introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines is urgently required to reduce the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and polio outbreaks due to wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses. In particular, the development of inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) derived from the attenuated Sabin strains is considered to be a highly favorable option for the production of novel IPV that reduce the risk of facility-acquired transmission of poliovirus to the communities. In Japan, Sabin-derived IPVs (sIPVs) have been developed and introduced for routine immunization in November 2012. They are the first licensed sIPVs in the world. Consequently, trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine was used for polio control in Japan for more than half a century but has now been removed from the list of vaccines licensed for routine immunization. This paper reviews the development, introduction, characterization, and global status of IPV derived from attenuated Sabin strains. PMID:25448090

  9. The Sabin live poliovirus vaccination trials in the USSR, 1959.

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Widespread use of the Sabin live attenuated poliovirus vaccine has had tremendous impact on the disease worldwide, virtually eliminating it from a number of countries, including the United States. Early proof of its safety and effectiveness was presented in 1959 by Russian investigators, who had staged massive trials in the USSR, involving millions of children. Their positive results were at first viewed in the United States and elsewhere with some skepticism, but the World Health Organization favored proceeding with large-scale trials, and responded to the claims made by Russian scientists by sending a representative to the USSR to review in detail the design and execution of the vaccine programs and the reliability of their results. The report that followed was a positive endorsement of the findings and contributed to the acceptance of the Sabin vaccine in the United States, where it has been the polio vaccine of choice since the mid-1960s. PMID:1814062

  10. National choices related to inactivated poliovirus vaccine, innovation and the endgame of global polio eradication.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2014-02-01

    Achieving the goal of a world free of poliomyelitis still requires significant effort. Although polio immunization represents a mature area, the polio endgame will require new tools and strategies, particularly as national and global health leaders coordinate the cessation of all three serotypes of oral poliovirus vaccine and increasingly adopt inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Poliovirus epidemiology and the global options for managing polioviruses continue to evolve, along with our understanding and appreciation of the resources needed and the risks that require management. Based on insights from modeling, we offer some perspective on the current status of plans and opportunities to achieve and maintain a world free of wild polioviruses and to successfully implement oral poliovirus vaccine cessation. IPV costs and potential wastage will represent an important consideration for national policy makers. Innovations may reduce future IPV costs, but the world urgently needs lower-cost IPV options. PMID:24308581

  11. High resolution identity testing of inactivated poliovirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Edward T.; Minor, Philip D.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Definitive identification of poliovirus strains in vaccines is essential for quality control, particularly where multiple wild-type and Sabin strains are produced in the same facility. Sequence-based identification provides the ultimate in identity testing and would offer several advantages over serological methods. Methods We employed random RT-PCR and high throughput sequencing to recover full-length genome sequences from monovalent and trivalent poliovirus vaccine products at various stages of the manufacturing process. Results All expected strains were detected in previously characterised products and the method permitted identification of strains comprising as little as 0.1% of sequence reads. Highly similar Mahoney and Sabin 1 strains were readily discriminated on the basis of specific variant positions. Analysis of a product known to contain incorrect strains demonstrated that the method correctly identified the contaminants. Conclusion Random RT-PCR and shotgun sequencing provided high resolution identification of vaccine components. In addition to the recovery of full-length genome sequences, the method could also be easily adapted to the characterisation of minor variant frequencies and distinction of closely related products on the basis of distinguishing consensus and low frequency polymorphisms. PMID:26049003

  12. Oral and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines in the Newborn: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.; Shinohara, Russell T.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) remains the vaccine-of-choice for routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) to eradicate poliomyelitis globally. Recent data from India suggested lowerthanexpected immunogenicity of an OPV birth dose, prompting a review of the immunogenicity of OPV or inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) when administered at birth. Methods We evaluated the seroconversion and reported adverse events among infants given a single birth dose (given ≤7 days of life) of OPV or IPV through a systematic review of published articles and conference abstracts from 1959-2011 in any language found on PubMed, Google Scholar, or reference lists of selected articles. Results 25 articles from 13 countries published between1959 and 2011 documented seroconversion rates in newborns following an OPV dose given within the first seven days of life. There were 10 studies that measured seroconversion rates between 4 and 8 weeks of a single birth dose of TOPV, using an umbilical cord blood draw at the time of birth to establish baseline antibody levels. The percentage of newborns who seroconverted at 8 weeks range 6-42% for poliovirus type 1, 2-63% for type 2, and 1-35% for type 3). For mOPV type 1, seroconversion ranged from 10-76%; mOPV type 3, the range was 12-58%; and for the one study reporting bOPV, it was 20% for type 1 and 7% for type 3. There were four studies of IPV in newborns with a seroconversion rate of 8-100% for serotype 1, 15-100% for serotype 2, and 15-94% for serotype 3, measured at 4-6 weeks of life. No serious adverse events related to newborn OPV or IPV dosing were reported, including no cases of acute flaccid paralysis. Conclusions There is great variability of the immunogenicity of a birth dose of OPV for reasons largely unknown. Our review confirms the utility of a birth dose of OPV, particularly in countries where early induction of polio immunity is imperative. IPV has higher seroconversion rates in newborns and

  13. Synthetic virus seeds for improved vaccine safety: Genetic reconstruction of poliovirus seeds for a PER.C6 cell based inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Papic, Natasa; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Custers, Jerome H H V

    2015-10-13

    Safety of vaccines can be compromised by contamination with adventitious agents. One potential source of adventitious agents is a vaccine seed, typically derived from historic clinical isolates with poorly defined origins. Here we generated synthetic poliovirus seeds derived from chemically synthesized DNA plasmids encoding the sequence of wild-type poliovirus strains used in marketed inactivated poliovirus vaccines. The synthetic strains were phenotypically identical to wild-type polioviruses as shown by equivalent infectious titers in culture supernatant and antigenic content, even when infection cultures are scaled up to 10-25L bioreactors. Moreover, the synthetic seeds were genetically stable upon extended passaging on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. Use of synthetic seeds produced on the serum-free PER.C6 cell platform ensures a perfectly documented seed history and maximum control over starting materials. It provides an opportunity to maximize vaccine safety which increases the prospect of a vaccine end product that is free from adventitious agents. PMID:26362098

  14. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame.

    PubMed

    Pons-Salort, Margarita; Burns, Cara C; Lyons, Hil; Blake, Isobel M; Jafari, Hamid; Oberste, M Steven; Kew, Olen M; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2) in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs) with trivalent OPV (tOPV) in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2). Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently "missed" groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004-2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55-0.82]). We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population immunity above the

  15. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Cara C.; Lyons, Hil; Blake, Isobel M.; Oberste, M. Steven; Kew, Olen M.; Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2) in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs) with trivalent OPV (tOPV) in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2). Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently “missed” groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004−2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55−0.82]). We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population immunity

  16. Current polio global eradication and control policy options: perspectives from modeling and prerequisites for oral poliovirus vaccine cessation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Tebbens, Radboud J Duintjer

    2012-04-01

    As the Global Polio Eradication Initiative progresses toward the eradication of wild polioviruses, national and global health leaders must still actively consider options for managing poliovirus risks, including risks associated with using oral poliovirus vaccine. Oral poliovirus vaccine continues to represent a highly effective tool, but its use causes noticeable, rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic polio and with low coverage it can evolve to become circulating vaccine-derived polioviruse that causes outbreaks. National leaders face a wide range of options, but their choices depend in part on global policies. This article explores the current set of global options for poliovirus eradication or control, discusses constraints and prerequisites for their implementation and offers some insights based on dynamic modeling to inform discussions and frame future economic analyses. PMID:22551030

  17. Fractional-Dose Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine Immunization Campaign - Telangana State, India, June 2016.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Bhatnagar, Pankaj; Haldar, Pradeep; Satapathy, Asish; Kumar, K N Arun; Horton, Jennifer; Estivariz, Concepcion F; Anand, Abhijeet; Sutter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Wild poliovirus type 2 was declared eradicated in September 2015 (1). In April 2016, India, switched from use of trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV; containing types 1, 2, and 3 polio vaccine viruses), to bivalent OPV (bOPV; containing types 1 and 3), as part of a globally synchronized initiative to withdraw Sabin poliovirus type 2 vaccine. Concurrently, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) was introduced into India's routine immunization program to maintain an immunity base that would mitigate the number of paralytic cases in the event of epidemic transmission of poliovirus type 2 (2,3). After cessation of use of type 2 Sabin vaccine, any reported isolation of vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (VDPV2) would be treated as a public health emergency and might need outbreak response with monovalent type 2 oral vaccine, IPV, or both (4). In response to identification of a VDPV2 isolate from a sewage sample collected in the southern state of Telangana in May 2016, India conducted a mass vaccination campaign in June 2016 using an intradermal fractional dose (0.1 ml) of IPV (fIPV). Because of a global IPV supply shortage, fIPV, which uses one fifth of regular intramuscular (IM) dose administered intradermally, has been recommended as a response strategy for VDPV2 (5). Clinical trials have demonstrated that fIPV is highly immunogenic (6,7). During the 6-day campaign, 311,064 children aged 6 weeks-3 years were vaccinated, achieving an estimated coverage of 94%. With appropriate preparation, an emergency fIPV response can be promptly and successfully implemented. Lessons learned from this campaign can be applied to successful implementation of future outbreak responses using fIPV. PMID:27559683

  18. Examination of poliovirus vaccine preparations for SV40 sequences.

    PubMed

    Sangar, D; Pipkin, P A; Wood, D J; Minor, P D

    1999-03-01

    Oral poliovaccines derived from the strains developed by Sabin have been the basis of vaccination against poliomyelitis in the U.K. since 1962. Contamination of earlier materials with the monkey virus SV40, particularly inactivated Salk type poliovaccines, is well documented. Precautions have been in place for more than 30 years to prevent SV40 contamination of oral poliovaccines based on screening of donor animals and tests for SV40 infectivity. PCR was applied to examine all archived samples of oral poliovaccines available to us dating from 1966 to the present, including all vaccines used in the U.K. since 1980, for the presence of SV40 sequences. Of 132 materials examined, 118 were negative on initial testing and fourteen gave reactions which on further examination were attributed either to cross contamination during handling in the laboratory at National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC) or to non-specific amplification. It was concluded that none of the samples contained SV40 sequences. The materials included 69 separate monovalent bulks of poliovirus type 1, 2 or 3 grown on monkey kidney cells from four different manufacturers and 74 bulks grown on human diploid cells from two manufacturers. One additional seed material from 1962 contained low levels of unique and characteristic SV40 sequences. The seed had been treated by the manufacturer to inactivate DNA viruses and tests by the manufacturer and at NIBSC failed to demonstrate the presence of infectious SV40 virus. Monovalent bulks prepared by the manufacturer from this seed were negative for SV40 sequences by PCR. The PCR studies provide no evidence of contamination of oral poliovaccines used in the UK with infectious SV40 and suggest that the steps taken to ensure the absence of infectious SV40 are satisfactory. PMID:10441397

  19. New Generation of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines for Universal Immunization After Eradication of Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Chumakov, Konstantin; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2008-01-01

    Twenty years of global polio eradication efforts may soon eliminate wild-type poliovirus transmission. However, new information about poliovirus learned during this campaign, as well as the political realities of a modern world demand that universal immunity against poliomyelitis be maintained even after wild poliovirus is eradicated. Although two excellent vaccines have proven highly effective in the past, neither the live nor current inactivated products are optimal for use in the post-eradication setting. Therefore, concerted efforts are urgently needed to develop a new generation of vaccine that is risk-free and affordable and can be produced on a global scale. Here we discuss the desired properties and ways to create a new polio vaccine. PMID:18990066

  20. Update on Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses - Worldwide, January 2015-May 2016.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Jaume; Diop, Ousmane M; Iber, Jane; Sutter, Roland W; Wassilak, Steven G; Burns, Cara C

    2016-01-01

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis worldwide (1). One of the main tools used in polio eradication efforts has been the live, attenuated, oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) (2), an inexpensive vaccine easily administered by trained volunteers. OPV might require several doses to induce immunity, but provides long-term protection against paralytic disease. Through effective use of OPV, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has brought wild polioviruses to the threshold of eradication (1). However, OPV use, particularly in areas with low routine vaccination coverage, is associated with the emergence of genetically divergent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) whose genetic drift from the parental OPV strains indicates prolonged replication or circulation (3). VDPVs can emerge among immunologically normal vaccine recipients and their contacts as well as among persons with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs) can replicate for years in some persons with PIDs. In addition, circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) (3) can emerge in areas with low OPV coverage and can cause outbreaks of paralytic polio. This report updates previous summaries regarding VDPVs (4). PMID:27491079

  1. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  2. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  3. Update on vaccine-derived polioviruses - worldwide, July 2012-December 2013.

    PubMed

    Diop, Ousmane M; Burns, Cara C; Wassilak, Steven G; Kew, Olen M

    2014-03-21

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis worldwide. One of the main tools used in polio eradication efforts has been live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), an inexpensive vaccine easily administered by trained volunteers. OPV might require several doses to induce immunity, but then it provides long-term protection against paralytic disease through durable humoral immunity. Rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis can occur among immunologically normal OPV recipients, their contacts, and persons who are immunodeficient. In addition, vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) can emerge in areas with low OPV coverage to cause polio outbreaks and can replicate for years in persons who have primary, B-cell immunodeficiencies. This report updates previous surveillance summaries and describes VDPVs detected worldwide during July 2012-December 2013. Those include a new circulating VDPV (cVDPV) outbreak identified in Pakistan in 2012, with spread to Afghanistan; an outbreak in Afghanistan previously identified in 2009 that continued into 2013; a new outbreak in Chad that spread to Cameroon, Niger, and northeastern Nigeria; and an outbreak that began in Somalia in 2008 that continued and spread to Kenya in 2013. A large outbreak in Nigeria that was identified in 2005 was nearly stopped by the end of 2013. Additionally, 10 newly identified persons in eight countries were found to excrete immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs), and VDPVs were found among immunocompetent persons and environmental samples in 13 countries. Because the majority of VDPV isolates are type 2, the World Health Organization has developed a plan for coordinated worldwide replacement of trivalent OPV (tOPV) with bivalent OPV (bOPV; types 1 and 3) by 2016, preceded by introduction of at least 1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) containing all three poliovirus serotypes into routine immunization schedules worldwide to ensure high population

  4. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past.

  5. Notes from the Field: Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Outbreaks - Five Countries, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Morales, Michelle; Nnadi, Chimeremma D; Tangermann, Rudolf H; Wassilak, Steven G F

    2016-02-12

    In 2015, wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission was identified in only Afghanistan and Pakistan (1). The widespread use of live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) has been key in polio eradication efforts. However, OPV use, particularly in areas with low vaccination coverage, is associated with the low risk for emergence of vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPV), which can cause paralysis (2). VDPVs vary genetically from vaccine viruses and can cause outbreaks in areas with low vaccination coverage. Circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs) are VDPVs in confirmed outbreaks. Single VDPVs for which the origin cannot be determined are classified as ambiguous (aVDPVs), which can also cause paralysis. Among the three types of WPV, type 2 has been declared to be eradicated. More than 90% of cVDPV cases have been caused by type 2 cVDPVs (cVDPV2). Therefore, in April 2016, all OPV-using countries of the world are discontinuing use of type 2 Sabin vaccine by simultaneously switching from trivalent OPV (types 1, 2, and 3) to bivalent OPV (types 1 and 3) for routine and supplementary immunization. The World Health Organization recently broadened the definition of cVDPVs to include any VDPV with genetic evidence of prolonged transmission (i.e., >1.5 years) and indicated that any single VDPV2 event (a case of paralysis caused by a VDPV or isolation of a VDPV from an environmental specimen) should elicit a detailed outbreak investigation and local immunization response. A confirmed cVDPV2 detection should elicit a full poliovirus outbreak response that includes multiple supplemental immunization activities (SIAs); an aVDPV designation should be made only after investigation and response (3). Since 2005, there have been 1-8 cVDPV outbreaks and 3-12 aVDPV events per year. There are currently five active cVDPV outbreaks in Guinea, Laos, Madagascar, Myanmar, and Ukraine, and four other active VDPV events. PMID:26866942

  6. Interim CDC guidance for polio vaccination for travel to and from countries affected by wild poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Gregory S; Seward, Jane F; Pallansch, Mark A

    2014-07-11

    In the prevaccine era, infection with wild poliovirus (WPV) was common worldwide, with seasonal peaks and epidemics in the summer and fall in temperate areas. The incidence of poliomyelitis in the United States declined rapidly after the licensure of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) in 1955 and live oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the 1960s. The last cases of indigenously acquired WPV in the United States occurred in 1979, the last WPV case in a U.S. resident traveling abroad occurred in 1986, and the last WPV imported case was in 1993. Since 2000, the United States has exclusively used IPV, resulting in prevention of 8-10 vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis cases annually. In 2005, an unvaccinated U.S. adult traveling abroad acquired vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis after contact with an infant recently vaccinated with OPV. PMID:25006826

  7. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on the stability and thermostability of poliovirus: a new method for vaccine preservation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Evanilce; Mendes, Ygara S; Silva, Jerson L; Galler, Ricardo; Oliveira, Andréa C; Freire, Marcos S; Gaspar, Luciane P

    2009-08-27

    Viruses are a structurally diverse group of infectious agents that differ widely in their sensitivities to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Studies on picornaviruses have demonstrated that these viruses are extremely resistant to HHP treatments, with poliovirus appearing to be the most resistant. Here, the three attenuated poliovirus serotypes were compared with regard to pressure and thermal resistance. We found that HHP does not inactivate any of the three serotypes studied (1-3). Rather, HHP treatment was found to stabilize poliovirus by increasing viral thermal resistance at 37 degrees C. Identification of new methods that stabilize poliovirus against heat inactivation would aid in the design of a more heat-stable vaccine, circumventing the problems associated with refrigeration during storage and transport of the vaccine prior to use. PMID:19616496

  8. The compatibility of inactivated-Enterovirus 71 vaccination with Coxsackievirus A16 and Poliovirus immunizations in humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Shao, Jie; Ying, Zhifang; Gao, Fan; Yao, Xin; Li, Changgui; Ye, Qiang; Xu, Miao; Li, Rongcheng; Zhu, Fengcai; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the key pathogen for Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD) and can result in severe neurological complications and death among young children. Three inactivated-EV71 vaccines have gone through phase III clinical trials and have demonstrated good safety and efficacy. These vaccines will benefit young children under the threat of severe HFMD. However, the potential immunization-related compatibility for different enterovirus vaccines remains unclear, making it hard to include the EV71 vaccine in Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). Here, we measured the neutralizing antibodies (NTAbs) against EV71, Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and Poliovirus from infants enrolled in those EV71 vaccine clinical trials. The results indicated that the levels of NTAb GMTs for EV71 increased significantly in all 3 vaccine groups (high, middle and low dosages, respectively) post-vaccination. Seroconversion ratios and Geometric mean fold increase were significantly higher in the vaccine groups (≥7/9 and 8.9~228.1) than in the placebo group (≤1/10 and 0.8~1.7, P < 0.05). But no similar NTAb response trends were found in CA16 and 3 types of Poliovirus. The decrease of 3 types of Poliovirus NTAb GMTs and an increase of CA16 GMTs post-EV71-vaccination were found in vaccine and placebo groups. Further animal study on CA16 and poliovirus vaccine co-immunization or pre-immunization with EV71 vaccine in mice indicated that there was no NTAb cross-activity between EV71 and CA16/Poliovirus. Our research showed that inactivated-EV71 vaccine has good specific-neutralizing capacity and can be included in EPI. PMID:25715318

  9. Update on Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses - Worldwide, January 2014-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Diop, Ousmane M; Burns, Cara C; Sutter, Roland W; Wassilak, Steven G; Kew, Olen M

    2015-06-19

    Since the World Health Assembly's 1988 resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis, one of the main tools of the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has been the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). OPV might require several doses to induce immunity but provides long-term protection against paralytic disease. Through effective use of OPV, GPEI has brought polio to the threshold of eradication. Wild poliovirus type 2 (WPV2) was eliminated in 1999, WPV3 has not been detected since November 2012, and WPV1 circulation appears to be restricted to parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. However, continued use of OPV carries two key risks. The first, vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) has been recognized since the early 1960s. VAPP is a very rare event that occurs sporadically when an administered dose of OPV reverts to neurovirulence and causes paralysis in the vaccine recipient or a nonimmune contact. VAPP can occur among immunologically normal vaccine recipients and their contacts as well as among persons who have primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) manifested by defects in antibody production; it is not associated with outbreaks. The second, the emergence of genetically divergent, neurovirulent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) was recognized more recently. Circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs) resemble WPVs and, in areas with low OPV coverage, can cause polio outbreaks. Immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs) can replicate and be excreted for years in some persons with PIDs; GPEI maintains a registry of iVDPV cases. Ambiguous VDPVs (aVDPVs) are isolates that cannot be classified definitively. This report updates previous surveillance summaries and describes VDPVs detected worldwide during January 2014-March 2015. Those include new cVDPV outbreaks in Madagascar and South Sudan, and sharply reduced type 2 cVDPV (cVDPV2) circulation in Nigeria and Pakistan during the latter half of 2014. Eight newly identified persons in

  10. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Muller, David A; Pearson, Frances E; Fernando, Germain J P; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S; Corrie, Simon R; Crichton, Michael L; Wei, Jonathan C J; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  11. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  12. Serial Recombination during Circulation of Type 1 Wild-Vaccine Recombinant Polioviruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Mei; Zheng, Du-Ping; Zhang, Li-Bi; Oberste, M. Steven; Kew, Olen M.; Pallansch, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Type 1 wild-vaccine recombinant polioviruses sharing a 367-nucleotide (nt) block of Sabin 1-derived sequence spanning the VP1 and 2A genes circulated widely in China from 1991 to 1993. We surveyed the sequence relationships among 34 wild-vaccine recombinants by comparing six genomic intervals: the conserved 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) (nt 186 to 639), the hypervariable portion of the 5′-UTR (nt 640 to 742), the VP4 and partial VP2 genes (nt 743 to 1176), the VP1 gene (nt 2480 to 3385), the 2A gene (nt 3386 to 3832), and the partial 3D gene (nt 6011 to 6544). The 5′-UTR, capsid (VP4-VP2 and VP1), and 2A sequence intervals had similar phylogenies. By contrast, the partial 3D sequences could be distributed into five divergent genetic classes. Most (25 of 34) of the wild-vaccine recombinant isolates showed no evidence of additional recombination beyond the initial wild-Sabin recombination event. Eight isolates from 1992 to 1993, however, appear to be derived from three independent additional recombination events, and one 1993 isolate was derived from two consecutive events. Complete genomic sequences of a representative isolate for each 3D sequence class demonstrated that these exchanges had occurred in the 2B, 2C, and 3D genes. The 3D gene sequences were not closely related to those of the Sabin strains or 53 diverse contemporary wild poliovirus isolates from China, but all were related to the 3D genes of species C enteroviruses. The appearance within approximately 2.5 years of five recombinant classes derived from a single ancestral infection illustrates the rapid emergence of new recombinants among circulating wild polioviruses. PMID:14512548

  13. An Introduction to Poliovirus: Pathogenesis, Vaccination, and the Endgame for Global Eradication.

    PubMed

    Minor, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is caused by poliovirus, which is a positive strand non-enveloped virus that occurs in three distinct serotypes (1, 2, and 3). Infection is mainly by the fecal-oral route and can be confined to the gut by antibodies induced either by vaccine, previous infection or maternally acquired. Vaccines include the live attenuated strains developed by Sabin and the inactivated vaccines developed by Salk; the live attenuated vaccine (Oral Polio Vaccine or OPV) has been the main tool in the Global Program of Polio eradication of the World Health Organisation. Wild type 2 virus has not caused a case since 1999 and type 3 since 2012 and eradication seems near. However most infections are entirely silent so that sophisticated environmental surveillance may be needed to ensure that the virus has been eradicated, and the live vaccine can sometimes revert to virulent circulating forms under conditions that are not wholly understood. Cessation of vaccination is therefore an increasingly important issue and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is playing a larger part in the end game. PMID:26983727

  14. Sabin Vaccine Reversion in the Field: a Comprehensive Analysis of Sabin-Like Poliovirus Isolates in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Stewart; Iber, Jane; Zhao, Kun; Adeniji, Johnson A.; Bukbuk, David; Baba, Marycelin; Behrend, Matthew; Burns, Cara C.; Oberste, M. Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To assess the dynamics of genetic reversion of live poliovirus vaccine in humans, we studied molecular evolution in Sabin-like poliovirus isolates from Nigerian acute flaccid paralysis cases obtained from routine surveillance. We employed a novel modeling approach to infer substitution and recombination rates from whole-genome sequences and information about poliovirus infection dynamics and the individual vaccination history. We confirmed observations from a recent vaccine trial that VP1 substitution rates are increased for Sabin-like isolates relative to the rate for the wild type due to increased nonsynonymous substitution rates. We also inferred substitution rates for attenuating nucleotides and confirmed that reversion can occur in days to weeks after vaccination. We combine our observations for Sabin-like virus evolution with the molecular clock for VP1 of circulating wild-type strains to infer that the mean time from the initiating vaccine dose to the earliest detection of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) is 300 days for Sabin-like virus type 1, 210 days for Sabin-like virus type 2, and 390 days for Sabin-like virus type 3. Phylogenetic relationships indicated transient local transmission of Sabin-like virus type 3 and, possibly, Sabin-like virus type 1 during periods of low wild polio incidence. Comparison of Sabin-like virus recombinants with known Nigerian vaccine-derived poliovirus recombinants shows that while recombination with non-Sabin enteroviruses is associated with cVDPV, the recombination rates are similar for Sabin isolate-Sabin isolate and Sabin isolate–non-Sabin enterovirus recombination after accounting for the time from dosing to the time of detection. Our study provides a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the oral polio vaccine in the field. IMPORTANCE The global polio eradication effort has completed its 26th year. Despite success in eliminating wild poliovirus from most of the world, polio

  15. PER.C6(®) cells as a serum-free suspension cell platform for the production of high titer poliovirus: a potential low cost of goods option for world supply of inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Custers, Jerome H H V; Koldijk, Martin H; Klaren, Vincent; Turk, Marije; Luitjens, Alfred; Bakker, Wilfried A M; Uytdehaag, Fons; Goudsmit, Jaap; Lewis, John A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2013-01-21

    There are two highly efficacious poliovirus vaccines: Sabin's live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) and Salk's inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). OPV can be made at low costs per dose and is easily administrated. However, the major drawback is the frequent reversion of the OPV vaccine strains to virulent poliovirus strains which can result in Vaccine Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccinees. Furthermore, some OPV revertants with high transmissibility can circulate in the population as circulating Vaccine Derived Polioviruses (cVDPVs). IPV does not convey VAPP and cVDPVs but the high costs per dose and insufficient supply have rendered IPV an unfavorable option for low and middle-income countries. Here, we explored whether the human PER.C6(®) cell-line, which has the unique capability to grow at high density in suspension, under serum-free conditions, could be used as a platform for high yield production of poliovirus. PER.C6(®) cells supported replication of all three poliovirus serotypes with virus titers ranging from 9.4 log(10) to 11.1 log(10)TCID(50)/ml irrespective of the volume scale (10 ml in shaker flasks to 2 L in bioreactors). This production yield was 10-30 fold higher than in Vero cell cultures performed here, and even 100-fold higher than what has been reported for Vero cell cultures in literature [38]. In agreement, the D-antigen content per volume PER.C6(®)-derived poliovirus was on average 30-fold higher than Vero-derived poliovirus. Interestingly, PER.C6(®) cells produced on average 2.5-fold more D-antigen units per cell than Vero cells. Based on our findings, we are exploring PER.C6(®) as an interesting platform for large-scale production of poliovirus at low costs, potentially providing the basis for global supply of an affordable IPV. PMID:23123018

  16. Improved Genotyping Vaccine and Wild-Type Poliovirus Strains by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: Clinical Diagnostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulou, Amalia; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Spyrou, Niki; Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    The combination of preventive vaccination and diagnostic typing of viral isolates from patients with clinical poliomyelitis constitutes our main protective shield against polioviruses. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) adaptation of the reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR methodology has advanced diagnostic genotyping of polioviruses, although further improvements are definitely needed. We report here on an improved RFLP procedure for the genotyping of polioviruses. A highly conserved segment within the 5′ noncoding region of polioviruses was selected for RT-PCR amplification by the UC53-UG52 primer pair with the hope that it would be most resistant to the inescapable genetic alteration-drift experienced by the other segments of the viral genome. Complete inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses by the present RFLP method was accomplished with a minimum set of four restriction endonucleases (HaeIII, DdeI, NcoI, and AvaI). To compensate for potential genetic drift within the recognition sites of HaeIII, DdeI, or NcoI in atypical clinical samples, the RFLP patterns generated with HpaII and StyI as replacements were analyzed. The specificity of the method was also successfully assessed by RFLP analysis of 55 reference nonpoliovirus enterovirus controls. The concerted implementation of these conditional protocols for diagnostic inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses was evaluated with 21 clinical samples with absolute success. PMID:11101561

  17. Improved genotyping vaccine and wild-type poliovirus strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis: clinical diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulou, A; Markoulatos, P; Spyrou, N; Vamvakopoulos, N C

    2000-12-01

    The combination of preventive vaccination and diagnostic typing of viral isolates from patients with clinical poliomyelitis constitutes our main protective shield against polioviruses. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) adaptation of the reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR methodology has advanced diagnostic genotyping of polioviruses, although further improvements are definitely needed. We report here on an improved RFLP procedure for the genotyping of polioviruses. A highly conserved segment within the 5' noncoding region of polioviruses was selected for RT-PCR amplification by the UC(53)-UG(52) primer pair with the hope that it would be most resistant to the inescapable genetic alteration-drift experienced by the other segments of the viral genome. Complete inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses by the present RFLP method was accomplished with a minimum set of four restriction endonucleases (HaeIII, DdeI, NcoI, and AvaI). To compensate for potential genetic drift within the recognition sites of HaeIII, DdeI, or NcoI in atypical clinical samples, the RFLP patterns generated with HpaII and StyI as replacements were analyzed. The specificity of the method was also successfully assessed by RFLP analysis of 55 reference nonpoliovirus enterovirus controls. The concerted implementation of these conditional protocols for diagnostic inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses was evaluated with 21 clinical samples with absolute success. PMID:11101561

  18. Multiple Independent Emergences of Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses during a Large Outbreak in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jing; Jorba, Jaume; Bukbuk, David; Adu, Festus; Gumede, Nicksy; Pate, Muhammed Ali; Abanida, Emmanuel Ade; Gasasira, Alex; Iber, Jane; Chen, Qi; Vincent, Annelet; Chenoweth, Paul; Henderson, Elizabeth; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Naeem, Asif; Umami, Rifqiyah Nur; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Baba, Marycelin; Adeniji, Adekunle; Williams, A. J.; Kilpatrick, David R.; Oberste, M. Steven; Wassilak, Steven G.; Tomori, Oyewale; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005, a large poliomyelitis outbreak associated with type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV2) has occurred in northern Nigeria, where immunization coverage with trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) has been low. Phylogenetic analysis of P1/capsid region sequences of isolates from each of the 403 cases reported in 2005 to 2011 resolved the outbreak into 23 independent type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV2) emergences, at least 7 of which established circulating lineage groups. Virus from one emergence (lineage group 2005-8; 361 isolates) was estimated to have circulated for over 6 years. The population of the major cVDPV2 lineage group expanded rapidly in early 2009, fell sharply after two tOPV rounds in mid-2009, and gradually expanded again through 2011. The two major determinants of attenuation of the Sabin 2 oral poliovirus vaccine strain (A481 in the 5′-untranslated region [5′-UTR] and VP1-Ile143) had been replaced in all VDPV2 isolates; most A481 5′-UTR replacements occurred by recombination with other enteroviruses. cVDPV2 isolates representing different lineage groups had biological properties indistinguishable from those of wild polioviruses, including efficient growth in neuron-derived HEK293 cells, the capacity to cause paralytic disease in both humans and PVR-Tg21 transgenic mice, loss of the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and the capacity for sustained person-to-person transmission. We estimate from the poliomyelitis case count and the paralytic case-to-infection ratio for type 2 wild poliovirus infections that ∼700,000 cVDPV2 infections have occurred during the outbreak. The detection of multiple concurrent cVDPV2 outbreaks in northern Nigeria highlights the risks of cVDPV emergence accompanying tOPV use at low rates of coverage in developing countries. PMID:23408630

  19. [Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo 2011-2012].

    PubMed

    Bazira, L; Coulibaly, T; Mayenga, M; Ncharre, C; Yogolelo, R; Mbule, A; Moudzeo, H; Lwamba, P; Mulumba, A W; Cabore, J

    2015-10-01

    According to the WHO records of 2013, the incidence of poliomyelitis was reduced by more than 99%, the number of endemic countries decreased from 125 in 1988 to 3 in 2013 and over 10 million cases were prevented from poliomyelitis thanks to the intensive use of Oral polio vaccine (OPV). However, the emergence of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus strains (cVDPV), causing serious epidemics like the wild poliovirus, is a major challenge on the final straight towards the goal of eradication and OPV cessation. This paper describes the cVDPVoutbreak that occurred in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) from November 2011 to April 2012. All children under 15 years of age with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and confirmed presence of cVDPV in the stool samples were included. Thirty (30) children, all from the administrative territories of Bukama and Malemba Nkulu in the Katanga Province (south-east DRC), were reported. The virus responsible was the cVDPV type 2 (0.7% -3.5% divergent from the reference Sabin 2 strain) in 29 children (97%) and the ambiguous vaccine-derived poliovirus strain (0.7% divergent) was confirmed in one case (3%), a boy seventeen months old and already vaccinated four times with OPV. Twentyfive children (83%) were protected by any of the routine EPI vaccines and 3 children (10%) had never received any dose of OPV. In reaction, DRC has conducted five local campaigns over a period of 10 months (from January to October 2012) and the epidemic was stopped after the second round performed in March 2012. As elsewhere in similar conditions, low immunization coverage, poor sanitation conditions and the stop of the use of OPV2 have favoured the emergence of the third cVDPV epidemic in DRC. The implementation of the Strategic Plan for Polio eradication and endgame strategic plan 2013-2018 will prevent the emergence of cVDPV and set up the conditions for a coordinated OPV phase out. PMID:26288132

  20. [Investigation of a Patient with Pre-vaccine-derived Poliovirus in Shandong Province, China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojuan; Liu, Yao; Wang, Suting; Zhang Xiao; Song, Lizhi; Tao, Zexin; Ji, Feng; Xiong, Ping; Xu, Aiqiang

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the genetic characteristics of a polio-I highly variant vaccine recombinant virus in Shandong Province (China) in 2011 and to identify isolates from healthy contacts, two stool specimens from one patient with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and 40 stool specimens from his contacts were collected for virus isolation. The complete genome of poliovirus and VP1 coding region of the non-polio enterovirus were sequenced. Homologous comparison and phylogenetic analyses based on VP1 sequences were undertaken among coxsackievirus (CV) B1, CV-B3 isolates, and those in GenBank. One poliovirus (P1/11186), CV-A4 and CV-A8 were isolated from the AFP patient; one CV-A2, Echovirus 3 (E-3), E-12 and E-14, ten CV-B1, and five CV-B3 strains were isolated from his contacts. These results led us to believe that there may be a human enterovirus epidemic in this area, and that surveillance must be enhanced. P1/11186 was a type-1 vaccine-related poliovirus; it combined with type-2 and type-3 polioviruses in 2A and 3A regions, respectively. There were 25 nucleotide mutations with 9 amino-acid alterations in the entire genome. There were 8 nucleotide mutations with 5 amino-acid alterations in the VP1 region compared with the corresponding Sabin strains. Homology analyses suggested that the ten CV-B1 isolates had 97.0%-100% nucleotide and 98.9%-100% amino-acid identities with each other, as well as 92.6%-100% nucleotide and 99.2%-100% amino-acid identities among the five CV-B3 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses on the complete sequences of VP1 among CV-B1 and CV-B3 isolates showed that Shandong strains, together with strains from other provinces in China, had a close relationship and belonged to the same group. PMID:26738293

  1. Limited and localized outbreak of newly emergent type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongmei; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Shuangli; Chen, Na; Li, Xiaolei; Wang, Dongyan; Ma, Xiaozhen; Zhu, Hui; Tong, Wenbin; Xu, Wenbo

    2014-07-01

    From August 2011 to February 2012, an outbreak caused by type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) occurred in Aba County, Sichuan, China. During the outbreak, four type 2 VDPVs (≥0.6% nucleotide divergence in the VP1 region relative to the Sabin 2 strain) were isolated from 3 patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and one close contact. In addition, a type 2 pre-VDPV (0.3% to 0.5% divergence from Sabin 2) that was genetically related to these type 2 VDPVs was isolated from another AFP patient. These 4 patients were all unimmunized children 0.7 to 1.1 years old. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the 4 VDPV isolates differed from Sabin 2 by 0.7% to 1.2% in nucleotides in the VP1 region and shared 5 nucleotide substitutions with the pre-VDPV. All 5 isolates were closely related, and all were S2/S3/S2/S3 recombinants sharing common recombination crossover sites. Although the two major determinants of attenuation and temperature sensitivity phenotype of Sabin 2 (A481 in the 5' untranslated region and Ile143 in the VP1 protein) had reverted in all 5 isolates, one VDPV (strain CHN16017) still retained the temperature sensitivity phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis of the third coding position of the complete P1 coding region suggested that the cVDPVs circulated locally for about 7 months following the initiating oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) dose. Our findings reinforce the point that cVDPVs can emerge and spread in isolated communities with immunity gaps and highlight the emergence risks of type 2 cVDPVs accompanying the trivalent OPV used. To solve this issue, it is recommended that type 2 OPV be removed from the trivalent OPV or that inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) be used instead. PMID:24850620

  2. Immunogenicity of poliovirus vaccines in chronically malnourished infants: A randomized controlled trial in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ali Faisal; Mach, Ondrej; Quadri, Farheen; Khan, Asia; Bhatti, Zaid; Rehman, Najeeb ur; Zaidi, Sohail; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, Steven M.; Salama, Maha; Sutter, Roland W.; Zaidi, Anita K.M.

    2015-01-01

    Reaching high population immunity against polioviruses (PV) is essential to achieving global polio eradication. Efficacy of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) varies and is lower among children living in tropical areas with impoverished environments. Malnutrition found as a risk factor for lower serological protection against PV. We compared whether inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) can be used to rapidly close the immunity gap among chronically malnourished (stunted) infants in Pakistan who will not be eligible for the 14 week IPV dose in routine EPI schedule. A phase 3, multicenter 4-arm randomized controlled trial conducted at five Primary Health Care (PHC) centers in Karachi, Pakistan. Infants, 9–12 months were stratified by length for age Z score into chronically malnourished and normally nourished. Infants were randomized to receive one dose of either bivalent OPV (bOPV) alone or bOPV + IPV. Baseline seroprevalence of PV antibodies and serum immune response to study vaccine dose were assessed by neutralization assay. Vaccine PV shedding in stool was evaluated 7 days after a bOPV challenge dose. Sera and stool were analyzed from 852/928 (92%) enrolled children. At baseline, the seroprevalence was 85.6% (n = 386), 73.6% (n = 332), and 70.7% (n = 319) in malnourished children against PV types 1, 2 and 3 respectively; and 94.1% (n = 448), 87.0% (n = 441) and 83.6% (n = 397) in the normally nourished group (p < 0.05). Children had previously received 9–10 doses of bOPV (80%) or tOPV (20%). One dose of IPV + bOPV given to malnourished children increased their serological protection (PV1, n = 201, 97.6%; PV2, n = 198, 96.1% and PV3, n = 189, 91.7%) to parity with normally nourished children who had not received IPV (p = <0.001). Seroconversion and boosting for all three serotypes was significantly more frequent in children who received IPV + bOPV than in those with bOPV only (p < 0.001) in both strata. Shedding of polioviruses in stool did

  3. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  4. Combined use of inactivated and oral poliovirus vaccines in refugee camps and surrounding communities - Kenya, December 2013.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Mohamed A; Makokha, Frederick; Hussein, Abdullahi M; Mohamed, Gedi; Mach, Ondrej; Humayun, Kabir; Okiror, Samuel; Abrar, Leila; Nasibov, Orkhan; Burton, John; Unshur, Ahmed; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Estivariz, Concepcion F

    2014-03-21

    Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988, circulation of indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) has continued without interruption in only three countries: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. During April-December 2013, a polio outbreak caused by WPV type 1 (WPV1) of Nigerian origin resulted in 217 cases in or near the Horn of Africa, including 194 cases in Somalia, 14 cases in Kenya, and nine cases in Ethiopia (all cases were reported as of March 10, 2014). During December 14-18, 2013, Kenya conducted the first-ever campaign providing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) together with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) as part of its outbreak response. The campaign targeted 126,000 children aged ≤59 months who resided in Somali refugee camps and surrounding communities near the Kenya-Somalia border, where most WPV1 cases had been reported, with the aim of increasing population immunity levels to ensure interruption of any residual WPV transmission and prevent spread from potential new importations. A campaign evaluation and vaccination coverage survey demonstrated that combined administration of IPV and OPV in a mass campaign is feasible and can achieve coverage >90%, although combined IPV and OPV campaigns come at a higher cost than OPV-only campaigns and require particular attention to vaccinator training and supervision. Future operational studies could assess the impact on population immunity and the cost-effectiveness of combined IPV and OPV campaigns to accelerate interruption of poliovirus transmission during polio outbreaks and in certain areas in which WPV circulation is endemic. PMID:24647400

  5. Isolation and Characterization of a Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus from Environmental Surveillance in China, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Xu, Aiqiang; Lin, Xiaojuan; Yoshida, Hiromu; Xiong, Ping; Zhu, Shuangli; Wang, Suting; Yan, Dongmei; Song, Lizhi; Wang, Haiyan; Cui, Ning; Xu, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of poliovirus on sewage has been conducted in Shandong Province, China since 2008. A type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) with 7 mutations in VP1 coding region was isolated from the sewage collected in the city of Jinan in December 2012. The complete genome sequencing analysis of this isolate revealed 25 nucleotide substitutions, 7 of which resulted in amino acid alteration. No evidence of recombination with other poliovirus serotypes was observed. The virus did not lose temperature sensitive phenotype at 40°C. An estimation based on the evolution rate of the P1 coding region suggested that evolution time of this strain might be 160–176 days. VP1 sequence analysis revealed that this VDPV strain is of no close relationship with other local type 2 polioviruses (n = 66) from sewage collected between May 2012 and June 2013, suggesting the lack of its circulation in the local population. The person who excreted the virus was not known and no closely related virus was isolated in local population via acute flaccid paralysis surveillance. By far this is the first report of VDPV isolated from sewage in China, and these results underscore the value of environmental surveillance in the polio surveillance system even in countries with high rates of OPV coverage. PMID:24386319

  6. Seroprevalence of poliovirus antibodies among 7-month-old infants after 4 doses of oral polio vaccine in Sistan-va-Baluchestan, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Izadi, S; Shahmahmoodi, S; Zahraei, S M; Dorostkar, F; Majdzadeh, S-R

    2015-02-01

    Despite high coverage rates of polio vaccine in the Islamic Republic of Iran, the seroconversion rates of infants may be inadequate. This study measured seroprevalence of antibodies against poliovirus serotypes 1 to 3 (PV1, PV2 and PV3) in 7-month-old infants who had received at least 4 doses of trivalent oral polio vaccine. A serosurvey was conducted in 2010 in rural areas of Chabahar, Sistan-va-Baluchestan province. Using cluster sampling, 72 eligible infants were tested for antibody against the 3 poliovirus serotypes according to WHO guidelines. Antibody titres ≥ 1:10 were considered positive. The seropositive rates for antibody against PV1, PV2 and PV3 were 84.7%, 95.8% and 70.8% respectively. Only 63.9% of participants were seropositive for antibodies against all 3 poliovirus serotypes. Except for PV2, the seroprevalence of antibody against the other 2 poliovirus serotypes, especially PV3, was unsatisfactory. PMID:25876819

  7. Influence of Enteric Infections on Response to Oral Poliovirus Vaccine: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Edward P. K.; Kampmann, Beate; Kang, Gagandeep; Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The impaired immunogenicity of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) in low-income countries has been apparent since the early field trials of this vaccine. Infection with enteropathogens at the time of vaccination may contribute to this phenomenon. However, the relative influence of these infections on OPV performance remains uncertain. Methods. We conducted a systematic review to examine the impact of concurrent enteric infections on OPV response. Using random-effects models, we assessed the effects of nonpolio enteroviruses (NPEVs) and diarrhea on the odds of seroconversion and/or vaccine virus shedding. Results. We identified 25 trials in which OPV outcomes were compared according to the presence or absence of enteric infections, the majority of which (n = 17) reported only on NPEVs. Concurrent NPEVs significantly reduced the odds of per-dose seroconversion for type 1 poliovirus (odds ratio [OR] 0.44, 95% confidence interval 0.23−0.84), but not type 2 (OR 0.53 [0.19−1.46]) or type 3 (OR 0.56 [0.27−1.12]). A similar reduction, significant for type 1 poliovirus (OR 0.50 [0.28−0.89]), was observed in the odds of vaccine virus shedding among NPEV-infected individuals. Concurrent diarrhea significantly inhibited per-dose seroconversion overall (OR 0.61 [0.38−0.87]). Conclusions. Our findings are consistent with an inhibitory effect of concurrent enteric infections on OPV response. PMID:24688069

  8. Sporadic Isolation of Sabin-Like Polioviruses and High-Level Detection of Non-Polio Enteroviruses during Sewage Surveillance in Seven Italian Cities, after Several Years of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Battistone, A.; Buttinelli, G.; Fiore, S.; Amato, C.; Bonomo, P.; Patti, A. M.; Vulcano, A.; Barbi, M.; Binda, S.; Pellegrinelli, L.; Tanzi, M. L.; Affanni, P.; Castiglia, P.; Germinario, C.; Mercurio, P.; Cicala, A.; Triassi, M.; Pennino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities between 2005 and 2008, after the introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccination (IPV) in 2002, showed rare polioviruses, none that were wild-type or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), and many other enteroviruses among 1,392 samples analyzed. Two of five polioviruses (PV) detected were Sabin-like PV2 and three PV3, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PCR results. Neurovirulence-related mutations were found in the 5′ noncoding region (5′NCR) of all strains and, for a PV2, also in VP1 region 143 (Ile > Thr). Intertypic recombination in the 3D region was detected in a second PV2 (Sabin 2/Sabin 1) and a PV3 (Sabin 3/Sabin 2). The low mutation rate in VP1 for all PVs suggests limited interhuman virus passages, consistent with efficient polio immunization in Italy. Nonetheless, these findings highlight the risk of wild or Sabin poliovirus reintroduction from abroad. Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) were detected, 448 of which were coxsackievirus B (CVB) and 294 of which were echoviruses (Echo). Fifty-six NPEVs failing serological typing were characterized by sequencing the VP1 region (nucleotides [nt] 2628 to 2976). A total of 448 CVB and 294 Echo strains were identified; among those strains, CVB2, CVB5, and Echo 11 predominated. Environmental CVB5 and CVB2 strains from this study showed high sequence identity with GenBank global strains. The high similarity between environmental NPEVs and clinical strains from the same areas of Italy and the same periods indicates that environmental strains reflect the viruses circulating in the population and highlights the potential risk of inefficient wastewater treatments. This study confirmed that sewage surveillance can be more sensitive than acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in monitoring silent poliovirus circulation in the population as well as the suitability of molecular approaches to enterovirus typing. PMID:24814793

  9. Sporadic isolation of sabin-like polioviruses and high-level detection of non-polio enteroviruses during sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities, after several years of inactivated poliovirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Battistone, A; Buttinelli, G; Fiore, S; Amato, C; Bonomo, P; Patti, A M; Vulcano, A; Barbi, M; Binda, S; Pellegrinelli, L; Tanzi, M L; Affanni, P; Castiglia, P; Germinario, C; Mercurio, P; Cicala, A; Triassi, M; Pennino, F; Fiore, L

    2014-08-01

    Sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities between 2005 and 2008, after the introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccination (IPV) in 2002, showed rare polioviruses, none that were wild-type or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), and many other enteroviruses among 1,392 samples analyzed. Two of five polioviruses (PV) detected were Sabin-like PV2 and three PV3, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PCR results. Neurovirulence-related mutations were found in the 5'noncoding region (5'NCR) of all strains and, for a PV2, also in VP1 region 143 (Ile>Thr). Intertypic recombination in the 3D region was detected in a second PV2 (Sabin 2/Sabin 1) and a PV3 (Sabin 3/Sabin 2). The low mutation rate in VP1 for all PVs suggests limited interhuman virus passages, consistent with efficient polio immunization in Italy. Nonetheless, these findings highlight the risk of wild or Sabin poliovirus reintroduction from abroad. Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) were detected, 448 of which were coxsackievirus B (CVB) and 294 of which were echoviruses (Echo). Fifty-six NPEVs failing serological typing were characterized by sequencing the VP1 region (nucleotides [nt] 2628 to 2976). A total of 448 CVB and 294 Echo strains were identified; among those strains, CVB2, CVB5, and Echo 11 predominated. Environmental CVB5 and CVB2 strains from this study showed high sequence identity with GenBank global strains. The high similarity between environmental NPEVs and clinical strains from the same areas of Italy and the same periods indicates that environmental strains reflect the viruses circulating in the population and highlights the potential risk of inefficient wastewater treatments. This study confirmed that sewage surveillance can be more sensitive than acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in monitoring silent poliovirus circulation in the population as well as the suitability of molecular approaches to enterovirus typing. PMID:24814793

  10. Immune response to simultaneous administration of a combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine with booster doses of diphtheria-tetanus and poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, G; Li Volti, S; Salemi, I; Giammanco Bilancia, G; Mauro, L

    1993-03-01

    A combined vaccine against measles (Edmonston-Zagreb 19 strain), mumps (Rubini strain) and rubella (Wistar RA 27/3 strain) was administered to a group of 46 children aged 10-12 months simultaneously with booster doses of compulsory diphtheria-tetanus toxoid and oral poliovirus vaccine. A second group of 53 children aged 15-24 months who had received booster doses of the compulsory vaccines 5 to 12 months before was also vaccinated. The same seroconversion rates (100%) and similar antibody titers for rubella were observed in both groups. The same seroconversion rates for mumps (93%) and similar rates for measles (98 and 94%) were observed in the two groups. Significantly lower antibody titers for measles and mumps were found in the first group, but they were compensated by an earlier protection, a reduction of number of visits for immunization, costs for the community, and improvement in parental compliance. These results confirm that Edmonston-Zagreb 19 and Rubini strains are still immunogenic even when they are combined with Wistar RA 27/3 strain. Moreover, a long term follow-up in order to verify the persistence of protective antibody levels in both groups of children, could suggest that combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine could be given earlier (at 10-12 months of age), simultaneously with booster doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoid and of trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine. PMID:8519358

  11. [Genetic Characteristics of Type 2 Vaccine-derived Poliovirus in Shanxi Province (China) in 2014].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongrei; Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Jianfang; Zhu, Shuangli; Wang, Dongyan; Zhang, Chuangye; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization redefined the type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) in 2010. To study the genetic characteristics and evolution of type 2 VDPV under this new definition, we conducted genome sequencing and analyses of type 2 VDPVs isolated from one patient with acute flaccid paralysis in Shanxi province (China) in 2014. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the full-length of type 2 VDPV is 7439 bases encoding 2207 amino acids with no insertion or deletion of nucleotides compared with Sabin2. One nucleotide substitution identified as a key determinant of the attenuated phenotype of the Sabin 2 strain (A-G reversion at nucleotide nt 481 in the 5-end of the untranslated region) had reverted in the Shanxi type 2 VDPV. The other known key determinant of the attenuated phenotype of the Sabin 2 strain (U-->C reversion at nt2909 in the VP1 coding region that caused a Ile143Thr substitution in VP1) had not reverted in the Shanxi VDPV. The Shanxi type 2 VDPV was S2/S1 recombinant, the crossover site of which mapped to the 3-end of the 3D region (between nt 6247 and nt 6281). A phylogentic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that evolution of the Shanxi type 2 VDPV was independent of other type 2 VDPVs detected worldwide. We estimated that the strain circulated for approximately = 11 months in the population according to the known evolution rate. The present study confirmed that the Chinese Polio Laboratory Network could discover the VDPV promptly and that it played an important part in maintenance of a polio-free China. PMID:26164941

  12. Development of a multiplex RT-PCR assay for the identification of recombination types at different genomic regions of vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, T G; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Tsakogiannis, D; Fikatas, A; Gartzonika, C; Levidiotou-Stefanou, S; Markoulatos, P

    2016-08-01

    Polioviruses (PVs) are the causal agents of acute paralytic poliomyelitis. Since the 1960s, poliomyelitis has been effectively controlled by the use of two vaccines containing all three serotypes of PVs, the inactivated poliovirus vaccine and the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Despite the success of OPV in polio eradication programme, a significant disadvantage was revealed: the emergence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). VAPP is the result of accumulated mutations and putative recombination events located at the genome of attenuated vaccine Sabin strains. In the present study, ten Sabin isolates derived from OPV vaccinees and environmental samples were studied in order to identify recombination types located from VP1 to 3D genomic regions of virus genome. The experimental procedure that was followed was virus RNA extraction, reverse transcription to convert the virus genome into cDNA, PCR and multiplex-PCR using specific designed primers able to localize and identify each recombination following agarose gel electrophoresis. This multiplex RT-PCR assay allows for the immediate detection and identification of multiple recombination types located at the viral genome of OPV derivatives. After the eradication of wild PVs, the remaining sources of poliovirus infection worldwide would be the OPV derivatives. As a consequence, the immediate detection and molecular characterization of recombinant derivatives are important to avoid epidemics due to the circulation of neurovirulent viral strains. PMID:27098645

  13. Molecular and Phenotypic Characterization of a Highly Evolved Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Isolated from Seawater in Brazil, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Cassemiro, Klécia Marília S. de Melo; Burlandy, Fernanda M.; Barbosa, Mikaela R. F.; Chen, Qi; Jorba, Jaume; Hachich, Elayse M.; Sato, Maria I. Z.; Burns, Cara C.; da Silva, Edson E.

