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Sample records for poloidal field system

  1. Starfire poloidal coil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.; Kim, S.H.; Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.

    1980-01-01

    The poloidal coils for STARFIRE consists of three systems: (1) equilibrium field (EF) coils; (2) ohmic heating (OH) coils; and (3) correction field (CF) coils. The EF coils are superconducting and lie outside the toroidal field (TF) coils. These coils provide the bulk of the equilibrium field necessary to keep the plasma positioned in the vacuum chamber with the desired cross sectional shape and pressure and current distributions. Having these coils outside of the TF coils requires that they have a larger stored energy and larger currents but eases the assembly, maintenance, and reliability of the coils. The STARFIRE OH system is relatively small compared to tokamaks in which the current is entirely ohmically driven. It is designed to provide sufficient flux in the early startup to raise the plasma current to the point (1 to 2 MA) where the rf current drive can take over.

  2. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  3. Tokamak poloidal field systems. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1980-05-01

    Work is reported on the development of superconducting tokamak poloidal field systems (TPFS). Progress is discussed on the design of a 20 MJ, 50 kA, 7.5 T superconducting pulsed energy storage coil operated in a 1 to 2 s bipolar mode from +7.5 T to -7.5 T in 1982. Conductor development for the coil is presented. A facility that uses a traction motor energy transfer system to test coils in the 20 to 100 MJ energy range is discussed. Current interrupter development and testing for protection and energy transfer circuits are also presented. The 400 kJ METS coil test preparation is under way.

  4. POLOIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYSIS WITH THE DIII-D LIBEAM SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. THOMAS

    2002-08-01

    For over thirty years, neutral lithium beams have been employed as a localized, noninvasive diagnostic on a variety of plasma experiments worldwide, providing a number of key physics measurements. On DIII-D the LIBEAM diagnostic has been designed to provide precise measurements of the local poloidal magnetic field in the edge region, a parameter of basic importance to understanding the stability of high performance tokamaks. We utilize the Zeeman splitting and known polarization characteristics of the collisionally excited 670.8 nm Li resonance line to interpret local magnetic field components viewed using a closely packed ({Delta}R {approx} 5 mm) array of 32 viewchords. A dual photoelastic modulator/linear polarizer combination serves to amplitude modulate the light in exact correspondence to its input polarization state. Subsequent narrowband spectral filtering using etalons and standard interference filters is used to isolate one of the three Zeeman components, and the polarization state of that component is recovered using a PC-based, multichannel digital lock-in detection system. Edge magnetic pitch angle profiles for a variety of shots have been reconstructed using a small number of chords and detailed analysis of the lockin and d.c. signal levels. Present system performance appears to be limited by etalon performance as well as various broadening mechanisms in the beam that tend to decrease the polarization fraction in the observed component. A careful analysis of this effect and some strategies for improving the measured polarization will be presented.

  5. The reversed-field pinch as a poloidal-field-dominated, compact, high-power-density fusion system

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of reversed-field pinch devices as future thermonuclear reactors. Safety, cost, ion temperatures, Lawson numbers, and power densities are reviewed for these types of devices. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  6. Poloidal rotation in tokamaks with large electric field gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F.L.; Kim, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The ion poloidal flow velocity near the plasma edge in a tokamak has been calculated by extending neoclassical theory to include orbit squeezing, which is the reduction of the ion banana widths due to radial electric field shear. The pressure gradient-driven ion parallel flow is reduced by orbit squeezing, and then no longer cancels the diamagnetic flow in its contribution to poloidal flow. This allows the poloidal flow velocity to be a significant fraction of the ion diamagnetic velocity, which can be much larger than the standard neoclassical value (proportional to the ion temperature gradient). Equations for determining the poloidal flow and radial electric field profiles self-consistently are given. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. An MHD simulation study of the poloidal mode field line resonance in the Earth's dipole magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, D. Q.; Denton, . E.; Hudson, M. K.; Lysak, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The poloidal mode field line resonance in the Earth's dipole magnetic field is investigated using cold plasma ideal MHD simulations in dipole geometry. In order to excite the poloidal mode resonance, we use either an initial or a continuous velocity perturbation to drive the system. The perturbation is localized at magnetic shell L = 7 with plasma flow in the radial direction (electric field component in the azimuthal direction). It is found that with the initial perturbation alone, no polodial mode resonance can be obtained and the initially localized perturbation spreads out across all magnetic L shells. With the continuous perturbation, oscillating near the poloidal resonance frequency, a global-scale poloidal cavity mode can be obtained. For the first time, a localized guided poloidal mode resonance is obtained when a radial component of electric field is added to the initial perturbation such that the curl of the electric field is everywhere perpendicular to the background dipole magnetic field. During the localized poloidal resonance, plasma vortices parallel/antiparallel to the background dipole magnetic field B(sub 0). This circular flow, elongated radially, results in twisting of magnetic field flux tubes, which, in turn, leads to the slowdown of the circular plasma flow and reversal of the plasma vortices. The energy associated with the localized poloidal resonance is conserved as it shifts back and forth between the oscillating plasma vortices and the alternately twisted magnetic flux tubes. In the simulations the eigenfunctions associated with the localized poloidal resonance are grid-scale singular functions. This result indicates that ideal MHD is inadequate to describe the underlying problem and nonideal MHD effects are needed for mode broadening.

  8. Equilibrium poloidal field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1982-04-01

    A comparison between the analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal field distribution is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one-third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the center shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one-tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The behavior of the magnetic axis shift as a function of plasma parameters is included. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the equilibrium behavior of an RFP discharge. Examples illustrating the application of the analytic formulae to the Los Alamos ZT-40M RFP experiment are given.

  9. Current density and poloidal magnetic field for toroidal elliptic plasmas with triangularity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.; Haines, M.G.; Castro, E.

    2005-08-15

    Changes in the poloidal magnetic field around a tokamak magnetic surface due to different values of triangularity and ellipticity are analyzed in this paper. The treatment here presented allows the determination of the poloidal magnetic field from knowledge of the toroidal current density. Different profiles of these currents are studied. Improvements in the analytic forms of the magnetic surfaces have also been found. The treatment has been performed using a recent published system of coordinates. Suitable analytic equations have been used for the elliptic magnetic surfaces with triangularity and Shafranov shift.

  10. Poloidal field amplification in a coaxial compact toroid accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, R. D.; Hwang, D. Q.; Howard, S.; Brockington, S. J.; Evans, R. W.

    2008-09-01

    The Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) produces spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) without external power switching, initiating a discharge by pulsed gas injection into a formation region containing a seed magnetic field generated by a solenoidal coil. After formation, the plasma is driven by an inductively delayed capacitor bank into an acceleration region, where surface axial and toroidal magnetic fields are measured at several axial positions. Due to strong eddy-current effects, formation-region magnetic field cannot be simply computed; instead, it is measured using the response of axial and radial test coils in the formation region to short solenoid test current pulses. A temporal and spatial reconstruction method is developed allowing formation-region field to be computed from the test-coil data for any CTIX discharge of identical solenoid geometry. By varying the peak value and timing of solenoidal current, curves of peak accelerator-region field as a function of initial formation-region field are developed. Curves of peak accelerator-region axial magnetic field are thereby found to be highly nonlinear functions of formation-region field, showing a threshold value for the formation-region field of approximately 5 G, above which acceleration-region field saturates at values between 2 and 12 kG. The direction of acceleration-region axial field reverses sign when the direction of solenoid current is reversed. Saturated accelerator-region axial field is a function of axial position and accelerator voltage, and is typically comparable to toroidal field at the same location. The ratio of accelerator-region to formation-region axial field commonly exceeds 1000 near the onset of saturation. This large amplification is of practical advantage for delayed plasma breakdown on CTIX, allowing a modest seed field to produce high poloidal fields, which are necessary for intense SCT acceleration. The results may also provide a useful benchmark for numerical

  11. POLOIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY FOR TOKAMAKS WITH CURRENT HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Puerta, Julio; Martin, Pablo; Castro, Enrique

    2009-07-26

    The appearance of hole currents in tokamaks seems to be very important in plasma confinement and on-set of instabilities, and this paper is devoted to study the topology changes of poloidal magnetic fields in tokamaks. In order to determine these fields different models for current profiles can be considered. It seems to us, that one of the best analytic descriptions is given by V. Yavorskij et al., which has been chosen for the calculations here performed. Suitable analytic equations for the family of magnetic field surfaces with triangularity and Shafranov shift are written down here. The topology of the magnetic field determines the amount of trapped particles in the generalized mirror type magnetic field configurations. Here it is found that the number of maximums and minimums of Bp depends mainly on triangularity, but the pattern is also depending of the existence or not of hole currents. Our calculations allow comparing the topology of configurations of similar parameters, but with and without whole currents. These differences are study for configurations with equal ellipticity but changing the triangularity parameters. Positive and negative triangularities are considered and compared between them.

  12. A method for estimating tokamak poloidal field coil currents which incorporates engineering constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.A.

    1990-05-01

    This thesis describes the development of a design tool for the poloidal field magnet system of a tokamak. Specifically, an existing program for determining the poloidal field coil currents has been modified to: support the general case of asymmetric equilibria and coil sets, determine the coil currents subject to constraints on the maximum values of those currents, and determine the coil currents subject to limits on the forces those coils may carry. The equations representing the current limits and coil force limits are derived and an algorithm based on Newton's method is developed to determine a set of coil currents which satisfies those limits. The resulting program allows the designer to quickly determine whether or not a given coil set is capable of supporting a given equilibrium. 25 refs.

  13. Lower-hybrid poloidal current drive for fluctuation reduction in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Uchimoto, E.; Cekic, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Litwin, C.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1994-06-01

    Current drive using the lower-hybrid slow wave is shown to be a promising candidate for improving confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP). Ray-tracing calculations indicate that the wave will make a few poloidal turns while spiraling radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The poloidal antenna wavelength of the lower hybrid wave can be chosen so that efficient parallel current drive will occur mostly in the poloidal direction in this outer region. Three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computation demonstrates that an additive poloidal current in this region will reduce the magnetic fluctuations and magnetic stochasticity.

  14. Ion orbit loss and the poloidal electric field in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.

    1994-07-29

    Monte Carlo simulation studies for ion orbit loss in limiter tokamaks show a poloidal asymmetry in ion loss arising from differences in ion orbit geometry. Since electron loss to the limiter is uniformly distributed because of its tiny orbit width, the nonuniform ion loss could cause a poloidal electric field that would tend to make the ion loss to the limiter more uniform. A simple analytical derivation of this poloidal electric field and a discussion of its effects ion movement and transport are also presented.

  15. Self-consistent poloidal electric field and neoclassical angular momentum flux

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.

    2009-12-15

    A complete expression is obtained for the poloidal variation of the electrostatic potential in the banana regime for large aspect ratio flux surfaces using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The result exhibits a finite discontinuity at the innermost point of a flux surface instead of a divergence as previously reported. Using this expression in combination with the solution of the linearized drift kinetic equation with a model collision operator, the part of the toroidal angular momentum flux due to the poloidal electric field is calculated. The result is larger than the one in existing works, which neglect the poloidal electric field, by the order of the square root of the aspect ratio.

  16. Poloidal asymmetry in perpendicular plasma rotation and radial electric field measured with correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, S.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Wassenhove, G. Van

    2008-09-15

    Measurements of plasma rotation and electric field are crucial for the study of plasma confinement and transport. The present paper is devoted to experimental observations of poloidal asymmetry in perpendicular plasma rotation with correlation reflectometry on TEXTOR.

  17. Fluctuation and transport reduction in a reversed field pinch by inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Sarff, J.S.; Hokin, S.A.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    An auxilliay poloidal inductive electric field applied to a reversed field pinch plasma reduces the current density gradient, slows the growth of m=1 tearing fluctations, suppresses their associated sawteeth, and doubles the energy confinement time. Small sawteeth occur in the improved state but with m=0 precursors. By requiring a change of toroidal flux embedding the plasma, inductive poloidal current profile drive is transient, but the improvement encourages the program of RFP transport suppression using current profile control.

  18. On the Sequential Control of ITER Poloidal Field Converters for Reactive Power Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongwen; Fu, Peng; Gao, Ge; Huang, Liansheng; Song, Zhiquan; He, Shiying; Wu, Yanan; Dong, Lin; Wang, Min; Fang, Tongzhen

    2014-12-01

    Sequential control applied to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) poloidal field converter system for the purpose of reactive power reduction is the subject of this investigation. Due to the inherent characteristics of thyristor-based phase-controlled converter, the poloidal field converter system consumes a huge amount of reactive power from the grid, which subsequently results in a voltage drop at the 66 kV busbar if no measure is taken. The installation of a static var compensator rated for 750 MVar at the 66 kV busbar is an essential way to compensate reactive power to the grid, which is the most effective measure to solve the problem. However, sequential control of the multi-series converters provides an additional method to improve the natural power factor and thus alleviate the pressure of reactive power demand of the converter system without any additional cost. In the present paper, by comparing with the symmetrical control technique, the advantage of sequential control in reactive power consumption is highlighted. Simulation results based on SIMULINK are found in agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  19. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, B. A.; Knowlton, S. F.; Hartwell, G. J. Hanson, J. D.; Maurer, D. A.

    2014-09-15

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  20. Poloidal electric field due to ICRH and its effect on neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, L. )

    1994-10-15

    We study the transport of a plasma in which a minority ion species is heated by fast Alfven waves. The strong anisotropy of the minority distribution function gives origin to a poloidal electric field. We calculate the poloidal dependence of the electric potential by numerically integrating the leading order minority distribution function. When the amplitude of this field is such that electrostatic trapping is not negligible in comparison to the magnetic trapping then neoclassical transport can be enhanced as found in previous work. The linearized kinetic equations are solved using a variational method in the banana regime. Approximate analytic expressions for the transport coefficients are given.

  1. Laboratory formation of a scaled protostellar jet by coaligned poloidal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; Ciardi, A; Nakatsutsumi, M; Vinci, T; Béard, J; Bonito, R; Billette, J; Borghesi, M; Burkley, Z; Chen, S N; Cowan, T E; Herrmannsdörfer, T; Higginson, D P; Kroll, F; Pikuz, S A; Naughton, K; Romagnani, L; Riconda, C; Revet, G; Riquier, R; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya; Soloviev, A; Huarte-Espinosa, M; Frank, A; Portugall, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2014-10-17

    Although bipolar jets are seen emerging from a wide variety of astrophysical systems, the issue of their formation and morphology beyond their launching is still under study. Our scaled laboratory experiments, representative of young stellar object outflows, reveal that stable and narrow collimation of the entire flow can result from the presence of a poloidal magnetic field whose strength is consistent with observations. The laboratory plasma becomes focused with an interior cavity. This gives rise to a standing conical shock from which the jet emerges. Following simulations of the process at the full astrophysical scale, we conclude that it can also explain recently discovered x-ray emission features observed in low-density regions at the base of protostellar jets, such as the well-studied jet HH 154. PMID:25324383

  2. Correction of the axial asymmetry of the poloidal magnetic field in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Patrov, M. I.; Varfolomeev, V. I.; Gusev, V. K.; Lamzin, E. A.; Sakharov, N. V.; Sychevskii, S. E.

    2010-06-15

    The toroidal inhomogeneity of the poloidal magnetic field-the so-called error fields that arise due to imperfections in manufacturing and assembling of the electromagnetic system-was measured in the Globus-M spherical tokamak. A substantial inhomogeneity corresponding to the n = 1 mode, which gave rise to a locked mode and led to discharge disruption, was revealed. After compensation of this inhomogeneity with the help of special correction coils, the discharge duration increased and the global plasma parameters improved substantially. A technique for determining and compensating the n = 1 mode inhomogeneity is described, the measured dependences of the penetration threshold of the m = 2/n = 1 mode on the plasma parameters are given, and results of experiments in which record parameters for the Globus-M tokamak were achieved after correction of the poloidal magnetic field are presented.

  3. Average photospheric poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components near solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Scherrer, P. H.; Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Average (over longitude and time) photospheric magnetic field components are derived from 3-min Stanford magnetograms made near the solar minimum of cycle 21. The average magnetograph signal is found to behave as the projection of a vector for measurements made across the disk. The poloidal field exhibits the familiar dipolar structure near the poles, with a measured signal in the line Fe I 5250 A of about 1 G. At low latitudes the poloidal field has the polarity of the poles, but is of reduced magnitude (about 0.1 G). A net photospheric toroidal field with a broad latitudinal extent is found. The polarity of the toroidal field is opposite in the northern and southern hemispheres and has the same sense as subsurface flux tubes giving rise to active regions of solar cycle 21. These observations are used to discuss large-scale electric currents crossing the photosphere and angular momentum loss to the solar wind.

  4. Poloidal field coil stress analysis for the ZTH machine

    SciTech Connect

    Girrens, S.P.; Bennett, J.G.; Murphy, D.M.

    1988-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analysis of representative equilibrium field and ohmic heating coils for the Los Alamos ZTH air core machine was performed to determine static stress levels developed within the coil structure caused by Lorentz-force loading. Because of the complex coil configuration in cross section (copper conductors embedded in an epoxy insulating matrix), the study was performed in three steps: a bulk orthotropic material property determination, a bulk material coil section analysis, and a detailed composite cross section of selected thickness analysis. Computational procedures used with coil stress and displacement results that were obtained are presented. Extensive work was performed to investigate the magnitude of the error in coil stress predictions arising from the use of the three-step analysis procedure. Analytical and numerical procedures used to perform the estimate of error study are also presented. 34 figs.

  5. Far-infrared polarimetry/interferometry for poloidal magnetic field measurement on ZT-40M

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    The measurement of internal magnetic field profiles may be a very important step in the understanding of magnetic confinement physics issues. The measurement of plasma-induced Faraday rotation is one of the more promising internal magnetic field diagnostics. This thesis describes the development of a heterodyne polarimeter/interferometer for internal poloidal magnetic field measurement on ZT-40M. Heterodyne techniques were employed because of the insensitivity to spurious signal amplitude changes that cause errors in other methods. Initial problems in polarimetric sensitivity were observed that were ultimately found to be related to discharge-induced motions of the constrained diagnostic access on ZT-40M. Grazing incidence motions of the constrained diagnostic access on ZT-40M. Grazing incidence reflections on metallic surfaces of the diagnostic ports caused polarization changes that affected the measurement accuracy. Installation of internally threaded sleeves to baffle the reflections eliminated the sensitivity problem, and allowed useful Faraday rotation measurements to be made. Simultaneous polarimetric and interferometric measurements have also been demonstrated. The ability to assemble a working heterodyne polarimeter/interferometer is no longer in question. The extension of the present system to multichord operation requires increased laser power and efficiency.

  6. Poloidal structure of the plasma edge with 3D magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Matteo; Scarin, Paolo; Carraro, Lorella; Spizzo, Gianluca; Spolaore, Monica; Vianello, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    In the RFX-mod reversed-field pinch, when the magnetic field spontaneously develops a non axi-symmetric structure, also the plasma edge assumes a three dimensional shape. In previous RFX works, it has been shown that kinetic properties of the plasma (electron pressure, connection lengths, floating potential, influx, plasma flow) closely follow the symmetry of the 3D field, both in amplitude and phase, along the toroidal angle (i.e, the RFP perpendicular direction in the edge). Using a set of poloidally distributed diagnostics, it is shown that these same properties follow the poloidal periodicity (m =1) of the field. However, the behavior of the phase is more difficult to understand. In particular, the 3D modulation of the plasma potential can rotate in the poloidal direction with the typical velocity of 100m/s, similar in value with the phase velocity of the m =1 magnetic mode; or it can jump between inboard and outboard equatorial midplane. Moreover, when the floating potential structure rotates, there are preliminary indications that its direction depends on the plasma density: it follows the m =1 mode at higher density, and rotates in the opposite direction at lower density.

  7. Effect of a poloidal electric field on neoclassical transport in a multispecies tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Indireshkumar, K.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The effects of a poloidal potential variation of or der c{var_epsilon}, heating or neutral beam injection, upon neoclassical particle transport and plasma current are studied theoretically, for a realistic tokamak plasma with significant impurity content. Using an approximate collision operator, an analytic procedure is employed to calculate the transport coefficients in the low collisionality regime for a large aspect ratio tokamak. In the presence of carbon impurity, the ion diffusion coefficients are generally found to increase by a factor of {approximately} 2. Inclusion of the effects of a poloidal electric field is found to result in an increase in the bootstrap current if the potential on the outside of the tokamak is greater than that on the inside (as during ICRH or NBI) and the density profiles are more peaked than roughly the square root of the temperature profiles.

  8. Effect of a poloidal electric field on neoclassical transport in a multispecies tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Indireshkumar, K.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    The effects of a poloidal potential variation of or der c[var epsilon], heating or neutral beam injection, upon neoclassical particle transport and plasma current are studied theoretically, for a realistic tokamak plasma with significant impurity content. Using an approximate collision operator, an analytic procedure is employed to calculate the transport coefficients in the low collisionality regime for a large aspect ratio tokamak. In the presence of carbon impurity, the ion diffusion coefficients are generally found to increase by a factor of [approximately] 2. Inclusion of the effects of a poloidal electric field is found to result in an increase in the bootstrap current if the potential on the outside of the tokamak is greater than that on the inside (as during ICRH or NBI) and the density profiles are more peaked than roughly the square root of the temperature profiles.

  9. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-03-08

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the n{tau} vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with {beta} = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size.

  10. Flux Consumption and Poloidal Magnetic Field Measurements in the MEDUSA TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstka, G. D.; Fonck, R. J.; Intrator, T.

    1996-11-01

    The Madison EDUcational Small-Aspect-ratio (MEDUSA) tokamak is a small (R=12 cm, a=8 cm) spherical tokamak designed to investigate features of ST plasmas on a laboratory scale. Recent experiments have been performed on MEDUSA to determine the consumption of ohmic flux during startup for several different operating scenarios. The primary diagnostic tool for these experiments was a low profile (0.3 cm diameter) internal magnetic probe array that provided poloidal field measurements crucial to the determination of the plasma internal inductance l_i. This probe consists of five fifteen-turn, 0.9 mm diameter coils. The coils are spaced at 1.5 cm intervals in the z direction at an installed major radius of 12 cm, and measure the radial component of the poloidal field (B_R). The flux consumption analysis was performed using the Poynting method, using the magnetic probe and the MEDUSA external magnetics to reconstruct the evolution of the MHD equilibria during startup. Results will be presented that identify the partition of poloidal flux into inductive and dissipative components. The magnetic probe array was also used to observe the redistribution of plasma current and the corresponding change in li caused by internal reconnection events. Results from these measurements will be presented.

  11. Gyrokinetic full f analysis of electric field dynamics and poloidal velocity in the FT2-tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Leerink, S.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Nora, M.; Ogando, F.

    2008-09-15

    The ELMFIRE gyrokinetic simulation code has been used to perform full f simulations of the FT-2 tokamak. The dynamics of the radial electric field and the creation of poloidal velocity in the presence of turbulence are presented.

