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Sample records for poly-adp ribose polymerase

  1. Trapping Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuqiao; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Wang, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Recent findings indicate that a major mechanism by which poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors kill cancer cells is by trapping PARP1 and PARP2 to the sites of DNA damage. The PARP enzyme-inhibitor complex "locks" onto damaged DNA and prevents DNA repair, replication, and transcription, leading to cell death. Several clinical-stage PARP inhibitors, including veliparib, rucaparib, olaparib, niraparib, and talazoparib, have been evaluated for their PARP-trapping activity. Although they display similar capacity to inhibit PARP catalytic activity, their relative abilities to trap PARP differ by several orders of magnitude, with the ability to trap PARP closely correlating with each drug's ability to kill cancer cells. In this article, we review the available data on molecular interactions between these clinical-stage PARP inhibitors and PARP proteins, and discuss how their biologic differences might be explained by the trapping mechanism. We also discuss how to use the PARP-trapping mechanism to guide the development of PARP inhibitors as a new class of cancer therapy, both for single-agent and combination treatments. PMID:25758918

  2. Purification of recombinant poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases.

    PubMed

    Amé, Jean-Christophe; Kalisch, Thomas; Dantzer, Françoise; Schreiber, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    The purification of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases from overexpressing cells (Sf9 insect cells, Escherichia coli) has been updated to a fast and reproducible three chromatographic steps protocol. After cell lysis, proteins from the crude extract are separated on a Heparine Sepharose™ column. The PARP-containing fractions are then affinity purified on a 3-aminobenzamide Sepharose™ chromatographic step. The last contaminants and the 3-methoxybenzamide used to elute the PARP from the previous affinity column are removed on the high-performance strong cations exchanger Source™ 15S matrix. The columns connected to an ÄKTA™ purifier system allow the purification of PARPs in 3 days with a high-yield recovery. As described in the protocol, more than 11 mg of pure and highly active mouse PARP-2 can be obtained from 1 L of Sf9 insect cell culture. PMID:21870259

  3. Crosstalk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and sirtuin enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Sauve, Anthony A.; Bai, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are NAD+ dependent enzymes that were identified as DNA repair proteins, however, today it seems clear that PARPs are responsible for a plethora of biological functions. Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzymes involved in the same biological processes as PARPs raising the question whether PARP and SIRT enzymes may interact with each other in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Hereby we review the current understanding of the SIRT-PARP interplay in regard to the biochemical nature of the interaction (competition for the common NAD+ substrate, mutual posttranslational modifications and direct transcriptional effects) and the physiological, or pathophysiological consequences of the interactions (metabolic events, oxidative stress response, genomic stability and ageing). Finally, we give an overview of the possibilities of pharmacological intervention to modulate PARP and SIRT enzymes either directly, or through modulating NAD+ homeostasis. PMID:23357756

  4. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase: a potential therapy against oligodendrocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Veto, Sara; Acs, Peter; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Berente, Zoltan; Setalo, Gyorgy; Borgulya, Gabor; Sumegi, Balazs; Komoly, Samuel; Gallyas, Ferenc; Illes, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination are major pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. In pattern III lesions, inflammation is minor in the early stages, and oligodendrocyte apoptosis prevails, which appears to be mediated at least in part through mitochondrial injury. Here, we demonstrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation and apoptosis inducing factor nuclear translocation within apoptotic oligodendrocytes in such multiple sclerosis lesions. The same morphological and molecular pathology was observed in an experimental model of primary demyelination, induced by the mitochondrial toxin cuprizone. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in this model attenuated oligodendrocyte depletion and decreased demyelination. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition suppressed c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, increased the activation of the cytoprotective phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt pathway and prevented caspase-independent apoptosis inducing factor-mediated apoptosis. Our data indicate that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of pattern III multiple sclerosis lesions. Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition was also effective in the inflammatory model of multiple sclerosis, it may target all subtypes of multiple sclerosis, either by preventing oligodendrocyte death or attenuating inflammation. PMID:20157013

  5. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity. PMID:23831359

  6. Increased poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in cells infected by human immunodeficiency virus type-1.

    PubMed

    Furlini, G; Re, M C; La Placa, M

    1991-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase is a chromatin-bound enzyme which is activated by free DNA ends and is therefore stimulated by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. The enzyme transfers the ADP moiety of NAD to nuclear proteins to create protein-bound ADP-ribose polymers. Under conditions favouring an accelerated poly(ADP-ribose) polymer formation, the enzyme may exhaust cellular NAD pools. At the same time, or shortly thereafter ATP levels drop and cell viability eventually declines. As a series of chemical and physical agents which may play a role in activating latent HIV-1 infection or favouring HIV-1 replication, have a DNA-damaging activity, we investigated the behaviour of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in various types of HIV-1-infected cells. The results obtained show that HIV-1-infected cells to possess an increased poly(ADP-ribosol)ating activity together with an accentuated fragmentation of cellular DNA which are associated with the time course of HIV-1 replication. These data give circumstantial support to the hypothesis that a NAD-depdendent cellular suicide response to DNA damage, could play a role in the death of HIV-1 infected cells. In this respect, the impared immunocompetence of HIV-1-infected patients could bear some resemblance to immune attribution that sometimes accompanies some inborn errors affecting DNA precursor metabolism and DNA integrity. PMID:1906973

  7. Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Nucleic Acid Metabolite 7-Methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D. K.; Tararov, V. I.; Kulikov, A. V.; Zakharenko, A. L.; Gushchina, I. V.; Mikhailov, S. N.; Lavrik, O. I.; Švedas, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 7-methylguanine, a nucleic acid metabolite, to inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-2 (PARP-2) has been identified in silico and studied experimentally. The amino group at position 2 and the methyl group at position 7 were shown to be important substituents for the efficient binding of purine derivatives to PARPs. The activity of both tested enzymes, PARP-1 and PARP-2, was suppressed by 7-methylguanine with IC50 values of 150 and 50 μM, respectively. At the PARP inhibitory concentration, 7-methylguanine itself was not cytotoxic, but it was able to accelerate apoptotic death of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells induced by cisplatin and doxorubicin, the widely used DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. 7-Methylguanine possesses attractive predictable pharmacokinetics and an adverse-effect profile and may be considered as a new additive to chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27437145

  8. Structural analysis of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase in higher and lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Scovassi, A I; Izzo, R; Franchi, E; Bertazzoni, U

    1986-08-15

    A phylogenetic survey for the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase has been conducted by analyzing enzyme activity in various organisms and determining the structure of the catalytic peptides by renaturation of functional activities of the enzyme in situ after electrophoresis in denaturing conditions (activity gel). The enzyme is widely distributed in cells from all different classes of vertebrates, from arthropods, mollusks and plant cells but could not be detected in echinoderms, nematodes, platyhelminths, thallophytes (including yeast) and bacteria. The presence on activity gels of a catalytic peptide with Mr = 115,000-120,000 was demonstrated in vertebrates, arthropods and mollusks but no activity bands were recovered in many lower eukaryotes, in plant cells and bacteria. By using an immunological procedure that used an antiserum against homogeneous calf thymus poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, common immunoreactive peptides were visualized in mammals, avians, reptiles, amphibians and fishes, while lacking in non-vertebrate organisms. Our results indicate that the structure of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is conserved down to the mollusks suggesting its important role for DNA metabolism of multicellular organisms. PMID:3091369

  9. Does inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase prevent energy overconsumption under microgravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, M. I.; Keul, A.

    When plants are exposed to a stress signal they expend a lot of energy and exhibit enhanced respiration rates This is partially due to a breakdown in the NAD pool caused by the enhanced activity PARP which uses NAD as a substrate to synthesize polymers of ADP-ribose Stress-induced depletion of NAD results in a similar depletion of energy since ATP molecules are required to resynthesize the depleted NAD It seems that plants with lowered poly ADP ribosyl ation activity appear tolerant to multiple stresses Inhibiting PARP activity prevents energy overconsumption under stress allowing normal mitochondrial respiration We intend to study if the microgravity is perceived by plants as a stress factor and if experimental inhibition of poly ADP-ribose polymerase may improve the energetic level of the cells References DeBlock M Verduyn C De Brouwer D and Cornelissen M 2005 Poly ADP-ribose polymerase in plants affects energy homeostasis cell death and stress tolerance The Plant Journal 41 95--106 Huang S Greenway H Colmerm T D and Millar A H 2005 Protein synthesis by rice coleoptiles during prolonged anoxia Implications for glycolysis growth and energy utilization Annals of Botany 96 703--715 Mittler R Vanderauwera S Gollery M and Van Breusegem F 2005 Reactive oxygen gene network of plants Trends in Plant Science 9 10 490-498

  10. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 attenuates the toxicity of carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Banasik, Marek; Stedeford, Todd; Strosznajder, Robert P; Takehashi, Masanori; Tanaka, Seigo; Ueda, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is routinely used as a model compound for eliciting centrilobular hepatotoxicity. It can be bioactivated to the trichloromethyl radical, which causes extensive lipid peroxidation and ultimately cell death by necrosis. Overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) can rapidly reduce the levels of (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and adenosine triphosphate and ultimately promote necrosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of PARP-1 could decrease CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, as measured by degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lipid peroxidation,and oxidative DNA damage. For this purpose, male ICR mice were administered intraperitoneally a hepatotoxic dose of CCl4 with or without 6(5H)-phenanthridinone, a potent inhibitor of PARP-1. Animals treated with CCl4 exhibited extensive poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in centrilobular hepatocytes, elevated serum levels of LDH, and increased lipid peroxidation. In contrast, animals treated concomitantly with CCl4 and 6(5H)-phenanthridinone showed significantly lower levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation, serum LDH, and lipid peroxidation. No changes were observed in the levels of oxidative DNA damage regardless of treatment. These results demonstrated that the hepatotoxicity of CCl4is dependent on the overactivation of PARP-1 and that inhibition of this enzyme attenuates the hepatotoxicity of CCl4. PMID:21395487

  11. Regulation of Myofibroblast Differentiation by Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biao; Wu, Zhe; Hergert, Polla; Henke, Craig A.; Bitterman, Peter B.; Phan, Sem H.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a post-translational protein modification effected by enzymes belonging to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) superfamily, mainly by PARP-1. The key acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose) include PARP-1 itself, histones, DNA repair proteins, and transcription factors. Because many of these factors are involved in the regulation of myofibroblast differentiation, we examined the role of PARylation on myofibroblast differentiation. Overexpression of PARP-1 with an expression plasmid activated expression of the α-SMA gene (Acta2), a marker of myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Suppression of PARP-1 activity or gene expression with PARP-1 inhibitors or siRNA, respectively, had the opposite effect on these cells. PARP-1–deficient cells also had reduced α-SMA gene expression. DNA pyrosequencing identified hypermethylated regions of the α-SMA gene in PARP-1–deficient cells, relative to wild-type cells. Interestingly, and of potential relevance to human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, PARP activity in lung fibroblasts isolated from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients was significantly higher than that in cells isolated from control subjects. Furthermore, PARP-1–deficient mice exhibited reduced pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin-induced lung injury, relative to wild-type controls. These results suggest that PARylation is important for myofibroblast differentiation and the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23260200

  12. Regulation of myofibroblast differentiation by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao; Wu, Zhe; Hergert, Polla; Henke, Craig A; Bitterman, Peter B; Phan, Sem H

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a post-translational protein modification effected by enzymes belonging to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) superfamily, mainly by PARP-1. The key acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose) include PARP-1 itself, histones, DNA repair proteins, and transcription factors. Because many of these factors are involved in the regulation of myofibroblast differentiation, we examined the role of PARylation on myofibroblast differentiation. Overexpression of PARP-1 with an expression plasmid activated expression of the α-SMA gene (Acta2), a marker of myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Suppression of PARP-1 activity or gene expression with PARP-1 inhibitors or siRNA, respectively, had the opposite effect on these cells. PARP-1-deficient cells also had reduced α-SMA gene expression. DNA pyrosequencing identified hypermethylated regions of the α-SMA gene in PARP-1-deficient cells, relative to wild-type cells. Interestingly, and of potential relevance to human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, PARP activity in lung fibroblasts isolated from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients was significantly higher than that in cells isolated from control subjects. Furthermore, PARP-1-deficient mice exhibited reduced pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin-induced lung injury, relative to wild-type controls. These results suggest that PARylation is important for myofibroblast differentiation and the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23260200

  13. Family-wide analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Uchima, Lilen; Rood, Jenny; Zaja, Roko; Hay, Ronald T.; Ahel, Ivan; Chang, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein family generates ADP-ribose (ADPr) modifications onto target proteins using NAD+ as substrate. Based on the composition of three NAD+ coordinating amino acids, the H-Y-E motif, each PARP is predicted to generate either poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) or mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR). However, the reaction product of each PARP has not been clearly defined, and is an important priority since PAR and MAR function via distinct mechanisms. Here we show that the majority of PARPs generate MAR, not PAR, and demonstrate that the H-Y-E motif is not the sole indicator of PARP activity. We identify automodification sites on seven PARPs, and demonstrate that MAR and PAR generating PARPs modify similar amino acids, suggesting that the sequence and structural constraints limiting PARPs to MAR synthesis do not limit their ability to modify canonical amino acid targets. In addition, we identify cysteine as a novel amino acid target for ADP-ribosylation on PARPs. PMID:25043379

  14. Bookmarking promoters in mitotic chromatin: poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 as an epigenetic mark

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Niraj; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics are the heritable changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. After mitosis, it is thought that bookmarking transcription factors remain at promoters, regulating which genes become active and which remain silent. Herein, we demonstrate that poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a genome-wide epigenetic memory mark in mitotic chromatin, and we further show that the presence of PARP-1 is absolutely crucial for reactivation of transcription after mitosis. Based on these findings, a novel molecular model of epigenetic memory transmission through the cell cycle is proposed. PMID:24861619

  15. PARP1 Is a TRF2-associated Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase and Protects Eroded Telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yie; Wu, Jun; Schreiber, Valerie; Dunlap, John; Dantzer, Francoise; Wang, Yisong

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  16. PARP1 is a TRF2-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and protects eroded telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Marla V; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  17. Biology of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerases: The Factotums of Cell Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peter

    2015-06-18

    The protein family of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) or diphtheria toxin-type ADP-ribose transferases (ARTDs) are multidomain proteins originally identified as DNA repair factors. There are 17 PARP enzymes in humans, and it is now evident that PARPs undertake more tasks than DNA repair. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive view of the biological roles of the PARP family starting from the simplest biochemical reactions to complex regulatory circuits. Special attention will be laid on discussing linkage of PARP enzymes with tumor biology, oxidative stress, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases. A better understanding of PARP-mediated processes and pathologies may help in identifying new pathways and, by these, new targets to combat diseases that affect large populations and seriously shorten life expectancy and the quality of life, such as cancer, metabolic, or inflammatory diseases. PMID:26091343

  18. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 is a novel target to promote axonal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brochier, Camille; Jones, James I.; Willis, Dianna E.; Langley, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the restoration of neurological functions after acute axonal injury are severely limited. In addition to limiting neuronal loss, effective treatments face the challenge of restoring axonal growth within an injury environment where inhibitory molecules from damaged myelin and activated astrocytes act as molecular and physical barriers. Overcoming these barriers to permit axon growth is critical for the development of any repair strategy in the central nervous system. Here, we identify poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) as a previously unidentified and critical mediator of multiple growth-inhibitory signals. We show that exposure of neurons to growth-limiting molecules—such as myelin-derived Nogo and myelin-associated glycoprotein—or reactive astrocyte-produced chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans activates PARP1, resulting in the accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) in the cell body and axon and limited axonal growth. Accordingly, we find that pharmacological inhibition or genetic loss of PARP1 markedly facilitates axon regeneration over nonpermissive substrates. Together, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of axon growth inhibition and identify PARP1 as an effective target to promote axon regeneration. PMID:26598704

  19. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K.; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  20. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  1. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase regulates glycolytic activity in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hana; Yoon, Sang Pil

    2016-01-01

    After renal injury, selective damage occurs in the proximal tubules as a result of inhibition of glycolysis. The molecular mechanism of damage is not known. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation plays a critical role of proximal tubular cell death in several renal disorders. Here, we studied the role of PARP on glycolytic flux in pig kidney proximal tubule epithelial LLC-PK1 cells using XFp extracellular flux analysis. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP activation was increased approximately 2-fold by incubation of the cells in 10 mM glucose for 30 minutes, but treatment with the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) does-dependently prevented the glucose-induced PARP activation (approximately 14.4% decrease in 0.1 mM 3-AB–treated group and 36.7% decrease in 1 mM 3-AB–treated group). Treatment with 1 mM 3-AB significantly enhanced the glucose-mediated increase in the extracellular acidification rate (61.1±4.3 mpH/min vs. 126.8±6.2 mpH/min or approximately 2-fold) compared with treatment with vehicle, indicating that PARP inhibition increases only glycolytic activity during glycolytic flux including basal glycolysis, glycolytic activity, and glycolytic capacity in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. Glucose increased the activities of glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase-1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, enolase, and pyruvate kinase in LLC-PK1 cells. Furthermore, PARP inhibition selectively augmented the activities of hexokinase (approximately 1.4-fold over vehicle group), phosphofructokinase-1 (approximately 1.6-fold over vehicle group), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (approximately 2.2-fold over vehicle group). In conclusion, these data suggest that PARP activation may regulate glycolytic activity via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. PMID:27382509

  2. PARP2 Is the Predominant Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase in Arabidopsis DNA Damage and Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Song, Junqi; Keppler, Brian D; Wise, Robert R; Bent, Andrew F

    2015-05-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) catalyze the transfer of multiple poly(ADP-ribose) units onto target proteins. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes including, most prominently, auto-activation of PARP at sites of DNA breaks to activate DNA repair processes. In humans, PARP1 (the founding and most characterized member of the PARP family) accounts for more than 90% of overall cellular PARP activity in response to DNA damage. We have found that, in contrast with animals, in Arabidopsis thaliana PARP2 (At4g02390), rather than PARP1 (At2g31320), makes the greatest contribution to PARP activity and organismal viability in response to genotoxic stresses caused by bleomycin, mitomycin C or gamma-radiation. Plant PARP2 proteins carry SAP DNA binding motifs rather than the zinc finger domains common in plant and animal PARP1 proteins. PARP2 also makes stronger contributions than PARP1 to plant immune responses including restriction of pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato growth and reduction of infection-associated DNA double-strand break abundance. For poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) enzymes, we find that Arabidopsis PARG1 and not PARG2 is the major contributor to poly(ADP-ribose) removal from acceptor proteins. The activity or abundance of PARP2 is influenced by PARP1 and PARG1. PARP2 and PARP1 physically interact with each other, and with PARG1 and PARG2, suggesting relatively direct regulatory interactions among these mediators of the balance of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. As with plant PARP2, plant PARG proteins are also structurally distinct from their animal counterparts. Hence core aspects of plant poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation are mediated by substantially different enzymes than in animals, suggesting the likelihood of substantial differences in regulation. PMID:25950582

  3. PARP2 Is the Predominant Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase in Arabidopsis DNA Damage and Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Song, Junqi; Keppler, Brian D.; Wise, Robert R.; Bent, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) catalyze the transfer of multiple poly(ADP-ribose) units onto target proteins. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes including, most prominently, auto-activation of PARP at sites of DNA breaks to activate DNA repair processes. In humans, PARP1 (the founding and most characterized member of the PARP family) accounts for more than 90% of overall cellular PARP activity in response to DNA damage. We have found that, in contrast with animals, in Arabidopsis thaliana PARP2 (At4g02390), rather than PARP1 (At2g31320), makes the greatest contribution to PARP activity and organismal viability in response to genotoxic stresses caused by bleomycin, mitomycin C or gamma-radiation. Plant PARP2 proteins carry SAP DNA binding motifs rather than the zinc finger domains common in plant and animal PARP1 proteins. PARP2 also makes stronger contributions than PARP1 to plant immune responses including restriction of pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato growth and reduction of infection-associated DNA double-strand break abundance. For poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) enzymes, we find that Arabidopsis PARG1 and not PARG2 is the major contributor to poly(ADP-ribose) removal from acceptor proteins. The activity or abundance of PARP2 is influenced by PARP1 and PARG1. PARP2 and PARP1 physically interact with each other, and with PARG1 and PARG2, suggesting relatively direct regulatory interactions among these mediators of the balance of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. As with plant PARP2, plant PARG proteins are also structurally distinct from their animal counterparts. Hence core aspects of plant poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation are mediated by substantially different enzymes than in animals, suggesting the likelihood of substantial differences in regulation. PMID:25950582

  4. Poly(ADP)-Ribose Polymerase-1 Inhibitors as a Potential Treatment for Cocaine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Scobie, Kimberly N

    2015-01-01

    As of 2008, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 1.4 million Americans met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for dependence or abuse of cocaine (in any form) in the past 12 months. However, there are no treatments for cocaine use disorders approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). Alterations in gene regulation contribute significantly to the changes that occur in the brain, both structurally and functionally, and the resultant addictive phenotype that occurs with chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. The Emerging Targets of Cocaine Use Disorders meeting sought to explore novel targets for the treatment of stimulant use disorder. The evidence for a role of one novel target, Poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1), was presented at the meeting and will be summarized in this review. PMID:26022260

  5. Curcumin enhances poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor sensitivity to chemotherapy in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Eun; Park, Eunmi

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor has shown promising responses in homologous recombination (HR) repair-deficient cancer cells. More specifically, targeting HR pathway in combination with PARP inhibitor has been an effective chemotherapy strategy by so far. Curcumin has been recognized as anticancer agents for several types of cancers. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin inhibits a critical step in HR pathway, Rad51 foci formation, and accumulates γ-H2AX levels in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Curcumin also directly reduces HR and induces cell death with cotreatment of PARP inhibitor in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Moreover, curcumin, when combined with ABT-888, could effectively delayed breast tumor formation in vivo. Our study indicates that cotreatment of curcumin and PARP inhibitor might be useful for the combination chemotherapy for aggressive breast cancer treatment as a natural bioactive compound. PMID:26350251

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and apoptosis inducing factor in neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2003-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is the guardian of the genome acting as a sentinel for genomic damage. However, PARP-1 is also mediator of cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury, glutamate excitotoxicity, and various inflammatory processes. The biochemistry underlying PARP-1-mediated cell death has remained elusive, although NAD(+) consumption and energy failure have been thought to be one of the possible molecular mechanisms. Recent observations link PARP-1 activation with translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus and indicate that AIF is an essential downstream effector of PARP-1-mediated cell death. PARP-1 activation signals AIF release from the mitochondria, resulting in a novel, caspase-independent pathway of programmed cell death. These recent findings suggest that AIF maybe a target for development of future therapeutic treatment for many neurological disorders involving excitotoxicity. PMID:14678748

  7. Mediation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death by apoptosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Poitras, Marc F; Coombs, Carmen; Bowers, William J; Federoff, Howard J; Poirier, Guy G; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2002-07-12

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) protects the genome by functioning in the DNA damage surveillance network. PARP-1 is also a mediator of cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury, glutamate excitotoxicity, and various inflammatory processes. We show that PARP-1 activation is required for translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus and that AIF is necessary for PARP-1-dependent cell death. N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, H2O2, and N-methyl-d-aspartate induce AIF translocation and cell death, which is prevented by PARP inhibitors or genetic knockout of PARP-1, but is caspase independent. Microinjection of an antibody to AIF protects against PARP-1-dependent cytotoxicity. These data support a model in which PARP-1 activation signals AIF release from mitochondria, resulting in a caspase-independent pathway of programmed cell death. PMID:12114629

  8. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors: Recent Advances and Future Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Clare L.; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promising activity in epithelial ovarian cancers, especially relapsed platinum-sensitive high-grade serous disease. Consistent with preclinical studies, ovarian cancers and a number of other solid tumor types occurring in patients with deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 seem to be particularly sensitive. However, it is also becoming clear that germline BRCA1/2 mutations are neither necessary nor sufficient for patients to derive benefit from PARP inhibitors. We provide an update on PARP inhibitor clinical development, describe recent advances in our understanding of PARP inhibitor mechanism of action, and discuss current issues in the development of these agents. PMID:25779564

  9. Oxidative-Nitrosative Stress and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Activation in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obrosova, Irina G.; Drel, Viktor R.; Pacher, Pal; Ilnytska, Olga; Wang, Zhong Q.; Stevens, Martin J.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation, an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications, is considered a downstream effector of oxidative-nitrosative stress. However, some recent findings suggest that it is not necessarily the case and that PARP activation may precede and contribute to free radical and oxidant-induced injury. This study evaluated the effect of PARP inhibition on oxidative-nitrosative stress in diabetic peripheral nerve, vasa nervorum, aorta, and high glucose–exposed human Schwann cells. In vivo experiments were performed in control rats and streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats treated with and without the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (ABA) (30 mg · kg−1 · day−1 i.p. for 2 weeks after 2 weeks of untreated diabetes). Human Schwann cells (HSC) (passages 7–10; ScienCell Research Labs) were cultured in 5.5 or 30 mmol/l glucose with and without 5 mmol/l ABA. Diabetes-induced increase in peripheral nerve nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, epineurial vessel superoxide and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivities, and aortic superoxide production was reduced by ABA. PARP-1 (Western blot analysis) was abundantly expressed in HSC, and its expression was not affected by high glucose or ABA treatment. High-glucose–induced superoxide production and overexpression of nitrosylated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated protein, chemically reduced amino acid-(4)-hydroxynonenal adducts, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were decreased by ABA. We concluded that PARP activation contributes to superoxide anion radical and peroxynitrite formation in peripheral nerve, vasa nervorum, and aorta of STZ-induced diabetic rats and high-glucose–exposed HSC. The relations between oxidative-nitrosative stress and PARP activation in diabetes are bi-rather than unidirectional, and PARP activation cannot only result from but also lead to free radical and oxidant generation. PMID:16306359