    2016-01-01

    A type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), differing from the Sabin 2 strain at 8.6% (78/903) of VP1 nucleotide positions, was isolated from seawater collected from a seaport in São Paulo State, Brazil. The P1/capsid region is related to the Sabin 2 strain, but sequences within the 5'-untranslated region and downstream of the P1 region were derived from recombination with other members of Human Enterovirus Species C (HEV-C). The two known attenuating mutations had reverted to wild-type (A481G in the 5'-UTR and Ile143Thr in VP1). The VDPV isolate had lost the temperature sensitive phenotype and had accumulated amino acid substitutions in neutralizing antigenic (NAg) sites 3a and 3b. The date of the initiating OPV dose, estimated from the number of synonymous substitutions in the capsid region, was approximately 8.5 years before seawater sampling, a finding consistent with a long time of virus replication and possible transmission among several individuals. Although no closely related type 2 VDPVs were detected in Brazil or elsewhere, this VDPV was found in an area with a mobile population, where conditions may favor both viral infection and spread. Environmental surveillance serves as an important tool for sensitive and early detection of circulating poliovirus in the final stages of global polio eradication. PMID:27019095

  14. A severe case of co-infection with Enterovirus 71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus type II.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohui; Du, Zengqing; Feng, Min; Che, Yanchun; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is often identified as the primary pathogen that directly leads to severe cases of HFMD, whereas the association between other enteroviruses and EV71 infection remains largely unclear. Here we report a rare case of a 5-year-old boy co-infected with EV71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus (VDPV) type II, which were identified based on PCR and sequence analysis results and clinical symptoms and were characterized on CT. We determined that the EV71 strain belongs to the C4 subtype, and the VDPV II strain was closely genetically related to the reference Sabin type II strain. This report may improved our understanding of the clinical significance of the associations between clinical signs and the infectious properties of the involved pathogens. PMID:26361010

  15. Combined immunization of infants with oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines: results of a randomized trial in The Gambia, Oman, and Thailand. WHO Collaborative Study Group on Oral and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    To assess an immunization schedule combining oral (OPV) and inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV), we conducted a clinical trial in the Gambia, Oman, and Thailand. Children were randomized to receive one of the following schedules: OPV at birth, 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age; OPV at birth followed by both OPV and IPV at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age: or placebo at birth followed by IPV at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age. A total of 1685 infants were enrolled; 24-week serum specimens were available for 1291 infants (77%). Across the study sites at 24 weeks of age, the proportion of seropositive children in the combined schedule group was 95-99% for type 1, 99-100% for type 2, and 97-100% for type 3. In the Gambia and Oman, the combined schedule performed significantly better than OPV for type 1 (95-97% versus 88-90%) and type 3 (97-99% versus 72-73%). In the Gambia and Oman, seroprevalences in the IPV group were lower for type 1 (significantly lower in the Gambia); significantly lower for type 2; and significantly higher for type 3, compared with the OPV group. In Thailand, the IPV group had significantly lower proportions of children who were seropositive for each of the three types, compared with the OPV group. The responses to OPV in the Gambia, Oman, and Thailand were consistent with previous studies from these countries. IPV given at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age provided inadequate serological protection against poliovirus, especially type 1. The combined schedule provided the highest levels of serum antibody response, with mucosal immunity equivalent to that produced by OPV alone. PMID:8789924

  16. Booster vaccination of pre-school children with reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus vaccine co-administered with measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Giuseppe; Cuccia, Mario; Mereu, Gabriele; Icardi, Giancarlo; Bona, Gianni; Esposito, Susanna; Marchetti, Federico; Messier, Marc; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Hardt, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pertussis occurs in older children, adolescents and adults due to waning immunity after primary vaccination. Booster vaccination for pre-school children has been recommended in Italy since 1999. In this study (NCT00871000), the immunogenicity, safety and reactogenicity of a booster dose of reduced-antigen content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (dTpa-IPV; GSK Biologicals Boostrix™-Polio; 3-component pertussis) vs. full-strength DTPa-IPV vaccine (sanofi-pasteur—MSD Tetravac™; 2-component pertussis) was evaluated in pre-school Italian children.   Methods: Healthy children aged 5–6 y primed in a routine vaccination setting with three doses of DTPa-based vaccines were enrolled and randomized (1:1) in this phase IIIb, booster study to receive a single dose of dTpa-IPV or DTPa-IPV; the MMRV vaccine was co-administered. Antibody concentrations/titers against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliovirus 1–3 were measured before and one month post-booster. Reactogenicity and safety was assessed. Results: 305 subjects were enrolled of whom 303 (dTpa-IPV = 151; DTPa-IPV = 152) received booster vaccination. One month post-booster, all subjects were seroprotected/seropositive for anti-diphtheria, anti-tetanus, anti-PT, anti-FHA and anti-poliovirus 1–3; 99.3% of dTpa-IPV and 60.4% of DTPa-IPV subjects were seropositive for anti-PRN; 98–100% of subjects were seropositive against MMRV antigens post-booster. Pain at the injection site (dTpa-IPV: 63.6%; DTPa-IPV: 63.2%) and fatigue (dTpa-IPV: 26.5%; DTPa-IPV: 23.7%) were the most commonly reported solicited local and general symptoms, during the 4-d follow-up period. No SAEs or fatalities were reported. Conclusions: The reduced-antigen-content dTpa-IPV vaccine was non-inferior to full-strength DTPa-IPV vaccine with respect to immunogenicity. The vaccine was well-tolerated and can be confidently used as a booster dose in pre-school children. PMID:22327497

  17. Immunogenicity and Effectiveness of Routine Immunization With 1 or 2 Doses of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The World Health Organization has recommended that all 124 countries currently using only oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) introduce at least 1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) before the global withdrawal of serotype 2 OPV in 2016. A 1- or 2-dose schedule, potentially administered intradermally with reduced antigen content, may make this affordable. Methods. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies documenting seroconversion after 1 or 2, full or fractional (1/5) doses of enhanced-potency IPV was performed. Studies reporting the clinical efficacy of IPV were also reviewed. Results. Twenty study arms from 12 published articles were included in the analysis of seroconversion. One full dose of intramuscular IPV seroconverted 33%, 41%, and 47% of infants against serotypes 1, 2, and 3 on average, whereas 2 full doses seroconverted 79%, 80%, and 90%, respectively. Seroconversion increased with age at administration. Limited data from case-control studies indicate clinical efficacy equivalent to the proportion seroconverting. One fractional dose of intradermal IPV gave lower seroconversion (10%–40%), but after 2 doses seroconversion was comparable to that with full-dose IPV. Conclusions. Routine immunization with 2 full or fractional doses of IPV given after 10 weeks of age is likely to protect >80% of recipients against poliomyelitis if poliovirus reemerges after withdrawal of OPV serotypes. PMID:24634499

  18. An Outbreak of Type Π Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus in Sichuan Province, China: Emergence and Circulation in an Under-Immunized Population

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chun-Xiang; Liu, Qing-Lian; Hao, Li-Xin; Liu, Yu; Zheng, Jing-Shan; Qin, Zhi-Ying; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Shi-Yue; Yin, Zun-Dong; Jing, Qiong; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Huang, Rong-Na; Yang, Ru-Pei; Tong, Wen-Bin; Qi, Qi; Guan, Xu-Jing; Jing, Yu-Lin; Ma, Qian-Li; Wang, Jin; Ma, Xiao-Zhen; Chen, Na; Zheng, Hong-Ru; Li, Yin-Qiao; Ma, Chao; Su, Qi-Ru; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Luo, Hui-Ming; Wu, Xian-Ping; Wen, Ning; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Background During August 2011–February 2012, an outbreak of type Π circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPVs) occurred in Sichuan Province, China. Methods A field investigation of the outbreak was conducted to characterize outbreak isolates and to guide emergency response. Sequence analysis of poliovirus capsid protein VP1 was performed to determine the viral propagation, and a coverage survey was carried out for risk assessment. Results One clinical compatible polio case and three VDPV cases were determined in Ngawa County, Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province. Case patients were unimmunized children, 0.8–1 years old. Genetic sequencing showed that the isolates diverged from the VP1 region of the type Π Sabin strain by 5–12 nucleotides (nt) and shared the same 5 nt VP1 substitutions, which indicate single lineage of cVDPVs. Of the 7 acute flaccid paralysis cases (all>6 months) reported in Ngawa Prefecture in 2011, 4 (57.1%) cases (including 2 polio cases) did not receive oral attenuated poliovirus vaccine. Supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) were conducted in February–May, 2012, and the strain has not been isolated since. Conclusion High coverage of routine immunization should be maintained among children until WPV transmission is globally eradicated. Risk assessments should be conducted regularly to pinpoint high risk areas or subpopulations, with SIAs developed if necessary. PMID:25503964

  19. Kinetics of poliovirus shedding following oral vaccination as measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR versus culture.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Mami; Begum, Sharmin; Uddin, Md Jashim; Platts-Mills, James A; Liu, Jie; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Chowdhury, Anwarul H; Jamil, Khondoker M; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A; Houpt, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Amid polio eradication efforts, detection of oral polio vaccine (OPV) virus in stool samples can provide information about rates of mucosal immunity and allow estimation of the poliovirus reservoir. We developed a multiplex one-step quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay for detection of OPV Sabin strains 1, 2, and 3 directly in stool samples with an external control to normalize samples for viral quantity and compared its performance with that of viral culture. We applied the assay to samples from infants in Dhaka, Bangladesh, after the administration of trivalent OPV (tOPV) at weeks 14 and 52 of life (on days 0 [pre-OPV], +4, +11, +18, and +25 relative to vaccination). When 1,350 stool samples were tested, the sensitivity and specificity of the quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay were 89 and 91% compared with culture. A quantitative relationship between culture(+)/qPCR(+) and culture(-)/qPCR(+) stool samples was observed. The kinetics of shedding revealed by qPCR and culture were similar. qPCR quantitative cutoffs based on the day +11 or +18 stool samples could be used to identify the culture-positive shedders, as well as the long-duration or high-frequency shedders. Interestingly, qPCR revealed that a small minority (7%) of infants contributed the vast majority (93 to 100%) of the total estimated viral excretion across all subtypes at each time point. This qPCR assay for OPV can simply and quantitatively detect all three Sabin strains directly in stool samples to approximate shedding both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:25378579

  20. Transgenic mice as an alternative to monkeys for neurovirulence testing of live oral poliovirus vaccine: validation by a WHO collaborative study.

    PubMed Central

    Dragunsky, Eugenia; Nomura, Tatsuji; Karpinski, Kazimir; Furesz, John; Wood, David J.; Pervikov, Yuri; Abe, Shinobu; Kurata, Takeshi; Vanloocke, Olivier; Karganova, Galina; Taffs, Rolf; Heath, Alan; Ivshina, Anna; Levenbook, Inessa

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Extensive WHO collaborative studies were performed to evaluate the suitability of transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus (TgPVR mice, strain 21, bred and provided by the Central Institute for Experimental Animals, Japan) as an alternative to monkeys in the neurovirulence test (NVT) of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). METHODS: Nine laboratories participated in the collaborative study on testing neurovirulence of 94 preparations of OPV and vaccine derivatives of all three serotypes in TgPVR21 mice. FINDINGS: Statistical analysis of the data demonstrated that the TgPVR21 mouse NVT was of comparable sensitivity and reproducibility to the conventional WHO NVT in simians. A statistical model for acceptance/rejection of OPV lots in the mouse test was developed, validated, and shown to be suitable for all three vaccine types. The assessment of the transgenic mouse NVT is based on clinical evaluation of paralysed mice. Unlike the monkey NVT, histological examination of central nervous system tissue of each mouse offered no advantage over careful and detailed clinical observation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on data from the collaborative studies the WHO Expert Committee for Biological Standardization approved the mouse NVT as an alternative to the monkey test for all three OPV types and defined a standard implementation process for laboratories that wish to use the test. This represents the first successful introduction of transgenic animals into control of biologicals. PMID:12764491

  1. Controlled trial of immune response of preterm infants to recombinant hepatitis B and inactivated poliovirus vaccines administered simultaneously shortly after birth

    PubMed Central

    Linder, N.; Handsher, R.; German, B.; Sirota, L.; Bachman, M.; Zinger, S.; Mendelson, E.; Barzilai, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—The study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity of an early, extra dose of enhanced inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) administered simultaneously with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (HBV) to preterm infants shortly after birth.
METHODS—Three groups were studied. Fifty preterm infants received IPV intramuscularly within 24 hours of birth, in addition to routine recommended childhood immunisations. Fifty two preterm infants and 35 full term infants received routine immunisations only (routine vaccination timing: HBV at birth, 1 and 6 months of age; IPV at 2 and 4 months; oral polio vaccine (OPV) at 4 and 6 months; diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) at 2, 4, and 6 months; and Haemophilus influenzae B vaccine at 2 and 4 months). Blood samples were taken at birth, 3 and 7months of age from all infants, and at 1 month of age from preterm infants only.
RESULTS—At birth, a lower percentage of both study and control preterm infants had antipoliovirus type 3 titres ⩾ 1:8 than full term infants. At 1 and 3 months of age significantly more early IPV infants had antipoliovirus type 3 titres ⩾ 1:8 than routinely vaccinated preterm infants (p < 0.05). At 7 months of age there were no significant differences in percentage of antipoliovirus titres ⩾ 1:8 or geometric mean times (GMTs) between the early IPV group and the routinely vaccinated preterm group. At 3 and 7 months of age, the percentage of positive antihepatitis B titres (⩾ 1:10) and the GMT of the early IPV preterm group did not differ significantly from those of preterm controls. There was no significant difference in percentage of positive antihepatitis B titres between the early IPV group and full term controls at any time. GMTs for hepatitis B antibodies were significantly lower in the early IPV preterm group than in full term controls at 3 and 7 months of age.
CONCLUSIONS—Administration of an additional dose of IPV simultaneously with routine HBV to preterm infants shortly after

  2. Rare natural type 3/type 2 intertypic capsid recombinant vaccine-related poliovirus isolated from a case of acute flaccid paralysis in Brazil, 2015.

    PubMed

    Cassemiro, Klécia M S M; Burlandy, Fernanda M; da Silva, Edson E

    2016-07-01

    A natural type 3/type 2 intertypic capsid recombinant vaccine-related poliovirus was isolated from an acute flaccid paralytic case in Brazil. Genome sequencing revealed the uncommon location of the crossover site in the VP1 coding region (nucleotides 3251-3258 of Sabin 3 genome). The Sabin 2 donor sequence replaced the last 118 nt of VP1, resulting in the substitution of the complete antigenic site IIIa by PV2-specific amino acids. The low overall number of nucleotide substitutions in P1 region indicated that the predicted replication time of the isolate was about 8-9 weeks. Two of the principal determinants of attenuation in Sabin 3 genomes were mutated (U472C and C2493U), but the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the isolate was preserved. Our results support the theory that there exists a PV3/PV2 recombination hotspot site in the tail region of the VP1 capsid protein and that the recombination may occur soon after oral poliovirus vaccine administration. PMID:27082658

  3. Preliminary report on vaccination in Croatia against poliomyelitis with type 1 (CHAT) and type 3 (W-Fox) attenuated polioviruses of Koprowski

    PubMed Central

    Ikić, D.; Jančikić, B.; Lulić, V.; Ćuk, D.; Juzbašić, M.; Manhalter, T.; Sindik, A.

    1963-01-01

    The incidence of poliomyelitis in the People's Republic of Croatia has progressively increased since 1945, and in 1953 and 1960 there were serious epidemics. In order to protect the age-groups at greatest risk a mass vaccination campaign was carried out with Koprowski live-virus vaccine in the early spring of 1961, covering the entire population aged 3 months to 20 years. Altogether 1 339 244 persons were given type 1 (CHAT strain), and 1 287 909 received type 3 (W-Fox). Over 100 000 persons were estimated to possess no pre-existing antibody to any of the three types of poliovirus. Although no unvaccinated control group was set up, it is considered that the epidemiological and serological data indicate the safety and efficacy of the vaccination. The serological conversion rate was 91.5% for type 1 and 93.5% for type 3. No post-vaccinal reactions were observed. The usual summer peak in incidence did not occur in 1961, altogether 6 cases being recorded from June (when immunity is considered to have been established) to December. This is the lowest figure since 1945. PMID:20604139

  4. Current status of poliovirus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, J L

    1996-01-01

    Two scientists who played leading roles in the conquest of poliomyelitis died recently. In 1954, Jonas Salk provided the first licensed polio vaccine, the formalin (and heat)-inactivated virus. Albert Sabin gave us the attenuated live virus vaccine, which was licensed in 1962. This paper takes the reader through the history of the disease, including its pathogenesis, epidemiology, vaccines, and future directions. The emphasis is on vaccines, for it seems that with proper vaccination the number of new cases is falling dramatically. It is hoped that by the year 2000, we will accomplish the goal of the World Health Organization of "a world without polio." Then, because there is no animal reservoir, we can seriously discuss when and how to eliminate the need for vaccination and ultimately destroy our stocks of poliovirus. PMID:8809461

  5. Current status of poliovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Melnick, J L

    1996-07-01

    Two scientists who played leading roles in the conquest of poliomyelitis died recently. In 1954, Jonas Salk provided the first licensed polio vaccine, the formalin (and heat)-inactivated virus. Albert Sabin gave us the attenuated live virus vaccine, which was licensed in 1962. This paper takes the reader through the history of the disease, including its pathogenesis, epidemiology, vaccines, and future directions. The emphasis is on vaccines, for it seems that with proper vaccination the number of new cases is falling dramatically. It is hoped that by the year 2000, we will accomplish the goal of the World Health Organization of "a world without polio." Then, because there is no animal reservoir, we can seriously discuss when and how to eliminate the need for vaccination and ultimately destroy our stocks of poliovirus. PMID:8809461

  6. Modeling population immunity to support efforts to end the transmission of live polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Pallansch, Mark A; Tebbens, Radboud J Duintjer; Wassilak, Steve G; Cochi, Stephen L

    2013-04-01

    Eradication of wild poliovirus (WPV) types 1 and 3, prevention and cessation of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses, and achievement and maintenance of a world free of paralytic polio cases requires active risk management by focusing on population immunity and coordinated cessation of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). We suggest the need for a complementary and different conceptual approach to achieve eradication compared to the current case-based approach using surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) to identify symptomatic poliovirus infections. Specifically, we describe a modeling approach to characterize overall population immunity to poliovirus transmission. The approach deals with the realities that exposure to live polioviruses (e.g., WPV, OPV) and/or vaccination with inactivated poliovirus vaccine provides protection from paralytic polio (i.e., disease), but does not eliminate the potential for reinfection or asymptomatic participation in poliovirus transmission, which may increase with time because of waning immunity. The AFP surveillance system provides evidence of symptomatic poliovirus infections detected, which indicate immunity gaps after outbreaks occur, and this system represents an appropriate focus for controlling disease outbreaks. We describe a conceptual dynamic model to characterize population immunity to poliovirus transmission that helps identify risks created by immunity gaps before outbreaks occur, which provides an opportunity for national and global policymakers to manage the risk of poliovirus and prevent outbreaks before they occur. We suggest that dynamically modeling risk represents an essential tool as the number of cases approaches zero. PMID:22985171

  7. An Insight into Recombination with Enterovirus Species C and Nucleotide G-480 Reversion from the Viewpoint of Neurovirulence of Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Shuangli; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Ye, Xufang; Wang, Dongyan; Jorba, Jaume; Zhu, Hui; An, Hongqiu; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Kew, Olen; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    A poliomyelitis outbreak caused by type 1 circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) was identified in China in 2004. Six independent cVDPVs (eight isolates) could be grouped into a single cluster with pathways of divergence different from a single cVDPV progenitor, which circulated and evolved into both a highly neurovirulent lineage and a less neurovirulent lineage. They were as neurovirulent as the wild type 1 Mahoney strain, recombination was absent, and their nucleotide 480-G was identical to that of the Sabin strain. The Guizhou/China cVDPV strains shared 4 amino acid replacements in the NAg sites: 3 located at the BC loop, which may underlie the aberrant results of the ELISA intratypic differentiation (ITD) test. The complete ORF tree diverged into two main branches from a common ancestral infection estimated to have occurred in about mid-September 2003, nine months before the appearance of the VDPV case, which indicated recently evolved VDPV. Further, recombination with species C enteroviruses may indicate the presence and density of these enteroviruses in the population and prolonged virus circulation in the community. The aforementioned cVDPVs has important implications in the global initiative to eradicate polio: high quality surveillance permitted earliest detection and response. PMID:26603565

  8. Interactions of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Vaccinal Poliovirus Type 1, and Bacteriophages φX174 and MS2 with a Drinking Water Biofilm and a Wastewater Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Helmi, Karim; Skraber, Sylvain; Gantzer, Christophe; Willame, Raphaël; Hoffmann, Lucien; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms colonizing surfaces inside drinking water distribution networks may provide a habitat and shelter to pathogenic viruses and parasites. If released from biofilms, these pathogens may disseminate in the water distribution system and cause waterborne diseases. Our study aimed to investigate the interactions of protozoan parasites (Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia [oo]cysts) and viruses (vaccinal poliovirus type 1, φX174, and MS2) with two contrasting biofilms. First, attachment, persistence, and detachment of the protozoan parasites and the viruses were assessed with a drinking water biofilm. This biofilm was allowed to develop inside a rotating annular reactor fed with tap water for 7 months prior to the inoculation. Our results show that viable parasites and infectious viruses attached to the drinking water biofilm within 1 h and persisted within the biofilm. Indeed, infectious viruses were detected in the drinking water biofilm up to 6 days after the inoculation, while viral genome and viable parasites were still detected at day 34, corresponding to the last day of the monitoring period. Since viral genome was detected much longer than infectious particles, our results raise the question of the significance of detecting viral genomes in biofilms. A transfer of viable parasites and viruses from the biofilm to the water phase was observed after the flow velocity was increased but also with a constant laminar flow rate. Similar results regarding parasite and virus attachment and detachment were obtained using a treated wastewater biofilm, suggesting that our observations might be extrapolated to a wide range of environmental biofilms and confirming that biofilms can be considered a potential secondary source of contamination. PMID:18281435

  9. Poliovirus Laboratory Based Surveillance: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor; Asghar, Humayun; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor

    2016-01-01

    World Health Assembly (WHA) in 1988 encouraged the member states to launch Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) (resolution WHA41.28) against "the Crippler" called poliovirus, through strong routine immunization program and intensified surveillance systems. Since its launch, global incidence of poliomyelitis has been reduced by more than 99 % and the disease squeezed to only three endemic countries (Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria) out of 125. Today, poliomyelitis is on the verge of eradication, and their etiological agents, the three poliovirus serotypes, are on the brink of extinction from the natural environment. The last case of poliomyelitis due to wild type 2 strain occurred in 1999 in Uttar Pradesh, India whereas the last paralytic case due to wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3) was seen in November, 2012 in Yobe, Nigeria. Despite this progress, undetected circulation cannot fully rule out the eradication as most of the poliovirus infections are entirely subclinical; hence sophisticated environmental surveillance is needed to ensure the complete eradication of virus. Moreover, the vaccine virus in under-immunized communities can sometimes revert and attain wild type characteristics posing a big challenge to the program. PMID:26983728

  10. Importation and circulation of poliovirus in Bulgaria in 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Kojouharova, Mira; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Gyurova, Snejana; Fiore, Lucia; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Kunchev, Angel; Vladimirova, Nadejda; Korsun, Neli; Filipova, Radosveta; Boneva, Roumiana; Gavrilin, Eugene; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Oblapenko, George; Wassilak, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the circumstances in which poliomyelitis occurred among three children in Bulgaria during 2001 and to describe the public health response. METHODS: Bulgarian authorities investigated the three cases of polio and their contacts, conducted faecal and serological screening of children from high-risk groups, implemented enhanced surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis, and conducted supplemental immunization activities. FINDINGS: The three cases of polio studied had not been vaccinated and lived in socioeconomically deprived areas of two cities. Four Roma children from the Bourgas district had antibody titres to serotype 1 poliovirus only, and wild type 1 virus was isolated from the faeces of two asymptomatic Roma children in the Bourgas and Sofia districts. Poliovirus isolates were related genetically and represented a single evolutionary lineage; genomic sequences were less than 90% identical to poliovirus strains isolated previously in Europe, but 98.3% similar to a strain isolated in India in 2000. No cases or wild virus isolates were found after supplemental immunization activities were launched in May 2001. CONCLUSIONS: In Bulgaria, an imported poliovirus was able to circulate for two to five months among minority populations. Surveillance data strongly suggest that wild poliovirus circulation ceased shortly after supplemental immunization activities with oral poliovirus vaccine were conducted. PMID:12973639

  11. Assessment of cell culture and polymerase chain reaction procedures for the detection of polioviruses in wastewater.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W. O.; Botma, K. L.; de Villiers, J. C.; Clay, C. G.; Erasmus, B.

    1999-01-01

    WHO considers that environmental surveillance for wild-type polioviruses is potentially important for surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis as a means of confirming eradication of poliomyelitis. The present study investigated methods for detecting polioviruses in a variety of water environments in South Africa. Most polioviruses were isolated on L20B mouse cells, which, however, were not selective: 16 reoviruses and 8 enteroviruses, apparently animal strains, were also isolated on these cells. Vaccine strains of polioviruses were isolated from surface waters during and shortly after two rounds of mass vaccination of children in an informal settlement where there was no sewerage. The results demonstrated the feasibility of poliovirus surveillance in such settlements. It was also evident that neither poliovirus vaccine strains nor other viruses were likely to interfere significantly with the detection of wild-type polioviruses. Optimal isolation of polioviruses was accomplished by parallel inoculation of L20B mouse cells and at least the PLC/PRF/5 human liver and buffalo green monkey (BGM) kidney cell lines. Analysis of cell cultures using the polymerase chain reaction revealed that 319 test samples contained at least 263 human enteroviruses that failed to produce a cytopathogenic effect. This type of analysis thus significantly increased the sensitivity of enterovirus detection. PMID:10680244

  12. Seroepidemiology of Polioviruses among University Students in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Cocchio, Silvia; Lazzari, Roberta; Saracino, Elena; Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Trevisan, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of poliovirus vaccination schemes has led to a marked decline in the incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis worldwide, but wild poliovirus is still endemic in some developing countries, and in 2009 a total of 23 countries reported at least 1 case of poliomyelitis caused by wild-strain polio viruses. A serological survey was thus conducted on the immunological status against polioviruses of 318 young adults, classified by their country of origin. Immunity to poliomyelitis was assessed by neutralizing antibody titration in tissues cultured on microplates. The rate of seronegativity (≤1:8) in the study population was 26.7% for poliovirus type 1, 7.2% for type 2, and 22.6% for type 3. In our sample of 318 individuals, 219 (68.9%) were Italian and 99 (31.1%) were from outside the European Union (EU). The proportion of cases found seropositive to polioviruses 1 and 3 decreased significantly with older age; this age-related decrease was more evident in the Italian group than among the non-EU subjects. Any risk of the wild virus recurring and causing paralytic poliomyelitis must be prevented, keeping Europe polio free by means of appropriate immunological protection, until polio has been conclusively eradicated all over the world. Judging from our findings, it may be worth considering administering a fifth dose of polio vaccine to adolescents. PMID:22739695

  13. Seroepidemiology of polioviruses among university students in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Baldovin, Tatjana; Cocchio, Silvia; Lazzari, Roberta; Saracino, Elena; Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Trevisan, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of poliovirus vaccination schemes has led to a marked decline in the incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis worldwide, but wild poliovirus is still endemic in some developing countries, and in 2009 a total of 23 countries reported at least 1 case of poliomyelitis caused by wild-strain polio viruses. A serological survey was thus conducted on the immunological status against polioviruses of 318 young adults, classified by their country of origin. Immunity to poliomyelitis was assessed by neutralizing antibody titration in tissues cultured on microplates. The rate of seronegativity (≤ 1:8) in the study population was 26.7% for poliovirus type 1, 7.2% for type 2, and 22.6% for type 3. In our sample of 318 individuals, 219 (68.9%) were Italian and 99 (31.1%) were from outside the European Union (EU). The proportion of cases found seropositive to polioviruses 1 and 3 decreased significantly with older age; this age-related decrease was more evident in the Italian group than among the non-EU subjects. Any risk of the wild virus recurring and causing paralytic poliomyelitis must be prevented, keeping Europe polio free by means of appropriate immunological protection, until polio has been conclusively eradicated all over the world. Judging from our findings, it may be worth considering administering a fifth dose of polio vaccine to adolescents. PMID:22739695

  14. Human Circulating Antibody-Producing B Cell as a Predictive Measure of Mucosal Immunity to Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Harish; Sharma, Prashant; Yang, Jae Seung; Saletti, Giulietta; Ahmad, Mohammad; Bahl, Sunil K.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Nandy, Ranjan K.; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Sutter, Roland W.; Czerkinsky, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Background The “gold standard” for assessing mucosal immunity after vaccination with poliovirus vaccines consists in measuring virus excretion in stool after challenge with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). This testing is time and resource intensive, and development of alternative methods is a priority for accelerating polio eradication. We therefore evaluated circulating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) as a potential means to evaluate mucosal immunity to poliovirus vaccine. Methods 199 subjects, aged 10 years, and previously immunized repeatedly with OPV, were selected. Subjects were assigned to receive either a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), bivalent OPV (bOPV), or no vaccine. Using a micro-modified whole blood-based ELISPOT assay designed for field setting, circulating poliovirus type-specific IgA- and IgG-ASCs, including gut homing α4β7+ ASCs, were enumerated on days 0 and 7 after booster immunization. In addition, serum samples collected on days 0, 28 and 56 were tested for neutralizing antibody titers against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3. Stool specimens were collected on day 28 (day of bOPV challenge), and on days 31, 35 and 42 and processed for poliovirus isolation. Results An IPV dose elicited blood IgA- and IgG-ASC responses in 84.8 to 94.9% of subjects, respectively. In comparison, a bOPV dose evoked corresponding blood ASC responses in 20.0 to 48.6% of subjects. A significant association was found between IgA- and IgG-ASC responses and serum neutralizing antibody titers for poliovirus type 1, 2, 3 (p<0.001). In the IPV group, α4β7+ ASCs accounted for a substantial proportion of IgA-ASCs and the proportion of subjects with a positive α4β7+ IgA-ASC response to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 was 62.7%, 89.8% and 45.8%, respectively. A significant association was observed between virus excretion and α4β7+ IgA- and/or IgG-ASC responses to poliovirus type 3 among immunized children; however, only a weak association was found for

  15. Managing population immunity to reduce or eliminate the risks of circulation following the importation of polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Kalkowska, Dominika A; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2015-03-24

    Poliovirus importations into polio-free countries represent a major concern during the final phases of global eradication of wild polioviruses (WPVs). We extend dynamic transmission models to demonstrate the dynamics of population immunity out through 2020 for three countries that only used inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) for routine immunization: the US, Israel, and The Netherlands. For each country, we explore the vulnerability to re-established transmission following an importation for each poliovirus serotype, including the impact of immunization choices following the serotype 1 WPV importation that occurred in 2013 in Israel. As population immunity declines below the threshold required to prevent transmission, countries become at risk for re-established transmission. Although importations represent stochastic events that countries cannot fully control because people cross borders and polioviruses mainly cause asymptomatic infections, countries can ensure that any importations die out. Our results suggest that the general US population will remain above the threshold for transmission through 2020. In contrast, Israel became vulnerable to re-established transmission of importations of live polioviruses by the late 2000s. In Israel, the recent WPV importation and outbreak response use of bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) eliminated the vulnerability to an importation of poliovirus serotypes 1 and 3 for several years, but not serotype 2. The Netherlands experienced a serotype 1 WPV outbreak in 1992-1993 and became vulnerable to re-established transmission in religious communities with low vaccine acceptance around the year 2000, although the general population remains well-protected from widespread transmission. All countries should invest in active management of population immunity to avoid the potential circulation of imported live polioviruses. IPV-using countries may wish to consider prevention opportunities and/or ensure preparedness for response

  16. A survey for neutralizing antibodies to the three types of poliovirus among children in Maiduguri, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Baba, M M; Haruna, B A; Ogunmola, O; Ambe, J P; Shidali, N N; Oderinde, B; Marcello, A; Talle, M

    2012-04-01

    The milestone in polio eradication program is to protect effectively children aged 0-5 years against the three serotypes of poliovirus. It became necessary to measure the level of neutralizing antibodies to the three poliovirus types in an endemic State in Nigeria. Neutralizing antibodies to the poliovirus types among children aged 0-5 years was estimated using micro neutralization assay. Of 129 children, 99 (76.8%), 95 (73.6%), and 95 (73.6%) had neutralizing antibodies with the geometric mean titer of 42.7, 31.3, and 33.2 for the poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Fifty-three percent of the children were protected against the three types of poliovirus. Combination of poliovirus types 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 were neutralized by 62.8, 58.9, and 61.2% of the children studied, respectively. Only poliovirus type 1 induced antibody titres ≥1:1,024. The number of children with neutralizing antibodies after receiving three doses was significantly higher than those who received one or two doses of oral polio vaccine (P ≤ 0.05). However, those who received more than three doses of oral polio vaccine showed no significant difference in their antibody response. The existence of immunity gap poses a risk of re-emergence of the paralytic poliovirus. The existence of unimmunized and unprotected children along with high birth rate could impede the success of polio vaccination in Nigeria. Elimination of non-compliance to polio vaccine, promotion of health education and documented evidence of vaccination of each child with the parents may facilitate the success of polio eradication program in Nigeria. PMID:22337311

  17. Contribution of Environmental Surveillance Toward Interruption of Poliovirus Transmission in Nigeria, 2012–2015

    PubMed Central

    Johnson Muluh, Ticha; Hamisu, Abdullahi Walla; Craig, Kehinde; Mkanda, Pascal; Andrew, Etsano; Adeniji, Johnson; Akande, Adefunke; Musa, Audu; Ayodeji, Isiaka; Nicksy, Gumede; Banda, Richard; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Oyetunji, Ajiboye; Diop, Ousmane; Vaz, Rui G.; Muhammad, Ado J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cases of paralysis caused by poliovirus have decreased by >99% since the 1988 World Health Assembly's resolution to eradicate polio. The World Health Organization identified environmental surveillance (ES) of poliovirus in the poliomyelitis eradication strategic plan as an activity that can complement acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance. This article summarizes key public health interventions that followed the isolation of polioviruses from ES between 2012 and 2015. Methods. The grap method was used to collect 1.75 L of raw flowing sewage every 2–4 weeks. Once collected, samples were shipped at 4°C to a polio laboratory for concentration. ES data were then used to guide program implementation. Results. From 2012 to 2015, ES reported 97 circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV2) and 14 wild polioviruses. In 2014 alone, 54 cVDPV type 2 cases and 1 WPV type 1 case were reported. In Sokoto State, 58 cases of AFP were found from a search of 9426 households. A total of 2 252 059 inactivated polio vaccine and 2 460 124 oral polio vaccine doses were administered to children aged <5 year in Borno and Yobe states. Conclusions. This article is among the first from Africa that relates ES findings to key public health interventions (mass immunization campaigns, inactivated polio vaccine introduction, and strengthening of AFP surveillance) that have contributed to the interruption of poliovirus transmission in Nigeria. PMID:26908747

  18. Combined hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine; Infanrix™ hexa

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Bonanni, Paolo; Castro, Marcela; Gabutti, Giovanni; Franco, Elisabetta; Marchetti, Federico; Prato, Rosa; Vitale, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Infant vaccination using 2-dose priming at 3 and 5 mo of age with a booster at 11–12 mo of age was pioneered in Italy. The 3-5-11 schedule is now used in a growing number of European countries. Infanrix™ hexa (DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) was first licensed for use in 2000 and has been the only pediatric hexavalent vaccine available since 2005. We reviewed available clinical trial data describing the immunogenicity of DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib when administered at 3, 5, and 11 mo of age, and conducted an analysis of safety using global and Italian post-marketing surveillance data. In Italy, DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib has a demonstrated safety record extending over a decade of use, it has been associated with record levels of vaccine coverage, and with sustained disease control in vaccinated cohorts. Hexavalent vaccines will continue to contribute to high vaccine coverage in Italy and across Europe. PMID:24004825

  19. Progress in the development of poliovirus antiviral agents and their essential role in reducing risks that threaten eradication.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, Mark A; Collett, Marc S; Hincks, Jeffrey R; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark A; Okayasu, Hiromasa; Sutter, Roland W; Modlin, John F; Dowdle, Walter R

    2014-11-01

    Chronic prolonged excretion of vaccine-derived polioviruses by immunodeficient persons (iVDPV) presents a personal risk of poliomyelitis to the patient as well as a programmatic risk of delayed global eradication. Poliovirus antiviral drugs offer the only mitigation of these risks. Antiviral agents may also have a potential role in the management of accidental exposures and in certain outbreak scenarios. Efforts to discover and develop poliovirus antiviral agents have been ongoing in earnest since the formation in 2007 of the Poliovirus Antivirals Initiative. The most advanced antiviral, pocapavir (V-073), is a capsid inhibitor that has recently demonstrated activity in an oral poliovirus vaccine human challenge model. Additional antiviral candidates with differing mechanisms of action continue to be profiled and evaluated preclinically with the goal of having 2 antivirals available for use in combination to treat iVDPV excreters. PMID:25316866

  20. Framework for evaluating the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis after global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, R. Bruce; Cochi, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    With the interruption of wild poliovirus transmission globally, the need for new policies to deal with the post-certification era will rapidly arise. New policies will be required in four areas: detection and notification of circulating polioviruses; biocontainment of wild, vaccine-derived and attenuated strains of poliovirus; vaccine stockpiles and response mechanisms; and routine immunization against polioviruses. A common understanding of the potential risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification period is essential to the development of these policies. Since 2000, there has been increasing international consensus that the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification era fall into two categories: those due to the continued use of the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and those due to future improper handling of wild polioviruses. The specific risks within both categories have now been defined, and an understanding of the frequency and potential burden of disease associated with each is rapidly improving. This knowledge and clarity have provided a framework that is already proving valuable for identifying research priorities and discussing potential policy options with national authorities. However, this framework must be regarded as a dynamic tool, requiring regular updating as additional information on these risks becomes available through further scientific research, programmatic work, and policy decisions. PMID:15106299

  1. Future of Polio Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary Over the past half-century, global use of highly effective vaccines against poliomyelitis brought this disease to the brink of elimination. Mounting evidence argues that a high level of population immunity must be maintained to preserve a polio-free status of the entire world after wild poliovirus circulation is stopped. Shifting factors in the risk-benefit-cost equation favor the creation of new poliovirus vaccines to be used in the foreseeable future. Genetically stable attenuated virus strains could be developed for an improved oral poliovirus vaccine, but proving their safety and efficacy would be impractical because of the enormous size of the clinical trials required. New versions of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) that could be used globally should be developed. An improved IPV must be efficacious, inexpensive, safe to manufacture, and easy to administer. Combination products containing IPV along with other protective antigens should become part of routine childhood immunizations around the world. PMID:19545205

  2. Molecular Properties of Poliovirus Isolates: Nucleotide Sequence Analysis, Typing by PCR and Real-Time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Burns, Cara C; Kilpatrick, David R; Iber, Jane C; Chen, Qi; Kew, Olen M

    2016-01-01

    Virologic surveillance is essential to the success of the World Health Organization initiative to eradicate poliomyelitis. Molecular methods have been used to detect polioviruses in tissue culture isolates derived from stool samples obtained through surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. This chapter describes the use of realtime PCR assays to identify and serotype polioviruses. In particular, a degenerate, inosine-containing, panpoliovirus (panPV) PCR primer set is used to distinguish polioviruses from NPEVs. The high degree of nucleotide sequence diversity among polioviruses presents a challenge to the systematic design of nucleic acid-based reagents. To accommodate the wide variability and rapid evolution of poliovirus genomes, degenerate codon positions on the template were matched to mixed-base or deoxyinosine residues on both the primers and the TaqMan™ probes. Additional assays distinguish between Sabin vaccine strains and non-Sabin strains. This chapter also describes the use of generic poliovirus specific primers, along with degenerate and inosine-containing primers, for routine VP1 sequencing of poliovirus isolates. These primers, along with nondegenerate serotype-specific Sabin primers, can also be used to sequence individual polioviruses in mixtures. PMID:26983735

  3. Annual report of the Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory, 2009.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Hobday, Linda; Polychronopoulos, Sophie; Ibrahim, Aishah; Thorley, Bruce R

    2010-09-01

    The Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory (NPRL) is accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the testing of faecal specimens from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases and operates as a regional poliovirus reference laboratory for the Western Pacific Region. The NPRL, in collaboration with the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, co-ordinates surveillance for cases of AFP in children in Australia, according to criteria recommended by the WHO. Specimens are referred from AFP cases in children and suspected cases of poliomyelitis in persons of any age. The WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator is 1 non-polio AFP case per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. In 2009, the Polio Expert Committee classified 48 cases as non-polio AFP, a rate of 1.17 cases per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. An additional WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator is that more than 80% of notified AFP cases have 2 faecal samples collected 24 hours apart and within 14 days of onset of paralysis. Adequate faecal samples were received from 16 (33.3%) of the 48 classified cases. A poliovirus was referred via the Enterovirus Reference Laboratory Network of Australia from a non-AFP case and was determined to be Sabin-like. This case most likely represents an importation event, the source of which was not identified, as Australia ceased using Sabin oral polio vaccine in 2005. The last report of a wild poliovirus importation in Australia was from Pakistan in 2007. In 2009, 1,604 wild poliovirus cases were reported in 23 countries with Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan remaining endemic for poliomyelitis. PMID:21090182

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Poliovirus Sequences.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomic sequencing is a major surveillance tool in the Polio Laboratory Network. Due to the rapid evolution of polioviruses (~1 % per year), pathways of virus transmission can be reconstructed from the pathways of genomic evolution. Here, we describe three main phylogenetic methods; estimation of genetic distances, reconstruction of a maximum-likelihood (ML) tree, and estimation of substitution rates using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The data set used consists of complete capsid sequences from a survey of poliovirus sequences available in GenBank. PMID:26983737

  5. Assessment of attitudes towards adverse events following immunization with oral poliovirus vaccine: a pilot study among high school students of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kinuani, Léon; Nzolo, Didier Bomene; Aloni, Michel Ntetani; Makolo, Pavel; Ntamabyaliro, Nsengi; Ntamba, Yves Lula; Kazadi, Crispin; Nyembwe, Michel; Ekila, Mathilde Bothale; Mesia, Gauthier Kahunu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the reaction of students to adverse events following immunization in order to offer a baseline for developing a communication and risk management plan. Method: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in Kinshasa. A survey was conducted between the third and the fourth rounds of Supplementary Immunization Activity. Nine hundred and fifty questionnaires were used and addressed students who attended this university from 1 to 10 June 2011. Results: Completed questionnaires were received from 848 students, with 485 females (57.2%), 343 males (40.4%), and 20 unknown (2.4%); 46.9% of students were from the faculty of medicine and 24.7% was from the third graduate degree. From those who completed the questionnaire, 136 (16.4%) reported experiencing an adverse events following immunization. Concerning the attitude of students towards adverse events following immunization, 79 students (58.5%) did nothing; 54 (40.0%) opted for self-medication; 2 (1.5%) went to the hospital. Conclusion: The main finding of our study is the low rate of people referring to health-care providers for vaccine-related problems, more specially for adverse events following immunization. A risk management plan should be focused in strategies to increase communication between population and health-care providers. PMID:25237792

  6. Poliomyelitis in the United States: A Historical Perspective and Current Vaccination Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farizo, Karen M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines poliomyelitis in the United States by reviewing clinical manifestations and outcomes, history, recent epidemiologic characteristics, characteristics of currently available vaccines, controversies surrounding vaccination policy, current poliovirus vaccination recommendations, and prospects for worldwide eradication. Poliomyelitis remains…

  7. Innovative IPV from attenuated Sabin poliovirus or newly designed alternative seed strains.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Ahd; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2012-11-01

    This article gives an overview of the patent literature related to innovative inactivated polio vaccine (i-IPV) based on using Sabin poliovirus strains and newly developed alternative recombinant poliovirus strains. This innovative approach for IPV manufacturing is considered to attribute to the requirement for affordable IPV in the post-polio-eradication era, which is on the horizon. Although IPV is a well-established vaccine, the number of patent applications in this field was seen to have significantly increased in the past decade. Currently, regular IPV appears to be too expensive for universal use. Future affordability may be achieved by using alternative cell lines, alternative virus seed strains, improved and optimized processes, dose sparing, or the use of adjuvants. A relatively short-term option to achieve cost-price reduction is to work on regular IPV, using wild-type poliovirus strains, or on Sabin-IPV, based on using attenuated poliovirus strains. This price reduction can be achieved by introducing efficiency in processing. There are also multiple opportunities to work on dose sparing, for example, by using adjuvants or fractional doses. Renewed interest in this field was clearly reflected in the number and diversity of patent applications. In a later stage, several innovative approaches may become even more attractive, for example the use of recombinant virus strains or even a totally synthetic vaccine. Currently, such work is mainly carried out by research institutes and universities and therefore clinical data are not available. PMID:24236927

  8. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Glynis; Klapsa, Dimitra; Wilton, Thomas; Stone, Lindsay; Minor, Philip D.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post-eradication era. PMID:26313548

  9. Identification and Manipulation of the Molecular Determinants Influencing Poliovirus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Runckel, Charles; Westesson, Oscar; Andino, Raul; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    The control and prevention of communicable disease is directly impacted by the genetic mutability of the underlying etiological agents. In the case of RNA viruses, genetic recombination may impact public health by facilitating the generation of new viral strains with altered phenotypes and by compromising the genetic stability of live attenuated vaccines. The landscape of homologous recombination within a given RNA viral genome is thought to be influenced by several factors; however, a complete understanding of the genetic determinants of recombination is lacking. Here, we utilize gene synthesis and deep sequencing to create a detailed recombination map of the poliovirus 1 coding region. We identified over 50 thousand breakpoints throughout the genome, and we show the majority of breakpoints to be concentrated in a small number of specific “hotspots,” including those associated with known or predicted RNA secondary structures. Nucleotide base composition was also found to be associated with recombination frequency, suggesting that recombination is modulated across the genome by predictable and alterable motifs. We tested the predictive utility of the nucleotide base composition association by generating an artificial hotspot in the poliovirus genome. Our results imply that modification of these motifs could be extended to whole genome re-designs for the development of recombination-deficient, genetically stable live vaccine strains. PMID:23408891

  10. Environmental surveillance of poliovirus and non-polio enterovirus in urban sewage in Dakar, Senegal (2007-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Abdou Kader; Diop, Pape Amadou Mbathio; Diop, Ousmane Madiagne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Global poliomyelitis eradication initiative relies on (i) laboratory based surveillance of acute flaccid surveillance (AFP) to monitor the circulation of wild poliovirus in a population, and (ii) vaccination to prevent its diffusion. However, as poliovirus can survive in the environment namely in sewage, environmental surveillance (ES) is of growing importance as the eradication target is close. This study aimed to assess polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses circulation in sewage drains covering a significant population of Dakar. Methods From April 2007 to May 2013, 271 specimens of raw sewage were collected using the grab method in 6 neighborhoods of Dakar. Samples were processed to extract and concentrate viruses using polyethylene glycol and Dextran (two-phase separation method). Isolation of enteroviruses was attempted in RD, L20B and Hep2 cell lines. Polioviruses were identified by RT-PCR and Elisa. Non Polio Enteroviruses (NPEVs) were identified by RT-PCR and microneutralisation tests. Results Polioviruses and NPEVs were respectively detected in 34,3% and 42,8% sewage samples. No wild poliovirus neither circulating vaccine-derived Poliovirus (cVDPV) was detected. Neutralization assays have identified 49 non polio enteroviruses that were subsequently classified in 13 serotypes belonging to HEV-A (22, 4%), HEV-B (12, 24%), HEV-C (26, 53%) and HEV-D (6, 12%) species. Conclusion This study is the first documentation of enteroviruses environmental detection in Senegal. It shows the usefulness of environmental surveillance for indirect monitoring of the circulation and distribution of enteroviruses in the community. PMID:25848458

  11. Safety and reactogenicity of the combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTPa-IPV/Hib) vaccine in healthy Vietnamese toddlers: An open-label, phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Anh, Dang Duc; Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Karkada, Naveen; Assudani, Deepak; Yu, Ta-Wen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    abstract The introduction of combination vaccines plays a significant role in increasing vaccine acceptance and widening vaccine coverage. Primary vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis and Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) diseases has been implemented in Vietnam. In this study we evaluated the safety and reactogenicity of combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-inactivated polio (DTPa-IPV)/Hib vaccine when administered as a booster dose in 300 healthy Vietnamese children <2 years of age (mean age: 15.8 months). During the 4-day follow-up period, pain (31.7%) and redness (27.3%) were the most frequent solicited local symptoms. Pain (2%) was also the most frequent grade 3 local symptom. One subject reported 2 serious adverse events that were not causally related to the study vaccine. DTPa-IPV/Hib conjugate vaccine was well tolerated as a booster dose in healthy Vietnamese children aged <2 years. PMID:26337197

  12. Safety and reactogenicity of the combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTPa-IPV/Hib) vaccine in healthy Vietnamese toddlers: An open-label, phase III study.