  12. PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    In the assessment of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement for toroidal axisymmetric geometry, the Grad-Shafranov equation must be solved, either analytically or numerically. Existing numerical tools have been developed primarily for mainframe usage and can prove cumbersome for screening assessments and parametric evaluations. The objective of this thesis was to develop a personal computer (PC)-based calculational tool for assessing MHD/PFC problems in a highly interactive mode, well suited for scoping studies. The approach adopted involves a two-step process: first the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment. The PC-based system developed consists of two programs: (1) PCEQ, which solve the MHD equilibrium problem and (2) PFDE-SIGN, which is employed to arrive at a PFC arrangement. PCEQ provides an output file including, but not limited to, the following: poloidal beta, total beta, safety factors, q, on axis and on edge. PCEQ plots the following contours and/or profiles: flux, pressure and toroidal current density, safety factor, and ratio of plasma toroidal field to vacuum field.

  13. A poloidal field measurement technique: Pitch angle measurements via injected He/sup +/ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.C.

    1989-07-01

    The poloidal field of a tokamak can be determined by observing the light emitted by He/sup +/ ions injected into the plasma by a perpendicular He/sup 0/ beam. These ions will orbit in small circles located where the neutral atom became ionized, and they will remain there for a few microseconds. During this time, some of these ions will also emit light at various spectral lines. The observed spectrum of any of these lines will have a peculiar and very wide shape, and it will be offset (Doppler shifted) with respect to the natural line location. The location and width of the spectral pattern provide independent information about the components of the poloidal field which are parallel and perpendicular to the beam velocity, and this information is local to the point where the light is emitted. For a horizontal beam, these components are b/sub x/ and b/sub y/, respectively. The difference in Doppler shift between two measurement points above one another (at the top and bottom of the beam) is directly proportional to /delta/b/sub x/, which in turn is proportional to the transform on that flux surface. Thus, this technique provides a means to measure directly local values of q(r). Simulation studies indicate that accurate measurements can be made in milliseconds. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Microturbulence studies of pulsed poloidal current drive discharges in the reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, D.; Pueschel, M. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental discharges with pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch are investigated using a semi-analytic equilibrium model in the gyrokinetic turbulence code Gene. PPCD cases, with plasma currents of 500 kA and 200 kA, exhibit a density-gradient-driven trapped electron mode (TEM) and an ion temperature gradient mode, respectively. Relative to expectations of tokamak core plasmas, the critical gradients for the onset of these instabilities are found to be greater by roughly a factor of the aspect ratio. A significant upshift in the nonlinear TEM transport threshold, previously found for tokamaks, is confirmed in nonlinear reversed field pinch simulations and is roughly three times the threshold for linear instability. The simulated heat fluxes can be brought in agreement with measured diffusivities by introducing a small, resonant magnetic perturbation, thus modeling the residual fluctuations from tearing modes. These fluctuations significantly enhance transport.

  15. Divertor with a third-order null of the poloidal field

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2013-09-15

    A concept and preliminary feasibility analysis of a divertor with the third-order poloidal field null is presented. The third-order null is the point where not only the field itself but also its first and second spatial derivatives are zero. In this case, the separatrix near the null-point has eight branches, and the number of strike-points increases from 2 (as in the standard divertor) to six. It is shown that this magnetic configuration can be created by a proper adjustment of the currents in a set of three divertor coils. If the currents are somewhat different from the required values, the configuration becomes that of three closely spaced first-order nulls. Analytic approach, suitable for a quick orientation in the problem, is used. Potential advantages and disadvantages of this configuration are briefly discussed.

  16. Microturbulence studies of pulsed poloidal current drive discharges in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, D. Pueschel, M. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-01-15

    Experimental discharges with pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch are investigated using a semi-analytic equilibrium model in the gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE. PPCD cases, with plasma currents of 500 kA and 200 kA, exhibit a density-gradient-driven trapped electron mode (TEM) and an ion temperature gradient mode, respectively. Relative to expectations of tokamak core plasmas, the critical gradients for the onset of these instabilities are found to be greater by roughly a factor of the aspect ratio. A significant upshift in the nonlinear TEM transport threshold, previously found for tokamaks, is confirmed in nonlinear reversed field pinch simulations and is roughly three times the threshold for linear instability. The simulated heat fluxes can be brought in agreement with measured diffusivities by introducing a small, resonant magnetic perturbation, thus modeling the residual fluctuations from tearing modes. These fluctuations significantly enhance transport.

  17. A PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.; Steiner, D.

    1989-03-01

    A personal computer system was developed for use in the assessment of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement in toroidal axisymmetric geometry. This system involves two steps: first MHD equilibrium is calculated with the program PCEQ, then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment using the program PFDESIGN. The PCEQ/PFDESIGN system was used to examine equilibrium for the STARFIRE reactor concept, including the design of two different PFC arrangements. The MHD/PFC calculations agree to within a few percent of mainframe code results, demonstrating the utility and accuracy of PCEQ/PFDESIGN, proving it to be an ideal tool for scoping studies.

  18. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators.

  19. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, R.D.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators. 6 figs.

  20. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    A method and apparatus for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators.

  1. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  2. Neutron star deformation due to poloidal-toroidal magnetic fields of arbitrary multipole order: a new analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrano, A.; Suvorov, A. G.; Melatos, A.

    2015-03-01

    A recipe is presented to construct an analytic, self-consistent model of a non-barotropic neutron star with a poloidal-toroidal field of arbitrary multipole order, whose toroidal component is confined in a torus around the neutral curve inside the star, as in numerical simulations of twisted tori. The recipe takes advantage of magnetic field aligned coordinates to ensure continuity of the mass density at the surface of the torus. The density perturbation and ellipticity of such a star are calculated in general and for the special case of a mixed dipole-quadrupole field as a worked example. The calculation generalizes previous work restricted to dipolar, poloidal-toroidal and multipolar, poloidal-only configurations. The results are applied, as an example, to magnetars whose observations (e.g. spectral features and pulse modulation) indicate that the internal magnetic fields may be at least one order of magnitude stronger than the external fields, as inferred from their spin-downs, and are not purely dipolar.

  3. Heat flux due to poloidal electric field in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M. )

    1992-02-01

    The heat flux due to poloidally varying electrostatic potential is calculated in the banana regime. This electrostatic potential determined self-consistently from charge neutrality is shown to increase the electron heat flux by a factor {radical}{ital m}{sub {ital i}}/{ital m}{sub {ital e}} compared with that when this potential is neglected, where {ital m}{sub {ital e}} and {ital m}{sub {ital i}} are the masses of electron and ion, respectively.

  4. Models for poloidal divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.E.; Heifetz, D.; Petravic, M.

    1982-07-01

    Recent progress in models for poloidal divertors has both helped to explain current divertor experiments and contributed significantly to design efforts for future large tokamak (INTOR, etc.) divertor systems. These models range in sophistication from zero-dimensional treatments and dimensional analysis to two-dimensional models for plasma and neutral particle transport which include a wide variety of atomic and molecular processes as well as detailed treatments of the plasma-wall interaction. This paper presents a brief review of some of these models, describing the physics and approximations involved in each model. We discuss the wide variety of physics necessary for a comprehensive description of poloidal divertors. To illustrate the progress in models for poloidal divertors, we discuss some of our recent work as typical examples of the kinds of calculations being done.

  5. Modification of far-SOL flow by substantial gas injection in the inboard poloidal field null configuration on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, T.; Zushi, H.; Oyama, Y.; Mishra, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kuzmin, A.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Quest Team

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous plasma flow is generated in the inboard poloidal field null (IPN) configuration on QUEST spherical tokamak. Previous research has found that there is a significant relationship between plasma current and far-SOL flow. Consequently, the SOL flow is influenced by global modification of IPN plasma. For further understanding of the far-SOL flow, a hybrid probe measuring plasma flow, electron density ne, and temperature Te, was installed in the far-SOL. Using the hybrid probe and divertor probe array, two-point observation on an open flux surface was performed to study the SOL-divertor relationship and the particle transport. Substantial gas injection (GI) from private region of the IPN configuration leads to high core density but Ip-drop by 50 %. ne and Te in the far-SOL and divertor region are modified appreciably due to the GI. Poloidal flow reversal occurs and toroidal velocity drops by about 50 % in the far-SOL. We investigate modifications of pressure gradient, electric field and particle transport, and study complex structure of the far-SOL flow. This work is supported by Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research (S24226020, 15K17800) and the Collaborative Research Program of Research Institute for Applied Mechanics.

  6. Self organization of high βp plasma equilibrium with an inboard poloidal magnetic field null in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kishore; Zushi, H.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Onchi, T.; Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Hanada, H.; Togashi, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Ejiri, A.; Takase, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Kuzmin, A.; QUEST Team

    2015-08-01

    Successful production of high βp plasmas (ɛβp ⩾ 1) fully non-inductively (NI) and their long pulse sustainment with the help of modest power (<100 kW) of electron cyclotron waves is demonstrated. High βp plasmas are found for the first time to be naturally self organized to form a stable natural inboard poloidal field null (IPN) equilibrium. A critical βp value is identified, which defines the transition boundary from inboard limiter (IL) to IPN equilibrium. A new feature of plasma self organization is evidenced, which enhances its negative triangular shape to sustain high βp. These results show a relatively simple method to produce and sustain high βp plasma close to the equilibrium limit in a stable configuration exploiting its self organization property.

  7. On the toroidal current density flowing across a poloidal-magnetic-field null in an axisymmetric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2013-04-15

    The axisymmetry condition and two of Maxwell's equations are used to show that, in general, there are no nested magnetic surfaces around a poloidal-magnetic-field null for a sufficiently small value of the toroidal current density flowing there. Hence, the toroidal current density at the axis of a magnetic configuration with extreme shear reversal cannot continuously approach zero unless nested surfaces are first broken or particular values are assigned to boundary conditions and other plasma parameters. The threshold of the toroidal current-density at which the topology changes is shown to be set by such parameters, and some examples of the predicted topology transition are presented using analytical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation.

  8. Particle Confinement in Axisymmetric Poloidal Magnetic Field Configurations with Zeros of B: Methodological Note

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.; Skovoroda, A.A.

    2005-12-15

    Collisionless particle confinement in axisymmetric configurations with magnetic field nulls is analyzed. The existence of an invariant of motion--the generalized azimuthal momentum--makes it possible to determine in which of the spatial regions separated by magnetic separatrices passing through the magnetic null lines the particle occurs after it leaves the vicinity of a magnetic null line. In particular, it is possible to formulate a sufficient condition for the particle not to escape through the separatrix from the confinement region to the external region. In the configuration under analysis, the particles can be lost from a separatrix layer with a thickness on the order of the Larmor radius because of the nonconservation of the magnetic moment {mu}. In this case, the variations in {mu} are easier to describe in a coordinate system associated with the magnetic surfaces. An analysis is made of the applicability of expressions for the single-pass change {delta}{mu} in the magnetic moment that were obtained in different magnetic field models for a confinement system with a divertor (such that there is a circular null line)

  9. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.P. ); Steiner, D. . Dept. of Nuclear Science)

    1989-07-01

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code.

  10. Spitzer or neoclassical resistivity: A comparison between measured and model poloidal field profiles on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Levinton, F.M.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; LeBlanc, B.; McCune, D.C.; Paul, S. )

    1992-03-01

    Direct measurements of the radial profile of the magnetic field line pitch on PBX-M (Phys. Fluids B {bold 2}, 1271 (1990)), coupled with model predictions of these profiles allow a critical comparison with the Spitzer and neoclassical models of plasma parallel resistivity. The measurements of the magnetic field line pitch are made by motional Stark effect polarimetry, while the model profiles are determined by solving the poloidal field diffusion equation in the TRANSP transport code using measured plasma profiles and assuming either Spitzer or neoclassical resistivity. The measured field pitch profiles were available for only seven cases, and the model profiles were distinguishable from each other in only three of those cases due to finite resistive diffusion times. The data in two of these three were best matched by the Spitzer model, especially in the inner-half of the plasma. Portions of the measured pitch profiles for these two cases and the full profiles for other cases, however, departed significantly from both the Spitzer and neoclassical models, indicating a plasma resistivity profile different from either model.

  11. A method for determining poloidal rotation from poloidal asymmetry in toroidal rotation (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Lao, L. L.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.

    2014-11-15

    A new diagnostic has been developed on DIII-D that determines the impurity poloidal rotation from the poloidal asymmetry in the toroidal angular rotation velocity. This asymmetry is measured with recently added tangential charge exchange viewchords on the high-field side of the tokamak midplane. Measurements are made on co- and counter-current neutral beams, allowing the charge exchange cross section effect to be measured and eliminating the need for atomic physics calculations. The diagnostic implementation on DIII-D restricts the measurement range to the core (r/a < 0.6) where, relative to measurements made with the vertical charge exchange system, the spatial resolution is improved. Significant physics results have been obtained with this new diagnostic; for example, poloidal rotation measurements that significantly exceed neoclassical predictions.

  12. Dependence of neoclassical toroidal viscosity on the poloidal spectrum of applied nonaxisymmetric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Smith, S. P.; Burrell, K. H.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a single mode model that accurately predicts the coupling of applied nonaxisymmetric fields to the plasma response that induces neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque in DIII-D H-mode plasmas. The torque is measured and modeled to have a sinusoidal dependence on the relative phase of multiple nonaxisymmetric field sources, including a minimum in which large amounts of nonaxisymmetric drive is decoupled from the NTV torque. This corresponds to the coupling and decoupling of the applied field to a NTV-driving mode spectrum. Modeling using the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code confirms an effective single mode coupling between the applied field and the resultant torque, despite its inherent nonlinearity. The coupling to the NTV mode is shown to have a similar dependence on the relative phasing as that of the IPEC dominant mode, providing a physical basis for the efficacy of this linear metric in predicting error field correction optima in NTV dominated regimes.

  13. The importance of matched poloidal spectra to error field correction in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C. Lanctot, M. J.; Buttery, R. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Strait, E. J.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Solomon, W. M.; Shiraki, D.; Hanson, J. M.

    2014-07-15

    Optimal error field correction (EFC) is thought to be achieved when coupling to the least-stable “dominant” mode of the plasma is nulled at each toroidal mode number (n). The limit of this picture is tested in the DIII-D tokamak by applying superpositions of in- and ex-vessel coil set n = 1 fields calculated to be fully orthogonal to the n = 1 dominant mode. In co-rotating H-mode and low-density Ohmic scenarios, the plasma is found to be, respectively, 7× and 20× less sensitive to the orthogonal field as compared to the in-vessel coil set field. For the scenarios investigated, any geometry of EFC coil can thus recover a strong majority of the detrimental effect introduced by the n = 1 error field. Despite low sensitivity to the orthogonal field, its optimization in H-mode is shown to be consistent with minimizing the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque and not the higher-order n = 1 mode coupling.

  14. Dependence of neoclassical toroidal viscosity on the poloidal spectrum of applied nonaxisymmetric fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Logan, Nikolas C.; Park, Jong -Kyu; Paz-Soldan, Carloa; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Smith, Sterling P.; Burrell, K. H.

    2016-02-05

    This paper presents a single mode model that accurately predicts the coupling of applied nonaxisymmetric fields to the plasma response that induces neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque in DIII-D H-mode plasmas. The torque is measured and modeled to have a sinusoidal dependence on the relative phase of multiple nonaxisymmetric field sources, including a minimum in which large amounts of nonaxisymmetric drive is decoupled from the NTV torque. This corresponds to the coupling and decoupling of the applied field to a NTV-driving mode spectrum. Modeling using the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code confirms an effective single mode coupling between themore » applied field and the resultant torque, despite its inherent nonlinearity. Lastly, the coupling to the NTV mode is shown to have a similar dependence on the relative phasing as that of the IPEC dominant mode, providing a physical basis for the efficacy of this linear metric in predicting error field correction optima in NTV dominated regimes.« less

  15. Analysis of Thermal-Hydraulic Gravity/ Buoyancy Effects in the Testing of the ITER Poloidal Field Full Size Joint Sample (PF-FSJS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zanino, R.; Savoldi Richard, L.; Bruzzone, P.; Ciazynski, D.; Nicollet, S.

    2004-06-23

    The PF-FSJS is a full-size joint sample, based on the NbTi dual-channel cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design currently foreseen for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Poloidal Field coil system. It was tested during the summer of 2002 in the Sultan facility of CRPP at a background peak magnetic field of typically 6 T. It includes about 3 m of two jointed conductor sections, using different strands but with identical layout. The sample was cooled by supercritical helium at nominal 4.5-5.0 K and 0.9-1.0 MPa, in forced convection from the top to the bottom of the vertical configuration. A pulsed coil was used to test AC losses in the two legs resulting, above a certain input power threshold, in bundle helium backflow from the heated region. Here we study the thermal-hydraulics of the phenomenon with the M and M code, with particular emphasis on the effects of buoyancy on the helium dynamics, as well as on the thermal-hydraulic coupling between the wrapped bundles of strands in the annular cable region and the central cooling channel. Both issues are ITER relevant, as they affect the more general question of the heat removal capability of the helium in this type of conductors.

  16. Radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Han, Xiang; Wen, Fei; Zhang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; Wang, Yumin; Gao, Yu; Huang, Canbin; Cai, Jianqing; Gao, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    An X-mode polarized V band (50 GHz-75 GHz) radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry is designed and installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Two frequency synthesizers (12 GHz-19 GHz) are used as sources. Signals from the sources are up-converted to V band using active quadruplers and then coupled together for launching through one single pyramidal antenna. Two poloidally separated antennae are installed to receive the reflected waves from plasma. This reflectometry system can be used for radial and poloidal correlation measurement of the electron density fluctuation. In ohmically heated plasma, the radial correlation length is about 1.5 cm measured by the system. The poloidal correlation analysis provides a means to estimate the fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field. In the present paper, the distance between two poloidal probing points is calculated with ray-tracing code and the propagation time is deduced from cross-phase spectrum. Fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field in the core of ohmically heated plasma is about from -1 km/s to -3 km/s. PMID:26329188

  17. Radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Han, Xiang; Wen, Fei; Zhang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; Wang, Yumin; Gao, Yu; Huang, Canbin; Cai, Jianqing; Gao, Xiang

    2015-08-15

    An X-mode polarized V band (50 GHz–75 GHz) radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry is designed and installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Two frequency synthesizers (12 GHz–19 GHz) are used as sources. Signals from the sources are up-converted to V band using active quadruplers and then coupled together for launching through one single pyramidal antenna. Two poloidally separated antennae are installed to receive the reflected waves from plasma. This reflectometry system can be used for radial and poloidal correlation measurement of the electron density fluctuation. In ohmically heated plasma, the radial correlation length is about 1.5 cm measured by the system. The poloidal correlation analysis provides a means to estimate the fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field. In the present paper, the distance between two poloidal probing points is calculated with ray-tracing code and the propagation time is deduced from cross-phase spectrum. Fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field in the core of ohmically heated plasma is about from −1 km/s to −3 km/s.

  18. A new method of measuring the poloidal magnetic and radial electric fields in a tokamak using a laser-accelerated ion-beam trace probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, X Y; Chen, Y H; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    Both the poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) are significant in magnetic confinement devices. In this paper, a new method was proposed to diagnose both Bp and Er at the same time, which was named Laser-accelerated Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP). This method based on the laser-accelerated ion beam, which has three properties: large energy spread, short pulse lengths, and multiple charge states. LITP can provide the 1D profiles, or 2D images of both Bp and Er. In this paper, we present the basic principle and some preliminary theoretical results. PMID:25430336

  19. Analysis of long-term variations in the geomagnetic poloidal field intensity and evaluation of their relationship with global geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggin, A. J.; Thomas, D. N.

    2003-02-01

    The 1167 published cooling unit (CU) palaeointensity estimates contained in the 400-10 Ma portion of the PINT global database were rigorously filtered according to accurate age determinations, palaeodirectional reliability, recognition of polarity and the method of palaeointensity acquisition. The remaining 865 estimates (group 1) were further filtered to ensure self-consistency, reducing the data set to 425 estimates (group 2). Group 1 and 2 data were clustered into temporally and/or spatially distinct rock suites (RS) enabling each part of the record to be assessed for potential biasing by overrepresentation of palaeosecular variation (PSV). The record was segmented according to the distribution of the data, rather than using arbitrary time windows, to ensure quasi-consistent behaviour within each segment. Differences between these segments clearly indicate that a significant long-timescale (107 and 108 yr) variation of the mean geomagnetic poloidal field intensity (GPFI) occurred during the 400-10 Ma period and hence that changing lowermost mantle conditions affect the capacity of the geodynamo to generate a poloidal field. Both the mean dipole moment and its standard deviation appear to be a function of the range of values each CU may adopt at one particular time. This range is itself controlled by the variation of the maximum limit of dipole moment, while the value of the minimum limit remains relatively constant. Tentative support is provided for the recent suggestion that PSV may have been reduced during the Cretaceous normal superchron (CNS), though more data are needed in the range 120-60 Ma to confirm this. No conclusive evidence was found to support the suggestion that the GPFI record may be biased towards low or high values by palaeointensity determinations obtained using methods that do not adopt pTRM checks. Indeed, offsets caused by unreliable data in well-represented parts of the record are likely to be random and cancel one another out. When GPFI

  20. Stochasticity about a poloidal divertor separatrix

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Prager, S.C.; Park, W.

    1986-10-01

    The stochasticization of the magnetic separatrix due to the presence of a helical perturbation in a poloidal divertor tokamak is illustrated by a numerical computation which traces magnetic field lines.

  1. Stochasticity about a poloidal divertor separatrix

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Prager, S.C.; Park, W.

    1987-04-01

    The stochasticization of the magnetic separatrix caused by the presence of a helical perturbation in a poloidal divertor tokamak is illustrated by a numerical computation that traces magnetic field lines.

  2. Poloidal OHMIC heating in a multipole

    SciTech Connect

    Holly, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using poloidal currents to heat plasmas confined by a multipole field has been examined experimentaly in Tokapole II. The machine is operated as a toroidal octupole, with a time-varying toroidal magnetic field driving poloidal plasma currents I/sub plasma/ - 20 kA to give densities n/sub e/ - 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and temperatures T/sub e/ - 30 eV.

  3. Heat flux and plasma flow in the far scrape-off layer of the inboard poloidal field null configuration in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, T.; Zushi, H.; Mishra, K.; Mahira, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Watanabe, O.

    2015-08-01

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are examined for the inboard poloidal field null (IPN) configuration of the spherical tokamak QUEST. In the plasma current (Ip) ramp-up phase, high heat flux (>1 MW/m2) and supersonic flow (Mach number M > 1) are found to be present simultaneously in the far-SOL. The heat flux is generated by energetic electrons excursed from the last closed flux surface. Supersonic flows in the poloidal and toroidal directions are correlated with each other. In the quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of Ip at 20 Hz is observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in the far-SOL are modified corresponding to the Ip-oscillation. The heat flow caused by motion of energetic electrons and the bulk-particle transport to the far-SOL is enhanced during the low-Ip phase. Modification of plasma flow in the far SOL occurs earlier than the Ip crash. The M-Ip curve has a limit-cycle characteristic with sawtooth-like oscillation. Such a core-SOL relationship indicates that the far-SOL flow plays an important role in sustaining the oscillation of Ip in the IPN configuration.

  4. Heat flux and plasma flow in the far scrape-off layer of the inboard poloidal field null configuration in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Kuzmin, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Watanabe, O.; Mishra, K.; Mahira, Y.; Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Nagaoka, K.