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 modulates Nrf2-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongde; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Tian, Wang; Jaramillo, Melba C; Lau, Alexandria; Zhang, Donna D

    2014-02-01

    The basic leucine zipper transcription factor Nrf2 has emerged as a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis by controlling the expression of a battery of redox-balancing antioxidants and phase II detoxification enzymes. Under oxidative stress conditions, Nrf2 is induced at the protein level through redox-sensitive modifications on critical cysteine residues in Keap1, a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is historically known to function in DNA damage detection and repair; however, recently PARP-1 has been shown to play an important role in other biochemical activities, such as DNA methylation and imprinting, insulator activity, chromosome organization, and transcriptional regulation. The exact role of PARP-1 in transcription modulation and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly defined. In this study, we report that PARP-1 forms complexes with the antioxidant response element (ARE) within the promoter region of Nrf2 target genes and upregulates the transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Interestingly, PARP-1 neither physically interacts with Nrf2 nor promotes the expression of Nrf2. In addition, PARP-1 does not target Nrf2 for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Instead, PARP-1 interacts directly with small Maf proteins and the ARE of Nrf2 target genes, which augments ARE-specific DNA-binding of Nrf2 and enhances the transcription of Nrf2 target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that PARP-1 serves as a transcriptional coactivator, upregulating the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 by enhancing the interaction among Nrf2, MafG, and the ARE. PMID:24140708

  11. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerases: New Players in the Pathogenesis of Exocrine Pancreatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bosch, Neus; Fernández-Zapico, Martin E; Navarro, Pilar; Yélamos, José

    2016-02-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes were initially characterized as sensors of DNA breaks but are now known to play key roles not only in the DNA damage response but also in regulating numerous molecular processes, such as gene transcription. Furthermore, these polymerases have emerged as key players in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases, providing promising therapeutic targets for pathologies such as cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In recent years, PARPs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, and PARP inhibition has been proposed as a valuable strategy for treating these two important gastrointestinal tract disorders. For instance, in preclinical mouse models, pancreatitis was significantly attenuated after genetic or pharmacological PARP inactivation, and several clinical trials have demonstrated promising responses to PARP inhibitors in pancreatic cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of PARP functions in these two dismal pathologies and discuss the next steps necessary to determine whether PARP inhibitors will finally make the difference in treating pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer successfully. PMID:26687988

  12. Effect of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase on the radiation response of HeLa S3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Burgman, P.; Konings, A.W. )

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in X-ray-induced cell killing, repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), and formation and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. As tools we used the inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), and 4-aminobenzamide (4AB). Both drugs inhibited PLD repair equally well but did not increase radiation-induced cell killing when cells were plated immediately after irradiation. 3AB affected repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, while 4AB had no effect. When 3AB was combined with aphidicolin (APC), it was found that the amount of DNA damage increased during the postirradiation incubation period. This means that the presence of 3AB stimulates the formation of DNA damage after X-irradiation. It is concluded that 3AB and 4AB sensitize HeLaS3 cells for radiation-induced cell killing by inhibiting repair of PLD. Because of the different effects of both inhibitors on repair of PLD and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage (a process known to be affected by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation), it is concluded that the observed inhibition of PLD repair is not caused by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, and that the inhibitors affect repair of PLD and repair of DNA damage through independent mechanisms.

  13. Effect of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase on the radiation response of HeLa S3 cells.

    PubMed

    Burgman, P; Konings, A W

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in X-ray-induced cell killing, repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), and formation and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. As tools we used the inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), and 4-aminobenzamide (4AB). Both drugs inhibited PLD repair equally well but did not increase radiation-induced cell killing when cells were plated immediately after irradiation. 3AB affected repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, while 4AB had no effect. When 3AB was combined with aphidicolin (APC), it was found that the amount of DNA damage increased during the postirradiation incubation period. This means that the presence of 3AB stimulates the formation of DNA damage after X-irradiation. It is concluded that 3AB and 4AB sensitize HeLaS3 cells for radiation-induced cell killing by inhibiting repair of PLD. Because of the different effects of both inhibitors on repair of PLD and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage (a process known to be affected by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation), it is concluded that the observed inhibition of PLD repair is not caused by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, and that the inhibitors affect repair of PLD and repair of DNA damage through independent mechanisms. PMID:2502817

  14. DNA vector-based RNAi approach for stable depletion of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Rashmi G.; Ghodgaonkar, Medini M.; Affar, El Bachir; Shah, Girish M. . E-mail: girish.shah@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2005-05-27

    RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique that is now being used in mammalian cells to specifically silence a gene. Some recent studies have used this technique to achieve variable extent of depletion of a nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). These studies reported either transient silencing of PARP-1 using double-stranded RNA or stable silencing of PARP-1 with a DNA vector which was introduced by a viral delivery system. In contrast, here we report that a simple RNAi approach which utilizes a pBS-U6-based DNA vector containing strategically selected PARP-1 targeting sequence, introduced in the cells by conventional CaPO{sub 4} protocol, can be used to achieve stable and specific silencing of PARP-1 in different types of cells. We also provide a detailed strategy for selection and cloning of PARP-1-targeting sequences for the DNA vector, and demonstrate that this technique does not affect expression of its closest functional homolog PARP-2.

  15. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  16. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases inhibitor, Zj6413, as a potential therapeutic agent against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Ji, Ming; Zhou, Jie; Jin, Jing; Xue, Nina; Chen, Ju; Xu, Bailing; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) facilitate repairing of cancer cell DNA damage as a mean to promote cancer proliferation and metastasis. Inhibitors of PARPs which interfering DNA repair, in context of defects in other DNA repair mechanisms, can thus be potentially exploited to inhibit or even kill cancer cells. However, nondiscriminatory inhibition of PARPs, such as PARP2, may lead to undesired consequences. Here, we demonstrated the design and development of the Zj6413 as a potent and selective PARP1 catalytic inhibitor. It trapped PARP1/2 at damaged sites of DNA. As expected, the Zj6413 showed notable anti-tumor activity against breast cancer gene (BRCA) deficient triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs). Zj6413 treated breast cancers (BCs) showed an elevated level of DNA damage evidenced by the accumulation of γ-H2AX foci and DNA damaged related proteins. Zj6413 also induced G2/M arrest and cell death in the MX-1, MDA-MB-453 BC cells, exerted chemo-sensitizing effect on BRCA proficient cancer cells and potentiated Temozolomide (TMZ)'s cytotoxicity in MX-1 xenograft tumors mice. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that a new PARP inhibitor strongly inhibited the catalytic activity of PARPs, trapped them on nicked DNA and damaged the cancer cells, eventually inhibiting the growth of breast tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26920250

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity controls plant growth by promoting leaf cell number.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Philipp; Jansseune, Karel; Degenkolbe, Thomas; Méret, Michaël; Claeys, Hannes; Skirycz, Aleksandra; Teige, Markus; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hannah, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    A changing global environment, rising population and increasing demand for biofuels are challenging agriculture and creating a need for technologies to increase biomass production. Here we demonstrate that the inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity is a promising technology to achieve this under non-stress conditions. Furthermore, we investigate the basis of this growth enhancement via leaf series and kinematic cell analysis as well as single leaf transcriptomics and plant metabolomics under non-stress conditions. These data indicate a regulatory function of PARP within cell growth and potentially development. PARP inhibition enhances growth of Arabidopsis thaliana by enhancing the cell number. Time course single leaf transcriptomics shows that PARP inhibition regulates a small subset of genes which are related to growth promotion, cell cycle and the control of metabolism. This is supported by metabolite analysis showing overall changes in primary and particularly secondary metabolism. Taken together the results indicate a versatile function of PARP beyond its previously reported roles in controlling plant stress tolerance and thus can be a useful target for enhancing biomass production. PMID:24587323

  18. Effect and mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in aldosterone-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, WEIWEI; ZHANG, WEILI; SHAO, SHUHONG; GAI, YUSHENG; ZHANG, MINGXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cells and the viability of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) in cells, and to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cell injury. Cultured endothelial cells were treated either with different concentrations of aldosterone for the same duration or with the same concentrations of aldosterone for different durations, and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 in the cells were detected, respectively. Aldosterone receptor antagonists or PARP1 inhibitors were added to cells during treatment with aldosterone and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 were detected. As the concentration of aldosterone increased or the treatment time increased, the number of apoptotic cells and the activity of PARP1 increased. The aldosterone receptor antagonists and PARP1 inhibitors inhibited the increase of apoptosis and PARP1 activity caused by aldosterone treatment. Aldosterone activated the activity of PARP1 via the aldosterone receptor, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Treatment with PARP1 may be used as a target for vascular diseases caused by aldosterone at high concentrations. PMID:25872931

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent energy depletion occurs through inhibition of glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Umanah, George K. E.; Chang, Calvin; Stevens, Daniel A.; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation kills cells via a cell-death process designated “parthanatos” in which PAR induces the mitochondrial release and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor to initiate chromatinolysis and cell death. Accompanying the formation of PAR are the reduction of cellular NAD+ and energetic collapse, which have been thought to be caused by the consumption of cellular NAD+ by PARP-1. Here we show that the bioenergetic collapse following PARP-1 activation is not dependent on NAD+ depletion. Instead PARP-1 activation initiates glycolytic defects via PAR-dependent inhibition of hexokinase, which precedes the NAD+ depletion in N-methyl-N-nitroso-N-nitroguanidine (MNNG)-treated cortical neurons. Mitochondrial defects are observed shortly after PARP-1 activation and are mediated largely through defective glycolysis, because supplementation of the mitochondrial substrates pyruvate and glutamine reverse the PARP-1–mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Depleting neurons of NAD+ with FK866, a highly specific noncompetitive inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, does not alter glycolysis or mitochondrial function. Hexokinase, the first regulatory enzyme to initiate glycolysis by converting glucose to glucose-6-phosphate, contains a strong PAR-binding motif. PAR binds to hexokinase and inhibits hexokinase activity in MNNG-treated cortical neurons. Preventing PAR formation with PAR glycohydrolase prevents the PAR-dependent inhibition of hexokinase. These results indicate that bioenergetic collapse induced by overactivation of PARP-1 is caused by PAR-dependent inhibition of glycolysis through inhibition of hexokinase. PMID:24987120

  20. Targeting BRCA1 localization to augment breast tumor sensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eddy S.; Nowsheen, Somaira; Rahman, Mohammad A.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Xia, Fen

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors have gained recent attention due to their highly selective killing of BRCA1/2 mutated and DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient tumors. Unfortunately, the majority of sporadic breast cancers carry wild-type BRCA1/2 and are proficient in DSB repair. We and others have shown that BRCA1 is a nuclear/cytoplasm shuttling protein which is transiently exported from the nucleus to the cytosol upon various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that depletion of nuclear BRCA1 would compromise DSB repair and subsequently render sporadic tumors susceptible to PARP inhibition. Indeed, in human sporadic breast cancer cells with functional BRCA1 and proficient DSB repair, a transient nuclear depletion of BRCA1 and subsequent HR repair deficit was induced with either truncated BRCA1 or irradiation. This rendered these human sporadic breast cancer cells susceptible to PARP inhibition. These observations were confirmed genetically using mislocated BRCA1 mutants as well as in vivo in mice bearing breast tumor xenografts. These data support the potential strategy of targeting BRCA1 location to convert BRCA1-proficient sporadic tumors to be susceptible to the synthetic lethal combination with PARP inhibitors. PMID:22962264

  1. Activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase by sulfur mustard in HeLa cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, O.E.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-05-13

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) E.C.2.4.2.30 has been proposed to play a key role in the NAD+ depletion following alkylation of DNA in sulfur mustard (HD) exposures. Papirmeister et al. (Fundam Appl Toxicol 5:Sl34, 1985) hypothesized that activation of PADPRP was central to the subsequent depletion of NAD+ and activation of proteolytic enzymes leading to vesication. NAD+ depletion following HD exposure has been previously documented and the results have been used to infer the effect of HD exposure on PADPRP. The present study was undertaken to demonstrate the direct effect of HD on PADPRP activity. HeLa cells culture were used as the model system. At 10 microns HD PADPRP activity was increased above the levels of controls in the first hour. The activity peaked at 4 hrs and by 6 hrs had returned to control levels. The 24-hour level of PADPRP activity was again elevated above the controls. The 100 microns HD exposures had maximal enzymatic response in HeLa cells within the first hour. The level had decreased 40% from the maximum by the second hour reaching a plateau at 30% of the maximum response after 4 hrs. Cells exposed to 100 microns HD showed enzyme levels at or below those seen with the 10 microns dose after 24 hours. The doses of HD used did not decrease viability as measured by trypan blue dye exclusion within 24 hr.

  2. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase inhibition: A potential treatment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Kivlin, Christine M; Watson, Kelsey L; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A; Belousov, Roman; Ingram, Davis R; Huang, Kai-Lieh; May, Caitlin D; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Landers, Sharon M; Kalam, Azad Abul; Slopis, John M; McCutcheon, Ian E; Pollock, Raphael E; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres, Keila E

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, first evaluated nearly a decade ago, are primarily used in malignancies with known defects in DNA repair genes, such as alterations in breast cancer, early onset 1/2 (BRCA1/2). While no specific mutations in BRCA1/2 have been reported in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), MPNST cells could be effectively targeted with a PARP inhibitor to drive cells to synthetic lethality due to their complex karyotype and high level of inherent genomic instability. In this study, we assessed the expression levels of PARP1 and PARP2 in MPNST patient tumor samples and correlated these findings with overall survival. We also determined the level of PARP activity in MPNST cell lines. In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of the PARP inhibitor AZD2281 (Olaparib) in MPNST cell lines. We observed decreased MPNST cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in vitro at doses similar to, or less than, the doses used in cell lines with established defective DNA repair genes. Furthermore, AZD2281 significantly reduced local growth of MPNST xenografts, decreased the development of macroscopic lung metastases, and increased survival of mice with metastatic disease. Our results suggest that AZD2281 could be an effective therapeutic option in MPNST and should be further investigated for its potential clinical use in this malignancy. PMID:26650448

  3. ATM deficiency sensitizes mantle cell lymphoma cells to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chris T; Muzik, Huong; Turhan, Ali G; Zamò, Alberto; O'Connor, Mark J; Bebb, D Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2010-02-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition is toxic to cells with mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, a concept termed synthetic lethality. However, whether this approach is applicable to other human cancers with defects in other DNA repair genes has yet to be determined. The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is altered in several human cancers including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Here, we characterize a panel of MCL cell lines for ATM status and function and investigate the potential for synthetic lethality in MCL in the presence of small-molecule inhibitors of PARP-1. We show that Granta-519 and UPN2 cells have low levels of ATM protein, are defective in DNA damage-induced ATM-dependent signaling, are radiation sensitive, and have cell cycle checkpoint defects: all characteristics of defective ATM function. Significantly, Granta-519 and UPN2 cells were more sensitive to PARP-1 inhibition than were the ATM-proficient MCL cell lines examined. Furthermore, the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (known previously as AZD2281/KU-0059436) significantly decreased tumor growth and increased overall survival in mice bearing s.c. xenografts of ATM-deficient Granta-519 cells while producing only a modest effect on overall survival of mice bearing xenografts of the ATM-proficient cell line, Z138. Thus, PARP inhibitors have therapeutic potential in the treatment of MCL, and the concept of synthetic lethality extends to human cancers with ATM alterations. PMID:20124459

  4. Involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in paraptotic cell death of D. discoideum.

    PubMed

    Rajawat, Jyotika; Mir, Hina; Alex, Tina; Bakshi, Sonal; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2014-01-01

    Paraptosis is mediated by several proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase being one of them. D. discoideum lacks caspases thus providing a better system to dissect out the role of PARP in paraptosis. The cell death phenotype in unicellular eukaryote, D. discoideum is similar to the programmed cell death phenotype of multicellular animals. However, the events downstream to the death signal of PCD in D. discoideum are yet to be understood. Our results emphasize that oxidative stress in D. discoideum lacking caspases leads to PARP activation, mitochondrial membrane potential changes, followed by the release of apoptosis inducing factor from mitochondria. AIF causes large scale DNA fragmentation, a hallmark feature of paraptosis. The role of PARP in paraptosis is reiterated via PARP inhibition by benzamide, PARG inhibition by gallotannin and PARP down-regulation, which delays paraptosis. PARP, PARG and AIF interplay is quintessential in paraptosis of D. discoideum. This is the first report to establish the involvement of PARP in the absence of caspase activity in D. discoideum which could be of evolutionary significance and gives a lead to understand the caspase independent paraptotic mechanism in higher organisms. PMID:24129923

  5. Docking study and binding free energy calculation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kazuki; Mitsui, Takashi; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Matsuura, Azuma; Fujitani, Hideaki; Niimi, Tatsuya; Orita, Masaya

    2011-02-01

    Recently, the massively parallel computation of absolute binding free energy with a well-equilibrated system (MP-CAFEE) has been developed. The present study aimed to determine whether the MP-CAFEE method is useful for drug discovery research. In the drug discovery process, it is important for computational chemists to predict the binding affinity accurately without detailed structural information for protein/ligand complex. We investigated the absolute binding free energies for Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)/inhibitor complexes, using the MP-CAFEE method. Although each docking model was used as an input structure, it was found that the absolute binding free energies calculated by MP-CAFEE are well consistent with the experimental ones. The accuracy of this method is much higher than that using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (MM/PBSA). Although the simulation time is quite extensive, the reliable predictor of binding free energies would be a useful tool for drug discovery projects. PMID:20480380

  6. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Mediates Diabetes-Induced Retinal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj

    2013-01-01

    Retinal neuropathy is an early event in the development of diabetic retinopathy. One of the potential enzymes that are activated by oxidative stress in the diabetic retina is poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We investigated the effect of the PARP inhibitor 1,5-isoquinolinediol on the expression of the neurodegeneration mediators and markers in the retinas of diabetic rats. After two weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, rats were treated with 1,5-isoquinolinediol (3 mg/kg/day). After 4 weeks of diabetes, the retinas were harvested and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined fluorometrically and the expressions of PARP, phosporylated-ERK1/2, BDNF, synaptophysin, glutamine synthetase (GS), and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Retinal levels of ROS, PARP-1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas the expressions of BDNF synaptophysin and GS were significantly decreased in the retinas of diabetic rats, compared to nondiabetic rats. Administration of 1,5-isoquinolinediol did not affect the metabolic status of the diabetic rats, but it significantly attenuated diabetes-induced upregulation of PARP, ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and cleaved caspase-3 and downregulation of BDNF, synaptophysin, and GS. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of the PARP inhibitor in increasing neurotrophic support and ameliorating early retinal neuropathy induced by diabetes. PMID:24347828

  7. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 modulates the lethality of CHK1 inhibitors in carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Clint; Park, Margaret; Eulitt, Patrick; Yang, Chen; Yacoub, Adly; Dent, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that inhibition of CHK1 can promote the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and phosphorylation of histone H2AX and that inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) can affect growth factor-induced ERK1/2 activation. The present studies were initiated to determine whether CHK1 inhibitors interacted with PARP1 inhibition to facilitate apoptosis. Transient expression of dominant-negative CHK1 raised basal ERK1/2 activity and prevented CHK1 inhibitors from activating ERK1/2. CHK1 inhibitors modestly increased the levels of PARP1 ADP ribosylation and molecular or small-molecule inhibition of PARP1 blocked CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated histone H2AX phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2. Stimulated histone H2AX phosphorylation was ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein-dependent. Multiple CHK1 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion with multiple PARP1 inhibitors to cause transformed cell-killing in short-term viability assays and synergistically killed tumor cells in colony-formation assays. Overexpression of BCL-xL or loss of BAX/BAK function, but not the function of BID, suppressed CHK1 inhibitor + PARP1 inhibitor lethality. Inhibition of BCL-2 family protein function enhanced CHK1 inhibitor + PARP1 inhibitor lethality and restored drug-induced cell-killing in cells overexpressing BCL-xL. Thus, PARP1 plays an important role in regulating the ability of CHK1 inhibitors to activate ERK1/2 and the DNA damage response. An inability of PARP1 to modulate this response results in transformed cell death mediated through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. PMID:20696794

  8. Regulation by phosphorylation of Xenopus laevis poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme activity during oocyte maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Aoufouchi, S; Shall, S

    1997-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is an abundant nuclear enzyme that is dependent on DNA breaks and nicks for its enzyme activity. These DNA nicks and breaks function as allosteric effectors of the enzyme activity. This reaction is important for efficient DNA base excision repair, although it is not a component of the elementary repair pathway itself. The physiological relevance of this reaction might be to ensure correct and efficient DNA repair. We have examined the enzyme activity of PARP in oocytes and eggs of Xenopus laevis. Although both oocytes and eggs contain approximately the same amounts of enzyme protein, there is no detectable enzyme activity in the oocytes, whereas in the eggs the enzyme is active. Enzyme activity appears during oocyte maturation, approx. 4 h after induction by progesterone. This enzyme activation coincides with the appearance of active maturation-promoting factor. Enzyme activation is accompanied by a shift in the electrophoretic mobility of the polypeptide, from an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa to 125 kDa. Treatment with either bacterial or potato phosphatase reverses the mobility shift and abolishes enzyme activity. Incubation of maturing X. laevis eggs with radioactive inorganic phosphate and subsequent immunoprecipitation demonstrate that the PARP protein is phosphorylated in vivo. We show that maturation-promoting factor (Cyclin B/cdc2) cannot itself be responsible for the phosphorylation and activation of PARP in maturing X. laevis eggs. Together, these results demonstrate that the enzyme activity of PARP in X. laevis oocytes and eggs is regulated by post-translational, covalent phosphorylation. PMID:9230139

  9. A novel crosstalk between BRCA1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Bi, Fang-Fang; Chen, Na-Na; Cao, Ji-Min; Sun, Wu-Ping; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Chun-Yan; Yang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    BRCA mutations are the main known hereditary factor for breast cancer. Notably, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) expression status plays a critical role in breast cancer progression and the clinical development of PARP1 inhibitors to treat BRCA-mutated breast cancer has advanced rapidly. However, dynamic crosstalk between BRCA1 and PARP1 remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that: (i) BRCA1 inactivation events (mutation, promoter methylation, or knockdown) were accompanied by increased PARP1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) levels, and a subsequent increase in NAD-dependent PARP1 activity in MDA-MB-231 and primary breast cancer cells; (ii) the overexpression of BRCA1 resulted in decreased PARP1 and NAD levels, and a subsequent impairment in NAD-dependent PARP1 activity in MDA-MB-231 and primary breast cancer cells; and (iii) intracellular NAD levels were largely responsible for regulating PARP1 activity in breast cancer cells, and NAD levels were positively correlated with PARP1 activity in human breast cancer specimens (R = 0.647, P < 0.001). Interestingly, the high efficiency of PARP1 triggered by BRCA1 inactivation may further inhibit BRCA1 transcription by NAD depletion. These results highlight a novel interaction between BRCA1 and PARP1, which may be beneficial for the dynamic balance between BRCA1 and PARP1-related biologic processes, especially for maintaining stable DNA repair ability. All of this may improve our understanding of the basic molecular mechanism underlying BRCA1- and PARP1-related breast cancer progression. PMID:25485588

  10. Neuroprotective Effects of Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase Inhibitor Olaparib in Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fei; Zhu, Ling; Su, Junhui; Zhang, Xi; Li, Ning; Nie, Zhiyu; Jin, Lingjing

    2016-07-01

    Olaparib was the first poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor approved by Food and Drug Administration for oncology treatment. However, its neuroprotective effects have not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of olaparib in transient cerebral ischemia. A mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion was used. Reperfusion was performed at 2 h after ischemia. Different doses of olaparib (1, 3, 5, 10 and 25 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally immediately after reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after ischemia, the neurological score was assessed, and grip and string tests were performed to evaluate the behavioral deficits in the mice. Cresyl violet staining was used to assess cerebral edema and the lesion volume. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression of blood-brain barrier proteins collagen IV and claudin-5, as well as extravasation of IgG. Ischemia induced a neurological deficit, which was significantly ameliorated by olaparib at 3 and 5 mg/kg. However, this neuroprotective effect was not observed in mice treated with either low-dose or high-dose olaparib. Both 3 and 5 mg/kg olaparib markedly reduced cerebral infarction volume, but not cerebral edema. The expression of collagen IV decreased after cerebral ischemia, which was improved by olaparib at 3 and 5 mg/kg. These results were confirmed by the reduction of IgG extravasation with olaparib. Olaparib showed clear neuroprotective effects in transient ischemic mice mainly through the reduction of cerebral infarction and blood-brain barrier damage. PMID:26869042

  11. Effect of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on the heat response of HeLa S3 cells.

    PubMed

    Burgman, P; Konings, A W

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in hyperthermic cell killing and hyperthermic DNA strand-break induction and repair in HeLa S3 cells. The inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and 4-aminobenzamide (4AB), were used as tools in this study. Both inhibitors could sensitize the cells for hyperthermic cell killing equally well, although 3AB is known to be a more effective enzyme inhibitor. The heat sensitization at the level of cell killing could be reversed when the compounds were still present during a 4-h postincubation at 37 degrees C. More heat-induced DNA strand breaks were formed in the presence of 3AB and 4AB. Repair of strand breaks was inhibited during the postincubation at 37 degrees C. Thus the effect of 3AB and 4AB on DNA strand-break repair was different from the cited effect on cell survival. It is concluded that the sensitizing effect of 3AB and 4AB on hyperthermic cell killing is not caused by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and is also not related to repair of DNA strand breaks. PMID:3144718

  12. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A T; van Zeeland, A A; Zwanenburg, T S

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, we have measured the influence of 3AB on DNA repair following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. Both acentric fragments and exchanges increase indicating that the presence of 3AB slows down the repair of DNA strand breaks (probably DNA double strand breaks), thus making breaks available for interaction with each other to give rise to exchanges. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. Most 3AB induced SCEs occur during the second cell cycle, in which DNA containing bromouridine (BU) is used as template for replication. BU containing DNA appears to be prone to errors during replication. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs by 3AB is correlated with the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of the cells. The frequencies of spontaneously occurring DNA single strand breaks in cells grown in BrdUrd containing medium are higher than in the cells grown in normal medium and this increase depends on the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of these cells. We have studied the extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the

  13. Analysis of knockout mutants reveals non-redundant functions of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase isoforms in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Phuong Anh; Wahl, Vanessa; Tohge, Takayuki; de Souza, Laise Rosado; Zhang, Youjun; Do, Phuc Thi; Olas, Justyna J; Stitt, Mark; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) has a dual function being involved both in the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and being a constituent of the NAD(+) salvage pathway. To date most studies, both in plant and non-plant systems, have focused on the signaling role of PARP in poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation rather than any role that can be ascribed to its metabolic function. In order to address this question we here used a combination of expression, transcript and protein localization studies of all three PARP isoforms of Arabidopsis alongside physiological analysis of the corresponding mutants. Our analyses indicated that whilst all isoforms of PARP were localized to the nucleus they are also present in non-nuclear locations with parp1 and parp3 also localised in the cytosol, and parp2 also present in the mitochondria. We next isolated and characterized insertional knockout mutants of all three isoforms confirming a complete knockout in the full length transcript levels of the target genes as well as a reduced total leaf NAD hydrolase activity in the two isoforms (PARP1, PARP2) that are highly expressed in leaves. Physiological evaluation of the mutant lines revealed that they displayed distinctive metabolic and root growth characteristics albeit unaltered leaf morphology under optimal growth conditions. We therefore conclude that the PARP isoforms play non-redundant non-nuclear metabolic roles and that their function is highly important in rapidly growing tissues such as the shoot apical meristem, roots and seeds. PMID:26428915

  14. Prevention of tumorigenesis of oncogene-transformed rat fibroblasts with DNA site inhibitors of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, A. Jr.; Lee, W.M.F.; Kirsten, E.; Hakam, A.; McLick, J.; Buki, K.; Kun, E.