    PubMed

    Anh, Dang Duc; Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Karkada, Naveen; Assudani, Deepak; Yu, Ta-Wen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of combination vaccines plays a significant role in increasing vaccine acceptance and widening vaccine coverage. Primary vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis and Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) diseases has been implemented in Vietnam. In this study we evaluated the safety and reactogenicity of combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-inactivated polio (DTPa-IPV)/Hib vaccine when administered as a booster dose in 300 healthy Vietnamese children <2 years of age (mean age: 15.8 months). During the 4-day follow-up period, pain (31.7%) and redness (27.3%) were the most frequent solicited local symptoms. Pain (2%) was also the most frequent grade 3 local symptom. One subject reported 2 serious adverse events that were not causally related to the study vaccine. DTPa-IPV/Hib conjugate vaccine was well tolerated as a booster dose in healthy Vietnamese children aged <2 years. PMID:26337197

  13. A poliovirus hybrid expressing a neutralization epitope from the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is highly immunogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Murdin, A D; Su, H; Manning, D S; Klein, M H; Parnell, M J; Caldwell, H D

    1993-01-01

    Trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases caused by Chlamydia trachomatis are major health problems worldwide. Epitopes on the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis have been identified as important targets for the development of vaccines. In order to examine the immunogenicity of a recombinant vector expressing a chlamydial epitope, a poliovirus hybrid was constructed in which part of neutralization antigenic site I of poliovirus type 1 Mahoney (PV1-M) was replaced by a sequence from variable domain I of the MOMP of C. trachomatis serovar A. The chlamydial sequence included the neutralization epitope VAGLEK. This hybrid was viable, grew very well compared with PV1-M, and expressed both poliovirus and chlamydial antigenic determinants. When inoculated into rabbits, this hybrid was highly immunogenic, inducing a strong response against both PV1-M and C. trachomatis serovar A. Antichlamydia titers were 10- to 100-fold higher than the titers induced by equimolar amounts of either purified MOMP or a synthetic peptide expressing the VAGLEK epitope. Furthermore, rabbit antisera raised against this hybrid neutralized chlamydial infectivity both in vitro, for hamster kidney cells, and passively in vivo, for conjunctival epithelia of cynomolgus monkeys. Because poliovirus infection induces a strong mucosal immune response in primates and humans, these results indicate that poliovirus-chlamydia hybrids could become powerful tools for the study of mucosal immunity to chlamydial infection and for the development of recombinant chlamydial vaccines. Images PMID:7691749

  14. Inhibition of poliovirus RNA synthesis by brefeldin A.

    PubMed Central

    Maynell, L A; Kirkegaard, K; Klymkowsky, M W

    1992-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that blocks transport of newly synthesized proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, was found to inhibit poliovirus replication 10(5)- to 10(6)-fold. BFA does not inhibit entry of poliovirus into the cell or translation of viral RNA. Poliovirus RNA synthesis, however, is completely inhibited by BFA. A specific class of membranous vesicles, with which the poliovirus replication complex is physically associated, is known to proliferate in poliovirus-infected cells. BFA may inhibit poliovirus replication by preventing the formation of these vesicles. Images PMID:1312615

  15. Alternative administration routes and delivery technologies for polio vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Heleen; van der Stel, Wanda; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Global polio eradication is closer than ever. Replacement of the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) by inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is recommended to achieve complete eradication. Limited global production capacity and relatively high IPV costs compared to OPV spur the need for improved polio vaccines. The target product profile of these vaccines includes not only dose sparing but also high stability, which is important for stockpiling, and easy application important for (emergency) vaccination campaigns. In this review, the current status of alternative polio vaccine delivery strategies is given. Furthermore, we discuss the feasibility of these strategies by highlighting challenges, hurdles to overcome, and formulation issues relevant for optimal vaccine delivery. PMID:26912100

  16. Massive outbreak of poliomyelitis caused by type-3 wild poliovirus in Angola in 1999.

    PubMed Central

    Valente, F.; Otten, M.; Balbina, F.; Van de Weerdt, R.; Chezzi, C.; Eriki, P.; Van-Dúnnen, J.; Bele, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    The largest outbreak of poliomyelitis ever recorded in Africa (1093 cases) occurred from 1 March to 28 May 1999 in Luanda, Angola, and in surrounding areas. The outbreak was caused primarily by a type-3 wild poliovirus, although type-1 wild poliovirus was circulating in the outbreak area at the same time. Infected individuals ranged in age from 2 months to 22 years; 788 individuals (72%) were younger than 3 years. Of the 590 individuals whose vaccination status was known, 23% had received no vaccine and 54% had received fewer than three doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). The major factors that contributed to this outbreak were as follows: massive displacement of unvaccinated persons to urban settings; low routine OPV coverage; inaccessible populations during the previous three national immunization days (NIDs); and inadequate sanitation. This outbreak indicates the urgent need to improve accessibility to all children during NIDs and the dramatic impact that war can have by displacing persons and impeding access to routine immunizations. The period immediately after an outbreak provides an enhanced opportunity to eradicate poliomyelitis. If continuous access in all districts for acute flaccid paralysis surveillance and supplemental immunizations cannot be assured, the current war in Angola may threaten global poliomyelitis eradication. PMID:10812730

  17. Hematopoietic Cancer Cell Lines Can Support Replication of Sabin Poliovirus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    van Eikenhorst, Gerco; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Pol, Leo A.; Bakker, Wilfried A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Viral vaccines can be produced in adherent or in suspension cells. The objective of this work was to screen human suspension cell lines for the capacity to support viral replication. As the first step, it was investigated whether poliovirus can replicate in such cell lines. Sabin poliovirus type 1 was serially passaged on five human cell lines, HL60, K562, KG1, THP-1, and U937. Sabin type 1 was capable of efficiently replicating in three cell lines (K562, KG1, and U937), yielding high viral titers after replication. Expression of CD155, the poliovirus receptor, did not explain susceptibility to replication, since all cell lines expressed CD155. Furthermore, we showed that passaged virus replicated more efficiently than parental virus in KG1 cells, yielding higher virus titers in the supernatant early after infection. Infection of cell lines at an MOI of 0.01 resulted in high viral titers in the supernatant at day 4. Infection of K562 with passaged Sabin type 1 in a bioreactor system yielded high viral titers in the supernatant. Altogether, these data suggest that K562, KG1, and U937 cell lines are useful for propagation of poliovirus. PMID:25815312

  18. Battle against poliovirus in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-11-01

    On 22 Feb 2013, the Polio Monitoring Cell of Pakistan announced that the 2012-2013 polio campaign ended, and that 1.6 million children could not be vaccinated due to security concerns in several regions where polio workers had been killed. Those who could not be vaccinated included 50,000 children from the Federally Administrated Tribal Area (FATA), 150,000 form Khyber Pakhtoon Khao, 400,000 from a Quetta, 400,000 from Karachi, and a small number from the Rawalpindi District. These statistics are worrying, as several districts in the large metropolitan cities of Karachi and Quetta were also excluded. The fear of advanced medicine, ideas, or complex devices is a new phenomenon in many conservative and poor countries such as Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sudan, and Somalia. To safeguard the safety of the rest of the world, the failure in the implementation of WHO guidelines for vaccination must be regulated by the UN. There are a number of reasons for the phobias surrounding vaccination, but as technology continues to evolve at such a rapid rate, those with self-determined ideologies cannot cope with such advances. They become vocal to gain popularity and prevent the use of these technologies and medicine by creating and spreading rumors and propaganda of expediency. The struggle to vaccinate children is not easily understood by anyone living in the developed world. The irrational fear of vaccines and the lack of vaccination pose a serious global health risk and must be curbed through a wide variety of pro-vaccination media and religious campaigns. PMID:24240051

  19. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  20. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  1. Poliovirus: Generation and Characterization of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Cecily P.; Strings, Vanessa R.; Schulte, Michael B.; Andino, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is the prototypical picornavirus. It is a non-enveloped RNA virus with a small (~7.5 kb) genome of positive polarity. cDNA clones of several strains are available, and infectious virus can be produced by the transfection of in vitro transcribed viral genomes into an appropriate host cell. The ease of genetic studies in poliovirus is a primary reason that it has long served as a model to study RNA virus biology, pathogenesis, and evolution. Protocols for the generation and characterization of PV mutants are presented. A separate unit concerning the production, propagation, quantification, and purification of PV will also be presented. PMID:23686829

  2. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Relationship of Wild Type 1 Poliovirus Strains Circulating across Pakistan and Afghanistan Bordering Areas during 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Sharif, Salmaan; Khurshid, Adnan; Malik, Farzana; Rehman, Lubna; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2014-01-01

    Pakistan and Afghanistan share a long uncontrolled border with extensive population movement on both sides. Wild poliovirus transmission has never been interrupted in this block due to war against terrorism, poor public health infrastructure, misconceptions about polio vaccines and inadequate immunization activities. All these issues complicate the eradication operations and reinforce the complexity of wiping out poliomyelitis from this region. This study illustrates the origins and routes of cross-border wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) transmission during 2010–2012 between Pakistan and Afghanistan. Sequence analyses were conducted based on complete VP1 capsid protein sequences for WPV1 study strains to determine the origin of poliovirus genetic lineages and their evolutionary relationships. Phylogenetic tree was constructed from VP1 gene sequences applying Maximum Likelihood method using Kimura 2- parameter model in MEGA program v 5.0. A total of 72 (14.3%) out of 502 wild-type 1 polioviruses were found circulating in border areas of both countries during 2010–2012. Molecular phylogenetic analysis classified these strains in to two sub-genotypes with four clusters and 18 lineages. Genetic data confirmed that the most of WPV1 lineages (12; 66.6%) were transmitted from Pakistan to Afghanistan. However, the genetic diversity was significantly reduced during 2012 as most of the lineages were completely eliminated. In conclusion, Pakistan-Afghanistan block has emerged as a single poliovirus reservoir sharing the multiple poliovirus lineages due to uncontrolled movement of people across the borders between two countries. If it is neglected, it can jeopardize the extensive global efforts done so-far to eradicate the poliovirus infection. Our data will be helpful to devise the preventive strategies for effective control of wild poliovirus transmission in this region. PMID:25229826

  3. Predictive spatial risk model of poliovirus to aid prioritization and hasten eradication in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the challenges facing the Global Polio Eradication Initiative is efficiently directing limited resources, such as specially trained personnel, community outreach activities, and satellite vaccinator tracking, to the most at-risk areas to maximize the impact of interventions. A validated predictive model of wild poliovirus circulation would greatly inform prioritization efforts by accurately forecasting areas at greatest risk, thus enabling the greatest effect of program interventions. Methods Using Nigerian acute flaccid paralysis surveillance data from 2004-2013, we developed a spatial hierarchical Poisson hurdle model fitted within a Bayesian framework to study historical polio caseload patterns and forecast future circulation of type 1 and 3 wild poliovirus within districts in Nigeria. A Bayesian temporal smoothing model was applied to address data sparsity underlying estimates of covariates at the district level. Results We find that calculated vaccine-derived population immunity is significantly negatively associated with the probability and number of wild poliovirus case(s) within a district. Recent case information is significantly positively associated with probability of a case, but not the number of cases. We used lagged indicators and coefficients from the fitted models to forecast reported cases in the subsequent six-month periods. Over the past three years, the average predictive ability is 86 ± 2% and 85 ± 4% for wild poliovirus type 1 and 3, respectively. Interestingly, the predictive accuracy of historical transmission patterns alone is equivalent (86 ± 2% and 84 ± 4% for type 1 and 3, respectively). We calculate uncertainty in risk ranking to inform assessments of changes in rank between time periods. Conclusions The model developed in this study successfully predicts districts at risk for future wild poliovirus cases in Nigeria. The highest predicted district risk was 12.8 WPV1 cases in 2006, while the lowest district risk

  4. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  5. Development and consideration of global policies for managing the future risks of poliovirus outbreaks: insights and lessons learned through modeling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J; Pallansch, Mark A; Kew, Olen M; Sutter, Roland W; Aylward, R Bruce; Watkins, Margaret; Gary, Howard; Alexander, James P; Venczel, Linda; Johnson, Denise; Cáceres, Victor M; Sangrujee, Nalinee; Jafari, Hamid; Cochi, Stephen L

    2006-12-01

    The success of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative promises to bring large benefits, including sustained improvements in quality of life (i.e., cases of paralytic disease and deaths avoided) and costs saved from cessation of vaccination. Obtaining and maintaining these benefits requires that policymakers manage the transition from the current massive use of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) to a world without OPV and free of the risks of potential future reintroductions of live polioviruses. This article describes the analytical journey that began in 2001 with a retrospective case study on polio risk management and led to development of dynamic integrated risk, economic, and decision analysis tools to inform global policies for managing the risks of polio. This analytical journey has provided several key insights and lessons learned that will be useful to future analysts involved in similar complex decision-making processes. PMID:17184398

  6. Transgenic mice carrying the human poliovirus receptor: new animal models for study of poliovirus neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Horie, H; Koike, S; Kurata, T; Sato-Yoshida, Y; Ise, I; Ota, Y; Abe, S; Hioki, K; Kato, H; Taya, C

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant viruses between the virulent Mahoney and attenuated Sabin 1 strains of poliovirus type 1 were subjected to neurovirulence tests using a transgenic (Tg) mouse line, ICR-PVRTg1, that carried the human poliovirus receptor gene. The Tg mice were inoculated intracerebrally with these recombinant viruses and observed for clinical signs, histopathological lesions, and viral antigens as parameters of neurovirulence of the viruses. These parameters observed in the Tg mice were different for different inoculated viruses. Dose-dependent incidences of paralysis and of death were observed in the Tg mice inoculated with any viruses used. This indicates that values of 50% lethal dose are useful to score a wide range of neurovirulence of poliovirus. The neurovirulence of individual viruses estimated by the Tg mouse model had a strong correlation with those estimated by monkey model. Consequently, the mouse tests identified the neurovirulence determinants on the genome of poliovirus that had been identified by monkey tests. In addition, the mouse tests revealed new neurovirulence determinants, that is, different nucleotides between the two strains at positions 189 and 21 and/or 935 in the 5'-proximal 1,122 nucleotides. The Tg mice used in this study may be suitable for replacing monkeys for investigating poliovirus neurovirulence. Images PMID:8289371

  7. Environmental Surveillance of Polioviruses in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in Support to the Activities of Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Pereira, Joseane Simone; da Silva, Lidiane Rodrigues; de Meireles Nunes, Amanda; de Souza Oliveira, Silas; da Costa, Eliane Veiga; da Silva, Edson Elias

    2016-03-01

    Wild polioviruses still remain endemic in three countries (Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria) and re-emergency of wild polio has been reported in previously polio-free countries. Environmental surveillance has been used as a supplementary tool in monitoring the circulation of wild poliovirus (PVs) and/or vaccine-derived PVs even in the absence of acute flaccid paralysis cases. This study aimed to monitor the presence of polioviruses in wastewater samples collected at one wastewater treatment plant located in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From December 2011 to June 2012 and from September to December 2012, 31 samples were collected and processed. RD and L20B cell cultures were able to isolate PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in 27/31 samples. Polioviruses were isolated in eight samples (type 1 Sabin = 1, type 2 Sabin = 5, and type 3 Sabin = 2). Vaccine-derived polioviruses were not detected nor evidence of recombination with other PVs or non-polio enterovirus serotypes were observed among the isolates. The Sabin-related serotypes 2 and 3 presented nucleotide substitutions in positions associated with the neurovirulent phenotype at the 5'-UTR. Changes in important Amino acid residues at VP1 were also observed in the serotypes 2 and 3. Environmental surveillance has been used successfully in monitoring the circulation of PVs and non-polio enteroviruses and it is of crucial importance in the final stages of the WHO global polio eradication initiative. Our results show the continuous circulation of Sabin-like PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in the analyzed area during the study period. PMID:26538420

  8. S2M: A Stochastic Simulation Model of Poliovirus Genetic State Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ecale Zhou, Carol L.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the molecular mechanisms that govern genetic variation can be useful in understanding the dynamics that drive genetic state transition in quasispecies viruses. For example, there is considerable interest in understanding how the relatively benign vaccine strains of poliovirus eventually revert to forms that confer neurovirulence and cause disease (ie, vaccine-derived poliovirus). This report describes a stochastic simulation model, S2M, which can be used to generate hypothetical outcomes based on known mechanisms of genetic diversity. S2M begins with predefined genotypes based on the Sabin-1 and Mahoney wild-type sequences, constructs a set of independent cell-based populations, and performs in-cell replication and cell-to-cell infection cycles while quantifying genetic changes that track the transition from Sabin-1 toward Mahoney. Realism is incorporated into the model by assigning defaults for variables that constrain mechanisms of genetic variability based roughly on metrics reported in the literature, yet these values can be modified at the command line in order to generate hypothetical outcomes driven by these parameters. To demonstrate the utility of S2M, simulations were performed to examine the effects of the rates of replication error and recombination and the presence or absence of defective interfering particles, upon reaching the end states of Mahoney resemblance (semblance of a vaccine-derived state), neurovirulence, genome fitness, and cloud diversity. Simulations provide insight into how modeled biological features may drive hypothetical outcomes, independently or in combination, in ways that are not always intuitively obvious. PMID:27385911

  9. Viral Aetiology of Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance Cases, before and after Vaccine Policy Change from Oral Polio Vaccine to Inactivated Polio Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathy Subramaniam, T. S.; Apandi, Mohd Apandi; Jahis, Rohani; Samsudin, Mohd Samsul; Saat, Zainah

    2014-01-01

    Since 1992, surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases was introduced in Malaysia along with the establishment of the National Poliovirus Laboratory at the Institute for Medical Research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, approved a vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). Eight states started using IPV in the Expanded Immunization Programme, followed by the remaining states in January 2010. The objective of this study was to determine the viral aetiology of AFP cases below 15 years of age, before and after vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine. One hundred and seventy-nine enteroviruses were isolated from the 3394 stool specimens investigated between 1992 and December 2012. Fifty-six out of 107 virus isolates were polioviruses and the remaining were non-polio enteroviruses. Since 2009 after the sequential introduction of IPV in the childhood immunization programme, no Sabin polioviruses were isolated from AFP cases. In 2012, the laboratory AFP surveillance was supplemented with environmental surveillance with sewage sampling. Thirteen Sabin polioviruses were also isolated from sewage in the same year, but no vaccine-derived poliovirus was detected during this period. PMID:24772175

  10. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  11. Failure to detect infection by oral polio vaccine virus following natural exposure among inactivated polio vaccine recipients

    PubMed Central

    GARY, H. E.; SMITH, B.; JENKS, J.; RUIZ, J.; SESSIONS, W.; VINJE, J.; SOBSEY, M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY While oral polio vaccine (OPV) has been shown to be safe and effective, it has been observed that it can circulate within a susceptible population and revert to a virulent form. Inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) confers protection from paralytic disease, but provides limited protection against infection. It is possible, then, that an IPV-immunized population, when exposed to OPV, could sustain undetected circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus. This study examines the possibility of polio vaccine virus circulating within the United States (highly IPV-immunized) population that borders Mexico (OPV-immunized). A total of 653 stool and 20 sewage samples collected on the US side of the border were tested for the presence of poliovirus. All samples were found to be negative. These results suggest that the risk of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus is low in fully immunized IPV-using populations in developed countries that border OPV-using populations. PMID:17376256

  12. Development of a poliovirus neutralization test with poliovirus pseudovirus for measurement of neutralizing antibody titer in human serum.

    PubMed

    Arita, Minetaro; Iwai, Masae; Wakita, Takaji; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    In the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, laboratory diagnosis plays a critical role by isolating and identifying poliovirus (PV) from the stool samples from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases. In recent years, reestablishment of PV circulation in countries where PV was previously eliminated has occurred because of decreased herd immunity, possibly due to poor vaccination coverage. To monitor the vulnerability of countries to PV circulation, surveillance of neutralizing-antibody titers against PV in susceptible populations is essential in the end game of the polio eradication program. In this study, we have developed a PV neutralization test with type 1, 2, and 3 PV pseudoviruses to determine the neutralizing-antibody titer against PV in human serum samples. With this test, the neutralizing-antibody titer against PV could be determined within 2 days by automated interpretation of luciferase signals without using infectious PV strains. We validated the pseudovirus PV neutralization test with 131 human serum samples collected from a wide range of age groups (ages 1 to >60 years) by comparison with a conventional neutralization test. We found good correlation in the neutralizing-antibody titers determined by these tests. These results suggest that a pseudovirus PV neutralization test would serve as a safe and simple procedure for the measurement of the neutralizing-antibody titer against PV. PMID:21880850

  13. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  14. Risk assessment, risk management and risk-based monitoring following a reported accidental release of poliovirus in Belgium, September to November 2014.

    PubMed

    Duizer, Erwin; Rutjes, Saskia; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Schijven, Jack

    2016-01-01

    On 6 September 2014, the accidental release of 10(13) infectious wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3) particles by a vaccine production plant in Belgium was reported. WPV3 was released into the sewage system and discharged directly to a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and subsequently into rivers that flowed to the Western Scheldt and the North Sea. No poliovirus was detected in samples from the WWTP, surface waters, mussels or sewage from the Netherlands. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) showed that the infection risks resulting from swimming in Belgium waters were above 50% for several days and that the infection risk by consuming shellfish harvested in the eastern part of the Western Scheldt warranted a shellfish cooking advice. We conclude that the reported release of WPV3 has neither resulted in detectable levels of poliovirus in any of the samples nor in poliovirus circulation in the Netherlands. This QMRA showed that relevant data on water flows were not readily available and that prior assumptions on dilution factors were overestimated. A QMRA should have been performed by all vaccine production facilities before starting up large-scale culture of WPV to be able to implement effective interventions when an accident happens. PMID:27020766

  15. Seroimmunity to polioviruses in U.S. Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Burke, D S; Gaydos, J C; Hodder, R A; Bancroft, W H

    1979-02-01

    Titers of neutralizing antibody to poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 were determined for serum specimens obtained from 268 U.S. Army recruits. Among those tested, 20.9% lacked neutralizing antibody to one or more types of poliovirus, and 1.1% lacked antibody to all three types. An analysis of demographic data showed that age of less than 18 years, schooling for less than 10 years, and residence in the northeastern United States were associated with higher percentages of recruits lacking neutralizing antibodies to polioviruses in serum. PMID:220335

  16. Concentration and purification of poliovirus by ultrafiltration and isopycnic centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Guskey, L E; Wolff, D A

    1972-07-01

    A method is described by which poliovirus can be rapidly and simply concentrated by the use of a Diaflo XM-50 ultrafilter membrane. Freon-extracted ultrafilter concentrates banded in CsCl provided a 1,724-fold volumetric concentration of poliovirus. During concentration, trypsin-digested cellular material can pass through the ultrafilter membrane, thus providing a versatile means of degrading and eliminating extraneous contaminating proteins. The ultrafilter concentration system is compared with the CsCl cushion system of poliovirus concentration, and both systems are further compared by banding virus and virus capsid material in CsCl by use of isopycnic centrifugation. PMID:4341520

  17. Construction and characterization of poliovirus subgenomic replicons.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G; Racaniello, V R

    1988-05-01

    Poliovirus RNAs containing in-frame deletions within the capsid-coding region were produced by in vitro transcription of altered poliovirus type 1 cDNA by using bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Three RNAs were transcribed that contained deletions of 2,317 nucleotides (bases 747 to 3064), 1,781 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,956), and 1,295 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,470). All three subgenomic RNAs replicated after transfection into HeLa cells, demonstrating that sequences encoding the capsid polypeptides are not essential for viral RNA replication in vivo. Viral RNA containing the largest deletion (R1) replicated approximately three times better than full-length RNA produced in vitro. Northern blot (RNA blot) hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA from HeLa cells at different times after transfection with R1 demonstrated the presence of increasing amounts of the expected 5.1-kilobase subgenomic RNA. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of viral proteins induced after transfection of R1 RNA into HeLa cells revealed the presence of proteins 2Apro, 2C, and 3Dpol and its precursors, suggesting that the polyprotein cleavages are similar to those occurring in virus-infected cells. Replication of P2/Lansing virion RNA was inhibited by cotransfection with the R1 replicon, as demonstrated by hybridization analysis with a serotype-specific oligonucleotide probe. A higher level of inhibition of RNA replication was observed when P2/Lansing RNA was cotransfected into HeLa cells with truncated R1 transcripts (R1-PvuII) that were missing 395 3' nucleotides and a poly(A) tail. These internally and terminally deleted RNAs inhibited the replication of subgenomic replicons R1, R2, and R3 and caused a reduction in plaque size when cotransfected with P1/Mahoney or P2/Lansing viral RNA, suggesting that individual cells had received both RNAs. No inhibition of plaque size was observed when replicon RNAs were used that were missing 1,384 or 1,839 3' nucleotides or contained plasmid

  18. History of polio vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Baicus, Anda

    2012-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is an acute paralytic disease caused by three poliovirus (PV) serotypes. Less than 1% of PV infections result in acute flaccid paralysis. The disease was controlled using the formalin-inactivated Salk polio vaccine (IPV) and the Sabin oral polio vaccine (OPV). Global poliomyelitis eradication was proposed in 1988 by the World Health Organization to its member states. The strategic plan established the activities required for polio eradication, certification for regions, OPV cessation phase and post-OPV phase. OPV is the vaccine of choice for the poliomyelitis eradication program because it induces both a systemic and mucosal immune response. The major risks of OPV vaccination are the appearance of Vaccine-Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis cases (VAPP) and the emergence of Vaccine Derived Polioviruses strains. The supplementary immunization with monovalent strains of OPV type 1 or type 3 or with a new bivalent oral polio vaccine bOPV (containing type 1 and type 3 PV) has been introduced in those regions where the virus has been difficult to control. Most countries have switched the schedule of vaccination by using IPV instead of OPV because it poses no risk of vaccine-related disease. Until 2008, poliomyelitis was controlled in Romania, an Eastern European country, predominantly using OPV. The alternative vaccination schedule (IPV/OPV) was implemented starting in September 2008, while beginning in 2009, the vaccination was IPV only. The risk of VAPP will disappear worldwide with the cessation of use of OPV. The immunization for polio must be maintained for at least 5 to 10 years using IPV. PMID:24175215

  19. WHO collaborative studies on poliovirus type 3 strains isolated during the 1968 poliomyelitis epidemic in Poland.

    PubMed

    Melnick, J L; Berencsi, G; Biberi-Moroeanu, S; Combiescu, A A; Furesz, J; Kantoch, M; Kostrzewski, J; Magrath, D I; Perkins, F T; Vonka, V; Cockburn, W C; Dömök, I; Assaad, F A

    1972-01-01

    In 1968 in Poland an extensive outbreak of poliomyelitis, caused by type 3 poliovirus, began about four months after small vaccine trials with the Leon 12a(1)b (Sabin) and USOL-D bac vaccine strains had been carried out. Because of the temporal association, and because the first cases appeared in the province in which the USOL-D vaccine trial was carried out, a detailed investigation of the strains isolated from cases in the epidemic was made in four laboratories in an attempt to determine whether they were related to the two vaccine strains or to a "wild" strain. All the studies were made under code. The rct marker was of no help in determining the relationship of the epidemic strains to the vaccine strains. The McBride test and the elution marker test clearly separated the Leon 12a(1)b strains from those from the cases, but were incapable of detecting whether the epidemic strains were related to the USOL-D bac strain or to wild type 3 strains. Thus the studies did not provide valid information on the origin of the epidemic. PMID:4346582

  20. Exploring the fitness landscape of poliovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Acevedo, Ashely; Andino, Raul; Tang, Chao

    2012-02-01

    RNA viruses are known to display extraordinary adaptation capabilities to different environments, due to high mutation rates. Their very dynamical evolution is captured by the quasispecies concept, according to which the viral population forms a swarm of genetic variants linked through mutation, which cooperatively interact at a functional level and collectively contribute to the characteristics of the population. The description of the viral fitness landscape becomes paramount towards a more thorough understanding of the virus evolution and spread. The high mutation rate, together with the cooperative nature of the quasispecies, makes it particularly challenging to explore its fitness landscape. I will present an investigation of the dynamical properties of poliovirus fitness landscape, through both the adoption of new experimental techniques and theoretical models.

  1. Cell-Specific Establishment of Poliovirus Resistance to an Inhibitor Targeting a Cellular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Viktorova, Ekaterina G.; Nchoutmboube, Jules; Ford-Siltz, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is hypothesized that targeting stable cellular factors involved in viral replication instead of virus-specific proteins may raise the barrier for development of resistant mutants, which is especially important for highly adaptable small (+)RNA viruses. However, contrary to this assumption, the accumulated evidence shows that these viruses easily generate mutants resistant to the inhibitors of cellular proteins at least in some systems. We investigated here the development of poliovirus resistance to brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of the cellular protein GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small cellular GTPase Arf1. We found that while resistant viruses can be easily selected in HeLa cells, they do not emerge in Vero cells, in spite that in the absence of the drug both cultures support robust virus replication. Our data show that the viral replication is much more resilient to BFA than functioning of the cellular secretory pathway, suggesting that the role of GBF1 in the viral replication is independent of its Arf activating function. We demonstrate that the level of recruitment of GBF1 to the replication complexes limits the establishment and expression of a BFA resistance phenotype in both HeLa and Vero cells. Moreover, the BFA resistance phenotype of poliovirus mutants is also cell type dependent in different cells of human origin and results in a fitness loss in the form of reduced efficiency of RNA replication in the absence of the drug. Thus, a rational approach to the development of host-targeting antivirals may overcome the superior adaptability of (+)RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Compared to the number of viral diseases, the number of available vaccines is miniscule. For some viruses vaccine development has not been successful after multiple attempts, and for many others vaccination is not a viable option. Antiviral drugs are needed for clinical practice and public health emergencies. However, viruses are highly adaptable and can

  2. Co-Circulation and Evolution of Polioviruses and Species C Enteroviruses in a District of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Guillot, Sophie; Iber, Jane; Balanant, Jean; Blondel, Bruno; Riquet, Franck; Martin, Javier; Kew, Olen; Randriamanalina, Bakolalao; Razafinimpiasa, Lalatiana; Rousset, Dominique; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Between October 2001 and April 2002, five cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) associated with type 2 vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) were reported in the southern province of the Republic of Madagascar. To determine viral factors that favor the emergence of these pathogenic VDPVs, we analyzed in detail their genomic and phenotypic characteristics and compared them with co-circulating enteroviruses. These VDPVs appeared to belong to two independent recombinant lineages with sequences from the type 2 strain of the oral poliovaccine (OPV) in the 5′-half of the genome and sequences derived from unidentified species C enteroviruses (HEV-C) in the 3′-half. VDPV strains showed characteristics similar to those of wild neurovirulent viruses including neurovirulence in poliovirus-receptor transgenic mice. We looked for other VDPVs and for circulating enteroviruses in 316 stools collected from healthy children living in the small area where most of the AFP cases occurred. We found vaccine PVs, two VDPVs similar to those found in AFP cases, some echoviruses, and above all, many serotypes of coxsackie A viruses belonging to HEV-C, with substantial genetic diversity. Several coxsackie viruses A17 and A13 carried nucleotide sequences closely related to the 2C and the 3Dpol coding regions of the VDPVs, respectively. There was also evidence of multiple genetic recombination events among the HEV-C resulting in numerous recombinant genotypes. This indicates that co-circulation of HEV-C and OPV strains is associated with evolution by recombination, resulting in unexpectedly extensive viral diversity in small human populations in some tropical regions. This probably contributed to the emergence of recombinant VDPVs. These findings give further insight into viral ecosystems and the evolutionary processes that shape viral biodiversity. PMID:18085822

  3. Applying the Concept of Peptide Uniqueness to Anti-Polio Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kanduc, Darja; Fasano, Candida; Capone, Giovanni; Pesce Delfino, Antonella; Calabrò, Michele; Polimeno, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although rare, adverse events may associate with anti-poliovirus vaccination thus possibly hampering global polio eradication worldwide. Objective. To design peptide-based anti-polio vaccines exempt from potential cross-reactivity risks and possibly able to reduce rare potential adverse events such as the postvaccine paralytic poliomyelitis due to the tendency of the poliovirus genome to mutate. Methods. Proteins from poliovirus type 1, strain Mahoney, were analyzed for amino acid sequence identity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level, searching for sequences that (1) have zero percent of identity to human proteins, (2) are potentially endowed with an immunologic potential, and (3) are highly conserved among poliovirus strains. Results. Sequence analyses produced a set of consensus epitopic peptides potentially able to generate specific anti-polio immune responses exempt from cross-reactivity with the human host. Conclusion. Peptide sequences unique to poliovirus proteins and conserved among polio strains might help formulate a specific and universal anti-polio vaccine able to react with multiple viral strains and exempt from the burden of possible cross-reactions with human proteins. As an additional advantage, using a peptide-based vaccine instead of current anti-polio DNA vaccines would eliminate the rare post-polio poliomyelitis cases and other disabling symptoms that may appear following vaccination. PMID:26568962

  4. Cellular origin and ultrastructure of membranes induced during poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, A; Giddings, T H; Ladinsky, M S; Kirkegaard, K

    1996-01-01

    Poliovirus RNA replicative complexes are associated with cytoplasmic membranous structures that accumulate during viral infection. These membranes were immunoisolated by using a monoclonal antibody against the viral nonstructural protein 2C. Biochemical analysis of the isolated membranes revealed that several organelles of the host cell (lysosomes, trans-Golgi stack and trans-Golgi network, and endoplasmic reticulum) contributed to the virus-induced membranous structures. Electron microscopy of infected cells preserved by high-pressure freezing revealed that the virus-induced membranes contain double lipid bilayers that surround apparently cytosolic material. Immunolabeling experiments showed that poliovirus proteins 2C and 3D were localized to the same membranes as the cellular markers tested. The morphological and biochemical data are consistent with the hypothesis that autophagy or a similar host process is involved in the formation of the poliovirus-induced membranes. PMID:8794292

  5. Poliovirus protein 2C has ATPase and GTPase activities.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, P L; Carrasco, L

    1993-04-15

    Poliovirus protein 2C belongs to an expanding group of proteins containing a nucleotide binding motif in their sequence. We present evidence that poliovirus 2C has nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activity and binds to RNA. Poliovirus 2C was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with the maltose binding protein (MBP). The fusion protein MBP-2C is efficiently cut by protease Xa within the 2C region. Thus, the fusion protein as such was used to assay for the putative activities of poliovirus 2C. Deletion mutants were constructed which lacked different portions of the 2C carboxyl terminus: mutant 2C delta 1 lacked the last 169 amino acids, whereas mutant 2C delta 2 had the last 74 amino acids deleted. The fusion proteins MBP-2C, MBP-2BC, and the mutant MBP-2C delta 2 that contained the first 255 amino acids of 2C had NTPase activity. Both ATPase and GTPase activities are inhibited by antibodies directed against the MBP-2C protein. Analysis of the ability of the different proteins to bind to labeled RNA indicates that MBP-2C and MBP-2BC form a complex, whereas none of the mutants interacted with RNA, indicating that the RNA binding domain lies beyond amino acid 255. None of the fusion proteins had detectable helicase activity. We suggest that poliovirus protein 2C shows similarities to the GTPases group involved in vesicular traffic and transports the viral RNA replication complexes. These results provide the first experimental evidence that poliovirus protein 2C is an NTPase and that this protein has affinity for nucleic acids. PMID:8385138

  6. Annual report of the Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory, 2008.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Grant, Kristina A; Yoon, Yeon Kyung; Polychronopoulos, Sophie; Ibrahim, Aishah; Thorley, Bruce R

    2009-09-01

    The Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory (NPRL) is accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the testing of stool specimens from cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), a major clinical presentation of poliovirus infection. The NPRL, in collaboration with the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, co-ordinates surveillance for cases of AFP in children in Australia, according to criteria recommended by the WHO. Clinical specimens are referred from AFP cases in children and suspected case of poliomyelitis in persons of any age. The WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator for a polio-free country such as Australia, is 1 non-polio AFP case per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. In 2008, the Polio Expert Committee (PEC) classified 62 cases as non-polio AFP, or 1.51 non-polio AFP cases per 100,000 children aged less than 15 years. Poliovirus infection is confirmed by virus culture of stool specimens from AFP cases as other conditions that present with acute paralysis can mimic polio. While no poliovirus was reported in Australia from any source in 2008, the non-polio enteroviruses echovirus 25, coxsackievirus B2 and echovirus 11 were isolated from stool specimens of AFP cases. The last report of a wild poliovirus in Australia was due to an importation from Pakistan in 2007. With 4 countries remaining endemic for poliomyelitis--Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan--and more than 1,600 confirmed cases of wild poliovirus infection in 18 countries in 2008, Australia continues to be at risk of further importation events. PMID:20043599

  7. Defective Interfering Particles of Poliovirus I. Isolation and Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Charles N.; Smoler, Donna; Wimmer, Eckard; Baltimore, David

    1971-01-01

    A class of defective interfering (DI) poliovirus particles has been identified. The first was found as a contaminant of a viral stock; others have been isolated by serial passage at a high multiplicity of infection. The DI particles are less dense than standard virus and sediment more slowly. Their ribonucleic acid (RNA) sediments more slowly than standard RNA and has a higher electrophoretic mobility. Competition hybridization experiments with double-stranded viral RNA indicate that DI RNA is 80 to 90% of the length of standard RNA. The proteins of DI particles are indistinguishable from those of standard poliovirus. PMID:4329564

  8. Modification of RNA polymerase IIO subspecies after poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, L M; Fernandez-Tomas, C; Dahmus, M E; Gariglio, P

    1987-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells with poliovirus results in a shutdown of host transcription. In an effort to understand the mechanism(s) that underlies this process, we analyzed the distribution of RNA polymerase IIO before and after viral infection. Analysis of free and chromatin-bound enzyme indicated that there is a significant reduction in RNA polymerase IIO following infection. This observation, together with increasing evidence that transcription is catalyzed by RNA polymerase IIO, supports the hypothesis that poliovirus-induced inhibition of host transcription occurs at the level of RNA chain initiation and involves the direct modification of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3029396

  9. Multiple Poliovirus Proteins Repress Cytoplasmic RNA Granules

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Jonathan D.; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that poliovirus (PV) infection induces stress granule (SG) formation early in infection and then inhibits the formation of SG and disperses processing bodies (PBs) by the mid-phase of infection. Loss of SG was linked to cleavage of G3BP1 by viral 3C proteinase (3Cpro), however dispersal of PBs was not strongly linked to cleavage of specific factors by viral proteinases, suggesting other viral proteins may play roles in inhibition of SG or PB formation. Here we have screened all viral proteins for roles in inducing or inhibiting the formation of RNA granules by creating fusions with mCherry and expressing them individually in cells. Expression of viral proteins separately revealed that the capsid region P1, 2Apro, 3A, 3Cpro, the protease precursor 3CD and 3D polymerase all affect RNA granules to varying extents, whereas 2BC does not. 2Apro, which cleaves eIF4GI, induced SGs as expected, and entered novel foci containing the SG nucleating protein G3BP1. Of the two forms of G3BP, only G3BP1 is cleaved by a virus proteinase, 3Cpro, whereas G3BP2 is not cleaved by 3Cpro or 2Apro. Surprisingly, 3CD, which contains proteinase activity, differentially repressed PBs but not SGs. Further, both 2Apro and 3Cpro expression dispersed PBs, however molecular targets were different since PB dispersal due to 2Apro and heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibition but not 3Cpro, could be rescued by application of oxidative stress to cells. The data indicate that PV repression of SGs and PBs is multifactorial, though protease function is dominant. PMID:26610553

  10. Poliovirus receptor CD155–targeted oncolysis of glioma1

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Melinda K.; Bernhardt, Guenter; Sampson, John H.; Wikstrand, Carol J.; Bigner, Darell D.; Gromeier, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily are aberrantly expressed in malignant glioma. Amongst these, the human poliovirus receptor CD155 provides a molecular target for therapeutic intervention with oncolytic poliovirus recombinants. Poliovirus has been genetically modified through insertion of regulatory sequences derived from human rhinovirus type 2 to selectively replicate within and destroy cancerous cells. Efficacious oncolysis mediated by poliovirus derivatives depends on the presence of CD155 in targeted tumors. To prepare oncolytic polioviruses for clinical application, we have developed a series of assays in high-grade malignant glioma (HGL) to characterize CD155 expression levels and susceptibility to oncolytic poliovirus recombinants. Analysis of 6 HGL cases indicates that CD155 is expressed in these tumors and in primary cell lines derived from these tumors. Upregulation of the molecular target CD155 rendered explant cultures of all studied tumors highly susceptible to a prototype oncolytic poliovirus recombinant. Our observations support the clinical application of such agents against HGL. PMID:15279713

  11. The vaccine origin of the 1968 epidemic of type 3 poliomyelitis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Martín, J; Ferguson, G L; Wood, D J; Minor, P D

    2000-12-01

    A clear association was demonstrated between the use of USOL-D-bac type 3 poliovirus live-attenuated vaccine and the 1968 poliomyelitis epidemic in Poland. The epidemic followed small-scale trials with Sabin and USOL-D-bac type 3 vaccine strains carried out in seven countries including Poland. Factors that might have contributed to the genesis and development of the epidemic were the pattern of virus excretion from vaccinees, mutations found in viruses from the epidemic, and the particular vaccination policies in Poland during the previous years. These findings may provide essential insights into the strategies for stopping polio immunisation once wild poliovirus has been eradicated. PMID:11112479

  12. Progress toward Global Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Transmission, 2010–2013 and Tackling the Challenges to Complete Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Wassilak, Steven G.F.; Oberste, M. Steven; Tangermann, Rudolph H.; Diop, Ousmane M.; Jafari, Hamid S.; Armstrong, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial progress, global polio eradication has remained elusive. Indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission in four endemic countries (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan) persisted into 2010 and outbreaks from imported WPV continued. By 2013, most outbreaks in the interim were promptly controlled. The number of polio-affected districts globally has declined by74% (from 481 in 2009 to 126 in 2013), including a 79% decrease in the number of affected districts in endemic countries (from 304 to 63). India is now polio-free. The challenges to success in the remaining polio-endemic countries include 1) threats to the security of vaccinators in each country and a ban on polio vaccination in areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan; 2) a risk of decreased government commitment; and 3) remaining surveillance gaps. Coordinated efforts under the International Health Regulations and efforts to mitigate the challenges provide a clear opportunity to soon secure global eradication. PMID:25316873

  13. Progress toward global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission, 2010-2013, and tackling the challenges to complete eradication.

    PubMed

    Wassilak, Steven G F; Oberste, M Steven; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Diop, Ousmane M; Jafari, Hamid S; Armstrong, Gregory L

    2014-11-01

    Despite substantial progress, global polio eradication has remained elusive. Indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission in 4 endemic countries (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan) persisted into 2010 and outbreaks from imported WPV continued. By 2013, most outbreaks in the interim were promptly controlled. The number of polio-affected districts globally has declined by 74% (from 481 in 2009 to 126 in 2013), including a 79% decrease in the number of affected districts in endemic countries (from 304 to 63). India is now polio-free. The challenges to success in the remaining polio-endemic countries include (1) threats to the security of vaccinators in each country and a ban on polio vaccination in areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan; (2) a risk of decreased government commitment; and (3) remaining surveillance gaps. Coordinated efforts under the International Health Regulations and efforts to mitigate the challenges provide a clear opportunity to soon secure global eradication. PMID:25316873

  14. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  19. POLIOVIRUS TYPE 1: NEUTRALIZATION BY PAPAIN-DIGESTED ANTIBODIES.

    PubMed

    VOGT, A; KOPP, R; MAASS, G; REICH, L

    1964-09-25

    Papain-digested rabbit antibody (Porter's fractions I and II) can neutralize poliovirus. Neutralizing capacity after digestion ranged from 35 to 45 percent of that of the undigested antibody. No definite dissociation of the antibody fragments from the virus was observed after the reaction mixture had been diluted in a neutral medium. PMID:14175107

  20. 42 CFR 100.3 - Vaccine injury table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chain reaction tests. (10) Vaccine-strain polio viral infection. This term is defined as a disease...-strain by oligonucleotide or polymerase chain reaction. Isolation of poliovirus from the stool is not... acute, severe, and potentially lethal systemic allergic reaction. Most cases resolve without...

  1. 42 CFR 100.3 - Vaccine injury table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... chain reaction tests. (10) Vaccine-strain polio viral infection. This term is defined as a disease...-strain by oligonucleotide or polymerase chain reaction. Isolation of poliovirus from the stool is not... acute, severe, and potentially lethal systemic allergic reaction. Most cases resolve without...

  2. 42 CFR 100.3 - Vaccine injury table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... chain reaction tests. (10) Vaccine-strain polio viral infection. This term is defined as a disease...-strain by oligonucleotide or polymerase chain reaction. Isolation of poliovirus from the stool is not... acute, severe, and potentially lethal systemic allergic reaction. Most cases resolve without...

  3. 42 CFR 100.3 - Vaccine injury table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... chain reaction tests. (10) Vaccine-strain polio viral infection. This term is defined as a disease...-strain by oligonucleotide or polymerase chain reaction. Isolation of poliovirus from the stool is not... acute, severe, and potentially lethal systemic allergic reaction. Most cases resolve without...

  4. 42 CFR 100.3 - Vaccine injury table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... chain reaction tests. (10) Vaccine-strain polio viral infection. This term is defined as a disease...-strain by oligonucleotide or polymerase chain reaction. Isolation of poliovirus from the stool is not... acute, severe, and potentially lethal systemic allergic reaction. Most cases resolve without...

  5. The case for periodic OPV routine vaccination campaigns.

    PubMed

    Houy, Nicolas

    2016-01-21

    The possibility of periodic routine vaccination campaigns (PRVCs) is introduced in the context of a search for optimal oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) administration strategies. Like the usual continuous routine vaccination campaign (CRVC), PRVCs target only newborns. However, they are not necessarily implemented continuously in time. Using a dynamic and compartmental polio transmission model in a stochastic context, it is shown that some PRVCs can achieve much greater efficiency than CRVC in terms of probability of wild poliovirus (WPV) eradication, even though they never outperform CRVC in terms of total number of paralytic infections. Moreover, these PRVCs results can be obtained at a lower price than CRVC. It is also shown that, even though PRVCs do not perform better than pulse vaccination campaigns (PVCs) when only epidemiological outputs are valued, they can do so when a cost-benefit analysis is preferred. PMID:26523796

  6. Chlorine resistance of poliovirus isolants recovered from drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, P T; Metcalf, T G; Sproul, O J

    1980-01-01

    Poliovirus 1 isolants were recovered from finished drinking water produced by a modern, well-operated water treatment plant. These waters contained free chlorine residuals in excess of 1 mg/liter. The chlorine inactivation of purified high-titer preparations of two such isolants was compared with the inactivation behavior of two stock strains of poliovirus 1, LSc and Mahoney. The surviving fraction of virus derived from the two natural isolants was shown to be orders of magnitude greater than that of the standard strains. These results raise the question whether indirect drinking water standards based on free chlorine residuals are adequate public health measures, or whether direct standards based on virus determinations might be necessary. Images PMID:6257162

  7. INFECTIVITY OF HISTONE-POLIOVIRUS RIBONUCLEIC ACID PREPARATIONS.

    PubMed

    LUDWIG, E H; SMULL, C E

    1963-06-01

    Ludwig, Ernest H. (The Pennsylvania State University, University Park) and Christine E. Smull. Infectivity of histone-poliovirus ribonucleic acid preparations. J. Bacteriol. 85:1334-1338. 1963.-Some properties of histone-poliovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) preparations, as relate to infectivity for HeLa cell monolayers, were investigated. The histone-RNA preparations were found to lose their infectivity rapidly at room temperature. They were considerably more stable at ice-bath temperature. Dilution of a histone-RNA preparation in a diluent containing an appropriate amount of histone yielded a plaque count which was proportional to the dilution factor, and which regressed linearly through the point of origin. Dilution of a histone-RNA preparation in a diluent containing no histone resulted in a rapidly decreasing plaque count which was not proportional to the dilution factor. The ability of histone to enhance the infectivity of poliovirus RNA was found to be dependent upon the presence of a low concentration of a monovalent salt in the histone-RNA preparations. Histone-RNA preparations containing approximately isotonic levels of NaCl exhibited a high degree of infectivity. When concentrations of NaCl outside this range were used, a great loss in infectivity of the histone-RNA preparations occurred. The NaCl could be replaced by KCl but not by CaCl(2), MgCl(2), or MgSO(4). PMID:14047226

  8. Surface for Catalysis by Poliovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Lyle, John M.; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, replicates the viral genomic RNA on the surface of virus-induced intracellular membranes. Macromolecular assemblies of 3Dpol form linear array of subunits that propagate along a strong protein-protein interaction called interface-I, as was observed in the crystal structure of wild-type poliovirus polymerase. These “filaments” recur with slight modifications in planar sheets and, with additional modifications that accommodate curvature, in helical tubes of the polymerase, by packing filaments together via a second set of interactions. Periodic variations of subunit orientations within 3Dpol tubes give rise to “ghost reflections” in diffraction patterns computed from electron cryomicrographs of helical arrays. The ghost reflections reveal that polymerase tubes are formed by bundles of 4–6 interface-I filaments, which are then connected to the next bundle of filaments with a perturbation of interface interactions between bundles. While enzymatically inactive polymerase is also capable of oligomerization, much thinner tubes are formed that lack interface-I interactions between adjacent subunits, suggesting that long-range allostery produces conformational changes that extend from the active site to the protein-protein interface. Macromolecular assemblies of poliovirus polymerase show repeated use of flexible interface interactions for polymerase lattice formation, suggesting that adaptability of polymerase-polymerase interactions facilitates RNA replication. In addition, the presence of a positively charged groove identified in polymerase arrays may help position and stabilize the RNA template during replication. PMID:23583774

  9. Global routine vaccination coverage, 2009.

    PubMed

    2010-10-29

    The widespread use of vaccines has greatly improved global public health, preventing millions of childhood hospitalizations and deaths each year. Vaccination of children also is projected to avert adult deaths through the prevention of hepatitis B (HepB) virus--related chronic liver disease and liver cancer and human papilloma virus--related cervical cancer. When the World Health Organization (WHO) began the Expanded Programme on Immunization in 1974, <5% of the world's children had been fully vaccinated with bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine, oral poliovirus vaccine, and measles-containing vaccine (MCV) during the first year of life. Since then, increased vaccination coverage has resulted in substantial reductions in morbidity and mortality, including a >99% decline in polio incidence since 1988, with eradication on the horizon, and a 78% decline in measles-associated mortality from 2000 to 2008 With the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, HepB vaccine, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), and rotavirus vaccine into many countries' routine vaccination schedules, further reductions in morbidity and mortality are expected. However, based on an annual global birth cohort of approximately 130 million, an estimated 23 million infants worldwide still do not receive the benefits of routine vaccination (i.e., 3 doses of DTP during the first year of life). The Global Immunization Vision and Strategy (GIVS), developed in 2005 by WHO and UNICEF, assists countries in strengthening immunization programs and vaccinating more persons. GIVS aims to achieve 90% national 3-dose DTP (DTP3) coverage by age 12 months in all countries, and 80% coverage in every district or equivalent administrative unit by 2010 (and to sustain these levels through 2015). This report summarizes global routine vaccination coverage during 2000--2009 and progress toward achieving GIVS goals. PMID:21030941

  10. Evidence of presence of poliovirus genomic sequences in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with postpolio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leparc-Goffart, I; Julien, J; Fuchs, F; Janatova, I; Aymard, M; Kopecka, H

    1996-08-01

    The postpolio syndrome (PPS) is characterized by new neuromuscular symptoms occurring 30 to 40 years after the acute episode of poliomyelitis paralysis. The presence of the poliovirus RNA genome in the cerebrospinal fluid from 10 patients with PPS and from 23 control patients was sought by using reverse transcription and a PCR specific for polioviruses and/or other enteroviruses. Poliovirus-specific genomic sequences in the 5' untranslated region and in the capsid region (VP1) were detected by reverse transcription PCR in 5 of 10 patients with PPS but in none of the control patients. Sequencing confirmed the presence of mutated poliovirus sequences. This finding suggests persistent viral infection in the central nervous system related to the presence of poliovirus genomes. PMID:8818905

  11. Investigation et riposte à une épidémie de poliovirus sauvage à Kinshasa

    PubMed Central

    Nsambu, Muriel Nzazi; Bazira, Léodegal; Coulibaly, Tiekoura; Mbule, Albert; Wilmet, Michèle Dramaix; Likwela, Joris Losimba

    2013-01-01

    Introduction La République Démocratique du Congo a été considérée comme un pays à circulation rétablie de poliovirus sauvage (PVS). Cet article décrit l’épidémie de PVS qui a sévit dans la province de Kinshasa de 2010 à 2011. Méthodes Les analyses ont porté sur les cas de paralysie flasque aigüe (PFA) enregistrés de décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, les données de surveillance des PFA, les données de couverture vaccinale et celles du monitorage indépendant des activités de vaccination supplémentaires. Résultats Entre décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, 298 cas de PFA ont été enregistrés par les zones de santé parmi lesquels 34 cas de PVS confirmés. 58% des cas de PVS avaient plus de 15 ans avec plus d'hommes que de femmes. 10 passages d'activités de vaccination supplémentaires ont été mis en œuvre dont 4 avaient ciblé toute la population de Kinshasa. Il n'y a plus eu de cas de PVS après le 3e passage. Le monitorage des activités de vaccination a montré une proportion de sujets non vaccinés allant de 4 à 13%. La performance du système de surveillance était globalement bonne. Conclusion La prédominance des adultes parmi les cas notifiés traduit leur susceptibilité alors qu'ils ne sont généralement pas concernés lors des campagnes de vaccination supplémentaires. Ceci devrait engager les autorités sanitaires à envisager des activités vaccinales supplémentaires ciblant les adultes afin de casser plus rapidement la chaîne de transmission. Les faiblesses subsistant dans le système de surveillance pourraient être jugulées par le renforcement de la surveillance à base communautaire. PMID:24062866

  12. Impact of the sequential IPV/OPV schedule on vaccination coverage levels--United States, 1997.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    In January 1997, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended adoption of a sequential inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)-oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) vaccination schedule. The schedule of injections of IPV at 2 months and 4 months of age, followed by OPV at 12-18 months and again at 4-6 years was intended to minimize the risk for vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) while maintaining population immunity to the potential introduction of wild-type poliovirus. To determine whether this change may result in reduced or delayed vaccination coverage because parents or physicians might be reluctant to administer multiple injections at a single visit, CDC investigated the impact of the change to a sequential IPV-OPV vaccination schedule at two large West coast health maintenance organizations (HMOs). This report summarizes the results of the investigation and indicates that changing to an initial two doses of IPV was not associated with decreases in vaccination coverage levels of routinely recommended vaccinations. PMID:9853937

  13. The golden jubilee of vaccination against poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    John, T Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), developed in the USA by Jonas Salk in the early 1950s, was field tested in 1954, and found to be safe and effective. The year 2004 marks the golden jubilee of this breakthrough. From 1955 IPV was used extensively in the US and polio incidence declined by more than 95 per cent. However, in 1962, when oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) became available, the national policy was shifted to its exclusive use, for reasons other than science and economics. The World Health Organisation (WHO) also adopted the policy of the exclusive use of OPV in developing countries. Thus IPV fell into disrepute in much of the world, while Northern European countries continued to use it. New research led to improving its potency, reducing its manufacturing costs and combining it with the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine to simplify its administration and reduce programmatic costs. All countries that chose to persist with IPV eliminated poliovirus circulation without OPV-induced polio or the risk of live vaccine viruses reverting to wild-like nature. IPV is highly immunogenic, confers mucosal immunity and exerts herd protective effect, all qualities of a good vaccine. It can be used in harmony with the extendend programme on immunization (EPI) schedule of infant immunisation with DTP, thus reducing programmatic costs. During the last ten years IPV has once again regained its popularity and some 25 industrialised countries use it exclusively. The demand is increasing from other countries and the supply has not caught up, leaving market forces to dictate the sale price of IPV. Anticipating such a turn of events India had launched its own IPV manufacturing programme in 1987, but the project was closed in 1992. Today it is not clear if we can complete the job of global polio eradication without IPV, on account of the genetic instability of OPV and the consequent tendency of vaccine viruses to revert to wild-like properties. The option to use IPV is