    2015-08-15

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are examined for the inboard poloidal field null (IPN) configuration of the spherical tokamak QUEST. In the plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up phase, high heat flux (>1 MW/m{sup 2}) and supersonic flow (Mach number M > 1) are found to be present simultaneously in the far-SOL. The heat flux is generated by energetic electrons excursed from the last closed flux surface. Supersonic flows in the poloidal and toroidal directions are correlated with each other. In the quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of I{sub p} at 20 Hz is observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in the far-SOL are modified corresponding to the I{sub p}-oscillation. The heat flow caused by motion of energetic electrons and the bulk-particle transport to the far-SOL is enhanced during the low-I{sub p} phase. Modification of plasma flow in the far SOL occurs earlier than the I{sub p} crash. The M–I{sub p} curve has a limit-cycle characteristic with sawtooth-like oscillation. Such a core–SOL relationship indicates that the far-SOL flow plays an important role in sustaining the oscillation of I{sub p} in the IPN configuration.

  5. Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer on the spherical tokamak QUEST with inboard poloidal field null configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; Zushi, Hideki; Mishra, Kishore; Hanada, Kazuaki; Idei, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Fujisawa, Akihide; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Makoto; Kuzmin, Arseny; Nagaoka, Kenichi; QUEST Team

    2014-10-01

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer (SOL) are examined in the inboard poloidal null (IPN) configuration on the spherical tokamak (ST) QUEST. In the ST, trapped energetic electrons on the low field side are widely excursed from the last closed flux surface to SOL so that significant heat loss occurs. Interestingly, plasma flows in the core and the SOL are also observed in IPN though no inductive force like ohmic heating is applied. High heat flux (>1 MW/m2) and sonic flow (M > 1) in far-SOL arise in current ramp-up phase. In quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of plasma current with 20 Hz has been observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in far-SOL are well correlated to plasma current oscillation. The toroidal Mach number largely increases from Mφ ~ 0.1 to ~ 0.5 and drops although the amplitude of plasma current is about 10% of that. Note that such flow modification occurs before plasma current crash, there may be some possibility that phenomena in the SOL or the edge trigger reactions in the core plasma. This work is supported by Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research (S24226020), NIFS Collaboration Research Program (NIFS12KUTR081), and the Collaborative Research Program of Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University.

  6. On steady poloidal and toroidal flows in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McClements, K. G.

    2010-08-15

    The effects of poloidal and toroidal flows on tokamak plasma equilibria are examined in the magnetohydrodynamic limit. ''Transonic'' poloidal flows of the order of the sound speed multiplied by the ratio of poloidal magnetic field to total field B{sub {theta}/}B can cause the (normally elliptic) Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to become hyperbolic in part of the solution domain. It is pointed out that the range of poloidal flows for which the GS equation is hyperbolic increases with plasma beta and B{sub {theta}/}B, thereby complicating the problem of determining spherical tokamak plasma equilibria with transonic poloidal flows. It is demonstrated that the calculation of the hyperbolicity criterion can be easily modified when the assumption of isentropic flux surfaces is replaced with the more tokamak-relevant one of isothermal flux surfaces. On the basis of the latter assumption, a simple expression is obtained for the variation of density on a flux surface when poloidal and toroidal flows are simultaneously present. Combined with Thomson scattering measurements of density and temperature, this expression could be used to infer information on poloidal and toroidal flows on the high field side of a tokamak plasma, where direct measurements of flows are not generally possible. It is demonstrated that there are four possible solutions of the Bernoulli relation for the plasma density when the flux surfaces are assumed to be isothermal, corresponding to four distinct poloidal flow regimes. Finally, observations and first principles-based theoretical modeling of poloidal flows in tokamak plasmas are briefly reviewed and it is concluded that there is no clear evidence for the occurrence of supersonic poloidal flows.

  7. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    DOEpatents

    Furth, Harold P.; Janos, Alan C.; Uyama, Tadao; Yamada, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  8. Global electromagnetic induction in the moon and planets. [poloidal eddy current transient response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments and analyses concerning electromagnetic induction in the moon and other extraterrestrial bodies are summarized. The theory of classical electromagnetic induction in a sphere is first considered, and this treatment is extended to the case of the moon, where poloidal eddy-current response has been found experimentally to dominate other induction modes. Analysis of lunar poloidal induction yields lunar internal electrical conductivity and temperature profiles. Two poloidal-induction analytical techniques are discussed: a transient-response method applied to time-series magnetometer data, and a harmonic-analysis method applied to data numerically Fourier-transformed to the frequency domain, with emphasis on the former technique. Attention is given to complicating effects of the solar wind interaction with both induced poloidal fields and remanent steady fields. The static magnetization field induction mode is described, from which are calculated bulk magnetic permeability profiles. Magnetic field measurements obtained from the moon and from fly-bys of Venus and Mars are studied to determine the feasibility of extending theoretical and experimental induction techniques to other bodies in the solar system.

  9. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  10. Poloidal Asymmetries in Edge Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Investigations of the poloidal structure within edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod using novel impurity measurements are presented, revealing large poloidal variations of parameters within a flux surface in the H-mode pedestal region, and significantly reduced poloidal variation in L-mode or I-mode pedestals. These measurements provide complete sets of impurity density, temperature, flow velocity, and electrostatic potential at both the low- and high-field side midplane, utilizing the Gas Puff-CXRS technique. Uncertainties in magnetic equilibrium reconstructions require assumptions to be made in order to properly align the LFS/HFS profiles. In H-mode plasmas, if profiles are aligned assuming impurity temperature is constant on a flux surface, large potential asymmetries would result (eΔΦ /Te ~ 0 . 6). If instead total pressure is assumed constant on a flux-surface, then the measured potential asymmetry is significantly reduced, but large in-out asymmetries result in the impurity temperature (>1.7x). This shows that impurity temperature and potential can not both be flux functions in the pedestal region. In both alignment cases, large asymmetries in impurity density (>6x) are present in H-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, which lack an electron density pedestal but do have a temperature pedestal, the poloidal variation of impurity temperature is weaker (~1.3x) and the impurity density nearly symmetric between the LFS and HFS. These measurements indicate that the sharp gradients in the pedestal region, particularly of main ion density, have a significant effect on the poloidal and radial distribution of impurities, which could have important implications for the prediction of impurity contamination in future fusion reactors such as ITER. Estimates of particle and heat transport timescales suggest that the radial and parallel transport timescales are of the same order in the pedestal region of C-Mod, supporting the idea that two-dimensional transport effects

  11. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  12. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  13. Method of sustaining a radial electric field and poloidal plasma rotation over most of the cross-section of a tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Douglass S.; Ono, Masayuki

    1990-03-06

    A radial electric field of a desired magnitude and configuration is created throughout a substantial portion of the cross-section of the plasma of a tokamak. The radial electric field is created by injection of a unidirectional electron beam. The magnitude and configuration of the radial electric field may be controlled by the strength of the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak.

  14. Method of sustaining a radial electric field and poloidal plasma rotation over most of the cross-section of a tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Douglass S.; Ono, Masayuki

    1990-01-01

    A radial electric field of a desired magnitude and configuration is created hroughout a substantial portion of the cross-section of the plasma of a tokamak. The radial electric field is created by injection of a unidirectional electron beam. The magnitude and configuration of the radial electric field may be controlled by the strength of the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak.

  15. Comparison of poloidal velocity measurements to neoclassical theory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R. E.; Andre, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kolesnikov, R. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Rewoldt, G.; Wang, W. X.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2010-08-15

    Knowledge of poloidal velocity is necessary for the determination of the radial electric field, which along with its gradient is linked to turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation. Recent measurements of poloidal flow on conventional tokamaks have been reported to be an order of magnitude larger than expected from neoclassical theory. In contrast, poloidal velocity measurements on the NSTX spherical torus [Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] are near or below neoclassical estimates. A novel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic is used, which features active and passive sets of up/down symmetric views to produce line-integrated poloidal velocity measurements that do not need atomic physics corrections. Inversions are used to extract local profiles from line-integrated active and background measurements. Poloidal velocity measurements are compared with neoclassical values computed with the codes NCLASS[Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] and GTC-NEO[Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 082501 (2006)].

  16. Poloidal rotation near the edge of a tokamak plasma in [ital H] mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F.L.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Brizard, A.; Burrell, K.H. )

    1994-02-21

    Ion poloidal flow in tokamaks near the plasma edge has been calculated by extending neoclassical theory to include orbit squeezing, which is the reduction of the ion banana widths due to the gradient in the radial electric field. The calculated poloidal flow velocity is a significant fraction of the ion diamagnetic velocity, which can be much larger than the velocity predicted by neoclassical theory (proportional to the ion temperature gradient). The agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the poloidal rotation velocity in helium plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak is shown to be reasonably good very close to the plasma edge.

  17. Impact of plasma poloidal rotation on resistive wall mode instability in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, N.; Shiraishi, J.; Tokuda, S.

    2011-02-15

    Stability of resistive wall mode (RWM) is investigated in a cylindrical plasma and an axisymmetric toroidal plasma by taking into account not only toroidal rotation but also poloidal rotation. Since the Doppler shifted frequency is responsible for the RWM stability, the modification of this Doppler shifted frequency by poloidal rotation affects the rotation effect on RWM. When a poloidal rotation frequency is not so large, the effect of poloidal rotation on the RWM stability can be approximately treated with the modified toroidal rotation frequency. In a toroidal plasma, this modified frequency is determined by subtracting a toroidal component of the rotation parallel to the magnetic field from the toroidal rotation frequency. The poloidal rotation that counteracts the effect of the Doppler shift strongly reduces the stabilizing effect of toroidal rotation, but by changing the rotational direction, the poloidal rotation enhances this stabilizing effect. This trend is confirmed in not only a cylindrical plasma but also a toroidal plasma. This result indicates that poloidal rotation produces the dependence of the critical toroidal rotation frequency for stabilizing RWM on the rotational direction of toroidal rotation in the same magnetic configuration.

  18. Nonambipolarity, orthogonal conductivity, poloidal flow, and torque

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, G.W.; Perkins, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    Nonambipolar processes, such as neutral injection onto trapped orbits or ripple-diffusion loss of ..cap alpha..-particles, act to charge a plasma. A current j/sub r/ across magnetic surfaces must arise in the bulk plasma to maintain charge neutrality. An axisymmetric, neoclassical model of the bulk plasma shows that these currents are carried by the ions and exert a j/sub r/B/sub theta/R/c torque in the toroidal direction. A driven poloidal flow V/sub theta/ = E/sub r/'c/B must also develop. The average current density is related to the radial electric field E/sub r/' = E/sub r/ + v/sub /phi//B/sub theta//c in a frame moving with the plasma via the orthogonal conductivity = sigma/sub /perpendicular//E/sub r/', which has the value sigma/sub /perpendicular// = (1.65epsilon/sup 1/2/)(ne/sup 2/..nu../sub ii//M..cap omega../sub theta//sup 2/) in the banana regime. If an ignited plasma loses an appreciable fraction ..delta.. of its thermonuclear ..cap alpha..-particles by banana ripple diffusion, then the torque will spin the plasma to sonic rotation in a time /tau//sub s/ approx. 2/tau//sub E//..delta.., /tau//sub E/ being the energy confinement time. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Modular tokamak magnetic system

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Tien-Fang

    1988-01-01

    A modular tokamak system comprised of a plurality of interlocking moldules. Each module is comprised of a vacuum vessel section, a toroidal field coil, moldular saddle coils which generate a poloidal magnetic field and ohmic heating coils.

  20. Simultaneous poloidal measurements using new magnetically driven reciprocating probes in COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejarnac, R.; Gunn, J. P.; Dimitrova, M.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Saragosti-Chausy, C.; Tamain, P.; the COMPASS team

    2016-03-01

    Particles and heat transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of tokamaks is not yet fully understood. COMPASS is a small-size tokamakp where the edge plasma is well diagnosed in view of studying the competition between the parallel and the cross-field transport in the SOL. In order to better characterize SOL dynamics, in particular the poloidal asymmetry of the main parameters' radial profiles, two new in-situ magnetically driven reciprocating manipulators have been recently installed in COMPASS. These manipulators, the so-called pecker probes, are two additional poloidal measurement points to the existing two (vertical and horizontal) reciprocating manipulators. The pecker probes are located at the low field side of COMPASS at ±47.5o with respect to the outer mid-plane and are equipped with identical tunnel probe heads, providing simultaneous measurements of the ion saturation current density Jsat, the electron temperature Te and the parallel Mach number M// with high temporal resolution. In this paper, a detailed description of the pecker probe system in COMPASS is described and first measurements are presented.

  1. Poloidal variation of viscous forces in the banana collisionality regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.P.; Callen, J.D.

    1992-12-01

    The poloidal variation of the parallel viscous and heat viscous forces are determined for the first time using a rigorous Chapman- Enskog-like approach that has been developed recently. It is shown that the poloidal variation is approximately proportional to the poloidal distribution of the trapped particles, which are concentrated on the outer edge (large major radius side) of the tokamak.

  2. Poloidal variation of viscous forces in the banana collisionality regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.P.; Callen, J.D. )

    1993-09-01

    The poloidal variation of the parallel viscous and heat viscous forces are determined for the first time using a rigorous Chapman--Enskog-like approach that has been developed recently. It is shown that the poloidal variation is, like the poloidal distribution of the trapped particles, concentrated on the outer edge (large major radius side) of the tokamak.

  3. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  4. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov`s results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov`s result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  5. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov's results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov's result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  6. Test data from the US-Demonstration Poloidal Coil experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, T.A.; Steeves, M.M.; Takayasu, M.; Gung, C.; Hoenig, M.O. . Plasma Fusion Center); Tsuji, H.; Ando, T.; Hiyama, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Nishi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Okuno, K.; Nakajima, H.; Kato, T.; Sugimoto, M.; Isono, T.; Kawano, K.; Koizumi, N.; Osikiri, M.; Hanawa, H.; Ouchi, H.; Ono, M.; Ishida, H.; Hiue, H.; Yoshida, J.; Kamiyauchi, Y.; Ouchi, T.; Tajiri, F.

    1992-01-01

    The US Demonstration Poloidal Field Coil (US-DPC) experiment took place successfully at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in late 1990. The 8 MJ niobium-tin coil was leak tight; it performed very well in DC tests; it performed well in AC tests, achieving approximately 70% of its design goal. An unexpected ramp-rate barrier at high currents was identified. The barrier could not be explored in the regime of higher fields and slower ramp rates due to limitations of the background-field coils. This document presents the results of the experiment with as little editing as possible. The coil, conductor, and operating conditions are given. The intent is to present data in a form that can be used by magnet analysts and designers.

  7. Comparison of Poloidal Velocity Meassurements to Neoclassical Theory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R E; Kaye, S M; Kolesnikov, R A; LeBlance, B P; Rewolldt, G; Wang, W X

    2010-04-07

    Knowledge of poloidal velocity is necessary for the determination of the radial electric field, Er, which along with its gradient is linked to turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation. Recent measurements of poloidal flow on conventional tokamaks have been reported to be an order of magnitude larger than expected from neoclassical theory. In contrast, recent poloidal velocity measurements on the NSTX spherical torus [S. M. Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] are near or below neoclassical estimates. A novel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic is used, which features active and passive sets of up/down symmetric views to produce line-integrated poloidal velocity measurements that do not need atomic physics corrections. Local profiles are obtained with an inversion. Poloidal velocity measurements are compared with neoclassical values computed with the codes NCLASS [W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] and GTC-Neo [W. X. Wang, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 082501 (2006)], which has been updated to handle impurities. __________________________________________________

  8. Transition of poloidal viscosity by electrode biasing in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, S.; Takahashi, H.; Ishii, K.; Sato, Y.; Kanno, M.; Tachibana, J.; Okamoto, A.; Sasao, M.; Inagaki, S.; Takayama, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Shoji, M.; Ashikawa, N.; Tokitani, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Satake, S.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Suzuki, C.; Nagayama, Y.; Tokuzawa, T.; Nishimura, K.; Morisaki, T.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2013-07-01

    Electrode biasing experiments were carried out in various magnetic configurations on the Large Helical Device (LHD). The transitions of poloidal viscosity, which were accompanied with bifurcation phenomena characterized by a negative resistance in an electrode characteristic, were clearly observed on LHD by the electrode biasing. The critical external driving force required for transition was compared with the local maximum in ion viscosity, and the radial resistivity before the transition also compared with the expected value from a neoclassical theory. The critical driving force increased and the radial resistivity decreased with the major radius of the magnetic axis Rax going outwards. The configuration dependence of the transition condition and the radial resistivity qualitatively agreed with neoclassical theories. The radial electric field and the viscosity were also evaluated by the neoclassical transport code for a non-axisymmetric system, and estimated electrode voltage required for the transition, which was consistent with the experimental results.

  9. Bright field illumination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Edward D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A Bright Field Illumination system for inspecting a range of characteristically different kinds of defects, depressions, and ridges in a selected material surface. The system has an illumination source placed near a first focus of an elliptical reflector. In addition, a camera facing the inspected area is placed near the illumination source and the first focus. The second focus of the elliptical reflector is located at a distance approximately twice the elliptical reflector's distance above the inspected surface. The elliptical reflector directs the light from the source onto the inspected surface. Due to the shape of the elliptical reflector, light that is specularly reflected from the inspected surface is directed into the camera is which located at the position of the reflected second focus of the ellipse. This system creates a brightly lighted background field against which damage sites appear as high contrast dark objects which can be easily detected by a person or an automated inspection system. In addition, the Bright Field Illumination system and method can be used in combination with a vision inspection system providing for multiplexed illumination and data handling of multiple kinds of surface characteristics including abrupt and gradual surface variations and differences between measured characteristics of different kinds and prior instruments.

  10. A poloidal section neutron camera for MAST upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sangaroon, S.; Weiszflog, M.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Wodniak, I.; Keeling, D.; Turnyanskiy, M. [EURATOM Collaboration: MAST Team

    2014-08-21

    The Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak Upgrade (MAST Upgrade) is intended as a demonstration of the physics viability of the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept and as a platform for contributing to ITER/DEMO physics. Concerning physics exploitation, MAST Upgrade plasma scenarios can contribute to the ITER Tokamak physics particularly in the field of fast particle behavior and current drive studies. At present, MAST is equipped with a prototype neutron camera (NC). On the basis of the experience and results from previous experimental campaigns using the NC, the conceptual design of a neutron camera upgrade (NC Upgrade) is being developed. As part of the MAST Upgrade, the NC Upgrade is considered a high priority diagnostic since it would allow studies in the field of fast ions and current drive with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this paper, we explore an optional design with the camera array viewing the poloidal section of the plasma from different directions.

  11. Oil field management system

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  12. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  13. Performance of the INTOR poloidal divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.E.; Petravic, M.; Schmidt, J.A.; Heifetz, D.

    1981-10-01

    The next generation of large tokamak experiments is expected to have large particle and heat outfluxes (approx. 10/sup 23/ particles/sec and 80 MW). These outfluxes must be controlled to provide adequate pumping of the helium ash and to minimize the sputtering erosion of the vacuum vessel walls, limiters, and neutralizer plates. A poloidal divertor design to solve these problems for INTOR has been done using a two-dimensional code which models the plasma as a fluid and solves equations for the flow of particles, momentum and energy, and calculates the neutral gas transport with Monte-Carlo techniques. These calculations show that there is a regime of operation where the density in the divertor is high and the temperature is low, thus easing the heat load and erosion problems. The neutral pressure at the plate is high, resulting in high gas throughputs, with modest pumping speeds.

  14. Observations of magnetospheric high-m poloidal waves by ST-5 satellites in low Earth orbit during geomagnetically quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, P. J.; Le, G.

    2015-06-01

    The poloidal waves with large azimuthal wave numbers (m) in the magnetosphere are known to be generated by drift or drift-bounce resonance with energetic ring current particles, and these waves may play a role in modulating the energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere. When examining the magnetic field data collected by the NASA Space Technology 5 (ST-5) satellites in the low Earth orbit, Le et al. (2011) discovered many wave events with frequencies of 30-200 mHz (in the Pc2 and Pc3 bands), and they proposed that these waves should, in fact, be Doppler-shifted high-m poloidal waves in the magnetosphere with frequencies at only a few millihertz (in the Pc5 band). Using a new method that examines the differences in wave phase detected by the three ST-5 satellites, we confirm that the frequencies in the Earth frame for the poloidal waves observed are mainly between 3 and 5 mHz. Not only were poloidal waves observed frequently by ST-5 in the dayside magnetosphere but they were also occasionally seen in the nightside when the satellites passed through the same L shells. In each wave event, the azimuthal wave number may change with L, but the wave frequency in the Earth frame remains the same. We also find that poloidal waves can last more than 9 h during geomagnetically quiet conditions, suggesting that even a very weak ring current can supply enough energetic particles to excite poloidal waves.

  15. Physical Processes of Poloidal Flux Injection in CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2011-05-01

    The erupting flux rope (EFR) model of CMEs has been extensively tested against CME dynamics observed by SOHO and STEREO, demonstrating good agreement between model results and data: the best-fit solutions can reproduce observed CME trajectories from the Sun to 1 AU to within 1-2% of the data, and such solutions yield the poloidal flux injection function whose temporal profiles closely match those of the associated soft X-ray flare emissions. This provides evidence that the flux injection function captures the underlying physical connection between CME acceleration and flare energy release [1]. This mathematical function admits two distinct physical interpretations. In this talk, the physical processes that can contribute to poloidal flux injection are discussed, one involving flux of subphotospheric source and the other of coronal source. Recently, Schuck [2] and earlier, Forbes [3] argued that there is insufficient Poynting flux observable through the photosphere to support the subphotospheric flux injection hypothesis. These calculations, however, impose ad hoc large-scale coherent horizontal fields in the photosphere and do not have any subphotospheric source of flux or any equations of motion describing an ``injection'' process from a source through a medium. That is, these arguments contain no flux injection mechanism that they purport to ``falsify'' and no physical properties of the convection zone. Physically relevant signatures of subphotospheric flux injection are discussed. [1] Chen, J., and Kunkel, V. 2010, ApJ, 717, 1105. [2] Schuck, P. W. 2010, 714, 68. [3] Forbes, T. G. 2001, Eos Trans. AGU, 82(20), SH41C-03.

  16. High poloidal beta equilibria in TFTR limited by a natural inboard poloidal field null

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Gross, R.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chance, M.S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Hatcher, R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hirshman, S.P.; Janos, A.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Manickam, J.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Ow

    1991-07-01

    Recent operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor TFTR, has produced plasma equilibria with values of {Lambda} {triple bond} {beta}{sub p eq} + l{sub i}/2 as large as 7, {epsilon}{beta}{sub p dia} {triple bond} 2{mu}{sub 0}{epsilon}/{much lt}B{sub p}{much gt}{sup 2} as large as 1.6, and Troyon normalized diamagnetic beta, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple bond} 10{sup 8}<{beta}{sub t}{perpendicular}>aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} as large as 4.7. When {epsilon}{beta}{sub p dia} {approx gt} 1.25, a separatrix entered the vacuum chamber, producing a naturally diverted discharge which was sustained for many energy confinement times, {tau}{sub E}. The largest values of {epsilon}{beta}{sub p} and plasma stored energy were obtained when the plasma current was ramped down prior to neutral beam injection. The measured peak ion and electron temperatures were as large as 24 keV and 8.5 keV, respectively. Plasma stored energy in excess of 2.5 MJ and {tau}{sub E} greater than 130 msec were obtained. Confinement times of greater than 3 times that expected from L-mode predictions have been achieved. The fusion power gain. Q{sub DD}, reached a values of 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} in a discharge with I{sub p} = 1 MA and {epsilon}{beta}{sub p dia} = 0.85. A large, sustained negative loop voltage during the steady state portion of the discharge indicates that a substantial non-inductive component of I{sub p} exists in these plasmas. Transport code analysis indicates that the bootstrap current constitutes up to 65% of I{sup p}. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability analysis shows that while these plasmas are near, or at the {beta}{sub p} limit, the pressure gradient in the plasma core is in the first region of stability to high-n modes. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Innovations in Quasi-Poloidal Stellarator Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. E.; Lyon, J. F.; Freudenberg, K. D.; Fogarty, P. J.; Benson, R. D.; Madhukar, M.