    1987-02-01

    The EJ-ras gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the steroid-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter/enhancer and introduced into Rat-1 fibroblasts, yielding the 14C cell line. When these cells were exposed to dexamethasone in vitro, EJ-ras mRNA was induced 15- to 20-fold, the cells grew in agar, and, after injection of cells into syngenic Fischer 344 rats, they produced lethal fibrosarcomas. Inhibitors of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, which prevent the activation of the purified enzyme by a synthrtic octadeoxyribonucleotide duplex, inhibited both in vivo tumorigenicity and in vitro growth in soft agar. The enzyme inhibitor 1,2-benzopyrone, which was studied in detail, and other polymerase inhibitors had no effect on EJ-ras mRNA or p21 protein expression. Poly(ADP ribose) polymerase was inhibited by the drug in both untreated and dexamethasone-treated cells both in vitro and in vivo to the same extent, but biological consequences of enzyme inhibition were manifest only when the cells were in the transformed tumorigenic state.

  15. Purification and biochemical characterization of a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-like enzyme from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Faraone-Mennella, M R; Gambacorta, A; Nicolaus, B; Farina, B

    1998-01-01

    A poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-like enzyme, detected in a crude homogenate from Sulfolobus solfataricus by means of activity and immunoblot analyses, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a rapid procedure including two sequential affinity chromatographies, on NAD+-agarose and DNA-Sepharose. The latter column selected specifically the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzyme with a 17% recovery of enzymic activity and a purification of more than 15000-fold. The molecular mass (54-55 kDa) assessed by SDS/PAGE and immunoblot was definitely lower than that determined for the corresponding eukaryotic protein. The enzyme was proved to be thermophilic, with a temperature optimum of approx. 80 degreesC, and thermostable, with a half-life of 204 min at 80 degreesC, in good agreement with the requirements of a thermozyme. It displayed a Km towards NAD+ of 154+/-50 microM; in the pH range 6.5-10.0 the activity values were similar, not showing a real optimum pH. The enzyme was able to bind homologous DNA, as evidenced by the ethidium bromide displacement assay. The product of the ADP-ribosylating reaction co-migrated with the short oligomers of ADP-ribose (less than 6 residues) from a eukaryotic source. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of the products, after digestion with phosphodiesterase I, gave an elution profile reproducing that obtained by the enzymic digestion of the rat testis poly(ADP-ribose). These results strongly suggest that the activities of the purified enzyme include the elongation step. PMID:9761745

  16. Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase Inhibition Ameliorates Hind Limb Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in a Murine Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chandler A.; Boloum, Valy; Albadawi, Hassan; Tsai, Shirling; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Oklu, Rahmi; Goldman, Mitchell H.; Watkins, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is known to increase poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP) activity and posttranslational poly-ADP-ribosylation of several regulatory proteins involved in inflammation and energy metabolism. These experiments test the hypothesis that PARP inhibition will modulate hind limb ischemia reperfusion (IR) in a mouse model of type-II diabetes; ameliorate the ribosylation and the activity/transnuclear localization of the key glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Methods db/db mice underwent 1.5hrs of hind limb ischemia followed by 1, 7, or 24hrs reperfusion. The treatment group received the PARP inhibitor PJ34 (PJ34) over a 24hrs period; the untreated group received Lactated ringer’s (LR) at the same time points. IR muscles were analyzed for indices of PARP activity, fiber injury, metabolic activity, inflammation, GAPDH activity /intracellular localization and poly-ADP-ribosylation of GAPDH. Results PARP activity was significantly lower in the PJ34 treated groups compared to the LR group at 7 and 24 hours reperfusion. There was significantly less muscle fiber injury in the PJ34 treated group compared to LR treated mice at 24 hrs reperfusion. PJ34 lowered levels of select proinflammatory molecules at 7hrs and 24hrs IR. There were significant increases in metabolic activity only at 24 hours IR in the PJ34 group, which temporally correlated with increase in GAPDH activity, decreased GAPDH poly ADP-ribosylation and nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Conclusions PJ34 reduced PARP activity, GAPDH ribosylation, GAPDH translocation, ameliorated muscle fiber injury, and increased metabolic activity following hind limb IR injury in a murine model of type-II diabetes. PARP inhibition might be a therapeutic strategy following IR in diabetic humans. PMID:23549425

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors regulate the mechanism of sulfur mustard-initiated cell death in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Meier, H L; Millard, C; Moser, J

    2000-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) produces slow-healing skin lesions that contain large, tight fluid-filled blisters. These lesions are the result of severe damage to areas of the body exposed to HD and require extensive medical care before complete recovery is achieved. Converting the mechanism of HD-initiated cell death from an inflammatory oncosis (homicide) to benign apoptosis (assisted suicide) may reduce the extent of cellular damage and the time required for healing. HD-exposed human lymphocytes lose cellular function, membrane integrity and viability, and suffer degradation of their nuclear components. The treatment of HD-exposed cells with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors prevents or alters the HD-initiated loss of cell viability, membrane integrity, cellular metabolic constituent (NAD) and cellular energy (ATP), while initiating alterations in nuclear constituents. It is hoped that by preventing or altering these HD-initiated changes we can limit the extent of the injury, decrease the time required for repair and reduce the loss of performance suffered by exposed individuals. The use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors to assist in initiating apoptosis in affected cells should help to achieve these objectives while preventing the chance of further disease development later in the exposed individuals. PMID:11428651

  18. ExpandplusCrystal Structures of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Zinc Fingers Bound to DNA

    SciTech Connect

    M Langelier; J Planck; S Roy; J Pascal

    2011-12-31

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has two homologous zinc finger domains, Zn1 and Zn2, that bind to a variety of DNA structures to stimulate poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis activity and to mediate PARP-1 interaction with chromatin. The structural basis for interaction with DNA is unknown, which limits our understanding of PARP-1 regulation and involvement in DNA repair and transcription. Here, we have determined crystal structures for the individual Zn1 and Zn2 domains in complex with a DNA double strand break, providing the first views of PARP-1 zinc fingers bound to DNA. The Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA structures establish a novel, bipartite mode of sequence-independent DNA interaction that engages a continuous region of the phosphodiester backbone and the hydrophobic faces of exposed nucleotide bases. Biochemical and cell biological analysis indicate that the Zn1 and Zn2 domains perform distinct functions. The Zn2 domain exhibits high binding affinity to DNA compared with the Zn1 domain. However, the Zn1 domain is essential for DNA-dependent PARP-1 activity in vitro and in vivo, whereas the Zn2 domain is not strictly required. Structural differences between the Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA complexes, combined with mutational and structural analysis, indicate that a specialized region of the Zn1 domain is re-configured through the hydrophobic interaction with exposed nucleotide bases to initiate PARP-1 activation.

  19. Mass spectrometry-based functional proteomics of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Pic, Emilie; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Poirier, Guy G

    2011-12-01

    PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear protein that plays an essential role in the regulation of many genome integrity and chromatin-based processes, such as DNA repair, replication or transcriptional regulation. PARP-1 modulates the function of chromatin and nuclear proteins through several poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr)-dependent pathways. Aside from the clearly established role of PARP-1 in the maintenance of genome stability, PARP-1 also emerged as an important regulator that links chromatin functions with extranuclear compartments. pADPr signaling has notably been found to be responsible for PARP-1-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Defining the mechanisms that govern the intrinsic functions of PARP-1 is fundamental to the understanding of signaling networks regulated by pADPr. The emergence of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and its broad applications in the study of biological systems represents an outstanding opportunity to widen our knowledge of the functional spectrum of PARP-1. In this article, we summarize various PARP-1 targeted proteomics studies and proteome-wide analyses that shed light on its protein interaction partners, expression levels and post-translational modifications. PMID:22087659

  20. Coordinated Regulation of TIP60 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 in Damaged-Chromatin Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Masae; Furuya, Kanji; Fukuto, Atsuhiko; Matsuda, Ryo; Adachi, Jun; Matsuda, Tomonari; Kakizuka, Akira; Ikura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-15

    The dynamic exchange of histones alleviates the nucleosome barrier and simultaneously facilitates various aspects of cellular DNA metabolism, such as DNA repair and transcription. In response to DNA damage, the acetylation of Lys5 in the histone variant H2AX, catalyzed by TIP60, plays a key role in promoting histone exchange; however, the detailed molecular mechanism still is unclear. Here, we show that the TIP60 complex includes poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 is required for the rapid exchange of H2AX on chromatin at DNA damage sites. It is known that PARP-1 binds dynamically to damaged chromatin and is crucial for the subsequent recruitment of other repair factors, and its auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is required for the dynamics. We also show that the acetylation of histone H2AX at Lys5 by TIP60, but not the phosphorylation of H2AX, is required for the ADP-ribosylation activity of PARP-1 and its dynamic binding to damaged chromatin. Our results indicate the reciprocal regulation of K5 acetylation of H2AX and PARP-1, which could modulate the chromatin structure to facilitate DNA metabolism at damage sites. This could explain the rather undefined roles of PARP-1 in various DNA damage responses. PMID:26976643

  1. PIASy Mediates SUMO-2/3 Conjugation of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) on Mitotic Chromosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyunju; Al-Ani, Gada; Deckert, Katelyn; Kirkpatrick, Donald; Gygi, Steven P.; Dasso, Mary; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PIASy is a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligase that modifies chromosomal proteins in mitotic Xenopus egg extracts and plays an essential role in mitotic chromosome segregation. We have isolated a novel SUMO-2/3-modified mitotic chromosomal protein and identified it as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1). PARP1 was robustly conjugated to SUMO-2/3 on mitotic chromosomes but not on interphase chromatin. PIASy promotes SUMOylation of PARP1 both in egg extracts and in vitro reconstituted SUMOylation assays. Through tandem mass spectrometry analysis of mitotically SUMOylated PARP1, we identified a residue within the BRCA1 C-terminal domain of PARP1 (lysine 482) as its primary SUMOylation site. Mutation of this residue significantly reduced PARP1 SUMOylation in egg extracts and enhanced the accumulation of species derived from modification of secondary lysine residues in assays using purified components. SUMOylation of PARP1 did not alter in vitro PARP1 enzyme activity, poly-ADP-ribosylation (PARylation), nor did inhibition of SUMOylation of PARP1 alter the accumulation of PARP1 on mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that SUMOylation regulates neither the intrinsic activity of PARP1 nor its localization. However, loss of SUMOylation increased PARP1-dependent PARylation on isolated chromosomes, indicating SUMOylation controls the capacity of PARP1 to modify other chromatin-associated proteins. PMID:20228053

  2. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals That Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression through EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kayla A.; Cesaroni, Matteo; Denny, Michael F.; Lupey, Lena N.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications, such as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), regulate chromatin-modifying enzymes, ultimately affecting gene expression. This study explores the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) on global gene expression in a lymphoblastoid B cell line. We found that inhibition of PARP catalytic activity with olaparib resulted in global gene deregulation, affecting approximately 11% of the genes expressed. Gene ontology analysis revealed that PARP could exert these effects through transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling enzymes, including the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2. EZH2 mediates the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), a modification associated with chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Both pharmacological inhibition of PARP and knockdown of PARP1 induced the expression of EZH2, which resulted in increased global H3K27me3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that PARP1 inhibition led to H3K27me3 deposition at EZH2 target genes, which resulted in gene silencing. Moreover, increased EZH2 expression is attributed to the loss of the occupancy of the transcription repressor E2F4 at the EZH2 promoter following PARP inhibition. Together, these data show that PARP plays an important role in global gene regulation and identifies for the first time a direct role of PARP1 in regulating the expression and function of EZH2. PMID:26370511

  3. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals That Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression through EZH2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kayla A; Cesaroni, Matteo; Denny, Michael F; Lupey, Lena N; Tempera, Italo

    2015-12-01

    Posttranslational modifications, such as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), regulate chromatin-modifying enzymes, ultimately affecting gene expression. This study explores the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) on global gene expression in a lymphoblastoid B cell line. We found that inhibition of PARP catalytic activity with olaparib resulted in global gene deregulation, affecting approximately 11% of the genes expressed. Gene ontology analysis revealed that PARP could exert these effects through transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling enzymes, including the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2. EZH2 mediates the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), a modification associated with chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Both pharmacological inhibition of PARP and knockdown of PARP1 induced the expression of EZH2, which resulted in increased global H3K27me3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that PARP1 inhibition led to H3K27me3 deposition at EZH2 target genes, which resulted in gene silencing. Moreover, increased EZH2 expression is attributed to the loss of the occupancy of the transcription repressor E2F4 at the EZH2 promoter following PARP inhibition. Together, these data show that PARP plays an important role in global gene regulation and identifies for the first time a direct role of PARP1 in regulating the expression and function of EZH2. PMID:26370511

  4. Cellular regulation of poly ADP-ribosylation of proteins: II. Augmentation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in SV40 3T3 cells following methotrexate-induced G1/S inhibition of cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    Sooki-Toth, A.; Asghari, F.; Kirsten, E.; Kun, E. )

    1987-05-01

    SV40-3T3 cells were exposed in monolayer cultures to 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} M methotrexate (MTX), that inhibited thymidylate synthetase, arrested cell growth without cell killing in 24 h and did not induce single- (ss) or double-strand (ds) breaks in DNA. Following 24, up to 72 h, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase content of attached cells was induced by 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} MTX and the augmentation of the enzyme increased with the time of exposure to the drug. Inhibition of protein or RNA synthesis abolished augmentation of enzymatic activity; so too did the initiation of maximal cell growth by thymidine + hypoxanthine, by-passing the inhibitory site of MTX. Isolation of the ADP-ribosylated enzyme protein by gel electrophoresis identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein as the molecule that was induced by 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} M MTX. Under identical conditions, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase induction in 3T3 cells could not be demonstrated. A possible cell-cycle dependent biosynthesis of the enzyme protein is proposed in SV40 3T3 cells.

  5. p21CDKN1A Regulates the Binding of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 to DNA Repair Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Tillhon, Micol; Cazzalini, Ornella; Stivala, Lucia A.; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Lavrik, Olga; Prosperi, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle inhibitor p21CDKN1A was previously found to interact directly with DNA nick-sensor poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and to promote base excision repair (BER). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this BER-related association of p21 with PARP-1 remains to be clarified. In this study we investigate the capability of p21 to influence PARP-1 binding to DNA repair intermediates in a reconstituted BER system in vitro. Using model photoreactive BER substrates containing single-strand breaks, we found that full-length recombinant GST-tagged p21 but not a C-terminal domain truncated form of p21 was able to stimulate the PARP-1 binding to BER intermediates with no significant influence on the catalytic activity of PARP-1. In addition, we investigate whether the activation of PARP-1 through poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) synthesis, is required for its interaction with p21. We have found that in human fibroblasts and in HeLa cells treated with the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), the interaction of p21 with PARP-1 was greatly dependent on PAR synthesis. In fact, an anti-PAR antibody was able to co-immunoprecipitate p21 and PARP-1 from extracts of MNNG-treated cells, while blocking PAR synthesis with the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib, drastically reduced the amount of p21 co-immunoprecipitated by a PARP-1 antibody. Our results provide the first evidence that p21 can stimulate the binding of PARP-1 to DNA repair intermediates, and that this cooperation requires PAR synthesis. PMID:26730949

  6. Caffeine metabolites are inhibitors of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Liesbeth; Moonen, Harald J J; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bast, Aalt; Hageman, Geja J

    2006-09-28

    The activity of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (E.C.2.4.2.30), which is highly activated by DNA strand breaks, is associated with the pathophysiology of both acute as well as chronic inflammatory diseases. PARP-1 overactivation and the subsequent extensive turnover of its substrate NAD+ put a large demand on mitochondrial ATP-production. Furthermore, due to its reported role in NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, PARP-1 is considered an interesting target in the treatment of these diseases. In this study the PARP-1 inhibiting capacity of caffeine and several metabolites as well as other (methyl)xanthines was tested using an ELISA-assay with purified human PARP-1. Caffeine itself showed only weak PARP-1 inhibiting activity, whereas the caffeine metabolites 1,7-dimethylxanthine, 3-methylxanthine and 1-methylxanthine, as well as theobromine and theophylline showed significant PARP-1 inhibiting activity. Further evaluation of these compounds in H2O2-treated A549 lung epithelial and RF24 vascular endothelial cells revealed that the decrease in NAD+-levels as well as the formation of the poly(ADP-ribose)polymer was significantly prevented by the major caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethylxanthine. Furthermore, H2O2-induced necrosis could be prevented by a high dose of 1,7-dimethylxanthine. Finally, antioxidant effects of the methylxanthines could be ruled out with ESR and measurement of the TEAC. Concluding, caffeine metabolites are inhibitors of PARP-1 and the major caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethylxanthine has significant PARP-1 inhibiting activity in cultured epithelial and endothelial cells at physiological concentrations. This inhibition could have important implications for nutritional treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory pathologies, like prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injury or vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:16870158

  7. Pathophysiological role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation during acetaminophen-induced liver cell necrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Fickert, Peter; Knight, Tamara R; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Farhood, Anwar; Trauner, Michael; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2005-03-01

    DNA fragmentation in hepatocytes occurs early after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose in mice. DNA strandbreaks can induce excessive activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP), which may lead to oncotic necrosis. Based on controversial findings with chemical PARP inhibitors, the role of PARP-1 activation in AAP hepatotoxicity remains unclear. To investigate PARP-1 activation and evaluate a pathophysiological role of PARP-1, we used both PARP inhibitors (3-aminobenzamide; 5-aminoisoquinolinone) and PARP gene knockout mice (PARP-/-). Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg AAP resulted in DNA fragmentation and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release as early as 3 h, with further increase of these parameters up to 12 h. Few nuclei of hepatocytes stained positive for poly-ADP-ribosylated nuclear proteins (PAR) as indicator for PARP-1 activation at 4.5 h. However, the number of PAR-positive cells and staining intensity increased substantially at 6 and 12 h. Pretreatment with 500 mg/kg 3-aminobenzamide before AAP attenuated hepatic glutathione depletion and completely eliminated DNA fragmentation and liver injury. Delayed treatment several hours after AAP was still partially protective. On the other hand, liver injury was not attenuated in PARP-/- mice compared to wild-type animals. Similarly, the specific PARP-1 inhibitor 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5 mg/kg) was not protective. However, 3-aminobenzamide attenuated liver injury in WT and PARP-/- mice. In summary, PARP-1 activation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation after AAP overdose. However, PARP-1 activation is not a relevant event for AAP-induced oncotic necrosis. The protection of 3-aminobenzamide against AAP-induced liver injury was due to reduced metabolic activation and potentially its antioxidant effect but independent of PARP-1 inhibition. PMID:15601672

  8. Prolonged poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity regulates JP-8-induced sustained cytokine expression in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis A; Smulson, Mark E; Chen, Zun

    2007-05-01

    Environmental pollutants inducing oxidative stress stimulate chronic inflammatory responses in the lung leading to pulmonary tissue dysfunction. In response to oxidative stress, alveolar macrophages produce both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which induce the expression of a wide variety of immune-response genes. We found that a prolonged exposure of alveolar macrophages to a nonlethal dose (8 microg/ml) of JP-8, the kerosene-based hydrocarbon jet fuel, induced the persistent expression of IL-1, iNOS, and COX-2, as well as cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1). Because poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1), a coactivator of NF-kappaB, regulates inflammatory responses and associated disorders in the airways, we determined whether JP-8 induces the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation automodification of PARP-1 in alveolar macrophages. We observed that PARP-1 is activated in a time-dependent manner, which was temporally coincident with the prolonged activation of NF-kappaB and with the augmented expression of the proinflammatory factors described above. The 4 microg/ml dilution of JP-8 also increased the activity of PARP-1 as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2, indicating that lower doses of JP-8 also affect the regulation of proinflammatory factors in pulmonary macrophages. Together, these results demonstrate that an extensive induction of PARP-1 might coordinate the persistent expression of proinflammatory mediators in alveolar macrophages activated by aromatic hydrocarbons that can result in lung injury from occupational exposure. PMID:17395016

  9. Regulation of Epstein-Barr virus OriP replication by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Italo; Deng, Zhong; Atanasiu, Constandache; Chen, Chi-Ju; D'Erme, Maria; Lieberman, Paul M

    2010-05-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is an abundant, chromatin-associated, NAD-dependent enzyme that functions in multiple chromosomal processes, including DNA replication and chromatin remodeling. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) origin of plasmid replication (OriP) is a dynamic genetic element that confers stable episome maintenance, DNA replication initiation, and chromatin organization functions. OriP function depends on the EBV-encoded origin binding protein EBNA1. We have previously shown that EBNA1 is subject to negative regulation by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation). We now show that PARP1 physically associates with OriP in latently EBV-infected B cells. Short hairpin RNA depletion of PARP1 enhances OriP replication activity and increases EBNA1, origin recognition complex 2 (ORC2), and minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) association with OriP. Pharmacological inhibitors of PARP1 enhance OriP plasmid maintenance and increase EBNA1, ORC2, and MCM3 occupancy at OriP. PARylation in vitro inhibits ORC2 recruitment and remodels telomere repeat factor (TRF) binding at the dyad symmetry (DS) element of OriP. Purified PARP1 can ribosylate EBNA1 at multiple sites throughout its amino terminus but not in the carboxy-terminal DNA binding domain. We also show that EBNA1 linking regions (LR1 and LR2) can bind directly to oligomers of PAR. We propose that PARP1-dependent PARylation of EBNA1 and adjacently bound TRF2 induces structural changes at the DS element that reduce EBNA1 DNA binding affinity and functional recruitment of ORC. PMID:20219917