  14. Cross-neutralizing human anti-poliovirus antibodies bind the recognition site for cellular receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaochun; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Hansen, Bryan T.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Bidzhieva, Bella; Makiya, Michelle; Agulto, Liane; Purcell, Robert H.; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Most structural information about poliovirus interaction with neutralizing antibodies was obtained in the 1980s in studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Recently we have isolated a number of human/chimpanzee anti-poliovirus antibodies and demonstrated that one of them, MAb A12, could neutralize polioviruses of both serotypes 1 and 2. This communication presents data on isolation of an additional cross-neutralizing antibody (F12) and identification of a previously unknown epitope on the surface of poliovirus virions. Epitope mapping was performed by sequencing of antibody-resistant mutants and by cryo-EM of complexes of virions with Fab fragments. The results have demonstrated that both cross-neutralizing antibodies bind the site located at the bottom of the canyon surrounding the fivefold axis of symmetry that was previously shown to interact with cellular poliovirus receptor CD155. However, the same antibody binds to serotypes 1 and 2 through different specific interactions. It was also shown to interact with type 3 poliovirus, albeit with about 10-fold lower affinity, insufficient for effective neutralization. Antibody interaction with the binding site of the cellular receptor may explain its broad reactivity and suggest that further screening or antibody engineering could lead to a universal antibody capable of neutralizing all three serotypes of poliovirus. PMID:24277851

  15. Poliovirus Proteins Induce Membrane Association of GTPase ADP-Ribosylation Factor

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Fogg, Mark H.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus infection results in the disintegration of intracellular membrane structures and formation of specific vesicles that serve as sites for replication of viral RNA. The mechanism of membrane rearrangement has not been clearly defined. Replication of poliovirus is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite known to prevent normal function of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of small GTPases. During normal membrane trafficking in uninfected cells, ARFs are involved in vesicle formation from different intracellular sites through interaction with numerous regulatory and coat proteins as well as in regulation of phospholipase D activity and cytoskeleton modifications. We demonstrate here that ARFs 3 and 5, but not ARF6, are translocated to membranes in HeLa cell extracts that are engaged in translation of poliovirus RNA. The accumulation of ARFs on membranes correlates with active replication of poliovirus RNA in vitro, whereas ARF translocation to membranes does not occur in the presence of BFA. ARF translocation can be induced independently by synthesis of poliovirus 3A or 3CD proteins, and we describe mutations that abolished this activity. In infected HeLa cells, an ARF1-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion redistributes from Golgi stacks to the perinuclear region, where poliovirus RNA replication occurs. Taken together, the data suggest an involvement of ARF in poliovirus RNA replication. PMID:15890959

  16. Poliovirus concentration from tap water with electropositive adsorbent filters.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, M D; Glass, J S

    1980-08-01

    Simple, reliable, and efficient concentration of poliovirus from tap water was obtained with two types of electropositive filter media, one of which is available in the form of a pleated cartridge filter (Virozorb 1MDS). Virus adsorption from tap water between pH 3.5 and 7.5 was more efficient with electropositive filters than with Filterite filters. Elution of adsorbed viruses was more efficient with beef extract in glycine, pH 9.5, than with glycine-NaOH, pH 11.0. In paired comparative studies, electropositive filters, with adsorption at pH 7.5 and no added polyvalent cation salts, gave less variable virus concentration efficiencies than did Filterite filters with adsorption at pH 3.5 plus added MgCl2. Recovery of poliovirus from 1,000-liter tap water volumes was approximately 30% efficient with both Virozorb 1MDS and Filterite pleated cartridge filters, but the former were much simpler to use. The virus adsorption behavior of these filters appears to be related to their surface charge properties, with more electropositive filters giving more efficient virus adsorption from tap water at higher pH levels. PMID:6258472

  17. A transcriptionally active form of TFIIIC is modified in poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, M E; Dasgupta, A

    1990-01-01

    In HeLa cells, RNA polymerase III (pol III)-mediated transcription is severely inhibited by poliovirus infection. This inhibition is due primarily to the reduction in transcriptional activity of the pol III transcription factor TFIIIC in poliovirus-infected cells. However, the specific binding of TFIIIC to the VAI gene B-box sequence, as assayed by DNase I footprinting, is not altered by poliovirus infection. We have used gel retardation analysis to analyze TFIIIC-DNA complexes formed in nuclear extracts prepared from mock- and poliovirus-infected cells. In mock-infected cell extracts, two closely migrating TFIIIC-containing complexes, complexes I and II, were detected in the gel retardation assay. The slower migrating complex, complex I, was absent in poliovirus-infected cell extracts, and an increase occurred in the intensity of the faster-migrating complex (complex II). Also, in poliovirus-infected cell extracts, a new, rapidly migrating complex, complex III, was formed. Complex III may have been the result of limited proteolysis of complex I or II. These changes in TFIIIC-containing complexes in poliovirus-infected cell extracts correlated kinetically with the decrease in TFIIIC transcriptional activity. Complexes I, II, and III were chromatographically separated; only complex I was transcriptionally active and specifically restored pol III transcription when added to poliovirus-infected cell extracts. Acid phosphatase treatment partially converted complex I to complex II but did not affect the binding of complex II or III. Dephosphorylation and limited proteolysis of TFIIIC are discussed as possible mechanisms for the inhibition of pol III-mediated transcription by poliovirus. Images PMID:2204807

  18. Concentration and Purification of Poliovirus by Ultrafiltration and Isopycnic Centrifugation1

    PubMed Central

    Guskey, Louis E.; Wolff, David A.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described by which poliovirus can be rapidly and simply concentrated by the use of a Diaflo XM-50 ultrafilter membrane. Freon-extracted ultrafilter concentrates banded in CsCl provided a 1,724-fold volumetric concentration of poliovirus. During concentration, trypsin-digested cellular material can pass through the ultrafilter membrane, thus providing a versatile means of degrading and eliminating extraneous contaminating proteins. The ultrafilter concentration system is compared with the CsCl cushion system of poliovirus concentration, and both systems are further compared by banding virus and virus capsid material in CsCl by use of isopycnic centrifugation. Images PMID:4341520

  19. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elaine R.; Moro, Pedro L.; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom

    2015-01-01

    poliovirus vaccine. However, making general assumptions and drawing conclusions about vaccinations causing deaths based on spontaneous reports to VAERS – some of which might be anecdotal or second-hand – or case reports in the media, is not a scientifically valid practice. PMID:26004568

  20. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elaine R; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom T

    2015-06-26

    poliovirus vaccine. However, making general assumptions and drawing conclusions about vaccinations causing deaths based on spontaneous reports to VAERS - some of which might be anecdotal or second-hand - or from case reports in the media, is not a scientifically valid practice. PMID:26004568

  1. Postpolio syndrome: poliovirus persistence is involved in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Julien, J; Leparc-Goffart, I; Lina, B; Fuchs, F; Foray, S; Janatova, I; Aymard, M; Kopecka, H

    1999-06-01

    The pathogenesis of the postpolio syndrome (PPS) remains unclear. In this study we looked for poliovirus (PV) persistence in the CSF of 20 patients with PPS, in a control group including 20 patients with unrelated neurological diseases, and in 7 patients with stable poliomyelitis sequelae. CSF samples and sera were examined using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of PV or other enterovirus genomes; this assay allows the detection from as little as 1 fg viral RNA. Sequencing of amplified products from 5 patients was performed. PV genomic sequences were detected in the CSF of 11 of 20 patients with PPS and in none of the control group. Sequencing in the 5' untranslated region confirmed the presence of mutated PV sequences. These findings suggest that PPS is related to the persistence of PV in the central nervous system. PMID:10431774

  2. Cytotoxic and immunogenic mechanisms of recombinant oncolytic poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael C; Gromeier, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    An oncolytic virus (OV) based on poliovirus (PV), the highly attenuated polio/rhinovirus recombinant PVSRIPO, may deliver targeted inflammatory cancer cell killing; a principle that is showing promise in clinical trials for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). The two decisive factors in PVSRIPO anti-tumor efficacy are selective cytotoxicity and its in situ immunogenic imprint. While our work is focused on what constitutes PVSRIPO cancer cytotoxicity, we are also studying how this engenders host immune responses that are vital to tumor regression. We hypothesize that PVSRIPO cytotoxicity and immunogenicity are inextricably linked in essential, complimentary roles that define the anti-neoplastic response. Herein we delineate mechanisms we unraveled to decipher the basis for PVSRIPO cytotoxicity and its immunotherapeutic potential. PMID:26083317

  3. Survival of poliovirus within organic solids during chlorination.

    PubMed Central

    Hejkal, T W; Wellings, F M; LaRock, P A; Lewis, A L

    1979-01-01

    Poliovirus in fecal homogenates was used to determine the protection against inactivation by chlorination afforded virus that was occluded within particulates. Virus that was closely associated with or occluded within small fecal particulates was protected. A fourfold increase in combined residual chlorine was required to achieve the same degree of inactivation for occluded virus as for free or secondarily adsorbed virus. A combined chlorine residual of 6.6 mg/liter was necessary to achieve 50% inactivation in 15 min at pH 8.0 and 22 degrees C in a particulate suspension containing occluded virus compared to 1.4 mg/liter for free virus. These differences were found to be relatively small compared to differences due to the presence of dissolved organics or between free and combined chlorine residuals. The results suggest different mechanisms of protection due to adsorption and occlusion. PMID:225993

  4. Complex Dynamic Development of Poliovirus Membranous Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vinod; Hansen, Bryan T.; Hoyt, Forrest H.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Replication of all positive-strand RNA viruses is intimately associated with membranes. Here we utilize electron tomography and other methods to investigate the remodeling of membranes in poliovirus-infected cells. We found that the viral replication structures previously described as “vesicles” are in fact convoluted, branching chambers with complex and dynamic morphology. They are likely to originate from cis-Golgi membranes and are represented during the early stages of infection by single-walled connecting and branching tubular compartments. These early viral organelles gradually transform into double-membrane structures by extension of membranous walls and/or collapsing of the luminal cavity of the single-membrane structures. As the double-membrane regions develop, they enclose cytoplasmic material. At this stage, a continuous membranous structure may have double- and single-walled membrane morphology at adjacent cross-sections. In the late stages of the replication cycle, the structures are represented mostly by double-membrane vesicles. Viral replication proteins, double-stranded RNA species, and actively replicating RNA are associated with both double- and single-membrane structures. However, the exponential phase of viral RNA synthesis occurs when single-membrane formations are predominant in the cell. It has been shown previously that replication complexes of some other positive-strand RNA viruses form on membrane invaginations, which result from negative membrane curvature. Our data show that the remodeling of cellular membranes in poliovirus-infected cells produces structures with positive curvature of membranes. Thus, it is likely that there is a fundamental divergence in the requirements for the supporting cellular membrane-shaping machinery among different groups of positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:22072780

  5. RAPID COMMUNICATION-- POLIO VACCINE COVERAGE IN THE ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS (AFP) CASES IN ROMANIA.

    PubMed

    Băicuş, Anda

    2015-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV), a member of the Enterovirus genus, is the etiological agent of poliomyelitis. A study carried out between 2013-2014 on 30 serum samples from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases, showed a protective antibody level of 90% against poliovirus Sabin strains type 1 and type 2 and of 88% against type 3. No PV strains were isolated from 2009 to 2015 in Romania. Maintaining a high vaccine coverage level against polio is mandatory until global polio eradication, especially as the risk of polio importation remains elevated in Romania. PMID:26727855

  6. Vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis cases from children presenting with acute flaccid paralysis in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nanteza, Mary B; Kisakye, Annet; Ota, Martin O; Gumede, Nicksy; Bwogi, Josephine

    2015-12-01

    A retrospective study to identify VAPP cases from the entire Uganda was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011. Eleven of the 106 AFP cases were VAPPs. The VAPP rate ranged from 0 to 3.39 cases per 1,000,000 birth cohorts and the peak was in 2009 when there was scaling up of OPV immunization activities following an importation of wild poliovirus in the country. All the subsequent polio suspect cases since then have been vaccine-associated polio cases. Our data support the strategy to withdraw OPV and introduce IPV progressively in order to mitigate against the paralysis arising from Sabin polioviruses. PMID:26058454

  7. The recent outbreaks and reemergence of poliovirus in war and conflict-affected areas

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Luma; Ahmad, H. Anwar

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by poliovirus, which becomes difficult to manage/eradicate in politically unstable areas. The objectives of this study were to determine the movement and management of such polio outbreaks in endemic countries and countries with reoccurring cases of polio and to determine the effect of political instability on polio eradication. Methods In this study, the extent of polio outbreaks was examined and modeled using statistical methodologies and mapped with GIS software. Data on polio cases and immunization were collected for countries with polio cases for the period 2011 to 2014. Weekly data from the Global Polio Eradication Initiative were collected for selected countries. The recent virus origin and current movement was mapped using GIS. Correlations between immunization rates, the Global Peace Index (GPI), and other indicators of a country’s political stability with polio outbreaks were determined. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 and ArcGIS 10. Results For several reasons, Pakistan remains highly vulnerable to new incidences of polio (306 cases in 2014). Overall immunization rates showed a steady decline over time in selected countries. Countries with polio cases were shown to have high rates of infant mortality, and their GPI ranked between 2.0 and 3.3; displaced populations, level of violent crime rating, and political instability also were ranked high for several countries. Conclusion Polio was shown to be high in areas with increased conflict and instability. Displaced populations living in hard-to-reach areas may lack access to proper vaccination and health care. Wars and conflict have also resulted in the reemergence of polio in otherwise polio-free countries. PMID:27237735

  8. Vaccinations for Neuroinfectious Disease: A Global Health Priority.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Emily C; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Vaccines for neuroinfectious diseases are becoming an ever-increasing global health priority, as neurologic manifestations and sequelae from existing and emerging central nervous system infections account for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. The prevention of neurotropic infections can be achieved through globally coordinated vaccination campaigns, which have successfully eradicated nonzoonotic agents such as the variola viruses and, hopefully soon, poliovirus. This review discusses vaccines that are currently available or under development for zoonotic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including Japanese and tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, West Nile, dengue, Zika, encephalitic equine viruses, and chikungunya. Also discussed are nonzoonotic agents, including measles and human herpesviruses, as well as select bacterial, fungal, and protozoal pathogens. While therapeutic vaccines will be required to treat a multitude of ongoing infections of the nervous system, the ideal vaccination strategy is pre-exposure vaccination, with the ultimate goals of minimizing disease associated with zoonotic viruses and the total eradication of nonzoonotic agents. PMID:27365085

  9. A developing country perspective on vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    John, T. Jacob

    2004-01-01

    When the Expanded Programme on Immunization was established and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) was introduced for developing countries to use exclusively, national leaders of public health had no opportunity to make an informed choice between OPV and the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Today, as progress is made towards the goal of global eradication of poliomyelitis attributable to wild polioviruses, all developing countries where OPV is used face the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). Until recently, awareness of VAPP has been poor and quantitative risk analysis scanty but it is now well known that the continued use of OPV perpetuates the risk of VAPP. Discontinuation or declining immunization coverage of OPV will increase the risk of emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV) that re-acquire wild virus-like properties and may cause outbreaks of polio. To eliminate the risk of cVDPV, either very high immunization coverage must be maintained as long as OPV is in use, or IPV should replace OPV. Stopping OPV without first achieving high immunization coverage with IPV is unwise on account of the possibility of emergence of cVDPV. Increasing numbers of developed nations prefer IPV, and manufacturing capacities have not been scaled up, so its price remains prohibitively high and unaffordable by developing countries, where, in addition, large-scale field experience with IPV is lacking. Under these circumstances, a policy shift to increase the use of IPV in national immunization programmes in developing countries is a necessary first step; once IPV coverage reaches high levels (over 85%), the withdrawal of OPV may begin. PMID:15106301

  10. Quadracel: Vaccination Against Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, and Poliomyelitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Juan F.; Smith, Lillian L.; Parke, Crystal K.; Brown, Jamal A.; LaFrance, Justin M.; Clark, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccinations in school-aged children are required by state and local law to maintain high vaccination coverage rates, as well as low rates of vaccine-preventable diseases. Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are childhood diseases that can be life threatening; poliomyelitis, another childhood disease, can be disabling. In turn, vaccinations were developed to provide protection against these diseases. Today, several vaccinations are recommended for children, including but not limited to diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) and poliomyelitis (IPV). DTaP requires five doses, and IPV requires four. Quadracel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed and inactivated poliovirus vaccine, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.) is a new vaccination developed to condense the last dose of both DTaP and IPV so they do not have to be given separately, thus reducing the total number of vaccinations required. Discussion: The Quadracel vaccine is an option for use in children who are completing the DTaP and IPV series. In a randomized, controlled, phase 3, pivotal trial, Quadracel proved to be as efficacious and safe as Daptacel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.) and IPOL (poliovirus vaccine inactivated, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.), given separately, to children between the ages of 4 and 6 years. Conclusion: Quadracel should be recommended to parents who have children between the ages of 4 and 6 years who meet the necessary administration criteria and need to finalize their DTaP and IPV series. Quadracel’s administration in the vaccination series replaces one additional injection, which may benefit children who are afraid of receiving shots and parents who need to schedule one less doctor’s appointment. PMID:27069343

  11. Formaldehyde-inactivated human enterovirus 71 vaccine is compatible for co-immunization with a commercial pentavalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Lee, Yi-Ping; Wang, Ya-Fang; Yu, Chun-Keung

    2011-03-24

    In this study we tested the effectiveness of a formaldehyde-inactivated EV71 vaccine and its compatibility for co-immunization with a pentavalent vaccine that contained inactivated poliovirus (PV) vaccine. The inactivated EV71 vaccine (C2 genogroup) elicited an antibody response which broadly neutralized homologous and heterologous genogroups, including B4, C4, and B5. Pups from vaccinated dams were resistant to the EV71 challenge and had a high survival rate and a low tissue viral burden when compared to those from non-vaccinated counterparts. Co-immunization with pentavalent and inactivated EV71 vaccines elicited antibodies against the major components of the pentavalent vaccine including the PV, Bordetella pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae type b, diphtheria toxoid, and tetanus toxoid at the same levels as in mice immunized with pentavalent vaccine alone. Likewise, EV71 neutralizing antibody titers were comparable between EV71-vaccinated mice and mice co-immunized with the two vaccines. These results indicate that formaldehyde-inactivated whole virus EV71 vaccine is feasible for designing multivalent vaccines. PMID:21315698

  12. EFFECT OF ENDOTOXIN ON CELLS AND ON THEIR RESPONSE TO INFECTION BY POLIOVIRUSES1

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William H.; Wisner, Carolyn

    1962-01-01

    Murphy, W. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and C. Wisner. Effect of endotoxin on cells and on their response to infection by polioviruses. J. Bacteriol. 83:649–662. 1962.—The effect of lipopolysaccharide on HeLa-S3, HeLa-Gey, Chang-liver, Maben, and L strain mouse fibroblasts was studied. The liminal dose of endotoxin for the human epithelial cell strains was approximately 250 μg/ml, and their order of sensitivity to endotoxin was: Chang-liver, HeLa-Gey, HeLa-S3, and Maben, the latter being the most resistant. Endotoxin at concentrations exceeding 100 μg/ml was cytotoxic to the L strain of mouse fibroblasts and caused them to markedly agglutinate. Cytotoxic response of cells to endotoxin was not characterized by cell lysis, but by distinctive nuclear changes. In an attempt to demonstrate the metabolic induction of the latent infection of cell cultures by a noncytopathic variant of poliovirus, endotoxin was added at maximal subliminal concentration to cell cultures totally, partially, or fully susceptible to virus. Endotoxin caused a slight but consistent accelerative cytopathic response of cells to infection by cytopathic poliovirus, but failed to induce cytopathic response to infection by submoderate (noncytopathic) poliovirus. Although endotoxin slightly suppressed yields of poliovirus from cells, it did not affect the plating efficiency of virus on cell monolayers. Images PMID:14477444

  13. Poliovirus neutralization epitopes: analysis and localization with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Emini, E A; Jameson, B A; Lewis, A J; Larsen, G R; Wimmer, E

    1982-01-01

    Two hybridomas (H3 and D3) secreting monoclonal neutralizing antibody to intact poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) were established. Each antibody bound to a site qualitatively different from that to which the other antibody bound. The H3 site was located on intact virions and, to a lesser extent, on 80S naturally occurring empty capsids and 14S precursor subunits. The D3 site was found only on virions and empty capsids. Neither site was expressed on 80S heat-treated virions. The antibodies did not react with free denatured or undenatured viral structural proteins. Viral variants which were no longer capable of being neutralized by either one or the other antibody were obtained. Such variants arose during normal cell culture passage of wild-type virus and were present in the progeny viral population on the order of 10(-4) variant per wild-type virus PFU. Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a heterobifunctional covalent cross-linking reagent, was used to irreversibly bind the F(ab) fragments of the two antibodies to their respective binding sites. In this way, VP1 was identified as the structural protein containing both sites. PMID:6183443

  14. Vaccine hesitancy as self-determination: an Israeli perspective.

    PubMed

    Velan, Baruch

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy can be portrayed as a broad spectrum of phenomena, ranging from a genuine call for help to complete defiance of authorities. The emphasis here is made on mid-spectrum hesitancy; hesitancy as an act of personal exploration and deliberation whether to get vaccinated or not. This form of vaccine hesitancy can be identified in the attitude of the Israeli public towards routine childhood vaccination programs, seasonal flu vaccination, newly introduced vaccines, such as human papilloma virus vaccine, as well as towards the emergency vaccination programs against poliovirus and H1N1 pandemic influenza. Vaccine hesitancy in Israel appears to be a process where individuals exercise self-determination and self-empowerment and make their own decisions based on assessment, reflection, choosing between various options and dealing with considerable complexities. Addressing this form of vaccine hesitancy could be challenging, but ultimately fruitful. This would require change of attitudes on the part of policymakers. The first steps should involve the realization that deliberative hesitancy is here to stay, and that hesitant individuals should be respected. This could pave the way for designing appropriate intervention strategies for convincing the hesitant public about the advantages of vaccination. PMID:27051517

  15. Septage treatments to reduce the numbers of bacteria and polioviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Stramer, S L; Cliver, D O

    1984-01-01

    Disposal of the pumped contents of septic tanks (septage) represents a possible means of dissemination of enteric pathogens including viruses, since persistence of enteroviruses in septic tank sludge for greater than 100 days has been demonstrated. The risk of exposure to potentially infectious agents can be reduced by disinfecting septages before their disposal. Of the septage disinfectants examined (technical and analytical grade glutaraldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, heat treatments, and a combination of heat and hydrogen peroxide), the treatment including hydrogen peroxide (5 mg, plus 0.33 mg of trichloroacetic acid, per ml of septage) and 55 degrees C killed virtually all the bacteria in septage within 1 h, whereas 55 degrees C alone inactivated inoculated polioviruses within 30 min. Virus was the most sensitive to heat, whereas fecal coliforms appeared to be the most sensitive to all chemical treatments. The responses of fecal streptococci and virus to both grades of glutaraldehyde (each at 1 mg/ml) were similar. Virus was more resistant than either fecal streptococci or total bacteria to low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (1 to 5 mg/ml); however, virus and fecal streptococci were more labile than total bacteria to the highest peroxide concentration (10 mg/ml) examined. It is possible that the treatment combining heat and hydrogen peroxide was the most effective in reducing the concentrations of all bacteria, because catalase and peroxidases as well as other enzymes were heat inactivated, although catalase seems the most likely cause of damage. However, this most effective treatment does not appear to be practical for on-site use as performed, so further work on septage disinfection is recommended. PMID:6093691

  16. Duration of the immune response to MMR vaccine in children of two age-different groups.

    PubMed

    Li Volti, S; Giammanco-Bilancia, G; Grassi, M; Garozzo, R; Gluck, R; Giammanco, G

    1993-05-01

    A combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) was administered to both a group of children aged 10-12 months simultaneously with booster doses of compulsory diphtheria-tetanus toxoids and oral poliovirus vaccine and a group of children aged 15-24 months who had previously received booster doses of the compulsory vaccines. Apart from one subject belonging to the second group who was non responder and one from the same group who did not seroconvert against the mumps virus alone, 5 to 6 weeks after MMR vaccine administration we found protective levels of antibodies against measles, mumps and rubella viruses in all children. The follow up of both groups at 3 years did not reveal difference between the two groups. Protective levels of serum antibodies against measles and mumps were found in the two groups, although a significant decline of rubella antibodies was shown (p < 0.05). Since the immunogenicity of the vaccines in the two groups did not differ, we recommend that the scientific community reconsider the vaccination schedule until now recommended. In our opinion the MMR vaccine should be administered simultaneously with booster doses of diphtheria-tetanus toxoids and oral poliovirus vaccine at 10-12 months of age because this policy improves parents' compliance, markedly reduces community costs and simplifies routine immunization schedule. PMID:8405317

  17. Next Generation Inactivated Polio Vaccine Manufacturing to Support Post Polio-Eradication Biosafety Goals

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Yvonne E.; van ’t Oever, Aart G.; van Oijen, Monique G. C. T.; Wijffels, René H.; van der Pol, Leo A.; Bakker, Wilfried A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide efforts to eradicate polio caused a tipping point in polio vaccination strategies. A switch from the oral polio vaccine, which can cause circulating and virulent vaccine derived polioviruses, to inactivated polio vaccines (IPV) is scheduled. Moreover, a manufacturing process, using attenuated virus strains instead of wild-type polioviruses, is demanded to enhance worldwide production of IPV, especially in low- and middle income countries. Therefore, development of an IPV from attenuated (Sabin) poliovirus strains (sIPV) was pursued. Starting from the current IPV production process based on wild type Salk strains, adaptations, such as lower virus cultivation temperature, were implemented. sIPV was produced at industrial scale followed by formulation of both plain and aluminium adjuvanted sIPV. The final products met the quality criteria, were immunogenic in rats, showed no toxicity in rabbits and could be released for testing in the clinic. Concluding, sIPV was developed to manufacturing scale. The technology can be transferred worldwide to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals. PMID:24349497

  18. Synthesis of immunogenic, but non-infectious, poliovirus particles in insect cells by a baculovirus expression vector.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, T; Ferguson, M; Minor, P D; Cooper, J; Sullivan, M; Almond, J W; Bishop, D H

    1989-06-01

    A baculovirus expression vector (AcLeon) derived from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was prepared containing the complete 6.6 kb coding region of the P3/Leon/37 strain of poliovirus type 3 placed under the control of the AcNPV polyhedrin promoter. The recombinant virus was used to infect Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. As demonstrated by use of the appropriate antibodies, infected insect cells made poliovirus proteins that included the structural proteins VP0, VP1 and VP3. Poliovirus particles were recovered from extracts of the infected cells and demonstrated to be free from detectable levels of RNA and to be non-infectious in tissue culture. After particle purification by CsCl gradient centrifugation and immunization of outbred mice, antibodies to the structural proteins, including neutralizing antibodies, were obtained. Other recombinant baculoviruses, containing the majority of the capsid coding region of P3/Leon/37 (e.g. AcCAP21, nucleotide residues 742 to 3318), made an unprocessed precursor to the poliovirus structural proteins. These data suggested that processing of the poliovirus gene product by the AcLeon construct was catalysed by the poliovirus-encoded proteases. The results demonstrated that antigenic and immunogenic poliovirus proteins and empty particles can be made in insect cells by recombinant baculoviruses. PMID:2543785

  19. Risks of reintroduction of polio after eradication: the vaccine origin of an outbreak of type 3 poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Ferguson, G L; Wood, D J; Minor, P D

    2001-01-01

    Sabin live-attenuated strains, which have proved to be the most effective tools for poliovirus eradication, could also be the source of reintroduction of polio epidemics after global eradication of wild poliomyelitis is achieved. There are still considerable gaps in our knowledge about the persistence of vaccine-derived viruses in the population and the mechanisms involved in poliovirus transmissibility, both of which are essential factors in assessing the risks posed by such strains and in designing effective strategies for the cessation of polio immunisation. In this report, we have examined virological and epidemiological aspects of an epidemic of poliomyelitis in 1968 in Poland that was shown to be associated with the use of the USOL-D-bac live-attenuated vaccine strain. Possible causes of the origin and progress of the outbreak included the pattern of virus excretion from vaccinees, mutations identified in epidemic viruses and the unique vaccination policies in Poland during the years preceding the epidemic. PMID:11763341

  20. Differential depuration of poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Power, U.F.; Collins, J.K. )

    1989-06-01

    The elimination of sewage effluent-associated poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a 22-nm icosahedral coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis, was studied. Both laboratory-and commercial-scale recirculating, UV depuration systems were used in this study. In the laboratory system, the logarithms of the poliovirus, E. coli, and coliphage levels were reduced by 1.86, 2.9, and 2.16, respectively, within 52 h of depuration. The relative patterns and rates of elimination of the three organisms suggest that they are eliminated from mussels by different mechanisms during depuration under suitable conditions. Poliovirus was not included in experiments undertaken in the commercial-scale depuration system. The differences in the relative rates and patterns of elimination were maintained for E. coli and coliphage in this system, with the logarithm of the E. coli levels being reduced by 3.18 and the logarithm of the coliphage levels being reduced by 0.87. The results from both depuration systems suggest that E. coli is an inappropriate indicator of the efficiency of virus elimination during depuration. The coliphage used appears to be a more representative indicator. Depuration under stressful conditions appeared to have a negligible affect on poliovirus and coliphage elimination rates from mussels. However, the rate and pattern of E. coli elimination were dramatically affected by these conditions. Therefore, monitoring E. coli counts might prove useful in ensuring that mussels are functioning well during depuration.

  1. CONCENTRATION OF POLIOVIRUS FROM TAP WATER USING POSITIVELY CHARGED MICROPOROUS FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microporous filters that are more electropositive than the negatively charged filters currently used for virus concentration from water by filter adsorption-elution methods were evaluated for poliovirus recovery from tap water. Zeta Plus filters composed of diatomaceous earth-cel...

  2. Concentration of poliovirus from tap water using positively charged microporous filters.

    PubMed Central

    Sobsey, M D; Jones, B L

    1979-01-01

    Microporous filters that are more electropositive than the negatively charged filters currently used for virus concentrations from water by filter adsorption-elution methods were evaluated for poliovirus recovery from tap water. Zeta Plus filters composed of diatomaceous earth-cellulose-"charge-modified" resin mixtures and having a net positive charge of up to pH 5 to 6 efficiently adsorbed poliovirus from tap water at ambient pH levels 7.0 to 7.5 without added multivalent cation salts. The adsorbed virus were eluted with glycine-NaOH, pH 9.5 to 11.5. Electropositive asbestos-cellulose filters efficiently adsorbed poliovirus from tap water without added multivalent cation salts between pH 3.5 and 9.0, and the absorbed viruses could be eluted with 3% beef extract, pH 9, but not with pH 9.5 to 11.5 glycine-NaOH. Under water quality conditions in which poliovirus recoveries from large volumes of water were less than 5% with conventional negatively charged filters and standard methods, recoveries with Zeta Plus filters averaged 64 and 22.5% for one- and two-stage concentration procedures, respectively. Electropositive filters appear to offer distinct advantages over conventional negatively charged filters for concentrating enteric viruses from water, and their behavior tends to confirm the importance of electrostatic forces in virus recovery from water by microporous filter adsorption-elution methods. PMID:36844

  3. EFFECTS OF BENTONITE CLAY SOLIDS ON POLIOVIRUS CONCENTRATION FROM WATER BY MICROPOROUS FILTER METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to determine if suspended solids interfere with enteric virus recovery from water by microporous filter methods, the effects of bentonite clay solids at a concentration of 10 NTU on the recovery of poliovirus type 1 from seeded, activated carbon-treated, filtered tap wat...

  4. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  5. Capped mRNAs with reduced secondary structure can function in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sonenberg, N.; Guertin, D.; Lee, K.A.W.

    1982-12-01

    Extracts form poliovirus-infected HeLa cells were used to study ribosome binding of native and denatured reovirus mRNAs and translation of capped mRNAs with different degrees of secondary structure. Here, the authors demonstrate that ribosomes in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells could form initiation complexes with denatured reovirus mRNA, in contrast to their inability to bind native reovirus mRNA. Furthermore, the capped alfalfa mosiac virus 4 RNA, which is most probable devoid of stable secondary structure at its 5' end, could be translated at much higher efficiency than could other capped mRNAs in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells.

  6. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and BCG-osis in an immigrant child with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome - Texas, 2013.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Robert; Atkins, Jane; Quigg, Troy C; Burns, Cara C; Wallace, Gregory S; Thomas, Mary; Mangla, Anil T; Infante, Anthony J

    2014-08-22

    Poliovirus transmission has been eliminated in most of the world through the use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). In the United States, use of OPV was discontinued by the year 2000 because of the potential for vaccine-associated paralytic polio (VAPP); an average of eight cases were reported each year in the United States during 1980-2000. Polio eradication efforts in other parts of the world continue to rely on OPV to take advantage of transmission of poliovirus vaccine strains to unvaccinated persons in the population, lower cost, and ease of administration. In 2013, an infant aged 7 months who recently immigrated to the United States from India was referred to a hospital in San Antonio, Texas. The infant had fever, an enlarging skin lesion in the deltoid region with axillary lymphadenopathy, decreased activity, and inability to bear weight on the left leg, progressing to paralysis of the left leg over a 6-week period. Recognition of lymphopenia on complete blood count led to immune evaluation, which revealed the presence of severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCIDS), an inherited disorder. A history of OPV and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination in India led to the diagnoses of VAPP and BCG-osis, which were confirmed microbiologically. This report demonstrates the importance of obtaining a comprehensive clinical history in a child who has recently immigrated to the United States, with recognition that differing vaccine practices in other countries might require additional consideration of potential etiologies. PMID:25144542

  7. Polio Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... inactive polio vaccine OPV=oral polio vaccine Polio Vaccination Pronounced [PO-lee-oh] Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... handling and storage Related Pages Global Vaccines and Immunization Global Polio Also Known As & Abbreviations Polio=poliomyelitis ...

  8. Nectin-Like Interactions between Poliovirus and Its Receptor Trigger Conformational Changes Associated with Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Belnap, David M.; Cheng, Naiqian; Noel, Roane T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliovirus infection is initiated by attachment to a receptor on the cell surface called Pvr or CD155. At physiological temperatures, the receptor catalyzes an irreversible expansion of the virus to form an expanded form of the capsid called the 135S particle. This expansion results in the externalization of the myristoylated capsid protein VP4 and the N-terminal extension of the capsid protein VP1, both of which become inserted into the cell membrane. Structures of the expanded forms of poliovirus and of several related viruses have recently been reported. However, until now, it has been unclear how receptor binding triggers viral expansion at physiological temperature. Here, we report poliovirus in complex with an enzymatically partially deglycosylated form of the 3-domain ectodomain of Pvr at a 4-Å resolution, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The interaction of the receptor with the virus in this structure is reminiscent of the interactions of Pvr with its natural ligands. At a low temperature, the receptor induces very few changes in the structure of the virus, with the largest changes occurring within the footprint of the receptor, and in a loop of the internal protein VP4. Changes in the vicinity of the receptor include the displacement of a natural lipid ligand (called “pocket factor”), demonstrating that the loss of this ligand, alone, is not sufficient to induce particle expansion. Finally, analogies with naturally occurring ligand binding in the nectin family suggest which specific structural rearrangements in the virus-receptor complex could help to trigger the irreversible expansion of the capsid. IMPORTANCE The cell-surface receptor (Pvr) catalyzes a large structural change in the virus that exposes membrane-binding protein chains. We fitted known atomic models of the virus and Pvr into three-dimensional experimental maps of the receptor-virus complex. The molecular interactions we see between poliovirus and its receptor are

  9. Childhood vaccination coverage in Italy: results of a seven-region survey. The Italian Vaccine Coverage Survey Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In Italy few data exist on vaccination coverage and timeliness. We therefore carried out cluster surveys on 12-23-month-olds in nine Italian cities and regions using standard Expanded Programme on Immunization methodology. The study areas accounted for 40% of all live births in Italy in 1991. Coverage levels for the third dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and for oral poliovirus vaccine, which are mandatory, exceeded 90% in all but one area. However, less than two-thirds of the children had completed the primary vaccine series by their first birthday. The commonest reason for failure to complete the series in time was that the child had been sick and was not brought for vaccination. For the two optional vaccines (pertussis and measles) coverage was much poorer, ranging from 8% to 71% for pertussis and from 9% to 53% for measles. The commonest reason given by the mothers for pertussis non-vaccination was that they had been advised against it, while for measles the commonest reasons were that the child was sick and that they had been advised against it. These findings suggest that although coverage for the mandatory vaccines is high, coverage for pertussis and measles is very low. Additional education of physicians and mothers is needed concerning the true contraindications for vaccination. Also, in the absence of legislation making pertussis and measles vaccines mandatory, greater efforts are needed to convince physicians and the public about the benefits of their use. PMID:7867134

  10. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  11. Vaccination coverage among children in kindergarten--United States, 2009-10 school year.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    Healthy People 2020 objectives include maintaining vaccination coverage among children in kindergarten (IID-10) (1). The target is ≥95% vaccination coverage for the following vaccines: poliovirus; diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTP/DTaP/DT); measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR); hepatitis B (HepB); and varicella (1). Data from school assessment surveys are used to monitor vaccination coverage and vaccination exemption levels among children enrolled in kindergarten. This report summarizes data from school assessment surveys submitted to CDC by 48 federal immunization program grantees (including 47 states and the District of Columbia) for the 2009-10 school year to describe vaccination coverage and exemption rates (2). For that period, 17 grantees reported coverage of ?95% for four vaccines (poliovirus, DTP/DTaP/DT, MMR, and HepB) and four grantees reported coverage of ≥95% for 2 doses of varicella vaccine. Total exemption rates, including medical, religious, and philosophical exemptions, ranged from <1% to 6.2% across grantees, and 15 grantees reported exemption rates<1%. Survey methods for vaccination coverage and exemption rates varied among grantees, making comparisons difficult and limiting the use of school assessment surveys to report aggregate national rates. Further standardization of school assessment survey methods will generate comparable data between grantees to monitor and track progress in reaching national objectives, and allow development of best practice guidelines for grantees to more effectively use and report school coverage and exemption data. CDC will continue to monitor vaccination coverage and exemption levels and assist grantees in identification of local areas with low vaccination coverage or high exemption rates for further evaluation or intervention. PMID:21637184

  12. The poliovirus receptor protein is produced both as membrane-bound and secreted forms.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, S; Horie, H; Ise, I; Okitsu, A; Yoshida, M; Iizuka, N; Takeuchi, K; Takegami, T; Nomoto, A

    1990-01-01

    Both genomic and complementary DNA clones encoding poliovirus receptors were isolated from genomic and complementary DNA libraries prepared from HeLa S3 cells, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these cloned DNAs revealed that the poliovirus receptor gene is approximately 20 kb long and contains seven introns in the coding region, and that at least four mRNA isoforms referring to the coding sequence are generated by alternative splicing and appear to encode four different molecules, that is, PVR alpha, PVR beta, PVR gamma and PVR delta. The predicted amino acid sequences indicate that PVR alpha and PVR delta, corresponding to the previously described cDNA clones H20A and H20B, respectively, are integral membrane proteins while the other two molecules described here for the first time lack a putative transmembrane domain. Mouse cell transformants carrying PVR alpha were permissive for poliovirus infection, but those carrying PVR beta were hardly permissive. In contrast to PVR alpha, PVR beta was not detected on the surface of the mouse cell transformants but was detected in the culture fluid by an immunological method using a monoclonal antibody against poliovirus receptor. Three types of splicing products for PVR alpha, PVR beta and PVR gamma were detected by polymerase chain reactions using appropriate primers in poly(A)+ RNAs of the brain, leukocyte, liver, lung and placenta of humans; the choice of primers used did not permit detection of PVR delta. In situ hybridization using a cDNA fragment as a probe demonstrated that the PVR gene is located at the band q13.1----13.2 of human chromosome 19. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2170108

  13. Strand-specific attachment of avidin-spheres to double-stranded poliovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, O C; Ehrenfeld, E; Manning, J

    1979-01-01

    Poliovirus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules containing covalently attached protein were coupled with a biotin ester through the protein moiety. Subsequent interaction of the RNA-biotin with avidin attached to electronopaque plastic spheres led to the formation of complexes that were easily visualized in the electron microscope. Avidinspheres were associated only with one end of the RNA-biotin molecules, as seen in the electron microscope. Avidin-sphere attachment to poliovirus double-stranded RNA is strand specific, as shown by molecular hybridization of strand-specific probes to the separated strands of denatured complexes. [3H]DNA complementary to polio virion RNA hybridized exclusively to the strands bearing associated spheres [(+) strands] whereas 125I-labeled virion RNA hybridized predominantly with strands without spheres [(-)strands]. This biotin-avidin labeling technique provides a means for the isolation of full-length poliovirus (-) strands and may provide a general means for isolation of double-stranded polynucleotides containing tightly attached protein. Images PMID:218216

  14. Identification of terminal adenylyl transferase activity of the poliovirus polymerase 3Dpol.

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, K L; Galarza, J M; Richards, O C; Summers, D F; Ehrenfeld, E

    1994-01-01

    A terminal adenylyl transferase (TATase) activity has been identified in preparations of purified poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3Dpol). Highly purified 3Dpol is capable of adding [32P]AMP to the 3' ends of chemically synthesized 12-nucleotide (nt)-long RNAs. The purified 52-kDa polypeptide, isolated after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and renatured, retained the TATase activity. Two 3Dpol mutants, purified from Escherichia coli expression systems, displayed no detectable polymerase activity and were unable to catalyze TATase activity. Likewise, extracts from the parental E. coli strain that harbored no expression plasmid were unable to catalyze formation of the TATase products. With the RNA oligonucleotide 5'-CCUGCUUUUGCA-3' used as an acceptor, the products formed by wild-type 3Dpol were 9 and 18 nt longer than the 12-nt oligomer. GTP, CTP, and UTP did not serve as substrates for transfer to this RNA, either by themselves or when all deoxynucleoside triphosphates were present in the reaction. Results from kinetic and stoichiometric analyses suggest that the reaction is catalytic and shows substrate and enzyme dependence. The 3'-terminal 13 nt of poliovirus minus-strand RNA also served as an acceptor for TATase activity, raising the possibility that this activity functions in poliovirus RNA replication. The efficiency of utilization and the nature of the products formed during the reaction were dependent on the acceptor RNA. Images PMID:8057462

  15. Recovery of poliovirus from cut surface of stored fresh papaya fruit.

    PubMed

    Lee, A S; Yap, K L

    1999-06-01

    Poliovirus kept on the cut surfaces of fully ripe papaya cubes placed in an ice box showed a sharp and significant reduction in the recovery of infectious virus about 15 minutes after exposure. Thereafter, a very gradual decrease ensued and infectious residual virus was detected up to the end of the 6-hour exposure period. Papaya cubes washed or kept overnight before virus inoculation, and from less ripe fruits produced a similar survival pattern. A very small proportion of the inoculum was recovered from the mashed content of the inoculated papaya cubes thus suggesting that most of the non-recovered virus particles were inactivated. The results suggest that the importance of poliovirus-contaminated cut papayas as a transmission vehicle for the virus is greatly reduced by the rapid decline in the infectivity of a large proportion of the virus soon after contamination. Nevertheless, the potential to transmit remains as a small residual pool of infectious poliovirus is able to survive for a relatively long period. PMID:10774695

  16. Effective case/infection ratio of poliomyelitis in vaccinated populations.

    PubMed

    Bencskó, G; Ferenci, T

    2016-07-01

    Recent polio outbreaks in Syria and Ukraine, and isolation of poliovirus from asymptomatic carriers in Israel have raised concerns that polio might endanger Europe. We devised a model to calculate the time needed to detect the first case should the disease be imported into Europe, taking the effect of vaccine coverage - both from inactivated and oral polio vaccines, also considering their differences - on the length of silent transmission into account by deriving an 'effective' case/infection ratio that is applicable for vaccinated populations. Using vaccine coverage data and the newly developed model, the relationship between this ratio and vaccine coverage is derived theoretically and is also numerically determined for European countries. This shows that unnoticed transmission is longer for countries with higher vaccine coverage and a higher proportion of IPV-vaccinated individuals among those vaccinated. Assuming borderline transmission (R = 1·1), the expected time to detect the first case is between 326 days and 512 days in different countries, with the number of infected individuals between 235 and 1439. Imperfect surveillance further increases these numbers, especially the number of infected until detection. While longer silent transmission does not increase the number of clinical diseases, it can make the application of traditional outbreak response methods more complicated, among others. PMID:26830060

  17. Recent Progress towards Novel EV71 Anti-Therapeutics and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ng, Qingyong; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy

    2015-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a group of viruses that belongs to the Picornaviridae family, which also includes viruses such as polioviruses. EV71, together with coxsackieviruses, is widely known for its association with Hand Foot Mouth Disease (HFMD), which generally affects children age five and below. Besides HFMD, EV71 can also trigger more severe and life-threatening neurological conditions such as encephalitis. Considering the lack of a vaccine and antiviral drug against EV71, together with the increasing spread of these viruses, the development of such drugs and vaccines becomes the top priority in protecting our younger generations. This article, hence, reviews some of the recent progress in the formulations of anti-therapeutics and vaccine generation for EV71, covering (i) inactivated vaccines; (ii) baculovirus-expressed vaccines against EV71; (iii) human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment; and (iv) the use of monoclonal antibody therapy as a prevention and treatment for EV71 infections. PMID:26670245

  18. Recent Progress towards Novel EV71 Anti-Therapeutics and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Qingyong; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a group of viruses that belongs to the Picornaviridae family, which also includes viruses such as polioviruses. EV71, together with coxsackieviruses, is widely known for its association with Hand Foot Mouth Disease (HFMD), which generally affects children age five and below. Besides HFMD, EV71 can also trigger more severe and life-threatening neurological conditions such as encephalitis. Considering the lack of a vaccine and antiviral drug against EV71, together with the increasing spread of these viruses, the development of such drugs and vaccines becomes the top priority in protecting our younger generations. This article, hence, reviews some of the recent progress in the formulations of anti-therapeutics and vaccine generation for EV71, covering (i) inactivated vaccines; (ii) baculovirus-expressed vaccines against EV71; (iii) human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment; and (iv) the use of monoclonal antibody therapy as a prevention and treatment for EV71 infections. PMID:26670245

  19. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in India during 1999: decreased risk despite massive use of oral polio vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Kathryn A.; Banerjee, Kaushik; Gary Hlady, W.; Andrus, Jon K.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) is a rare but serious consequence of the administration of oral polio vaccine (OPV). Intensified OPV administration has reduced wild poliovirus transmission in India but VAPP is becoming a matter of concern. METHODS: We analysed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance data in order to estimate the VAPP risk in this country. VAPP was defined as occurring in AFP cases with onset of paralysis in 1999, residual weakness 60 days after onset, and isolation of vaccine-related poliovirus. Recipient VAPP cases were a subset with onset of paralysis between 4 and 40 days after receipt of OPV. FINDINGS: A total of 181 AFP cases met the case definition. The following estimates of VAPP risk were made: overall risk, 1 case per 4.1 to 4.6 million OPV doses administered; recipient risk,1 case per 12.2 million; first-dose recipient risk, 1 case per 2.8 million; and subsequent-dose recipient risk, 1 case per 13.9 million. CONCLUSION: On the basis of data from a highly sensitive surveillance system the estimated VAPP risk in India is evidently lower than that in other countries, notwithstanding the administration of multiple OPV doses to children in mass immunization campaigns. PMID:11984607

  20. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  1. Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events Also Known As Smallpox = Vaccinia Smallpox Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The smallpox ... like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent ...

  2. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... and Gynecologists. Committee Opinion No. 588: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2014;123(3):712-8. PMID: ...