    2006-10-01

    The Quasi-Poloidal Stellarator (QPS) is being developed with very low plasma aspect ratio, 1/2-1/4 that of existing stellarators. Design innovation is driven by both the complex 3-D geometry and the need for reduced cost and risk in fabrication, so QPS differs significantly in design and construction from other toroidal devices. An internally cooled, compacted cable conductor consisting of stranded copper filaments wound around an internal copper cooling tube was developed that can be wound into complex 3-D shapes. This conductor is wound directly onto the complex, highly accurate, stainless steel coil winding forms. Simplified coil winding procedures lead to faster fabrication and reduced technical risk. A full-size prototype of the largest and most complex of the winding forms has been cast using a patternless process (machined sand molds) and a high-temperature pour, which resulted in <1/10 the major weld repairs of similar sand castings using conventional patterns, and machined to high precision. A vacuum-tight cover is welded over each coil pack and a high-temperature cyanate ester resin is used for vacuum pressure impregnation of the coils because it has several important advantages over the usual epoxy. The completed coils are then installed in an external vacuum vessel.

  18. An electromagnetic theory of turbulence driven poloidal rotation

    SciTech Connect

    McDevitt, C. J.; Guercan, Oe. D.

    2012-10-15

    An electromagnetic theory of turbulence driven poloidal rotation is developed with particular emphasis on understanding poloidal rotation in finite-{beta} plasmas. A relation linking the flux of polarization charge to the divergence of the total turbulent stress is derived for electromagnetic gyrokinetic modes. This relation is subsequently utilized to derive a constraint on the net electromagnetic turbulent stress exerted on the poloidal flow. Various limiting cases of this constraint are considered, where it is found that electromagnetic contributions to the turbulent stress may either enhance or reduce the net turbulent stress depending upon the branch of turbulence excited.

  19. Low beta equilibrium and stability for anisotropic pressure closed field line plasma confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V.P.; Ilgisonis, V.I.; Subbotin, A.A.

    1994-05-01

    General formalism is developed to analyze the equilibrium and stability of low beta anisotropic pressure plasmas confined in closed field line magnetic systems. The formalism allows one to consider rather general magnetic systems with nonuniform axis curvature and longitudinal profiles of toroidal and multipole poloidal field. It also allows having a strong pressure anisotropy corresponding to enhanced plasma pressure in mirror cells of the system. As an example of such a system the authors consider the recently proposed linked mirror neutron source (LMNS). Application of the above formalism to the LMNS analysis confirms most of the preliminary results, however, they obtain a considerable reduction of mirror cell axis curvature and an appreciable ellipticity of plasma cross-section in the mirror cell midplane. They have also optimized the longitudinal pressure and magnetic field distribution.

  20. Convective particle transport arising from poloidal inhomogeneity in tokamak H mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.

    2005-09-15

    In tokamak high-confinement modes (H modes), a large poloidal flow exists within an edge transport barrier, and the electrostatic potential and density profiles can be steep both in the radial and poloidal directions. The two-dimensional structures of the electrostatic potential, density, and flow velocity near the edge of a tokamak plasma are investigated. The analysis is carried out with the momentum conservation law using the shock ordering. For the case with a strong radial electric field (H-mode case), a particle flux is induced from asymmetry of the poloidal electric field in the transport barrier. This convective transport is found to depend weakly on collisionality, and changes its direction in accordance with the direction of the radial electric field, the toroidal magnetic field, and the plasma current. The divergence of a particle flux is a source of temporal variation of the density, and there are negative divergence regions both in the inward and outward flux cases. Thus this convective particle flux is a new candidate for the cause of the rapid establishment of the density pedestal after the onset of low to high confinement mode (L/H) transition.

  1. Phase Relationships of Solar Hemispheric Toroidal and Poloidal Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraközy, J.

    2016-08-01

    The solar northern and southern hemispheres exhibit differences in their intensities and time profiles of the activity cycles. The time variation of these properties was studied in a previous article covering the data from Cycles 12–23. The hemispheric phase lags exhibited a characteristic variation: the leading role was exchanged between hemispheres every four cycles. The present work extends the investigation of this variation using the data of Staudacher and Schwabe in Cycles 1–4 and 7–10 as well as Spörer’s data in Cycle 11. The previously observed variation cannot be clearly recognized using the data of Staudacher, Schwabe, and Spörer. However, it is more interesting that the phase lags of the reversals of the magnetic fields at the poles follow the same variations as those of the hemispheric cycles in Cycles 12–23, i.e., one of the hemispheres leads in four cyles and the leading role jumps to the opposite hemisphere in the next four cycles. This means that this variation is a long-term property of the entire solar dynamo mechanism, for both the toroidal and poloidal fields, which hints at an unidentified component of the process responsible for the long-term memory.

  2. The structure and poloidal dynamics of blob filaments in TJ-K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, S.; Fuchert, G.; Ramisch, M.; Hirth, T.

    2016-04-01

    Relatively dense, field-aligned, filament-like structures (blobs) have been observed to propagate radially and poloidally through the scrape-off layer (SOL) in magnetically confined fusion plasmas, and contribute significantly to SOL transport. A detailed understanding of blob structure and dynamics, and their dependence on magnetic field geometry, is important in magnetic confinement physics for the prediction of heat loads on reactor wall facing components, as well as for understanding plasma confinement and neutral particle recycling. Experimentally deduced centre of mass poloidal blob velocity components, obtained using the conditional averaging technique, have been compared to an analytical blob model which has been simplified to express blob velocity in terms of the magnetic field curvature vector. Background flows are not incorporated into the analytical model, and must be added in to obtain good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the 3D structure of blobs in TJ-K has been investigated using the conditional average of density fluctuations in two toroidally separated poloidal planes. Blobs are observed to be aligned to a flux tube near to the last closed flux surface, in the blob birth region. However at positions further along the blob trajectory, the structures do not deform according to the magnetic shear, rather they remain rigid, and retain their original form.

  3. The impact of poloidal asymmetries on tungsten transport in the core of JET H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angioni, C.; Pütterich, T.; Bilato, R.; Casson, F. J.; Giroud, C.; Mantica, P.; Helander, P.

    2015-05-15

    Recent progress in the understanding and prediction of the tungsten behaviour in the core of JET H-mode plasmas with ITER-like wall is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of poloidal asymmetries of the impurity density. In particular, it is shown that the predicted reduction of temperature screening induced by the presence of low field side localization of the tungsten density produced by the centrifugal force is consistent with the observed tungsten behaviour in a JET discharge in H-mode baseline scenario. This provides first evidence of the role of poloidal asymmetries in reducing the strength of temperature screening. The main differences between plasma parameters in JET baseline and hybrid scenario discharges which affect the impact of poloidally asymmetric density on the tungsten radial transport are identified. This allows the conditions by which tungsten accumulation can be avoided to be more precisely defined.

  4. Experimental identification of the kink instability as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S C; Bellan, P M

    2003-05-30

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma. Onset of column kinking agrees quantitatively with the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and the kink acts as a dynamo which converts toroidal to poloidal flux. Regime II clearly leads to both poloidal flux amplification and the development of a spheromak configuration. PMID:12786562

  5. Characteristics of High Poloidal Beta (βp) Plasma Formed by Electron Cyclotron Waves in Spherical Tokamak QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kishore; Idei, Hiroshi; Zushi, Hideki; Tashima, Saya; Banerjee, Santanu; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hanada, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Fujisawa, Akihide; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Kawasaki, S.; Higashijima, A.; Nakashima, H.

    In spherical tokamak QUEST, plasma with high poloidal beta (βp) is obtained by injecting Electron Cyclotron Waves (ECW) into the Ohmic target plasma. With high βp, the plasma shape is transformed from an inboard limiter configuration to a natural divertor with the appearance of an poloidal null at the inboard side. By applying high vertical magnetic field (Bz), this high βp plasma is sustained. With suitable control of the equilibrium, effective current drive is observed in the later part of the discharge along with strong recharging of the Ohmic circuit and the Ip is sustained for > 1 s.

  6. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  7. Ideal MHD beta-limits of poloidally asymmetric equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, A.M.M.; Miller, A.E.; Grimm, R.C.; Okabayashi, M.; Dalhed, H.E. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    The ideal MHD stability of poloidally asymmetric equilibria, which are typical of a tokamak reactor design with a single-null poloidal divertor is examined. As with symmetric equilibria, stability to non-axisymmetric modes improves with increasing triangularity and ellipticity, and with lower edge safety factor. Pressure profiles optimized with respect to ballooning stability are obtained for an asymmetric shape, resulting in ..beta../sub critical/ approx. = 5.7%. The corresponding value for an equivalent symmetric shape is ..beta../sub critical/ approx. = 6.5%.

  8. Primary Design and Analysis of Feeder for ITER Poloidal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Mingzhun; Song, Yuntao; Liu, Sumei; Lu, Kun; Wang, Zhongwei

    2011-10-01

    An electromagnetic (EM) analytic model for the PF feeder, applied to ITER and needed to convey the cryogenic supply and electrical power to the PF magnets, was built up. The magnetic flux density and the EM force under the worst conditions with the maximum working current in each coil were then calculated. Based on the EM analysis and theoretical calculation, the relationship between the busbar stress and the distance of neighbouring busbar supports was obtained, which provides an approach to optimize the design of the busbar supports. In order to check the feasibility of the PF feeder structure, a finite element model was built up and the ANSYS code was applied to analyze the stress and displacement. The numerical results show that the stress of the PF feeder is within the allowable limits and the structure is feasible.

  9. Capability Assessment of the Equilibrium Field System in KTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bing; Luo, Zhengping; Xiao, Bingjia; You, Wei; Tan, Mingsheng; Guo, Yong; Bai, Wei; Mao, Wenzhe; Li, Hong; Liu, Adi; Lan, Tao; Xie, Jinlin; Liu, Wandong

    2016-01-01

    Radial equilibrium of the KTX plasma column is maintained by the vertical field which is produced by the equilibrium field coils. The equilibrium is also affected by the eddy current, which is generated by the coupling of copper shell, plasma and poloidal field coils. An equivalent circuit model is developed to analyze the dynamic performance of equilibrium field coils, without auxiliary power input to equilibrium field coils and passive conductors. Considering the coupling of poloidal field coils, copper shell and plasma, the evolution of spatial distribution of the eddy current density on the copper shell is estimated by finite element to analyze the effect of shell to balance. The simulation results show that the copper shell and equilibrium field coils can provide enough vertical field to balance 1 MA plasma current in phase 1 of a KTX discharge. Auxiliary power supply on the EQ coils is necessary to control the horizontal displacement of KTX due to the finite resistance effect of the shell. supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (No. 2011GB106000)

  10. Plasma boundary and SOL studies of ECH-plasmas in TJ-II stellarator with diagnosed mobile poloidal limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cal, E.; Brañas, B.; Tabarés, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Fraguas, A. L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Tribaldos, V.; Ascasibar, E.; Herranz, J.; Pastor, I.; TJ-II Team

    2001-03-01

    TJ-II is a medium size (major radius R=1.5 m, average minor plasma radius a<0.2 m, on axis magnetic field B=1 T) helical axis stellarator operating in its first phase with up to 600 kW of ECH power. Two mobile poloidal limiters can control the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) and diagnose the plasma boundary with a set of Langmuir probes and with CCD-cameras equipped with interference filters. In the described experiments, plasmas with different minor radii interact either with the toroidal limiter or with the mobile poloidal limiters. The electron density and temperature profiles are characterised in the plasma centre, boundary and scape-off layer (SOL) for the different configurations. The global energy for the different configurations is compared and the ratio of the energy confinement time to that obtained by the LHD-scaling-law, seem to be improved when inserting the poloidal limiters. Finally, it is discussed whether the large connection lengths obtained in certain poloidal limiter SOL regions effectively reduce the plasma size, making the definition of the plasma minor radius ambiguous.

  11. Poloidal divertor experiment with applied E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E J

    1980-05-01

    It has been proposed that the E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift arising from an externally applied electric field could be used in a tokamak or other toroidal device to remove plasma and impurities from the region near the wall and to reduce the amount of plasma striking the wall, either assisting or replacing a conventional magnetic field divertor. A poloidal magnetic divertor (without pumping chamber) was added to the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole, and the octupole was operated with a tokamak-like magnetic field configuration (q = 0.7). A radial electric field was applied in the scrape-off zone, causing an E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift with a large poloidal component. This reduced plasma flux reaching the wall of the toroid by up to a factor of 5 beyond the effect of the magnetic divertor, for divertor configurations with both high and low magnetic mirror ratios, in good agreement with a simple theoretical model. Plasma density and density scale length were also reduced in the scrape-off zone, in qualitative agreement with the model. This was not accompanied by any new instabilities in the scrape-off zone, nor by any appreciable degradation of confinement of the central plasma.

  12. Role of energetic electrons during current ramp-up and production of high poloidal beta plasma in non-inductive current drive on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashima, Saya; Zushi, H.; Isobe, M.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Okamura, S.; Banerjee, S.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.

    2014-02-01

    A scenario for non-inductive current ramp-up has been demonstrated using electron cyclotron waves in the spherical tokamak QUEST. The configuration was characterized by a high toroidal magnetic mirror ratio of 2 and a steady vertical magnetic field of more than 10% of the toroidal magnetic field. The generation and confinement of energetic electrons having energy greater than 10 keV were studied using hard x-rays. Because of the energetic electron pressure, a natural divertor formed with an inboard poloidal field null at the high poloidal beta (approximately 3-4).

  13. Upgrades to Power Systems and Magnetic Field Coils in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, J. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Bradisse, M. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Swager, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    A set of facility upgrades for Pegasus is currently underway to improve the control and performance of the power systems and the magnetic field coils, with the aim of increased helicity-driven current drive for non-inductive startup. The plasma current achieved through helicity injection goes as √ITF Iinj , the toroidal field rod current and injector bias current, respectively. To increase this quantity, the toroidal field power system will be upgraded. Eight new high-current IGBT bridges will replace the 6 bridges currently in place, bringing ITF from 288 kA-turns to 600 kA-turns. Iinj is increased via a new 14 kA, 2.2 kV, single-quadrant IGCT switching power supply. The main poloidal field coil system is expanded to provide faster vertical field penetration of the vessel wall, thereby providing more flexible control of plasma position during startup and current growth. The L/R time for these coils is reduced by ˜40%. New divertor coils are being installed to provide more shaping flexibility and separatrix-limited operations. Overall power supply control will be improved and simplified by deployment of digital feedback controllers using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to replace PWM analog feedback controllers. FPGAs will provide faster control frequencies, improved fault-handling capability, and streamlined recording of power system operations.

  14. Poloidal velocity of impurity ions in neoclassical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.; Solomon, W. M.

    2008-08-15

    A formula for the poloidal velocity of impurity ions in a two-species plasma is derived from neoclassical theory in the banana regime, with corrections from the boundary layer separating the trapped and transiting ions. The formula is applicable to plasmas with toroidal rotations that can approach the thermal speeds of the ions. Using the formula to determine the poloidal velocity of C{sup +6} ions in a recently reported experiment [W. M. Solomon et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056116 (2006)] leads to agreement in the direction of the central region when it is otherwise from theories without strong toroidal rotations. Comparisons among these theories are made, demonstrating the degree of uncertainty of theoretical predictions.

  15. Effect of poloidal asymmetries on impurity peaking in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mollen, A.; Pusztai, I.; Fueloep, T.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Moradi, S.

    2012-05-15

    Poloidal impurity asymmetries are frequently observed in tokamaks. In this paper, the effect of poloidal asymmetry on electrostatic turbulent transport is studied, including the effect of the E Multiplication-Sign B drift. Collisions are modeled by a Lorentz operator, and the gyrokinetic equation is solved with a variational approach. The impurity transport is shown to be sensitive to the magnetic shear and changes sign for s Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.5 in the presence of inboard accumulation. The zero-flux impurity density gradient (peaking factor) is shown to be rather insensitive to collisions in both ion temperature gradient and trapped electron mode driven cases. Our results suggest that the asymmetry (both the location of its maximum and its strength) and the magnetic shear are the two most important parameters that affect the impurity peaking.

  16. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, C. Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L.; Stacey, W. M.

    2014-01-15

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  17. Analytic expression for poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.

    2013-01-15

    The poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime is calculated by improving the l = 1 approximation for the Fokker-Planck collision operator [M. Taguchi, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 1897 (1988)]. The obtained analytic expression for this flow, which can be used for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, agrees quite well with the recently calculated numerical results by Parker and Catto [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085011 (2012)] in the full range of aspect ratio.

  18. Optical Potential Field Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical system for creating a potential field map of a bounded two dimensional region containing a goal location and an arbitrary number of obstacles. The potential field mapping system has an imaging device and a processor. Two image writing modes are used by the imaging device, electron deposition and electron depletion. Patterns written in electron deposition mode appear black and expand. Patterns written in electron depletion mode are sharp and appear white. The generated image represents a robot's workspace. The imaging device under processor control then writes a goal location in the work-space using the electron deposition mode. The black image of the goal expands in the workspace. The processor stores the generated images, and uses them to generate a feedback pattern. The feedback pattern is written in the workspace by the imaging device in the electron deposition mode to enhance the expansion of the original goal pattern. After the feedback pattern is written, an obstacle pattern is written by the imaging device in the electron depletion mode to represent the obstacles in the robot's workspace. The processor compares a stored image to a previously stored image to determine a change therebetween. When no change occurs, the processor averages the stored images to produce the potential field map.

  19. Fivefold confinement time increase in the Madison Symmetric Torus using inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.R.; Lanier, N.E.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sinitsyn, D.

    1996-12-01

    Current profile control is employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch to reduce the magnetic fluctuations responsible for anomalous transport. An inductive poloidal electric field pulse is applied in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile, reducing the dynamo fluctuation amplitude required to sustain the equilibrium. This technique demonstrates a substantial reduction in fluctuation amplitude (as much as 50%), and improvement in energy confinement (from 1 ms to 5 ms); a record low fluctuation (0.8%) and record high temperature (615 eV) for this device were observed simultaneously during current drive experiments. Plasma beta increases by 50% and the Ohmic input power is three times lower. Particle confinement improves and plasma impurity contamination is reduced. The results of the transient current drive experiments provide motivation for continuing development of steady-state current profile control strategies for the reversed field pinch.

  20. Poloidal flow damping with potato orbits in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.

    2005-10-01

    The poloidal flow damping rate in the vicinity of the magnetic axis in tokamaks is calculated using the time-dependent plasma viscosity. It is found that the damping rate is of the order of {nu}{sub ii}/f{sub t}{sup 2}, where {nu}{sub ii} is the ion-ion collision frequency, and f{sub t} is the fraction of the trapped potatoes. The corresponding neoclassical polarization or inertia enhancement factor is [1+({sigma}{sub p}q{sup 2}/f{sub t})], where {sigma}{sub p} is a numerical number of the order of unity, and q is the safety factor.

  1. Comparison of Flux-Surface Aligned Curvilinear Coordinate Systems and Neoclassical Magnetic Field Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collart, T. G.; Stacey, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    Several methods are presented for extending the traditional analytic ``circular'' representation of flux-surface aligned curvilinear coordinate systems to more accurately describe equilibrium plasma geometry and magnetic fields in DIII-D. The formalism originally presented by Miller is extended to include different poloidal variations in the upper and lower hemispheres. A coordinate system based on separate Fourier expansions of major radius and vertical position greatly improves accuracy in edge plasma structure representation. Scale factors and basis vectors for a system formed by expanding the circular model minor radius can be represented using linear combinations of Fourier basis functions. A general method for coordinate system orthogonalization is presented and applied to all curvilinear models. A formalism for the magnetic field structure in these curvilinear models is presented, and the resulting magnetic field predictions are compared against calculations performed in a Cartesian system using an experimentally based EFIT prediction for the Grad-Shafranov equilibrium. Supported by: US DOE under DE-FG02-00ER54538.

  2. Zonal flow modes in a tokamak plasma with dominantly poloidal mean flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Deng

    2010-10-15

    The zonal flow eigenmodes in a tokamak plasma with dominantly poloidal mean flows are theoretically investigated. It is found that the frequencies of both the geodesic acoustic mode and the sound wave increase with respect to the poloidal Mach number. In contrast to the pure standing wave form in static plasmas, the density perturbations consist of a standing wave superimposed with a small amplitude traveling wave in the poloidally rotating plasma.

  3. Universal asymptotical behaviour of poloidal spectra of resonant magnetic perturbations created by a set of saddle coils in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaev, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Universal asymptotical behaviour of poloidal spectra of resonant magnetic perturbations created by a set of saddle coils in tokamak plasmas is studied in a vacuum approximation. It is shown that the poloidal mode spectra for a given toroidal mode can be presented by a linear combination of three universal asymptotical formulae corresponding to horizontal and vertical segments of a set of saddle coils. Each of the asymptotical formulae depends only on the safety factor of the equilibrium plasma and the geometry of the perturbation coils. The validity of the universal formulae is confirmed by numerical computations of the poloidal mode spectra for typical plasmas with large and small inverse aspect ratios, DIII-D-like plasmas with internal (I-) coils (Jackson et al 2003 Proc. 30th EPS Conf. on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics (St Petersburg, Russia, 7-11 July 2003) vol 27A (ECA) P-4.47) and spherical NSTX-like plasmas with error field coils (Gates et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 104016).

  4. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  5. Improved analytical flux surface representation and calculation models for poloidal asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collart, T. G.; Stacey, W. M.

    2016-05-01

    An orthogonalized flux-surface aligned curvilinear coordinate system has been developed from an up-down asymmetric variation of the "Miller" flux-surface equilibrium model. It is found that the new orthogonalized "asymmetric Miller" model representation of equilibrium flux surfaces provides a more accurate match than various other representations of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614-633 (2002)] discharges to flux surfaces calculated using the DIII-D Equilibrium Fitting tokamak equilibrium reconstruction code. The continuity and momentum balance equations were used to develop a system of equations relating asymmetries in plasma velocities, densities, and electrostatic potential in this curvilinear system, and detailed calculations of poloidal asymmetries were performed for a DIII-D discharge.

  6. Observation of dust torus with poloidal rotation in direct current glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manjit Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K. Sharma, Devendra; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2015-03-15

    Observation of dust cloud rotation in parallel-plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported here. The experiments are carried out at high pressures (∼130 Pa) with a metallic ring placed on the lower electrode (cathode). The dust cloud rotates poloidally in the vertical plane near the cathode surface. This structure is continuous toroidally. Absence of magnetic field rules out the possibility of E × B induced ion flow as the cause of dust rotation. The dust rotational structures exist even with water cooled cathode. Therefore, temperature gradient driven mechanisms, such as thermophoretic force, thermal creep flow, and free convection cannot be causing the observed dust rotation. Langmuir probe measurement reveals the existence of a sharp density gradient near the location of the rotating dust cloud. The gradient in the density, giving rise to a gradient in the ion drag force, has been identified as the principal cause behind the rotation of dust particles.