  10. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 by arsenite interferes with repair of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Liu, Wenlan; Cooper, Karen L; Qin, Xu-Jun; de Souza Bergo, Patrícia L; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2009-03-13

    Arsenic enhances skin tumor formation when combined with other carcinogens, including UV radiation (UVR). In this study we report that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite synergistically increases UVR-induced oxidative DNA damage in human keratinocytes as detected by 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanine (8-OHdG) formation. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is involved in base excision repair, a process that repairs 8-OHdG lesions. Arsenite suppresses UVR-induced PARP-1 activation in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of PARP-1 activity by 3-aminobenzamide or small interfering RNA silencing of PARP-1 expression significantly increases UVR-induced 8-OHdG formation, suggesting that inhibition of PARP-1 activity by arsenite contributes to oxidative DNA damage. PARP-1 is a zinc finger protein, and mass spectrometry analysis reveals that arsenite can occupy a synthetic apopeptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1 (PARPzf). When the PARPzf peptide is preincubated with Zn(II) followed by incubation with increasing concentrations of arsenite, the ZnPARPzf signal is decreased while the AsPARPzf signal intensity is increased as a function of arsenite dose, suggesting a competition between zinc and arsenite for the same binding site. Addition of Zn(II) abolished arsenite enhancement of UVR-stimulated 8-OHdG generation and restored PARP-1 activity. Our findings demonstrate that arsenite inhibits oxidative DNA damage repair and suggest that interaction of arsenite with the PARP-1 zinc finger domain contributes to the inhibition of PARP-1 activity by arsenite. Arsenite inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is one likely mechanism for the reported co-carcinogenic activities of arsenic in UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:19056730

  11. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Represses Liver X Receptor-mediated ABCA1 Expression and Cholesterol Efflux in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Elina; Hussein, Maryem A; Savas, Jeffery N; Ouimet, Mireille; Barrett, Tessa J; Leone, Sarah; Yates, John R; Moore, Kathryn J; Fisher, Edward A; Garabedian, Michael J

    2016-05-20

    Liver X receptors (LXR) are oxysterol-activated nuclear receptors that play a central role in reverse cholesterol transport through up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) that mediate cellular cholesterol efflux. Mouse models of atherosclerosis exhibit reduced atherosclerosis and enhanced regression of established plaques upon LXR activation. However, the coregulatory factors that affect LXR-dependent gene activation in macrophages remain to be elucidated. To identify novel regulators of LXR that modulate its activity, we used affinity purification and mass spectrometry to analyze nuclear LXRα complexes and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as an LXR-associated factor. In fact, PARP-1 interacted with both LXRα and LXRβ. Both depletion of PARP-1 and inhibition of PARP-1 activity augmented LXR ligand-induced ABCA1 expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage line and primary bone marrow-derived macrophages but did not affect LXR-dependent expression of other target genes, ABCG1 and SREBP-1c. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed PARP-1 recruitment at the LXR response element in the promoter of the ABCA1 gene. Further, we demonstrated that LXR is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated by PARP-1, a potential mechanism by which PARP-1 influences LXR function. Importantly, the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide enhanced macrophage ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to the lipid-poor apolipoprotein AI. These findings shed light on the important role of PARP-1 on LXR-regulated lipid homeostasis. Understanding the interplay between PARP-1 and LXR may provide insights into developing novel therapeutics for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27026705

  12. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase in Cervical Cancer Pathogenesis: Mechanism and Potential Role for PARP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Ioannis C; Kucukmetin, Ali; Mukhopadhyay, Asima; Lunec, John; Curtin, Nicola J

    2016-05-01

    Treatment options for disease recurrence of women treated for locally advanced and advanced cervical cancer are very limited-largely palliative chemotherapy. The low efficacy of the currently available drugs raises the need for new targeted agents. Poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (PARPi) have emerged as a promising class of chemotherapeutic agents in cancers associated with defects in DNA repair. Their therapeutic potential in cervical cancer is currently being evaluated in 3 ongoing clinical trials. Here we review the available information regarding all the aspects of PARP in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer, from expression and the mechanism of action to the role of the polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as the potential of the inhibitors. We finally propose a new unifying theory regarding the role of PARPs in the development of cervical carcinomas. PMID:26905326

  13. 3-aminobenzamide, one of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 inhibitors, rescuesapoptosisin rat models of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianqing; Song, Wenqi; Deng, Bin; Xing, Ziling; Zhang, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is anubiquitous, DNA repair-associated enzyme, which participates in gene expression, cell death, central nerve system (CNS) disorders and oxidative stress. According to the previous studies, PARP-1 over-activation may lead to over-consumption of ATP and even cell apoptosis. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an inducement towards PARP-1 over-activation due to its massive damage to DNA. 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) is a kind of PARP-1 inhibitors. The relationship among PARP-1, 3-AB, SCI and apoptosis has not been fully understood. Hence, in the present study, we focused on the effects of 3-AB on cell apoptosis after SCI. Accordingly, SCI model was constructed artificially, and 3-AB was injected intrathecally into the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The results demonstrated an increase in cell apoptosis after SCI. Furthermore, PARP-1 was over-activated after SCI but inhibited by 3-AB injection. In addition, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was inhibited but B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) was up-regulated by 3-AB. Interestingly, caspase-3 was not significantly altered with or without 3-AB. In conclusion, our experiments showed that 3-AB, as a PARP-1 inhibitor, could inhibit cell apoptosis after SCI in caspase-independent way, which could provide a better therapeutic target for the treatment of SCI. PMID:26722405

  14. Continuous inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase does not reduce reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Kenya; Yanagida, Shigeki; Yamagishi, Tadashi; Takayama, Eiichi; Bessho, Motoaki; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Adachi, Takeshi; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka

    2013-07-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), an enzyme that is important to the regulation of nuclear function, is activated by DNA strand breakage. In massive DNA damage, PARP is overactivated, exhausting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and leading to cell death. Recent studies have succeeded in reducing cellular damage in ischemia/reperfusion by inhibiting PARP. However, PARP plays an important part in the DNA repair system, and its inhibition may be hazardous in certain situations. We compared the short-time inhibition of PARP against continuous inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion using isolated rat hearts. The hearts were reperfused after 21 minutes of ischemia with a bolus injection of 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) (10 mg/kg) followed by continuous 3-AB infusion (50 μM) for the whole reperfusion period or for the first 6 minutes or without 3-AB. At the end of reperfusion, contractile function, high-energy phosphate content, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide content, and infarcted area were significantly preserved in the 3-AB 6-minute group. In the 3-AB continuous group, these advantages were not apparent. At the end of reperfusion, PARP cleavage had significantly proceeded in the 3-AB continuous group, indicating initiation of the apoptotic cascade. Thus, continuous PARP inhibition by 3-AB does not reduce reperfusion injury in the isolated rat heart, which may be because of acceleration of apoptosis. PMID:23846805

  15. Structural basis for lack of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-13/zinc finger antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Tobias; Klepsch, Mirjam; Thorsell, Ann-Gerd; Andersson, C David; Linusson, Anna; Schüler, Herwig

    2015-03-20

    The mammalian poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family includes ADP-ribosyltransferases with diphtheria toxin homology (ARTD). Most members have mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PARP13/ARTD13, also called zinc finger antiviral protein, has roles in viral immunity and microRNA-mediated stress responses. PARP13 features a divergent PARP homology domain missing a PARP consensus sequence motif; the domain has enigmatic functions and apparently lacks catalytic activity. We used x-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and biochemical analyses to investigate the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in human PARP13 and two of its functional partners in stress granules: PARP12/ARTD12, and PARP15/BAL3/ARTD7. The crystal structure of the PARP homology domain of PARP13 shows obstruction of the canonical active site, precluding NAD(+) binding. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this closed cleft conformation is maintained in solution. Introducing consensus side chains in PARP13 did not result in 3-aminobenzamide binding, but in further closure of the site. Three-dimensional alignment of the PARP homology domains of PARP13, PARP12, and PARP15 illustrates placement of PARP13 residues that deviate from the PARP family consensus. Introducing either one of two of these side chains into the corresponding positions in PARP15 abolished PARP15 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Taken together, our results show that PARP13 lacks the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PMID:25635049

  16. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation induces high mobility group box 1 release from proximal tubular cells during cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, J

    2016-06-20

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs against cancer, but its major side effect such as nephrotoxicity limits its use. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protects against various renal diseases via gene transactivation and/or ADP-ribosylation. However, the role of PARP in necrotic cell death during cisplatin nephrotoxicity remains an open question. Here we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PARP by postconditioning dose-dependently prevented tubular injury and renal dysfunction following cisplatin administration in mice. PARP inhibition by postconditioning also attenuated ATP depletion during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Systemic release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein in plasma induced by cisplatin administration was significantly diminished by PARP inhibition by postconditioning. In in vitro kidney proximal tubular cell lines, PARP inhibition by postconditioning also diminished HMGB1 release from cells. These data demonstrate that cisplatin-induced PARP1 activation contributes to HMGB1 release from kidney proximal tubular cells, resulting in the promotion of inflammation during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:26447520

  17. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Radioiodinated Tracer with Specificity for Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zmuda, Filip; Malviya, Gaurav; Blair, Adele; Boyd, Marie; Chalmers, Anthony J; Sutherland, Andrew; Pimlott, Sally L

    2015-11-12

    Interest in nuclear imaging of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has grown in recent years due to the ability of PARP-1 to act as a biomarker for glioblastoma and increased clinical use of PARP-1 inhibitors. This study reports the identification of a lead iodinated analog 5 of the clinical PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib as a potential single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging agent. Compound 5 was shown to be a potent PARP-1 inhibitor in cell-free and cellular assays, and it exhibited mouse plasma stability but approximately 3-fold greater intrinsic clearance when compared to olaparib. An (123)I-labeled version of 5 was generated using solid state halogen exchange methodology. Ex vivo biodistribution studies of [(123)I]5 in mice bearing subcutaneous glioblastoma xenografts revealed that the tracer had the ability to be retained in tumor tissue and bind to PARP-1 with specificity. These findings support further investigations of [(123)I]5 as a noninvasive PARP-1 SPECT imaging agent. PMID:26469301

  18. Natural and glucosyl flavonoids inhibit poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and induce synthetic lethality in BRCA mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    MAEDA, JUNKO; ROYBAL, ERICA J.; BRENTS, COLLEEN A.; UESAKA, MITSURU; AIZAWA, YASUSHI; KATO, TAKAMITSU A.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been proven to represent superior clinical agents targeting DNA repair mechanisms in cancer therapy. We investigated PARP inhibitory effects of the natural and synthetic flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, monoglucosyl rutin and maltooligosyl rutin) and tested the synthetic lethality in BRCA2 mutated cells. In vitro ELISA assay suggested that the flavonoids have inhibitory effects on PARP activity, but glucosyl modifications reduced the inhibitory effect. Cytotoxicity tests of Chinese hamster cells defective in BRCA2 gene (V-C8) and its parental V79 cells showed BRCA2-dependent synthetic lethality when treated with the flavonoids. BRCA2 mutated cells were three times more sensitive to the flavonoids than the wild-type and gene complemented cells. Reduced toxicity was observed in a glucosyl modification-dependent manner. The present study provides support for the clinical use of new treatment drugs, and is the beginning of the potential application of flavonoids in cancer prevention and the periodic consumption of appropriate flavonoids to reduce cancer risk in individuals carrying a mutant allele of the BRCA2 gene. PMID:24317580

  19. Effectiveness and safety of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in cancer therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhengqiang; Cao, Chao; Geng, Xinwei; Tian, Baoping; Wu, Yanping; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-02-16

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are a class of small-molecule drugs suppressing PARP enzymes activity, inducing the death of cells deficient in homologous recombination repair (HRR). HRR deficiency is common in tumor cells with BRCA gene mutation. Since their first clinical trial in 2003, PARP inhibitors have shown benefit in the treatment of HRR-deficient tumors. Recently, several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate the potential benefit of administration of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. However, the results remain controversial. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of PARP inhibitors in patients with cancer, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of RCTs. According to our study, PARP inhibitors could clearly improve progression-free survival (PFS), especially in patients with BRCA mutation. However, our study showed no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between the PARP inhibitors and controls, even in the BRCA mutation group. Little toxicity was reported in the rate of treatment correlated adverse events (AEs) in PARP inhibitor group compared with controls. In conclusion, PARP inhibitors do well in improving PFS with little toxicity, especially in patients with BRCA deficiency. PMID:26399274

  20. Effectiveness and safety of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in cancer therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xinwei; Tian, Baoping; Wu, Yanping; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are a class of small-molecule drugs suppressing PARP enzymes activity, inducing the death of cells deficient in homologous recombination repair (HRR). HRR deficiency is common in tumor cells with BRCA gene mutation. Since their first clinical trial in 2003, PARP inhibitors have shown benefit in the treatment of HRR-deficient tumors. Recently, several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate the potential benefit of administration of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. However, the results remain controversial. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of PARP inhibitors in patients with cancer, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of RCTs. According to our study, PARP inhibitors could clearly improve progression-free survival (PFS), especially in patients with BRCA mutation. However, our study showed no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between the PARP inhibitors and controls, even in the BRCA mutation group. Little toxicity was reported in the rate of treatment correlated adverse events (AEs) in PARP inhibitor group compared with controls. In conclusion, PARP inhibitors do well in improving PFS with little toxicity, especially in patients with BRCA deficiency. PMID:26399274

  1. Regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 activity by the phosphorylation state of the nuclear NAD biosynthetic enzyme NMN adenylyl transferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Felicitas; Lau, Corinna; Ziegler, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear NAD+ metabolism constitutes a major component of signaling pathways. It includes NAD+-dependent protein deacetylation by members of the Sir2 family and protein modification by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 has emerged as an important mediator of processes involving DNA rearrangements. High-affinity binding to breaks in DNA activates PARP-1, which attaches poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to target proteins. NMN adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) catalyze the final step of NAD+ biosynthesis. We report here that the nuclear isoform NMNAT-1 stimulates PARP-1 activity and binds to PAR. Its overexpression in HeLa cells promotes the relocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria to the nucleus, a process known to depend on poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Moreover, NMNAT-1 is subject to phosphorylation by protein kinase C, resulting in reduced binding to PAR. Mimicking phosphorylation, substitution of the target serine residue by aspartate precludes PAR binding and stimulation of PARP-1. We conclude that, depending on its state of phosphorylation, NMNAT-1 binds to activated, automodifying PARP-1 and thereby amplifies poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. PMID:17360427

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition reverses vascular dysfunction after {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Carsten J. . E-mail: Carsten.Beller@urz.uni-heidelberg.de; Radovits, Tamas; Seres, Leila; Kosse, Jens; Krempien, Robert; Gross, Marie-Luise; Penzel, Roland; Berger, Irina; Huber, Peter E.; Hagl, Siegfried; Szabo, Csaba; Szabo, Gabor

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The generation of reactive oxygen species during {gamma}-irradiation may induce DNA damage, leading to activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) culminating in endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we assessed the effect of PARP inhibition on changes in vascular function after acute and short-term irradiation. Methods and Materials: In the acute experiments, aortic rings were exposed to 20 Gy of {gamma}-irradiation. The aortae were harvested after 1 or 7 days. Two additional groups received the ultrapotent PARP inhibitor, INO-1001, for 1 or 7 days after irradiation. The aortic rings were precontracted by phenylephrine and relaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were studied. Results: The vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine was significantly lower both acutely and 1 and 7 days after irradiation. Vasorelaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was not impaired acutely after irradiation. One and seven days after irradiation, vasorelaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was significantly enhanced. Treatment with INO-1001 reversed vascular dysfunction after irradiation. Conclusion: Vascular dysfunction was observed 1 and 7 days after irradiation, as evidenced by reduced vasoconstriction, coupled with endothelium-dependent and -independent hyperrelaxation. PARP inhibition restored vascular function and may, therefore, be suitable to reverse vascular dysfunction after irradiation.

  3. Transcriptional Reprogramming and Resistance to Colonic Mucosal Injury in Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1)-deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Larmonier, Claire B; Shehab, Kareem W; Laubitz, Daniel; Jamwal, Deepa R; Ghishan, Fayez K; Kiela, Pawel R

    2016-04-22

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize and bind branched polymers of ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins using NAD as a substrate and participate in the control of gene transcription and DNA repair. PARP1, the most abundant isoform, regulates the expression of proinflammatory mediator cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, and inhibition of PARP1 enzymatic activity reduced or ameliorated autoimmune diseases in several experimental models, including colitis. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the protective effects of PARP1 inhibition in colitis and the cell types in which Parp1 deletion has the most significant impact are unknown. The objective of the current study was to determine the impact of Parp1 deletion on the innate immune response to mucosal injury and on the gut microbiome composition. Parp1 deficiency was evaluated in DSS-induced colitis in WT, Parp1(-/-), Rag2(-/-), and Rag2(-/-)×Parp1(-/-) double knock-out mice. Genome-wide analysis of the colonic transcriptome and fecal 16S amplicon profiling was performed. Compared with WT, we demonstrated that Parp1(-/-) were protected from dextran-sulfate sodium-induced colitis and that this protection was associated with a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming in the colon. PARP1 deficiency was also associated with a modulation of the colonic microbiota (increases relative abundance of Clostridia clusters IV and XIVa) and a concomitant increase in the frequency of mucosal CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. The protective effects conferred by Parp1 deletion were lost in Rag2(-/-) × Parp1(-/-) mice, highlighting the role of the adaptive immune system for full protection. PMID:26912654

  4. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  5. Latonduine Analogs Restore F508del-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Trafficking through the Modulation of Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase 3 and Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase 16 Activity.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Graeme W; Robert, Renaud; Matthes, Elizabeth; Yang, Qi; Solari, Roberto; Hatley, Richard; Edge, Colin M; Hanrahan, John W; Andersen, Raymond; Thomas, David Y; Birault, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a major lethal genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). This encodes a chloride ion channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells. The most common mutation in CFTR (F508del-CFTR) generates a protein that is misfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Identifying small molecules that correct this CFTR trafficking defect is a promising approach in CF therapy. However, to date only modest efficacy has been reported for correctors in clinical trials. We identified the marine sponge metabolite latonduine as a corrector. We have now developed a series of latonduine derivatives that are more potent F508del-CFTR correctors with one (MCG315 [2,3-dihydro-1H-2-benzazepin-1-one]) having 10-fold increased corrector activity and an EC50 of 72.25 nM. We show that the latonduine analogs inhibit poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) isozymes 1, 3, and 16. Further our molecular modeling studies point to the latonduine analogs binding to the PARP nicotinamide-binding domain. We established the relationship between the ability of the latonduine analogs to inhibit PARP-16 and their ability to correct F508del-CFTR trafficking. We show that latonduine can inhibit both PARP-3 and -16 and that this is necessary for CFTR correction. We demonstrate that latonduine triggers correction by regulating the activity of the unfolded protein response activator inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE-1) via modulation of the level of its ribosylation by PARP-16. These results establish latonduines novel site of action as well as its proteostatic mechanism of action. PMID:27193581

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition combined with irradiation: A dual treatment concept to prevent neointimal hyperplasia after endarterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Carsten J. . E-mail: Carsten.Beller@urz.uni-heidelberg.de; Kosse, Jens; Radovits, Tamas; Geroe, Domokos; Krempien, Robert; Gross, Marie-Luise; Berger, Irina; Hagl, Siegfried; Szabo, Csaba; Szabo, Gabor

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: In a rat model of endarterectomy we investigated the potential role of the peroxynitrite-poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) pathway in neointima formation and the effects of irradiation, pharmacologic inhibition of PARP, or combined pharmacologic inhibition of PARP and irradiation on vascular remodeling. Methods and Materials: Carotid endarterectomy was performed by incision of the left carotid artery with removal of intima in Sprague-Dawley rats. Six groups were studied: sham-operated rats (n = 10), control endarterectomized rats (n = 10), or endarterectomized rats irradiated with 15 Gy (n = 10), or treated with PARP inhibitor, INO-1001 (5 mg/kg/day) (n = 10), or with combined treatment with INO-1001 and irradiation with 5 Gy (n = 10) or with 15 Gy (n = 10). After 21 days, neointima formation and vascular remodeling were assessed. Results: Neointima formation after endarterectomy was inhibited by postoperative irradiation with 15 Gy and was attenuated by PARP inhibition. However, in parallel to inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia, activation of the peroxynitrite-PARP pathway in the outer vessel wall layers was triggered by postoperative irradiation. Combined pharmacologic PARP inhibition and irradiation with 15 Gy significantly reduced both neointimal hyperplasia and activation of the peroxynitrite-PARP pathway in the outer vessel wall layers. Combination of PARP inhibition and irradiation with 5 Gy was less effective than both PARP inhibition or irradiation with 15 Gy alone. Conclusions: We conclude, that combined PARP inhibition and irradiation with 15 Gy may be a new dual strategy for prevention of restenosis after surgical vessel reconstruction: combining the strong antiproliferative effect of irradiation and ameliorating irradiation-induced side effects caused by excessive PARP activation.

  7. Radiosensitization of Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo through Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibition with ABT-888

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew J.; Reyes, Juvenal; Armour, Michael; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1/2 (PARP-1/2) inhibition enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo, and the mechanism by which this occurs. Methods Pancreatic carcinoma cells were treated with ABT-888, radiation, or both. In vitro cell viability, apoptosis, and PARP activity were measured. Orthotopic xenografts were generated in athymic mice and treated with ABT-888 (25 mg/kg), radiation (5 Gy), both, or no treatment. Mice were monitored with bioluminescence imaging. RESULTS In vitro, treatment with ABT-888 and radiation led to higher rates of cell death after 8 days (P < .01). Co-treatment with 5 Gy and 1, 10 or 100 μmol/l of ABT-888 led to dose enhancement factors of 1.29, 1.41 and 2.36, respectively. Caspase activity was not significantly increased when treated with ABT-888 (10 μmol/l) alone (1.28-fold, P = .08), but became significant when radiation was added (2.03-fold, P < .01). PARP activity increased post-radiation and was abrogated following co-treatment with ABT-888. In vivo, treatment with ABT-888, radiation or both led to tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of 8, 30 and 39 days, and survival at 60 days of 0%, 0% and 40%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS ABT-888 with radiation significantly enhanced tumor response in vitro and in vivo. ABT-888 inhibited PAR protein polymerization resulting in dose-dependent feedback up-regulation of PARP and p-ATM suggesting increased DNA damage. This translated into enhancement in TGI and survival with radiation in vivo. In vitro PAR levels correlated with levels of tumor apoptosis suggesting potential as a predictive biomarker. These data are being used to support a Phase I study in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:24836647

  8. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors Sensitize Cancer Cells to Death Receptor-mediated Apoptosis by Enhancing Death Receptor Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, X. Wei; Koh, Brian D.; Zhang, Jin-San; Flatten, Karen S.; Schneider, Paula A.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-α-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), agonistic monoclonal antibodies to TRAIL receptors, and small molecule TRAIL receptor agonists are in various stages of preclinical and early phase clinical testing as potential anticancer drugs. Accordingly, there is substantial interest in understanding factors that affect sensitivity to these agents. In the present study we observed that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors olaparib and veliparib sensitize the myeloid leukemia cell lines ML-1 and K562, the ovarian cancer line PEO1, non-small cell lung cancer line A549, and a majority of clinical AML isolates, but not normal marrow, to TRAIL. Further analysis demonstrated that PARP inhibitor treatment results in activation of the FAS and TNFRSF10B (death receptor 5 (DR5)) promoters, increased Fas and DR5 mRNA, and elevated cell surface expression of these receptors in sensitized cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated enhanced binding of the transcription factor Sp1 to the TNFRSF10B promoter in the presence of PARP inhibitor. Knockdown of PARP1 or PARP2 (but not PARP3 and PARP4) not only increased expression of Fas and DR5 at the mRNA and protein level, but also recapitulated the sensitizing effects of the PARP inhibition. Conversely, Sp1 knockdown diminished the PARP inhibitor effects. In view of the fact that TRAIL is part of the armamentarium of natural killer cells, these observations identify a new facet of PARP inhibitor action while simultaneously providing the mechanistic underpinnings of a novel therapeutic combination that warrants further investigation. PMID:24895135

  9. Replication-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dungey, Fiona A.; Loeser, Dana A.; Chalmers, Anthony J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Current treatments for glioblastoma multiforme are inadequate and limited by the radiation sensitivity of normal brain. Because glioblastoma multiforme are rapidly proliferating tumors within nondividing normal tissue, the therapeutic ratio might be enhanced by combining radiotherapy with a replication-specific radiosensitizer. KU-0059436 (AZD2281) is a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) undergoing a Phase II clinical trial as a single agent. Methods and Materials: Based on previous observations that the radiosensitizing effects of PARP inhibition are more pronounced in dividing cells, we investigated the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization of human glioma cells by KU-0059436, evaluating the replication dependence of this effect and its therapeutic potential. Results: KU-0059436 increased the radiosensitivity of four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, and U87-MG). Radiosensitization was enhanced in populations synchronized in S phase and abrogated by concomitant exposure to aphidicolin. Sensitization was further enhanced when the inhibitor was combined with a fractionated radiation schedule. KU-0059436 delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks and was associated with a replication-dependent increase in {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that KU-0059436 increases radiosensitivity in a replication-dependent manner that is enhanced by fractionation. A mechanism is proposed whereby PARP inhibition increases the incidence of collapsed replication forks after ionizing radiation, generating persistent DNA double-strand breaks. These observations indicate that KU-0059436 is likely to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A Phase I clinical trial is in development.