  3. Footrot vaccines and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dhungyel, Om; Hunter, James; Whittington, Richard

    2014-05-30

    Research on footrot in small ruminants, which is caused by Dichelobacter nodosus, has led to development of vaccines and their application for control, treatment and eradication of the disease in sheep. Footrot vaccines have evolved over decades to contain monovalent whole cell, multivalent recombinant fimbrial, and finally mono or bivalent recombinant fimbrial antigens. Initially whole cell vaccines made against the few known serogroups of D. nodosus were found to be inefficient in control of the disease in the field, which was attributed to the presence of other unidentified serogroups and also the use of inefficient adjuvants. Fimbriae or pili, which are the basis for antigenic variation, were found to be the major protective and also curative antigens but they are not cross protective between the different serogroups. Multivalent vaccines incorporating all the known serogroups have been proven to be of limited efficacy due to the phenomenon of antigenic competition. Recent studies in Nepal, Bhutan and Australia have shown that outbreak-specific vaccination which involves targeting identified serogroups with mono- or bivalent recombinant fimbrial vaccines, can be very effective in sheep and goats. Where multiple serogroups are present in a flock, antigenic competition can be overcome by sequentially targeting the serogroups with different bivalent vaccines every 3 months. A common antigen which would confer immunity to all serogroups would be the ideal immunogen but the initial studies were not successful in this area. Until universal antigen/s are available, flock specific mono or bivalent fimbrial vaccines are likely to be the most effective tool for control and eradication of footrot in sheep and goats. Future research in footrot vaccines should be focused on improving the duration of prophylaxis by incorporating new and emerging immunomodulators or adjuvants with modified delivery vehicles, discovering a common antigen and understanding the mechanisms of

  4. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921696

  5. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  6. Isolation and characterization of HeLa cell lines blocked at different steps in the poliovirus life cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, G; Levy, A; Racaniello, V R

    1989-01-01

    Cotransfection of poliovirus RNA and R1, a poliovirus subgenomic RNA containing a deletion of nearly all of the capsid region, resulted in surviving cells, in contrast to the complete cell death observed after transfection with viral RNA. Cells that survived the cotransfection grew into colonies, produced infectious poliovirus, and underwent cycles of cell lysis (crisis periods) where less than 1% of the cells survived, followed by periods of growth. Poliovirus evolved during the persistent infection as judged by changes in plaque size. After passage for 6 months, a stable line called SOFIA emerged that no longer produced infectious virus and did not contain viral proteins or viral RNA. Cells frozen in liquid N2 while still in crisis and recultured 4 months later (named SOFIA N2) were also stabilized. After infection with poliovirus, SOFIA N2 cells showed a delay in the development of cytopathic effect, viral production, and cellular death when compared with HeLa cells. In contrast, SOFIA cells did not develop cytopathic effect and produced 10,000 times less virus than SOFIA N2 or HeLa cells. Viral production was delayed in SOFIA and SOFIA N2 cells transfected with poliovirus RNA when compared with HeLa cells, suggesting the presence of an intracellular block to poliovirus replication. Analysis of the cellular receptor for poliovirus by virus binding, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and in situ rosette assays with an antireceptor monoclonal antibody showed that receptors were expressed in SOFIA N2 cells but not in SOFIA cells. Echovirus 6, an enterovirus which uses a different cellular receptor, formed small plaques on SOFIA cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus formed plaques of similar size on SOFIA and HeLa cells, suggesting that the intracellular block was specific for enteroviruses. Cotransfection of the subgenomic replicon R1 with poliovirion RNA therefore resulted in the selection of HeLa cell variants containing blocks to poliovirus replication at the

  7. Isolation of a soluble and template-dependent poliovirus RNA polymerase that copies virion RNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Flanegan, J B; Van Dyke, T A

    1979-01-01

    A soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was isolated from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells and was shown to copy poliovirus RNA in vitro. The enzyme was purified from a 200,000-X-g supernatant of a cytoplasmic extract of infected cells. The activity of the enzyme was measured throughout the purification by using a polyadenylic acid template and oligouridylic acid primer. The enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, glycerol gradient centrifugation, and phosphocellulose chromatography. The polymerase precipitated in a 35% saturated solution of ammonium sulfate, sedimented at about 7S on a glycerol gradient, and eluted from phosphocellulose with 0.15 M KC1. The polymerase was purified about 40-fold and was shown to be totally dependent on exogenous RNA for activity and relatively free of contaminating nuclease. The partially purified polymerase was able to use purified polio virion RNA as well as a template. Under the reaction conditions used, the polymerase required an oligouridylic acid primer and all four ribonucleside triphosphates for activity. The optimum ratio of oligouridylic acid molecules to poliovirus RNA molecules for priming activity was about 16:1. A nearest-neighbor analysis of the in vitro RNA product shows it to be heteropolymeric. Annealing the in vitro product with poliovirus RNA product shows it to be heteropolymeric. Annealing the in vitro product with poliovirus RNA rendered it resistant to RNase digestion, thus suggesting that the product RNA was complementary to the virion RNA template. PMID:232168

  8. Attenuation of Neurovirulence, Biodistribution, and Shedding of a Poliovirus:Rhinovirus Chimera after Intrathalamic Inoculation in Macaca fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrikova, Elena Y.; Goetz, Christian; Walters, Robert W.; Lawson, Sarah K.; Peggins, James O.; Muszynski, Karen; Ruppel, Sheryl; Poole, Karyol; Giardina, Steven L.; Vela, Eric M.; Estep, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A dependence of poliovirus on an unorthodox translation initiation mode can be targeted selectively to drive viral protein synthesis and cytotoxicity in malignant cells. Transformed cells are naturally susceptible to poliovirus, due to widespread ectopic upregulation of the poliovirus receptor, Necl-5, in ectodermal/neuroectodermal cancers. Viral tumor cell killing and the host immunologic response it engenders produce potent, lasting antineoplastic effects in animal tumor models. Clinical application of this principle depends on unequivocal demonstration of safety in primate models for paralytic poliomyelitis. We conducted extensive dose-range-finding, toxicity, biodistribution, shedding, and neutralizing antibody studies of the prototype oncolytic poliovirus recombinant, PVS-RIPO, after intrathalamic inoculation in Macaca fascicularis. These studies suggest that intracerebral PVS-RIPO inoculation does not lead to viral propagation in the central nervous system (CNS), does not cause histopathological CNS lesions or neurological symptoms that can be attributed to the virus, is not associated with extraneural virus dissemination or replication and does not induce shedding of virus with stool. Intrathalamic PVS-RIPO inoculation induced neutralizing antibody responses against poliovirus serotype 1 in all animals studied. PMID:22171271

  9. Stool screening of Syrian refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, 2013/2014: Identification of Sabin like polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Sindy; Neubauer, Katrin; Baillot, Armin; Rieder, Gabriele; Adam, Maja; Diedrich, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Germany is a partner of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Assurance of polio free status is based on enterovirus surveillance, which focuses on patients with signs of acute flaccid paralysis or aseptic meningitis/encephalitis, representing the key symptoms of poliovirus infection. In response to the wild poliovirus outbreak in Syria 2013 and high number of refugees coming from Syria to Germany, stool samples from 629 Syrian refugees/asylum seekers aged <3 years were screened for wild poliovirus between November 2013 and April 2014. Ninety-three samples (14.8%) were positive in an enterovirus specific PCR. Of these, 12 contained Sabin-like polioviruses. The remaining 81 samples were characterized as non-polio enteroviruses representing several members of groups A-C as well as rhinovirus. Wild-type poliovirus was not detected via stool screening involving molecular and virological methods, indicating a very low risk for the importation by Syrian refugees and asylum seekers at that time. PMID:26321005

  10. Outbreak of paralytic poliomyelitis in Oman: evidence for widespread transmission among fully vaccinated children.

    PubMed

    Sutter, R W; Patriarca, P A; Brogan, S; Malankar, P G; Pallansch, M A; Kew, O M; Bass, A G; Cochi, S L; Alexander, J P; Hall, D B

    1991-09-21

    From January, 1988, to March, 1989, a widespread outbreak (118 cases) of poliomyelitis type 1 occurred in Oman. Incidence of paralytic disease was highest in children younger than 2 years (87/100,000) despite an immunisation programme that recently had raised coverage with 3 doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) among 12-month-old children from 67% to 87%. We did a case-control study (70 case-patients, 692 age-matched controls) to estimate the clinical efficacy of OPV, assessed the immunogenicity of OPV and extent of poliovirus spread by serology, retrospectively evaluated the cold chain and vaccine potency, and sought the origin of the outbreak strain by genomic sequencing. 3 doses of OPV reduced the risk of paralysis by 91%; vaccine failures could not be explained by failures in the cold chain nor on suboptimum vaccine potency. Cases and controls had virtually identical type 1 neutralising antibody profiles, suggesting that poliovirus type 1 circulation was widespread. Genomic sequencing indicated that the outbreak strain had been recently imported from South Asia and was distinguishable from isolates indigenous to the Middle East. Accumulation of enough children to sustain the outbreak seems to have been due to previous success of the immunisation programme in reducing spread of endemic strains, suboptimum efficacy of OPV, and delay in completing the primary immunisation series until 7 months of age. Additionally, the estimated attack rate of infection among children aged 9-23 months exceeded 25% in some regions, suggesting that a substantial proportion of fully vaccinated children had been involved in the chain of transmission. PMID:1679866

  11. Using the social structure of markets as a framework for analyzing vaccination debates: The case of emergency polio vaccination.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Yaron; Ziv, Arnona; Goren, Uri; Tal, Orna; Kaplan, Giora; Velan, Baruch

    2016-07-01

    The framework of the social structure of markets was used to analyze an online debate revolving around an emergency poliovirus vaccination campaign in Israel. Examination of a representative sample of 200 discussions revealed the activity of three parties: authoritative agents promoting vaccinations, alternative agents promoting anti-vaccination, both representing sellers, and the impartial agents, representing the customers-the general public deliberating whether to comply with vaccination or not. Both sellers interacted with consumers using mechanisms of luring and convincing. The authoritative agents conveyed their message by exhibiting professionalism, building trust and offering to share information. The alternative agents spread doubts and evoked negative emotions of distrust and fear. Among themselves, the alternative agents strived to discredit the authoritative agents, while the latter preferred to ignore the former. Content analysis of discussions conducted by the general public reveal reiteration of the messages conveyed by the sellers, implying that the transaction of pro and anti-vaccination ideas indeed took place. We suggest that the framework of the market as a social structure can be applied to the analysis of other vaccination debates, and thereby provide additional insights into vaccination polemics. PMID:27058586

  12. Community Circulation Patterns of Oral Polio Vaccine Serotypes 1, 2, and 3 After Mexican National Immunization Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Stephanie B.; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Huang, ChunHong; Sarnquist, Clea; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Nelson, Christine; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Holubar, Marisa; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; García-García, Lourdes; Maldonado, Yvonne A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. With wild poliovirus nearing eradication, preventing circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) by understanding oral polio vaccine (OPV) community circulation is increasingly important. Mexico, where OPV is given only during biannual national immunization weeks (NIWs) but where children receive inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) as part of their primary regimen, provides a natural setting to study OPV community circulation. Methods. In total, 216 children and household contacts in Veracruz, Mexico, were enrolled, and monthly stool samples and questionnaires collected for 1 year; 2501 stool samples underwent RNA extraction, reverse transcription, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect OPV serotypes 1, 2, and 3. Results. OPV was detected up to 7 months after an NIW, but not at 8 months. In total, 35% of samples collected from children vaccinated the prior month, but only 4% of other samples, contained OPV. Although each serotype was detected in similar proportions among OPV strains shed as a result of direct vaccination, 87% of OPV acquired through community spread was serotype 2 (P < .0001). Conclusions. Serotype 2 circulates longer and is transmitted more readily than serotypes 1 or 3 after NIWs in a Mexican community primarily vaccinated with IPV. This may be part of the reason why most isolated cVDPV has been serotype 2. PMID:24367038

  13. Conditional poliovirus mutants made by random deletion mutagenesis of infectious cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, K; Nelsen, B

    1990-01-01

    Small deletions were introduced into DNA plasmids bearing cDNA copies of Mahoney type 1 poliovirus RNA. The procedure used was similar to that of P. Hearing and T. Shenk (J. Mol. Biol. 167:809-822, 1983), with modifications designed to introduce only one lesion randomly into each DNA molecule. Methods to map small deletions in either large DNA or RNA molecules were employed. Two poliovirus mutants, VP1-101 and VP1-102, were selected from mutagenized populations on the basis of their host range phenotype, showing a large reduction in the relative numbers of plaques on CV1 and HeLa cells compared with wild-type virus. The deletions borne by the mutant genomes were mapped to the region encoding the amino terminus of VP1. That these lesions were responsible for the mutant phenotypes was substantiated by reintroduction of the sequenced lesions into a wild-type poliovirus cDNA by deoxyoligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The deletion of nucleotides encoding amino acids 8 and 9 of VP1 was responsible for the VP1-101 phenotype; the VP1-102 defect was caused by the deletion of the sequences encoding the first four amino acids of VP1. The peptide sequence at the VP1-VP3 proteolytic cleavage site was altered from glutamine-glycine to glutamine-methionine in VP1-102; this apparently did not alter the proteolytic cleavage pattern. The biochemical defects resulting from these mutations are discussed in the accompanying report. Images PMID:2152811

  14. The human poliovirus receptor. Receptor-virus interaction and parameters of disease specificity.

    PubMed

    Gromeier, M; Lu, H H; Bernhardt, G; Harber, J J; Bibb, J A; Wimmer, E

    1995-05-25

    The host range of poliovirus is determined by the expression of the hPVR, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We characterized hPVR proteins biochemically and found them to be complex-type glycoproteins. The outermost V-like domain of three extracellular domains harbors the PVR function. A panel of single or multiple amino acid exchanges were introduced throughout this domain in order to localize regions involved in virus-receptor interactions. Putative contact amino acids were found to reside in the C'C"D and DE regions. Binding and uptake of poliovirus paralleled virus replication in all mutants tested suggesting that virus binding was affected without abrogating the ability to mediate subsequent events in the infection. Although the primate PVR is essential in conferring susceptibility to poliovirus infection, certain strains can induce neurological disease in rodents. Mouse neurovirulent PV isolates of divergent serotypical origin each provoked a distinctive, characteristic neurological syndrome upon intracerebral infection of wild-type mice. We analyzed clinical and histopathological features of diffuse encephalomyelitis caused by these PV strains and compared the condition with poliomyelitis in mice transgenic for the hPVR. Diffuse PV encephalomyelitis in wild-type mice could be distinguished clinically and histopathologically from hPVR-mediated poliomyelitis in trangenic mice. We localized the determinants of mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a), a derivative of PV1 (Mahoney), in a portion of the viral genome encompassing parts of the capsid protein VP1 as well as the nonstructural protein 2A. Mouse neuropathogenicity could possibly be conferred by reduced particle stability of PV1(LS-a) inasmuch as we found particles to be thermolabile. PMID:7611627

  15. Efficiency of beef extract for the recovery of poliovirus from wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Landry, E F; Vaughn, J M; Thomas, M Z; Vicale, T J

    1978-10-01

    The efficiency of poliovirus elution from fiber glass cartridge filters (K27), epoxy-fiber glass-asbestos filters (M780), and pleated cartridge filters was assessed by using 3% beef extract (pH 9.0) or 0.1 M glycine (pH 11.5). Poliovirus type I, strain LSc, was seeded into 20- to 25-gallon (ca. 75.6- to 95.6-liter) samples of treated sewage effluent and concentrated by using a filter adsorption-elution technique. Virus elution was accomplished by using either two 600-ml portions of 3% beef extract (pH 9.0), or two 1-liter portions of 0.1 M glycine (pH 11.5). In all experiments, beef extract elution followed by organic flocculation was found to be superior, yielding a mean recovery efficiency of 85%, with recoveries ranging from 68 to 100%. Elution with 0.1 M glycine (pH 11.5) followed by inorganic flocculation resulted in a mean recovery efficiency of 36%. The variable range of recoveries with beef extract could not be significantly improved by varying the type of beef extract or by extending the elution time to 30 min. Second-step reconcentration of 1-liter seeded sewage effluent and renovated wastewater samples indicated that organic flocculation was a more efficient method for virus recovery than inorganic flocculation. Beef extract concentrations of less than 3% were found to be efficient in the recovery of poliovirus from renovated wastewater. PMID:30391

  16. In Vitro Synthesis of Poliovirus Ribonucleic Acid: Role of the Replicative Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Marc

    1969-01-01

    Poliovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase crude extracts could be stored frozen in liquid nitrogen without loss of activity or specificity. The major in vitro product of these extracts was viral single-stranded RNA. However, after short periods of incubation with radioactive nucleoside triphosphates, most of the incorporated label was found in replicative intermediate. When excess unlabeled nucleoside triphosphate was added, the label was displaced from the replicative intermediate and accumulated as viral RNA. It is concluded from this experiment that the replicative intermediate is the precursor to viral RNA. In addition, some of the label was chased into double-stranded RNA. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:4306193

  17. Calcium Flux between the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrion Contributes to Poliovirus-Induced Apoptosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Brisac, Cynthia; Téoulé, François; Autret, Arnaud; Pelletier, Isabelle; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Brenner, Catherine; Lemaire, Christophe; Blondel, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We show that poliovirus (PV) infection induces an increase in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentration in neuroblastoma IMR5 cells, at least partly through Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum lumen via the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels. This leads to Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondria through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). This increase in mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration in PV-infected cells leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. PMID:20861253

  18. Pioneering figures in medicine: Albert Bruce Sabin--inventor of the oral polio vaccine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R; Leggat, Peter A

    2005-01-01

    Over ten years after his death, the Sabin oral vaccine continues its profound influence on public health throughout the world. The annual incidence of polio has fallen dramatically since its introduction, with more than 300,000 lives being spared each year and an annual global saving in excess of 1 billion US dollars. In many ways, the development of an effective oral vaccine and its subsequent regulation by the World Health Organization can serve as a model for medical researchers. Our review describes the contribution of Albert Sabin as a medical researcher, and how his vaccine had a profound impact on the global reduction of polio infections. As many different factors influenced health-care last century, we describe Sabin's involvement with respect to prevailing scientific paradigms and public health issues of the time. Our paper also outlines the basic epidemiology of poliovirus and the historical development of an effective vaccine, both with and without Albert Sabin. PMID:16422178

  19. Remodeling the Endoplasmic Reticulum by Poliovirus Infection and by Individual Viral Proteins: an Autophagy-Like Origin for Virus-Induced Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Suhy, David A.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2000-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes studied assemble RNA replication complexes on the surfaces of cytoplasmic membranes. Infection of mammalian cells with poliovirus and other picornaviruses results in the accumulation of dramatically rearranged and vesiculated membranes. Poliovirus-induced membranes did not cofractionate with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), lysosomes, mitochondria, or the majority of Golgi-derived or endosomal membranes in buoyant density gradients, although changes in ionic strength affected ER and virus-induced vesicles, but not other cellular organelles, similarly. When expressed in isolation, two viral proteins of the poliovirus RNA replication complex, 3A and 2C, cofractionated with ER membranes. However, in cells that expressed 2BC, a proteolytic precursor of the 2B and 2C proteins, membranes identical in buoyant density to those observed during poliovirus infection were formed. When coexpressed with 2BC, viral protein 3A was quantitatively incorporated into these fractions, and the membranes formed were ultrastructurally similar to those in poliovirus-infected cells. These data argue that poliovirus-induced vesicles derive from the ER by the action of viral proteins 2BC and 3A by a mechanism that excludes resident host proteins. The double-membraned morphology, cytosolic content, and apparent ER origin of poliovirus-induced membranes are all consistent with an autophagic origin for these membranes. PMID:10982339

  20. A Critical Role of a Cellular Membrane Traffic Protein in Poliovirus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Feng, Qian; Nikovics, Krisztina; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2008-01-01

    Replication of many RNA viruses is accompanied by extensive remodeling of intracellular membranes. In poliovirus-infected cells, ER and Golgi stacks disappear, while new clusters of vesicle-like structures form sites for viral RNA synthesis. Virus replication is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA), implicating some components(s) of the cellular secretory pathway in virus growth. Formation of characteristic vesicles induced by expression of viral proteins was not inhibited by BFA, but they were functionally deficient. GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small cellular GTPases, Arf, is responsible for the sensitivity of virus infection to BFA, and is required for virus replication. Knockdown of GBF1 expression inhibited virus replication, which was rescued by catalytically active protein with an intact N-terminal sequence. We identified a mutation in GBF1 that allows growth of poliovirus in the presence of BFA. Interaction between GBF1 and viral protein 3A determined the outcome of infection in the presence of BFA. PMID:19023417

  1. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  2. Effect of Poliovirus on Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, W. W.; Cox, D. C.; Kurtz, H.; Powers, C. D.; Davies, S. J.

    1966-01-01

    Ackermann, W. W. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), D. C. Cox, H. Kurtz, C. D. Powers, and S. J. Davies. Effect of poliovirus on deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in HeLa cells. J. Bacteriol. 91:1943–1952. 1966.—Both poliovirus and arginine stimulated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in cultures of HeLa cells which were preconditioned by incubation in a medium deficient in arginine. However, the number of cells producing DNA was unaffected. DNA synthesis in such preconditioned cells was 10 to 20% of the maximal value obtained with a full complement of amino acids. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was produced in these cultures either by increasing the multiplicity of exposure above 40 plaque-forming units of virus per cell or by increasing the concentration of the deficient amino acid at the time of virus addition. Inhibition of DNA synthesis resulted from a reduction in the fraction of cells producing DNA. The concentration of arginine required for viral inhibition of DNA synthesis is greater than that for viral multiplication. PMID:4287076

  3. Development of a novel bag-mediated filtration system for environmental recovery of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Fagnant, Christine Susan; Beck, Nicola Koren; Yang, Ming-Fong; Barnes, Kilala Sayisha; Boyle, David S; Meschke, John Scott

    2014-12-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is on the verge of global eradication. Due to asymptomatic shedding, eradication certification requires environmental and clinical surveillance. Current environmental surveillance methods involve collection and processing of 400-mL to 1-L grab samples by a two-phase separation method, where sample volume limits detection sensitivity. Filtration of larger sample volumes facilitates increased detection sensitivity. This study describes development of a pumpless in-field filtration system for poliovirus recovery from environmental waters. Recovery of PV types 1, 2, and 3 were compared for glass wool, ViroCap, and NanoCeram (PV1 only) filters. Seeded experiments were performed using 10(5) plaque forming units of PV inoculated into 10-L volumes of secondary effluent, surface water, or a 50:50 mixture of each at pH 7.0. Filter eluates were plated onto buffalo green monkey kidney cells for virus enumeration by plaque assay. Across all water types, recovery from glass wool filters for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 17%, 28%, and 6%, respectively. Recovery from ViroCaps for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 44%, 70%, and 81%, respectively. 10-L samples of moderate turbidity water were processed through ViroCap filters in less than 30 minutes using a pumpless, bag-mediated filtration system. Bag-mediated filtration offers a simple, compact, and efficient method for enhanced environmental PV surveillance. PMID:25473984

  4. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  5. Modification of an adenovirus major late promoter-binding factor during poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Fernández-Tomás, C; Gariglio, P; Weinmann, R

    1989-01-01

    To further characterize the mechanism involved in poliovirus-induced inhibition of HeLa cells mRNA synthesis, in vitro formation of DNA-protein complexes between nuclear upstream stimulatory transcription factor (USF) and the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter upstream promoter element (UPE; located between -45 and -65 base pairs) was studied. Using the gel shift assay, we found differences between the UPE-protein complex formed with partially purified nuclear extracts from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells and that obtained in the presence of mock-infected extracts. Formation of the modified UPE-USF complex coincided with virus-induced inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis in vivo and with a less efficient in vitro transcriptional activity of the nuclear extracts from infected cells. Furthermore, using a cross-linking protocol, we found that the host 46-kilodalton UPE-binding USF factor was severely diminished and that a virus-induced or -modified 50-kilodalton polypeptide appeared to be specifically bound to the UPE template. Images PMID:2474675

  6. The Role of Electron Microscopy in Studying the Continuum of Changes in Membranous Structures during Poliovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Evan D.; Yang, Jie E.; Bullitt, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the poliovirus genome is localized to cytoplasmic replication factories that are fashioned out of a mixture of viral proteins, scavenged cellular components, and new components that are synthesized within the cell due to viral manipulation/up-regulation of protein and phospholipid synthesis. These membranous replication factories are quite complex, and include markers from multiple cytoplasmic cellular organelles. This review focuses on the role of electron microscopy in advancing our understanding of poliovirus RNA replication factories. Structural data from the literature provide the basis for interpreting a wide range of biochemical studies that have been published on virus-induced lipid biosynthesis. In combination, structural and biochemical experiments elucidate the dramatic membrane remodeling that is a hallmark of poliovirus infection. Temporal and spatial membrane modifications throughout the infection cycle are discussed. Early electron microscopy studies of morphological changes following viral infection are re-considered in light of more recent data on viral manipulation of lipid and protein biosynthesis. These data suggest the existence of distinct subcellular vesicle populations, each of which serves specialized roles in poliovirus replication processes. PMID:26473912

  7. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showe...

  8. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are several types of HPV. ...

  9. Diphtheria Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination Pronounced (dif-THEER-ee-a) Recommend on Facebook ... Related Pages Pertussis Tetanus Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Abbreviations DTaP=Pediatric - Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis ...

  10. Giardia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Olson, M E; Ceri, H; Morck, D W

    2000-05-01

    Recently, a Giardia vaccine has become commercially available in the USA for prevention of clinical signs of giardiasis and reduction of cyst shedding in dogs and cats. The vaccine is based upon the current state of knowledge of Giardia antigenicity and immunology. Here, Merle Olson, Howard Ceri and Douglas Morck describe studies that led to the development of this vaccine and subsequent efficacy studies. Immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapeutic application of the vaccine are discussed. PMID:10782082

  11. H1PVAT is a novel and potent early-stage inhibitor of poliovirus replication that targets VP1.

    PubMed

    Tijsma, Aloys; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Spieser, Stéphane A H; De Palma, Armando; Koukni, Mohamed; Rhoden, Eric; Oberste, Steve; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Volny-Luraghi, Antonia; Martin, Javier; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter

    2014-10-01

    A novel small molecule, H1PVAT, was identified as a potent and selective inhibitor of the in vitro replication of all three poliovirus serotypes, whereas no activity was observed against other enteroviruses. Time-of-drug-addition studies revealed that the compound interfered with an early stage of virus replication. Four independently-selected H1PVAT-resistant virus variants uniformly carried the single amino acid substitution I194F in the VP1 capsid protein. Poliovirus type 1 strain Sabin, reverse-engineered to contain this substitution, proved to be completely insensitive to the antiviral effect of H1PVAT and was cross-resistant to the capsid-binding inhibitors V-073 and pirodavir. The VP1 I194F mutant had a smaller plaque phenotype than wild-type virus, and the amino acid substitution rendered the virus more susceptible to heat inactivation. Both for the wild-type and VP1 I194F mutant virus, the presence of H1PVAT increased the temperature at which the virus was inactivated, providing evidence that the compound interacts with the viral capsid, and that capsid stabilization and antiviral activity are not necessarily correlated. Molecular modeling suggested that H1PVAT binds with high affinity in the pocket underneath the floor of the canyon that is involved in receptor binding. Introduction of the I194F substitution in the model of VP1 induced a slight concerted rearrangement of the core β-barrel in this pocket, which disfavors binding of the compound. Taken together, the compound scaffold, to which H1PVAT belongs, may represent another promising class of poliovirus capsid-binding inhibitors next to V-073 and pirodavir. Potent antivirals against poliovirus will be essential in the poliovirus eradication end-game. PMID:25043639

  12. [The immunological basis of the administration of DTP-polio vaccine].

    PubMed

    Cohen, H

    2000-01-01

    The main subject of this essay is the analysis of the immunizing properties and possible side effects of DTP (whole cell)-polio vaccine, which since 1964 is the backbone of the immunization programme in the Netherlands. The concept, that the basis of the immunity conferred by diphtheria and tetanus toxoid and inactivated poliovirus is humoral, is now generally accepted. Assessment of the potency of these three components is based on their binding properties to specific immunoglobulines in standard-antisera. An example is the testing of neutralising antibodies against the three types of poliovirus in sera obtained from different groups of infants injected with increasing doses of this vaccine. Side-effects after injecting diphtheria- and tetanus toxoids and three types inactivated poliovaccine are negligible. For the pertussis component of the vaccine, this is not the case. The standardization of the potency of cellular pertussis vaccine is still based on the analysis of the protective capacity of a number of plain vaccine lots in the intercerebral mouse-protection test relative to the protection they confer in children. An international standard vaccine is available for this purpose, and the potency of individual lots can be expressed in International Units. At present acellular pertussis vaccines are also available for immunization against this disease. The components of such vaccines are at least for a number of components, arbitrarily chosen. Recently in a trial in Sweden, a five-component pertussis vaccine has given a similar protection of infants as a cellular vaccine of British origin. In addition this acellular vaccine induced less febrile reactions. However, acellular vaccines do not protect mice against intracerebral infection. because producers have decided to omit the "Outer Membrane Complex (OMC) as a component of the vaccine. In addition it has recently been shown that the presence of the cellular pertussis component in DPT vaccine will almost

  13. Who Needs Chickenpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Not Get Chickenpox Vaccine Types of Chickenpox Vaccine Child and Adult Immunization Schedules Possible Side Effects of Chickenpox Vaccine Childcare and School Vaccine Requirements Also Known As & Abbreviations ...

  14. Vaccination against poliomyelitis in economically underdeveloped countries

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1980-01-01

    Poliomyelitis lameness surveys in children of school age recently reported from Burma, Egypt, Ghana, and the Philippines have indicated an estimated, average annual endemic incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis similar to or higher than the overall average annual rate in the USA during the peak years in the prevaccine era. Contrary to oft-expressed dogma, high rates of paralytic poliomyelitis are occurring annually in regions with high infant mortality rates, continuing undernutrition, and absence of basic sanitary facilities. Recent data indicate that prolonged breast feeding does not impede the effectiveness of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). A high prevalence of nonpoliovirus enteric infections can modify, delay, and lower the frequency of seroconversion after OPV, but these effects are overcome by multiple doses. The problem of eliminating paralytic poliomyelitis from economically underdeveloped countries depends on administrative rather than immunological or epidemiological factors, although a specially concentrated effort is needed in countries where most of the cases occur during the first two years of life and where paralytic polioviruses are propagating throughout the year in a large proportion of the infant population. Under such circumstances, expanded routine infant immunization programmes, which include OPV but reach at best only 20-40% of the total infant population, who receive only one or a few doses of vaccines requiring multiple doses, cannot be expected to eliminate paralytic poliomyelitis as an important public health problem. Injections of multiple doses of quadruple vaccine (DPT + inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine) would not only greatly increase the cost of routine immunizations but would not achieve more or as much as feeding OPV at the time of the DPT injections. Mass administration of OPV each year on 2 days of the year 2 months apart, to all children under 2, 3, or 4 years of age (depending on the epidemiological situation), without

  15. Poliovirus Polyuridylic Acid Polymerase and RNA Replicase Have the Same Viral Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Flanegan, James B.; Baltimore, David

    1979-01-01

    A poliovirus-specific polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] polymerase that copies a polyadenylic acid template complexed to an oligouridylic acid primer was isolated from the membrane fraction of infected HeLa cells and was found to sediment at 4 to 5S on a linear 5 to 20% glycerol gradient. When the poly(U) polymerase was isolated from cells labeled with [35S]methionine and was analyzed by glycerol gradient centrifugation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the position of only one viral protein was found to correlate with the location of enzyme activity. This protein had an apparent molecular weight of 62,500 based on its electrophoretic mobility relative to that of several molecular weight standards and was designated p63. When the poly(U) polymerase was isolated from the soluble fraction of a cytoplasmic extract, the activity was found to sediment at about 7S. In this case, however, both p63 and NCVP2 (77,000-dalton precursor of p63) cosedimented with the 7S activity peak. When the 7S polymerase activity was purified by phosphocellulose chromatography, both p63 and NCVP2 were found to co-chromatograph with poly(U) polymerase activity. The poliovirus replicase complexed with its endogenous RNA template was isolated from infected cells labeled with [35S]methionine and was centrifuged through a linear 15 to 30% glycerol gradient. The major viral polypeptide component in a 26S peak of replicase activity was p63, but small amounts of other poliovirus proteins were also present. When the replicase-template complex was treated with RNase T1 before centrifugation, a single peak of activity was found that sedimented at 20S and contained only labeled p63. Thus, p63 was found to be the only viral polypeptide in the replicase bound to its endogenous RNA template, and appears to be active as a poly(U) polymerase either as a monomer protein or as a 7S complex. Images PMID:219230

  16. Host range of poliovirus is restricted to simians because of a rapid sequence change of the poliovirus receptor gene during evolution.

    PubMed

    Ida-Hosonuma, M; Sasaki, Y; Toyoda, H; Nomoto, A; Gotoh, O; Yonekawa, H; Koike, S

    2003-01-01

    The host range of most poliovirus (PV) strains is restricted to simians. This host range specificity is believed to be determined by the interaction between PV and its receptor molecule. To elucidate the molecular basis of this species-specific infection of PV, we cloned orthologs of the PV receptor (PVR) gene ( pvr) as well as those of PV receptor-related genes 1 and 2 ( prr1 and prr2) from various mammalian species. These three genes are widely present in mammalian genomes including those of non-susceptible species. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of PVR orthologs revealed that the NH(2)-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain 1), which is the virus binding site in the human PVR, is highly variable among species, whereas that of PRR1 is highly conserved. Domain 1 of the PVR orthologs for the ring-tailed lemur and rabbit, which are not susceptible to PV, show only 51 and 61% amino acid sequence identity to that of human PVR, respectively. Chimeric PVR proteins that have the domain 1 of the ring-tailed lemur and rabbit PVRs failed to serve as receptors for PV. These results suggest that rapid changes in the domain 1 sequence during mammalian evolution determined the host range restriction of PV. PMID:12536294

  17. Immunogenicity, safety, and antibody persistence at 3, 5, and 10 years postvaccination in adolescents randomized to booster immunization with a combined tetanus, diphtheria, 5-component acellular pertussis, and inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine administered with a hepatitis B virus vaccine concurrently or 1 month apart.

    PubMed

    Embree, Joanne; Law, Barbara; Voloshen, Tim; Tomovici, Antigona

    2015-03-01

    An understanding of the antibody persistence elicited by a combined tetanus, diphtheria, 5-component acellular pertussis, and inactivated poliovirus vaccine (Tdap-IPV) after adolescent vaccination is important to optimize booster dosing intervals. Our objectives were to compare the safety and immunogenicity of Tdap-IPV coadministered with hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) and sequential administration and evaluate humoral immunity at 3, 5, and 10 years after Tdap-IPV vaccination in adolescents. This phase II randomized, controlled, and open-label study enrolled 280 11- to 14-year-old adolescents with up to 10 years postvaccination follow-up. Group 1 (n = 145) received Tdap-IPV, followed by a HepB dose 1 month later, and group 2 (n = 135) received both vaccines simultaneously. No consistent increases in solicited reactions or unsolicited adverse events occurred with coadministration. All vaccinees attained seroprotective antibody levels at ≥0.01 IU/ml for diphtheria and tetanus, at a ≥1:8 dilution for poliovirus (serotypes 1, 2, and 3), and ≥10 mIU/ml for hepatitis B at 1 month postvaccination. Clinically relevant immunologic interactions did not occur with coadministration. For pertussis, all participants achieved seropositivity levels (at or above the lower limit of quantitation), and 72.7% to 95.8% had 4-fold increases in pertussis antibodies at 1 month postvaccination. At 10 years postvaccination, the remaining participants (62.8% of the original cohort) maintained seroprotective levels of ≥0.01 IU/ml for diphtheria and tetanus, a ≥1:8 dilution for all 3 poliovirus serotypes, and 74.1% to 98.2% maintained pertussis seropositivity levels depending on the antigen tested. There were no differences between the groups. These results support the coadministration of Tdap-IPV and HepB to adolescents and suggest that vaccination with Tdap-IPV can offer protection for 10 years after an adolescent booster vaccination. PMID:25540274

  18. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  19. Comparison of ozone inactivation, in flowing water, of hepatitis A virus, poliovirus 1, and indicator organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, K.; Flehmig, B.; Botzenhart, K. )

    1989-11-01

    In steadily flowing water at 20 degrees C and pH 7, five organisms had the following order of resistance to ozone (at constant levels of ozone): poliovirus 1 (PV1) less than Escherichia coli less than hepatitis A virus (HAV) less than Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 less than Bacillus subtilis spores. The tests were repeated at 10 degrees C with HAV, PV1, and E. coli. Ozone inactivation of HAV and E. coli was faster at 10 degrees C than at 20 degrees C. At 20 degrees C, 0.25 to 0.38 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of HAV but only 0.13 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of PV1.

  20. Effects of actinomycin D on the cytopathology induced by poliovirus in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Guskey, L E; Wolff, D A

    1974-11-01

    One possible mechanism of virus-induced cell damage is that the redistributed (released) lysosomal enzymes produce the cytopathic effect during cytolytic types of infections such as poliovirus in HEp-2 cells. To determine if the lysosomal enzyme redistribution and cell damage are host-cell directed, we studied sensitivity of these events to the action of actinomycin D. By the use of actinomycin D at concentrations producing the least toxicity but maximal effectiveness in shuting down cell RNA synthesis, it was shown that the cytopathic effect and enzyme redistribution were not inhibited and, therefore, not directly controlled and induced by the cell genome in response to the virus infection. Evaluation of cytopathic effect by a phase contrast microscopy method detected changes earlier than the erythrocin B uptake method. PMID:4372396

  1. Effects of Actinomycin D on the Cytopathology Induced by Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guskey, Louis E.; Wolff, David A.

    1974-01-01

    One possible mechanism of virus-induced cell damage is that the redistributed (released) lysosomal enzymes produce the cytopathic effect during cytolytic types of infections such as poliovirus in HEp-2 cells. To determine if the lysosomal enzyme redistribution and cell damage are host-cell directed, we studied sensitivity of these events to the action of actinomycin D. By the use of actinomycin D at concentrations producing the least toxicity but maximal effectiveness in shuting down cell RNA synthesis, it was shown that the cytopathic effect and enzyme redistribution were not inhibited and, therefore, not directly controlled and induced by the cell genome in response to the virus infection. Evaluation of cytopathic effect by a phase contrast microscopy method detected changes earlier than the erythrocin B uptake method. PMID:4372396

  2. Human-Mouse Hybrid Cell Lines and Susceptibility to Poliovirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Richard; Pollack, Robert; Kusano, Toshihisa; Green, Howard

    1970-01-01

    A number of human-mouse somatic hybrid cell lines have been prepared, containing from 3 to 12 human biarmed chromosomes. These lines were susceptible to poliovirus type 1, producing viral yields comparable to those of the human parental cells. A small proportion of the cells of these lines survived the polio infection, and their progeny were solidly resistant to reinfection with the virus. Both sensitive and resistant hybrids produced virus following infection with viral ribonucleic acid, indicating that the cytoplasm of the resistant hybrids was able to support viral multiplication. Viral adsorption studies carried out at 4 C showed that the resistant sublines had negligible ability to adsorb the virus. It was concluded that the hybrid cells became resistant to polio through loss of the human chromosome bearing the gene for the receptor substance. PMID:4317112

  3. The novel adjuvant dmLT promotes dose sparing, mucosal immunity and longevity of antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth B; Bauer, David L; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Lawson, Louise B; Clements, John D

    2015-04-15

    One option for achieving global polio eradication is to replace the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), which has the risk of reversion to wild-type virulence, with the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) vaccine. Adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization are promising options that may reduce antigen dose in IPV vaccinations, potentially allowing dose sparing and cost savings. Use of adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization could also help promote mucosal immunity, potentially mimicking the protection against intestinal virus shedding seen with OPV. In the current study, we examined the impact of combining the novel adjuvant dmLT with trivalent IPV for dose sparing, induction of mucosal immunity and increasing longevity of anti-poliovirus (PV) responses in a mouse model following either intradermal (ID) or intramuscular (IM) delivery. We found that non-adjuvanted ID delivery was not superior to IM delivery for fractional dose sparing, but was associated with development of mucosal immunity. Vaccination with IPV+dmLT promoted serum anti-PV neutralizing antibodies with fractional IPV doses by either IM or ID delivery, achieving at least five-fold dose sparing above non-adjuvanted fractional doses. These responses were most noticeable with the PV1 component of the trivalent vaccine. dmLT also promoted germinal center formation and longevity of serum anti-PV neutralizing titers. Lastly, dmLT enhanced mucosal immunity, as defined by fecal and intestinal anti-PV IgA secretion, when included in IPV immunization by ID or IM delivery. These studies demonstrate that dmLT is an effective adjuvant for either IM or ID delivery of IPV. Inclusion of dmLT in IPV immunizations allows antigen dose sparing and enhances mucosal immunity and longevity of anti-PV responses. PMID:25765967

  4. Use of a Novel Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Oral Polio Vaccine Shedding and Reversion in Stool and Sewage Samples after a Mexican National Immunization Day▿

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Stephanie B.; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Huang, ChunHong; Mahmud, Nadim; Lee, Yu-Jin; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Flaster, Harry; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; García-García, Lourdes; Maldonado, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    During replication, oral polio vaccine (OPV) can revert to neurovirulence and cause paralytic poliomyelitis. In individual vaccinees, it can acquire specific revertant point mutations, leading to vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). With longer replication, OPV can mutate into vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), which causes poliomyelitis outbreaks similar to those caused by wild poliovirus. After wild poliovirus eradication, safely phasing out vaccination will likely require global use of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) until cessation of OPV circulation. Mexico, where children receive routine IPV but where OPV is given biannually during national immunization days (NIDs), provides a natural setting to study the duration of OPV circulation in a population primarily vaccinated with IPV. We developed a real-time PCR assay to detect and distinguish revertant and nonrevertant OPV serotype 1 (OPV-1), OPV-2, and OPV-3 from RNA extracted directly from stool and sewage. Stool samples from 124 children and 8 1-liter sewage samples from Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico, collected 6 to 13 weeks after a NID were analyzed. Revertant OPV-1 was found in stool at 7 and 9 weeks, and nonrevertant OPV-2 and OPV-3 were found in stool from two children 10 weeks after the NID. Revertant OPV-1 and nonrevertant OPV-2 and -3 were detected in sewage at 6 and 13 weeks after the NID. Our real-time PCR assay was able to detect small amounts of OPV in both stool and sewage and to distinguish nonrevertant and revertant serotypes and demonstrated that OPV continues to circulate at least 13 weeks after a NID in a Mexican population routinely immunized with IPV. PMID:21411577

  5. Fully liquid DTaP-IPV-Hib pediatric combination vaccine (Pediacel): a review of 18 years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Donna L; Vidor, Emmanuel

    2014-08-01

    Safe and effective combination pediatric vaccines are necessary to simplify complex immunization schedules and to improve coverage and protection for children worldwide. We provide an overview of the 18 years of clinical and worldwide experience with DTaP-IPV-Hib (Pediacel(®)), a unique fully liquid pentavalent vaccine (diphtheria [D], tetanus [T], acellular pertussis, inactivated poliovirus [IPV], Haemophilus influenzae type b [Hib]). Pediacel has demonstrated good and lasting immunogenicity in many populations, with differing primary series and booster schedules, and with a variety of coadministered vaccines. The acellular pertussis antigens have proven efficacy and real-world effectiveness. Clinical and post-marketing studies confirm the safety of Pediacel. Pediacel can be used for primary series and toddler booster doses, as well as in mixed pediatric vaccine schedules. PMID:24985159

  6. Detection and quantification of poliovirus infection using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a globalized word, prevention of infectious diseases is a major challenge. Rapid detection of viable virus particles in water and other environmental samples is essential to public health risk assessment, homeland security and environmental protection. Current virus detection methods, especially assessing viral infectivity, are complex and time-consuming, making point-of-care detection a challenge. Faster, more sensitive, highly specific methods are needed to quantify potentially hazardous viral pathogens and to determine if suspected materials contain viable viral particles. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with cellular-based sensing, may offer a precise way to detect specific viruses. This approach utilizes infrared light to monitor changes in molecular components of cells by tracking changes in absorbance patterns produced following virus infection. In this work poliovirus (PV1) was used to evaluate the utility of FTIR spectroscopy with cell culture for rapid detection of infective virus particles. Results Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells infected with different virus titers were studied at 1 - 12 hours post-infection (h.p.i.). A partial least squares (PLS) regression method was used to analyze and model cellular responses to different infection titers and times post-infection. The model performs best at 8 h.p.i., resulting in an estimated root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 17 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml when using low titers of infection of 10 and 100 PFU/ml. Higher titers, from 103 to 106 PFU/ml, could also be reliably detected. Conclusions This approach to poliovirus detection and quantification using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture could potentially be extended to compare biochemical cell responses to infection with different viruses. This virus detection method could feasibly be adapted to an automated scheme for use in areas such as water safety monitoring and medical diagnostics. PMID

  7. Characterization of Poliovirus Neutralization Escape Mutants of Single-Domain Antibody Fragments (VHHs)

    PubMed Central

    Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Rombaut, Bart

    2015-01-01

    To complete the eradication of poliovirus and to protect unvaccinated people subsequently, the development of one or more antiviral drugs will be necessary. A set of five single-domain antibody fragments (variable parts of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody [VHHs]) with an in vitro neutralizing activity against poliovirus type 1 was developed previously (B. Thys, L. Schotte, S. Muyldermans, U. Wernery, G. Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, and B. Rombaut, Antiviral Res 87:257–264, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2010.05.012), and their mechanisms of action have been studied (L. Schotte, M. Strauss, B. Thys, H. Halewyck, D. J. Filman, M. Bostina, J. M. Hogle, and B. Rombaut, J Virol 88:4403–4413, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03402-13). In this study, neutralization escape mutants were selected for each VHH. Sequencing of the P1 region of the genome showed that amino acid substitutions are found in the four viral proteins of the capsid and that they are located both in proximity to the binding sites of the VHHs and in regions further away from the canyon and hidden beneath the surface. Characterization of the mutants demonstrated that they have single-cycle replication kinetics that are similar to those of their parental strain and that they are all drug (VHH) independent. Their resistant phenotypes are stable, as they do not regain full susceptibility to the VHH after passage over HeLa cells in the absence of VHH. They are all at least as stable as the parental strain against heat inactivation at 44°C, and three of them are even significantly (P < 0.05) more resistant to heat inactivation. The resistant variants all still can be neutralized by at least two other VHHs and retain full susceptibility to pirodavir and 35-1F4. PMID:26014941

  8. Antiviral Activity of Trichilia catigua Bark Extracts for Herpesvirus and Poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Espada, Samantha F; Faccin-Galhardi, Ligia C; Rincao, Vinicius P; Bernardi, Ana L S; Lopes, Nayara; Longhini, Renata; de Mello, Joao C P; Linhares, Rosa E C; Nozawa, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus and poliovirus are responsible for important diseases in human and animal. Trichilia catigua a Brazilian native plant known as catiguá has several medicinal properties among them antimicrobial for bacteria and protozoa, however, no antiviral activity has been reported yet. This study evaluated the antiviral activity of the crude extract (CE) and aqueous and ethyl acetate fractions (AF, EAF) obtained from T. catigua in the replication of the Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), bovine herpesvirus (BoHV-1) and poliovirus (PV-1). The cytotoxicity was analyzed by MTT assay and the antiviral effect was determined by the addition of extracts (0.25 to 100.0 μg/ml), before (-2h and -1h), during (Oh) and after (1h and 2h) the viral infection, by plaque reduction assay, in HEp-2 cell culture. The virucidal activity and inhibition of viral adsorption were also evaluated. In addition, the combination index (CI) with Acyclovir (ACV - reference drug) was determined for HSV-1. CE, AF and EAF showed a low toxicity (CC(50) >400 µg/ml) and low inhibitory concentration (IC50), ranging from 2.44-34.25 µg/ml for herpesvirus and 0.67 to 1.8 µg/ml for PV-1, associated with high selectivity index. The tested compounds showed high virucidal effect and high ability to inhibit viral adsorption, for all virus. The CI demonstrated a synergic effect (CI<1) for AF and EAF comparatively to acyclovir (ACV). Our study demonstrated that the extract and fractions of T. catigua is promising for future antiviral drug design with economically feasible production. PMID:25941883

  9. New approaches to the development of virus vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, K; Barrett, T; Kai, C

    1998-12-01

    The marked progress in recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology during the past decade has led to the development of a variety of safe new vaccine vectors which are capable of efficiently expressing foreign immunogens. These have been based on a variety of virus types--poxviruses, herpesviruses and adenoviruses--and have led to the production of many new potential recombinant vaccines. Of these recombinant vaccines, the rabies vaccine, in which the rabies G protein is expressed in a vaccinia vector, has been widely used in the field to prevent the spread of rabies both in Europe and in the United States of America. A recombinant Newcastle disease virus vaccine, using fowlpox virus as the vector to express immunogenic proteins from the Newcastle disease virus, has been licensed as the first commercial recombinant vectored vaccine. Many other recombinant virus vaccines are still at the stage of laboratory or field testing. The most recent breakthrough in vaccinology has been the success with the use of naked DNA as a means of vaccination. This approach has shown great promise in mouse model systems and has now become the most active field in new vaccine development. Molecular redesigning of conventional ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses to obtain more stable attenuated vaccines was previously possible only for positive-strand RNA viruses, such as poliovirus. However, recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the rescuing of negative-strand viruses from DNA copies of their genomes. This has made it possible to engineer specific changes in the genomes of Rhabdoviridae and Paramyxoviridae, both of which include several viruses of veterinary importance. The authors describe the current progress in the development of vector vaccines, DNA vaccines and vaccines based on engineered positive- and negative-strand RNA virus genomes, with special emphasis on their application to diseases of veterinary importance. PMID:9850535

  10. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  11. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  12. Seroprevalence and vaccination coverage of vaccine-preventable diseases in perinatally HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sticchi, Laura; Bruzzone, Bianca; Caligiuri, Patrizia; Rappazzo, Emanuela; Lo Casto, Michele; De Hoffer, Laura; Gustinetti, Giulia; Viscoli, Claudio; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2014-08-27

    Background Even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-infected subjects are at higher risk of complications from vaccine-preventable diseases than those uninfected. The current international guidelines strongly recommend that these patients should receive all the routine childhood vaccinations. Although these children represent an appropriate target for immunization, the available data indicate suboptimal coverage rates. Methods To evaluate seroprotection/seropositivity rates and vaccination coverage against the common vaccine-preventable diseases, all patients with vertically transmitted HIV-1 infection who attended San Martino Hospital were enrolled. Blood samples were collected for testing antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, hepatitis A and B viruses by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay and polioviruses by microneutralization test. In order to assess immunization coverage, retrospectively was recorded the vaccination history collecting data from Regional Immunization Database. Results A total of 39 perinatally HIV-1 infected patients were included in the study. At the time of serum was obtained, the mean age was 18,1 years (range: 6-28). The median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count was 702 cells/mm (3) (2-1476 cells/mm (3)). Twenty-nine (74.4%) patients were found with HIV RNA load<50 copies/mL. The proportion of subjects with protective anti-tetanus and anti-HBs were 43.6% and 30.8%, respectively. Seroprotection rates about 20% against rubella and measles were found, less than 20% against all the other antigens investigated. In particular, all patients resulted susceptible to mumps. High immunization rates were observed for polio and HBV (100% and 92.3%, respectively) and suboptimal for diphtheria-tetanus (84.6%). For the other recommended vaccines the rates were generally low. None of the patients received varicella vaccine doses. Conclusions As in the HAART era the vertically acquired HIV infection has become a chronic treatable disease

  13. Dengue vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; SK, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way. PMID:25424928

  14. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in the postelimination era in Latin America and the Caribbean, 1992-2011.

    PubMed

    Landaverde, J Mauricio; Trumbo, Silas Pierson; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Cochi, Shea E; Gandhi, Raghunathan; Ruiz-Matus, Cuauhtémoc

    2014-05-01

    The Americas interrupted the transmission of poliovirus in 1991; most Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries rely on the oral polio vaccine (OPV) to maintain elimination. We estimated the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic polio (VAPP) in LAC for 1992-2011. VAPP cases were identified using LAC's acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance system. VAPP was defined as any AFP case with residual paralysis 60 days following onset that did not have a clear alternative etiology and with isolation of vaccine-strain poliovirus. Recipient VAPP cases were defined as those with paralysis onset 4-40 days following OPV; cases meeting these criteria but with unknown residual paralysis were added. Nonrecipient VAPP cases were defined as those in individuals with an unknown vaccination status, those in individuals who received 0 doses, or those with paralysis onset outside the 4-40-day interval. Of 40 926 AFP cases reported in LAC from 1992-2011, we identified 72 recipient and 119 nonrecipient VAPP cases. The estimated risk of recipient VAPP was 1 case per 3.15 million newborns (95% confidence interval [CI], 1 case per 2.56-4.10 million newborns), and the estimated overall risk was 1 case per 1.19 million newborns (95% CI, 1 case per 1.04-1.39 million newborns). In this multicountry VAPP analysis in a postelimination period, we found that the risk of VAPP in LAC was lower than previously estimated. PMID:24520126

  15. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  16. The challenge of changing the inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine in Latin America: declaration of the Latin American Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (SLIPE).

    PubMed

    Falleiros-Arlant, Luiza Helena; Avila-Agüero, María Luisa; Brea del Castillo, José; Mariño, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Even though we have already covered 99% of the path to eradicate poliomyelitis from the world, this disease is still causing paralysis in children. Its eradication means not only the end of wild poliovirus circulation, but vaccine-derived poliovirus circulation as well. Taking into account different factors such as: current epidemiological data, adverse events of the attenuated oral poliomyelitis vaccine (OPV), the availability of an injectable inactivated vaccine (IPV) without the potential of causing the severe adverse events of the oral vaccine (OPV), the efficacy and effectiveness of the IPV in several countries of the world where it has been used for several years, the rationale of changing the vaccination schedule in different Latin American countries; the Latin American Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (SLIPE) announces its recommendation of switching to IPV in Latin America, by this Declaration, with an Action Plan for 2014-2015 period as regards vaccination against polio policies in Latin America. 1. The optimal proposed schedule consists of four IPV doses (three doses in the primary schedule plus a booster dose), whether IPV is combined or not with other indicated vaccines in the immunization program of the country. During the OPV to IPV transition phase, an alternative schedule is acceptable; 2. Countries should set optimal strategies in order to maintain and improve vaccination coverage, and implement a nominal immunization registry; 3. Improving the Epidemiological Surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) and setting up an environmental surveillance program; 4. Setting up strategies for introducing IPV in National Immunization Programs, such as communicating properly with the population, among others; 5. Bringing scientific societies closer to decision makers; 6. Ensuring optimal supply and prices for IPV introduction; 7. Training vaccination teams; 8. Enhancing the distribution and storing logistics of vaccines. In addition to the

  17. Virus Replication, Cytopathology, and Lysosomal Enzyme Response of Mitotic and Interphase Hep-2 Cells Infected with Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Bienz, Kurt; Egger, Denise; Wolff, David A.

    1973-01-01

    Mitotic Hep-2 cells, selected by the PEL (colloidal silica) density gradient method and held in mitosis with Colcemid, are readily infected by poliovirus type I (Mahoney). They produce and release the same amount of virus as interphase, random-growing cells. In contrast to interphase cells, mitotic cells show no detectable virus-induced cytopathic effect at the light microscopy level and only slight alterations, consisting of small clusters of vacuoles, at the electron microscopy level. Mitotic cells contain the same total amount of lysosomal enzymes per cell as interphase cells, but they display no redistribution of lysosomal enzymes during the virus infection as interphase cells do. This supports the view that lysosomal enzyme redistribution is associated with the cytopathic effect in poliovirus infection but shows that virus synthesis and release is not dependent on either the cytopathic effect or lysosomal enzyme release. The possible reasons for the lack of cytopathic effect in mitotic cells are discussed. Images PMID:4121707

  18. Poliovirus Replication Requires the N-terminus but not the Catalytic Sec7 Domain of ArfGEF GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites whose reproduction relies on factors provided by the host. The cellular protein GBF1 is critical for poliovirus replication. Here we show that the contribution of GBF1 to virus replication is different from its known activities in uninfected cells. Normally GBF1 activates the Arf GTPases necessary for formation of COPI transport vesicles. GBF1 function is modulated by p115 and Rab1b. However, in polio-infected cells, p115 is degraded and neither p115 nor Rab1b knock-down affects virus replication. Poliovirus infection is very sensitive to BFA, an inhibitor of Arf activation by GBF1. BFA targets the catalytic Sec7 domain of GBF1. Nevertheless the BFA block of polio replication is rescued by expression of only the N-terminal region of GBF1 lacking the Sec7 domain. Replication of BFA-resistant poliovirus in the presence of BFA is uncoupled from Arf activation but is dependent on GBF1. Thus the function(s) of this protein essential for viral replication can be separated from those required for cellular metabolism. PMID:20497182

  19. [Poliovirus uptake into and excretion from oysters: a model experiment for elimination of Norwalk-like viruses from oysters].