  7. Increased confinement and beta by inductive poloidal current drive in the RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Sarff, J.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    Progress in understanding magnetic-fluctuation-induced transport in the reversed field pinch (RFP) has led to the idea of current profile control to reduce fluctuations and transport. With the addition of inductive poloidal current drive in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST), the magnetic fluctuation amplitude is halved, leading to a four- to five-fold increase in the energy confinement time to {tau}{sub E}{approximately}5 ms as a result of both decreased plasma resistance and increased stored thermal energy. The record low fluctuation amplitude coincides with a record high electron temperature of {approximately}600 eV (for MST), and beta {beta} = 2{mu}{sub 0}

    / B(a){sup 2} increases from 6% to 8% compared with conventional MST RFP plasmas. Other improvements include increased particle confinement and impurity reduction. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Extraction of Poloidal Velocity from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Solomon; K.H. Burrell; P. Gohil; R.J. Groebner; L.R. Baylor

    2004-07-16

    A novel approach has been implemented on DIII-D to allow the correct determination of the plasma poloidal velocity from charge exchange spectroscopy measurements. Unlike usual techniques, the need for detailed atomic physics calculations to properly interpret the results is alleviated. Instead, the needed atomic physics corrections are self-consistently determined directly from the measurements, by making use of specially chosen viewing chords. Modeling results are presented that were used to determine a set of views capable of measuring the correction terms. We present the analysis of a quiescent H-mode discharge, illustrating that significant modifications to the velocity profiles are required in these high ion temperature conditions. We also present preliminary measurements providing the first direct comparison of the standard cross-section correction to the atomic physics calculations.

  9. Resonance parallel viscosity in the banana regime in poloidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hsu, C.T.; Dominguez, N. )

    1994-05-01

    Parallel viscosity in the banana regime in a poloidally ([bold E][times][bold B]) rotating tokamak plasma is calculated to include the effects of orbit squeezing and to allow the poloidal [bold E][times][bold B] Mach number [ital M][sub [ital p

  10. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of poloidal flows in tokamaks and MHD pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2011-09-15

    Poloidal rotation is routinely observed in present-day tokamak experiments, in particular near the plasma edge and in the high-confinement mode of operation. According to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium theory [R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2439 (2000)], radial discontinuities form when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed (or rather, more correctly, the poloidal magneto-slow speed). Two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that the transonic discontinuities develop on a time scale of a plasma poloidal revolution to form an edge density pedestal and a localized velocity shear layer at the pedestal location. While such an MHD pedestal surrounds the entire core, the outboard side of the pedestal is driven by the transonic discontinuity while the inboard side is caused by a poloidal redistribution of the mass. The MHD simulations use a smooth momentum source to drive the poloidal flow. Soon after the flow exceeds the poloidal sound speed, the density pedestal and the velocity shear layer form and persist into a quasi steady state. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition, the early stages of the pedestal and edge transport barrier formation.

  11. Thermal system field performance predictions from laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Teaney, Brian P.; Doe, Joshua M.

    2016-05-01

    Laboratory measurements on thermal imaging systems are critical to understanding their performance in a field environment. However, it is rarely a straightforward process to directly inject thermal measurements into thermal performance modeling software to acquire meaningful results. Some of the sources of discrepancies between laboratory and field measurements are sensor gain and level, dynamic range, sensor display and display brightness, and the environment where the sensor is operating. If measurements for the aforementioned parameters could be performed, a more accurate description of sensor performance in a particular environment is possible. This research will also include the procedure for turning both laboratory and field measurements into a system model.

  12. Mapping of drift surfaces in toroidal systems with chaotic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, S.S.; Wingen, A.; Spatschek, K.H.

    2006-04-15

    Drift orbits of test particles are studied using a recently proposed Hamiltonian theory of guiding-center motion in toroidal systems. A symplectic mapping procedure in symmetric form is developed which allows a fast and accurate characterization of the Poincare plots in poloidal cross sections. It is shown that the stochastic magnetic field acts differently on the onset of chaotic motion for co- and counterpassing particles, respectively. Resonant drift surfaces are shifted inward for the co-passing particles, and are shifted outward for the counterpassing particles, when compared with resonant magnetic surfaces. The overall result is an inward (outward) shift of chaotic zones of co-passing (counterpassing) particles with respect to the magnetic ergodic zone. The influence of a stationary radial electric field is discussed. It shifts the orbits farther inward for the co-passing particles and outward for the counterpassing particles, respectively. The shifts increase with the energies of the particles. A rotation of the magnetic field perturbations and its effect on drift motion is also investigated. Estimates for the local diffusion rates are presented. For applications, parameters of the dynamic ergodic divertor of the Torus Experiment for Technology-Oriented Research are used [Fusion Eng. Design 37, 337 (1997)].

  13. TPX: Contractor preliminary design review. Volume 2, PF systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, H.A.

    1995-07-28

    This system development specification covers the Poloidal Field (PF) Magnet System, WBS 14 in the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory TPX Program to build a tokamak fusion reactor. This specification establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements of the PF Magnet System.

  14. Comparison of Edge Turbulence Imaging at Two Different Poloidal Locations in the Scrape-off Layer of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben, et. al.

    2013-03-29

    This paper describes 2-D imaging measurements of plasma turbulence made in the scrape-off layer of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak simultaneously at two different poloidal locations, one near the outer midplane and the other near the divertor X-point region. These images were made with radial and poloidal resolution using two gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostics, which were not directly connected along a B field line. The turbulence correlation structure has a significantly different tilt angle with respect to the local flux surfaces for the midplane and X-regions, and a slightly different ellipticity and size. The time-averaged turbulence velocities can be different in the midplane and Xregions, even within the same flux surface in the same shot, and in most cases the fluctuations in poloidal velocity in these two regions were not correlated. These structures are partially consistent with a magnetic flux tube mapping model, and the velocities are compared with various poloidal flow models.

  15. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  16. High-m Poloidal Waves Observed in Low Earth Orbit and Their Implications for Energetic Particles in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, P. J.; Johnson, J.; Porazik, P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies of the magnetic field data collected by the NASA ST-5 satellites in the low Earth orbit have revealed many wave events with frequencies of 30-200 mHz (in the Pc 2-3 band). It was soon realized that these waves were in fact Doppler-shifted waves in the magnetosphere, with wave frequencies of merely a few mHz (in the Pc 5 band) and azimuthal wavenumbers (m) of the order of 100. Oscillating in the poloidal direction, high-mwaves are known to engage in drift or drift bounce resonance with energetic ring current particles, and therefore they are expected to play a role in modulating the energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere. Using a new method that examines the differences in wave phase detected by the three ST-5 satellites in a "pearls-on-a-string" configuration, we confirm that the frequencies of the observed poloidal waves are mainly between 3 and 5 mHz in the Earth frame. In some events, the NOAA satellites were located at the equator and close to the field lines connected to the ST-5 satellites, confirming the wave frequencies estimated using only ST-5 observations. In each of the poloidal wave events observed by ST-5, the azimuthal wavenumber may change with L, but the wave frequency in the Earth frame remains the same. We have also found cases where poloidal waves were observed in both dayside and nightside of the magnetosphere when ST-5 satellite passed through the same Lshells within a single orbit, supporting the theoretical prediction of a global poloidal mode, which is also known as the transverse Alfvén resonator. Satellite observations in low Earth orbits have shown that high-m poloidal waves can last many hours even during geomagnetically quiet conditions, suggesting that a very weak ring current may be capable of supplying enough energetic particles to excite poloidal waves. We will address the implications for energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere with theoretical and modeling considerations.

  17. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1994-06-18

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics experiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three paris of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (NB{sub 3}Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper.

  18. Measurements and modelling of plasma response field to RMP on the COMPASS tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, T.; Liu, Y. Q.; Cahyna, P.; Pánek, R.; Peterka, M.; Aftanas, M.; Bílková, P.; Bohm, P.; Imríšek, M.; Háček, P.; Havlicek, J.; Havránek, A.; Komm, M.; Urban, J.; Weinzettl, V.; the COMPASS Team

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown on several tokamaks that application of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field to the plasma can lead to suppression or mitigation of edge-localized mode (ELM) instabilities. Due to the rotation of the plasma in the RMP field reference system, currents are induced on resonant surfaces within the plasma, consequently screening the original perturbation. In this work, the extensive set of 104 saddle loops installed on the COMPASS tokamak is utilized to measure the plasma response field for two n  =  2 RMP configurations of different poloidal mode m spectra. It is shown that spatially the response field is in opposite phase to the original perturbation, and that the poloidal profile of the measured response field does not depend on the poloidal profile of the applied RMP. Simulations of the plasma response by the linear MHD code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681) reveal that both of the studied RMP configurations are well screened by the plasma. Comparison of measured plasma response field with the simulated one shows a good agreement across the majority of poloidal angles, with the exception of the midplane low-field side area, where discrepancy is seen.

  19. Hydrocarbon disperse systems in electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deinega, Y.F.

    1983-07-01

    On the basis of method for regulating the smooth adjustment of the charge of the disperse phase of hydrocarbon systems in electric fields from positive to negative values by means of surfactants, a schematic electrokinetic picture of the behavior of the systems is derived. Changes in the structure of the disperse systems in electric fields have a substantial effect on the rheological properties of the system. The effect of electric fields on the formation of crystallization-condensation structures, the mechanism of electrical conduction with a high rate of deformation, and the many practical applications of electrical effects on hydrocarbon disperse systems are also studied.

  20. Nonlinear evolution of resistive wall mode in a cylindrical tokamak with poloidal rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, M.; Nakajima, N.

    2006-10-15

    Nonlinear simulations of resistive wall modes (RWMs) with a Doppler shift dominant equilibrium poloidal rotation have been carried out by using reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations in a low beta cylindrical tokamak, where the core plasma is surrounded by a cold plasma with a high resistivity. When the equilibrium poloidal rotation frequency is small and the Doppler shift is predominant, the wall mode becomes unstable, which is one of the RWMs nearly locked to the resistive wall. Since the slowing down torque increases with equilibrium poloidal rotation frequency and the poloidal rotation decreases to almost zero near the plasma surface before the saturation, the nonlinear saturation level does not depend on either the equilibrium poloidal rotation frequency or the density of the cold plasma. When the equilibrium poloidal rotation frequency becomes larger than a critical value, the plasma mode rotating to the resistive wall becomes unstable. When the cold plasma has the same density as that in the core plasma, neither the centrifugal force nor the Coriolis force has any effect. In such a case, as the equilibrium poloidal rotation frequency increases, the magnetic flux is so hard to diffuse into the resistive wall that the slowing down torque decreases and the rotation tends to survive in the nonlinear phase, which makes the saturation level decrease.

  1. Poloidal flux linkage requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have applied two computational models to calculate the poloidal flux linkage requirements for the current ramp-up and for the flattop phase of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the current ramp-up phase, we have used the TSC code to simulate the entire current ramp-up period as described in the TAC-3 Physics Report. We have extended the time of the simulation to cover the full current penetration time, that is, until the loop voltage is a constant throughout the plasma. Sensitivity studies have been performed with respect to current ramp-up time, impurity concentration, and to the time of onset of auxiliary heating. We have also used a steady state plasma equilibrium code that has the constant loop voltage constraint built in to survey the dependence of the steady state loop-voltage on the density and temperature profiles. This calculation takes into account the plasma bootstrap current contribution, including non-circular and collisional corrections. The results can be displayed as contours of the loop-voltage on a POPCON like diagram.

  2. The role of parallel and poloidal heat flux in setting the detachment threshold in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. N.; Allen, S. L.; Lasnier, C. J.; McLean, A. G.; Petrie, T. W.; Leonard, A. W.; Groth, M.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental results show that the threshold density for divertor detachment is reduced even as the parallel scrape-off-layer (SOL) heat flux (q| |) is more than doubled, contrary to expectation. The work is part of a systematic study to identify the physics basis for obtaining detached divertors in future high power burning plasma experiments, consistent with requirements for high confinement steady-state operation. Parallel heat flux [PSOL * (Btor /Bpol) / 2 πRλq ; λq is the SOL width] is independent of poloidal flux expansion and is commonly used to quantify the divertor heat flux challenge. In these experiments, the parallel heat flux was varied either by changing the heating power (thereby PSOL), plasma current (the SOL width), or toroidal field (the projection of PSOL onto Btor). The data point to poloidal-field physics effects (e.g., neutral penetration field, line length, and impurity radiation volume) playing a dominant role in setting the detachment threshold. Comparison with 2D simulation will be shown. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. Instability of the plasma flow in the shadow of a poloidal tokamak limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, V.G.

    1987-11-01

    The stability of the plasma flow in the shadow of a poloidal limiter is analyzed on the basis of hydrodynamic equations incorporating the ion inertia. The flute instability and an instability caused by the polarization properties of the plasma may occur. The real fluctuation frequencies and the poloidal wave numbers are close to those observed experimentally. An estimate of the turbulent diffusion coefficient also agrees with the experimental values.

  4. Stereoscopic wide field of view imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prechtl, Eric F. (Inventor); Sedwick, Raymond J. (Inventor); Jonas, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A stereoscopic imaging system incorporates a plurality of imaging devices or cameras to generate a high resolution, wide field of view image database from which images can be combined in real time to provide wide field of view or panoramic or omni-directional still or video images.

  5. Theory of the Poloidal Spin-up Precursor to Transport Barrier Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, G. M.

    1999-11-01

    The phenomenon of a sudden change in the poloidal flow prior to the reduction in transport and the steepening of temperature and density profiles has been observed both at the edge (high-modes) and in the core (enhanced reversed shear (ERS-modes) of tokamaks. The poloidal spin-up precursor is narrowly localized in the (radial) direction across magnetic flux surfaces. Although the reduction of turbulent transport is consistent with the theory of E× B flow shear suppression, the localized poloidal spin-up precursor has not been explained by the theory until now. It will be shown that the observed flow pattern is well described by a new class of bifurcation to the momentum balance equations. The new physics follows from extending the standard neoclassical theory of poloidal flow damping to include the turbulent viscous stress. The new bifurcation results from balancing the non-linear turbulent viscous tress with the linear poloidal flow damping due to the neoclassical parallel viscous stress. The new bifurcation results in a mono-polar E× B flow structure (with a large poloidal component) which is narrowly localized in the radial direction. The peak in the flow is shown to reduce and finally disappear as the diamagnetic velocity shear increases.

  6. Field Theory for Multi-Particle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouhong; Ma, Tian

    2016-03-01

    The main objectives of this talk are 1) to introduce some basic postulates for quantum multi-particle systems, and 2) to develop a universal field theory for interacting multi-particle systems coupling both particle fields and interacting fields. By carefully examining the nature of interactions between multi-particles, we conclude that multi-particle systems must obey i) the gauge symmetry, ii) the principle of interaction dynamics (PID), and iii) the principle of representation invariance (PRI). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action functional under energy-momentum conservation constraint, offers a different and natural way of introducing Higgs fields, and is also required by the presence of dark matter and dark energy and the quark confinement. PRI requires that the SU(N) gauge theory be independent of representations of SU(N). Based on these principles, a few basic postulates for multi-particle systems are introduced in this talk, leading to a field theory for interacting multi-particle systems. A direct consequence of the field theory is the derivation of general atomic spectrum equations. Supported in Part by the Office of Naval Research, by the US National Science Foundation, and by the Chinese National Science Foundation.

  7. Improved Large-Field Focusing Schlieren System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1993-01-01

    System used to examine complicated two- and three-dimensional flows. High-brightness large-field focusing schlieren system incorporates Fresnel lens instead of glass diffuser. In system with large field of view, image may also be very large. Relay optical subsystem minifies large image while retaining all of light. Facilities candidates for use of focusing schlieren include low-speed wind and water tunnels. Heated or cooled flow tracers or injected low- or high-density tracers used to make flows visible for photographic recording.

  8. Development of real-time rotating waveplate Stokes polarimeter using multi-order retardation for ITER poloidal polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, R; Kawano, Y; Ono, T; Itami, K

    2016-01-01

    The rotating waveplate Stokes polarimeter was developed for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) poloidal polarimeter. The generalized model of the rotating waveplate Stokes polarimeter and the algorithm suitable for real-time field-programmable gate array (FPGA) processing were proposed. Since the generalized model takes into account each component associated with the rotation of the waveplate, the Stokes parameters can be accurately measured even in unideal condition such as non-uniformity of the waveplate retardation. Experiments using a He-Ne laser showed that the maximum error and the precision of the Stokes parameter were 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. The rotation speed of waveplate was 20 000 rpm and time resolution of measuring the Stokes parameter was 3.3 ms. Software emulation showed that the real-time measurement of the Stokes parameter with time resolution of less than 10 ms is possible by using several FPGA boards. Evaluation of measurement capability using a far-infrared laser which ITER poloidal polarimeter will use concluded that measurement error will be reduced by a factor of nine. PMID:26827317

  9. Development of real-time rotating waveplate Stokes polarimeter using multi-order retardation for ITER poloidal polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imazawa, R.; Kawano, Y.; Ono, T.; Itami, K.

    2016-01-01

    The rotating waveplate Stokes polarimeter was developed for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) poloidal polarimeter. The generalized model of the rotating waveplate Stokes polarimeter and the algorithm suitable for real-time field-programmable gate array (FPGA) processing were proposed. Since the generalized model takes into account each component associated with the rotation of the waveplate, the Stokes parameters can be accurately measured even in unideal condition such as non-uniformity of the waveplate retardation. Experiments using a He-Ne laser showed that the maximum error and the precision of the Stokes parameter were 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. The rotation speed of waveplate was 20 000 rpm and time resolution of measuring the Stokes parameter was 3.3 ms. Software emulation showed that the real-time measurement of the Stokes parameter with time resolution of less than 10 ms is possible by using several FPGA boards. Evaluation of measurement capability using a far-infrared laser which ITER poloidal polarimeter will use concluded that measurement error will be reduced by a factor of nine.

  10. Linear and non-linear numerical simulations of poloidal Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A.

    2013-05-01

    Among the many of numerical simulations of MHD turbulence, few studies had been made of Alfven waves interacting with realistic boundaries. Thus, we have developed a novel hybrid spectral/finite element code, which is capable of simulate properly realistic boundaries properties. Our model is based on a Fourier decompositions of all variables in the azimuthal direction and on a finite element projection in the meridian plan. In order to simulate realistic boundary conditions for the magnetic field we solve the induction equation enforcing continuity of the magnetic field H at the interface with the external insulating medium through a Interior Penalty Galerkin method (IPG) [1]. I will present the results of our investigation of Alfven waves propagating in a cylinder filled of liquid metal submitted to an axial magnetic field. Poloidal Alfven waves are excited magnetically by imposing an azimuthal current pulse at the bottom of the cylinder. In the linear axisymmetric model we find a good agreement with previous experiments in liquid metals by Lundquist and by Lenhert and more recently by Alboussiere et al [2]. This axisymmetric study is extended to the non linear regime, where the amplitudes of the perturbations are comparable to the external applied magnetic field,in this conditions a complex response is found due to waves waves interactions. [1] J. L. Guermond, J.L Leorat, F. Luddens, C. Nore, A. Ribeiro. Effects of discontinuous magnetic permeability on magnetodynamic problems, Journal of Computational Physics Volume 230, Issue 16, 10 July 2011, Pages 6299 -- 6319. [2] T. Alboussiere, P. Cardin, F. Debray, H. C. Nataf, F. Plunian, A. Ribeiro, D. Schmitt, Experimental evidence of Alfven wave propagation in a Gallium alloy, Physics of fluids, 2011, vol. 23, nb 9.

  11. Design and construction of Big Dee poloidal coils and their support structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, R.; Jones, J.D.

    1983-12-01

    The construction of the Big Dee tokamak requires the replacement of several Doublet III poloidal coils with a lesser number of new coils. Eight of the new coils will be enclosed in a 1.27 cm thick stainless steel box beam. The box beam will react part of the loads generated in the encapsulated copper conductor and transmit other loads around it. Coil lead supports will be attached to the box beam, transmitting their loads directly to the support structure. The new outer E-coils (ohmic heating coils) will be encased with the new field shaping coils. The water cooled copper conductor will be wound with alternating layers of fiberglass and Kapton tape and placed in the stainless steel box beam to be vacuum impregnated with epoxy resin. The support structure will consist of horizontal box beams (coil cases) and columns. The box beams will be of welded construction except for a bolted joint that allows the two halves of the assembly to be separated for the removal of the encapsulated coil. Electrically insulated breaks will be provided in the box beam and at the column/box beam interface. The support structure will locate and support the vacuum vessel by means of four trunnions located at the midplane of the vessel.

  12. Multisatellite Observations of Long-lasting Poloidal Pc 4 Pulsations in the Dayside Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Korotova, G. I.; Engebretson, M. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We use magnetic field, plasma and particles observations from Van Allen Probes and THEMIS spacecraft to study the characteristics of long-lasting poloidal Pc4 pulsations in the dayside magnetosphere. They were observed after the main phase of a strong storm during low geomagnetic activity. The Pc 4 pulsations exhibited periods of 40-50 s and amplitudes of 4-6 nT in the dominant radial component. They had a packet-like structure and lasted more than 3 hours. The FFT spectra show that the main spectral power corresponds to frequencies of ~ 20-22 mHz, which argues against a source for the pulsations in the solar wind. The frequencies of the central power peak in the radial component decrease with radial distance from the Earth. The most striking feature of the Pc 4 pulsations was their occurrence at similar locations on three of four successive orbits of Van Allen Probes nine hours apart. We determined that the pulsations were second harmonic mode waves. We test various possible mechanisms for their generation.

  13. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Obara, Clifford J.; Amer, Tahani R.; Faulcon, Nettie D.; Carmine, Michael T.; Burkett, Cecil G.; Pritchard, Daniel W.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Field System that is used to provide global surface pressure and temperature measurements on models tested in Langley wind tunnels. The system was developed and is maintained by Global Surface Measurements Team personnel of the Data Acquisition and Information Management Branch in the Research Facilities Services Competency. Descriptions of the system hardware and software are presented and operational procedures are detailed.

  14. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems is presented in this paper. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed.

  15. Field-based gunfire location systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzes, Charles A.

    2009-05-01

    A new approach to gunfire location coupling antenna design to field models and signal processing procedures enables direction finding and ranging of projectile sources in spectrally competitive environments, the ranging permitted in certain circumstances. The approach is based upon the notion that data collection should enable mathematical models for incident acoustic fields in antenna neighborhoods, permitting utilization of systems having high resolving power. Theory, procedures, and design are outlined and gunfire location field test results incorporating multiple shooters, echoes, and reverberation are presented. *Technology protected by US Patents 7,423,934; 7,394,724;,7,372,774; 7,123,548; and patents pending.