  10. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  11. Rapamycin-Resistant Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Overexpression Is a Potential Therapeutic Target in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Gallacchi, Dana; Zhang, Erik Y.; Reynolds, Samuel B.; Robinson, Lauren; Malinowska, Izabela A.; Chiou, Terry T.; Pereira, Ana M.; Li, Chenggang; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a female-predominant cystic lung disease that can lead to respiratory failure. LAM cells typically have inactivating tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) mutations and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex (mTORC) 1 activation. Clinical response to the mTORC1 inhibitors has been limited, prompting a search for additional therapy for LAM. In this study, we investigated the impact of TSC2 on the expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 that initiates the DNA repair pathway, and tested the efficacy of PARP1 inhibitors in the survival of TSC2-deficient (TSC2−) cells. We analyzed publicly available expression arrays of TSC2− cells and validated the findings using real-time RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. We examined the impact of rapamycin and Torin 1 on PARP1 expression. We also tested the effect of PARP1 inhibitors, 8-hydroxy-2-methylquinazoline-4-one and 3,4-dihydro-5[4-(1-piperindinyl)butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinoline, on the survival of TSC2− cells. We identified the up-regulation of PARP1 in TSC2− cells relative to cells in which wild-type TSC2 has been reintroduced (TSC2-addback [TSC2+] cells). The transcript levels of PARP1 in TSC2− cells were not affected by rapamycin. PARP1 levels were increased in TSC2− cells, xenograft tumors of rat-derived TSC2− cells, renal cystadenomas from Tsc2+/− mice, and human LAM nodules. RNA interference of mTOR failed to reduce PARP1 levels. Proliferation and survival of TSC2− cells was reduced in response to PARP1 inhibitor treatment, more so than TSC2+ cells. TSC2− cells exhibit higher levels of PARP1 relative to TSC2+ cells in an mTOR-insensitive manner. PARP1 inhibitors selectively suppress the growth and induce apoptosis of TSC2− cells from patients with LAM. Targeting PARP1 may be beneficial in the treatment of LAM and other neoplasm with mTORC1 activation. PMID:24874429

  12. Poly(ADP-ribose): An organizer of cellular architecture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Distinct properties of poly(ADP-ribose)—including its structural diversity, nucleation potential, and low complexity, polyvalent, highly charged nature—could contribute to organizing cellular architectures. Emergent data indicate that poly(ADP-ribose) aids in the formation of nonmembranous structures, such as DNA repair foci, spindle poles, and RNA granules. Informatics analyses reported here show that RNA granule proteins enriched for low complexity regions, which aid self-assembly, are preferentially modified by poly(ADP-ribose), indicating how poly(ADP-ribose) could direct cellular organization. PMID:24914234

  13. Proteome-wide identification of poly(ADP-ribose) binding proteins and poly(ADP-ribose)-associated protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Isabelle, Maxim; Lo, Ken Sin; Bourassa, Sylvie; Hendzel, Michael J; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Poirier, Guy G

    2008-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) is a polymer assembled from the enzymatic polymerization of the ADP-ribosyl moiety of NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). The dynamic turnover of pADPr within the cell is essential for a number of cellular processes including progression through the cell cycle, DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic integrity, and apoptosis. In spite of the considerable advances in the knowledge of the physiological conditions modulated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions, and notwithstanding the fact that pADPr can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, few pADPr binding proteins have been identified so far. In this study, refined in silico prediction of pADPr binding proteins and large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis of pADPr binding proteins were used to establish a comprehensive repertoire of pADPr-associated proteins. Visualization and modeling of these pADPr-associated proteins in networks not only reflect the widespread involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in several pathways but also identify protein targets that could shed new light on the regulatory functions of pADPr in normal physiological conditions as well as after exposure to genotoxic stimuli. PMID:18981049

  14. Proteome-wide identification of poly(ADP-ribose) binding proteins and poly(ADP-ribose)-associated protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Isabelle, Maxim; Lo, Ken Sin; Bourassa, Sylvie; Hendzel, Michael J.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Poirier, Guy G.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) is a polymer assembled from the enzymatic polymerization of the ADP-ribosyl moiety of NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). The dynamic turnover of pADPr within the cell is essential for a number of cellular processes including progression through the cell cycle, DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic integrity, and apoptosis. In spite of the considerable advances in the knowledge of the physiological conditions modulated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions, and notwithstanding the fact that pADPr can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, few pADPr binding proteins have been identified so far. In this study, refined in silico prediction of pADPr binding proteins and large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis of pADPr binding proteins were used to establish a comprehensive repertoire of pADPr-associated proteins. Visualization and modeling of these pADPr-associated proteins in networks not only reflect the widespread involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in several pathways but also identify protein targets that could shed new light on the regulatory functions of pADPr in normal physiological conditions as well as after exposure to genotoxic stimuli. PMID:18981049

  15. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors. PMID:25046176

  16. Functional association of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase with DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex: a link between DNA strand break detection and DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Dantzer, F; Nasheuer, H P; Vonesch, J L; de Murcia, G; Ménissier-de Murcia, J

    1998-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is an element of the DNA damage surveillance network evolved by eukaryotic cells to cope with numerous environmental and endogenous genotoxic agents. PARP has been found to be involved in vivo in both cell proliferation and base excision repair of DNA. In this study the interaction between PARP and the DNA polymerase alpha-primase tetramer has been examined. We provide evidence that in proliferating cells: (i) PARP is physically associated with the catalytic subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha-primase tetramer, an association confirmed by confocal microscopy, demonstrating that both enzymes are co-localized at the nuclear periphery of HeLa cells; (ii) this interaction requires the integrity of the second zinc finger of PARP and is maximal during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle; (iii) PARP-deficient cells derived from PARP knock-out mice exhibited reduced DNA polymerase activity, compared with the parental cells, a reduction accentuated following exposure to sublethal doses of methylmethanesulfonate. Altogether, the present results strongly suggest that PARP participates in a DNA damage survey mechanism implying its nick-sensor function as part of the control of replication fork progression when breaks are present in the template. PMID:9518481

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer is a death signal

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Kim, No Soo; Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Koh, David W.; Sasaki, Masayuki; Klaus, Judith A.; Otsuka, Takashi; Zhang, Zhizheng; Koehler, Raymond C.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2006-01-01

    Excessive activation of the nuclear enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) plays a prominent role in various of models of cellular injury. Here, we identify poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer, a product of PARP-1 activity, as a previously uncharacterized cell death signal. PAR polymer is directly toxic to neurons, and degradation of PAR polymer by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) or phosphodiesterase 1 prevents PAR polymer-induced cell death. PARP-1-dependent, NMDA excitotoxicity of cortical neurons is reduced by neutralizing antibodies to PAR and by overexpression of PARG. Neuronal cultures with reduced levels of PARG are more sensitive to NMDA excitotoxicity than WT cultures. Transgenic mice overexpressing PARG have significantly reduced infarct volumes after focal ischemia. Conversely, mice with reduced levels of PARG have significantly increased infarct volumes after focal ischemia compared with WT littermate controls. These results reveal PAR polymer as a signaling molecule that induces cell death and suggests that interference with PAR polymer signaling may offer innovative therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cellular injury. PMID:17116882

  18. Poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) Binding to Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Is Critical For PAR Polymerase-1-Dependent Cell Death (Parthanatos)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingfei; Kim, No Soo; Haince, Jean-Francois; Kang, HoChul; David, Karen K.; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) plays a pivotal role in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)-mediated cell death (parthanatos), during which it is released from the mitochondria and translocates to the nucleus. Here, we show that AIF is a high affinity poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)–binding protein and that PAR binding to AIF is required for parthanatos both in vitro and in vivo. AIF bound PAR at a site distinct from AIF’s DNA binding site and this interaction triggered AIF release from the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Mutation of the PAR binding site in AIF did not affect its NADH oxidase activity, its ability to bind FAD or DNA, or its ability to induce nuclear condensation. However, this AIF mutant was not released from mitochondria and did not translocate to the nucleus or mediate cell death following PARP-1 activation. These results suggest a mechanism for PARP-1 to initiate AIF-mediated cell death and indicate that AIF’s bioenergetic cell survival-promoting functions are separate from its effects as a mitochondrially-derived death effector. Interference with the PAR-AIF interaction or PAR signaling may provide unique opportunities for preventing cell death following activation of PARP-1. PMID:21467298

  19. Effects of abamectin exposure on male fertility in rats: potential role of oxidative stress-mediated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation.

    PubMed

    Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Tasatargil, Arda; Tekcan, Merih; Sati, Leyla; Gungor, Ece; Isbir, Mehmet; Demir, Ramazan

    2011-12-01

    Despite the known adverse effects of abamectin pesticide, little is known about its action on male fertility. To explore the effects of exposure to abamectin on male fertility and its mechanism, low (1mg/kg/day) and high dose (4 mg/kg/day) abamectin were applied to male rats by oral gavage for 1week and for 6weeks. Weight of testes, serum reproductive hormone levels, sperm dynamics and histopathology of testes were used to evaluate the reproductive efficiency of abamectin-exposed rats. Abamectin level was determined at high concentrations in plasma and testicular tissues of male rats exposed to this pesticide. The testes weights of animals and serum testosterone concentrations did not show any significant changes after abamectin exposure. Abamectin administration was associated with decreased sperm count and motility and increased seminiferous tubule damage. In addition, significant elevations in the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE)-modified proteins and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) expression, as markers for oxidative stress and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation, were observed in testes of rats exposed to abamectin. These results showed that abamectin exposure induces testicular damage and affects sperm dynamics. Oxidative stress-mediated PARP activation might be one of the possible mechanism(s) underlying testicular damage induced by abamectin. PMID:21945325

  20. Stable and Reusable Electrochemical Biosensor for Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase and Its Inhibitor Based on Enzyme-Initiated Auto-PARylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Li; Wang, Zhaoyin; Dai, Zhihui

    2016-07-27

    A stable and reusable electrochemical biosensor for the label-free detection of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is designed in this work. C-kit-1, a thiol-modified G-quadruplex oligonucleotide, is first self-assembled on a gold electrode surface. The G-quadruplex structure of c-kit-1 can specifically tether and activate PARP, resulting in the generation of negatively charged poly(ADP-ribose) polymer (PAR). On the basis of electrostatic attraction, PAR facilitates the surface accumulation of positively charged electrochemical signal molecules. Through the characterization of electrochemical signal molecules, the label-free quantification of PARP is simply implemented. On the basis of the proposed method, selective quantification of PARP can be achieved over the linear range from 0.01 to 1 U with a calculated detection limit of 0.003U. Further studies also demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method to biosamples revealing the broad potential in practical applications. Furthermore, inhibitor of PARP has also been detected with this biosensor. Meanwhile, benefited from self-assembly on solid surface, this biosensor possesses two important features, i.e., reusability and stability, which are desirable in related biosensors. PMID:27367274

  1. Conformational Activation of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 upon DNA Binding Revealed by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a nuclear protein that plays key roles in several fundamental cellular processes. PARP-1 catalyzes the polymerization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide on itself and other acceptor proteins, forming long branched poly(ADP-ribose) polymers. The catalytic activity of PARP-1 is stimulated upon binding to damaged DNA, but how this signal is transmitted from the N-terminal DNA binding domain to the C-terminal catalytic domain in the context of the full-length enzyme is unknown. In this paper, small-angle X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were used to gain insight into the conformational changes that occur during the catalytic activation of PARP-1 by an 8-mer DNA ligand. The data are consistent with a model in which binding of the DNA ligand establishes interdomain interactions between the DNA binding and catalytic domains, which induces an allosteric change in the active site that promotes catalysis. Moreover, the PARP-1–8-mer complex is seen to adopt a conformation that is poised to recruit DNA repair factors to the site of DNA damage. This study provides the first structural information about the DNA-induced conformational activation of full-length PARP-1. PMID:24588584

  2. GDP-Mannose-4,6-Dehydratase Is a Cytosolic Partner of Tankyrase 1 That Inhibits Its Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Kamlesh K.; Dudognon, Charles; Chang, William G.; Sokol, Ethan S.; Ramirez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Tankyrase 1 is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) that participates in a broad range of cellular activities due to interaction with multiple binding partners. Tankyrase 1 recognizes a linear six-amino-acid degenerate motif and, hence, has hundreds of potential target proteins. Binding of partner proteins to tankyrase 1 usually results in their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARsylation) and can lead to ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. However, it is not known how tankyrase 1 PARP activity is regulated. Here we identify GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) as a binding partner of tankyrase 1. GMD is a cytosolic protein required for the first step of fucose synthesis. We show that GMD is complexed to tankyrase 1 in the cytosol throughout interphase, but its association with tankyrase 1 is reduced upon entry into mitosis, when tankyrase 1 binds to its other partners TRF1 (at telomeres) and NuMA (at spindle poles). In contrast to other binding partners, GMD is not PARsylated by tankyrase 1. Indeed, we show that GMD inhibits tankyrase 1 PARP activity in vitro, dependent on the GMD tankyrase 1 binding motif. In vivo, depletion of GMD led to degradation of tankyrase 1, dependent on the catalytic PARP activity of tankyrase 1. We speculate that association of tankyrase 1 with GMD in the cytosol sequesters tankyrase 1 in an inactive stable form that can be tapped by other target proteins as needed. PMID:22645305

  3. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S; Yip, Bryan K; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity. PMID:25195882

  4. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S.; Yip, Bryan K.; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity. PMID:25195882

  5. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 in neurological diseases: A promising trove for new pharmacological interventions to enter clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Jangra, Ashok; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The highly conserved abundant nuclear protein poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 (PARP1) functions at the center of cellular stress response and is mainly implied in DNA damage repair mechanism. Apart from its involvement in DNA damage repair, it does sway multiple vital cellular processes such as cell death pathways, cell aging, insulator function, chromatin modification, transcription and mitotic apparatus function. Since brain is the principal organ vulnerable to oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, upon stress encounters robust DNA damage can occur and intense PARP1 activation may result that will lead to various CNS diseases. In the context of soaring interest towards PARP1 as a therapeutic target for newer pharmacological interventions, here in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of the role of PARP1 in the neurological diseases and the potential of its inhibitors to enter clinical translation, along with its structural and functional aspects. PMID:25049175

  6. TCDD-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP/PARP7) mono-ADP-ribosylates and co-activates liver X receptors.

    PubMed

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Tan, Susanna; Bott, Debbie; Cho, Tiffany; Tamblyn, Laura; MacPherson, Laura; Grønning-Wang, Line; Nebb, Hilde Irene; Matthews, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Members of the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) family catalyse the ADP-ribosylation of target proteins and are known to play important roles in many cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation and transcription. The majority of PARPs exhibit mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity rather than PARP activity; however, little is known about their biological activity. In the present study, we report that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP), mono-ADP-ribosylates and positively regulates liver X receptor α (LXRα) and LXRβ activity. Overexpression of TIPARP enhanced LXR-reporter gene activity. TIPARP knockdown or deletion reduced LXR regulated target gene expression levels in HepG2 cells and inTiparp(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) respectively. Deletion and mutagenesis studies showed that TIPARP's zinc-finger and catalytic domains were required to enhance LXR activity. Protein interaction studies using TIPARP and LXRα/β peptide arrays revealed that LXRs interacted with an N-terminal sequence (a.a. 209-236) of TIPARP, which also overlapped with a putative co-activator domain of TIPARP (a.a. 200-225). Immunofluorescence studies showed that TIPARP and LXRα or LXRβ co-localized in the nucleus.In vitroribosylation assays provided evidence that TIPARP mono-ADP-ribosylated both LXRα and LXRβ. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) studies revealed that ADP-ribosylase macrodomain 1 (MACROD1), but not MACROD2, interacted with LXRs in a TIPARP-dependent manner. This was complemented by reporter gene studies showing that MACROD1, but not MACROD2, prevented the TIPARP-dependent increase in LXR activity. GW3965-dependent increases in hepatic Srebp1 mRNA and protein expression levels were reduced inTiparp(-/-)mice compared withTiparp(+/+)mice. Taken together, these data identify a new mechanism of LXR regulation that involves TIPARP, ADP-ribosylation and MACROD1. PMID:26814197

  7. MicroRNA-7a/b Protects against Cardiac Myocyte Injury in Ischemia/Reperfusion by Targeting Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Li, Rui; Zhang, Chun; Bian, Hong-jun; Wang, Fu; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Shan-wen; Yi, Wei; Zhang, Ming-xiang; Wang, Shuang-xi; Zhang, Yun; Su, Guo-hai; Ji, Xiao-ping

    2014-01-01

    Objectives MicroRNA-7 (miR-7) is highly connected to cancerous cell proliferation and metastasis. It is also involved in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and is upregulated in cardiomyocyte under simulated I/R (SI/R). We aimed to investigate the role of miR-7 during myocardial I/R injury in vitro and in vivo and a possible gene target. Methods and Results Real-time PCR revealed that miR-7a/b expression was upregulated in H9c2 cells after SI/R. Flow cytometry showed SI/R-induced cell apoptosis was decreased with miR-7a/b mimic transfection but increased with miR-7a/b inhibitor in H9c2 cells. In a rat cardiac I/R injury model, infarct size determination and TUNEL assay revealed that miR-7a/b mimic decreased but miR-7a/b inhibitor increased cardiac infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis as compared with controls. We previously identified an important gene connected with cell apoptosis -- poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) -- as a candidate target for miR-7a/b and verified the target by luciferase reporter activity assay and western blot analysis. Conclusions miR-7a/b is sensitive to I/R injury and protects myocardial cells against I/R-induced apoptosis by negatively regulating PARP expression in vivo and in vitro. miR-7a/b may provide a new therapeutic approach for treatment of myocardial I/R injury. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. PMID:24594984

  8. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage. PMID:25326781

  9. The structure and catalytic mechanism of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Dunstan, Mark S.; Barkauskaite, Eva; Weston, Ria; Lafite, Pierre; Dixon, Neil; Ahel, Marijan; Leys, David; Ahel, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation regulates many cellular pathways that are critical for genome stability, including DNA repair, chromatin structure, mitosis and apoptosis1. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is composed of repeating ADP-ribose units linked via a unique glycosidic ribose-ribose bond, and is synthesised from NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs)1,2. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only protein capable of specific hydrolysis of the ribose-ribose bonds present in PAR chains; its deficiency leads to cell death3,4. Here we show that filamentous fungi and a number of bacteria possess a divergent form of PARG that exhibits all the main characteristics of the human PARG enzyme. We present the first PARG crystal structure (derived from the bacterium Thermomonospora curvata), which reveals that the PARG catalytic domain is a distant member of the ubiquitous ADP-ribose-binding macro domain family5,6. High resolution structures of T. curvata PARG in complexes with ADP-ribose and the PARG inhibitor ADP-HPD, complemented by biochemical studies, allow us to propose a model for PAR binding and catalysis by PARG. Our insights into the PARG structure and catalytic mechanism should greatly improve our understanding of how PARG activity controls reversible protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and potentially of how the defects in this regulation link to human disease. PMID:21892188

  10. Overview on poly(ADP-ribose) immuno-biomedicine and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), identified in 1966 independently by three groups Strassbourg, Kyoto and Tokyo, is synthesized by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) from NAD(+) as a substrate in the presence of Mg(2+). The structure was unique in that it has ribose-ribose linkage. In the early-1970s, however, its function in vivo/in vitro was still controversial and the antibody against it was desired to help clear its significance. Thereupon, the author tried to produce antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in rabbits and succeeded in it for the first time in the world. Eventually, this success has led to the following two groundbreaking papers in Nature: "Naturally-occurring antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in patients with autoimmune disease SLE", and "Induction of anti-poly(ADP-ribose) antibody by immunization with synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(A)·poly(U)".On the way to the publication of the first paper, a reviewer gave me a friendly comment that there is "heteroclitic" fashion as a mechanism of the production of natural antibody. This comment was really a God-send for me, and became a train of power for publication of another paper, as described above. Accordingly, I thought this, I would say, episode is worth describing herein. Because of its importance in biomedical phenomena, a certain number of articles related to "heteroclitic" have become to be introduced in this review, although they were not always directly related to immuno-biological works on poly(ADP-ribose). Also, I tried to speculate on the future prospects of poly(ADP-ribose), product of PARP, as an immuno-regulatory molecule, including either induced or naturally-occurring antibodies, in view of "heteroclitic". PMID:27477457

  11. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Interacts with Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 (NRF-1) and Plays a Role in NRF-1 Transcriptional Regulation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad B.; Ji, Ping; Anish, Ramakrishnan; Jacobson, Raymond H.; Takada, Shinako

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) is one of the key transcriptional activators for nuclear-coded genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as for many housekeeping genes. A transcriptional co-activator PGC-1 and its related family member PRC have previously been shown to interact with NRF-1 and co-activate NRF-1. We show here that NRF-1 can also directly interact with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and co-purify the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex. Our in vitro binding experiments show that DNA-binding/dimerization domain of NRF-1 and the N-terminal half of PARP-1, which contains two Zinc fingers and the auto-modification domain, are responsible for the interaction, and that this interaction occurs with or without PARP-1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation). DNA-bound NRF-1 can form a complex with PARP-1, suggesting that NRF-1 can recruit the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex to the promoter. PARP-1 can also PARylate the DNA-binding domain of NRF-1 and negatively regulate NRF-1·PARP-1 interaction. Transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that PARP-1 plays a role during transcriptional activation by NRF-1. Our finding identifies a new aspect of transcriptional regulation used by NRF-1. PMID:19181665

  12. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1–Sirtuin 1 Functional Interplay Regulates LPS-Mediated High Mobility Group Box 1 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Thomas D; Di Caro, Valentina; Piganelli, Jon; Billiar, Timothy R; Clark, Robert SB; Aneja, Rajesh K

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions that lead to the release of the prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) also result in activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1; now known as ADP-ribosyl transferase 1 [ARTD1]). Persistent activation of PARP1 promotes energy failure and cell death. The role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HMGB1 release has been explored previously; however, PARP1 is a versatile enzyme and performs several other functions including cross-talk with another nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- (NAD+) dependent member of the Class III histone deacetylases (HDACs), sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). Previously, it has been shown that the hyperacetylation of HMGB1 is a seminal event prior to its secretion, a process that also is dependent on HDACs. Therefore, in this study, we seek to determine if PARP1 inhibition alters LPS-mediated HMGB1 hyperacetylation and subsequent secretion due to its effect on SIRT1. We demonstrate in an in vitro model that LPS treatment leads to hyperacetylated HMGB1 with concomitant reduction in nuclear HDAC activity. Treatment with PARP1 inhibitors mitigates the LPS-mediated reduction in nuclear HDAC activity and decreases HMGB1 acetylation. By utilizing an NAD+-based mechanism, PARP1 inhibition increases the activity of SIRT1. Consequently, there is an increased nuclear retention and decreased extracellular secretion of HMGB1. We also demonstrate that PARP1 physically interacts with SIRT1. Further confirmation of this data was obtained in a murine model of sepsis, that is, administration of PJ-34, a specific PARP1 inhibitor, led to decreased serum HMGB1 concentrations in mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) as compared with untreated mice. In conclusion, our study provides new insights in understanding the molecular mechanisms of HMGB1 secretion in sepsis. PMID:25517228

  13. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Edit; Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Caidahl, Kenneth; Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Department of Throracic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Baeck, Magnus; Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  14. Deficiency in Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Accelerates Aging and Spontaneous Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piskunova, Tatiana S.; Yurova, Maria N.; Ovsyannikov, Anton I.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.; Popovich, Irina G.; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Anisimov, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have shown that PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation play an important role in DNA repair, genomic stability, cell death, inflammation, telomere maintenance, and suppressing tumorigenesis, suggesting that the homeostasis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and PARP-1 may also play an important role in aging. Here we show that PARP-1−/− mice exhibit a reduction of life span and a significant increase of population aging rate. Analysis of noninvasive parameters, including body weight gain, body temperature, estrous function, behavior, and a number of biochemical indices suggests the acceleration of biological aging in PARP-1−/− mice. The incidence of spontaneous tumors in both PARP-1−/− and PARP-1+/+ groups is similar; however, malignant tumors including uterine tumors, lung adenocarcinomas and hepatocellular carcinomas, develop at a significantly higher frequency in PARP-1−/− mice than PARP-1+/+ mice (72% and 49%, resp.; P < .05). In addition, spontaneous tumors appear earlier in PARP-1−/− mice compared to the wild type group. Histopathological studies revealed a wide spectrum of tumors in uterus, ovaries, liver, lungs, mammary gland, soft tissues, and lymphoid organs in both groups of the mice. These results demonstrate that inactivation of DNA repair gene PARP-1 in mice leads to acceleration of aging, shortened life span, and increased spontaneous carcinogenesis. PMID:19415146