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Miwa; Kawada, Kazunobu; Yano, Takuya; Sugiyama, Akira; Nakayama, Osamu; Nishio, Osamu; Sekine, Hiromasa; Sakurai, Nakao

    2003-02-01

    Outbreaks of gastroenteritis caused by Norwalk-like viruses are often induced by the consumption of raw shellfish such as oysters. Incidences reach a peak during the cold season in Japan, when seawater temperatures fall below 10 degrees C. We investigated oysters' uptake and excretion of viruses, over varying lengths of exposure, monitoring the effects of changes in temperature and flow rate of seawater, and the presence of plankton. The study was performed using a poliovirus and an experimental circulatory system, which was framed on the same principle as a model practically used for the depuration of oysters. Polioviruses present in the seawater were taken rapidly into the midgut gland of oysters. However, virus levels detected in oysters at both 10 degrees C and 20 degrees C were decreased to approximately 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 within 6 hrs after the circulatory seawater was replaced by UV irradiated seawater. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the circulatory depuration system for the elimination of poliovirus from oysters, and indicate that controlling the temperature and flow rate of the circulatory system could decrease the risk of NLV infection. PMID:12661085

  20. Expression and subcellular localization of poliovirus VPg-precursor protein 3AB in eukaryotic cells: evidence for glycosylation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, U; Dasgupta, A

    1994-01-01

    The poliovirus-encoded, membrane-associated VPg-precursor polypeptide 3AB has been implicated in the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. We have expressed 3AB and 3A polypeptides in eukaryotic cells and examined their localization using indirect immunofluorescence and a direct in vitro membrane-binding assay. Results presented here demonstrate that both 3AB and 3A are capable of localizing in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus in transfected HeLa cells in the absence of any other poliovirus protein. We have also shown that the carboxy-terminal 18 amino acids of 3A that constitute an amphipathic domain are important in membrane binding of 3A and 3AB. Additionally, we demonstrate that a significant fraction of both 3A and 3AB can be glycosylated in a membrane-dependent fashion during in vitro translation in reticulocyte lysate. We demonstrate that 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine, an inhibitor of glycoprotein synthesis, significantly inhibits poliovirus RNA synthesis in vivo. The implications of glycosylation of 3AB (and 3A) in viral replication are discussed. Images PMID:8207820

  1. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause problems like genital warts and some kinds of cancer, a vaccine is an important step in preventing infection and protecting against the spread of HPV. That's why doctors recommend that all girls and guys get the vaccine at these ages: ...

  2. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  3. Anthrax Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... products some military personnel, as determined by the Department of Defense These people should get five doses of vaccine ( ... cdc.gov/agent/anthrax/vaccination/. Contact the U.S Department of Defense (DoD): call 1-877-438-8222 or visit ...

  4. Schistosomiasis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Ganley-Leal, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease of public health importance to a billion people. An estimated 200 million people are currently infected; an additional 779 million individuals are at risk to acquire the infection in 74 countries. Despite many years of implementation of mass anti-parasitic drug therapy programs and other control measures, this disease has not been contained and continues to spread to new geographic areas.  The discovery of a protective vaccine still remains the most potentially effective means for the control of this disease, especially if the vaccine provides long-term immunity against the infection. A vaccine would contribute to the reduction of schistosomiasis morbidity through induced immune responses leading to decrease in parasite load and reduced egg production. This vaccine could be administered to children between the ages of 3 and 12 years to prevent severe infection in a particularly high risk population. This review summarizes the current status of schistosomiasis vaccine development. PMID:22048120

  5. Typhoid vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A; Dutta, A K

    2001-08-01

    Typhoid fever continues to be a major public health problem in developing countries with about 33 million cases per year. Protective efficacy of traditional acetone/phenol killed vaccines is similar to newer typhoid vaccines (Ty21A and Vi antigen vaccine) but side effects of these newer vaccines are considerably less. Though the mortality is low, typhoid fever causes considerable morbidity and loss of working days. Problems during treatment are increasing due to emergence and spread of multidrug resistant S. typhi. Hence to decrease the incidence of typhoid fever in addition to ensuring safe water supply and excreta disposal a typhoid vaccine needs to be introduced in the National Immunization Schedule. PMID:11563251

  6. [VACCINE-ASSOCIATED PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS IN RUSSIAN FEDERATION DURING THE PERIOD OF CHANGES IN VACCINATION SCHEDULE (2006-2013 yy.)].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, O E; Eremeeva, T P; Morozova, N S; Shakaryan, A K; Gmyl, A P; Yakovenko, M L; Korotkova, E A; Chernjavskaja, O P; Baykova, O Yu; Silenova, O V; Krasota, A Yu; Krasnoproshina, L I; Mustafina, A N; Kozlovskaja, L I

    2016-01-01

    The results of virologic testing of clinical materials and epidemiological analysis of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) cases obtained in 2006-2013 during AFP surveillance are presented. Among the 2976 cases of AFP 30 cases were VAPP. 15 cases were observed in OPV recipients, whereas 15 cases were observed in non-vaccinated contacts. The age of the patients varied from 4 months to 5.5 years (13.6 ± 12.4 months old). Children younger than 1 year constituted 63.3% of the group; boys were dominant (73.3%); 53.3% of children were vaccinated with OPV; the time period between receipt of OPV and onset of palsy was from 2 to 32 days (18.7 ± 8.2). Lower paraparesis was documented in 48.3% of patients; lower monoparesis in 37.9%; upper monoparesis, in 6.9%; tetraparesis with bulbar syndrome, in 6%. The majority of the patients (85.7%) had an unfavorable premorbid status. The violations of the humoral immunity were found in 73.9% cases: CVID (52.9%), hypogammaglobulinemia (41.2%); selective lgA deflciency (5.9%). In 70.6% cases damage to humoral immunity was combined with poor premorbid status. The most frequently observed (76%, p < 0.05) represented the single type of poliovirus--type 2 (44%) and type 3 (32%). All strains were of the vaccine origin, the divergence from the homotypic Sabin strains fell within the region of the gene encoding VPI protein, which did not exceed 0.5% of nucleotide substitutions except vaccine derived poliovirus type 2--multiple recombinant (type 2/type 3/ type 2/type 1) with the degree of the divergence of 1.44% isolated from 6-month old unvaccinated child (RUS08063034001). The frequency of the VAPP cases was a total of 1 case per 3.4 million doses of distributed OPV in 2006-2013; 2.2 cases per 1 million of newborns were observed. This frequency decreased after the introduction of the sequential scheme of vaccination (IPV, OPV) in 2008-2013 as compared with the period of exclusive use of OPV in 2006-2007: 1 case per 4.9 million

  7. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  8. National, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19-35 Months - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hill, Holly A; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Yankey, David; Singleton, James A; Kolasa, Maureen

    2015-08-28

    The reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States has been described as one of the 10 greatest public health achievements of the first decade of the 21st century. A recent analysis concluded that routine childhood vaccination will prevent 322 million cases of disease and about 732,000 early deaths among children born during 1994-2013, for a net societal cost savings of $1.38 trillion. The National Immunization Survey (NIS) has monitored vaccination coverage among U.S. children aged 19-35 months since 1994. This report presents national, regional, state, and selected local area vaccination coverage estimates for children born from January 2011 through May 2013, based on data from the 2014 NIS. For most vaccinations, there was no significant change in coverage between 2013 and 2014. The exception was hepatitis A vaccine (HepA), for which increases were observed in coverage with both ≥1 and ≥2 doses. As in previous years, <1% of children received no vaccinations. National coverage estimates indicate that the Healthy People 2020 target* of 90% was met for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (93.3%), ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.5%), ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (91.6%), and ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine (91.0%). Coverage was below target for ≥4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP), the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, hepatitis B (HepB) birth dose,† ≥4 doses pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), ≥2 doses of HepA, the full series of rotavirus vaccine, and the combined vaccine series.§ Examination of coverage by child's race/ethnicity revealed lower estimated coverage among non-Hispanic black children compared with non-Hispanic white children for several vaccinations, including DTaP, the full series of Hib, PCV, rotavirus vaccine, and the combined series. Children from households classified as below the

  9. [Rabbies vaccination].

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    With very few exceptions, rabies is occurring around the globe. The clinical course of this mammal-transmitted infection is almost universally fatal. Thus, the disease is causing more human deaths than any other zoonosis. Due to the lack of effective therapeutic options, pre- or post-exposure vaccination remains the only effective means to avoid development of fatal disease. Save and highly effective cell culture vaccines which have been available for decades provide long-lasting protection. Various vaccination schedules have been tested and are being recommended. PMID:27268449

  10. Crystal structure of CD155 and electron microscopic studies of its complexes with polioviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ping; Mueller, Steffen; Morais, Marc C.; Bator, Carol M.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Hafenstein, Susan; Wimmer, Eckard; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-02

    When poliovirus (PV) recognizes its receptor, CD155, the virus changes from a 160S to a 135S particle before releasing its genome into the cytoplasm. CD155 is a transmembrane protein with 3 Ig-like extracellular domains, D1-D3, where D1 is recognized by the virus. The crystal structure of D1D2 has been determined to 3.5-{angstrom} resolution and fitted into {approx}8.5-{angstrom} resolution cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of the virus-receptor complexes for the 3 PV serotypes. These structures show that, compared with human rhinoviruses, the virus-receptor interactions for PVs have a greater dependence on hydrophobic interactions, as might be required for a virus that can inhabit environments of different pH. The pocket factor was shown to remain in the virus during the first recognition stage. The present structures, when combined with earlier mutational investigations, show that in the subsequent entry stage the receptor moves further into the canyon when at a physiological temperature, thereby expelling the pocket factor and separating the viral subunits to form 135S particles. These results provide a detailed analysis of how a nonenveloped virus can enter its host cell.

  11. Molecular tectonic model of virus structural transitions: the putative cell entry states of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Belnap, D M; Filman, D J; Trus, B L; Cheng, N; Booy, F P; Conway, J F; Curry, S; Hiremath, C N; Tsang, S K; Steven, A C; Hogle, J M

    2000-02-01

    Upon interacting with its receptor, poliovirus undergoes conformational changes that are implicated in cell entry, including the externalization of the viral protein VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. We have determined the structures of native virions and of two putative cell entry intermediates, the 135S and 80S particles, at approximately 22-A resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. The 135S and 80S particles are both approximately 4% larger than the virion. Pseudoatomic models were constructed by adjusting the beta-barrel domains of the three capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 from their known positions in the virion to fit the 135S and 80S reconstructions. Domain movements of up to 9 A were detected, analogous to the shifting of tectonic plates. These movements create gaps between adjacent subunits. The gaps at the sites where VP1, VP2, and VP3 subunits meet are plausible candidates for the emergence of VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. The implications of these observations are discussed for models in which the externalized components form a transmembrane pore through which viral RNA enters the infected cell. PMID:10627545

  12. Poliovirus receptor (CD155) regulates a step in transendothelial migration between PECAM and CD99.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David P; Seidman, Michael A; Muller, William A

    2013-03-01

    The movement of leukocytes across endothelium [referred to as diapedesis or transendothelial migration (TEM)] is a critical step in the inflammatory process. Recently, it was demonstrated that treatment of endothelial cells and monocytes with antibodies against poliovirus receptor (PVR; CD155) and DNAX-associated molecule-1 (DNAM-1; CD226) arrested monocytes over endothelial junctions and prevented TEM, suggesting that these molecules are involved in diapedesis. However, nothing was known about the mechanism by which PVR and DNAM-1 work in TEM. Herein, we show that, similar to endothelial PECAM interacting with leukocyte PECAM, activation of endothelial PVR with anti-PVR antibodies or interaction with its ligand, DNAM-1, results in recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp-2, and this process is dependent on Src kinases. Furthermore, differential and sequential treatment with blocking antibodies directed against PVR, DNAM-1, PECAM, and CD99 showed that endothelial PVR and monocyte DNAM-1 interact at and regulate a step between those regulated by PECAM and CD99. Further studies demonstrate that PVR resides in the recently identified lateral border recycling compartment, similar to PECAM and CD99. These findings suggest that the localization of adhesion/signaling molecules to the lateral border recycling compartment and the recruitment of Shp-2 may be common mechanisms for the regulation of TEM by endothelial cells. PMID:23333754

  13. Membrane Requirements for Uridylylation of the Poliovirus VPg Protein and Viral RNA Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Mark H.; Teterina, Natalya L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2003-01-01

    Efficient translation of poliovirus (PV) RNA in uninfected HeLa cell extracts generates all of the viral proteins required to carry out viral RNA replication and encapsidation and to produce infectious virus in vitro. In infected cells, viral RNA replication occurs in ribonucleoprotein complexes associated with clusters of vesicles that are formed from preexisting intracellular organelles, which serve as a scaffold for the viral RNA replication complex. In this study, we have examined the role of membranes in viral RNA replication in vitro. Electron microscopic and biochemical examination of extracts actively engaged in viral RNA replication failed to reveal a significant increase in vesicular membrane structures or the protective aggregation of vesicles observed in PV-infected cells. Viral, nonstructural replication proteins, however, bind to heterogeneous membrane fragments in the extract. Treatment of the extracts with nonionic detergents, a membrane-altering inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis (cerulenin), or an inhibitor of intracellular membrane trafficking (brefeldin A) prevents the formation of active replication complexes in vitro, under conditions in which polyprotein synthesis and processing occur normally. Under all three of these conditions, synthesis of uridylylated VPg to form the primer for initiation of viral RNA synthesis, as well as subsequent viral RNA replication, was inhibited. Thus, although organized membranous structures morphologically similar to the vesicles observed in infected cells do not appear to form in vitro, intact membranes are required for viral RNA synthesis, including the first step of forming the uridylylated VPg primer for RNA chain elongation. PMID:14557626

  14. Cellular COPII Proteins Are Involved in Production of the Vesicles That Form the Poliovirus Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rust, René C.; Landmann, Lukas; Gosert, Rainer; Tang, Bor Luen; Hong, Wanjin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) replicates its genome in association with membranous vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To elucidate the origin and mode of formation of PV vesicles, immunofluorescence labeling with antibodies against the viral vesicle marker proteins 2B and 2BC, as well as cellular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), anterograde transport vesicles, and the Golgi complex, was performed in BT7-H cells. Optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy were subjected to a deconvolution process to enhance resolution and signal-to-noise ratio and to allow for a three-dimensional representation of labeled membrane structures. The mode of formation of the PV vesicles was, on morphological grounds, similar to the formation of anterograde membrane traffic vesicles in uninfected cells. ER-resident membrane markers were excluded from both types of vesicles, and the COPII components Sec13 and Sec31 were both found to be colocalized on the vesicular surface, indicating the presence of a functional COPII coat. PV vesicle formation during early time points of infection did not involve the Golgi complex. The expression of PV protein 2BC or the entire P2 and P3 genomic region led to the production of vesicles carrying a COPII coat and showing the same mode of formation as vesicles produced after PV infection. These results indicate that PV vesicles are formed at the ER by the cellular COPII budding mechanism and thus are homologous to the vesicles of the anterograde membrane transport pathway. PMID:11559814

  15. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase specifically binds to the poliovirus IRES to activate translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri E.; Hirnet, Juliane; Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Niepmann, Michael; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to the host cell environment to efficiently take-over the host cell's machinery is crucial in particular for small RNA viruses like picornaviruses that come with only small RNA genomes and replicate exclusively in the cytosol. Their Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements are specific RNA structures that facilitate the 5′ end-independent internal initiation of translation both under normal conditions and when the cap-dependent host protein synthesis is shut-down in infected cells. A longstanding issue is which host factors play a major role in this internal initiation. Here, we show that the functionally most important domain V of the poliovirus IRES uses tRNAGly anticodon stem–loop mimicry to recruit glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) to the apical part of domain V, adjacent to the binding site of the key initiation factor eIF4G. The binding of GARS promotes the accommodation of the initiation region of the IRES in the mRNA binding site of the ribosome, thereby greatly enhancing the activity of the IRES at the step of the 48S initiation complex formation. Moonlighting functions of GARS that may be additionally needed for other events of the virus–host cell interaction are discussed. PMID:22373920

  16. Inhibition of host cell protein synthesis by UV-inactivated poliovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Helentjaris, T; Ehrenfeld, E

    1977-01-01

    The ability of poliovirus that was irradiated with UV light at energies up to 2,160 ergs/mm2 to subsequently inhibit host cell protein synthesis was measured. The inactivation of the host cell shutoff function followed one-hit kinetics. Increasing irradiation did not affect the rate of inhibition until the multiplicity of infection after irradiation was reduced to approximately 1 PFU/cell. At higher functional multiplicities, the rate was unchanged, but an increasing lag before the onset of inhibition was observed with increasing irradiation. The energy levels required to inactivate virus-induced inhibition of host cell protein synthesis suggest that damage to virus RNA rather than to virus capsid proteins is responsible for the loss of function. When the inactivation of host cell shutoff was compared with the inactivation of other viral functions by UV irradiation, it correlated exactly with the loss of infectivity but not with other viral functions measured. Guanidine treatment, which prevents detectable viral RNA and protein synthesis, completely inhibited host cell shutoff by low multiplicities of unirradiated virus infection but not higher multiplicities. When a high multiplicity of virus was first reduced to a low titer by irradiation, host cell shutoff was still evident in the presence of guanidine. The results demonstrate that the complete inhibition of host cell protein synthesis can be accomplished by one infectious viral genome per cell. Images PMID:189067

  17. Molecular Tectonic Model of Virus Structural Transitions: the Putative Cell Entry States of Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Belnap, David M.; Filman, David J.; Trus, Benes L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Booy, Frank P.; Conway, James F.; Curry, Stephen; Hiremath, Chaitanya N.; Tsang, Simon K.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Hogle, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Upon interacting with its receptor, poliovirus undergoes conformational changes that are implicated in cell entry, including the externalization of the viral protein VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. We have determined the structures of native virions and of two putative cell entry intermediates, the 135S and 80S particles, at ∼22-Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. The 135S and 80S particles are both ∼4% larger than the virion. Pseudoatomic models were constructed by adjusting the beta-barrel domains of the three capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 from their known positions in the virion to fit the 135S and 80S reconstructions. Domain movements of up to 9 Å were detected, analogous to the shifting of tectonic plates. These movements create gaps between adjacent subunits. The gaps at the sites where VP1, VP2, and VP3 subunits meet are plausible candidates for the emergence of VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. The implications of these observations are discussed for models in which the externalized components form a transmembrane pore through which viral RNA enters the infected cell. PMID:10627545

  18. Antiviral Activity of Sulfated Polysaccharide of Adenanthera pavonina against Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Godoi, Ananda Marques; Faccin-Galhardi, Lígia Carla; Lopes, Nayara; de Almeida, Raimundo Rafael; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Nozawa, Carlos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthera pavonina, popularly known as red-bead tree, carolina, pigeon's eye, and dragon's eye, is a plant traditionally used in Brazil for the treatment of several diseases. The present study aimed at evaluating the activity of sulfated polysaccharide from the Adenanthera pavonina (SPLSAp) seeds against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) in HEp-2 cell cultures. The SPLSAp presented a cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 500 μg/mL in HEp-2 cell cultures, evaluated by the dimethylthiazolyl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method (MTT). The SPLSAp exhibited a significant antiviral activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.18 µg/mL, determined by plaque reduction assay and a high selectivity index (SI) of 423. The maximum inhibition (100%) of PV replication was found when the SPLSAp treatment was concomitant with viral infection (time 0 h), at all tested concentrations. The maximal inhibition was also found when the SPLSAp was used 1 h and 2 h postinfection, albeit at 50 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL. Therefore, we demonstrated that the SPLSAp inhibited PV growth. We also suggested that SPLSAp inhibited PV in more than one step of the replication, as the mechanism of antiviral action. We, therefore, selected the compound as a potential candidate for further development towards the control of the infection. PMID:25221609

  19. DNA-based immunisation against rabies and rabies-related viruses: towards multivalent vaccines.

    PubMed

    Perrin, P; Jacob, Y; Desmézières, E; Tordo, N

    2000-01-01

    Prototypes of multivalent DNA vaccines against lyssaviruses (LV: rabies and rabies-related viruses) and other viruses were developed using chimaeric LV glycoprotein (cLVG) DNA and cLVG DNA carrying foreign epitopes. cLVG is composed of the N-terminal half of an LV genotype (GT) containing antigenic site II, the C-terminal half of GT containing antigenic site III, as well as the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the same or a different GT. Both antigenic sites induced virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAb). Foreign B and T cell epitopes inserted between the two halves of cLVG correspond to the B cell C3 neutralisation epitope of poliovirus VP1 protein and to the H2d CMH I restricted T cell epitope of the nucleoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). In mice and dogs homogenous rabies virus G DNA induced protection against wild-type rabies virus whereas cLVG protected against lyssaviruses. cLVG DNA carrying foreign epitopes induced VNAb against LV and poliovirus and protection against LCMV. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the potential usefulness of cLVG for the development of multivalent vaccines against viral diseases, including rabies and zoonoses. PMID:11713814

  20. Arthropod vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lee, R; Opdebeeck, J P

    1999-03-01

    Antigens located in the midgut of the tick are hidden from the host's immune system. Egg production of ticks can be reduced when ticks are fed on animals vaccinated with midgut antigens of the tick, and a subunit vaccine formulated with the recombinant antigen Bm86 is now available that can reduce the number of ticks infesting cattle grazing on pasture. Midgut antigens used in vaccines against insects that transmit pathogenic organisms to humans have not been as effective in reducing insect fecundity and an alternative approach may be necessary. Transmission-blocking vaccines directed at interfering with the vector-pathogen interaction could result in loss of vector competence and block the spread of disease-causing organisms. PMID:10198800

  1. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, ... a typhoid carrier. • Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria. Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot) • One dose ...

  2. Meningococcal Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an infection of the covering of the brain and the spinal cord. Meningococcal disease also causes ... legs, have problems with their nervous systems, become deaf or mentally ... use of meningococcal vaccine is important for people at highest risk.

  3. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  4. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  5. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  6. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination Pronounced (per-TUS-iss) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... The best way to prevent it is through vaccinations. The childhood vaccine is called DTaP. The whooping ...

  7. What you don't know about vaccines can hurt you.

    PubMed

    Pace, Victor M

    2015-01-01

    As physicians, we've all learned in detail about the science behind vaccinations, but I suspect few of us have been taught about the history of vaccinations. Sure, we all know that Dr. Jonas Salk developed the poliovirus vaccine, but I wasn't aware that he inoculated himself, his wife, and his three children with his then experimental vaccine. When our editorial committee decided to focus on vaccinations as our theme for this month's Greene County Medical Society's Journal, I perused the internet for interesting topics. I came across a fascinating website, historyofvaccines.org; this website is a project of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, touted as being the oldest professional medical organization in the United States. I credit the majority of the information in this article to the above website and the rest to the National Institutes of Health (nih.gov) website; I trust that the information is valid and true, based on the agencies behind these websites. Below are some interesting tidbits about vaccine preventable diseases that I found noteworthy to pass on to our readers. PMID:25958653

  8. Poliovirus protease 3C (P3-7c) does not cleave P220 of the eucaryotic mRNA cap-binding protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K A; Edery, I; Hanecak, R; Wimmer, E; Sonenberg, N

    1985-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells by poliovirus results in proteolysis of the large subunit (P220) of the cap-binding protein complex. This is believed to cause the rapid shut-off of host protein synthesis during poliovirus infection. In this communication we examined the possible involvement of poliovirus proteins 3C (a proteinase) and 2C in cleavage of P220. Using antisera against these two viral polypeptides, we were unable to inhibit proteolysis of P220 in an in vitro assay. These results indicate that viral proteins 3C and 2C are not directly involved in cleaving P220 and hence do not cause shut-off of cellular protein synthesis. Images PMID:2991572

  9. Promoting Vaccine Confidence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Vaccine hesitancy incorporates a wide range of parental attitudes and behaviors surrounding vaccines. Ironically, the very success of the immunization program has fueled vaccine concerns; because vaccine-preventable diseases are no longer prevalent, attention has shifted to the safety and necessity of vaccines themselves. This article reviews some of the underlying themes of vaccine hesitancy as well as specific vaccine safety concerns. Strategies for discussing vaccines with concerned parents are also discussed. PMID:26337737

  10. Marked increases in concentrations of apolipoprotein in the cerebrospinal fluid of poliovirus-infected macaques: relations between apolipoprotein concentrations and severity of brain injury.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Seishima, M; Heyes, M P; Song, H; Fujigaki, S; Maeda, S; Vickers, J H; Noma, A

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoproteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) might have important functional roles in the pathophysiology of brain and lipid metabolism in the vascular component. The present study examined apolipoprotein A-I (apo-A-I) and apolipoprotein E (apo-E) levels in CSF and serum from poliovirus-infected macaques. Poliovirus-infected macaques developed motor deficits and were classified into three groups: (1) muscle weakness in one or both legs; (2) partial paralysis in one or both legs; (3) complete paralysis in one or both legs. No motor deficits were evident in the control or sham-treated macaques. Apo-A-I concentrations in CSF were markedly elevated in poliovirus-infected macaques with weakness, partial or complete paralysis, in comparison with either control or sham-treated animals, and were proportional to the severity of motor impairment. Apo-E concentrations in CSF were also significantly elevated in poliovirus-infected macaques with complete paralysis. The magnitude of increase in CSF apo-A-I or apo-E concentrations was also closely associated with the degree of histologic neurological damage and inflammation (lesion scores). However, no changes in serum apo-A-I and apo-E concentrations were observed in the poliovirus-infected macaques compared with control macaques. Furthermore there were no significant correlations apo-A-I or apo-E concentrations between serum and CSF. We hypothesize that the elevation of apo-A-I and apo-E concentrations after poliovirus infection is caused by immune stimulation within the central nervous system (CNS). Measures of CSF apo-A-I and apo-E levels might serve as a useful marker for the severity and/or the range of CNS injury. PMID:9003413

  11. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi traffic by poliovirus protein 3A: genetic and ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Doedens, J R; Giddings, T H; Kirkegaard, K

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus protein 3A, only 87 amino acids in length, is a potent inhibitor of protein secretion in mammalian cells, blocking anterograde protein traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. The function of viral protein 3A in blocking protein secretion is extremely sensitive to mutations near the N terminus of the protein. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids or insertion of a single amino acid between amino acids 15 and 16, a mutation that causes a cold-sensitive defect in poliovirus RNA replication, abrogates the inhibition of protein secretion although wild-type amounts of the mutant proteins are expressed. Immunofluorescence light microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrate that 3A protein, expressed in the absence of other viral proteins, colocalizes with membranes derived from the ER. The precise topology of 3A with respect to ER membranes is not known, but it is likely to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the ER. Although the glycosylation of 3A in translation extracts has been reported, we show that tunicamycin, under conditions in which glycosylation of cellular proteins is inhibited, has no effect on poliovirus growth. Therefore, glycosylation of 3A plays no functional role in the viral replicative cycle. Electron microscopy reveals that the ER dilates dramatically in the presence of 3A protein. The absence of accumulated vesicles and the swelling of the ER-derived membranes argues that ER-to-Golgi traffic is inhibited at the step of vesicle formation or budding from the ER. PMID:9371562

  12. Degradation of the interferon-induced 68,000-M(r) protein kinase by poliovirus requires RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Black, T L; Barber, G N; Katze, M G

    1993-01-01

    Control of the interferon-induced double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) activated protein kinase (referred to as P68 because of its M(r) of 68,000 in human cells) by animal viruses is essential to avoid decreases in protein synthetic rates during infection. We have previously demonstrated that poliovirus establishes a unique way of regulating the protein kinase, namely by inducing the specific degradation of P68 during infection (T. L. Black, B. Safer, A. Hovanessian, and M. G. Katze, J. Virol. 63:2244-2251, 1989). In the present study we investigated the mechanisms by which P68 degradation occurred. To do this we used an in vitro degradation assay which faithfully reproduced the in vivo events. Although viral gene expression was required for P68 degradation, the major poliovirus proteases, 2A and 3C, were found not to be directly involved with P68 proteolysis. However, the protease responsible for P68 degradation required divalent cations for maximal activity and probably has both an RNA and a protein component since trypsin and ribonuclease abrogated the activity. Despite this requirement for divalent cations and RNA, activation of the kinase was not required for proteolysis since a catalytically inactive P68 was still degraded. Mapping of P68 protease-sensitive sites by using in vitro translated truncation and deletion mutants revealed that sites required for degradation resided in the amino terminus and colocalized to dsRNA-binding domains. Finally, we found that preincubation of cell extracts with the synthetic dsRNA poly(I-C) largely prevented P68 proteolysis, providing additional evidence for the critical role of RNA. On the basis of these data, we present a hypothetical model depicting possible mechanisms of P68 degradation in poliovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:7678306

  13. Stabilization of Poliovirus Polymerase by NTP Binding and Fingers-Thumb Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Albertini, Rebecca A.; Peersen, Olve B.

    2007-01-01

    The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases show a conserved structure where the fingers domain interacts with the top of the thumb domain to create a tunnel through which nucleotide triphosphates reach the active site. We have solved the crystal structures of poliovirus polymerase (3Dpol) in complex with all four NTPs, showing that they all bind in a common preinsertion site where the phosphates are not yet positioned over the active site. The NTPs interact with both the fingers and palm domains, forming bridging interactions that explain the increased thermal stability of 3Dpol in the presence of NTPs. We have also examined the importance of the fingers-thumb domain interaction for the function and structural stability of 3Dpol. Results from thermal denaturation experiments using circular dichroism and 2-aniliino-6-napthaline-sulfonate (ANS) fluorescence show that 3Dpol has a melting temperature of only ∼40°C. NTP binding stabilizes the protein and increases the melting by 5-6 °C while mutations in the fingers-thumb domain interface destabilize the protein and reduce the melting point by as much as 6 °C. In particular, the burial of Phe30 and Phe34 from the tip of the index finger into a pocket at the top of the thumb and the presence of Trp403 on the thumb domain are key interactions required to maintain the structural integrity of the polymerase. The data suggest the fingers domain has significant conformational flexibility and exists in a highly dynamic molten globule state at physiological temperature. The role of the enclosed active site motif as a structural scaffold for constraining the fingers domain and accommodating conformational changes in 3Dpol and other viral polymerases during the catalytic cycle is discussed. PMID:17223130

  14. Influence of pH and electrolyte composition on adsorption of poliovirus by soils and minerals.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D H; Moore, R S; Sturman, L S

    1981-01-01

    The pH and the nature an concentration of simple electrolytes influenced the interaction of poliovirus type 2 with three soils, a sand, and a clay mineral. In electrolytes above pH 9 the virus was not adsorbed extensively to the substrates, but below pH 7 almost all virus was bound. For each adsorbent there was a characteristic pH region of transition from strong to weak uptake. Differences between the soils in virus uptake were shown to parallel their pH-dependent mineral. In electrolytes above pH 9 the virus was not adsorbed extensively to the substrates, but below pH 7 almost all virus was bound. For each adsorbent there was a characteristic pH region of transition from strong to weak uptake. Differences between the soils in virus uptake were shown to parallel their pH-dependent mineral. In electrolytes above pH 9 the virus was not adsorbed extensively to the substrates, but below pH 7 almost all virus was bound. For each adsorbent there was a characteristic pH region of transition from strong to weak uptake. Differences between the soils in virus uptake were shown to parallel their pH-dependent charge properties, as determined by whole-particle microelectrophoresis. Only when the pH was close to or above the critical region was uptake increased with electrolyte concentration. The transition region for all substrates was above pH 7.5 the isoelectric point of the virus. Thus, it appears that when both the virus and substrate are highly negative charged, repulsive electrostatic effects may exceed inherent attractive interactions, thereby inhibiting adsorption. PMID:6274260

  15. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-Ichi

    2016-02-01

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. PMID:26637351

  16. Antiviral effect of Guazuma ulmifolia and Stryphnodendron adstringens on poliovirus and bovine herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Felipe, Adriana Meri Mestrimer; Rincão, Vinicius Pires; Benati, Fabrício José; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho; Galina, Karen Janaina; de Toledo, Cleyton Eduardo Mendes; Lopes, Gisely Cristiny; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nozawa, Carlos

    2006-06-01

    Crude extract (CE) and aqueous (AqF) and ethyl acetate (EtOAcF) fractions of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam., Sterculiaceae and the corresponding AqF, EtOAcF of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville, Leguminosae were tested for their antiviral activity against poliovirus 1 (P-1) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) in HEp-2 cultured cells. The antiviral activity was monitored by plaque assay and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) under virucidal and therapeutic protocols. The therapeutic protocol demonstrated statistically significant positive results with both plants and for both virus strains. The highest percentages of viral inhibition were found for G. ulmifolia EtOAcF which inhibited BHV-1 and P-1 replication by 100% and 99%, respectively (p<0.05, Student's t-test). For S. adstringens, AqF was the most efficient, inhibiting BHV-1 and P-1 by 97% and 93%, respectively (p<0.05). In the virucidal protocol, G. ulmifolia CE inhibited the replication of BHV-1 and P-1 by 60% and 26%, respectively (p<0.05), while, for S. adstringens, inhibition of 62% (p<0.05) was demonstrated only with EtOAcF for P-1. IFA demonstrated that the greatest reduction in fluorescent cell number occurred with G. ulmifolia, under the therapeutic protocol for both virus strains. However, AqF and EtOAcF of S. adstringens were most efficient with the virucidal protocol for P-1. In conclusion, we demonstrated that G. ulmifolia and S. adstringens inhibited BHV-1 and P-1 replication, as well as, blocked the synthesis of viral antigens in infected cell cultures. PMID:16754999

  17. Cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients’ immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes. PMID:25904595

  18. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  19. Inhibition of host cell RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription by poliovirus: Inactivation of specific transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, L.G.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Berk, A.J.; Dasgupta, A.

    1987-11-01

    The inhibition of transcription by RNA polymerase III in poliovirus-infected cells was studied. Experiments utilizing two different cell lines showed that the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase III was impaired by infection of these cells with the virus. The observed inhibition of transcription was not due to shut-off of host cell protein synthesis by poliovirus. Among four distinct components required for accurate transcription in vitro from cloned DNA templates, activities of RNA polymerase III and transcription factor TFIIIA were not significantly affected by virus infection. The activity of transcription factor TFIIIC, the limiting component required for transcription of RNA polymerase III genes, was severely inhibited in infected cells, whereas that of transcription factor TFIIIB was inhibited to a lesser extent. The sequence-specific DNA-binding of TFIIIC to the adenovirus VA1 gene internal promoted, however, was not altered by infection of cells with the virus. The authors conclude that (i) at least two transcription factors, TFIIIB and TFIIIC, are inhibited by infection of cells with poliovirtus, (ii) inactivation of TFIIIC does not involve destruction of its DNA-binding domain, and (iii) sequence-specific DNA binding by TFIIIC may be necessary but is not sufficient for the formation of productive transcription complexes.

  20. Generation of Recombinant Polioviruses Harboring RNA Affinity Tags in the 5′ and 3′ Noncoding Regions of Genomic RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Flather, Dylan; Cathcart, Andrea L.; Cruz, Casey; Baggs, Eric; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being intensely studied for more than 50 years, a complete understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle remains elusive. Specifically, only a handful of cellular proteins have been shown to be involved in the RNA replication cycle of these viruses. In an effort to isolate and identify additional cellular proteins that function in enteroviral RNA replication, we have generated multiple recombinant polioviruses containing RNA affinity tags within the 3′ or 5′ noncoding region of the genome. These recombinant viruses retained RNA affinity sequences within the genome while remaining viable and infectious over multiple passages in cell culture. Further characterization of these viruses demonstrated that viral protein production and growth kinetics were unchanged or only slightly altered relative to wild type poliovirus. However, attempts to isolate these genetically-tagged viral genomes from infected cells have been hindered by high levels of co-purification of nonspecific proteins and the limited matrix-binding efficiency of RNA affinity sequences. Regardless, these recombinant viruses represent a step toward more thorough characterization of enterovirus ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in RNA replication. PMID:26861382

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tat-Activated Expression of Poliovirus Protein 2A Inhibits mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Hong; Baltimore, David

    1989-04-01

    To study the effect of poliovirus protein 2A on cellular RNA translation, the tat control system of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was used. Protein 2A was expressed from a plasmid construct (pHIV/2A) incorporating the HIV long terminal repeat. Protein synthesis was measured by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. When HIV/2A was contransfected with the reporter, addition of a tat-producing plasmid caused at least a 50-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis. A HeLa cell line carrying HIV/2A was established. In it, tat expression caused more than a 10-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis from the reporter plasmid. Furthermore, 2A induction by tat caused cleavage of the cellular translation factor P220, a part of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F. Thus protein 2A can, by itself, carry out the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis characteristic of a poliovirus infection. Also, the HIV tat activation provides a very effective method to control gene expression in mammalian cells.

  2. Structural organization of poliovirus RNA replication is mediated by viral proteins of the P2 genomic region.

    PubMed Central

    Bienz, K; Egger, D; Troxler, M; Pasamontes, L

    1990-01-01

    Transcriptionally active replication complexes bound to smooth membrane vesicles were isolated from poliovirus-infected cells. In electron microscopic, negatively stained preparations, the replication complex appeared as an irregularly shaped, oblong structure attached to several virus-induced vesicles of a rosettelike arrangement. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry of such preparations demonstrated that the poliovirus replication complex contains the proteins coded by the P2 genomic region (P2 proteins) in a membrane-associated form. In addition, the P2 proteins are also associated with viral RNA, and they can be cross-linked to viral RNA by UV irradiation. Guanidine hydrochloride prevented the P2 proteins from becoming membrane bound but did not change their association with viral RNA. The findings allow the conclusion that the protein 2C or 2C-containing precursor(s) is responsible for the attachment of the viral RNA to the vesicular membrane and for the spatial organization of the replication complex necessary for its proper functioning in viral transcription. A model for the structure of the viral replication complex and for the function of the 2C-containing P2 protein(s) and the vesicular membranes is proposed. Images PMID:2154600

  3. Isolation of enteroviruses from water, suspended solids, and sediments from Galveston Bay: survival of poliovirus and rotavirus adsorbed to sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V C; Seidel, K M; Goyal, S M; Metcalf, T G; Melnick, J L

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and quantitation of enteroviruses among water, suspended solids, and compact sediments in a polluted estuary are described. Samples were collected sequentially from water, suspended solids, fluffy sediments (uppermost layer of bottom sediments), and compact sediment. A total of 103 samples were examined of which 27 (26%) were positive for virus. Polioviruses were recovered most often, followed by coxsackie B viruses and echoviruses 7 and 29. Virus was found most often attached to suspended solids: 72% of these samples were positive, whereas only 14% of water samples without solids yielded virus. Fluffy sediments yielded virus in 47% of the samples, whereas only 5% of compact bottom-sediment samples were positive. When associated with solids, poliovirus and rotavirus retained their infectious quality for 19 days. The same viruses remained infectious for only 9 days when freely suspended in seawater. Collection of suspended solids at ambient water pH appears to be very useful for the detection of virus; it has advantages over collecting and processing large volumes of water, with accompanying pH adjustment and salt addition for processing. PMID:6091548

  4. A Cysteine-Rich Motif in Poliovirus Protein 2CATPase Is Involved in RNA Replication and Binds Zinc In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Thomas; Jones, Keith W.; Wimmer, Eckard

    2000-01-01

    Protein 2CATPase of picornaviruses is involved in the rearrangement of host cell organelles, viral RNA replication, and encapsidation. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which 2CATPase engages in these processes are not known. To characterize functional domains of 2CATPase, we have focused on a cysteine-rich motif near the carboxy terminus of poliovirus 2CATPase. This region, which is well conserved among enteroviruses and rhinoviruses displaying an amino acid arrangement resembling zinc finger motifs, was studied by genetic and biochemical analyses. A mutation that replaced the first cysteine residue of the motif with a serine was lethal. A mutant virus which lacked the second of four potential coordination sites for zinc was temperature sensitive. At the restrictive temperature, RNA replication was inhibited whereas translation and polyprotein processing, assayed in vitro and in vivo, appeared to be normal. An intragenomic second-site revertant which reinserted the missing coordination site for zinc and recovered RNA replication at the restrictive temperature was isolated. The cysteine-rich motif was sufficient to bind zinc in vitro, as assessed in the presence of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol by a colorimetric assay. Zinc binding, however, was not required for hydrolysis of ATP. 2CATPase as well as its precursors 2BC and P2 were found to exist in a reduced form in poliovirus-infected cells. PMID:10590122

  5. Rabies Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and booster doses should be given as needed. (Testing or booster doses are not recommended for travelers.) Ask your doctor for details. Vaccination After an Exposure:Anyone who has been bitten by an animal, or who otherwise may have been exposed to ...

  6. Valuing vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  7. Vexing Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  8. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... it while traveling. Typhoid strikes about 21 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000. ... booster dose is needed every 2 years for people who remain at risk. Live typhoid vaccine (oral)Four doses: one capsule every other day for a week (day 1, day 3, day ...

  9. Polio Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the world. It would only take one person infected with polio virus coming from another country to bring the ... However, any medicine could cause a serious side effect, such as a severe allergic reaction or even death. The risk of polio vaccine causing serious harm is extremely small.

  10. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  11. Replicating vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  12. Single-Cell Analysis Uncovers Extensive Biological Noise in Poliovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viral infections often begin with a very small number of initiating particles. Accordingly, the outcome of an infection is likely to be affected by variability in the initial molecular interactions between virus and host. In this study, we investigated the range of outcomes upon infection of single cells. We isolated individual cells infected with poliovirus at low or high multiplicities of infection (MOI) and measured viral genomic replication and infectious viral progeny in each cell. We first determined that at 7 h postinfection, the ratio of positive to negative strands in individual cells varies from 5:1 to more than 190:1, with and average of 20:1, suggesting a significant variability in RNA synthesis. We further found that while virus genome production is higher in cells infected at a high multiplicity, the production of infectious particles is largely independent of the number of viruses infecting each cell. Strikingly, by correlating RNA and particle production within individual infections, we uncovered a significant contribution of stochastic noise to the outcome of infection. At low MOI, stochastic influences appear as kinetic effects which are most critical at the initial steps in infection. At high MOI, stochastic influences appear to dictate the virus's ability to harness cellular resources. We conclude that biological noise is a critical determinant of the overall productivity of viral infections. The distinct nature of stochasticity in the outcome of infection by low and high numbers of viral particles may have important implications for our understanding of the determinants of successful viral infections. IMPORTANCE By correlating genome and particle production in single-cell infections, we elucidated sources of noise in viral infections. When a cell was infected by only a single infectious particle, variation in the kinetics of the initial steps of replication contributed significantly to the overall productivity of the infection

  13. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccine for T1D promising in the clinic HPV vaccines halved infections in US teenage girls Modified DC immunotherapy against melanoma New study looks at clinical severity of human H7N9 infections Prevnar vaccines are valuable for healthcare systems GAPVAC: New consortium in the fight of brain cancer Cytomegalovirus vaccine to enter phase 3 Malaria vaccination using chemically attenuated parasites

  14. Fish Vaccines in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination is a proven, cost-effective method to prevent infectious diseases in animals. Current fish vaccines can be categorized as killed fish vaccines or modified live vaccines. The major advantage of live vaccine is their ability to stimulate both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses for ...

  15. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs Tips for Finding Vaccine Records Trusted Sources of Vaccine ... PRETEENS Vaccines You Need ...

  16. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)Treatment of pneumococcal infections with penicillin and other drugs used to be more effective. But ... the disease, through vaccination, even more important. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) protects against 23 types of pneumococcal ...

  17. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  18. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  19. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barcodes Related Link Vaccines & Immunizations Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select one PDF [335 KB] RTF [260 ... child will get one or more of these vaccines today: DTaP Hib Hepatitis B Polio PCV13 Why ...

  20. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy, please see the MotherToBaby fact sheet Seasonal Influenza Vaccine (Flu Shot) during Pregnancy ( http: / / mothertobaby. org/ fact- sheets/ seasonal- influenza- vaccine- flu- shot- pregnancy/ pdf/ ). Nasal spray flu vaccines ...

  1. Vaccinations and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do not measure your viral load within 4 weeks of any vaccination. Flu shots have been studied ... live” vaccination in the past 2 or 3 weeks. Still, the “MMR” vaccine against measles, mumps and ...

  2. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccine called MMRV, which contains both chickenpox and MMR vaccines, may be given instead of the two individual ... like rash (about 1 person in 20) than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Moderate Problems:Seizure (jerking or staring) ...

  3. Vaccines for Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus (HBV) during pregnancy Vaccination and Pregnancy Resources, journal articles, more sources, etc., from Immunization Action Coalition Video: "Vaccines and Your Baby" (26:41 min) Vaccine Education Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, November 2002 Also ...

  4. Vaccine refrigeration

    PubMed Central

    McColloster, Patrick J; Martin-de-Nicolas, Andres

    2014-01-01

    This commentary reviews recent changes in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) vaccine storage guidelines that were developed in response to an investigative report by the Office of the Inspector General. The use of temperature data loggers with probes residing in glycol vials is advised along with storing vaccines in pharmaceutical refrigerators. These refrigerators provide good thermal distribution but can warm to 8 °C in less than one hour after the power is discontinued. Consequently, electric grid instability influences appropriate refrigerator selection and the need for power back-up. System Average Interruption Duration Index (SAIDI) values quantify this instability and can be used to formulate region-specific guidelines. A novel aftermarket refrigerator regulator with a battery back-up power supply and microprocessor control system is also described. PMID:24442209

  5. Rotavirus Vaccine -- Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these vaccines. The infant's immune response to influenza vaccine administered at the same time as rotavirus vaccine ... previously that an inactivated vaccine (e.g., inactivated influenza vaccine) may be administered either simultaneously or at any ...

  6. Subviral Particle as Vaccine and Vaccine Platform

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subvirual particles retain similar antigenic features of their authentic viral capsids and thus have been applied as nonreplicating subunit vaccines against viral infection and illness. Additionally, the self-assembled, polyvalent subviral particles are excellent platforms to display foreign antigens for immune enhancement for vaccine development. These subviral particle-based vaccines are noninfectious and thus safer than the conventional live attenuated and inactivated vaccines. While several VLP vaccines are available in the markets, numerous others, including dual vaccines against more than one pathogen, are under clinical or preclinical development. This article provides an update of these efforts. PMID:24662314

  7. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Measles vaccination: Targeted and non-targeted benefits CDC reports: 2-dose regimen of chickenpox vaccine is a success Positive preliminary results from the CAPiTA study Seasonal flu vaccine associate with reduced stroke risk HPV vaccine shown to halve cervical abnormalities Global prize for mobile mast vaccine storage project Developmental pathway of potent HIV-neutralizing antibodies Burkholderia vaccine: US Dep of Defense collaborates with Bavarian Nordic

  8. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy and safety of first-ever Dengue vaccine candidate in Phase 3 Agenus‘ brain cancer vaccine doubles survival rate in GBM patients New study: Rotavirus vaccines dramatically cut hospitalization rates in US children Therapeutic vaccines – from heart disease to cancer Agenus‘ genital herpes vaccine significantly reduces viral burden in Phase 2 The latest on PaxVax‘ and Gotovax AB’s cholera vaccine candidates ACIP ponders recommendation for Prevnar use in seniors PMID:25424916

  9. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    Two therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates successful in phase 1 Flu shot may prevent heart attacks and stroke CDX-1401 combined with TLR agonist: Positive phase 1 results Three MRSA vaccines in early clincial trials Ovarian cancer vaccine candidate DPX-Survivac: Positive interim results from phase 1 Chinese biotech partnership brings first hepatitis E vaccine to the market Therapeutic vaccine for treatment of genital herpes enters phase 2 Visionary concept: Printable vaccines PMID:23817319

  10. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  11. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic immunotherapy reduces the size of melanoma tumors in phase 3 trial EV71 vaccine protects children against HFMD Influenza vaccination important for risk groups Bharat‘s rotavirus vaccine is safe and modestly efficacious Successfully avoiding the cold-chain for vaccines FDA approval for Stallergenes’ sublingual grass pollen allergy immunotherapy HPV vaccination campaign could change from three to two doses in the UK Valneva continues phase 2/3 trial of Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccine PMID:25290656

  12. Vaccines.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Vaccinated More Info Glossary Our Partners Related Websites AIDS.gov Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) CDC Vaccines Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program ...

  13. Poliovirus infection of cyclophosphamide-treated mice results in persistence and late paralysis: I. Clinical, pathologic, and immunologic studies.

    PubMed

    Jubelt, B; Meagher, J B

    1984-04-01

    An attenuated human poliovirus infection of cyclophosphamide (CY)-treated mice was developed as a model of persistent CNS enterovirus infections and as an investigation of the interaction of virus with motor neurons during persistence. Ten percent of mice inoculated intracerebrally with undiluted virus developed clinical disease by day 90, but of those treated with CY, 80% developed disease. At higher virus dilutions plus CY there was a marked increase in the incubation period. The latest onset of clinical disease occurred on day 146. Only paralyzed animals had pathologic changes in the spinal cord and virus antigen in anterior horn cells. Neutralizing antibodies were suppressed by CY, as were humoral and cellular immune responses to other antigens. PMID:6322051

  14. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in Poliovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Causes Conditional Defects in Encapsidation and Uncoating

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Emmanuel; Mugavero, JoAnn; Jiang, Ping; Paul, Aniko V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The specificity of encapsidation of C-cluster enteroviruses depends on an interaction between capsid proteins and nonstructural protein 2CATPase. In particular, residue N252 of poliovirus 2CATPase interacts with VP3 of coxsackievirus A20, in the context of a chimeric virus. Poliovirus 2CATPase has important roles both in RNA replication and encapsidation. In this study, we searched for additional sites in 2CATPase, near N252, that are required for encapsidation. Accordingly, segments adjacent to N252 were analyzed by combining triple and single alanine mutations to identify residues required for function. Two triple alanine mutants exhibited defects in RNA replication. The remaining two mutations, located in secondary structures in a predicted three-dimensional model of 2CATPase, caused lethal growth phenotypes. Most single alanine mutants, derived from the lethal variants, were either quasi-infectious and yielded variants with wild-type (wt) or temperature-sensitive (ts) growth phenotypes or had a lethal growth phenotype due to defective RNA replication. The K259A mutation, mapping to an α helix in the predicted structure of 2CATPase, resulted in a cold-sensitive virus. In vivo protein synthesis and virus production were strikingly delayed at 33°C relative to the wt, suggesting a defect in uncoating. Studies with a reporter virus indicated that this mutant is also defective in encapsidation at 33°C. Cell imaging confirmed a much-reduced production of K259A mature virus at 33°C relative to the wt. In conclusion, we have for the first time linked a cold-sensitive encapsidation defect in 2CATPase (K259A) to a subsequent delay in uncoating of the virus particle at 33°C during the next cycle of infection. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus morphogenesis, which involves the encapsidation of newly made virion RNA, is a process still poorly understood. Elucidation of this process is important for future drug development for a large variety of diseases caused by these

  15. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s).

  16. Modified procedure for extraction of poliovirus from naturally-infected oysters using Cat-Floc and beef extract

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, E.F.; Vaughn, J.M.; Vicale, T.J.

    1980-02-01

    Methods for recovery of poliovirus type 1 from naturally-infected oysters were examined. Extraction procedures analyzed included glycine-saline and polyelectrolyte (Cat-Floc) methods followed by concentration using modifications of an acid precipitation technique. Direct viral assay of shellfish homogenates, when compared to virus recovery following extraction, indicated that substantially fewer viruses were detected in initial homogenates. These data appeared to support the contention that input values based on homogenate assay were inappropriate in determining recovery efficiencies with naturally-infected shellfish. Since absolute efficiencies could not be determined, relative efficiencies using samples from pooled homogenates were used to determine the recovery efficiencies of various extraction procedures. Cat-Floc extraction followed by a beef extract-modified acid precipitation technique resulted in higher virus recoveries than a glycine-saline extraction procedure.

  17. Construction of recombinant DNA molecules by the use of a single stranded DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction: its application to chimeric hepatitis A virus/poliovirus subgenomic cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wychowski, C; Emerson, S U; Silver, J; Feinstone, S M

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the importance of VP4 in picornavirus replication and translation, we replaced the hepatitis A virus (HAV) VP4 with the poliovirus (PV1) VP4. Using a modification of oligonucleotide site directed mutagenesis and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we created a subgenomic cDNA chimera of hepatitis A virus in which the precise sequences coding for HAV VP4 capsid protein were replaced by the sequences coding for the poliovirus VP4 capsid protein. The method involved the use of PCR primers corresponding to the 3' and 5' ends of the poliovirus VP4 sequence and that had HAV VP4 3' and 5' flanking sequences on their 5'ends. Single stranded DNA of 240 and 242 nt containing the 204 nt coding for the complete poliovirus VP4 were produced by using a limiting amount of one of the primers in a PCR reaction. These single stranded PCR products were used like mutagenic oligonucleotides on a single stranded phagemid containing the first 2070 bases of the HAV genome. Using this technique, we precisely replaced the HAV VP4 gene by the poliovirus VP4 gene as determined by DNA sequencing. The cDNA was transcribed into RNA and translated in vitro. The resulting protein could be precipitated by antibody to poliovirus VP4 but not to HAV VP4. Images PMID:2156236

  18. A New Method for Estimating the Coverage of Mass Vaccination Campaigns Against Poliomyelitis From Surveillance Data.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K M; Cori, A; Durry, E; Wadood, M Z; Bosan, A; Aylward, R B; Grassly, N C

    2015-12-01

    Mass vaccination campaigns with the oral poliovirus vaccine targeting children aged <5 years are a critical component of the global poliomyelitis eradication effort. Monitoring the coverage of these campaigns is essential to allow corrective action, but current approaches are limited by their cross-sectional nature, nonrandom sampling, reporting biases, and accessibility issues. We describe a new Bayesian framework using data augmentation and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate variation in vaccination coverage from children's vaccination histories investigated during surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. We tested the method using simulated data with at least 200 cases and were able to detect undervaccinated groups if they exceeded 10% of all children and temporal changes in coverage of ±10% with greater than 90% sensitivity. Application of the method to data from Pakistan for 2010-2011 identified undervaccinated groups within the Balochistan/Federally Administered Tribal Areas and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa regions, as well as temporal changes in coverage. The sizes of these groups are consistent with the multiple challenges faced by the program in these regions as a result of conflict and insecurity. Application of this new method to routinely collected data can be a useful tool for identifying poorly performing areas and assisting in eradication efforts. PMID:26568569

  19. A New Method for Estimating the Coverage of Mass Vaccination Campaigns Against Poliomyelitis From Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, K. M.; Cori, A.; Durry, E.; Wadood, M. Z.; Bosan, A.; Aylward, R. B.; Grassly, N. C.