  16. The ESRF Miniature Pulsed Magnetic Field System

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Strohm, Cornelius; Roth, Thomas; Detlefs, Carsten; Mathon, Olivier

    2010-06-23

    We have developed a portable system to provide pulsed magnetic fields on the ESRF X-ray beamlines. The complete system consists of a power supply, liquid Helium and liquid Nitrogen dewars with a siphon each, control electronics and a double cryostat for separate coil and sample cooling. The liquid nitrogen cooled solenoids reach a maximum field of 30 Tesla for a total pulse duration of one milisecond. They are constructed for optimised cooling rate after the pulse to obtain a high duty cycle, the repetition rate is five pulses per minute at maximum field. The sample is cooled in an independent Helium flow cryostat which is inserted into the bore of the magnet. The flow cryostat has a temperature range from 5 to 250 Kelvin with a direct contact between the sample and Helium flow. This overview gives a general presentation of the system and we will show recent results.

  17. The ESRF Miniature Pulsed Magnetic Field System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Peter J. E. M.; Strohm, Cornelius; Roth, Thomas; Detlefs, Carsten; Mathon, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    We have developed a portable system to provide pulsed magnetic fields on the ESRF X-ray beamlines. The complete system consists of a power supply, liquid Helium and liquid Nitrogen dewars with a siphon each, control electronics and a double cryostat for separate coil and sample cooling. The liquid nitrogen cooled solenoids reach a maximum field of 30 Tesla for a total pulse duration of one milisecond. They are constructed for optimised cooling rate after the pulse to obtain a high duty cycle, the repetition rate is five pulses per minute at maximum field. The sample is cooled in an independent Helium flow cryostat which is inserted into the bore of the magnet. The flow cryostat has a temperature range from 5 to 250 Kelvin with a direct contact between the sample and Helium flow. This overview gives a general presentation of the system and we will show recent results.

  18. Initiation of bipolar flows by magnetic field twisting in protostellar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, William I.; Newman, Alice L.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    1992-01-01

    A model is developed for the time-dependent twisting of an initial poloidal magnetic field threading a conducting protostellar disk. The region outside the disk is assumed to be filled, at least initially, with a low-density, force-free 'coronal' plasma. The differential rotation of the disk acts to twist the B field in the space outside the disk thus generating a toroidal magnetic field. In turn, the toroidal field acts to pinch the plasma and the poloidal field toward the system axis producing a collimated channel. This channel could facilitate the formation of bipolar flows. The magnitude and duration of the field twisting is expected to be limited by magnetohydrodynamic instability.

  19. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor,Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Wire degradation has resulted in aircraft fatalities and critical space launches being delayed. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power is wirelessly provided to the sensing element by using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency, resistance and amplitude has been developed and is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be near the acquisition hardware. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed. Examples of magnetic field response sensors and the respective measurement characterizations are presented. Implementation of this method on an aerospace system is discussed.

  20. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, Melanie L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequencies correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic field used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for discerning changes in sensor s response kequency, resistance and amplitude is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminating the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to any form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  1. E × B flow velocity deduced from the poloidal motion of fluctuation patterns in neutral beam injected L-mode plasmas on KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Leem, J.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Ko, S. H.; Choi, M. J.; Wang, W. X.; Budny, R. V.; Ethier, S.; Park, Y. S.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W. H.; Kim, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    A method for direct assessment of the equilibrium E × B flow velocity ( E ×B flow shear is responsible for the turbulence suppression and transport reduction in tokamak plasmas) is investigated based on two facts. The first one is that the apparent poloidal rotation speed of density fluctuation patterns is close to the turbulence rotation speed in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetic field line within the flux surface. And the second "well-known" fact is that the turbulence rotation velocity consists of the equilibrium E × B flow velocity and intrinsic phase velocity of turbulence in the E × B flow frame. In the core region of the low confinement (L-mode) discharges where a strong toroidal rotation is induced by neutral beam injection, the apparent poloidal velocities (and turbulence rotation velocities) are good approximations of the E ×B flow velocities since linear gyrokinetic simulations suggest that the intrinsic phase velocity of the dominant turbulence is significantly lower than the apparent poloidal velocity. In the neutral beam injected L-mode plasmas, temporal and spatial scales of the measured turbulence are studied by comparing with the local equilibrium parameters relevant to the ion-scale turbulence.

  2. Thermalization of field driven quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Fotso, H.; Mikelsons, K.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in how quantum systems thermalize after a sudden change, because unitary evolution should preclude thermalization. The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis resolves this because all observables for quantum states in a small energy window have essentially the same value; it is violated for integrable systems due to the infinite number of conserved quantities. Here, we show that when a system is driven by a DC electric field there are five generic behaviors: (i) monotonic or (ii) oscillatory approach to an infinite-temperature steady state; (iii) monotonic or (iv) oscillatory approach to a nonthermal steady state; or (v) evolution to an oscillatory state. Examining the Hubbard model (which thermalizes under a quench) and the Falicov-Kimball model (which does not), we find both exhibit scenarios (i–iv), while only Hubbard shows scenario (v). This shows richer behavior than in interaction quenches and integrability in the absence of a field plays no role. PMID:24736404

  3. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  4. Effect of poloidal asymmetry on the impurity density profile in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fueloep, T.; Moradi, S.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of poloidal asymmetry of impurities on impurity transport driven by electrostatic turbulence in tokamak plasmas is analyzed. It is found that if the density of the impurity ions is poloidally asymmetric then the zero-flux impurity density gradient is significantly reduced and even a sign change in the impurity flux may occur if the asymmetry is sufficiently large. This effect is most effective in low shear plasmas with the impurity density peaking on the inboard side and may be a contributing factor to the observed outward convection of impurities in the presence of radio frequency heating.

  5. Direct Observation of Ion-Bernstein-Wave-Induced Poloidal Flow in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, B.P.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Wilson, J.R.; Rogers, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Shearing of the plasma poloidal rotation velocity was observed during application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The first evidence of corroboration between measured poloidal velocity shearing and actively induced Reynolds stress effects is presented. A model reproduces salient experimental features: The observed sheared flow occurs near the tritium fifth harmonic cyclotron resonance layer and depends strongly on the tritium density in agreement with the model. Furthermore, the model reproduces the observed insensitivity of the induced rotation to the tritium density in the region between the third deuterium harmonic layer and the fifth tritium harmonic layer. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Poloidal flow and toroidal particle ring formation in a sessile drop driven by megahertz order vibration.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Amgad R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2014-09-23

    Poloidal flow is curiously formed in a microliter sessile water drop over 157-225 MHz because of acoustic streaming from three-dimensional standing Lamb waves in a lithium niobate substrate. The flow possesses radial symmetry with downwelling at the center and upwelling around the periphery of the drop. Outside this frequency range, the attenuation occurs over a length scale incompatible with the drop size and the poloidal flow vanishes. Remarkably, shear-induced migration was found to drive toroidal particle ring formation with diameters inversely proportional to the frequency of the acoustic irradiation. PMID:25186138

  7. Reduced-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of toroidally and poloidally localized edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzl, M.; Guenter, S.; Mueller, W.-C.; Lackner, K.; Krebs, I.; Wenninger, R. P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-08-15

    We use the non-linear reduced-magnetohydrodynamic code JOREK to study edge localized modes (ELMs) in the geometry of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Toroidal mode numbers, poloidal filament sizes, and radial propagation speeds of filaments into the scrape-off layer are in good agreement with observations for type-I ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade. The observed instabilities exhibit a toroidal and poloidal localization of perturbations which is compatible with the 'solitary magnetic perturbations' recently discovered in ASDEX Upgrade [R. Wenninger et al., 'Solitary magnetic perturbations at the ELM onset,' Nucl. Fusion (accepted)]. This localization can only be described in numerical simulations with high toroidal resolution.

  8. Magnetic field regulation control system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Badelt, Steven W.

    1996-05-01

    This study comprises (1) an analytical characterization of the Cameca ion microscope`s magnetic field regulation circuitry and (2) comparisons between the analytical predictions and the measured performance of the control system. It is the first step in a project to achieve routine field regulation better than 10ppm. The control loop was decomposed into functional subcircuits and simulated in SPICE to determine DC, AC, and transient response. Transfer functions were extracted from SPICE, simplified, and analyzed in MATLAB. Both SPICE and MATLAB simulations were calculated for step inputs, and these results were compared to actual measurements. Magnetic field fluctuations were measured at high mass resolving power. The frequency spectrum of the fluctuations was analyzed by FFT. Difficulties encountered and implications for future work are discussed.

  9. Interfaces in Random Field Ising Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, Eira

    2001-03-01

    Domain walls are studied in random field Ising magnets at T=0 in two and three dimensions using exact ground state calculations. In 2D below the random field strength dependent length scale Lb the walls exhibit a super-rough behavior with a roughness exponent greater than unity ζ ~= 1.20 ± 0.05. The nearest-neighbor height difference probability distribution depends on the system size below L_b. Above Lb domains become fractal, ζ ~= 1.(E. T. Seppälä, V. Petäjä, and M. J. Alava, Phys. Rev. E 58), R5217 (1998). The energy fluctuation exponent has a value θ=1, contradicting the exponent relation θ = 2ζ -1 due to the broken scale-invariance, below Lb and vanishes for system sizes above L_b. The broken scale-invariance should be manifest also in Kardar-Parisi-Zhang problem with random-field noise.(E. Frey, U. C. Täuber, and H. K. Janssen, Europhys. Lett. 47), 14 (1999). In 3D there exists a transition between ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases at the critical random field strength (Δ/J)_c. Below (Δ/J)c the roughness exponent is also greater ζ ~= 0.73 ± 0.03 than the functional-renormalization-group calculation result ζ = (5-d)/3.(D. Fisher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56), 1964 (1986).(P. Chauve, P. Le Doussal, and K. Wiese, cond-mat/0006056.) The height differences are system size dependent in 3D, as well. The behavior of the domain walls in 2D below Lb with a constant external field, i.e., the random-bulk wetting, is demonstrated.(E. T. Seppälä, I. Sillanpää, and M. J. Alava, unpublished.)

  10. Mean-Field Evolution of Fermionic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikter, Niels; Porta, Marcello; Schlein, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    The mean field limit for systems of many fermions is naturally coupled with a semiclassical limit. This makes the analysis of the mean field regime much more involved, compared with bosonic systems. In this paper, we study the dynamics of initial data close to a Slater determinant, whose reduced one-particle density is an orthogonal projection ω N with the appropriate semiclassical structure. Assuming some regularity of the interaction potential, we show that the evolution of such an initial data remains close to a Slater determinant, with reduced one-particle density given by the solution of the Hartree-Fock equation with initial data ω N . Our result holds for all (semiclassical) times, and gives effective bounds on the rate of the convergence towards the Hartree-Fock dynamics.

  11. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  12. Poloidal tilting symmetry of high order tokamak flux surface shaping in gyrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin; Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael

    2016-04-01

    A poloidal tilting symmetry of the local nonlinear δ f gyrokinetic model is demonstrated analytically and verified numerically. This symmetry shows that poloidally rotating all the flux surface shaping effects with large poloidal mode number by a single tilt angle has an exponentially small effect on the transport properties of a tokamak. This is shown using a generalization of the Miller local equilibrium model to specify an arbitrary flux surface geometry. With this geometry specification we find that, when performing an expansion in large flux surface shaping mode number, the governing equations of gyrokinetics are symmetric in the poloidal tilt of the high order shaping effects. This allows us to take the fluxes from a single configuration and calculate the fluxes in any configuration that can be produced by tilting the large mode number shaping effects. This creates a distinction between tokamaks with mirror symmetric flux surfaces and tokamaks without mirror symmetry, which is expected to have important consequences for generating toroidal rotation using up-down asymmetry.

  13. Effects of orbit squeezing on poloidal mass flow and bootstrap current in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C. ); Hsu, C.T. ); Hazeltine, R.D. )

    1994-10-01

    It is shown, by solving the drift kinetic equation, that the asymptotic values of the poloidal mass flow and the bootstrap current in the banana regime of large-aspect-ratio tokamak plasmas are not affected by orbit squeezing. However, because the definition of ion collisionality [upsilon][sub *[ital i

  14. Time dependent parallel viscosity and relaxation rate of poloidal rotation in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.; Shaing, K.C.; Gormley, R. )

    1994-01-01

    Time dependent ion parallel viscous force in the banana regime with arbitrary inverse aspect ratio [epsilon] is calculated using the eigenfunction approach. The flux surface averaged viscosity is then used to study the relaxation process of the poloidal rotation which leads to oscillatory relaxation behavior. The relaxation rate [nu][sub [ital p

  15. Relaxation rate of poloidal rotation in the banana regime in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1989-03-01

    The relaxation rate ..nu../sub p/ of poloidal rotation in the banana regime in tokamaks is calculated using a time-dependent parallel viscosity. It is found that ..nu../sub p/ is on the order of ..nu../sub i//sub i/, the ion--ion collision frequency, with no geometric enhancement factor associated with toroidicity.

  16. Testing neoclassical and turbulent effects on poloidal rotation in the core of DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.; Lao, L. L.; Grassie, J. S. de; Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, W. X.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Mordijck, S.; Meneghini, O.

    2014-07-15

    Experimental tests of ion poloidal rotation theories have been performed on DIII-D using a novel impurity poloidal rotation diagnostic. These tests show significant disagreements with theoretical predictions in various conditions, including L-mode plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITB), H-mode plasmas, and QH-mode plasmas. The theories tested include standard neoclassical theory, turbulence driven Reynolds stress, and fast-ion friction on the thermal ions. Poloidal rotation is observed to spin up at the formation of an ITB and makes a significant contribution to the measurement of the E{sup →}×B{sup →} shear that forms the ITB. In ITB cases, neoclassical theory agrees quantitatively with the experimental measurements only in the steep gradient region. Significant quantitative disagreement with neoclassical predictions is seen in the cores of ITB, QH-, and H-mode plasmas, demonstrating that neoclassical theory is an incomplete description of poloidal rotation. The addition of turbulence driven Reynolds stress does not remedy this disagreement; linear stability calculations and Doppler backscattering measurements show that disagreement increases as turbulence levels decline. Furthermore, the effect of fast-ion friction, by itself, does not lead to improved agreement; in QH-mode plasmas, neoclassical predictions are closest to experimental results in plasmas with the largest fast ion friction. Predictions from a new model that combines all three effects show somewhat better agreement in the H-mode case, but discrepancies well outside the experimental error bars remain.

  17. Magnetic turbulence and resistive MHD instabilities in a 0. 6 < q < 3 poloidal divertor tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Agim, Y.Z.; Callen, J.D.; Chang, Z.; Dexter, R.N.; Goetz, J.A.; Graessle, D.E.; Haines, E.; Kortbawi, D.; LaPointe, M.A.; Moyer, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Detailed statistical properties of internal magnetic turbulence, and internal disruptions in magnetically- and materially-limited discharges, are studied in the Tokapole II poloidal divertor tokamak over the safety factor range 0.6 < q{sub a} < 3. A nonlinear MHD code treats tearing modes in the divertor geometry. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Zanetti, L. J.; Suther, L. L.; Potemra, T. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System (MFEDAS) has been developed to process and analyze satellite magnetic field experiment data from the TRIAD, MAGSAT, AMPTE/CCE, Viking, Polar BEAR, DMSP, HILAT, UARS, and Freja satellites. The MFEDAS provides extensive data management and analysis capabilities. The system is based on standard data structures and a standard user interface. The MFEDAS has two major elements: (1) a set of satellite unique telemetry processing programs for uniform and rapid conversion of the raw data to a standard format and (2) the program Magplot which has file handling, data analysis, and data display sections. This system is an example of software reuse, allowing new data sets and software extensions to be added in a cost effective and timely manner. Future additions to the system will include the addition of standard format file import routines, modification of the display routines to use a commercial graphics package based on X-Window protocols, and a generic utility for telemetry data access and conversion.

  19. Gravity fields of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zendell, A.; Brown, R. D.; Vincent, S.

    1975-01-01

    The most frequently used formulations of the gravitational field are discussed and a standard set of models for the gravity fields of the earth, moon, sun, and other massive bodies in the solar system are defined. The formulas are presented in standard forms, some with instructions for conversion. A point-source or inverse-square model, which represents the external potential of a spherically symmetrical mass distribution by a mathematical point mass without physical dimensions, is considered. An oblate spheroid model is presented, accompanied by an introduction to zonal harmonics. This spheroid model is generalized and forms the basis for a number of the spherical harmonic models which were developed for the earth and moon. The triaxial ellipsoid model is also presented. These models and their application to space missions are discussed.

  20. On Mean Field Limits for Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Niklas; Pickl, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We present a purely probabilistic proof of propagation of molecular chaos for N-particle systems in dimension 3 with interaction forces scaling like 1/\\vert q\\vert ^{3λ - 1} with λ smaller but close to one and cut-off at q = N^{-1/3}. The proof yields a Gronwall estimate for the maximal distance between exact microscopic and approximate mean-field dynamics. This can be used to show weak convergence of the one-particle marginals to solutions of the respective mean-field equation without cut-off in a quantitative way. Our results thus lead to a derivation of the Vlasov equation from the microscopic N-particle dynamics with force term arbitrarily close to the physically relevant Coulomb- and gravitational forces.

  1. Open systems dynamics for propagating quantum fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragiola, Ben Quinn

    In this dissertation, I explore interactions between matter and propagating light. The electromagnetic field is modeled as a Markovian reservoir of quantum harmonic oscillators successively streaming past a quantum system. Each weak and fleeting interaction entangles the light and the system, and the light continues its course. In the context of quantum tomography or metrology one attempts, using measure- ments of the light, to extract information about the quantum state of the system. An inevitable consequence of these measurements is a disturbance of the system's quantum state. These ideas focus on the system and regard the light as ancillary. It serves its purpose as a probe or as a mechanism to generate interesting dynamics or system states but is eventually traced out, leaving the reduced quantum state of the system as the primary mathematical subject. What, then, when the state of light itself harbors intrinsic self-entanglement? One such set of states, those where a traveling wave packet is prepared with a defi- nite number of photons, is a focal point of this dissertation. These N-photon states are ideal candidates as couriers in quantum information processing device. In con- trast to quasi-classical states, such as coherent or thermal fields, N-photon states possess temporal mode entanglement, and local interactions in time have nonlocal consequences. The reduced state of a system probed by an N-photon state evolves in a non-Markovian way, and to describe its dynamics one is obliged to keep track of the field's evolution. I present a method to do this for an arbitrary quantum system using a set of coupled master equations. Many models set aside spatial degrees of freedom as an unnecessary complicating factor. By doing so the precision of predictions is limited. Consider a ensemble of cold, trapped atomic spins dispersively probed by a paraxial laser beam. Atom-light coupling across the ensemble is spatially inhomogeneous as is the radiation pattern of

  2. Filmless Radiographic System For Army Field Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedband, Melvin P.; Grenzow, Frank C.; Gray, James; Heilman, Craig A.; Zhang, Hui L.

    1989-05-01

    Small computers incorporating hard disc memory, multiple high resolution monitors and the small computer systems interface (SCSI) can be used for low-cost filmless radiography. A system has been constructed which can perform all of the functions required of a small clinic or field hospital including scheduling, reporting, image acquisition and display, image annotation, image storage and transmission, and control of peripheral devices. The peripheral devices include an optical card reader/writer, an optical disc reader/writer, a SCSI to DIN/PACS port, an Ethernet port and a SCSI to a long distance telephone/computer port, the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) port. Individual patient optical data cards may be prepared, all images and reports may be archived in a small optical disc in the computer, other image sources may be coupled to the system via the DIN/PACS port, data may be exchanged with the local DIN via the Ethernet port and with distant sites via the ISDN port. The small optical data cards, about the size of a credit card, are used for individual patient images and reports. An independent viewer may be used to display the contents of the cards. The result is a complete "filmless and paperless" medical imaging system. The system was developed on Contract DAMD17-88C-8058 with the US Army Medical Research and Development Command.

  3. Field testing of the Cobra Seal System

    SciTech Connect

    Yellin, E.; Vodrazka, P. ); Ystesund, K.; Drayer, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The Cobra Seal System consists of a passive fiber optic seal and verification equipment which have been modified to take advantage of current technology. The seal permits on-site verification without requiring replacement of the seal. The modifications to the original Cobra Seal System extended the maximum fiber optic cable length from 1 meter to 10 meters. This improvement allowed the Cobra Seal to be considered for application on dry irradiated fuel storage canisters at two Canadian facilities. These canisters are located in an exterior environment exposed to extreme weather conditions. This paper describe the application of the Cobra Seal to these canisters, a housing for the protection of the Cobra Seal body from the environment, and some preliminary results of the IAEA field tests. 4 refs.

  4. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-19

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs.

  5. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  6. Global Positioning System Simulator Field Operational Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Quinn, David A.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) simulation is an important activity in the development or qualification of GPS signal receivers for space flight. Because a GPS simulator is a critical resource it is highly desirable to develop a set of field operational procedures to supplement the basic procedures provided by most simulator vendors. Validated field procedures allow better utilization of the GPS simulator in the development of new test scenarios and simulation operations. These procedures expedite simulation scenario development while resulting in scenarios that are more representative of the true design, as well as enabling construction of more complex simulations than previously possible, for example, spacecraft maneuvers. One difficulty in the development of a simulation scenario is specifying various modes of test vehicle motion and associated maneuvers requiring that a user specify some (but not all) of a few closely related simulation parameters. Currently this can only be done by trial and error. A stand-alone procedure that implements the simulator maneuver motion equations and solves for the motion profile transient times, jerk and acceleration would be of considerable value. Another procedure would permit the specification of some configuration parameters that would determine the simulated GPS signal composition. The resulting signal navigation message, for example, would force the receiver under test to use only the intended C-code component of the simulated GPS signal. A representative class of GPS simulation-related field operational procedures is described in this paper. These procedures were developed and used in support of GPS integration and testing for many successful spacecraft missions such as SAC-A, EO-1, AMSAT, VCL, SeaStar, sounding rockets, and by using the industry standard Spirent Global Simulation Systems Incorporated (GSSI) STR series simulators.

  7. Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

    1999-05-27

    The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination

  8. Statistical field theory of a nonadditive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olemskoi, A. I.; Yushchenko, O. V.; Badalyan, A. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    Based on quantum field methods, we develop a statistical theory of complex systems with nonadditive potentials. Using the Martin-Siggia-Rose method, we find the effective system Lagrangian, from which we obtain evolution equations for the most probable values of the order parameter and its fluctuation amplitudes. We show that these equations are unchanged under deformations of the statistical distribution while the probabilities of realizing different phase trajectories depend essentially on the nonadditivity parameter. We find the generating functional of a nonadditive system and establish its relation to correlation functions; we introduce a pair of additive generating functionals whose expansion terms determine the set of multipoint Green's functions and their self-energy parts. We find equations for the generating functional of a system having an internal symmetry and constraints. In the harmonic approximation framework, we determine the partition function and moments of the order parameter depending on the nonadditivity parameter. We develop a perturbation theory that allows calculating corrections of an arbitrary order to the indicated quantities.