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and its cleavage products differentially modulate cellular protection through NF-kappaB-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Castri, Paola; Lee, Yang-Ja; Ponzio, Todd; Maric, Dragan; Spatz, Maria; Bembry, Joliet; Hallenbeck, John

    2014-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and its cleavage products regulate cell viability and NF-kappaB activity when expressed in neurons. PARP-1 cleavage generates a 24 kDa (PARP-1(24)) and an 89 kDa fragment (PARP-1(89)). Compared to WT (PARP-1WT), the expression of an uncleavable PARP-1 (PARP-1(UNCL)) or of PARP-1(24) conferred protection from oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) or OGD/restoration of oxygen and glucose (ROG) damage in vitro, whereas expression of PARP-1(89) was cytotoxic. Viability experiments were performed in SH-SY5Y, a human neuroblastoma cell line, as well as in rat primary cortical neurons. Following OGD, the higher viability in the presence of PARP-1UNCL or PARP-1(24) was not accompanied with decreased formation of poly(ADP-riboses) or higher NAD levels. PARP-1 is a known cofactor for NF-kappaB, hence we investigated whether PARP-1 cleavage influences the inflammatory response. All PARP-1 constructs mimicked PARP-1WT in regard to induction of NF-kappaB translocation into the nucleus and its increased activation during ischemic challenge. However, expression of PARP-1(89) construct induced significantly higher NF-kB activity than PARP-1WT; and the same was true for NF-kappaB-dependent iNOS promoter binding activity. At a protein level, PARP-1UNCL and PARP-1(24) decreased iNOS (and lower levels of iNOS transcript) and COX-2, and increased Bcl-xL The increased levels of NF-kB and iNOS transcriptional activities, seen with cytotoxic PARP-189, were accompanied by higher protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS (and higher levels of INOS transcript) and lower protein expression of Bcl-xL Taken together, these findings suggest that PARP-1 cleavage products may regulate cellular viability and inflammatory responses in opposing ways during in vitro models of "ischemia". PMID:24333653

  16. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and its cleavage products differentially modulate cellular protection through NF-kB-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Castri, Paola; Lee, Yang-ja; Ponzio, Todd; Maric, Dragan; Spatz, Maria; Bembry, Joliet; Hallenbeck, John

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and its cleavage products regulate cell viability and NF-kB activity when expressed in neurons. PARP-1 cleavage generates a 24kDa (PARP-124) and an 89kDa fragment (PARP-189). Compared to WT (PARP-1WT), the expression of an uncleavable PARP-1 (PARP-1UNCL) or of PARP-124 conferred protection from oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) or OGD/restoration of oxygen and glucose (ROG) damage in vitro, whereas expression of PARP-189 was cytotoxic. Viability experiments were performed in SH-SY5Y, a human neuroblastoma cell line, as well as in rat primary cortical neurons. Following OGD, the higher viability in the presence of PARP-1UNCL or PARP-124 was not accompanied with decreased formation of poly(ADP-riboses) or higher NAD levels. PARP-1 is a known cofactor for NF-kB, hence we investigated whether PARP-1 cleavage influences the inflammatory response. All PARP-1 constructs mimicked PARP-1WT in regards to induction of NF-kB translocation into the nucleus and its increased activation during ischemic challenge. However, expression of PARP-189 construct induced significantly higher NF-kB activity than PARP-1WT; and the same was true for NF-kB-dependent iNOS promoter binding activity. At a protein level, PARP-1UNCL and PARP-124 decreased iNOS (and lower levels of iNOS transcript) and COX-2, and increased Bcl-xL. The increased levels of NF-kB and iNOS transcriptional activities, seen with cytotoxic PARP-189, were accompanied by higher protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS (and higher levels of iNOS transcript) and lower protein expression of Bcl-xL. Taken together, these findings suggest that PARP-1 cleavage products may regulate cellular viability and inflammatory responses in opposing ways during in vitro models of “ischemia”. PMID:24333653

  17. Targeting Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase and the c-Myb-TopBP1-ATR-Chk1 Signaling Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Likun; Chang, Wenjun; Yang, Guang; Ren, Chengzhen; Park, Sanghee; Karantanos, Theodoros; Karanika, Styliani; Wang, Jianxiang; Yin, Jianhua; Shah, Parantu K.; Takahiro, Hirayama; Dobashi, Masato; Zhang, Wenling; Efstathiou, Eleni; Maity, Sankar N.; Aparicio, Ana M.; Tapia, Elsa M Li Ning; Troncoso, Patricia; Broom, Bradley; Xiao, Lianchun; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Ju-Seog; Corn, Paul G.; Navone, Nora; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the standard systemic treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most patients ultimately develop castration-resistance. We show here that MYB is transcriptionally activated by androgen deprivation or impairment of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. MYB gene silencing significantly inhibited PCa growth in vitro and in vivo. Microarray data revealed that c-Myb shares a substantial subset of DNA damage response (DDR) target genes with AR, suggesting that c-Myb may replace AR for the dominant role in the regulation of their common DDR target genes in AR inhibition-resistant or AR-negative PCa. Gene signatures comprising AR, MYB, and their common DDR target genes are significantly correlated with metastasis, castration-resistance, recurrence, and shorter overall survival in PCa patients. We demonstrated in vitro that silencing of MYB, BRCA1 or TOPBP1 synergized with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib (OLA) to increase cytotoxicity to PCa cells. We further demonstrated that targeting the c-Myb-TopBP1-ATR-Chk1 pathway by using the Chk1 inhibitor AZD7762 synergizes with OLA to increase PCa cytotoxicity. Our results reveal new mechanism-based therapeutic approaches for PCa by targeting PARP and the c-Myb-TopBP1-ATR-Chk1 pathway. PMID:24847116

  18. Induction of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase in Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Preliminary Observations

    PubMed Central

    He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Zong, Lin; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Several investigators have reported increased levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme which plays an important role in the repair of damaged DNA, in cells exposed to extremely low dose ionizing radiation which does not cause measurable DNA damage. Objective. To examine whether exposure of the cells to nonionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) is capable of increasing messenger RNA of PARP-1 and its protein levels in mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods. BMSCs were exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 μW/cm2 power intensity for 3 hours/day for 5 days. PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels were examined at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 hours after exposure using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Sham-exposed (SH) cells and those exposed to ionizing radiation were used as unexposed and positive control cells. Results. BMSCs exposed to RF showed significantly increased expression of PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels after exposure to RF while such changes were not observed in SH-exposed cells. Conclusion. Nonionizing RF exposure is capable of inducing PARP-1. PMID:27190989

  19. Doxorubicin-induced necrosis is mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) but is independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Gui, Xiangai; Achek, Asma; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Necrosis, unregulated cell death, is characterized by plasma membrane rupture as well as nuclear and cellular swelling. However, it has recently been reported that necrosis is a regulated form of cell death mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1). PARP1 is thought to mediate necrosis by inducing DNA damage, although this remains unconfirmed. In this study, we examined the mechanisms of PARP1-mediated necrosis following doxorubicin (DOX)-induced DNA damage in human kidney proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. DOX initiated DNA damage response (DDR) and upregulated PARP1 and p53 expression, resulting in morphological changes similar to those observed during necrosis. Additionally, DOX induced mitochondrial hyper-activation, as evidenced by increased mitochondrial respiration and cytosolic ATP (cATP) production. However, DOX affected mitochondrial mass. DOX-induced DNA damage, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (cROS) generation, and mitochondrial hyper-activation decreased in cells with inhibited PARP1 expression, while generation of nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) remained unaffected. Moreover, DOX-induced DNA damage, cell cycle changes, and oxidative stress were not affected by p53 inhibition. These findings suggest that DNA damage induced necrosis through a PARP1-dependent and p53-independent pathway. PMID:26522181

  20. Sphingosine 1-phosphate inhibits activation of caspases that cleave poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and lamins during Fas- and ceramide-mediated apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, O; Rosenthal, D S; Smulson, M E; Spiegel, S

    1998-01-30

    Ceramide, a sphingolipid generated by the hydrolysis of membrane-associated sphingomyelin, appears to play a role as a gauge of apoptosis. A further metabolite of ceramide, sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP), prevents ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and it has been suggested that the balance between intracellular ceramide and SPP levels may determine the cell fate (Cuvillier, O., Pirianov, G, Kleuser, B., Vanek, P. G., Coso, O. A., Gutkind, J. S., and Spiegel, S. (1996) Nature 381, 800-803). Here, we investigated the role of SPP and the protein kinase C activator, phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), in the caspase cascade leading to the proteolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and lamins. In Jurkat T cells, Fas ligation or addition of exogenous C2-ceramide induced activations of caspase-3/CPP32 and caspase-7/Mch3 followed by PARP cleavage, effects that can be blocked either by SPP or TPA. Furthermore, both SPP and TPA inhibit the activation of caspase-6/Mch2 and subsequent lamin B cleavage. Ceramide, in contrast to Fas ligation, did not induce activation of caspase-8/FLICE and neither SPP nor TPA were able to prevent this activation. Thus, SPP, likely generated via protein kinase C-mediated activation of sphingosine kinase, suppresses the apoptotic pathway downstream of FLICE but upstream of the executioner caspases, caspase-3, -6, and -7. PMID:9446602

  1. Rationale for Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Inhibitors in Combination Therapy with Camptothecins or Temozolomide Based on PARP Trapping versus Catalytic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Junko; Zhang, Yiping; Morris, Joel; Ji, Jiuping; Takeda, Shunichi; Doroshow, James H.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors exert their cytotoxicity primarily by trapping PARP-DNA complexes in addition to their NAD+-competitive catalytic inhibitory mechanism. PARP trapping is drug-specific, with olaparib exhibiting a greater ability than veliparib, whereas both compounds are potent catalytic PARP inhibitors. Here, we evaluated the combination of olaparib or veliparib with therapeutically relevant DNA-targeted drugs, including the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin, the alkylating agent temozolomide, the cross-linking agent cisplatin, and the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide at the cellular and molecular levels. We determined PARP-DNA trapping and catalytic PARP inhibition in genetically modified chicken lymphoma DT40, human prostate DU145, and glioblastoma SF295 cancer cells. For camptothecin, both PARP inhibitors showed highly synergistic effects due to catalytic PARP inhibition, indicating the value of combining either veliparib or olaparib with topoisomerase I inhibitors. On the other hand, for temozolomide, PARP trapping was critical in addition to catalytic inhibition, consistent with the fact that olaparib was more effective than veliparib in combination with temozolomide. For cisplatin and etoposide, olaparib only showed no or a weak combination effect, which is consistent with the lack of involvement of PARP in the repair of cisplatin- and etoposide-induced lesions. Hence, we conclude that catalytic PARP inhibitors are highly effective in combination with camptothecins, whereas PARP inhibitors capable of PARP trapping are more effective with temozolomide. Our study provides insights in combination treatment rationales for different PARP inhibitors. PMID:24650937

  2. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S.; Yip, Bryan K.; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.

    2014-08-29

    BMN 673, a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor in clinical development with substantial tumor cytotoxicity, forms extensive hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking in the nicotinamide pocket, with its unique disubstituted scaffold extending towards the less conserved edges of the pocket. These interactions might provide structural insight into the ability of BMN 673 to both inhibit catalysis and affect DNA-binding activity. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity.

  3. Protective actions of PJ34, a poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor, on the blood-brain barrier after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, X; Chen, X; Hao, S; Hou, Z; Lu, T; Sun, M; Liu, B

    2015-04-16

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is activated by oxidative stress and plays an important role in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The objective of this study was to investigate whether PARP activation participated in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and edema formation in a mouse model of controlled cortical impact (CCI). N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide (PJ34) (10 mg/kg), a selective PARP inhibitor, was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min and 8 h after experimental CCI. After 6 h and 24 h of CCI, the permeability of the cortical BBB was determined after Evans Blue administration. The water content of the brain was also measured. Treatment with PJ34 markedly attenuated the permeability of the BBB and decreased the brain edema at 6 h and 24 h after CCI. Our data showed the up-regulation of nuclear factor-κB in cytosolic fractions and nuclear fractions in the injured cortex, and these changes were reversed by PJ34. Moreover, PJ34 significantly lessened the activities of myeloperoxidase and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9, enhanced the levels of occludin, laminin, collagen IV and integrin β1, reduced neurological deficits, decreased the contusion volume, and attenuated the necrotic and apoptotic neuronal cell death. These data suggest the protective effects of PJ34 on BBB integrity and cell death during acute TBI. PMID:25668593

  4. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HONGWEI; HUA, NING; XIE, KELIANG; ZHAO, TINGTING; YU, YONGHAO

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  5. Differential effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition on DNA break repair in human cells are revealed with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjian; Halweg, Christopher J; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A

    2012-04-24

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors can generate synthetic lethality in cancer cells defective in homologous recombination. However, the mechanism(s) by which they affect DNA repair has not been established. Here we directly determined the effects of PARP inhibition and PARP1 depletion on the repair of ionizing radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) in human lymphoid cell lines. To do this, we developed an in vivo repair assay based on large endogenous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) circular episomes. The EBV break assay provides the opportunity to assess quantitatively and simultaneously the induction and repair of SSBs and DSBs in human cells. Repair was efficient in G1 and G2 cells and was not dependent on functional p53. shRNA-mediated knockdown of PARP1 demonstrated that the PARP1 protein was not essential for SSB repair. Among 10 widely used PARP inhibitors, none affected DSB repair, although an inhibitor of DNA-dependent protein kinase was highly effective at reducing DSB repair. Only Olaparib and Iniparib, which are in clinical cancer therapy trials, as well as 4-AN inhibited SSB repair. However, a decrease in PARP1 expression reversed the ability of Iniparib to reduce SSB repair. Because Iniparib disrupts PARP1-DNA binding, the mechanism of inhibition does not appear to involve trapping PARP at SSBs. PMID:22493268

  6. Rationale for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in combination therapy with camptothecins or temozolomide based on PARP trapping versus catalytic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Murai, Junko; Zhang, Yiping; Morris, Joel; Ji, Jiuping; Takeda, Shunichi; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves

    2014-06-01

    We recently showed that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors exert their cytotoxicity primarily by trapping PARP-DNA complexes in addition to their NAD(+)-competitive catalytic inhibitory mechanism. PARP trapping is drug-specific, with olaparib exhibiting a greater ability than veliparib, whereas both compounds are potent catalytic PARP inhibitors. Here, we evaluated the combination of olaparib or veliparib with therapeutically relevant DNA-targeted drugs, including the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin, the alkylating agent temozolomide, the cross-linking agent cisplatin, and the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide at the cellular and molecular levels. We determined PARP-DNA trapping and catalytic PARP inhibition in genetically modified chicken lymphoma DT40, human prostate DU145, and glioblastoma SF295 cancer cells. For camptothecin, both PARP inhibitors showed highly synergistic effects due to catalytic PARP inhibition, indicating the value of combining either veliparib or olaparib with topoisomerase I inhibitors. On the other hand, for temozolomide, PARP trapping was critical in addition to catalytic inhibition, consistent with the fact that olaparib was more effective than veliparib in combination with temozolomide. For cisplatin and etoposide, olaparib only showed no or a weak combination effect, which is consistent with the lack of involvement of PARP in the repair of cisplatin- and etoposide-induced lesions. Hence, we conclude that catalytic PARP inhibitors are highly effective in combination with camptothecins, whereas PARP inhibitors capable of PARP trapping are more effective with temozolomide. Our study provides insights in combination treatment rationales for different PARP inhibitors. PMID:24650937

  7. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Hua, Ning; Xie, Keliang; Zhao, Tingting; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-08-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  8. Hydroxyurea-induced replication stress causes poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 accumulation and changes its intranuclear location in root meristems of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Rybaczek, Dorota

    2016-07-01

    Replication stress induced by 24 and 48h exposure to 2.5mM hydroxyurea (HU) increased the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2; EC 2.4.2.30) in root meristem cells of Vicia faba. An increase in the number of PARP-2 foci was accompanied by their delocalization from peripheral areas to the interior of the nucleus. Our results indicate that the increase in PARP-2 was connected with an increase in S139-phosphorylated H2AX histones. The findings suggest the possible role of PARP-2 in replication stress. We also confirm that the intranuclear location of PARP-2 depends on the duration of HU-induced replication stress, confirming the role of PARP-2 as an indicator of stress intensity. Finally, we conclude that the more intense the HU-mediated replication stress, the greater the probability of PARP-2 activation or H2AXS139 phosphorylation, but also the greater the chance of increasing the efficiency of repair processes and a return to normal cell cycle progression. PMID:27155387

  9. Vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is associated with mammalian telomerase and is dispensable for telomerase function and vault structure in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yie; Snow, Bryan E; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Erdmann, Natalie; Zhou, Wen; Wakeham, Andrew; Gomez, Marla; Rome, Leonard H; Harrington, Lea

    2004-06-01

    Vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) was originally identified as a minor protein component of the vault ribonucleoprotein particle, which may be involved in molecular assembly or subcellular transport. In addition to the association of VPARP with the cytoplasmic vault particle, subpopulations of VPARP localize to the nucleus and the mitotic spindle, indicating that VPARP may have other cellular functions. We found that VPARP was associated with telomerase activity and interacted with exogenously expressed telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1) in human cells. To study the possible role of VPARP in telomerase and vault complexes in vivo, mVparp-deficient mice were generated. Mice deficient in mVparp were viable and fertile for up to five generations, with no apparent changes in telomerase activity or telomere length. Vaults purified from mVparp-deficient mouse liver appeared intact, and no defect in association with other vault components was observed. Mice deficient in mTep1, whose disruption alone does not affect telomere function but does affect the stability of vault RNA, showed no additional telomerase or telomere-related phenotypes when the mTep1 deficiency was combined with an mVparp deficiency. These data suggest that murine mTep1 and mVparp, alone or in combination, are dispensable for normal development, telomerase catalysis, telomere length maintenance, and vault structure in vivo. PMID:15169895

  10. Differential regulation of activator protein-1 and heat shock factor-1 in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury: role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Hake, Paul W; O'Connor, Michael; Denenberg, Alvin; Wong, Hector R; Kong, Sue; Aronow, Bruce J

    2004-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme activated in response to DNA strand breaks, has been implicated in cell dysfunction in myocardial reperfusion injury. PARP-1 has also been shown to participate in transcription and regulation of gene expression. In this study, we investigated the role of PARP-1 on the signal transduction pathway of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) in myocardial reperfusion injury. Mice genetically deficient of PARP-1 (PARP-1(-/-) mice) exhibited a significant reduction of myocardial damage after occlusion and reperfusion of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery compared with their wild-type littermates. This cardioprotection was associated with a reduction of the phosphorylative activity of JNK and, subsequently, reduction of the DNA binding of the signal transduction factor AP-1. On the contrary, in PARP-1(-/-) mice, DNA binding of HSF-1 was enhanced and was associated with a significant increase of the cardioprotective heat shock protein (HSP)70 compared with wild-type mice. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of several AP-1-dependent genes of proinflammatory mediators and HSPs was altered in PARP-1(-/-) mice. The data indicate that PARP-1 may exert a pathological role in reperfusion injury by functioning as an enhancing factor of AP-1 activation and as a repressing factor of HSF-1 activation and HSP70 expression. PMID:14670820

  11. Neuroprotective effects of a novel water-soluble poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibitor, MP-124, in in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Egi, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Shigeru; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Fujio, Masakazu; Yuki, Satoshi; Akira, Toshiaki

    2011-05-10

    Cerebral ischemia induces excessive activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), leading to neuronal cell death and the development of post-ischemic dysfunction. Blockade of PARP-related signals during cerebral ischemia has become a focus of interest as a new therapeutic approach for acute stroke treatment. The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacological profiles of MP-124, a novel water-soluble PARP-1 inhibitor, and its neuroprotective effects on ischemic injury in vitro and in vivo. MP-124 demonstrated competitive inhibition of the PARP-1 activity of human recombinant PARP-1 enzyme (Ki=16.5nmol/L). In P388D(1) cells, MP-124 inhibited the LDH leakage induced by H(2)O(2) in a concentration-dependent manner. (IC(50)=20.8nmol/L). In rat primary cortical neurons, MP-124 also inhibited the NAD depletion and polymerized ADP-ribose formation induced by H(2)O(2) exposure. Moreover, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of MP-124 in rat permanent and transient stroke models. In the rat permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, MP-124 was administered intravenously for 24h from 5min after the onset of MCAO. MP-124 (1, 3 and 10mg/kg/h) significantly inhibited the cerebral infarction in a dose-dependent manner (18, 42 and 48%). In rat transient MCAO model, MP-124 was administered intravenously from 30min after the onset of MCAO. MP-124 (3 and 10mg/kg/h) significantly reduced the infarct volume (53% and 50%). The present findings suggest that MP-124 acts as a potent neuroprotective agent in focal ischemia and its actions can be attributed to a reduction in NAD depletion and PAR formation. PMID:21420942

  12. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 and DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Have Equivalent Roles in Double Strand Break Repair Following Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jody; Smith, Graeme; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are predominantly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), involving DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), well characterized for its role in single strand break repair, may also facilitate DSB repair. We investigated the activation of these enzymes by differing DNA ends and their interaction in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: The effect of PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors (KU-0058684 and NU7441) on repair of IR-induced DSBs was investigated in DNA-PK and PARP-1 proficient and deficient cells by measuring gammaH2AX foci and neutral comets. Complementary in vitro enzyme kinetics assays demonstrated the affinities of DNA-PK and PARP-1 for DSBs with varying DNA termini. Results: DNA-PK and PARP-1 both promoted the fast phase of resolution of IR-induced DSBs in cells. Inactivation of both enzymes was not additive, suggesting that PARP-1 and DNA-PK cooperate within the same pathway to promote DSB repair. The affinities of the two enzymes for oligonucleotides with blunt, 3' GGG or 5' GGG overhanging termini were similar and overlapping (K{sub dapp} = 2.6-6.4nM for DNA-PK; 1.7-4.5nM for PARP-1). DNA-PK showed a slightly greater affinity for overhanging DNA and was significantly more efficient when activated by a 5' GGG overhang. PARP-1 had a preference for blunt-ended DNA and required a separate factor for efficient stimulation by a 5' GGG overhang. Conclusion: DNA-PK and PARP-1 are both required in a pathway facilitating the fast phase of DNA DSB repair.

  13. Modulation of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor response and DNA recombination in breast cancer cells by drugs affecting endogenous wild-type p53.