    2015-01-01

    Mass vaccination campaigns with the oral poliovirus vaccine targeting children aged <5 years are a critical component of the global poliomyelitis eradication effort. Monitoring the coverage of these campaigns is essential to allow corrective action, but current approaches are limited by their cross-sectional nature, nonrandom sampling, reporting biases, and accessibility issues. We describe a new Bayesian framework using data augmentation and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate variation in vaccination coverage from children's vaccination histories investigated during surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. We tested the method using simulated data with at least 200 cases and were able to detect undervaccinated groups if they exceeded 10% of all children and temporal changes in coverage of ±10% with greater than 90% sensitivity. Application of the method to data from Pakistan for 2010–2011 identified undervaccinated groups within the Balochistan/Federally Administered Tribal Areas and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa regions, as well as temporal changes in coverage. The sizes of these groups are consistent with the multiple challenges faced by the program in these regions as a result of conflict and insecurity. Application of this new method to routinely collected data can be a useful tool for identifying poorly performing areas and assisting in eradication efforts. PMID:26568569

  20. Avian influenza vaccines and vaccination for poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines against avian influenza (AI) have had more limited use in poultry than vaccines against other poultry diseases such as Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bronchitis, and have been used more commonly in the developing world. Over the past 40 years, AI vaccines have been primarily based o...

  1. Recombinant Baculovirus Associated with Bilosomes as an Oral Vaccine Candidate against HEV71 Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Premanand, Balraj; Prabakaran, Mookkan; Kiener, Tanja K.; Kwang, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) is one of the major pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Currently no effective vaccine or antiviral drugs are available. Like poliovirus, EV71 is transmitted mainly by the feco-oral route. To date the majority of the studied EV71 vaccine candidates are administered parenterally. Injectable vaccines induce good systemic immunity but mucosal responses are often unsatisfactory, whereas mucosal vaccines provide both systemic and mucosal immunity. Therefore, oral immunization appears to be an attractive alternative to parenteral immunization. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we studied the efficacy of an orally administered vaccine candidate developed using recombinant baculovirus displaying VP1 (Bac-VP1) in a murine model. Gastrointestinal delivery of Bac-VP1 significantly induced VP1-specific humoral (IgG) and mucosal (IgA) immune responses. Further, we studied the efficacy of the Bac-VP1 associated with bilosomes and observed that the Bac-VP1 associated with bilosomes elicited significantly higher immune responses compared to bilosomes non-associated with Bac-VP1. However, mice immunized subcutaneously with live Bac-VP1 had significantly enhanced VP1 specific serum IgG levels and higher neutralizing antibody titers compared with mice orally immunized with live Bac-VP1 alone or associated with bilosomes. Conclusion Bilosomes have been shown to possess inherent adjuvant properties when associated with antigen. Therefore Bac-VP1 with bilosomes could be a promising oral vaccine candidate against EV71 infections. Thus, Bac-VP1 loaded bilosomes may provide a needle free, painless approach for immunization against EV71, thereby increasing patient compliance and consequently increasing vaccination coverage. PMID:23390538

  2. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6-16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9-79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4-72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5-77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9-59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  3. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9–79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4–72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5–77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9–59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  4. Adverse events following vaccination in the French armed forces: An overview of surveillance conducted from 2002 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Mayet, A; Haus-Cheymol, R; Bouaiti, E A; Decam, C; Simon, F; Mérens, A; Spiegel, A; Meynard, J B; Deparis, X; Migliani, R

    2012-01-01

    French military personnel are subject to a compulsory vaccination schedule. The aim of this study was to describe vaccine adverse events (VAE) reported from 2002 to 2010 in armed forces. VAE are routinely surveyed by the military Centre for epidemiology and public health. For each case, military practitioners fill a notification form, providing patient characteristics, clinical information and vaccines administered. For this study, VAE following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination were excluded. Among the 473 cases retained, 442 (93%) corresponded to non-severe VAE,including local, regional and systemic events, while 31 corresponded to severe VAE, with two leading to significant disability. The global VAE reporting rate (RR) was 14.0 per 100,000 injections. While stationary from 2002 to 2008, the RR increased from 2009. The most important observations were a marked increase of VAE attributed to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine from 2005 to 2008, a high RR observed with the inactivated diphtheria-tetanus (toxoids)-poliovirus vaccine combined with acellular pertussis vaccine (dTap-IPV) from 2008 and an increase in RR for seasonal influenza vaccine VAE in 2009. Our RR for severe VAE (1.1 VAEper 100,000) appears comparable with rates observed among United States civilians and military personnel. The increase observed from 2009 could be partly explained by the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic which increased practitioner awareness towards VAE. In conclusion, the tolerance of the vaccines used in French armed forces appears acceptable. PMID:22720768

  5. History of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before. PMID:25136134

  6. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... The hepatitis B vaccination is a non-infectious, vaccine prepared from recombinant yeast cultures, rather than human blood or plasma. There is no risk of contamination from other bloodborne pathogens nor is there any ... from the vaccine. The vaccine must be administered according to the ...

  7. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Loucq, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles Mérieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global health. Thanks to a vaccine, smallpox has been eradicated, polio has nearly disappeared, Haemophilus influenzae B, measles and more recently meningitis A are controlled in many countries. While a malaria vaccine is undergoing phase 3, International Vaccine Institute, in collaboration with an Indian manufacturer has brought an oral inactivated cholera vaccine to pre-qualification. The field of vaccinology has undergone major changes thanks to philanthropists such as Bill and Melinda Gates, initiatives like the Decade of Vaccines and public private partnerships. Current researches on vaccines have more challenging targets like the dengue viruses, malaria, human immunodeficiency virus, the respiratory syncytial virus and nosocomial diseases. Exciting research is taking place on new adjuvants, nanoparticles, virus like particles and new route of administration. An overcrowded infant immunization program, anti-vaccine groups, immunizing a growing number of elderlies and delivering vaccines to difficult places are among challenges faced by vaccinologists and global health experts. PMID:23596584

  8. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles Mérieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global health. Thanks to a vaccine, smallpox has been eradicated, polio has nearly disappeared, Haemophilus influenzae B, measles and more recently meningitis A are controlled in many countries. While a malaria vaccine is undergoing phase 3, International Vaccine Institute, in collaboration with an Indian manufacturer has brought an oral inactivated cholera vaccine to pre-qualification. The field of vaccinology has undergone major changes thanks to philanthropists such as Bill and Melinda Gates, initiatives like the Decade of Vaccines and public private partnerships. Current researches on vaccines have more challenging targets like the dengue viruses, malaria, human immunodeficiency virus, the respiratory syncytial virus and nosocomial diseases. Exciting research is taking place on new adjuvants, nanoparticles, virus like particles and new route of administration. An overcrowded infant immunization program, anti-vaccine groups, immunizing a growing number of elderlies and delivering vaccines to difficult places are among challenges faced by vaccinologists and global health experts. PMID:23596584

  9. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics: news.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in the development of immunotherapeutic mAbs for cancer New vaccine reduces malaria infection by 72% Bavarian Nordic's cancer immunotherapy shows promise in colorectal cancer Chinese HFMD vaccine shows high efficacy in Phase 3 Two-dose regimen of Merck's Gardasil looks effective Accelerating influenza vaccine development using synthetic biology A key role for gut microbes in vaccination Understanding of and attitudes towards vaccines: a study in teenagers. PMID:23863285

  10. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  11. Countering Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kathryn M; Hackell, Jesse M

    2016-09-01

    Immunizations have led to a significant decrease in rates of vaccine-preventable diseases and have made a significant impact on the health of children. However, some parents express concerns about vaccine safety and the necessity of vaccines. The concerns of parents range from hesitancy about some immunizations to refusal of all vaccines. This clinical report provides information about addressing parental concerns about vaccination. PMID:27573088

  12. Translation of poliovirus RNA: role of an essential cis-acting oligopyrimidine element within the 5' nontranslated region and involvement of a cellular 57-kilodalton protein.

    PubMed Central

    Pestova, T V; Hellen, C U; Wimmer, E

    1991-01-01

    Translation of poliovirus RNA is initiated by cap-independent internal entry of ribosomes into the 5' nontranslated region. This process is dependent on elements within the 5' nontranslated region (the internal ribosomal entry site) and may involve novel translation factors. Systematic mutation of a conserved oligopyrimidine tract has revealed a cis-acting element that is essential for translation in vitro. The function of this element is related to its position relative to other cis-acting domains. This element is part of a more complex structure that interacts with several cellular factors, but changes in protein binding after mutation of this element were not detected in a UV cross-linking assay. A 57-kDa protein from the ribosomal salt wash fraction of HeLa cells was identified that binds upstream of the oligopyrimidine tract. Translation of poliovirus mRNA in vitro was strongly and specifically inhibited by competition with the p57-binding domain (nucleotides 260 to 488) of the 5' nontranslated region of encephalomyocarditis virus, indicating a probable role for p57 in poliovirus translation. p57 is likely to be identical to the ribosome-associated factor that binds to and is necessary for the function of the internal ribosomal entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus RNA. Images PMID:1656091

  13. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. PMID:25902360

  14. Obesity vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight. PMID:24365968

  15. Rotavirus vaccine: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Goel Manish; Arun, Kumar; Bilas, Jain Ram; Ruchi, Jain; Pardeep, Khanna; Pradeep, Siwach

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, large proportion i.e., 37% of deaths due to diarrhea in young children is attributed to rotavirus. A monovalent P1A[8] G1 vaccine and a pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine human rotavirus vaccine had shown good clinical efficacy without any increase in intussusception among vaccine recipients. WHO recommends that the first dose of rotavirus vaccine should be administered to infants up to age of 6-15 weeks irrespective of the prior history of rotavirus infection and the maximum age for administering the last dose of the vaccine should be 32 weeks. Booster doses are not recommended. The current update reviews the issues related to rotavirus vaccines and their usages like milestones in the development of rotavirus vaccines, concerns regarding their efficacy and cost-effectiveness, immunity after natural infection, potential for changes in virus strains, current recommendations, post marketing surveillance, and future challenges and scope for further research regarding rotavirus vaccines. PMID:25145068

  16. [Developments in HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    de Melker, Hester; Kenter, Gemma; van Rossum, Tekla; Conyn-van Spaendonck, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been included in the national Vaccination Programme of the Netherlands for 12-year-old girls since 2010. Vaccination coverage for the birth cohort of 1997 was 56.; there is a gradual increase in uptake. Continuous safety monitoring brought no new unknown serious side effects to light; many girls suffered from transient symptoms such as painful arm, fatigue and headache. After the current vaccines that protect against HPV types 2 and 4 types, respectively and induce some cross protection, vaccines are being developed that can induce broader protection. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls is cost-effective, even for relatively low vaccination coverage. The potential protection of HPV vaccination extends beyond prevention of cervical cancer by preventing other oncological manifestations of HPV infection in women as well as men and genital warts. The preventive HPV vaccines do not appear to be effective in treating existing abnormalities. PMID:23171565

  17. Current Vaccine Shortages and Delays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education Programs and Tools VTrckS (Vaccine Tracking System) Immunization Registries (IIS) Vaccines for Children (VFC) Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) Vaccine Management Business Improvement Project (VMBIP) Global Immunizations & Vaccinations Immunization Program ...

  18. Mumps - Vaccine Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... containing vaccine, given as combination measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, separated by at least 28 days, are routinely ... been vaccinated should also receive 1 dose of MMR vaccine, but adults who work in healthcare, a school/ ...

  19. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  20. Side Effects of Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET Side Effects of Smallpox Vaccination The smallpox vaccine prevents smallpox. For most people, ... go away without treatment: The arm receiving the vaccination may be sore and red where the vaccine ...

  1. Vaccination: An Act of Love

    MedlinePlus

    ... benefits of vaccines. For this reason, we created Vaccination Week in the Americas to get vaccines to ... and no one gets left behind. Help the vaccination teams when they come to your town, your ...

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes or ringing in the ears.Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual ... visit CDC's website at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines. HPV Vaccine (Gardasil) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health ...

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Cervarix)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes or ringing in the ears. Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual ... gov/std/hpv and http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines HPV Vaccine (Cervarix) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health ...

  4. Vaccines against poverty

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  5. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  6. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  7. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  8. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  9. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  10. 75 FR 48712 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Influenza Vaccine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... season, 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine is being incorporated into the seasonal vaccine formulation... vaccine provides some protection. The 2010-2011 vaccine provides protection against H1N1 (pandemic.... People who got the 2009 H1N1 vaccine still need to get vaccinated with the 2010-2011 influenza...

  11. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Research : Vaccines Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Vaccines What Are Vaccines and What Do They Do? A vaccine—also ... immune response against the disease. Is There a Vaccine for HIV? No. There is currently no vaccine ...

  12. MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

    MedlinePlus

    Attenuvax® Measles Vaccine ... R-Vax® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine) ... M-R® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine)

  13. LESSONS FROM THE SALK POLIO VACCINE: METHODS FOR AND RISKS OF RAPID TRANSLATION

    PubMed Central

    Juskewitch, Justin E.; Tapia, Carmen J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Salk inactivated poliovirus vaccine is one of the most rapid examples of bench-to-bedside translation in medicine. In the span of 6 years, the key basic lab discoveries facilitating the development of the vaccine were made, optimization and safety testing was completed in both animals and human volunteers, the largest clinical trial in history of 1.8 million children was conducted, and the results were released to an eagerly awaiting public. Such examples of rapid translation can not only offer clues to what factors can successfully drive and accelerate the translational process but also what mistakes can occur (and thus should be avoided) during such a swift process. In this commentary, we explore the translational path of the Salk polio vaccine from the key basic science discoveries to the 1954 Field Trials and delve into the scientific and sociopolitical factors that aided in its rapid development. Moreover, we look at the Cutter and Wyeth incidents after the vaccine’s approval and the errors that led to them. PMID:20718820

  14. New Strains Intended for the Production of Inactivated Polio Vaccine at Low-Containment After Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Knowlson, Sarah; Burlison, John; Giles, Elaine; Fox, Helen; Macadam, Andrew J.; Minor, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has nearly been eradicated through the efforts of the World Health Organization’s Global Eradication Initiative raising questions on containment of the virus after it has been eliminated in the wild. Most manufacture of inactivated polio vaccines currently requires the growth of large amounts of highly virulent poliovirus, and release from a production facility after eradication could be disastrous; WHO have therefore recommended the use of the attenuated Sabin strains for production as a safer option although it is recognised that they can revert to a transmissible paralytic form. We have exploited the understanding of the molecular virology of the Sabin vaccine strains to design viruses that are extremely genetically stable and hyperattenuated. The viruses are based on the type 3 Sabin vaccine strain and have been genetically modified in domain V of the 5’ non-coding region by changing base pairs to produce a cassette into which capsid regions of other serotypes have been introduced. The viruses give satisfactory yields of antigenically and immunogenically correct viruses in culture, are without measurable neurovirulence and fail to infect non-human primates under conditions where the Sabin strains will do so. PMID:26720150

  15. Antibody Responses in Serum, Secretions, and Urine of Man After Parenteral Administration of Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sirisinha, Stitaya; Charupatana, Chinda

    1970-01-01

    The nature of antibody activities associated with purified immunoglobulin fractions of serum, secretions (whole saliva, parotid secretion, and intestinal secretion), and urine of a volunteer after subcutaneous booster injections with rabies virus, poliovirus, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and typhoid-paratyphoid-cholera vaccines was investigated. The results showed that the pattern of antibody responses in these fluids differed from one antigen to another. Serum-antibody responses to killed-bacterial vaccine were associated mainly with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) component, slight activities were detected in the IgG, and only traces of activities, if any, were found in the IgA. These antibodies were primarily of the secretory IgA type in whole saliva and parotid secretion. Slight activities were also observed in the urinary IgG fraction. Responses to inactivated viral vaccine and toxoids were almost exclusively associated with the serum IgG component. Some antitoxic activities to diphtheria and tetanus toxins were noted in a low-molecular-weight urinary immunoglobulin component. PMID:16557795

  16. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak-Somalia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Background.  In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods.  We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results.  Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%-72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%-48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%-30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%-20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%-12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%-16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions.  Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases. PMID:27419182

  17. Comparative in vivo efficiencies of hand-washing agents against hepatitis A virus (HM-175) and poliovirus type 1 (Sabin).

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, J N; Springthorpe, V S; Sattar, S A

    1993-01-01

    The abilities of 10 hygienic hand-washing agents and tap water (containing approximately 0.5 ppm of free chlorine) to eliminate strain HM-175 of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and poliovirus (PV) type 1 (Sabin) were compared by using finger pad and whole-hand protocols with three adult volunteers. A mixture of the two viruses was prepared in a 10% suspension of feces, and 10 microliters of the mixture was placed on each finger pad. The inoculum was allowed to dry for 20 min, and the contaminated area was exposed to a hand-washing agent for 10 s, rinsed in tap water, and dried with a paper towel. In the whole-hand protocol, the hands were contaminated with 0.5 ml of the virus mixture, exposed for 10 s to a hand-washing agent, washed, and dried as described above. Tryptose phosphate broth was used to elute any virus remaining on the finger pads or hands. One part of the eluate was assayed directly for PV with FRhK-4 cells, while the other part was first treated with a PV-neutralizing serum and then assayed for HAV with the same cell line. The results are reported as mean percentages of reduction in PFU compared with the amount of infectious virus detectable after initial drying.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8250567

  18. Sero-Survey of Polio Antibodies during Wild Poliovirus Outbreak in Southern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Bo; Zhu, Shuang-Li; Zheng, Jing-Shan; Gou, Ai-Li; Cui, Hui; Zhang, Yong; Ning, Gui-Jun; Fan, Chun-Xiang; Chen, Yuan-Sheng; Li, Ke-Li; Yuan, Ping; Ma, Chao; Ma, Jing; Zheng, Hui; Fan, Xin-Chun; Li, Xin-Lan; Tang, Hai-Shu; Li, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Fan; Yan, Dong-Mei; Wang, Dong-Yan; Cui, Zhi-Qiang; Ren, Li-Ping; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Hui-Ling; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; An, Hong-Qiu; Liu, Yang; Li, Jing; Xu, Wen-Bo; Wen, Ning; Xu, Ai-Qiang; Luo, Hui-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background After being polio free for more than 10 years, an outbreak following importation of wild poliovirus (WPV) was confirmed in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China, in 2011. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted prior to supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), immediately after the confirmation of the WPV outbreak. In selected prefectures, participants aged ≤60 years old who visited hospitals at county-level or above to have their blood drawn for reasons not related to the study, were invited to participate in our study. Antibody titers ≥8 were considered positive. Results Among the 2,611 participants enrolled, 2,253 (86.3%), 2,283 (87.4%), and 1,989 (76.2%) were seropositive to P1, P2 and P3 respectively, and 1744 (66.8%) participants were seropositive to all the three serotypes. Lower antibody seropositivities and geometric mean titers were observed in children <1 year of age and in adults aged 15–39 years. Conclusion Serosurveys to estimate population immunity in districts at high risk of polio importation might be useful to gauge underlying population immunity gaps to polio and possibly to guide preparedness and response planning. Consideration should be given to older children and adults during polio risk assessment planning and outbreak response. PMID:24991811

  19. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak—Somalia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Background. In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods. We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results. Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%–72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%–48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%–30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%–20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%–12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%–16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions. Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases. PMID:27419182

  20. Crystal Structure of Poliovirus 3CD Protein: Virally Encoded Protease and Precursor to the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte,L.; Wass, A.; Gohara, D.; Pathak, H.; Arnold, J.; Filman, D.; Cameron, C.; Hogle, J.

    2007-01-01

    Poliovirus 3CD is a multifunctional protein that serves as a precursor to the protease 3Cpro and the viral polymerase 3Dpol and also plays a role in the control of viral replication. Although 3CD is a fully functional protease, it lacks polymerase activity. We have solved the crystal structures of 3CD at a 3.4- Angstroms resolution and the G64S fidelity mutant of 3Dpol at a 3.0- Angstroms resolution. In the 3CD structure, the 3C and 3D domains are joined by a poorly ordered polypeptide linker, possibly to facilitate its cleavage, in an arrangement that precludes intramolecular proteolysis. The polymerase active site is intact in both the 3CD and the 3Dpol G64S structures, despite the disruption of a network proposed to position key residues in the active site. Therefore, changes in molecular flexibility may be responsible for the differences in fidelity and polymerase activities. Extensive packing contacts between symmetry-related 3CD molecules and the approach of the 3C domain's N terminus to the VPg binding site suggest how 3Dpol makes biologically relevant interactions with the 3C, 3CD, and 3BCD proteins that control the uridylylation of VPg during the initiation of viral replication. Indeed, mutations designed to disrupt these interfaces have pronounced effects on the uridylylation reaction in vitro.

  1. Modifications of both selectivity factor and upstream binding factor contribute to poliovirus-mediated inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rajeev; Weidman, Mary K; Navarro, Sonia; Comai, Lucio; Dasgupta, Asim

    2005-08-01

    Soon after infection, poliovirus (PV) shuts off host-cell transcription, which is catalysed by all three cellular RNA polymerases. rRNA constitutes more than 50 % of all cellular RNA and is transcribed from rDNA by RNA polymerase I (pol I). Here, evidence has been provided suggesting that both pol I transcription factors, SL-1 (selectivity factor) and UBF (upstream binding factor), are modified and inactivated in PV-infected cells. The viral protease 3C(pro) appeared to cleave the TATA-binding protein-associated factor 110 (TAF(110)), a subunit of the SL-1 complex, into four fragments in vitro. In vitro protease-cleavage assays using various mutants of TAF(110) and purified 3C(pro) indicated that the Q(265)G(266) and Q(805)G(806) sites were cleaved by 3C(pro). Both SL-1 and UBF were depleted in PV-infected cells and their disappearance correlated with pol I transcription inhibition. rRNA synthesis from a template containing a human pol I promoter demonstrated that both SL-1 and UBF were necessary to restore pol I transcription fully in PV-infected cell extracts. These results suggested that both SL-1 and UBF are transcriptionally inactivated in PV-infected HeLa cells. PMID:16033979

  2. Development of an efficient entire-capsid-coding-region amplification method for direct detection of poliovirus from stool extracts.

    PubMed

    Arita, Minetaro; Kilpatrick, David R; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Burns, Cara C; Bukbuk, David; Oderinde, Soji B; Oberste, M Steven; Kew, Olen M; Pallansch, Mark A; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis has played a critical role in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative since 1988, by isolating and identifying poliovirus (PV) from stool specimens by using cell culture as a highly sensitive system to detect PV. In the present study, we aimed to develop a molecular method to detect PV directly from stool extracts, with a high efficiency comparable to that of cell culture. We developed a method to efficiently amplify the entire capsid coding region of human enteroviruses (EVs) including PV. cDNAs of the entire capsid coding region (3.9 kb) were obtained from as few as 50 copies of PV genomes. PV was detected from the cDNAs with an improved PV-specific real-time reverse transcription-PCR system and nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP1 coding region. For assay validation, we analyzed 84 stool extracts that were positive for PV in cell culture and detected PV genomes from 100% of the extracts (84/84 samples) with this method in combination with a PV-specific extraction method. PV could be detected in 2/4 stool extract samples that were negative for PV in cell culture. In PV-positive samples, EV species C viruses were also detected with high frequency (27% [23/86 samples]). This method would be useful for direct detection of PV from stool extracts without using cell culture. PMID:25339406

  3. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Cancer.gov

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  4. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  5. Screening Tests and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Text size | Print | Screening Tests and Vaccines This information in Spanish ( en español ) Getting important screening tests and vaccines can save your life. Check this section of ...

  6. [Biotechnology and vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Peret, R

    1990-12-01

    Current biotechnologies used in the manufacture of new vaccines are of three kinds: Genetic recombinations leading to either vaccinal sub-units or living vaccines represented by recombinant vectors; Chemical synthesis techniques; Use of the spatial configuration of an anti-antibody similar to the initial antigen. These are the anti-idiotype vaccines. Genetic engineering is the basis of a new generation of vaccines, sought with the aim of attempting to eradicate a number of diseases throughout the world. However, there is presently an inadequacy in resources, most often linked to financial considerations, which limits widespread systematic vaccination. In the future, vaccines against dental caries will probably be obtained from purified proteins of hydrolase fractions common to cariogenic bacteria and resulting from genetic recombinations in the form of vaccinal sub-units. PMID:2077866

  7. Smallpox Vaccine Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... complications from the vaccinia virus can be severe. Benefit of Vaccine Following Exposure Vaccination within 3 days ... Policies About CDC.gov Link to Us All Languages Contact CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

  8. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  9. Tetanus (Lockjaw) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Tetanus (Lockjaw) Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tetanus (lockjaw) ... Related Pages Diphtheria Pertussis Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Also Known As & Abbreviations Tetanus = Lockjaw DTaP = ...

  10. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... are at increased risk of developing meningococcal disease. Immunization Schedule Vaccination with MCV4 is recommended: when kids ...

  11. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  12. Your child's first vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... these vaccines today: [ ] DTaP [ ] Hib [ ] Hepatitis B [ ] Polio [ ] PCV13 (Provider: Check appropriate boxes) 1. Why get vaccinated? ... the 6-month dose is not needed. Pneumococcal (PCV13) 4 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 12- ...

  13. Vaccines and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Morton, D B

    2007-04-01

    Vaccination promotes animal welfare by protecting animal health, but it also has other welfare benefits, e.g. recent investigations have looked at the potential of vaccines in immunoneutering such as immunocastration--a humane alternative to the painful traditional methods. Similarly, vaccination can be used during disease outbreaks as a viable alternative to stamping-out, thus avoiding the welfare problems that on-farm mass slaughter can cause. Protecting animal health through vaccination leads to improved animal welfare, and maintaining good welfare ensures that animals can respond successfully to vaccination (as poor welfare can lead to immunosuppression, which can affect the response to vaccination). It is clear that vaccination has tremendous advantages for animal welfare and although the possible side effects of vaccination can have a negative effect on the welfare of some individual animals, the harm caused by these unwanted effects must be weighed against the undoubted benefits for groups of animals. PMID:17633300

  14. Clinical vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

  15. Vaccine Reaction Images

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Materials Q fever Info & Guidance for Clinicians Salmonella Shigella Smallpox Smallpox Basics Vaccine Basics Clinicians Vaccination ... Metals Nerve Agents Pulmonary Agents Riot Control Agents Toxic Alcohols Vesicants Chemical-Specific Fact Sheets Toxicology FAQs ...

  16. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Cancer.gov

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  17. Retrospective cost-effectiveness analyses for polio vaccination in the United States.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Tebbens, Radboud J Duintjer

    2006-12-01

    The history of polio vaccination in the United States spans 50 years and includes different phases of the disease, multiple vaccines, and a sustained significant commitment of resources. We estimated cost-effectiveness ratios and assessed the net benefits of polio vaccination applicable at various points in time from the societal perspective and we discounted these back to appropriate points in time. We reconstructed vaccine price data from available sources and used these to retrospectively estimate the total costs of the U.S. historical polio vaccination strategies (all costs reported in year 2002 dollars). We estimate that the United States invested approximately US dollars 35 billion (1955 net present value, discount rate of 3%) in polio vaccines between 1955 and 2005 and will invest approximately US dollars 1.4 billion (1955 net present value, or US dollars 6.3 billion in 2006 net present value) between 2006 and 2015 assuming a policy of continued use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) for routine vaccination. The historical and future investments translate into over 1.7 billion vaccinations that prevent approximately 1.1 million cases of paralytic polio and over 160,000 deaths (1955 net present values of approximately 480,000 cases and 73,000 deaths). Due to treatment cost savings, the investment implies net benefits of approximately US dollars 180 billion (1955 net present value), even without incorporating the intangible costs of suffering and death and of averted fear. Retrospectively, the U.S. investment in polio vaccination represents a highly valuable, cost-saving public health program. Observed changes in the cost-effectiveness ratio estimates over time suggest the need for living economic models for interventions that appropriately change with time. This article also demonstrates that estimates of cost-effectiveness ratios at any single time point may fail to adequately consider the context of the investment made to date and the importance of

  18. Seroprevalence rate of Poliovirus antibodies among the Healthy and Protein Energy Malnutrition children

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Aliya; Syed Shah, Skindar Ali; Syed Jaffery, Imtiaz Ahmed; Ahmed, Syed Azher; Khan, M.A Basit; Aslam, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the association between Protein energy malnutrition and polio-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies production among children in Gadap Town Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: Comparative cross sectional survey conducted at fixed EPI center and Pediatric OPD of a tertiary care hospital Karachi. Children were selected by convenient sampling method during the period from 17 March to 17 May 2013. It was ensured that they must have received more than seven oral polio vaccine doses as eligibility criteria for the study. A total of 170 blood samples were collected and tested for the presence of polio-specific IgG antibodies using Poliomyelitis IgG ELISA Test Kit produced. Results: Statistically significant relation was found between PEM and IgG antibodies production OR (P = 0.000). Overall Seroprevalence rate among the study population was 98.8%, PEM group 97.6% and healthy group 100%. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that there is a need to focus on the protein energy malnutrition among the children as an immunization strategy for the 100% seroprevalence rate in all population against polio in Pakistan. PMID:26101500

  19. Polysaccharide-Based Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Violeta Fernández; Balbin, Yury Valdés; Calderón, Janoi Chang; Icart, Luis Peña; Verez-Bencomo, Vicente

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and lipopolysaccharides from bacteria are employed for the production of vaccines against human diseases. Initial development of CPS as a vaccine was followed by the development and introduction of conjugate polysaccharide-protein vaccines. The principles leading to both developments are reviewed.

  20. Vaccines in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mitali M; Shah, Aishani C; Mahajan, Rashmi S; Bilimoria, Freny E

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a specific disease. More than two centuries have passed since the first successful vaccine for smallpox was developed. We’ve come a long way since. Today's vaccines are among the 21st century's most successful and cost-effective public health tools for preventing diseases. PMID:26120155

  1. A Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P

    2016-06-30

    Denvaxia is the first licensed vaccine for the prevention of dengue. It is a live vaccine developed using recombinant DNA technology. The vaccine is given as three doses over the course of a year and has the potential to prevent hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations each year. PMID:27368091

  2. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    What is yellow fever?Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is found in certain parts of Africa ... How can I prevent yellow fever?Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow fever. ... only at designated vaccination centers. After getting the vaccine, you ...

  3. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  4. Estimating the costs of the vaccine supply chain and service delivery for selected districts in Kenya and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mvundura, Mercy; Lorenson, Kristina; Chweya, Amos; Kigadye, Rosemary; Bartholomew, Kathryn; Makame, Mohammed; Lennon, T Patrick; Mwangi, Steven; Kirika, Lydia; Kamau, Peter; Otieno, Abner; Murunga, Peninah; Omurwa, Tom; Dafrossa, Lyimo; Kristensen, Debra

    2015-05-28

    Having data on the costs of the immunization system can provide decision-makers with information to benchmark the costs when evaluating the impact of new technologies or programmatic innovations. This paper estimated the supply chain and immunization service delivery costs and cost per dose in selected districts in Kenya and Tanzania. We also present operational data describing the supply chain and service delivery points (SDPs). To estimate the supply chain costs, we collected resource-use data for the cold chain, distribution system, and health worker time and per diems paid. We also estimated the service delivery costs, which included the time cost of health workers to provide immunization services, and per diems and transport costs for outreach sessions. Data on the annual quantities of vaccines distributed to each facility, and the occurrence and duration of stockouts were collected from stock registers. These data were collected from the national store, 2 regional and 4 district stores, and 12 SDPs in each country for 2012. Cost per dose for the supply chain and immunization service delivery were estimated. The average annual costs per dose at the SDPs were $0.34 (standard deviation (s.d.) $0.18) for Kenya when including only the vaccine supply chain costs, and $1.33 (s.d. $0.82) when including immunization service delivery costs. In Tanzania, these costs were $0.67 (s.d. $0.35) and $2.82 (s.d. $1.64), respectively. Both countries experienced vaccine stockouts in 2012, bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine being more likely to be stocked out in Kenya, and oral poliovirus vaccine in Tanzania. When stockouts happened, they usually lasted for at least one month. Tanzania made investments in 2011 in preparation for planned vaccine introductions, and their supply chain cost per dose is expected to decline with the new vaccine introductions. Immunization service delivery costs are a significant portion of the total costs at the SDPs. PMID:25865467

  5. Importance of vaccination habit and vaccine choice on influenza vaccination among healthy working adults.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chyongchiou J; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Toback, Seth L; Rousculp, Matthew D; Raymund, Mahlon; Ambrose, Christopher S; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2010-11-10

    This randomized cluster trial was designed to improve workplace influenza vaccination rates using enhanced advertising, choice of vaccine type (intranasal or injectable) and an incentive. Workers aged 18-49 years were surveyed immediately following vaccination to determine factors associated with vaccination behavior and choice. The questionnaire assessed attitudes, beliefs and social support for influenza vaccine, demographics, and historical, current, and intentional vaccination behavior. Of the 2389 vaccinees, 83.3% received injectable vaccine and 16.7% received intranasal vaccine. Factors associated with previous influenza vaccination were older age, female sex, higher education and greater support for injectable vaccine (all P<.02). Current influenza vaccination with intranasal vaccine vs. injectable vaccine was associated with higher education, the study interventions, greater support for the intranasal vaccine and nasal sprays, less support of injectable vaccine, more negative attitudes about influenza vaccine, and a greater likelihood of reporting that the individual would not have been vaccinated had only injectable vaccine been offered (all P<.01). Intentional vaccine choice was most highly associated with previous vaccination behavior (P<.001). A key to long term improvements in workplace vaccination is to encourage first time influenza vaccination through interventions that include incentives, publicity and vaccine choice. PMID:20638452

  6. A rabies vaccine adjuvanted with saponins from leaves of the soap tree (Quillaja brasiliensis) induces specific immune responses and protects against lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Yendo, Anna Carolina A; de Costa, Fernanda; Cibulski, Samuel P; Teixeira, Thais F; Colling, Luana C; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Soulé, Silvia; Roehe, Paulo M; Gosmann, Grace; Ferreira, Fernando A; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-04-29

    Quillaja brasiliensis (Quillajaceae) is a saponin producing species native from southern Brazil and Uruguay. Its saponins are remarkably similar to those of Q. saponaria, which provides most of the saponins used as immunoadjuvants in vaccines. The immunostimulating capacities of aqueous extract (AE) and purified saponin fraction (QB-90) obtained from leaves of Q. brasiliensis were favorably comparable to those of a commercial saponin-based adjuvant preparation (Quil-A) in experimental vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and 5, poliovirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice model. Herein, the immunogenicity and protection efficacy of rabies vaccines adjuvanted with Q. brasiliensis AE and its saponin fractions were compared with vaccines adjuvanted with either commercial Quil-A or Alum. Mice were vaccinated with one or two doses (on days 0 and 14) of one of the different vaccines and serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were quantified over time. A challenge experiment with a lethal dose of rabies virus was carried out with the formulations. Viral RNA detection in the brain of mice was performed by qPCR, and RNA copy-numbers were quantified using a standard curve of in vitro transcribed RNA. All Q. brasiliensis saponin-adjuvanted vaccines significantly enhanced levels of specific IgG isotypes when compared with the no adjuvant group (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, one or two doses of saponin-based vaccine were efficient to protect against the lethal rabies exposure. Both AE and saponin fractions from Q. brasiliensis leaves proved potent immunological adjuvants in vaccines against a lethal challenge with a major livestock pathogen, hence confirming their value as competitive or complementary sustainable alternatives to saponins of Q. saponaria. PMID:27032516

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Paul; Bansal, Anju

    2014-12-01

    Although some success was achieved in recent years in HIV prevention, an effective vaccine remains the means with the most potential of curtailing HIV-1 infections worldwide. Despite multiple failed attempts, a recent HIV vaccine regimen demonstrated modest protection from infection. Although the protective efficacy in this trial was not sufficient to warrant licensure, it spurred renewed optimism in the field and has provided valuable insights for improving future vaccine designs. This review summarizes the pertinent details of vaccine development and discusses ways the field is moving forward to develop a vaccine to prevent HIV infection and disease progression. PMID:25287587

  8. Vaccination for Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehen, Stephan; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant virus vaccines that express a limited number of epitopes are currently being developed to prevent disease by changing the relative balance between viral spread and the immune response. Some circumstances, however, were found in infections with a noncytopathic virus in which vaccination caused disease; sensitive parameters included the genetic background of the host, the time or dose of infection, and the constituents of the vaccine. Thus, immunopathologic damage by T cells may be an unwanted consequence of vaccination with the new types of peptide or recombinant vaccines that are being investigated for the human immunodeficiency viruses and other pathogens.

  9. Vaccine-Associated Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Benage, Matthew; Fraunfelder, Frederick W

    2016-01-01

    All of the widely administered vaccines have been reported to cause uveitis. The ocular inflammation is usually temporary and resolves with topical ocular steroids. During a 26-year period, a total of 289 cases of vaccine-associated uveitis were reported to three adverse reaction reporting databases. Hepatitis B vaccine, either alone or administered with other vaccines, appears to be the leading offender. Clinicians are encouraged to report cases of vaccine- or drug-associated ocular adverse reactions to www.eyedrugregistry.com. PMID:27039491

  10. Vaccinations for Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Geeta K.; Heine, R. Phillips

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician–gynecologists are well-suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease–related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and infant benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and provider resources. PMID:25560127

  11. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

  12. Vaccinations for pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Geeta K; Heine, R Phillips

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician-gynecologists are well suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease-related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and neonatal benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and health care provider resources. PMID:25560127

  13. Vaccines for allergy

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines aim to establish or strengthen immune responses but are also effective for the treatment of allergy. The latter is surprising because allergy represents a hyper-immune response based on immunoglobulin E production against harmless environmental antigens, i.e., allergens. Nevertheless, vaccination with allergens, termed allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only disease-modifying therapy of allergy with long-lasting effects. New forms of allergy diagnosis and allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergen-derivatives, peptides and allergen genes have emerged through molecular allergen characterization. The molecular allergy vaccines allow sophisticated targeting of the immune system and may eliminate side effects which so far have limited the use of traditional allergen extract-based vaccines. Successful clinical trials performed with the new vaccines indicate that broad allergy vaccination is on the horizon and may help to control the allergy pandemic. PMID:22521141

  14. Vaccines for allergy.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-01

    Vaccines aim to establish or strengthen immune responses but are also effective for the treatment of allergy. The latter is surprising because allergy represents a hyper-immune response based on immunoglobulin E production against harmless environmental antigens, i.e., allergens. Nevertheless, vaccination with allergens, termed allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only disease-modifying therapy of allergy with long-lasting effects. New forms of allergy diagnosis and allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergen-derivatives, peptides and allergen genes have emerged through molecular allergen characterization. The molecular allergy vaccines allow sophisticated targeting of the immune system and may eliminate side effects which so far have limited the use of traditional allergen extract-based vaccines. Successful clinical trials performed with the new vaccines indicate that broad allergy vaccination is on the horizon and may help to control the allergy pandemic. PMID:22521141

  15. Immunology of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beverley, P C L

    2002-01-01

    An ideal vaccine is relatively easy to define, but few real vaccines approach the ideal and no vaccines exist for many organisms, for which a vaccine is the only realistic protective strategy in the foreseeable future. Many difficulties account for the failure to produce these vaccines. All micro-organisms deploy evasion mechanisms that interfere with effective immune responses and, for many organisms, it is not clear which immune responses provide effective protection. However, recent advances in methods for studying immune response to pathogens have provided a better understanding of immune mechanisms, including immunological memory, and led to the realisation that the initiation of immune responses is a key event requiring triggering through 'danger' signals. Based on these findings, the development of novel adjuvants, vectors and vaccine formulations allowing stimulation of optimal and prolonged protective immunity should lead to the introduction of vaccines for previously resistant organisms. PMID:12176847

  16. Vaccine epidemiology: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    This review article outlines the key concepts in vaccine epidemiology, such as basic reproductive numbers, force of infection, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological shift, disease modeling, and describes the application of this knowledge both at program levels and in the practice by family physicians, epidemiologists, and pediatricians. A case has been made for increased knowledge and understanding of vaccine epidemiology among key stakeholders including policy makers, immunization program managers, public health experts, pediatricians, family physicians, and other experts/individuals involved in immunization service delivery. It has been argued that knowledge of vaccine epidemiology which is likely to benefit the society through contributions to the informed decision-making and improving vaccination coverage in the low and middle income countries (LMICs). The article ends with suggestions for the provision of systematic training and learning platforms in vaccine epidemiology to save millions of preventable deaths and improve health outcomes through life-course. PMID:27453836

  17. [Vaccinations for the travellers].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, Dominique

    2004-03-15

    Immunisations for the traveller include, before specific vaccine, a correct immunisation schedule according to national recommendations with appropriate boosters and hepatitis B immunisation. The yellow fever vaccine is required to entry in countries of endemic area and quadrivalent ACYW135 meningococcal vaccine for entry in Saudi Arabia. Hepatitis A immunisation could be performed at 1 year of age and is recommended for travellers in tropical areas and children vaccination control the disease both in the patient and in the contacts. Meningococcal A+C vaccines are required for travellers in meningitis-prone areas of tropical Africa during the dry season (December to June), and quadrivalent ACYW135 is useful only in Burkina-Faso and Niger. Typhoid and rabies vaccines are required for ambulatory travellers in endemic areas, as Japanese encephalitis in south-west Asia. In central Europe, tick-borne encephalitis vaccination is recommended for patients travelling in forest areas during spring and summer. PMID:15176511

  18. Immunogenicity of a combination vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, three-component acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, inactivated polio virus, and Haemophilus influenzae type b when given concomitantly with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Kieninger, Dorothee M; Kueper, Kathrin; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Bernaola, Enrique; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Steul, Kathrin; Juergens, Christine; Gurtman, Alejandra; Giardina, Peter; Liang, John Z; Gruber, William C; Emini, Emilio A; Scott, Daniel A

    2011-08-11

    Two randomized trials of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) relative to PCV7 evaluated the immune responses of coadministered antigens comprising Infanrix(®) hexa/Infanrix(®)-IPV+Hib (diphtheria, tetanus, 3-component acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, inactivated poliovirus, and Haemophilus influenzae type b). After the 3-dose infant series, immunogenic noninferiority was demonstrated for all concomitantly administered antigens between the PCV13 and PCV7 groups. All antigens elicited good booster responses after the toddler dose except pertussis toxoid; however, 99.6% subjects achieved pertussis toxoid protective antibody level ≥5EU/mL in both groups. These results support the concomitant administration of PCV13 and Infanrix hexa/Infanrix-IPV+Hib as part of routine immunization schedules. PMID:21704105

  19. Environmental Enteropathy, Oral Vaccine Failure and Growth Faltering in Infants in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Caitlin; Lu, Miao; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Buonomo, Erica; Nayak, Uma; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Kirkpatrick, Beth; Colgate, Ross; Carmolli, Marya; Dickson, Dorothy; van der Klis, Fiona; Weldon, William; Steven Oberste, M.; Ma, Jennie Z.; Petri, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical enteric condition found in low-income countries that is characterized by intestinal inflammation, reduced intestinal absorption, and gut barrier dysfunction. We aimed to assess if EE impairs the success of oral polio and rotavirus vaccines in infants in Bangladesh. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study of 700 infants from an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh from May 2011 to November 2014. Infants were enrolled in the first week of life and followed to age one year through biweekly home visits with EPI vaccines administered and growth monitored. EE was operationally defied as enteric inflammation measured by any one of the fecal biomarkers reg1B, alpha-1-antitrypsin, MPO, calprotectin, or neopterin. Oral polio vaccine success was evaluated by immunogenicity, and rotavirus vaccine response was evaluated by immunogenicity and protection from disease. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01375647. Findings EE was present in greater than 80% of infants by 12 weeks of age. Oral poliovirus and rotavirus vaccines failed in 20.2% and 68.5% of the infants respectively, and 28.6% were malnourished (HAZ < − 2) at one year of age. In contrast, 0%, 9.0%, 7.9% and 3.8% of infants lacked protective levels of antibody from tetanus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, diphtheria and measles vaccines respectively. EE was negatively associated with oral polio and rotavirus response but not parenteral vaccine immunogenicity. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation and measures of maternal health were additionally predictive of both oral vaccine failure and malnutrition. The selected biomarkers from multivariable analysis accounted for 46.3% variation in delta HAZ. 24% of Rotarix® IgA positive individuals can be attributed to the selected biomarkers. Interpretation EE as well as systemic inflammation and poor maternal health were associated with oral but not parenteral vaccine

  20. New tuberculosis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martín Montañés, Carlos; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-03-01

    The current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), is a live vaccine used worldwide, as it protects against severe forms of the disease, saving thousands of lives every year, but its efficacy against pulmonary forms of TB, responsible for transmission of the diseases, is variable. For more than 80 years now no new TB vaccines have been successfully developed. Over the last decade the effort of the scientific community has resulted in the design and construction of promising vaccine candidates. The goal is to develop a new generation of vaccines effective against respiratory forms of the disease. We will focus this review on new prophylactic vaccine candidates that aim to prevent TB diseases. Two are the main strategies used to improve the immunity conferred by the current BCG vaccine, by boosting it with new subunit vaccines, and a second strategy is focused on the construction of new more effective live vaccines, capable to replace the current BCG and to be used as prime vaccines. After rigorous preclinical studies in different animal models new TB vaccine candidates enter in clinical trials in humans. First, a small Phase I for safety followed by immunological evaluation in Phase II trials and finally evaluated in large population Phase III efficacy trials in endemic countries. At present BCG prime and boost with different subunit vaccine candidates are the more advanced assessed in Phase II. Two prime vaccines (based on recombinant BCG) have been successfully evaluated for safety in Phase I trials. A short number of live attenuated vaccines are in advance preclinical studies and the candidates ready to enter Phase I safety trials are produced under current good manufacturing practices. PMID:21420568

  1. Poliovirus Internal Ribosome Entry Segment Structure Alterations That Specifically Affect Function in Neuronal Cells: Molecular Genetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malnou, Cécile E.; Pöyry, Tuija A. A.; Jackson, Richard J.; Kean, Katherine M.

    2002-01-01

    Translation of poliovirus RNA is driven by an internal ribosome entry segment (IRES) present in the 5′ noncoding region of the genomic RNA. This IRES is structured into several domains, including domain V, which contains a large lateral bulge-loop whose predicted secondary structure is unclear. The primary sequence of this bulge-loop is strongly conserved within enteroviruses and rhinoviruses: it encompasses two GNAA motifs which could participate in intrabulge base pairing or (in one case) could be presented as a GNRA tetraloop. We have begun to address the question of the significance of the sequence conservation observed among enterovirus reference strains and field isolates by using a comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis program targeted to these two GNAA motifs. Mutants were analyzed functionally in terms of (i) viability and growth kinetics in both HeLa and neuronal cell lines, (ii) structural analyses by biochemical probing of the RNA, and (iii) translation initiation efficiencies in vitro in rabbit reticulocyte lysates supplemented with HeLa or neuronal cell extracts. Phenotypic analyses showed that only viruses with both GNAA motifs destroyed were significantly affected in their growth capacities, which correlated with in vitro translation defects. The phenotypic defects were strongly exacerbated in neuronal cells, where a temperature-sensitive phenotype could be revealed at between 37 and 39.5°C. Biochemical probing of mutated domain V, compared to the wild type, demonstrated that such mutations lead to significant structural perturbations. Interestingly, revertant viruses possessed compensatory mutations which were distant from the primary mutations in terms of sequence and secondary structure, suggesting that intradomain tertiary interactions could exist within domain V of the IRES. PMID:12368304

  2. Influenza Vaccines: Challenges and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is the best method for the prevention and control of influenza. Vaccination can reduce illness and lessen severity of infection. This review focuses on how currently licensed influenza vaccines are generated in the U.S., why the biology of influenza poses vaccine challenges, and vaccine approaches on the horizon that address these challenges. PMID:25766291

  3. [Mercury in vaccines].