  9. Magnetic field exposure and behavioral monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A W; Drost, D J; Prato, F S

    2001-09-01

    To maximize the availability and usefulness of a small magnetic field exposure laboratory, we designed a magnetic field exposure system that has been used to test human subjects, caged or confined animals, and cell cultures. The magnetic field exposure system consists of three orthogonal pairs of coils 2 m square x 1 m separation, 1.751 m x 0.875 m separation, and 1.5 m x 0.75 m separation. Each coil consisted of ten turns of insulated 8 gauge stranded copper conductor. Each of the pairs were driven by a constant-current amplifier via digital to analog (D/A) converter. A 9 pole zero-gain active Bessel low-pass filter (1 kHz corner frequency) before the amplifier input attenuated the expected high frequencies generated by the D/A conversion. The magnetic field was monitored with a 3D fluxgate magnetometer (0-3 kHz, +/- 1 mT) through an analog to digital converter. Behavioral monitoring utilized two monochrome video cameras (viewing the coil center vertically and horizontally), both of which could be video recorded and real-time digitally Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) encoded to CD-ROM. Human postural sway (standing balance) was monitored with a 3D forceplate mounted on the floor, connected to an analog to digital converter. Lighting was provided by 12 offset overhead dimmable fluorescent track lights and monitored using a digitally connected spectroradiometer. The dc resistance, inductance of each coil pair connected in series were 1.5 m coil (0.27 Omega, 1.2 mH), 1.75 m coil (0.32 Omega, 1.4 mH), and 2 m coil (0.38 Omega, 1.6 mH). The frequency response of the 1.5 m coil set was 500 Hz at +/- 463 microT, 1 kHz at +/- 232 microT, 150 micros rise time from -200 microT(pk) to + 200 microT(pk) (square wave) and is limited by the maximum voltage ( +/- 146 V) of the amplifier (Bessel filter bypassed). PMID:11536281

  10. Collisionality Scaling of Main-ion Toroidal and Poloidal Rotation in Low Torque DIII-D Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B A Grierson, et al

    2013-05-10

    In tokamak plasmas with low levels of toroidal rotation, the radial electric fi eld Er is a combination of pressure gradient and toroidal and poloidal rotation components, all having similar magnitudes. In order to assess the validity of neoclassical poloidal rotation theory for determining the poloidal rotation contribution to Er , Dα emission from neutral beam heated tokamak discharges in DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42 , 614 (2002)] has been evaluated in a sequence of low torque (electron cyclotron resonance heating and balanced diagnostic neutral beam pulse) discharges to determine the local deuterium toroidal rotation velocity. By invoking the radial force balance relation the deuterium poloidal rotation can be inferred. It is found that the deuterium poloidal low exceeds the neoclassical value in plasmas with collisionality νi < 0: 1, being more ion diamagnetic, and with a stronger dependence on collisionality than neoclassical theory predicts. At low toroidal rotation, the poloidal rotation contribution to the radial electric fi eld and its shear is signi cant. The eff ect of anomalous levels of poloidal rotation on the radial electric fi eld and cross fi eld heat transport is investigated for ITER parameters.

  11. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  12. Crystalline electric fields in mixed valent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The inelastic neutron studies of rare-earth-based mixed valent systems have all shown remarkably similar results: a broad quasielastic line with half width on the order of 10 MeV. This width exhibits a strong temperature dependence in those systems which undergo a valence transition and is only weakly temperature dependent in those systems which show no transition. A surprising result was the absence of crystalline electric field (CEF) excitations. Recent measurements on the alloy Ce/sub .9-x/La/sub x/Th/sub .1/ have revealed the existence of CEF excitations. For x = 0, the valence transition is strongly first order and occurs near T/sub 0/ approx. 150 K. The inelastic spectra exhibit the typical broad quasielastic scattering. As x increases, T/sub 0/ decreases due to internal pressure effects, and a well-defined, but broad, excitation appears near E = 15 MeV. This is interpreted as a CEF excitation between the GAMMA/sub 7/ and GAMMA/sub 8/ levels of the Ce/sup 3/+ ion. For x = 0.40, the valence transition is almost completely suppressed and the excitation becomes even sharper.

  13. An upgrade of the magnetic diagnostic system of the DIII-D tokamak for non-axisymmetric measurements.

    PubMed

    King, J D; Strait, E J; Boivin, R L; Taussig, D; Watkins, M G; Hanson, J M; Logan, N C; Paz-Soldan, C; Pace, D C; Shiraki, D; Lanctot, M J; La Haye, R J; Lao, L L; Battaglia, D J; Sontag, A C; Haskey, S R; Bak, J G

    2014-08-01

    The DIII-D tokamak magnetic diagnostic system [E. J. Strait, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 023502 (2006)] has been upgraded to significantly expand the measurement of the plasma response to intrinsic and applied non-axisymmetric "3D" fields. The placement and design of 101 additional sensors allow resolution of toroidal mode numbers 1 ≤ n ≤ 3, and poloidal wavelengths smaller than MARS-F, IPEC, and VMEC magnetohydrodynamic model predictions. Small 3D perturbations, relative to the equilibrium field (10(-5) < δB/B0 < 10(-4)), require sub-millimeter fabrication and installation tolerances. This high precision is achieved using electrical discharge machined components, and alignment techniques employing rotary laser levels and a coordinate measurement machine. A 16-bit data acquisition system is used in conjunction with analog signal-processing to recover non-axisymmetric perturbations. Co-located radial and poloidal field measurements allow up to 14.2 cm spatial resolution of poloidal structures (plasma poloidal circumference is ~500 cm). The function of the new system is verified by comparing the rotating tearing mode structure, measured by 14 BP fluctuation sensors, with that measured by the upgraded B(R) saddle loop sensors after the mode locks to the vessel wall. The result is a nearly identical 2/1 helical eigenstructure in both cases. PMID:25173265

  14. An upgrade of the magnetic diagnostic system of the DIII-D tokamak for non-axisymmetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Boivin, R. L.; Taussig, D.; Watkins, M. G.; Hanson, J. M.; Logan, N. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Pace, D. C.; Shiraki, D.; Lanctot, M. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Lao, L. L.; Battaglia, D. J.; Sontag, A. C.; Haskey, S. R.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-08-01

    The DIII-D tokamak magnetic diagnostic system [E. J. Strait, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 023502 (2006)] has been upgraded to significantly expand the measurement of the plasma response to intrinsic and applied non-axisymmetric "3D" fields. The placement and design of 101 additional sensors allow resolution of toroidal mode numbers 1 ≤ n ≤ 3, and poloidal wavelengths smaller than MARS-F, IPEC, and VMEC magnetohydrodynamic model predictions. Small 3D perturbations, relative to the equilibrium field (10-5 < δB/B0 < 10-4), require sub-millimeter fabrication and installation tolerances. This high precision is achieved using electrical discharge machined components, and alignment techniques employing rotary laser levels and a coordinate measurement machine. A 16-bit data acquisition system is used in conjunction with analog signal-processing to recover non-axisymmetric perturbations. Co-located radial and poloidal field measurements allow up to 14.2 cm spatial resolution of poloidal structures (plasma poloidal circumference is ˜500 cm). The function of the new system is verified by comparing the rotating tearing mode structure, measured by 14 BP fluctuation sensors, with that measured by the upgraded BR saddle loop sensors after the mode locks to the vessel wall. The result is a nearly identical 2/1 helical eigenstructure in both cases.

  15. Measured and simulated poloidal asymmetries of the FTU S.O.L. in the toroidal limiter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigheb, M.; Ridolfini, V. Pericoli; Zagorski, R.

    The scrape-off layer (SOL) of FTU in the magnetic configuration generated by a TZM (Molybdenum) toroidal limiter has been studied by an array of reciprocating Langmuir probes extended over a large part of the poloidal angle, and the results have been compared with the 2-dimensional multifluid SOL code EPIT. A comparison with the previous poloidal limiter configuration with the same main plasma conditions, showed at the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) longer and more poloidally uniform connection lengths, and a corresponding better uniformity of SOL plasma parameters. Asymmetry of electron density is observed, which can be associated with the recycling of plasma near the toroidal limiter plates in a configuration with long connection lengths. Electron temperature appears to be less dependent of power entering the SOL than in the old poloidal limiter configuration. Experimentally observed dependence of the edge plasma condition on Lcon has been confirmed by the results of the 2D code EPIT.

  16. Neutral-beam current-driven high-poloidal-beta operation of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Matsuoka, M.; Bhadra, D.K.; Burrell, K.H.; Callis, R.W.; Chance, M.S.; Chu, M.S.; Greene, J.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Harvey, R.W.; and others

    1988-10-10

    Neutral-beam current-drive experiments in the DIII-D tokamak with a single null poloidal divertor are described. A plasma current of 0.34 MA has been sustained by neutral beams alone, and the energy confinement is of H-mode quality. Poloidal ..beta.. values reach 3.5 without disruption or coherent magnetic activity suggesting that these plasmas may be entering the second stability regime.

  17. Classical chaos in atom-field systems.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Carlos, J; Bastarrachea-Magnani, M A; Lerma-Hernández, S; Hirsch, J G

    2016-08-01

    The relation between the onset of chaos and critical phenomena, like quantum phase transitions (QPTs) and excited-state quantum phase transitions (ESQPTs), is analyzed for atom-field systems. While it has been speculated that the onset of hard chaos is associated with ESQPTs based in the resonant case, the off-resonant cases, and a close look at the vicinity of the QPTs in resonance, show clearly that both phenomena, ESQPTs and chaos, respond to different mechanisms. The results are supported in a detailed numerical study of the dynamics of the semiclassical Hamiltonian of the Dicke model. The appearance of chaos is quantified calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent for a wide sample of initial conditions in the whole available phase space for a given energy. The percentage of the available phase space with chaotic trajectories is evaluated as a function of energy and coupling between the qubit and bosonic part, allowing us to obtain maps in the space of coupling and energy, where ergodic properties are observed in the model. Different sets of Hamiltonian parameters are considered, including resonant and off-resonant cases. PMID:27627300

  18. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  19. Classical chaos in atom-field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez-Carlos, J.; Bastarrachea-Magnani, M. A.; Lerma-Hernández, S.; Hirsch, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    The relation between the onset of chaos and critical phenomena, like quantum phase transitions (QPTs) and excited-state quantum phase transitions (ESQPTs), is analyzed for atom-field systems. While it has been speculated that the onset of hard chaos is associated with ESQPTs based in the resonant case, the off-resonant cases, and a close look at the vicinity of the QPTs in resonance, show clearly that both phenomena, ESQPTs and chaos, respond to different mechanisms. The results are supported in a detailed numerical study of the dynamics of the semiclassical Hamiltonian of the Dicke model. The appearance of chaos is quantified calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent for a wide sample of initial conditions in the whole available phase space for a given energy. The percentage of the available phase space with chaotic trajectories is evaluated as a function of energy and coupling between the qubit and bosonic part, allowing us to obtain maps in the space of coupling and energy, where ergodic properties are observed in the model. Different sets of Hamiltonian parameters are considered, including resonant and off-resonant cases.

  20. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  1. Quantum field theory of interacting plasmon-photon-phonon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to the construction of the quantum field theory of the interacting system of plasmons, photons and phonons on the basis of general fundamental principles of electrodynamics and quantum field theory of many-body systems. Since a plasmon is a quasiparticle appearing as a resonance in the collective oscillation of the interacting electron gas in solids, the starting point is the total action functional of the interacting system comprising electron gas, electromagnetic field and phonon fields. By means of the powerful functional integral technique, this original total action is transformed into that of the system of the quantum fields describing plasmons, transverse photons, acoustic as well as optic longitudinal and transverse phonons. The collective oscillations of the electron gas is characterized by a real scalar field φ(x) called the collective oscillation field. This field is split into the static background field φ0(x) and the fluctuation field ζ(x). The longitudinal phonon fields {{{Q}}al}(x), {{{Q}}ol}(x) are also split into the background fields {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) and dynamical fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x) while the transverse phonon fields {{{Q}}at}(x), {{{Q}}ot}(x) themselves are dynamical fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) without background fields. After the canonical quantization procedure, the background fields φ0(x), {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) remain the classical fields, while the fluctuation fields ζ(x) and dynamical phonon fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) become quantum fields. In quantum theory, a plasmon is the quantum of Hermitian scalar field σ(x) called the plasmon field, longitudinal phonons as complex spinless quasiparticles are the quanta of the effective longitudinal phonon Hermitian scalar fields {{θ }a}(x), {{θ }0}(x), while transverse phonons are the quanta of the original Hermitian transverse phonon vector fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x). By means of the functional integral

  2. Advanced control of MST's poloidal field with a programmable power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. E.; Holly, D. J.; McCollam, K. J.; Morin, J. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Squitieri, A.; Anderson, J. K.; Seltzman, A. H.

    2015-11-01

    One thrust of the MST program is to advance inductive control for the development of both the RFP's fusion potential and the predictive capability of fusion science. This entails programmable power supplies (PPS's) for the Bt and Bp circuits. A Bt PPS is in place, and a Bp PPS is being designed. Together, these supplies will provide inductive capability rivaling that of any fusion device in the world. To better inform the design of the Bp PPS, and to demonstrate some of the new capabilities that will be provided, the existing Bt PPS has been connected to MST's Bp circuit. While limited to lower voltage and current than the planned Bp PPS, this has already more than quadrupled the Ip flattop duration. It has also allowed access to very low Ip, down to 20 kA, substantially increasing MST's range of Lundquist number, important for the validation of MHD computational models. Low Ip has also allowed electron energization by high-harmonic EBW. At higher Ip, work has begun on self-similar ramp-down of Ip, a potential route to improved confinement. Work supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  3. Field Turf System Has Irrigation Down PAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    1973-01-01

    Explains the process whereby Goshen High School (Indiana) acquired a football field that is never muddy, but which is never covered with expensive sheeting; and that has green grass the year around, but which no one ever sprinkles. It also offers firmness for running, resiliency for falling, traction for turning, and a flat, highly uniform field.…

  4. The topology of integrable systems with incomplete fields

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, K R

    2014-09-30

    Liouville's theorem holds for Hamiltonian systems with complete Hamiltonian fields which possess a complete involutive system of first integrals; such systems are called Liouville-integrable. In this paper integrable systems with incomplete Hamiltonian fields are investigated. It is shown that Liouville's theorem remains valid in the case of a single incomplete field, while if the number of incomplete fields is greater, a certain analogue of the theorem holds. An integrable system on the algebra sl(3) is taken as an example. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  5. QM-8 field joint protection system, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Elgie

    1989-01-01

    The pre-launch functioning data of the Field Joint Protection System (JPS) used on QM-8 are presented. Also included is the post fire condition of the JPS components following the test firing of the motor. The JPS components are: field joint heaters; field joint sensors; field joint moisture seal; moisture seal kevlar retaining straps; field joint external extruded cork insulation; vent valve; power cables; and igniter heater.

  6. Magnetic helicity and the relaxation of fossil fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of an active dynamo, purely poloidal magnetic field configurations are unstable to large-scale dynamical perturbations, and decay via reconnection on an Alfvénic time-scale. Nevertheless, a number of classes of dynamo-free stars do exhibit significant, long-lived, surface magnetic fields. Numerical simulations suggest that the large-scale poloidal field in these systems is stabilized by a toroidal component of the field in the stellar interior. Using the principle of conservation of total helicity, we develop a variational principle for computing the structure of the magnetic field inside a conducting sphere surrounded by an insulating vacuum. We show that, for a fixed total helicity, the minimum energy state corresponds to a force-free configuration. We find a simple class of axisymmetric solutions, parametrized by angular and radial quantum numbers. However, these solutions have a discontinuity in the toroidal magnetic field at the stellar surface which will exert a toroidal stress on the surface of the star. We then describe two other classes of solutions, the standard spheromak solutions and ones with fixed surface magnetic fields, the latter being relevant for neutron stars with rigid crusts. We discuss the implications of our results for the structure of neutron star magnetic fields, the decay of fields, and the origin of variability and outbursts in magnetars.

  7. Development of two color laser diagnostics for the ITER poloidal polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahata, K.; Akiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nakayama, K.; Okajima, S.

    2010-10-15

    Two color laser diagnostics using terahertz laser sources are under development for a high performance operation of the Large Helical Device and for future fusion devices such as ITER. So far, we have achieved high power laser oscillation lines simultaneously oscillating at 57.2 and 47.7 {mu}m by using a twin optically pumped CH{sub 3}OD laser, and confirmed the original function, compensation of mechanical vibration, of the two color laser interferometer. In this article, application of the two color laser diagnostics to the ITER poloidal polarimeter and recent hardware developments will be described.

  8. Hydromagnetic waves in a compressed-dipole field via field-aligned Klein-Gordon equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jinlei; Hu, Qiang; Webb, Gary M.; McKenzie, James F.

    2016-05-01

    Hydromagnetic waves, especially those of frequencies in the range of a few millihertz to a few hertz observed in the Earth's magnetosphere, are categorized as ultra low-frequency (ULF) waves or pulsations. They have been extensively studied due to their importance in the interaction with radiation belt particles and in probing the structures of the magnetosphere. We developed an approach to examining the toroidal standing Aflvén waves in a background magnetic field by recasting the wave equation into a Klein-Gordon (KG) form along individual field lines. The eigenvalue solutions to the system are characteristic of a propagation type when the corresponding eigenfrequency is greater than a critical frequency and a decaying type otherwise. We apply the approach to a compressed-dipole magnetic field model of the inner magnetosphere and obtain the spatial profiles of relevant parameters and the spatial wave forms of harmonic oscillations. We further extend the approach to poloidal-mode standing Alfvén waves along field lines. In particular, we present a quantitative comparison with a recent spacecraft observation of a poloidal standing Alfvén wave in the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis based on the KG equation yields consistent results which agree with the spacecraft measurements of the wave period and the amplitude ratio between the magnetic field and electric field perturbations.

  9. Observation of an edge coherent mode and poloidal flow in the electron cyclotron wave induced high βp plasma in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Zushi, H.; Nishino, N.; Mishra, K.; Mahira, Y.; Tashima, S.; Ejiri, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Onchi, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Matsuoka, K.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations are measured in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of QUEST using fast visible imaging diagnostic. Electron cyclotron wave injection in the Ohmic plasma features excitation of low frequency coherent fluctuations near the separatrix and enhanced cross-field transport. Plasma shifts from initial high field side limiter bound (inboard limited, IL) towards inboard poloidal null (IPN) configuration with steepening of the density profile at the edge. This may have facilitated the increased edge and SOL fluctuation activities. Observation of the coherent mode, associated plasma flow, and particle out-flux, for the first time in the IPN plasma configuration in a spherical tokamak may provide further impetus to the edge and SOL turbulence studies in tokamaks.

  10. Ray vector fields, prismatic effect, and thick astigmatic optical systems.

    PubMed

    Harris, W F

    1996-06-01

    The application of the concept of ray vector fields to optical systems is reexamined. Paraxial or linear optics defines a four-dimensional ray vector field for any optical system: the vector field maps the incident ray vector into the emergent ray vector. In the case of thin systems, including thin astigmatic lenses, one can define a vector field of reduced dimensionality: the vector field is two-dimensional and maps the ray's incident position into the change in reduced direction. When the index of refraction is the same before and after a thin system, the change in reduced direction is the reduced deflection through the system or the reduced prismatic effect. Contrary to what has recently been claimed, this type of two-dimensional vector field does not apply in general to thick systems. However, a number of different types of two-dimensional vector fields can be defined for various particular classes of optical systems. Thick systems differ qualitatively from thin systems. They do not have equivalent thin lenses and cannot generally be replaced by thin lenses. Equations are derived for the change in reduced direction and deflection for a ray through optical systems in general and through separated two- and three-lens systems in particular. PMID:8807654

  11. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  12. Photovoltaic-Powered Vaccine Refrigerator: Freezer Systems Field Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  13. Wide field strip-imaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180-degree strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frusto-conical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide-angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180-degree strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  14. Effect of zero magnetic field on cardiovascular system and microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Yu. I.; At'kov, O. Yu.; Vasin, A. L.; Breus, T. K.; Sasonko, M. L.; Pishchalnikov, R. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of zero magnetic field conditions on cardiovascular system of healthy adults have been studied. In order to generate zero magnetic field, the facility for magnetic fields modeling "ARFA" has been used. Parameters of the capillary blood flow, blood pressure, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring were measured during the study. All subjects were tested twice: in zero magnetic field and, for comparison, in sham condition. The obtained results during 60 minutes of zero magnetic field exposure demonstrate a clear effect on cardiovascular system and microcirculation. The results of our experiments can be used in studies of long-term stay in hypo-magnetic conditions during interplanetary missions.

  15. Effect of zero magnetic field on cardiovascular system and microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel, Yu I; At'kov, O Yu; Vasin, A L; Breus, T K; Sasonko, M L; Pishchalnikov, R Yu

    2016-02-01

    The effects of zero magnetic field conditions on cardiovascular system of healthy adults have been studied. In order to generate zero magnetic field, the facility for magnetic fields modeling "ARFA" has been used. Parameters of the capillary blood flow, blood pressure, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring were measured during the study. All subjects were tested twice: in zero magnetic field and, for comparison, in sham condition. The obtained results during 60 minutes of zero magnetic field exposure demonstrate a clear effect on cardiovascular system and microcirculation. The results of our experiments can be used in studies of long-term stay in hypo-magnetic conditions during interplanetary missions. PMID:26948007

  16. A Novel Variable Field System for Field-Cycled Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Keerthi; Caia, George L.; Kesselring, Eric; Samouilov, Alexandre; Petryakov, Sergey; Lurie, David J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an NMR-based technique which enables detection and spectral characterization of endogenous and exogenous paramagnetic substances measured via transfer of polarization from the saturated unpaired electron spin system to the NMR active nuclei. A variable field system capable of performing DNP spectroscopy with NMR detection at any magnetic field in the range 0 - 0.38 T is described. The system is built around a clinical open-MRI system. To obtain EPR spectra via DNP, partial cancellation of the detection field B0NMR is required to alter the evolution field B0EPR at which the EPR excitation is achieved. The addition of resistive actively shielded field cancellation coils in the gap of the primary magnet provides this field offset in the range of 0–100 mT. A description of the primary magnet, cancellation coils, power supplies, interfacing hardware, RF electronics and console are included. Performance of the instrument has been evaluated by acquiring DNP spectra of phantoms with aqueous nitroxide solutions (TEMPOL) at three NMR detection fields of 97 G, 200 G and 587 G corresponding to 413 kHz, 851.6 kHz and 2.5 MHz respectively and fixed EPR evolution field of 100 G corresponding to an irradiation frequency of 282.3 MHz. This variable field DNP system offers great flexibility for the performance of DNP spectroscopy with independent optimum choice of EPR excitation and NMR detection fields. PMID:20570197

  17. MAPLE Procedures For Boson Fields System On Curved Space - Time

    SciTech Connect

    Murariu, Gabriel

    2007-04-23

    Systems of interacting boson fields are an important subject in the last years. From the problem of dark matter to boson stars' study, boson fields are involved. In the general configuration, it is considered a Klein-Gordon-Maxwell-Einstein fields system for a complex scalar field minimally coupled to a gravitational one. The necessity of studying a larger number of space-time configurations and the huge volume of computations for each particular situation are some reasons for building a MAPLE procedures set for this kind of systems.

  18. Development of field portable sampling and analysis systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.

    2000-06-08

    A rapid field portable sample and analysis system has been demonstrated at the Savannah River Site and the Hanford Site. The portable system can be used when rapid decisions are needed in the field during scoping or remediation activities, or when it is impractical to bring large volumes of water to the lab for analysis.

  19. Calculation of poloidal velocity in the tokamak plasma with allowance for density inhomogeneity and diamagnetic drift of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Shurygin, R. V.