    PubMed

    Ireno, Ivanildce Cristiane; Wiehe, Rahel Stephanie; Stahl, Andreea Iulia; Hampp, Stephanie; Aydin, Sevtap; Troester, Melissa A; Selivanova, Galina; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic lethal interactions between poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and homologous recombination (HR) repair pathways have been exploited for the development of novel mono- and combination cancer therapies. The tumor suppressor p53 was demonstrated to exhibit indirect and direct regulatory activities in DNA repair, particularly in DNA double-strand break (DSB)-induced and replication-associated HR. In this study, we tested a potential influence of the p53 status on the response to PARP inhibition, which is known to cause replication stress. Silencing endogenous or inducibly expressing p53 we found a protective effect of p53 on PARP inhibitor (PARPi)-mediated cytotoxicities. This effect was specific for wild-type versus mutant p53 and observed in cancer but not in non-transformed cell lines. Enhanced cytotoxicities after treatment with the p53-inhibitory drug Pifithrinα further supported p53-mediated resistance to PARP inhibition. Surprisingly, we equally observed increased PARPi sensitivity in the presence of the p53-activating compound Nutlin-3. As a common denominator, both drug responses correlated with decreased HR activities: Pifithrinα downregulated spontaneous HR resulting in damage accumulation. Nutlin-3 induced a decrease of DSB-induced HR, which was accompanied by a severe drop in RAD51 protein levels. Thus, we revealed a novel link between PARPi responsiveness and p53-controlled HR activities. These data expand the concept of cell and stress type-dependent healer and killer functions of wild-type p53 in response to cancer therapeutic treatment. Our findings have implications for the individualized design of cancer therapies using PARPi and the potentially combined use of p53-modulatory drugs. PMID:25085902

  14. Enhanced non-homologous end joining contributes toward synthetic lethality of pathological RAD51C mutants with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Mishra, Anup; Jameei, Aida; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors are actively under clinical trials for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers that arise due to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. The RAD51 paralog RAD51C has been identified as a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. The pathological RAD51C mutants that were identified in cancer patients are hypomorphic with partial repair function. However, targeting cancer cells that express hypomorphic mutants of RAD51C is highly challenging. Here, we report that RAD51C-deficient cells can be targeted by a 'synthetic lethal' approach using PARP inhibitor and this sensitivity was attributed to accumulation of cells in the G2/M and chromosomal aberrations. In addition, spontaneous hyperactivation of PARP1 was evident in RAD51C-deficient cells. Interestingly, RAD51C-negative cells exhibited enhanced recruitment of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) proteins onto chromatin and this accumulation correlated with increased activity of error-prone NHEJ as well as genome instability leading to cell death. Notably, inhibition of DNA-PKcs or depletion of KU70 or Ligase IV rescued this phenotype. Strikingly, stimulation of NHEJ by low dose of ionizing radiation (IR) in the PARP inhibitor-treated RAD51C-deficient cells and cells expressing pathological RAD51C mutants induced enhanced toxicity 'synergistically'. These results demonstrate that cancer cells arising due to hypomorphic mutations in RAD51C can be specifically targeted by a 'synergistic approach' and imply that this strategy can be potentially applied to cancers with hypomorphic mutations in other homologous recombination pathway genes. PMID:25292178

  15. Activity of CEP-9722, a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in urothelial carcinoma correlates inversely with homologous recombination repair response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jian, Weiguo; Xu, Hua-Guo; Chen, Jianfeng; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Levitt, Jonathan M; Stanley, Jennifer A; Yang, Eddy S; Lerner, Seth P; Sonpavde, Guru

    2014-09-01

    As loss of DNA-repair proteins is common in urothelial carcinoma (UC), a rationale can be made to evaluate the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors to exploit synthetic lethality. We aimed to preclinically evaluate a PARP inhibitor, CEP-9722, and its active metabolite, CEP-8983, in UC. The activity of CEP-8983 was evaluated using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay against human UC cell lines. Flow cytometry, COMET assay, and western blot were performed to assess apoptosis, DNA damage, and DNA-repair proteins, respectively. RT4 xenografts received placebo or CEP-9722 (100 or 200 mg/kg/day) orally. Xenografts were subjected to immunohistochemistry for apoptosis [cleaved caspase (cc)-3] and angiogenesis (CD31). CEP-8983 (1 μmol/l) reduced the viability of RT4 and T24 cells by 20%, but did not reduce the viability of 5637 and TCC-SUP cells. Apoptosis and necrosis occurred in 9.7 and 9.1% of RT4 and 5637 cells, respectively. RT4 cells showed greater DNA damage compared with 5637 cells. Increased DNA damage occurred with combination versus CEP-8983 or cisplatin alone in RT4 and 5637 cells. T24 and RT4 showed the least RAD51 foci 8 h following radiation, whereas TCC-SUP and 5637 robustly induced RAD51 foci. CEP-9722 showed dose-dependent antitumor activity in RT4 xenografts; 200 mg/kg daily was better than control (P=0.04) and 100 mg/kg was not (P=0.26). Immunohistochemistry of xenografts showed a significant increase in cc-3 and decrease in CD31 with both doses (P<0.05). Biomarker-driven evaluation of PARP inhibitors in UC is justified as the activity of CEP-9722 correlated inversely with homologous recombination repair response to DNA damage. PMID:24714082

  16. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Protects against Hyperglycemic-Induced Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Improves Myocardial Dysfunction by Suppressing Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Guang-hao; Feng, Min; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jia-ning; Dong, Wen-qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Under high glucose conditions, endothelial cells respond by acquiring fibroblast characteristics, that is, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), contributing to diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has cardioprotective properties independent of its glucose-lowering effect. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here we investigated whether GLP-1 inhibits myocardial EndMT in diabetic mice and whether this is mediated by suppressing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice were treated with or without GLP-1 analog (24 nmol/kg daily) for 24 wks. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in normal glucose (NG) (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG) (30 mmol/L) medium with or without GLP-1analog. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were performed to evaluate EndMT and PARP-1 activity. Diabetes mellitus attenuated cardiac function and increased cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with the GLP-1 analog improved diabetes mellitus–related cardiac dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that hyperglycemia markedly increased the percentage of von Willebrand factor (vWF)+/alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+ cells in total α-SMA+ cells in diabetic hearts compared with controls, which was attenuated by GLP-1 analog treatment. In cultured HAECs, immunofluorescent staining and Western blot also showed that both GLP-1 analog and PARP-1 gene silencing could inhibit the HG-induced EndMT. In addition, GLP-1 analog could attenuate PARP-1 activation by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, GLP-1 treatment could protect against the hyperglycemia-induced EndMT and myocardial dysfunction. This effect is mediated, at least partially, by suppressing PARP-1 activation. PMID:25715248

  17. p38γ Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Contributes to Oncogenic Properties Maintenance and Resistance to Poly (ADP-Ribose)-Polymerase-1 Inhibition in Breast Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyan; Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Gang; Kreike, Bas; Chen, Wei; Sethi, Seema; Miller, Fred R; Wu, Guojun

    2011-01-01

    p38γ MAPK, one of the four members of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), has previously been shown to harbor oncogenic functions. However, the biologic function of p38γ MAPK in breast cancer has not been well defined. In this study, we have shown that p38γ MAPK is overexpressed in highly metastatic human and mouse breast cancer cell lines and p38γ MAPK expression is preferentially associated with basal-like and metastatic phenotypes of breast tumor samples. Ectopic expression of p38γ MAPK did not lead to an increase in oncogenic properties in vitro in most tested mammary epithelial cells. However, knockdown of p38γ MAPK expression resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, invasion in vitro and significant retardation of tumorigenesis, and long-distance metastasis to the lungs in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of p38γ MAPK triggered the activation of AKT signaling. Inhibition of this feedback loop with various PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitors facilitated the effect of targeting p38γ MAPK. We further found that overexpression of p38γ MAPK did not promote cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin and paclitaxel but significantly increased cell resistance to PJ-34, a DNA damage agent poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP) inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we identified that p38γ MAPK overexpression led to marked cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Our study for the first time clearly demonstrates that p38γ MAPK is a promising target for the design of targeted therapies for basal-like breast cancer with metastatic characteristics and for overcoming potential resistance against the PARP inhibitor. PMID:21532888

  18. Cross talk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 methylation and oxidative stress involved in the toxic effect of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Gao, Ai

    2015-01-01

    Given the tremendous growth in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs), concerns about the potential health hazards of TNPs to humans have been raised. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, is involved in many molecular and cellular processes. Limited data demonstrated that certain nanomaterials induced the aberrant hypermethylation of PARP-1. However, the mechanism involved in TNP-induced PARP-1 abnormal methylation has not been studied. A549 cells were incubated with anatase TNPs (22.1 nm) for 24 hours pretreatment with or without methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger α-lipoic acid to assess the possible role of methylation and ROS in the toxic effect of TNPs. After TNPs characterization, a battery of assays was performed to evaluate the toxic effect of TNPs, PARP-1 methylation status, and oxidative damage. Results showed that TNPs decreased the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, in accordance with the increase of lactate dehydrogenase activity, which indicated membrane damage of cells. Similar to the high level of PARP-1 methylation, the generation of ROS was significantly increased after exposure to TNPs for 24 hours. Furthermore, α-lipoic acid decreased TNP-induced ROS generation and then attenuated TNP-triggered PARP-1 hypermethylation. Meanwhile, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine simultaneously decreased the ROS generation induced by TNPs, resulting in the decline of PARP-1 methylation. In summary, TNPs triggered the aberrant hypermethylation of the PARP-1 promoter and there was a cross talk between oxidative stress and PARP-1 methylation in the toxic effect of TNPs. PMID:26366077

  19. The Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Enzyme Tankyrase Antagonizes Activity of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex through ADP-ribosylation of Axin and APC2.

    PubMed

    Croy, Heather E; Fuller, Caitlyn N; Giannotti, Jemma; Robinson, Paige; Foley, Andrew V A; Yamulla, Robert J; Cosgriff, Sean; Greaves, Bradford D; von Kleeck, Ryan A; An, Hyun Hyung; Powers, Catherine M; Tran, Julie K; Tocker, Aaron M; Jacob, Kimberly D; Davis, Beckley K; Roberts, David M

    2016-06-10

    Most colon cancer cases are initiated by truncating mutations in the tumor suppressor, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). APC is a critical negative regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway that participates in a multi-protein "destruction complex" to target the key effector protein β-catenin for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Prior work has established that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme Tankyrase (TNKS) antagonizes destruction complex activity by promoting degradation of the scaffold protein Axin, and recent work suggests that TNKS inhibition is a promising cancer therapy. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen and uncovered TNKS as a putative binding partner of Drosophila APC2, suggesting that TNKS may play multiple roles in destruction complex regulation. We find that TNKS binds a C-terminal RPQPSG motif in Drosophila APC2, and that this motif is conserved in human APC2, but not human APC1. In addition, we find that APC2 can recruit TNKS into the β-catenin destruction complex, placing the APC2/TNKS interaction at the correct intracellular location to regulate β-catenin proteolysis. We further show that TNKS directly PARylates both Drosophila Axin and APC2, but that PARylation does not globally regulate APC2 protein levels as it does for Axin. Moreover, TNKS inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases β-catenin signaling, which we find cannot be explained solely through Axin stabilization. Instead, our findings suggest that TNKS regulates destruction complex activity at the level of both Axin and APC2, providing further mechanistic insight into TNKS inhibition as a potential Wnt pathway cancer therapy. PMID:27068743

  20. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  1. Another “String to the Bow” of PJ34, a Potent Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase Inhibitor: An Antiplatelet Effect through P2Y12 Antagonism?

    PubMed Central

    Lechaftois, Marie; Dreano, Elise; Palmier, Bruno; Margaill, Isabelle; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Lerouet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuro- and vasoprotective effects of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibition have been largely documented in models of cerebral ischemia, particularly with the potent PARP inhibitor PJ34. Furthermore, after ischemic stroke, physicians are faced with incomplete tissue reperfusion and reocclusion, in which platelet activation/aggregation plays a key role. Data suggest that certain PARP inhibitors could act as antiplatelet agents. In that context, the present in vitro study investigated on human blood the potential antiplatelet effect of PJ34 and two structurally different PARP inhibitors, DPQ and INO-1001. Methods and results ADP concentrations were chosen to induce a biphasic aggregation curve resulting from the successive activation of both its receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12. In these experimental conditions, PJ34 inhibited the second phase of aggregation; this effect was reduced by incremental ADP concentrations. In addition, in line with a P2Y12 pathway inhibitory effect, PJ34 inhibited the dephosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) in a concentration-dependent manner. Besides, PJ34 had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by collagen or PAR1 activating peptide, used at concentrations inducing a strong activation independent on secreted ADP. By contrast, DPQ and INO-1001 were devoid of any effect whatever the platelet agonist used. Conclusions We showed that, in addition to its already demonstrated beneficial effects in in vivo models of cerebral ischemia, the potent PARP inhibitor PJ34 exerts in vitro an antiplatelet effect. Moreover, this is the first study to report that PJ34 could act via a competitive P2Y12 antagonism. Thus, this antiplatelet effect could improve post-stroke reperfusion and/or prevent reocclusion, which reinforces the interest of this drug for stroke treatment. PMID:25329809

  2. Effect of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors on oxidative stress evoked hydroxyl radical level and macromolecules oxidation in cell free system of rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Czapski, Grzegorz A; Cakala, Magdalena; Kopczuk, Dorota; Strosznajder, Joanna B

    2004-02-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a nuclear enzyme involved in DNA repair, replication and cell cycle. However, its overactivation leads to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and ATP depletion and cell death. The inhibitors of PARP-1 were successfully used in the basic studies and in animal models of different diseases. For this reason, it is important to discriminate between specific and non-specific antioxidant properties of PARP-1 inhibitors. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PARP-1 inhibitors on the free radical level and oxidation of macromolecules and to compare their properties with the efficacy of antioxidants. Oxidative stress was induced in the brain cortex homogenate by FeCl(2) or CuSO(4) at 25 microM during 15 min incubation at 37 degrees C. PARP-1 inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), 1,5-dihydroxyisoquinoline (DHIQ) and 3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone (DPQ), and the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, resveratrol and Tempol were used at 0-5 mM. Free radical contents were estimated by spin-trapping using HPLC. Lipid and protein oxidation were determined by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and carbonyl groups or using fluorescent probe TyrFluo, respectively. Our data indicate that 3-AB and DHIQ are potent hydroxyl radical scavengers and inhibitors of protein oxidation. DHIQ additionally decreases lipid peroxidation. DPQ has no antioxidant properties and seems to be a specific PARP-1 inhibitor, however, it is a water insoluble compound. Among the investigated antioxidants, the most potent was resveratrol and then alpha-tocopherol and Tempol. These results indicate that 3-A beta, benzamide and DHIQ are potent hydroxyl radical scavengers and antioxidants. These data ought to be taken into consideration when properties of these compounds as PARP inhibitors are evaluated. PMID:14746898

  3. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  4. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase enzyme inhibitor, veliparib, potentiates chemotherapy and radiation in vitro and in vivo in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Zhang, Guojing; Deng, Xingming; Rossi, Michael R; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Doho, Gregory H; Chen, Zhengjia; Kim, Sungjin; Strychor, Sandy; Christner, Susan M; Beumer, Jan; Li, Chunyang; Yue, Ping; Chen, Alice; Sica, Gabriel L; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Kowalski, Jeanne; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) plays a key role in DNA repair and is highly expressed in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We investigated the therapeutic impact of PARP inhibition in SCLC. In vitro cytotoxicity of veliparib, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide singly and combined was determined by MTS in 9 SCLC cell lines (H69, H128, H146, H526, H187, H209, DMS53, DMS153, and DMS114). Subcutaneous xenografts in athymic nu/nu mice of H146 and H128 cells with relatively high and low platinum sensitivity, respectively, were employed for in vivo testing. Mechanisms of differential sensitivity of SCLC cell lines to PARP inhibition were investigated by comparing protein and gene expression profiles of the platinum sensitive and the less sensitive cell lines. Veliparib showed limited single-agent cytotoxicity but selectively potentiated (≥50% reduction in IC50) cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide in vitro in five of nine SCLC cell lines. Veliparib with cisplatin or etoposide or with both cisplatin and etoposide showed greater delay in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone in H146 but not H128 xenografts. The potentiating effect of veliparib was associated with in vitro cell line sensitivity to cisplatin (CC = 0.672; P = 0.048) and DNA-PKcs protein modulation. Gene expression profiling identified differential expression of a 5-gene panel (GLS, UBEC2, HACL1, MSI2, and LOC100129585) in cell lines with relatively greater sensitivity to platinum and veliparib combination. Veliparib potentiates standard cytotoxic agents against SCLC in a cell-specific manner. This potentiation correlates with platinum sensitivity, DNA-PKcs expression and a 5-gene expression profile. PMID:25124282

  5. A Role for Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Melanoma Growth Stimulatory Activity (CXCL1) Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Nirodi, Chaitanya; NagDas, Subir; Gygi, Steven P.; Olson, Gary; Aebersold, Ruedi; Richmond, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The melanoma growth stimulatory activity/growth-regulated protein, CXCL1, is constitutively expressed at high levels during inflammation and progression of melanocytes into malignant melanoma. It has been shown previously that CXCL1 overexpression in melanoma cells is due to increased transcription as well as stability of the CXCL1 message. The transcription of CXCL1 is regulated through several cis-acting elements including Sp1, NF-κB, HMGI(Y), and the immediate upstream region (IUR) element (nucleotides −94 to −78), which lies immediately upstream to the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) element. Previously, it has been shown that the IUR is necessary for basal and cytokine-induced transcription of the CXCL1 gene. UV cross-linking and Southwestern blot analyses indicate that the IUR oligonucleotide probe selectively binds a 115-kDa protein. In this study, the IUR element has been further characterized. We show here that proximity of the IUR element to the adjacent NF-κB element is critical to its function as a positive regulatory element. Using binding site oligonucleotide affinity chromatography, we have selectively purified the 115-kDa IUR-F. Mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight spectroscopy and amino acid analysis as well as microcapillary reverse phase chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified this protein as the 114-kDa poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP1). Furthermore, 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of PARP-specific ADP-ribosylation, inhibits CXCL1 promoter activity and reduces levels of CXCL1 mRNA. The data point to the possibility that PARP may be a coactivator of CXCL1 transcription. PMID:11112786

  6. Modulation of farnesoid X receptor results in post-translational modification of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen H.; Kong, Bo; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Li, Fei; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-01-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR deficiency in mice results in cholestasis, metabolic disorders, and tumorigenesis in liver and intestine. FXR is known to contribute to pathogenesis by regulating gene transcription; however, changes in the post-transcriptional modification of proteins associated with FXR modulation have not been determined. In the current study, proteomic analysis of the livers of wild-type (WT) and FXR knockout (FXR-KO) mice treated with a FXR synthetic ligand or vehicle was performed. The results identified five proteins as novel FXR targets. Since FXR deficiency in mice leads to liver tumorigenesis, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, member 1 (Parp1) that is important for DNA repair, was validated in the current study by quantitative real-time PCR, and 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis/western blot. The results showed that Parp1 mRNA levels were not altered by FXR genetic status or by agonist treatment. However, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in FXR-KO mice as early as 3 month old. Interestingly, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in WT mice in an age-dependent manner (from 3 to 18 months), but not in FXR-KO mice. Finally, activation of FXR in WT mice resulted in reduction of phosporylated Parp1 protein in the liver without affecting total Parp1 protein levels. In conclusion, this study reveals that FXR genetic status and agonist treatment affects basal levels and phosphorylation state of Parp1, respectively. These alterations, in turn, may be associated with the hepatobiliary alterations observed in FXR-KO mice and participate in FXR agonist-induced protection in the liver. -- Highlights: ► Proteomic analysis identified novel FXR targets. ► FXR modification altered post-translational modification of the Parp1 protein. ► Altered Parp1 function may contribute to mechanisms of FXR regulation of liver functions.

  7. Effects of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition on sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injuries in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Jiang, Ning; Xiao, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Jun-ping; Mei, Yi-zhou; Zheng, Pan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Xin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Early studies with first-generation poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have already indicated some therapeutic potential for sulfur mustard (SM) injuries. The available novel and more potential PARP inhibitors, which are undergoing clinical trials as drugs for cancer treatment, bring it back to the centre of interest. However, the role of PARP-1 in SM-induced injury is not fully understood. In this study, we selected a high potent specific PARP inhibitor ABT-888 as an example to investigate the effect of PARP inhibitor in SM injury. The results showed that in both the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) and HaCaT cell model, PARP inhibitor ABT-888 can reduce cell damage induced by severe SM injury. ABT-888 significantly reduced SM induced edema and epidermal necrosis in MEVM. In the HaCaT cell model, ABT-888 can reduce SM-induced NAD+/ATP depletion and apoptosis/necrosis. Then, we studied the mechanism of PARP-1 in SM injury by knockdown of PARP-1 in HaCaT cells. Knockdown of PARP-1 protected cell viability and downregulated the apoptosis checkpoints, including p-JNK, p-p53, Caspase 9, Caspase 8, c-PARP and Caspase 3 following SM-induced injury. Furthermore, the activation of AKT can inhibit autophagy via the regulation of mTOR. Our results showed that SM exposure could significantly inhibit the activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. Knockdown of PARP-1 reversed the SM-induced suppression of the Akt/mTOR pathway. In summary, the results of our study indicated that the protective effects of downregulation of PARP-1 in SM injury may be due to the regulation of apoptosis, necrosis, energy crisis and autophagy. However, it should be noticed that PARP inhibitor ABT-888 further enhanced the phosphorylation of H2AX (S139) after SM exposure, which indicated that we should be very careful in the application of PARP inhibitors in SM injury treatment because of the enhancement of DNA damage. PMID:27077006

  8. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K.; Liu, Ke J.; Lau, Serrine S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  9. A duplicated region is responsible for the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase polymorphism, on chromosome 13, associated with a predisposition to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, D.; Cherney, B.W.; Lupold, S.; Smulson, M. ); Lalande, M. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Berenson, J.R.; Lichtenstein, A. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA ); Bhatia, K.G. )

    1993-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) gene (13q33-qter) depicts a two-allele (A/B) polymorphism. In the noncancer population, the frequency of the B allele is higher among blacks than among whites. Since the incidence of multiple myeloma and prostate and lung cancer is higher in the US black population, the authors have analyzed the B-allele frequency in germ-line DNA to determine whether the PADPRP gene correlates with a polymorphic susceptibility to these diseases. For multiple myeloma and prostate cancer, an increased frequency of the B allele appeared to be striking only in black patients. In contrast, the distribution of the B allele in germ-line DNA did not differ among white patients with these diseases, when compared with the control group. An elevated B-allele frequency was also found in germ-line DNA in blacks with colon cancer. These observations suggest that the PADPRP polymorphism may provide a valid marker for a predisposition to these cancers in black individuals. To determine the genomic structure of the polymorphic PADPRP sequences, a 2.68-kb HindIII clone was isolated and sequenced from a chromosome 13-enriched library. Sequence analysis of this clone (A allele) revealed a close sequence similarity (91.8%) to PADPRP cDNA (1q42) and an absence of introns, suggesting that the gene on 13q exists as a processed pseudogene. A 193-bp conserved duplicated region within the A allele was identified as the source of the polymorphism. The nucleotide differences between the PADPRP gene on chromosome 13 and related PADPRP genes were exploited to develop oligonucleotides that can detect the difference between the A/B genotypes in a PCR. This PCR assay offers the opportunity for analyzing additional black cancer patients, to determine how the PADPRP processed pseudogene or an unidentified gene that cosegregates with the PADPRP gene might be involved with the development of malignancy. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Extracellular poly(ADP-ribose) is a pro-inflammatory signal for macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Krukenberg, Kristin A.; Kim, Sujeong; Tan, Edwin S.; Maliga, Zoltan; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) synthesizes poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), an essential post-translational modification whose function is important in many cellular processes including DNA damage signalling, cell death, and inflammation. All known PAR biology is intracellular, but we suspected it might also play a role in cell-to-cell communication during inflammation. We found that PAR activated cytokine release in human and mouse macrophages, a hallmark of innate immune activation, and determined structure-activity relationships. PAR was rapidly internalized by murine macrophages, while the monomer, ADP-ribose, was not. Inhibitors of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling blocked macrophage responses to PAR, and PAR induced TLR2 and TLR4 signaling in reporter cell lines suggesting it was recognized by these TLRs, much like bacterial pathogens. We propose that PAR acts as an extracellular “Damage Associated Molecular Pattern” (DAMP) that drives inflammatory signaling. PMID:25865309

  11. Excitotoxicity in the lung: N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced, nitric oxide-dependent, pulmonary edema is attenuated by vasoactive intestinal peptide and by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Said, S I; Berisha, H I; Pakbaz, H

    1996-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the "adult respiratory distress syndrome," and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8643465

  12. Excitotoxicity in the Lung: N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Dependent, Pulmonary Edema is Attenuated by Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and by Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Sami I.; Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah

    1996-05-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the ``adult respiratory distress syndrome,'' and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

  13. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Dioxin Targets Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) for ADP-ribosylation via 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (TiPARP)*

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Zhang, Sheng; Ram, Payal; Rifkind, Arleen B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) include a wasting syndrome associated with decreased gluconeogenesis. TCDD is a potent activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand activated transcription factor. The relationship between gene activation by the AHR and TCDD toxicities is not well understood. We recently identified a pathway by which the AHR target gene TiPARP (TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) contributes to TCDD suppression of transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key regulator of gluconeogenesis, by consuming NAD+ and decreasing Sirtuin 1 activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), a transcriptional activator of PEPCK. We report here that TCDD-induced TiPARP also targets PEPCK for ADP-ribosylation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of PEPCK were found to undergo ADP-ribosylation. Unexpectedly, AHR suppression also enhanced ADP-ribosylation and did so by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent mechanism. This report 1) identifies ADP-ribosylation as a new posttranslational modification for PEPCK, 2) describes a pathway by which transcriptional induction of TiPARP by the AHR can lead to a downstream posttranslational change in a TCDD target protein (PEPCK), and 3) reveals that the AHR exerts complex, previously unidentified modulatory effects on ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23770670

  14. Identification and ranking of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors as protectors against sulfur mustard induced decrease in cellular energy and viability in in vitro assays with human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, H.L.; Kelly, S.A.

    1993-05-13

    Lymphocyte were utilized as a model for investigating HD effects on resting cells. Lymphocytes exposed to HD demonstrated a concentration dependent decrease in ATP, NAD, and viability. The decrease began in 15 minutes for ATP, 2 hours for NAD, and 6 hours for viability. All three of these HD initiated biochemical changes can be blocked by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PADPRPI). To completely inhibit HD initiated ATP, NAD, and viability decreases the PADPRPI had to be present at time 0, 1, and 4 hours respectfully. The amount of protection conferred by the PADPRPI in the viability assay decreased in a linear manner with the delay of the addition and the concentration of the inhibitor from 6-12 hours post HD exposure. There was a good correlation between IC50 to inhibit poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and EC50 prevention of HD initiated cell death (r=O.94). Thus, three in vitro assays which can measure biochemical and pathologic changes induced by HD in G sub 0 lymphocytes have been developed. These assays have been employed to study the ability of candidate antidotes to prevent HD initiated changes. Benzamidine analogs, including the F.D.A. approved vitamin niacinamide, have been shown to be effective at inhibiting all of these changes.

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose): From chemical synthesis to drug design.