    PubMed

    Hessel, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Thiomersal, also called thimerosal, is an ethyl mercury derivative used as a preservative to prevent bacterial contamination of multidose vaccine vials after they have been opened. Exposure to low doses of thiomersal has essentially been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Nevertheless there is no evidence that allergy to thiomersal could be induced by thiomersal-containing vaccines. Allergy to thiomersal is usually of delayed-hypersensitivity type, but its detection through cutaneous tests is not very reliable. Hypersensitivity to thiomersal is not considered as a contraindication to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines. In 1999 in the USA, thiomersal was present in approximately 30 different childhood vaccines, whereas there were only 2 in France. Although there were no evidence of neurological toxicity in infants related to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines, the FDA considered that the cumulative dose of mercury received by young infants following vaccination was high enough (although lower than the FDA threshold for methyl mercury) to request vaccine manufacturers to remove thiomersal from vaccine formulations. Since 2002, all childhood vaccines used in Europe and the USA are thiomersal-free or contain only minute amounts of thiomersal. Recently published studies have shown that the mercury levels in the blood, faeces and urine of children who had received thiomersal-containing vaccines were much lower than those accepted by the American Environmental Protection Agency. It has also been demonstrated that the elimination of mercury in children was much faster than what was expected on the basis of studies conducted with methyl mercury originating from food. Recently, the hypothesis that mercury contained in vaccines could be the cause of autism and other neurological developmental disorders created a new debate in the medical community and the general public. To date, none of the epidemiological studies conducted in Europe and elsewhere

  4. The Danish vaccination register.

    PubMed

    Grove Krause, T; Jakobsen, S; Haarh, M; Mølbak, K

    2012-01-01

    Immunisation information systems (IIS) are valuable tools for monitoring vaccination coverage and for estimating vaccine effectiveness and safety. Since 2009, an advanced IIS has been developed in Denmark and will be implemented during 2012–14. This IIS is based on a database existing since 2000. The reporting of all administered vaccinations including vaccinations outside the national programme will become mandatory. Citizens will get access to data about their own vaccinations and healthcare personnel will get access to information on the vaccinations of their patients. A national concept of identification, a national solution combining a personal code and a card with codes, ensures easy and secure access to the register. From the outset, the IIS will include data on childhood vaccinations administered from 1996 and onwards. All Danish citizens have a unique identifier, a so called civil registration number, which allows the linking of information on vaccinations coming from different electronic data sources. The main challenge will be to integrate the IIS with the different electronic patient record systems currently existing at general practitioner, vaccination clinic and hospital level thereby avoiding double-entry. A need has been identified for an updated international classification of vaccine products on the market. Such a classification would also be useful for the future exchange of data on immunisations from IIS between countries. PMID:22551494

  5. Nasal vaccine innovation.

    PubMed

    Jabbal-Gill, Inderjit

    2010-12-01

    The current vaccine market is gaining momentum in the development of alternative administration routes namely intranasal, oral, topical, pulmonary, vaginal, and rectal; the nasal route offers the most promising opportunity for vaccine administration. It can enhance convenience, safety, elicit both local and systemic immune responses; thus potentially provide protection from pathogens at the site of entry. Nasal vaccine innovation comes with both opportunities and challenges. The innovative strategies used by industry and researchers to overcome the hurdles are discussed in this article: these include live-attenuated vaccines, adjuvants, mucoadhesives, particulate delivery systems, virus-like particles, vaccine manufacture, challenges of regulatory authorities, and the nasal vaccine impact on market potential. Critical issues for effective nasal vaccination are the antigen-retention period that enables its interaction with the lymphatic system and choice of an adjuvant that is nontoxic and induces the required immune response. Co-adjuvanting by means of a mucoadhesive technology addresses some of these issues. ChiSys(®), a natural bioadhesive with proven intranasal safety profile, has already demonstrated efficacy for several nasally delivered vaccines including norovirus. With the looming threat of a pandemic, alternatives such as intranasal vaccination will ultimately facilitate greater public compliance and rapid mass global vaccination. PMID:21047271

  6. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world. PMID:17521780

  7. Cutaneous reactions to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Stein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are important for infectious disease prevention; however, there are adverse effects of vaccines, many of which are cutaneous. Some of these reactions are due to nonspecific inflammation and irritation at the injection site, whereas other reactions are directly related to the live attenuated virus. Rarely, vaccinations have been associated with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The onset of certain inflammatory dermatologic conditions, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and pemphigoid, were reported to occur shortly after vaccine administration. Allergic contact dermatitis can develop at the injection site, typically due to adjuvant ingredients in the vaccine, such as thimerosal and aluminum. Vaccinations are important to promote development of both individual and herd immunity. Although most vaccinations are considered relatively safe, there may be adverse effects associated with any vaccine. Cutaneous manifestations make up a large portion of the types of reactions associated with vaccines. There are many different reasons for the development of a cutaneous reaction to a vaccination. Some are directly related to the injection of a live attenuated virus, such as varicella or vaccinia (for immunity to smallpox), whereas others cause more nonspecific erythema and swelling at the injection site, as a result of local inflammation or irritation. Vaccinations have also been associated in rare reports with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There have been case reports associating the administration of a vaccine with the new onset of a dermatologic condition, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and Sweet syndrome. Finally, allergic contact

  8. Meningitis C vaccine (North American vaccine).

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Maria; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    North American Vaccine Inc (NAVI) has launched a conjugate polysaccharide vaccinefor the prevention of meningitis caused by group C meningococcal bacteria [433475]. The vaccine is based upon conjugate technology, incorporating the serogroup C polysaccharide (CPS) of all three major serogroups. Antibody-dependent, complement-mediated activity was demonstrated in mice and non-human primates, with no detectable adverse effects [277193]. Approval was filed for in the UK in January 2000 [353305]. In July 2000, Baxter received approval for NeisVac-C in the UK, and by September 2000 the vaccine was expected to be incorporated into the NHS's immunization campaign against meningitis C [381225]. NeisVac-C will initially appear labeled from NAVI; Baxter completed its acquisition of NAVI in June 2000 [375389]. Baxter estimates the worldwide global market for the vaccine at US $600 million per year [376204]. PMID:12054072

  9. Vaccine process technology.

    PubMed

    Josefsberg, Jessica O; Buckland, Barry

    2012-06-01

    The evolution of vaccines (e.g., live attenuated, recombinant) and vaccine production methods (e.g., in ovo, cell culture) are intimately tied to each other. As vaccine technology has advanced, the methods to produce the vaccine have advanced and new vaccine opportunities have been created. These technologies will continue to evolve as we strive for safer and more immunogenic vaccines and as our understanding of biology improves. The evolution of vaccine process technology has occurred in parallel to the remarkable growth in the development of therapeutic proteins as products; therefore, recent vaccine innovations can leverage the progress made in the broader biotechnology industry. Numerous important legacy vaccines are still in use today despite their traditional manufacturing processes, with further development focusing on improving stability (e.g., novel excipients) and updating formulation (e.g., combination vaccines) and delivery methods (e.g., skin patches). Modern vaccine development is currently exploiting a wide array of novel technologies to create safer and more efficacious vaccines including: viral vectors produced in animal cells, virus-like particles produced in yeast or insect cells, polysaccharide conjugation to carrier proteins, DNA plasmids produced in E. coli, and therapeutic cancer vaccines created by in vitro activation of patient leukocytes. Purification advances (e.g., membrane adsorption, precipitation) are increasing efficiency, while innovative analytical methods (e.g., microsphere-based multiplex assays, RNA microarrays) are improving process understanding. Novel adjuvants such as monophosphoryl lipid A, which acts on antigen presenting cell toll-like receptors, are expanding the previously conservative list of widely accepted vaccine adjuvants. As in other areas of biotechnology, process characterization by sophisticated analysis is critical not only to improve yields, but also to determine the final product quality. From a regulatory

  10. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Healthcare Workers on the Knowledge and Attitudes towards Polio Vaccination in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Aqeel, Talieha; Akbar, Naila; Salman, Saad; Idress, Jawaria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pakistan accounts for 85.2% of the total polio cases reported worldwide. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are an integral part of immunization campaigns and source of education for the general public. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitudes towards polio vaccination among HCWs providing immunisation and education to general public in Quetta and Peshawar divisions of Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 490 HCWs was conducted in two major referral public teaching hospitals of Quetta and Peshawar divisions. During February to April, 2015, a random sample of 490 HCWs was invited to participate in this study. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed by using self-administered, anonymous and pretested questionnaire. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used to express the results. Results A total of 468 participants responded to the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 95.5%. Overall, participants demonstrated good knowledge and positive attitudes towards polio vaccination. The mean knowledge score of HCWs about polio was 13.42±2.39 (based on 18 knowledge questions) while the mean attitude score was 28.75±5.5 (based on 9 attitudes statements). Knowledge gaps were identified about the incubation period of poliovirus (19.5%), management issues (31.9%), use of polio vaccine in mild illnesses (34.7%) and the consequences of the polio virus (36.9%). The majority of participants agreed that all children should be vaccinated for polio (95.1%), while reservations were noted about the need of a booster (38.9%), and sterility issues associated with polio vaccines (43.6%). Internet (n = 167, 37%) and Posters (n = 158, 35%) were the main sources used by HCWs to educate themselves about polio. Conclusion Participants in this study had good knowledge and positive attitudes towards polio vaccination. Although the data are indicative of gaps in the knowledge of HCWs, the findings may not be generalized to other hospitals in Pakistan. PMID

  11. Recombinant influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sedova, E S; Shcherbinin, D N; Migunov, A I; Smirnov, Iu A; Logunov, D Iu; Shmarov, M M; Tsybalova, L M; Naroditskiĭ, B S; Kiselev, O I; Gintsburg, A L

    2012-10-01

    This review covers the problems encountered in the construction and production of new recombinant influenza vaccines. New approaches to the development of influenza vaccines are investigated; they include reverse genetics methods, production of virus-like particles, and DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines. Such approaches as the delivery of foreign genes by DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines can preserve the native structure of antigens. Adenoviral vectors are a promising gene-delivery platform for a variety of genetic vaccines. Adenoviruses can efficiently penetrate the human organism through mucosal epithelium, thus providing long-term antigen persistence and induction of the innate immune response. This review provides an overview of the practicability of the production of new recombinant influenza cross-protective vaccines on the basis of adenoviral vectors expressing hemagglutinin genes of different influenza strains. PMID:23346377

  12. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. PMID:26920587

  13. Vaccines against leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against leptospirosis followed within a year of the first isolation of Leptospira, with the first use of a killed whole cell bacterin vaccine in guinea pigs published in 1916. Since then, bacterin vaccines have been used in humans, cattle, swine, and dogs and remain the only vaccines licensed at the present time. The immunity elicited is restricted to serovars with related lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen. Likewise, vaccines based on LPS antigens have clearly demonstrated protection in animal models, which is also at best serogroup specific. The advent of leptospiral genome sequences has allowed a reverse vaccinology approach for vaccine development. However, the use of inadequate challenge doses and inappropriate statistical analysis invalidates many of the claims of protection with recombinant proteins. PMID:25388138

  14. Chikungunya vaccines in development

    PubMed Central

    Schwameis, Michael; Buchtele, Nina; Wadowski, Patricia Pia; Schoergenhofer, Christian; Jilma, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus has become a global health threat, spreading to the industrial world of Europe and the Americas; no treatment or prophylactic vaccine is available. Since the late 1960s much effort has been put into the development of a vaccine, and several heterogeneous strategies have already been explored. Only two candidates have recently qualified to enter clinical phase II trials, a chikungunya virus-like particle-based vaccine and a recombinant live attenuated measles virus-vectored vaccine. This review focuses on the current status of vaccine development against chikungunya virus in humans and discusses the diversity of immunization strategies, results of recent human trials and promising vaccine candidates. PMID:26554522

  15. What Vaccinations Do You Need?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » What Vaccinations Do You Need? A Guide for Adults with ... a Kidney Transplant Why do I need a vaccination? Vaccinations, usually given as a shot, protect you ...

  16. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  17. What Vaccines Do You Need?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Adolescent and Adult Vaccine Quiz Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Españ ... adolescentes y adultos Did you know that certain vaccines are recommended for adults and adolescents?* Take this ...

  18. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  19. Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... need this vaccine? Yes, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends 5 doses of diphtheria and ...

  20. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  1. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  2. New technologies for influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dormitzer, Philip R; Tsai, Theodore F; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Influenza vaccine preparations have been administered to humans since the late 1930s, and the diversity of approaches in licensed trivalent seasonal or monovalent pandemic products is unparalleled by vaccines against any other target. These approaches include inactivated whole virus vaccines, detergent or solvent "split" vaccines, subunit vaccines, live attenuated vaccines, adjuvanted vaccines, intramuscular vaccines, intradermal vaccines, intranasal vaccines, egg-produced vaccines and mammalian cell culture-produced vaccines. The challenges of influenza immunization, including multiple co-circulating strains, antigenic change over time, a broad age spectrum of disease, and the threat of pandemics, continue to drive the development of new approaches. This review describes some of the new approaches to influenza immunization that are the subjects of active research and development. PMID:22251994

  3. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Monica A.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a significant human health concern in Asia, Indonesia and parts of Australia with more than 3 billion people potentially at risk of infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agent of JE. Given the risk to human health and the theoretical potential for JEV use as a bioweapon, the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent JEV infection is vital for preserving human health. The development of vaccines for JE began in the 1940s with formalin-inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccines. These vaccines have been shown to induce a protective immune response and to be very effective. Mouse brain-derived vaccines were still in use until May 2011 when the last lots of the BIKEN® JE-VAX® expired. Development of modern JE vaccines utilizes cell culture-derived viruses and improvements in manufacturing processes as well as removal of potential allergens or toxins have significantly improved vaccine safety. China has developed a live-attenuated vaccine that has proven to induce protective immunity following a single inoculation. In addition, a chimeric vaccine virus incorporating the prM and E structural proteins derived from the live-attenuated JE vaccine into the live-attenuated yellow fever 17D vaccine virus backbone is currently in clinical trials. In this article, we provide a summary of JE vaccine development and on-going clinical trials. We also discuss the potential risk of JEV as a bioweapon with a focus on virus sustainability if used as a weapon. PMID:23125946

  4. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents. PMID:16277033

  5. Emerging Vaccine Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Rebecca J.; Johnson, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination has proven to be an invaluable means of preventing infectious diseases by reducing both incidence of disease and mortality. However, vaccines have not been effectively developed for many diseases including HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV), tuberculosis and malaria, among others. The emergence of new technologies with a growing understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immunity may lead to efficacious vaccines against pathogens, previously thought impossible. PMID:26343196

  6. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future therapeutics. PMID:22130115

  7. Conformational Ensemble of the Poliovirus 3CD Precursor Observed by MD Simulations and Confirmed by SAXS: A Strategy to Expand the Viral Proteome?

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M.; Gohara, David W.; Uchida, Akira; Yennawar, Neela; Cameron, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of RNA viruses are relatively small. To overcome the small-size limitation, RNA viruses assign distinct functions to the processed viral proteins and their precursors. This is exemplified by poliovirus 3CD protein. 3C protein is a protease and RNA-binding protein. 3D protein is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). 3CD exhibits unique protease and RNA-binding activities relative to 3C and is devoid of RdRp activity. The origin of these differences is unclear, since crystal structure of 3CD revealed “beads-on-a-string” structure with no significant structural differences compared to the fully processed proteins. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on 3CD to investigate its conformational dynamics. A compact conformation of 3CD was observed that was substantially different from that shown crystallographically. This new conformation explained the unique properties of 3CD relative to the individual proteins. Interestingly, simulations of mutant 3CD showed altered interface. Additionally, accelerated MD simulations uncovered a conformational ensemble of 3CD. When we elucidated the 3CD conformations in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments a range of conformations from extended to compact was revealed, validating the MD simulations. The existence of conformational ensemble of 3CD could be viewed as a way to expand the poliovirus proteome, an observation that may extend to other viruses. PMID:26610545

  8. Dengue virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions, causing hundreds of millions of infections each year. Infections range from asymptomatic to a self-limited febrile illness, dengue fever (DF), to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The expanding of the habitat of DENV-transmitting mosquitoes has resulted in dramatic increases in the number of cases over the past 50 years, and recent outbreaks have occurred in the United States. Developing a dengue vaccine is a global health priority. DENV vaccine development is challenging due to the existence of four serotypes of the virus (DENV1-4), which a vaccine must protect against. Additionally, the adaptive immune response to DENV may be both protective and pathogenic upon subsequent infection, and the precise features of protective versus pathogenic immune responses to DENV are unknown, complicating vaccine development. Numerous vaccine candidates, including live attenuated, inactivated, recombinant subunit, DNA, and viral vectored vaccines, are in various stages of clinical development, from preclinical to phase 3. This review will discuss the adaptive immune response to DENV, dengue vaccine challenges, animal models used to test dengue vaccine candidates, and historical and current dengue vaccine approaches. PMID:24373316

  9. Rabies vaccines and interferon

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Samples of Fermi, Semple, modified Semple, Duck embryo and tissue culture rabies vaccine were inoculated by different routes and in different doses into rabbits, mice and hamsters. The vaccines induced neither detectable interferon nor immediate protection against lethal challenge with CVS rabies virus. Under similar conditions, high but transient levels of interferon were induced in control animals of the same species with the polynucleotide complex Poly I.C. Hamsters but not mice were protected by Poly I.C.-induced interferon. No autointerference by vaccine with challenge virus was established. Vaccine-induced protection in mice was directly related to immune response. PMID:4506993

  10. Polyvalent AIDS Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shan; Grimes Serrano, Jill M.; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    A major hurdle in the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine is viral diversity. For close to three decades, HIV vaccine development has focused on either the induction of T cell immune responses or antibody responses, and only rarely on both components. After the failure of the STEP trial, the scientific community concluded that a T cell-based vaccine would likely not be protective if the T cell immune responses were elicited against only a few dominant epitopes. Similarly, for vaccines focusing on antibody responses, one of the main criticisms after VaxGen’s failed Phase III trials was on the limited antigen breadth included in the two formulations used. The successes of polyvalent vaccine approaches against other antigenically variable pathogens encourage implementation of the same approach for the design of HIV-1 vaccines. A review of the existing HIV-1 vaccination approaches based on the polyvalent principle is included here to provide a historical perspective for the current effort of developing a polyvalent HIV-1 vaccine. Results summarized in this review provide a clear indication that the polyvalent approach is a viable one for the future development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:21054250

  11. Cochlear-Meningitis Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and otolaryngologists) and families should review the vaccination records of current and prospective cochlear implant recipients to ensure that all ... of Use Join Donate ENTConnect Contact Us ...

  12. Vaccines: the Fourth Century▿

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Stanley A.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccine development, which began with Edward Jenner's observations in the late 18th century, has entered its 4th century. From its beginnings, with the use of whole organisms that had been weakened or inactivated, to the modern-day use of genetic engineering, it has taken advantage of the tools discovered in other branches of microbiology. Numerous successful vaccines are in use, but the list of diseases for which vaccines do not exist is long. However, the multiplicity of strategies now available, discussed in this article, portends even more successful development of vaccines. PMID:19793898

  13. Anthrax vaccination strategies

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, Robert J.; Sanz, Patrick; O'Brien, Alison D.

    2009-01-01

    The biological attack conducted through the U.S. postal system in 2001 broadened the threat posed by anthrax from one pertinent mainly to soldiers on the battlefield to one understood to exist throughout our society. The expansion of the threatened population placed greater emphasis on the reexamination of how we vaccinate against Bacillus anthracis. The currently-licensed Anthrax Vaccine, Adsorbed (AVA) and Anthrax Vaccine, Precipitated (AVP) are capable of generating a protective immune response but are hampered by shortcomings that make their widespread use undesirable or infeasible. Efforts to gain U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for licensure of a second generation recombinant protective antigen (rPA)-based anthrax vaccine are ongoing. However, this vaccine's reliance on the generation of a humoral immune response against a single virulence factor has led a number of scientists to conclude that the vaccine is likely not the final solution to optimal anthrax vaccine design. Other vaccine approaches, which seek a more comprehensive immune response targeted at multiple components of the B. anthracis organism, are under active investigation. This review seeks to summarize work that has been done to build on the current PA-based vaccine methodology and to evaluate the search for future anthrax prophylaxis strategies. PMID:19729034

  14. Vaccine delivery using nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Anthony E.; Titball, Richard; Williamson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has had a major impact on the control of infectious diseases. However, there are still many infectious diseases for which the development of an effective vaccine has been elusive. In many cases the failure to devise vaccines is a consequence of the inability of vaccine candidates to evoke appropriate immune responses. This is especially true where cellular immunity is required for protective immunity and this problem is compounded by the move toward devising sub-unit vaccines. Over the past decade nanoscale size (<1000 nm) materials such as virus-like particles, liposomes, ISCOMs, polymeric, and non-degradable nanospheres have received attention as potential delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens which can both stabilize vaccine antigens and act as adjuvants. Importantly, some of these nanoparticles (NPs) are able to enter antigen-presenting cells by different pathways, thereby modulating the immune response to the antigen. This may be critical for the induction of protective Th1-type immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Their properties also make them suitable for the delivery of antigens at mucosal surfaces and for intradermal administration. In this review we compare the utilities of different NP systems for the delivery of sub-unit vaccines and evaluate the potential of these delivery systems for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:23532930

  15. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases. PMID:25749248

  16. Molecular basis of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, G; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1998-02-01

    Vaccines represent the most cost-effective means to prevent infectious diseases. Most of the vaccines which are currently available were developed long before the era of molecular biology and biotechnology. They were obtained following empirical approaches leading to the inactivation or to the attenuation of microorganisms, without any knowledge neither of the mechanisms of pathogenesis of the disease they were expected to protect from, nor of the immune responses elicited by the infectious agents or by the vaccine itself. The past two decades have seen an impressive progress in the field of immunology and molecular biology, which have allowed a better understanding of the interactions occurring between microbes and their hosts. This basic knowledge has represented an impetus towards the generation of better vaccines and the development of new vaccines. In this monograph we briefly summarize some of the most important biotechnological approaches that are currently followed in the development of new vaccines, and provide details on an approach to vaccine development: the genetic detoxification of bacterial toxins. Such an approach has been particularly successful in the rational design of a new vaccine against pertussis, which has been shown to be extremely efficacious and safe. It has been applied to the construction of powerful mucosal adjuvants, for administration of vaccines at mucosal surfaces. PMID:9789264

  17. Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Adacel® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine) ... Boostrix® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine)

  18. Polio field census and vaccination of underserved populations--northern Nigeria, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    2013-08-23

    In 2012, the World Health Assembly declared completion of polio eradication a public health emergency. However, wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission remains endemic in three countries (Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan). In Nigeria, the National Stop Transmission of Polio (N-STOP) program, under the umbrella of the Nigerian Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP), has been developed to implement innovative strategies that address the remaining polio eradication challenges in Nigeria. One N-STOP initiative focuses on locating and vaccinating children aged<5 years in remote nomadic, scattered, and border populations in northern Nigeria, where low polio vaccination coverage likely contributes to ongoing WPV transmission. During August 2012-April 2013, N-STOP conducted field outreach activities that enumerated 40,212 remote settlements, including 4,613 (11.5%) settlements never visited by vaccination teams during previous polio supplemental immunization activities (SIAs). Enumeration resulted in documentation of 906,201 children aged<5 years residing in these settlements, including 53,738 (5.9%) who had never received polio vaccination, and in detection of 211 unreported cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) with onset of illness in the 6 months before enumeration. Sustaining access to underserved populations in remote settlements in future SIAs will increase overall population immunity and should decrease WPV transmission. By providing a flexible and capable workforce consisting of Nigerian citizens, N-STOP is able to support evaluation and implementation of innovative polio eradication strategies in Nigeria while building local public health capacity with a potential to address other public health problems following the eradication of polio from Nigeria. PMID:23965829

  19. Universal influenza vaccines: Shifting to better vaccines.

    PubMed

    Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Tsvetnitsky, Vadim; Donnelly, John J

    2016-06-01

    Influenza virus causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections and is the most likely, among known pathogens, to cause a large epidemic in humans. Influenza virus mutates rapidly, enabling it to evade natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, influenza viruses can cross from animals to humans, generating novel, potentially pandemic strains. Currently available influenza vaccines induce a strain specific response and may be ineffective against new influenza viruses. The difficulty in predicting circulating strains has frequently resulted in mismatch between the annual vaccine and circulating viruses. Low-resource countries remain mostly unprotected against seasonal influenza and are particularly vulnerable to future pandemics, in part, because investments in vaccine manufacturing and stockpiling are concentrated in high-resource countries. Antibodies that target conserved sites in the hemagglutinin stalk have been isolated from humans and shown to confer protection in animal models, suggesting that broadly protective immunity may be possible. Several innovative influenza vaccine candidates are currently in preclinical or early clinical development. New technologies include adjuvants, synthetic peptides, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vectors, messenger RNA, viral vectors, and attenuated or inactivated influenza viruses. Other approaches target the conserved exposed epitope of the surface exposed membrane matrix protein M2e. Well-conserved influenza proteins, such as nucleoprotein and matrix protein, are mainly targeted for developing strong cross-protective T cell responses. With multiple vaccine candidates moving along the testing and development pipeline, the field is steadily moving toward a product that is more potent, durable, and broadly protective than previously licensed vaccines. PMID:27038130

  20. Vaccine hesitancy, vaccine refusal and the anti-vaccine movement: influence, impact and implications.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Eve; Vivion, Maryline; MacDonald, Noni E

    2015-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of parents. Anti-vaccination movements have been implicated in lowered vaccine acceptance rates and in the increase in vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. In this review, we will look at determinants of parental decision-making about vaccination and provide an overview of the history of anti-vaccination movements and its clinical impact. PMID:25373435

  1. [HPV prophylactic vaccines].

    PubMed

    Konopnicki, D

    2014-09-01

    Since 2007, two prophylactic vaccines against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV. induced lesions (both precancerous dysplasia and cancer) have been registered in Belgium. In multicentre randomized trials including more than 64,000 patients, these vaccines were shown to be highly efficient against the occurrence of condyloma and of dysplastic lesion in the cervix, vagina and vulva in females and in the anus in males. These vaccines display an excellent tolerance and safety profile, the most common adverse event being minor and transient side effects at the injection site. The protection given by these vaccines is more important in subjects that have not been in contact with HPV previously ; moreover the title of neutralizing antibodies against HPV are significantly higher in children vaccinated before 15 years-old age compared to young person vaccinated after this age. For these two reasons, it is recommended to vaccinate before the first sexual relationships. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that vaccination by two doses given at 0 and 6 months in children before 15 years-old was equivalent to the three doses scheme that should be given at 0, 1 or 2 and 6 months in subjects aged 15 years or more. In the countries that have achieved a high vaccine coverage among their young female population, the prevalence of HPV infection and the incidence of high grade cervical dysplasia have significantly decreased while condyloma has almost disappeared four years after the implementation of HPV vaccination. In HIV-positive subjects who are particularly susceptible to infection and lesions induced by HPV, vaccination brings levels of antibody comparable to what is found in the general population with similar safety. PMID:25675641

  2. Vaccination in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Barbara C; Meyer, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Public health vaccination guidelines cannot be easily transferred to elite athletes. An enhanced benefit from preventing even mild diseases is obvious but stronger interference from otherwise minor side effects has to be considered as well. Thus, special vaccination guidelines for adult elite athletes are required. In most of them, protection should be strived for against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, measles, mumps and varicella. When living or traveling to endemic areas, the athletes should be immune against tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, poliomyelitis, typhoid fever, and meningococcal disease. Vaccination against pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae type b is only relevant in athletes with certain underlying disorders. Rubella and papillomavirus vaccination might be considered after an individual risk-benefit analysis. Other vaccinations such as cholera, rabies, herpes zoster, and Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) cannot be universally recommended for athletes at present. Only for a very few diseases, a determination of antibody titers is reasonable to avoid unnecessary vaccinations or to control efficacy of an individual's vaccination (especially for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis B and, partly, hepatitis A). Vaccinations should be scheduled in a way that possible side effects are least likely to occur in periods of competition. Typically, vaccinations are well tolerated by elite athletes, and resulting antibody titers are not different from the general population. Side effects might be reduced by an optimal selection of vaccines and an appropriate technique of administration. Very few discipline-specific considerations apply to an athlete's vaccination schedule mainly from the competition and training pattern as well as from the typical geographical distribution of competitive sites. PMID:24986118

  3. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-09-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  4. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  5. Vaccines for lymphomas: idiotype vaccines and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Levy, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for lymphomas have been developed to induce active and long-lasting immune responses against lymphoma capable of eradicating the tumor. Most of these vaccines use the tumor B cell idiotype (the unique variable region of the surface immunoglobulin) as a tumor-specific antigen. The first human clinical trial for lymphoma vaccine was initiated 20 years ago. Along with several other phase I/II trials, it showed encouraging results which supported the initiation of three phase III trials. The results of these trials have recently been released (although not published yet) which failed to demonstrate a prolongation in progression-free survival following chemotherapy. Despite this disappointing result, a number of observations have accumulated over the years that suggest some clinical efficacy of lymphoma vaccines. Several strategies are being developed to improve these results that include optimization of antigen delivery and presentation as well as enhancement of anti-tumor T cell function. This review describes the clinical development of lymphoma vaccines and delineates advances, problems and prospects towards integration of this strategy in the therapeutic armamentarium for lymphoma. PMID:18951668

  6. Advances in influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections yearly cause high morbidity and mortality burdens in humans, and the development of a new influenza pandemic continues to threaten mankind as a Damoclean sword. Influenza vaccines have been produced by using egg-based virus growth and passaging techniques that were developed more than 60 years ago, following the identification of influenza A virus as an etiological agent of seasonal influenza. These vaccines aimed mainly at eliciting neutralizing antibodies targeting antigenically variable regions of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which requires regular updates to match circulating seasonal influenza A and B virus strains. Given the relatively limited protection induced by current seasonal influenza vaccines, a more universal influenza vaccine that would protect against more—if not all—influenza viruses is among the largest unmet medical needs of the 21st century. New insights into correlates of protection from influenza and into broad B- and T-cell protective anti-influenza immune responses offer promising avenues for innovative vaccine development as well as manufacturing strategies or platforms, leading to the development of a new generation of vaccines. These aim at the rapid and massive production of influenza vaccines that provide broad protective and long-lasting immunity. Recent advances in influenza vaccine research demonstrate the feasibility of a wide range of approaches and call for the initiation of preclinical proof-of-principle studies followed by clinical trials in humans. PMID:24991424

  7. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the next 7 days, who requires a protected environment (for example, following a bone marrow transplant). Sometimes ... The National Vaccine Injury Compensation ProgramThe National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a federal program that was created to compensate people who may have ...

  8. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  9. Vaccination to Prevent Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines stimulate the immune system, mimicking infectious attacks and thereby promoting the development of protective antibodies and/or cellular immunity so that the body is immune to infection when live native infections attack. Some of these infections are associated with cancer-causing changes in the body; thus some vaccines may help prevent cancer. PMID:27621345

  10. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In a randomised, double-blind trial in pregnant women, a seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine without a lipid adjuvant and covering strain A/H1N1v was partially effective: the incidence of influenza in the mothers and their infants was about 1.8% with the vaccine versus 3.6% with placebo. No noteworthy adverse reactions were reported. PMID:27042735

  11. Pricing of new vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    New vaccine pricing is a complicated process that could have substantial long-standing scientific, medical and public health ramifications. Pricing can have a considerable impact on new vaccine adoption and, thereby, either culminate or thwart years of research and development and public health efforts. Typically, pricing strategy consists of the following eleven components: (1) Conduct a target population analysis; (2) Map potential competitors and alternatives; (3) Construct a vaccine target product profile (TPP) and compare it to projected or actual TPPs of competing vaccines; (4) Quantify the incremental value of the new vaccine's characteristics; (5) Determine vaccine positioning in the marketplace; (6) Estimate the vaccine price-demand curve; (7) Calculate vaccine costs (including those of manufacturing, distribution, and research and development); (8) Account for various legal, regulatory, third party payer and competitor factors; (9) Consider the overall product portfolio; (10) Set pricing objectives; (11) Select pricing and pricing structure. While the biomedical literature contains some studies that have addressed these components, there is still considerable room for more extensive evaluation of this important area. PMID:20861678

  12. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics. PMID:26458840

  13. The Human Hookworm Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Diemert, David; Bacon, Kristina M; Beaumier, Coreen; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Brooker, Simon; Couto, Artur Roberto; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Homma, Akira; Lee, Bruce Y; Loukas, Alex; Loblack, Marva; Morel, Carlos Medicis; Oliveira, Rodrigo Correa; Russell, Philip K

    2013-04-18

    Hookworm infection is one of the world's most common neglected tropical diseases and a leading cause of iron deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries. A Human Hookworm Vaccine is currently being developed by the Sabin Vaccine Institute and is in phase 1 clinical testing. The candidate vaccine is comprised of two recombinant antigens known as Na-GST-1 and Na-APR-1, each of which is an important parasite enzyme required for hookworms to successfully utilize host blood as a source of energy. The recombinant proteins are formulated on Alhydrogel(®) and are being tested in combination with a synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist. The aim of the vaccine is to induce anti-enzyme antibodies that will reduce both host blood loss and the number of hookworms attached to the gut. Transfer of the manufacturing technology to the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ)/Bio-Manguinhos (a Brazilian public sector developing country vaccine manufacturer) is planned, with a clinical development plan that could lead to registration of the vaccine in Brazil. The vaccine would also need to be introduced in the poorest regions of Africa and Asia, where hookworm infection is highly endemic. Ultimately, the vaccine could become an essential tool for achieving hookworm control and elimination, a key target in the 2012 London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases. PMID:23598487

  14. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  15. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  16. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  17. Next generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2011-07-01

    In February this year, about 100 delegates gathered for three days in Vienna (Austria) for the Next Generation Vaccines conference. The meeting held in the Vienna Hilton Hotel from 23rd-25th February 2011 had a strong focus on biotech and industry. The conference organizer Jacob Fleming managed to put together a versatile program ranging from the future generation of vaccines to manufacturing, vaccine distribution and delivery, to regulatory and public health issues. Carefully selected top industry experts presented first-hand experience and shared solutions for overcoming the latest challenges in the field of vaccinology. The program also included several case study presentations on novel vaccine candidates in different stages of development. An interactive pre-conference workshop as well as interactive panel discussions during the meeting allowed all delegates to gain new knowledge and become involved in lively discussions on timely, interesting and sometimes controversial topics related to vaccines. PMID:22002157

  18. Developing new smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, S. R.; Merchlinsky, M.; Kleppinger, C.; Goldenthal, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    New stockpiles of smallpox vaccine are required as a contingency for protecting civilian and military personnel against deliberate dissemination of smallpox virus by terrorists or unfriendly governments. The smallpox vaccine in the current stockpile consists of a live animal poxvirus (Vaccinia virus [VACV]) that was grown on the skin of calves. Because of potential issues with controlling this earlier manufacturing process, which included scraping VACV lesions from calfskin, new vaccines are being developed and manufactured by using viral propagation on well-characterized cell substrates. We describe, from a regulatory perspective, the various strains of VACV, the adverse events associated with calf lymph-propagated smallpox vaccine, the issues regarding selection and use of cell substrates for vaccine production, and the issues involved in demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy. PMID:11747717

  19. [Varicella vaccination: who should be vaccinated these days?].

    PubMed

    Hügle, Boris; Suchowerskyj, Philipp; Schuster, Volker

    2005-02-24

    In July 2004 the STIKO (German National Commission for Vaccinations) recommended routine varicella vaccination (together with the first MMR vaccination) for all healthy infants. The previous recommendations for vaccination of adolescents with no history of varicella and patient groups at risk remain valid. In persons with severely depressed cellular immunity or pregnant women vaccination with live attenuated VZV vaccines is contraindicated. Experience gained in the United States show that widespread introduction of VZV vaccination results in a decrease in both the incidence of varicella and concomitant complications including herpes zoster. PMID:18441563

  20. Vaccination coverage among adults, excluding influenza vaccination - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Williams, Walter W; Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kim, David K; Pilishvili, Tamara; Hales, Craig M; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-02-01

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2015. With the exception of influenza vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, other adult vaccinations are recommended for specific populations based on a person's age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report highlights results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity,† and vaccination indication). Influenza vaccination coverage estimates for the 2013-14 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2012, only modest increases occurred in Tdap vaccination among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 17.2%), herpes zoster vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 24.2%), and HPV vaccination among males aged 19-26 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 5.9%); coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic disparities in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap and herpes zoster vaccination. Increases in vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Awareness of the need for vaccines for adults is low

  1. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  2. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  3. Vaccines against nicotine.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Erich H; Cerny, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    Medications against any dependence-inducing drug face a dilemma: if they are efficient, they will induce withdrawal symptoms and the patient is likely to stop taking his medication. Anti drug vaccines are irreversible, provide protection over years and need booster injections far beyond the critical phase of acute withdrawal symptoms. Interacting rather with the drug in the blood than with a receptor in the brain, the vaccines are, in addition, free of side effects due to central interaction. For drugs like nicotine interacting with different types of receptors in many organs, this is a further advantage. There are three reasons that anti drug vaccines have first been developed against nicotine. Firstly, in most parts of the world 20 to 50% of the adult population smoke and any smoking cessation treatment will have an important impact on public health and be commercially a very attractive product. The second reason are the smokers themselves, who would like to quit in significant numbers and who have shown good compliance for any form of treatment. Thirdly, the quantities of cocaine or heroine taken by dependant persons are higher than the quantity of nicotine per cigarette, which makes an anti nicotine vaccine the easier vaccine project. Three anti nicotine vaccines are today in an advanced stage of clinical evaluation. We report here how those vaccines work, on the progress of the trials and future developments to expect. Results show that the efficiency of the vaccines is directly related to the antibody levels of the probates, a fact which will help to optimize further the vaccine effect. We expect the vaccines to appear on the market during a time window between 2009 and 2011. PMID:19276649

  4. Lassa fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2004-04-01

    Lassa fever remains a serious challenge to public health in West Africa threatening both local residents in rural areas and those who serve them, particularly medical care providers. Given the ecology of the rodent host and conditions in the endemic area, a vaccine is mandatory for control. The challenge is to overcome the scientific, political and economic obstacles to producing a human use vaccine candidate. There are some scientific issues to resolve. It is known that the G-protein confers protection but we do not know its duration. If the N-protein is also included there may be a better duration of protection but it is unclear whether the N-protein as a vaccine may possibly enhance the infection. The original vaccinia vector must be replaced by new vectors, chimeras or by delivering DNA in some format. A live vaccine is attractive because it can confer protection in a single shot. A killed vaccine is more stable, particularly for distribution in the tropics but usually requires repeated shots. For practical reasons a live vaccine format should probably be pursued, which could then be combined with a yellow fever vaccine, using the same cold chains, since this disease occupies the same endemic areas in West Africa. Lassa vaccine initiatives have suffered from a lack of funding in the past but bioterrorism has brought new resources to Lassa virus science. Adequate funding and applications of new vaccine technologies give hope that we may soon see a vaccine in clinical trials. However, the difficulty of conducting trials in endemic areas and lack of political stability remain serious problems. PMID:15056044

  5. The Vaccine Safety Datalink: successes and challenges monitoring vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael M; Gee, Julianne; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A; Lee, Grace M; Glanz, Jason M; Nordin, James D; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Naleway, Allison L; Jackson, Lisa A; Omer, Saad B; Jacobsen, Steven J; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-09-22

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) is a collaborative project between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 9 health care organizations. Established in 1990, VSD is a vital resource informing policy makers and the public about the safety of vaccines used in the United States. Large linked databases are used to identify and evaluate adverse events in over 9 million individuals annually. VSD generates rapid, important safety assessments for both routine vaccinations and emergency vaccination campaigns. VSD monitors safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in near-real time, and provided essential information on the safety of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the recent pandemic. VSD investigators have published important studies demonstrating that childhood vaccines are not associated with autism or other developmental disabilities. VSD prioritizes evaluation of new vaccines; searches for possible unusual health events after vaccination; monitors vaccine safety in pregnant women; and has pioneered development of biostatistical research methods. PMID:25108215

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of Brucella vaccines and vaccine targets using VIOLIN

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the commonest zoonotic diseases found worldwide in humans and a variety of animal species. While several animal vaccines are available, there is no effective and safe vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in humans. VIOLIN (http://www.violinet.org) is a web-based vaccine database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes published data of commercialized vaccines, and vaccines in clinical trials or in research. VIOLIN contains information for 454 vaccines or vaccine candidates for 73 pathogens. VIOLIN also contains many bioinformatics tools for vaccine data analysis, data integration, and vaccine target prediction. To demonstrate the applicability of VIOLIN for vaccine research, VIOLIN was used for bioinformatics analysis of existing Brucella vaccines and prediction of new Brucella vaccine targets. Results VIOLIN contains many literature mining programs (e.g., Vaxmesh) that provide in-depth analysis of Brucella vaccine literature. As a result of manual literature curation, VIOLIN contains information for 38 Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates, 14 protective Brucella antigens, and 68 host response studies to Brucella vaccines from 97 peer-reviewed articles. These Brucella vaccines are classified in the Vaccine Ontology (VO) system and used for different ontological applications. The web-based VIOLIN vaccine target prediction program Vaxign was used to predict new Brucella vaccine targets. Vaxign identified 14 outer membrane proteins that are conserved in six virulent strains from B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis that are pathogenic in humans. Of the 14 membrane proteins, two proteins (Omp2b and Omp31-1) are not present in B. ovis, a Brucella species that is not pathogenic in humans. Brucella vaccine data stored in VIOLIN were compared and analyzed using the VIOLIN query system. Conclusions Bioinformatics curation and ontological

  7. [Current events in vaccination].

    PubMed

    Aubert, M; Aumaître, H; Beytout, J; Bloch, K; Bouhour, D; Callamand, P; Chave, C; Cheymol, J; Combadière, B; Dahlab, A; Denis, F; De Pontual, L; Dodet, B; Dommergues, M-A; Dufour, V; Gagneur, A; Gaillat, J; Gaudelus, J; Gavazzi, G; Gillet, Y; Gras-le-Guen, C; Haas, H; Hanslik, T; Hau-Rainsard, I; Larnaudie, S; Launay, O; Lorrot, M; Loulergue, P; Malvy, D; Marchand, S; Picherot, G; Pinquier, D; Pulcini, C; Rabaud, C; Regnier, F; Reinert, P; Sana, C; Savagner, C; Soubeyrand, B; Stephan, J-L; Strady, C

    2011-11-01

    The annual meeting of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) ; which brought together nearly 5000 participants from over 80 countries in Vancouver, Canada, October 21 to 24, 2010 ; provided a review of the influenza (H1N1) 2009 pandemic, evaluated vaccination programmes and presented new vaccines under development. With 12,500 deaths in the United States in 2009-2010, the influenza (H1N1) 2009 pandemic was actually less deadly than the seasonal flu. But it essentially hit the young, and the toll calculated in years of life lost is high. The monovalent vaccines, whether live attenuated or inactivated with or without adjuvants, were well tolerated in toddlers, children, adults and pregnant women. In order to protect infants against pertussis, family members are urged to get their booster shots. The introduction of the 13-valent Pneumococcal conjugated vaccine in the beginning of 2010 may solve - but for how long ? - the problem of serotype replacement, responsible for the re-increasing incidence of invasive Pneumococcal infections observed in countries that had introduced the 7-valent vaccine. The efficacy of a rotavirus vaccine has been confirmed, with a reduction in hospitalization in the United States and a reduction in gastroenteritis-related deaths in Mexico. In the United States, vaccination of pre-adolescents against human papillomavirus (HPV) has not resulted in any specific undesirable effects. Routine vaccination against chicken pox, recommended since 1995, has not had an impact on the evolution of the incidence of shingles. Vaccination against shingles, recommended in the United States for subjects 60 years and over, shows an effectiveness of 55 %, according to a cohort study (Kaiser Permanente, Southern California). Although some propose the development of personalized vaccines according to individual genetic characteristics, the priority remains with increasing vaccine coverage, not only in infants but also in adults and the elderly. Vaccine

  8. [Current events in vaccination].

    PubMed

    Aubert, M; Aumaître, H; Beytout, J; Bloch, K; Bouhour, D; Callamand, P; Chave, C; Cheymol, J; Combadière, B; Dahlab, A; Denis, F; De Pontual, L; Dodet, B; Dommergues, M A; Dufour, V; Gagneur, A; Gaillat, J; Gaudelus, J; Gavazzi, G; Gillet, Y; Gras-le-Guen, C; Haas, H; Hanslik, T; Hau-Rainsard, I; Larnaudie, S; Launay, O; Lorrot, M; Loulergue, P; Malvy, D; Marchand, S; Picherot, G; Pinquier, D; Pulcini, C; Rabaud, C; Regnier, F; Reinert, P; Sana, C; Savagner, C; Soubeyrand, B; Stephan, J L; Strady, C

    2011-05-01

    The annual meeting of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA); which brought together nearly 5000 participants from over 80 countries in Vancouver, Canada, October 21 to 24, 2010; provided a review of the influenza (H1N1) 2009 pandemic, evaluated vaccination programmes and presented new vaccines under development. With 12,500 deaths in the United States in 2009-2010, the influenza (H1N1) 2009 pandemic was actually less deadly than the seasonal flu. But it essentially hit the young, and the toll calculated in years of life lost is high. The monovalent vaccines, whether live attenuated or inactivated with or without adjuvants, were well tolerated in toddlers, children, adults and pregnant women. In order to protect infants against pertussis, family members are urged to get their booster shots. The introduction of the 13-valent Pneumococcal conjugated vaccine in the beginning of 2010 may solve--but for how long?--the problem of serotype replacement, responsible for the re-increasing incidence of invasive Pneumococcal infections observed in countries that had introduced the 7-valent vaccine. The efficacy of a rotavirus vaccine has been confirmed, with a reduction in hospitalization in the United States and a reduction in gastroenteritis-related deaths in Mexico. In the United States, vaccination of pre-adolescents against human papillomavirus (HPV) has not resulted in any specific undesirable effects. Routine vaccination against chicken pox, recommended since 1995, has not had an impact on the evolution of the incidence of shingles. Vaccination against shingles, recommended in the United States for subjects 60 years and over, shows an effectiveness of 55%, according to a cohort study (Kaiser Permanente, Southern California). Although some propose the development of personalized vaccines according to individual genetic characteristics, the priority remains with increasing vaccine coverage, not only in infants but also in adults and the elderly. Vaccine

  9. Vaccinations for the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Gowrishankar; Biedenbender, Rex; Davidson, Harley Edward; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Vaccine response declines with age, but currently recommended vaccines are safe and effective in reducing, if not preventing, disease altogether. Over the last decade, advancements in vaccine immunogenicity, either by increasing dose or conjugating vaccines to protein, have resulted in more immunogenic vaccines that also seem more effective in reducing clinical disease both for influenza and pneumococcus. Meanwhile, there is a resurgence in incident pertussis, exceeding prevalence from five decades ago, adding older adults to a recommended target vaccination group. This article discusses currently available vaccines, in the context of current epidemiology and recommendations, for older adults. PMID:27394026

  10. Tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Effective prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccination is a key strategy for controlling the global TB epidemic. The partial effectiveness of the existing TB vaccine, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), suggests effective vaccination is possible and highlights the need for an improved vaccination strategy. Clinical trials are evaluating both modifications to the existing BCG immunization methods and also novel TB vaccines, designed to replace or boost BCG. Candidate vaccines in clinical development include live mycobacterial vaccines designed to replace BCG, subunit vaccines designed to boost BCG and therapeutic vaccines designed as an adjunct to chemotherapy. There is a great need for validated animal models, identification of immunological biomarkers of protection and field sites with the capacity for large-scale efficacy testing in order to develop and license a novel TB vaccine or regimen. PMID:21604985

  11. Novel Vaccination Strategies against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Peter; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the BCG (Bacillus Calmette–Guérin) vaccine. Novel vaccination strategies are urgently needed to arrest global transmission and prevent the uncontrolled development of multidrug-resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in the field of vaccine development with numerous innovative preclinical candidates and more than a dozen vaccines in clinical trials. These vaccines are developed either as boosters of the current BCG vaccine or as novel prime vaccines to replace BCG. Given the enormous prevalence of latent TB infection, vaccines that are protective on top of an already established infection remain a high priority and a significant scientific challenge. Here we discuss the current state of TB vaccine research and development, our understanding of the underlying immunology, and the requirements for an efficient TB vaccine. PMID:24890836

  12. [Vaccines for the future].

    PubMed

    Girard, M P

    2009-05-01

    The field of vaccines and vaccinology has seen remarkable progress during the past 20 years. Many vaccines, however, still need to be improved, either because the protection they provide is relatively short-lived and would greatly benefit from the development of booster formulations (as is the case for tuberculosis), or because they only cover part of the many serotypes of the pathogen that causes the disease (rotaviruses, papillomaviruses, or Streptococcus pneumoniae). In addition, still many diseases lack a proper preventive vaccine, such as AIDS, hepatitis C, malaria, viral pneumonias, croup and bronchiolitis, dengue fever, leishmaniasis, Staphylococcus aureus, groups A and B Streptococcus, Shigellas and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, to only name a few. These are the current targets of vaccines under development, a great many of which will hopefully reach the market within the coming 10 years. The development of preventive vaccines against chronic diseases such as AIDS and hepatitis C will probably require more time, due to basic science complexities to be overcome first. It is likely that the future will also see an emphasis on therapeutic vaccines targeted against noninfectious diseases such as cancers (lung, skin, prostate, etc) and metabolic or neurologic diseases (atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease). This review will focus on examples of preventive vaccines under development that target infectious diseases with a heavy global burden on public health. PMID:19446671

  13. Nanoparticles for transcutaneous vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steffi; Lehr, Claus‐Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary The living epidermis and dermis are rich in antigen presenting cells (APCs). Their activation can elicit a strong humoral and cellular immune response as well as mucosal immunity. Therefore, the skin is a very attractive site for vaccination, and an intradermal application of antigen may be much more effective than a subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. However, the stratum corneum (SC) is a most effective barrier against the invasion of topically applied vaccines. Products which have reached the stage of clinical testing, avoid this problem by injecting the nano‐vaccine intradermally or by employing a barrier disrupting method and applying the vaccine to a relatively large skin area. Needle‐free vaccination is desirable from a number of aspects: ease of application, improved patient acceptance and less risk of infection among them. Nanocarriers can be designed in a way that they can overcome the SC. Also incorporation into nanocarriers protects instable antigen from degradation, improves uptake and processing by APCs, and facilitates endosomal escape and nuclear delivery of DNA vaccines. In addition, sustained release systems may build a depot in the tissue gradually releasing antigen which may avoid booster doses. Therefore, nanoformulations of vaccines for transcutaneous immunization are currently a very dynamic field of research. Among the huge variety of nanocarrier systems that are investigated hopes lie on ultra‐flexible liposomes, superfine rigid nanoparticles and nanocarriers, which are taken up by hair follicles. The potential and pitfalls associated with these three classes of carriers will be discussed. PMID:21854553

  14. Vaccines, viruses, and voodoo.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Keen, Carl L; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Silva, Joseph; Gershwin, M Eric

    2002-01-01

    Vaccinations are invaluable in protection from a wide variety of diseases that can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Although a rare complication of vaccination, autoimmune disorders represent one of these morbidities. Recently, widespread public concern has arisen from case reports suggesting that--similar to what has been observed after natural viral infections--there might be an association between specific immunizations and autoimmune diseases. Herein we address the biological plausibility of such a connection, focusing particularly on the examples of hepatitis B, rubella, and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccinations, and the autoimmune diseases they are potentially associated with. Our review of the available data suggests that, for the general population, the risk: benefit ratio is overwhelmingly in favor of vaccinations. However, the possibility cannot be ruled out that, in genetically susceptible individuals, vaccination can result in the unmasking of an autoimmune disease triggered by the immunization. We also critically examine the existing data suggesting a link between immunization against MMR and autism, and briefly discuss the controversial evidence pointing to a possible relationship between mercury exposure from vaccines and autistic disorders. There is a continued urgent need for rigorously designed and executed studies addressing these potential associations, although the use of vaccinations remains a critical public health tool for protection against infectious disease. PMID:12530114

  15. [Vaccinations in respiratory medicine].

    PubMed

    Lode, H M; Stahlmann, R

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinations are the most successful and cost-effective measures for prevention of infections. Important pathogens of respiratory tract infections (e.g. influenza viruses and pneumococci) can be effectively treated by vaccinations. The seasonal trivalent and recently now quadrivalent influenza vaccines include antigens from influenza A and B type viruses, which have to be modified annually oriented to the circulating strains. The effective protection by influenza vaccination varies considerably (too short protection time, mismatch); therefore, administration late in the year is the best approach (November/December). Two pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for adults: the over 30-year-old 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 4-year-old 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13). The immunological and clinical efficacy of PPV23 is controversially discussed; however, a moderate reduction of invasive pneumococcal infections is widely accepted. The PCV13 stimulates a T-cell response and has currently demonstrated its clinical efficacy in an impressive study (CAPiTA). The problem of PCV13 is the relatively limited coverage of only 47% of the currently circulating invasive pneumococcal serotypes. PMID:26330051

  16. Research toward Malaria Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Louis H.; Howard, Russell J.; Carter, Richard; Good, Michael F.; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1986-12-01

    Malaria exacts a toll of disease to people in the Tropics that seems incomprehensible to those only familiar with medicine and human health in the developed world. The methods of molecular biology, immunology, and cell biology are now being used to develop an antimalarial vaccine. The Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria have many stages in their life cycle. Each stage is antigenically distinct and potentially could be interrupted by different vaccines. However, achieving complete protection by vaccination may require a better understanding of the complexities of B- and T-cell priming in natural infections and the development of an appropriate adjuvant for use in humans.

  17. Anti-addiction vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts to eradicate it, addiction to both legal and illicit drugs continues to be a major worldwide medical and social problem. Anti-addiction vaccines can produce the antibodies to block the effects of these drugs on the brain, and have great potential to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with illicit drug intoxications. This review provides a current overview of anti-addiction vaccines that are under clinical trial and pre-clinical research evaluation. It also outlines the development challenges, ethical concerns, and likely future intervention for anti-addiction vaccines. PMID:22003367

  18. Hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Romanò, Luisa; Paladini, Sara; Galli, Cristina; Raimondo, Giovanni; Pollicino, Teresa; Zanetti, Alessandro R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a worldwide leading cause of acute and chronic liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Effective vaccines have been available since the early '80s and vaccination has proved highly successful in reducing the disease burden, the development of the carrier state and the HB-related morbidity and mortality in the countries where vaccination has been implemented.   Neutralizing (protective) antibodies (anti-HBs) induced by vaccination are targeted largely towards the amino acid hydrophilic region, referred to as the common a determinant which is present on the outer protein coat or surface antigen (HBsAg), spanning amino acids 124-149. This provides protection against all HBV genotypes (from A to H) and is responsible for the broad immunity afforded by hepatitis B vaccination. Thus, alterations of residues within this region of the surface antigen may determine conformational changes that can allow replication of the mutated HBV in vaccinated people. An important mutation in the surface antigen region was identified in Italy some 25 years ago in infants born to HBsAg carrier mothers who developed breakthrough infections despite having received HBIG and vaccine at birth. This virus had a point mutation from guanosine to adenosine at nucleotide position 587, resulting in aa substitution from glycine (G) to arginine (R) at position 145 in the a determinant. Since the G145R substitution alters the projecting loop (aa 139-147) of the a determinant, the neutralizing antibodies induced by vaccination are no longer able to recognize the mutated epitope. Beside G145R, other S-gene mutations potentially able to evade neutralizing anti-HBs and infect vaccinated people have been described worldwide. In addition, the emergence of Pol mutants associated with resistance to treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues can select viruses with crucial changes in the overlapping S-gene, potentially able to alter the S protein immunoreactivity. Thus

  19. Developing vaccines against pandemic influenza.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, J M

    2001-01-01

    Pandemic influenza presents special problems for vaccine development. There must be a balance between rapid availability of vaccine and the safeguards to ensure safety, quality and efficacy of vaccine. Vaccine was developed for the pandemics of 1957, 1968, 1977 and for the pandemic alert of 1976. This experience is compared with that gained in developing vaccines for a possible H5N1 pandemic in 1997-1998. Our ability to mass produce influenza vaccines against a pandemic threat was well illustrated by the production of over 150 million doses of 'swine flu' vaccine in the USA within a 3 month period in 1976. However, there is cause for concern that the lead time to begin vaccine production is likely to be about 7-8 months. Attempts to reduce this time should receive urgent attention. Immunogenicity of vaccines in pandemic situations is compared over the period 1968-1998. A consistent feature of the vaccine trials is the demonstration that one conventional 15 microg haemagglutinin dose of vaccine is not sufficiently immunogenic in naive individuals. Much larger doses or two lower doses are needed to induce satisfactory immunity. There is some evidence that whole-virus vaccines are more immunogenic than split or subunit vaccines, but this needs substantiating by further studies. H5 vaccines appeared to be particularly poor immunogens and there is evidence that an adjuvant may be needed. Prospects for improving the development of pandemic vaccines are discussed. PMID:11779397

  20. Wild Poliovirus Cases

    MedlinePlus

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