    2012-02-15

    A one-dimensional evolution equation for the angle-averaged poloidal momentum of the tokamak plasma is derived in the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics with allowance for density inhomogeneity and diamagnetic drift of ions. In addition to fluctuations of the E Multiplication-Sign B drift velocity, the resulting turbulent Reynolds stress tensor includes fluctuations of the ion density and ion pressure, as well as turbulent radial fluxes of particles and heat. It is demonstrated numerically by using a particular example that the poloidal velocity calculated using the refined one-dimensional evolution equation differs substantially from that provided by the simplified model. When passing to the new model, both the turbulent Reynolds force and the Stringer-Winsor force increase, which leads to an increase in the amplitude of the ion poloidal velocity. This, in turn, leads to a decrease in turbulent fluxes of particles and heat due to the effect of shear decorrelation.

  20. Topological field theory of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V.

    2012-09-15

    Here, it is shown that the path-integral representation of any stochastic or deterministic continuous-time dynamical model is a cohomological or Witten-type topological field theory, i.e., a model with global topological supersymmetry (Q-symmetry). As many other supersymmetries, Q-symmetry must be perturbatively stable due to what is generically known as non-renormalization theorems. As a result, all (equilibrium) dynamical models are divided into three major categories: Markovian models with unbroken Q-symmetry, chaotic models with Q-symmetry spontaneously broken on the mean-field level by, e.g., fractal invariant sets (e.g., strange attractors), and intermittent or self-organized critical (SOC) models with Q-symmetry dynamically broken by the condensation of instanton-antiinstanton configurations (earthquakes, avalanches, etc.) SOC is a full-dimensional phase separating chaos and Markovian dynamics. In the deterministic limit, however, antiinstantons disappear and SOC collapses into the 'edge of chaos.' Goldstone theorem stands behind spatio-temporal self-similarity of Q-broken phases known under such names as algebraic statistics of avalanches, 1/f noise, sensitivity to initial conditions, etc. Other fundamental differences of Q-broken phases is that they can be effectively viewed as quantum dynamics and that they must also have time-reversal symmetry spontaneously broken. Q-symmetry breaking in non-equilibrium situations (quenches, Barkhausen effect, etc.) is also briefly discussed.

  1. Distributed magnetic field positioning system using code division multiple access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigge, Eric A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and methods for a magnetic field positioning system use a fundamentally different, and advantageous, signal structure and multiple access method, known as Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). This signal architecture, when combined with processing methods, leads to advantages over the existing technologies, especially when applied to a system with a large number of magnetic field generators (beacons). Beacons at known positions generate coded magnetic fields, and a magnetic sensor measures a sum field and decomposes it into component fields to determine the sensor position and orientation. The apparatus and methods can have a large `building-sized` coverage area. The system allows for numerous beacons to be distributed throughout an area at a number of different locations. A method to estimate position and attitude, with no prior knowledge, uses dipole fields produced by these beacons in different locations.

  2. Optimized low-cost-array field designs for photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    As manager of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic Systems Definition Project, Sandia National Laboratories is engaged in a comprehensive program to define and develop array field subsystems which can achieve the lowest possible lifecycle costs. The major activity of this program is described, namely, the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. As part of this activity, design criteria and performance requirements for specific array subsystems including support structures, foundations, intermodule connections, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control have been defined and evaluated. Similarly, fully integrated flat-panel array field designs, optimized for lowest lifecycle costs, have been developed for system sizes ranging from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs for these array field designs are presented and discussed.

  3. IR system field performance with superresolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanning, Jonathan; Miller, Justin; Park, Jennifer; Tener, Gene; Reynolds, Joseph; O'Shea, Patrick; Halford, Carl; Driggers, Ron

    2007-04-01

    Superresolution processing is currently being used to improve the performance of infrared imagers through an increase in sampling, the removal of aliasing, and the reduction of fixed-pattern noise. The performance improvement of superresolution has not been previously tested on military targets. This paper presents the results of human perception experiments to determine field performance on the NVESD standard military eight (8)-target set using a prototype LWIR camera. These experiments test and compare human performance of both still images and movie clips, each generated with and without superresolution processing. Lockheed Martin's XR® algorithm is tested as a specific example of a modern combined superresolution and image processing algorithm. Basic superresolution with no additional processing is tested to help determine the benefit of separate processes. The superresolution processing is modeled in NVThermIP for comparison to the perception test. The measured range to 70% probability of identification using XR® is increased by approximately 34% while the 50% range is increased by approximately 19% for this camera. A comparison case is modeled using a more undersampled commercial MWIR sensor that predicts a 45% increase in range performance from superresolution.

  4. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  5. Role of field-aligned current closure via the Pedersen, Hall, and atmospheric displacement current in the formation of ionospheric current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.; Song, Y.; Lysak, R. L.

    2002-12-01

    To consider the transmission process of electromagnetic disturbances carried by field-aligned current (FAC) into the ionospheric and atmospheric loading region, we construct a simplified model for the ionosphere-atmosphere-Earth electromagnetically coupled system. The ionospheric slab (conductor) separated by Earth_fs ground plane by the atmospheric region forms a capacitor. Outgoing current flows in the ionospheric slab and return current flows in the ground plane, forming an inductor. Thus, the ionospheric slab acts as if it has a capacitor in parallel to a ground inductor in series. Electric energy is stored in the dielectric atmospheric region due to the electric field between ionospheric slab and ground plane. Charge present in the ionospheric slab and induced in the ground plane creates a shunt self-capacitance. Magnetic energy associated to currents is stored in the ionospheric slab. The magnetic field links the loop formed by the conductor and ground plane and creates a series self-inductance. This model clarifies the roles of the FAC closure via the currents in the ionosphere-atmosphere-Earth electromagnetically coupled system. Electromagnetic energy associated with FACs is dissipated in the ionosphere through Joule dissipation of the ionospheric divergent Pedersen current carried by ions. On the other hand, the FAC closure via the divergent Hall current carried by electrons increases the energy of the rotational Hall current, causing it to radiate Poynting fluxes that lead to the growth of a poloidal-type magnetic field in the magnetosphere and atmosphere. Furthermore, the FAC closure via the atmospheric displacement current provides Poynting fluxes for the generation of a non-local ionospheric current system. In this study, we will show the physical details of the redistribution process of the FAC_fs momentum and energy into current in the ionosphere-atmosphere loading region.

  6. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A.

    1995-03-01

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain Q{sub DT} = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased l{sub i}.

  7. Impurity flows and plateau-regime poloidal density variation in a tokamak pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Landreman, M.; Fueloep, T.; Guszejnov, D.

    2011-09-15

    In the pedestal of a tokamak, the sharp radial gradients of density and temperature can give rise to poloidal variation in the density of impurities. At the same time, the flow of the impurity species is modified relative to the conventional neoclassical result. In this paper, these changes to the density and flow of a collisional impurity species are calculated for the case when the main ions are in the plateau regime. In this regime, it is found that the impurity density can be higher at either the inboard or outboard side. This finding differs from earlier results for banana- or Pfirsch-Schlueter-regime main ions, in which case the impurity density is always higher at the inboard side in the absence of rotation. Finally, the modifications to the impurity flow are also given for the other regimes of main-ion collisionality.

  8. Integrated modeling of high poloidal beta scenario for a next-step reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenaghan, J.; Garofalo, A. M.; Meneghini, O.; Smith, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    In order to fill the scientific and technological gaps between ITER and a nuclear fusion power plant DEMO, a next-step integrated nuclear test facility is critical. A high poloidal beta tokamak regime investigated in recent DIII-D experiments is a promising candidate for steady state operation in such a next-step device because the large bootstrap current fraction (~ 80 %) reduces the demands on the external current drive. Despite the large values of q95 ~10, the normalized fusion performance observed in the experiments meet the target for an economically attractive fusion power plant such as ARIES-ACT2. In this work, we will project the performance for a conducting and superconducting coil next-step steady state reactor using theory-based 0-D modeling and full 1.5D transport modeling. Work supported by U.S. DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. Poloidal asymmetric flow and current relaxation of ballooned transport during I-phase in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Fuchert, G.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Maraschek, M.; Medvedeva, A.; Mink, F.; Scott, B. D.; Shao, L. M.; Stroth, U.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulence driven poloidal asymmetric parallel flow and current perturbations are studied for tokamak plasmas of circular geometry. Whereas zonal flows can lead to in-out asymmetry of parallel flows and currents via the Pfirsch-Schlüter mechanism, ballooned transport can result in an up-down asymmetry due to the Stringer spin-up mechanism. Measurements of up-down asymmetric parallel current fluctuations occurring during the I-phase in ASDEX Upgrade are not responses to the equilibrium by the Pfirsch-Schlüter current, but can be interpreted as a response to strongly ballooned plasma transport coupled with the Stringer spin-up mechanism. A good agreement of the experimental measured limit-cycle frequencies during I-phase with the Stringer spin-up relaxation frequency is found.

  10. A large-field laser holographic focusing schilieren system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Glen P.; Chokani, N.

    1992-01-01

    A large-field laser holographic focusing schlieren system for high-speed flow visualization has been built and evaluated. This system is based on a recently improved large-field focusing schlieren technique and is combined with laser holography methods to record three-dimensional flows. A coordinated experimental and computational study of supersonic flows over wedge, cone, and sphere geometries was conducted to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the system. The ability of the system to focus on planes normal to its optical axis is demonstrated. The sharpness of focus of the present system was found to be limited. Issues regarding obtaining quantitative measurements of the density gradient are discussed.

  11. Soliton asymptotics for systems of `field-particle' type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaykin, Valery M.

    2013-04-01

    This survey is devoted to the recent mathematical progress in the study of interaction between particles and fields. It covers a series of papers from 2000 till now. Three systems describing the interaction of a field and a charged particle are considered: the scalar Klein-Gordon field or the wave field coupled to a particle, and the Maxwell-Lorentz system describing a charged particle in the Maxwell field. The Wiener condition on the charge density of the particle was introduced in the first papers on long-time convergence to solitons in the absence of external potentials (the 1990s) and turned out to play an important role in the investigations reflected here of soliton asymptotics for solutions with initial data sufficiently close to invariant solitary manifolds. Our approach is based on using the Hamiltonian structure of the systems and the Buslaev-Perelman method of symplectic projection. Bibliography: 49 titles.

  12. The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

  13. Reactions of the nervous system to magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kholodov, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    This magnetobiological survey considers sensory, nervous, stress and genetic effects of magnetic fields on man and animals. It is shown that the nervous system plays an important role in the reactions of the organism to magnetic fields; the final biological effect is a function of the strength of the magnetic fields, the gradient, direction of the lines of force, duration and location of the action, and the functional status of the organism.

  14. Field trial of rural solar photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, P.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Banerjee, T.; Das, S.; Saha, H.

    Experience, costs, and performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems set up in a remote Indian village to power an adult literacy center and an irrigation pump are described. The center was furnished with a 14-module, 200 W array to power a television and three fluorescent lamps. The pumping installation has 20 modules for a 300 W output directly coupled to a 300-W dc pump motor. Data were gathered on the open circuit voltage, short circuit current, specific gravity of the battery fluid, degradation of the cells, nominal operating temperature of the cells, load currents, Amp-hours, water flow rate (pump), and the static head and draw down rate (pump). Monitoring of the array performances in the dusty environment showed that once/week cleaning is necessary. Al-substrates cracked at the center installation and sealant evaporation caused condensation which degraded the light transmissivity and thereby the short-circuit current of the modules. The combination of low-efficiency (5 pct) cells and cheap labor demonstrated economic operation without high-efficiency cells.

  15. Magnetic fields of the solar system: A comparative planetology toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, J. B.; Purucker, M. E.; Johnson, C. L.; Sabaka, T. J.; Olsen, N.; Sun, Z.; Al Asad, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Lillis, R. J.; Langlais, B.; Winslow, R. M.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic fields within the solar system provide a strong organizing force for processes active both within a planet or moon, and outside of it. In the interest of stimulating research and education in the field of comparative planetology, we present documented Fortran and MATLAB source codes and benchmarks to the latest models for planets and satellites that host internal magnetic fields. This presentation is made in the context of an interactive website: http://planetary-mag.net. Models are included for Earth (Comprehensive model CM4 of Sabaka et al., 2004, Geophysics J. Int.), Mercury (Anderson et al, 2011, Science), the Moon (Purucker and Nicholas, 2010, JGR), Mars (Lillis et al., 2010, JGR), and the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (Russell and Dougherty, 2010, Space Science Reviews). All models include magnetic fields of internal origin, and fields of external origin are included in the models for Mercury, the Earth, and the Moon. As models evolve, we intend to include magnetic fields of external origin for the other planets and moons. The website allows the user to select a coordinate system, such as planet-centered, heliocentric, or boundary normal, and the location within that coordinate system, and the vector magnetic field due to each of the component source fields at that location is then calculated and presented. Alternatively, the user can input a range as well as a grid spacing, and the vector magnetic field will be calculated for all points on that grid and be made available as a file for downloading.

  16. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL TOILET SYSTEMS AND GREY WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the field program was to determine the operational characteristics and overall acceptability of popular models of biological toilets and a few select grey water systems. A field observation scheme was devised to take advantage of in-use sites throughout the State...

  17. Magnetic field in the Lobachevsky space and related integrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkin, Yu. A. Otchik, V. S.; Ovsiyuk, E. M.

    2012-10-15

    Various possibilities to define analogs of the uniform magnetic field in the Lobachevsky space are considered using different coordinate systems in this space. Quantum mechanical problem of motion in the defined fields is also treated. Variables in the Schroedinger equation are separated and diagonal operators are found. For some cases, exact solutions are obtained.

  18. Evolution of Self-organized Poloidal Dust Rotation with Neutral Pressure in a Direct Current Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manjit; Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Sharma, D.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2015-11-01

    Poloidal rotation of mono-dispersed dust particles in toroidally symmetric structures is obtained experimentally in an unmagnetized parallel plate dc glow discharge at high pressures, using a concentric metallic ring placed over surface of cathode. The poloidal rotation of dust particles is observed to be localized above the ring. A radial gradient in the ion drag force arising due to a radial density gradient above the ring is identified as the principal cause of dust rotation. The evolution of this poloidal dust rotation with background gas pressure is studied. A transition from a filled-vortex (poloidal cross-section of the toroidal structure) to a vortex with void at the centre is observed with increase in fill-in gas pressure accompanied by a decrease in vortex height from cathode surface. The velocity of the dust particles is observed to increase with an increase in neutral gas pressure. This observation contradicts the obvious interpretation of slowing down of dust rotation due to an increase in neutral frictional force which increases with pressure. These experimental results with probable causes will be presented in details.

  19. Entropy squeezing for qubit – field system under decoherence effect

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Khalek, S; Berrada, K; A-S F Obada; Wahiddin, M R

    2014-03-28

    We study in detail the dynamics of field entropy squeezing (FES) for a qubit – field system whose dynamics is described by the phase-damped model. The results of calculations show that the initial state and decoherence play a crucial role in the evolution of FES. During the temporal evolution of the system under decoherence effect, an interesting monotonic relation between FES, Wehrl entropy (WE) and negativity is observed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. A microscopic field theoretical approach for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, F.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a microscopic modeling approach for active systems. The approach extends the phase field crystal (PFC) model and allows us to describe generic properties of active systems within a continuum model. The approach is validated by reproducing results obtained with corresponding agent-based and microscopic phase field models. We consider binary collisions, collective motion and vortex formation. For larger numbers of particles we analyze the coarsening process in active crystals and identify giant number fluctuation in a cluster formation process.

  1. Conceptual models of the evolution of transgressive dune field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.

    2013-10-01

    This paper examines the evolutionary paths of some transgressive dune fields that have formed on different coasts of the world, and presents some initial conceptual models of system dynamics for transgressive dune sheets and dune fields. Various evolutionary pathways are conceptualized based on a visual examination of dune fields from around the world. On coasts with high sediment supply, dune sheets and dune fields tend to accumulate as large scale barrier systems with little colonization of vegetation in arid-hyper to arid climate regimes, and as multiple, active discrete phases of dune field and deflation plain couplets in temperate to tropical environments. Active dune fields tend to be singular entities on coasts with low to moderate sediment supply. Landscape complexity and vegetation richness and diversity increases as dune fields evolve from simple active sheets and dunes to single and multiple deflation plains and basins, precipitation ridges, nebkha fields and a host of other dune types associated with vegetation (e.g. trailing ridges, slacks, remnant knobs, gegenwalle ridges and dune track ridges, 'tree islands' and 'bush pockets'). Three principal scenarios of transgressive dune sheet and dune field development are discussed, including dune sheets or dune fields evolving directly from the backshore, development following foredune and/or dune field erosion, and development from the breakdown or merging of parabolic dunes. Various stages of evolution are outlined for each scenario. Knowledge of evolutionary patterns and stages in coastal dune fields is very limited and caution is urged in attempts to reverse, change and/or modify dune fields to 'restore' some perceived loss of ecosystem or dune functioning.

  2. Conceptual models of the evolution of transgressive dune field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. Hesp, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    This paper examines the evolutionary paths of some transgressive dune fields that have formed on different coasts of the world, and presents some initial conceptual models of system dynamics for transgressive dune sheets and dune fields. Various evolutionary pathways are conceptualized based on a visual examination of dune fields from around the world. On coasts with high sediment supply, dune sheets and dune fields tend to accumulate as large scale barrier systems with little colonization of vegetation in arid-hyper to arid climate regimes, and as multiple, active discrete phases of dune field and deflation plain couplets in temperate to tropical environments. Active dune fields tend to be singular entities on coasts with low to moderate sediment supply. Landscape complexity and vegetation richness and diversity increases as dune fields evolve from simple active sheets and dunes to single and multiple deflation plains and basins, precipitation ridges, nebkha fields and a host of other dune types associated with vegetation (e.g. trailing ridges, slacks, remnant knobs, gegenwalle ridges and dune track ridges, ‘tree islands' and ‘bush pockets'). Three principal scenarios of transgressive dune sheet and dune field development are discussed, including dune sheets or dune fields evolving directly from the backshore, development following foredune and/or dune field erosion, and development from the breakdown or merging of parabolic dunes. Various stages of evolution are outlined for each scenario. Knowledge of evolutionary patterns and stages in coastal dune fields is very limited and caution is urged in attempts to reverse, change and/or modify dune fields to ‘restore' some perceived loss of ecosystem or dune functioning.

  3. NASA-JSC antenna near-field measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W. P.; Friederich, P. G.; Jenkins, B. M.; Jameson, C. R.; Estrada, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Work was completed on the near-field range control software. The capabilities of the data processing software were expanded with the addition of probe compensation. In addition, the user can process the measured data from the same computer terminal used for range control. The design of the laser metrology system was completed. It provides precise measruement of probe location during near-field measurements as well as position data for control of the translation beam and probe cart. A near-field range measurement system was designed, fabricated, and tested.

  4. Control and data acquisition systems for high field superconducting wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Ilyin, I.; Karpov, G.; Kozak, V.; Kuzin, M.; Kuper, E.; Mamkin, V.; Mezentsev, N.; Repkov, V.; Selivanov, A.; Shkaruba, V.

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the control and DAQ system of superconducting wigglers with magnetic field range up to 10.3 T. The first version of the system controls a 7 T superconducting wiggler prepared for installation at Bessy-II (Germany). The second one controls a 10 T wiggler which is under testing now at the SPring-8 site (Japan). Both systems are based on VME apparatus. The set of specialized VME modules is elaborated to arrange wiggler power supply control, full time wiggler monitoring, and magnetic field high accuracy measurement and field stabilization. The software for the control of the wigglers is written in C language for VxWorks operation system for a Motorola-162 VME controller. The task initialization, stops and acquisition of the data can be done from the nearest personal computer (FTP host for VME), or from the remote system as well.

  5. A programmable autosampler for a field deployable tritium analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Cable, P.R.; Beals, D.M.; Jones, J.

    1996-08-01

    Researchers in the Environmental Technology Section of the Savannah River Technology Center, in cooperation with Sampling Systems, Inc. are developing a fully programmable, remotely operated, fixed volume, automatic sampler for use with the field deployable tritium analysis system currently under development at U. of GA`s Center for Applied Isotope Studies. The sampler will collect a limited-volume sample and perform on-line sample purification for tritium analyses from multiple collection sites. Pneumatically operated stainless steel samplers operate satisfactorily upon remote activation. The one-step purification system removes all impurities with interfere with tritium analysis by liquid scintillation. Field testing has confirmed system operation. The autosampler may act as a stand-alone device and is enclosed in a rugged, field-portable case with wheels. The system weighs about 40 lbs.

  6. An artificial compound eye system for large field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Lifang; Shi, Ruiying; Dong, Xiaochun; Deng, Qiling; Du, Chunlei

    2012-11-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology, optical imaging system has been widely used, and the performance requirements are getting higher and higher such as lighter weight, smaller size, larger field of view and more sensitive to the moving targets. With the advantages of large field of view, high agility and multi-channels, compound eye is more and more concerned by academia and industry. In this work, an artificial spherical compound eye imaging system is proposed, which is formed by several mini cameras to get a large field of view. By analyzing the relationship of the view field between every single camera and the whole system, the geometric arrangement of cameras is studied and the compound eye structure is designed. By using the precision machining technology, the system can be manufactured. To verify the performance of this system, experiments were carried out, where the compound eye was formed by seven mini cameras which were placed centripetally along a spherical surface so that each camera points in a different direction. Pictures taken by these cameras were mosaiced into a complete image with large field of view. The results of the experiments prove the validity of the design method and the fabrication technology. By increasing the number of the cameras, larger view field even panoramic imaging can be realized by using this artificial compound eye.

  7. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Atkinson, D P; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Grim, G P; Aragonez, R J; Archuleta, T N; Batha, S H; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Danly, C R; Day, R D; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Hsu, A H; Jaramillo, S A; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Oertel, J A; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Buckles, R A; Cradick, J R; Kaufman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

    2011-10-24

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system will be presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system will be presented. We will also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  8. The neutron imaging system fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittinghoff, D. N.; Atkinson, D. P.; Bower, D. E.; Drury, O. B.; Dzenitis, J. M.; Frank, M.; Liddick, S. N.; Moran, M. J.; Roberson, G. P.; Weiss, P. B.; Grim, G. P.; Aragonez, R. J.; Archuleta, T. N.; Batha, S. H.; Clark, D. D.; Clark, D. J.; Danly, C. R.; Day, R. D.; Fatherley, V. E.; Finch, J. P.; Garcia, F. P.; Gallegos, R. A.; Guler, N.; Hsu, A. H.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Loomis, E. N.; Mares, D.; Martinson, D. D.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Munson, C.; Murphy, T. J.; Oertel, J. A.; Polk, P. J.; Schmidt, D. W.; Tregillis, I. L.; Valdez, A. C.; Volegov, P. L.; Wang, T. F.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Buckles, R. A.; Cradick, J. R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Lutz, S. S.; Malone, R. M.; Traille, A.

    2013-11-01

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system is presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system is presented. We also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  9. Double layer field shaping systems for toroidal plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for plasma generation, confinement and control such as Tokamak plasma systems are described having a two layer field shaping coil system comprising an inner coil layer close to the plasma and an outer coil layer to minimize the current in the inner coil layer.

  10. An improved large-field focusing schlieren system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis and performance of a high-brightness large-field focusing schlieren system is described. The system can be used to examine complex two- and three-dimensional flows. Techniques are described to obtain focusing schlieren through distorting optical elements, to use multiple colors in a time multiplexing technique, and to use diffuse screen holography for three-dimensional photographs.