    PubMed

    Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2016-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an important biopolymer, which is involved in various life processes such as DNA repair and replication, modulation of chromatin structure, transcription, cell differentiation, and in pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, ischemia and inflammations. PAR is the most electronegative biopolymer and this property is essential for its binding with a wide range of proteins. Understanding of PAR functions in cell on molecular level requires chemical synthesis of regular PAR oligomers. Recently developed methodologies for chemical synthesis of PAR oligomers, will facilitate the study of various cellular processes, involving PAR. PMID:27318540

  16. VERO cells harbor a poly-ADP-ribose belt partnering their epithelial adhesion belt

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Kun, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) is a polymer of up to 400 ADP-ribose units synthesized by poly-ADP-ribose-polymerases (PARPs) and degraded by poly-ADP-ribose-glycohydrolase (PARG). Nuclear PAR modulates chromatin compaction, affecting nuclear functions (gene expression, DNA repair). Diverse defined PARP cytoplasmic allocation patterns contrast with the yet still imprecise PAR distribution and still unclear functions. Based on previous evidence from other models, we hypothesized that PAR could be present in epithelial cells where cadherin-based adherens junctions are linked with the actin cytoskeleton (constituting the adhesion belt). In the present work, we have examined through immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, the subcellular localization of PAR in an epithelial monkey kidney cell line (VERO). PAR was distinguished colocalizing with actin and vinculin in the epithelial belt, a location that has not been previously reported. Actin filaments disruption with cytochalasin D was paralleled by PAR belt disruption. Conversely, PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide, PJ34 or XAV 939, affected PAR belt synthesis, actin distribution, cell shape and adhesion. Extracellular calcium chelation displayed similar effects. Our results demonstrate the existence of PAR in a novel subcellular localization. An initial interpretation of all the available evidence points towards TNKS-1 as the most probable PAR belt architect, although TNKS-2 involvement cannot be discarded. Forthcoming research will test this hypothesis as well as explore the existence of the PAR belt in other epithelial cells and deepen into its functional implications. PMID:25332845

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose) Signals to Mitochondrial AIF: A Key Event in Parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingfei; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) plays a pivotal role in multiple neurologic diseases by mediating caspase-independent cell death, which has recently been designated parthanatos to distinguish it from other forms of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) release and translocation to the nucleus is the commitment point for parthanatos. This process involves a pathogenic role of poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer. It generates in the nucleus and translocates to the mitochondria to mediate AIF release following lethal PARP-1 activation. PAR polymer itself is toxic to cells. Thus, PAR polymer signaling to mitochondrial AIF is the key event initiating the deadly crosstalk between the nucleus and the mitochondria in parthanatos. Targeting PAR-mediated AIF release could be a potential approach for the therapy of neurologic disorders. PMID:19332058

  18. Failure to degrade poly(ADP-ribose) causes increased sensitivity to cytotoxicity and early embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Koh, David W.; Lawler, Ann M.; Poitras, Marc F.; Sasaki, Masayuki; Wattler, Sigrid; Nehls, Michael C.; Stöger, Tobias; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    The metabolism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is critical for genomic stability in multicellular eukaryotes. Here, we show that the failure to degrade PAR by means of disruption of the murine poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) gene unexpectedly causes early embryonic lethality and enhanced sensitivity to genotoxic stress. This lethality results from the failure to hydrolyze PAR, because PARG null embryonic day (E) 3.5 blastocysts accumulate PAR and concurrently undergo apoptosis. Moreover, embryonic trophoblast stem cell lines established from early PARG null embryos are viable only when cultured in medium containing the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor benzamide. Cells lacking PARG also show reduced growth, accumulation of PAR, and increased sensitivity to cytotoxicity induced by N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and menadione after benzamide withdrawal. These results provide compelling evidence that the failure to degrade PAR has deleterious consequences. Further, they define a role for PARG in embryonic development and a protective role in the response to genotoxic stress. PMID:15591342

  19. Altered poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism impairs cellular responses to genotoxic stress in a hypomorphic mutant of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Hong; Coyle, Donna L.; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jacobson, Myron K. . E-mail: mjacobson@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2007-03-10

    Genotoxic stress activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) metabolism leading to PAR synthesis catalyzed by DNA damage activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and rapid PAR turnover by action of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The involvement of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in responses to DNA damage has been well studied but the involvement of nuclear PARG is less well understood. To gain insights into the function of nuclear PARG in DNA damage responses, we have quantitatively studied PAR metabolism in cells derived from a hypomorphic mutant mouse model in which exons 2 and 3 of the PARG gene have been deleted (PARG-{delta}2,3 cells), resulting in a nuclear PARG containing a catalytic domain but lacking the N-terminal region (A domain) of the protein. Following DNA damage induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), we found that the activity of both PARG and PARPs in intact cells is increased in PARG-{delta}2,3 cells. The increased PARG activity leads to decreased PARP-1 automodification with resulting increased PARP activity. The degree of PARG activation is greater than PARP, resulting in decreased PAR accumulation. Following MNNG treatment, PARG-{delta}2,3 cells show reduced formation of XRCC1 foci, delayed H2AX phosphorylation, decreased DNA break intermediates during repair, and increased cell death. Our results show that a precise coordination of PARPs and PARG activities is important for normal cellular responses to DNA damage and that this coordination is defective in the absence of the PARG A domain.

  20. Optimization of Phenyl-Substituted Benzimidazole Carboxamide Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors: Identification of (S)-2-(2-Fluoro-4-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)phenyl)-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxamide (A-966492), a Highly Potent and Efficacious Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, Thomas D.; Zhu, Gui-Dong; Gong, Jianchun; Thomas, Sheela; Gandhi, Viraj B.; Liu, Xuesong; Shi, Yan; Klinghofer, Vered; Johnson, Eric F.; Park, Chang H.; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Donawho, Cherrie K.; Frost, David J.; Buchanan, Fritz G.; Bukofzer, Gail T.; Rodriguez, Luis E.; Bontcheva-Diaz, Velitchka; Bouska, Jennifer J.; Osterling, Donald J.; Olson, Amanda M.; Marsh, Kennan C.; Luo, Yan; Giranda, Vincent L.

    2010-06-21

    We have developed a series of phenylpyrrolidine- and phenylpiperidine-substituted benzimidazole carboxamide poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors with excellent PARP enzyme potency as well as single-digit nanomolar cellular potency. These efforts led to the identification of (S)-2-(2-fluoro-4-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)phenyl)-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxamide (22b, A-966492). Compound 22b displayed excellent potency against the PARP-1 enzyme with a K{sub i} of 1 nM and an EC{sub 50} of 1 nM in a whole cell assay. In addition, 22b is orally bioavailable across multiple species, crosses the blood-brain barrier, and appears to distribute into tumor tissue. It also demonstrated good in vivo efficacy in a B16F10 subcutaneous murine melanoma model in combination with temozolomide and in an MX-1 breast cancer xenograft model both as a single agent and in combination with carboplatin.

  1. Molecular Insights into Poly(ADP-ribose) Recognition and Processing

    PubMed Central

    Žaja, Roko; Mikoč, Andreja; Barkauskaite, Eva; Ahel, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational protein modification involved in the regulation of important cellular functions including DNA repair, transcription, mitosis and apoptosis. The amount of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PAR) in cells reflects the balance of synthesis, mediated by the PARP protein family, and degradation, which is catalyzed by a glycohydrolase, PARG. Many of the proteins mediating PAR metabolism possess specialised high affinity PAR-binding modules that allow the efficient sensing or processing of the PAR signal. The identification of four such PAR-binding modules and the characterization of a number of proteins utilising these elements during the last decade has provided important insights into how PAR regulates different cellular activities. The macrodomain represents a unique PAR-binding module which is, in some instances, known to possess enzymatic activity on ADP-ribose derivatives (in addition to PAR-binding). The most recently discovered example for this is the PARG protein, and several available PARG structures have provided an understanding into how the PARG macrodomain evolved into a major enzyme that maintains PAR homeostasis in living cells. PMID:24970154

  2. Quantitative proteomics profiling of the poly(ADP-ribose)-related response to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Pic, Émilie; Isabelle, Maxim; Krietsch, Jana; Éthier, Chantal; Paquet, Éric; Kelly, Isabelle; Boutin, Michel; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J.; Poirier, Guy G.

    2012-01-01

    Upon DNA damage induction, DNA-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize an anionic poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) scaffold to which several proteins bind with the subsequent formation of pADPr-associated multiprotein complexes. We have used a combination of affinity-purification methods and proteomics approaches to isolate these complexes and assess protein dynamics with respect to pADPr metabolism. As a first approach, we developed a substrate trapping strategy by which we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) mutant can act as a physiologically selective bait for the isolation of specific pADPr-binding proteins through its macrodomain-like domain. In addition to antibody-mediated affinity-purification methods, we used a pADPr macrodomain affinity resin to recover pADPr-binding proteins and their complexes. Second, we designed a time course experiment to explore the changes in the composition of pADPr-containing multiprotein complexes in response to alkylating DNA damage-mediated PARP activation. Spectral count clustering based on GeLC-MS/MS analysis was complemented with further analyses using high precision quantitative proteomics through isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)- and Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics. Here, we present a valuable resource in the interpretation of systems biology of the DNA damage response network in the context of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and provide a basis for subsequent investigations of pADPr-binding protein candidates. PMID:22669911

  3. Quantitative proteomics profiling of the poly(ADP-ribose)-related response to genotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Pic, Emilie; Isabelle, Maxim; Krietsch, Jana; Ethier, Chantal; Paquet, Eric; Kelly, Isabelle; Boutin, Michel; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J; Poirier, Guy G

    2012-09-01

    Upon DNA damage induction, DNA-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize an anionic poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) scaffold to which several proteins bind with the subsequent formation of pADPr-associated multiprotein complexes. We have used a combination of affinity-purification methods and proteomics approaches to isolate these complexes and assess protein dynamics with respect to pADPr metabolism. As a first approach, we developed a substrate trapping strategy by which we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) mutant can act as a physiologically selective bait for the isolation of specific pADPr-binding proteins through its macrodomain-like domain. In addition to antibody-mediated affinity-purification methods, we used a pADPr macrodomain affinity resin to recover pADPr-binding proteins and their complexes. Second, we designed a time course experiment to explore the changes in the composition of pADPr-containing multiprotein complexes in response to alkylating DNA damage-mediated PARP activation. Spectral count clustering based on GeLC-MS/MS analysis was complemented with further analyses using high precision quantitative proteomics through isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)- and Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics. Here, we present a valuable resource in the interpretation of systems biology of the DNA damage response network in the context of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and provide a basis for subsequent investigations of pADPr-binding protein candidates. PMID:22669911

  4. Effect of heat shock on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase and DNA repair in Drosophila cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, N.L.; Kidwell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, a chromatin-bound enzyme which attaches polyanionic chains of ADP-ribose to nuclear proteins, was found to be temperature sensitive in intact Drosophila melanogaster cells. The synthetase was completely inactivated by heat-shocking the cells at 37/sup 0/C for 5 min, a condition which had no appreciable effect on the subsequent growth of Drosophila cells at their physiological temperature. The heat-shock effect on synthetase was reversible; enzyme activity began to reappear about 2 hr post heat shock. During the 2-hr interval when poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was absent, the cells were competent in repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA strand breaks as shown by DNA sedimentation studies on alkaline sucrose gradients. It is thus concluded that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is unnecessary for repair of DNA strand breaks introduced by irradiation. The same conclusion was reached from the fact that two inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase 3-aminobenzamide and 5-methylnicotinamide, failed to block repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA chain breaks even though both inhibitors reduced the amount of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cells by 50-75%. Although it was found that the repair of DNA strand breaks is independent of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, irradiation does activate the synthetase in control cells, as shown by radioimmunoassay of poly(ADP-ribose) levels.

  5. Poly(ADP-ribose) in the bone: from oxidative stress signal to structural element.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Csaba; Robaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Lakatos, Petra; Szabó, Éva; Virág, László

    2015-05-01

    Contrary to common perception bone is a dynamic organ flexibly adapting to changes in mechanical loading by shifting the delicate balance between bone formation and bone resorption carried out by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. In the past decades numerous studies demonstrating production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen intermediates, effects of different antioxidants, and involvement of prototypical redox control mechanisms (Nrf2-Keap1, Steap4, FoxO, PAMM, caspase-2) have proven the central role of redox regulation in the bone. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a NAD-dependent protein modification carried out by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes recently emerged as a new regulatory mechanism fine-tuning osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Interestingly PARylation does not simply serve as a signaling mechanism during osteoblast differentiation but also couples it to osteoblast death. Even more strikingly, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer likely released from succumbed cells at the terminal stage of differentiation is incorporated into the bone matrix representing the first structural role of this versatile biopolymer. Moreover, this new paradigm explains why and how osteodifferentiation and death of cells entering this pathway are closely coupled to each other. Here we review the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates as well as PARylation in osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, function, and cell death. PMID:25660995

  6. Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in nuclear extracts from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, R; Rossi, L; Poirier, G G; Scovassi, A I

    1997-03-01

    We have analysed poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase, the enzyme responsible for in vivo degradation of ADP-ribose polymers, by means of a biochemical assay based on the capacity of the enzyme to use a synthetic 32P-labelled polymer as a substrate. The visualization of the reaction has been achieved by separation of poly and mono(ADP-ribose) by thin-layer chromatography followed by autoradiography, whereas polymer hydrolysis has been quantified by counting the spots corresponding to poly and mono(ADP-ribose). By addition of the enzyme inhibitor ethacridine to the reaction mixture, we have confirmed the specificity of the procedure we have developed. The protocol has been applied to study the specific activity of glycohydrolase in nuclear extracts from different mammalian cell lines and to an apoptotic experimental system, namely HL60 cells treated with etoposide. We have observed the activation of the enzyme after a two-hour drug treatment, that is concomitant with the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, the enzyme which synthesizes the polymer. These data suggest a precise regulation of ADP-ribosylation process during cell death by apoptosis. PMID:9074616

  7. Discovery of novel benzo[b][1,4]oxazin-3(4H)-ones as poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gangloff, Anthony R; Brown, Jason; de Jong, Ron; Dougan, Douglas R; Grimshaw, Charles E; Hixon, Mark; Jennings, Andy; Kamran, Ruhi; Kiryanov, Andre; O'Connell, Shawn; Taylor, Ewan; Vu, Phong

    2013-08-15

    Structure based drug design of a series of novel 1,4-benzoxazin-3-one derived PARP-1 inhibitors are described. The synthesis, enzymatic & cellular activities and pharmacodynamic effects are described. Optimized analogs demonstrated inhibition of poly-ADP-ribosylation in SW620 tumor bearing nude mice through 24h following a single dose. PMID:23850199

  8. [From poly(ADP-ribose) discovery to PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Valérie; Illuzzi, Giuditta; Héberlé, Eléa; Dantzer, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARP-1 is a molecular sensor of DNA breaks, playing a key role in the spatial and temporal organization of their repair, contributing to the maintenance of genome integrity and cell survival. The fact that PARP inhibition impairs efficacy of break repair has been exploited as anticancer strategies to potentiate the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. Numerous clinical trials based on this innovative approach are in progress. PARP inhibition has also proved to be exquisitely efficient to kill tumour cells deficient in double strand break repair by homologous recombination, such as cells mutated for the breast cancer early onset genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, by synthetic lethality. Several phase III clinical trials are in progress for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers with BRCA mutations and the PARP inhibitor olaparib has just been approved for advanced ovarian cancers with germline BRCA mutation. This review recapitulates the history from the discovery of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reaction to the promising therapeutic applications of its inhibition in innovating anticancer strategies. Benefits, hopes and obstacles are discussed. PMID:26384693

  9. Thrombin or Ca(++)-ionophore-mediated fall in endothelial ATP levels independent of poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase activity and NAD levels--comparison with the effects of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Halldórsson, Haraldur; Thors, Brynhildur; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a fall in cellular ATP following stimulation of endothelial cells with thrombin is secondary to a decrease in NAD levels caused by poly(ADP-Ribose)polymerase (PARP), we measured the levels of NAD and ATP in endothelial cells after treatment with thrombin, the Ca(++)-ionophore A23187, or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and compared the effects of inhibitors of PARP, NAD synthesis, and ADP-ribose breakdown on these responses. Neither thrombin nor A23187 caused a reduction in endothelial NAD levels and A23187 affected ATP levels independently of NAD levels or PARP activity. H2O2 induced lowering of NAD caused modest lowering of ATP but marked additional ATP-lowering, independent of PARP and NAD, was also demonstrated. We conclude that in endothelial cells ATP levels are largely independent of NAD and PARP, which do not play a role in thrombin or Ca(++)-ionophore-mediated lowering of ATP. H2O2 caused ATP lowering through a similar mechanism as thrombin and A23187 but, additionally, caused a further ATP lowering through its intense stimulation of PARP and marked lowering of NAD. PMID:25774718

  10. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells.

    PubMed

    James, Dominic I; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years. PMID:27610220

  11. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    James, Dominic I.; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A.; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years.

  12. Poly (ADP-ribose) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunjong; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Yun-Il; Kim, Young Pil; Shin, Joo-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The defining feature of Parkinson’s disease is a progressive and selective demise of dopaminergic neurons. A recent report on Parkinson’s disease animal model demonstrates that poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) dependent cell death, also named parthanatos, is accountable for selective dopaminergic neuronal loss. Parthanatos is a programmed necrotic cell death, characterized by PARP1 activation, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation, and large scale DNA fragmentation. Besides cell death regulation via interaction with AIF, PAR molecule mediates diverse cellular processes including genomic stability, cell division, transcription, epigenetic regulation, and stress granule formation. In this review, we will discuss the roles of PARP1 activation and PAR molecules in the pathological processes of Parkinson’s disease. Potential interaction between PAR molecule and Parkinson’s disease protein interactome are briefly introduced. Finally, we suggest promising points of therapeutic intervention in the pathological PAR signaling cascade to halt progression in Parkinson’s disease. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(8): 424-432] PMID:24874851

  13. Discovery of 2-{4-[(3S)-piperidin-3-yl]phenyl}-2H-indazole-7-carboxamide (MK-4827): a novel oral poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitor efficacious in BRCA-1 and -2 mutant tumors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Philip; Altamura, Sergio; Boueres, Julia; Ferrigno, Federica; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Giomini, Claudia; Lamartina, Stefania; Monteagudo, Edith; Ontoria, Jesus M; Orsale, Maria Vittoria; Palumbi, Maria Cecilia; Pesci, Silvia; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Scarpelli, Rita; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Toniatti, Carlo; Rowley, Michael

    2009-11-26

    We disclose the development of a novel series of 2-phenyl-2H-indazole-7-carboxamides as poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2 inhibitors. This series was optimized to improve enzyme and cellular activity, and the resulting PARP inhibitors display antiproliferation activities against BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 deficient cancer cells, with high selectivity over BRCA proficient cells. Extrahepatic oxidation by CYP450 1A1 and 1A2 was identified as a metabolic concern, and strategies to improve pharmacokinetic properties are reported. These efforts culminated in the identification of 2-{4-[(3S)-piperidin-3-yl]phenyl}-2H-indazole-7-carboxamide 56 (MK-4827), which displays good pharmacokinetic properties and is currently in phase I clinical trials. This compound displays excellent PARP 1 and 2 inhibition with IC(50) = 3.8 and 2.1 nM, respectively, and in a whole cell assay, it inhibited PARP activity with EC(50) = 4 nM and inhibited proliferation of cancer cells with mutant BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 with CC(50) in the 10-100 nM range. Compound 56 was well tolerated in vivo and demonstrated efficacy as a single agent in a xenograft model of BRCA-1 deficient cancer. PMID:19873981

  14. Tetrandrine induces apoptosis Via caspase-8, -9, and -3 and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase dependent pathways and autophagy through beclin-1/ LC3-I, II signaling pathways in human oral cancer HSC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Shun; Yu, Chun-Shu; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Yang, Jiun-Long; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that was found in the Radix Stephania tetrandra S Moore. It had been reported to induce cytotoxic effects on many human cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of tetrandrine on human oral cancer HSC-3 cells in vitro. Treatments of HSC-3 cells with tetrandrine significantly decreased the percentage of viable cells through the induction of autophagy and apoptosis and these effects are in concentration-dependent manner. To define the mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effects of tetrandrine, we investigated the critical molecular events known to regulate the apoptotic and autophagic machinery. Tetrandrine induced chromatin condensation, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9, and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) that were associated with apoptosis, and it also enhanced the expression of LC3-I and -II that were associated with the induction of autophagy in human squamous carcinoma cell line (HSC-3) cells. Tetrandrine induced autophagy in HSC-3 cells was significantly attenuated by bafilomycin A1 (inhibitor of autophagy) pre-treatment that confirmed tetrandrine induced cell death may be associated with the autophagy. In conclusion, we suggest that tetrandrine induced cell death may be through the induction of apoptosis as well as autophagy in human oral cancer HSC-3 cells via PARP, caspases/Becline I/LC3-I/II signaling pathways. PMID:25266202

  15. Profiling of Biomarkers for the Exposure of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Lamin-A/C Isoform 3, Poly[ADP-ribose] Polymerase 1, and Mitochondria Copy Number Are Identified as Universal Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, Hye-Ran; Trang, Nguyen Thi Dai; Baek, Hee-Jo; Moon, Jae-Dong; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Kook, Hoon; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the profiling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- (PAH-) induced genotoxicity in cell lines and zebrafish. Each type of cells displayed different proportionality of apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number was dramatically elevated after 5-day treatment of fluoranthene and pyrene. The notable deregulated proteins for PAHs exposure were displayed as follows: lamin-A/C isoform 3 and annexin A1 for benzopyrene; lamin-A/C isoform 3 and DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha for pentacene; poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1) for fluoranthene; and talin-1 and DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha for pyrene. Among them, lamin-A/C isoform 3 and PARP-1 were further confirmed using mRNA and protein expression study. Obvious morphological abnormalities including curved backbone and cardiomegaly in zebrafish were observed in the 54 hpf with more than 400 nM of benzopyrene. In conclusion, the change of mitochondrial genome (increased mtDNA copy number) was closely associated with PAH exposure in cell lines and mesenchymal stem cells. Lamin-A/C isoform 3, talin-1, and annexin A1 were identified as universal biomarkers for PAHs exposure. Zebrafish, specifically at embryo stage, showed suitable in vivo model for monitoring PAHs exposure to hematopoietic tissue and other organs. PMID:25114913

  16. The Guanine-Quadruplex Structure in the Human c-myc Gene's Promoter Is Converted into B-DNA Form by the Human Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase-1

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Anna; Kenesi, Erzsebet; Hunyadi-Gulyas, Eva; Durgo, Hajnalka; Berko, Barbara; Dunai, Zsuzsanna A.; Bauer, Pal I.

    2012-01-01

    The important regulatory role of the guanine-quadruplex (GQ) structure, present in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 region of the human c-myc (h c-myc) gene's promoter, in the regulation of the transcription of that gene has been documented. Here we present evidences, that the human nuclear poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (h PARP-1) protein participates in the regulation of the h c-myc gene expression through its interaction with this GQ structure, characterized by binding assays, fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) experiments and by affinity pull-down experiments in vitro, and by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-qPCR analysis and h c-myc-promoter-luciferase reporter determinations in vivo. We surmise that h PARP-1 binds to the GQ structure and participates in the conversion of that structure into the transcriptionally more active B-DNA form. The first Zn-finger structure present in h PARP-1 participates in this interaction. PARP-1 might be a new member of the group of proteins participating in the regulation of transcription through their interactions with GQ structures present in the promoters of different genes. PMID:22880082

  17. Txk, a member of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tec family, forms a complex with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and elongation factor 1α and regulates interferon-γ gene transcription in Th1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, T; Nara, K; Yoshikawa, H; Suzuki, N

    2007-01-01

    We have found previously that Txk, a member of the Tec family tyrosine kinases, is involved importantly in T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine production. However, how Txk regulates interferon (IFN)-γ gene transcription in human T lymphocytes was not fully elucidated. In this study, we identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) as Txk-associated molecules that bound to the Txk responsive element of the IFN-γ gene promoter. Txk phosphorylated EF-1α and PARP1 formed a complex with them, and bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter in vitro. In particular, the N terminal region containing the DNA binding domain of PARP1 was important for the trimolecular complex formation involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1. Several mutant Txk which lacked kinase activity were unable to form the trimolecular complex. A PARP1 inhibitor, PJ34, suppressed IFN-γ but not interleukin (IL)-4 production by normal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Multi-colour confocal analysis revealed that Txk and EF-1α located in the cytoplasm in the resting condition. Upon activation, a complex involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1 was formed and was located in the nucleus. Collectively, Txk in combination with EF-1α and PARP1 bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter, and exerted transcriptional activity on the IFN-γ gene. PMID:17177976

  18. Active site fingerprinting and pharmacophore screening strategies for the identification of dual inhibitors of protein kinase C [Formula: see text] and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1).

    PubMed

    Chadha, Navriti; Silakari, Om

    2016-08-01

    Current clinical studies have revealed that diabetic complications are multifactorial disorders that target two or more pathways. The majority of drugs in clinical trial target aldose reductase and protein kinase C ([Formula: see text]), while recent studies disclosed a significant role played by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). In light of this, the current study was aimed to identify novel dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 using a pharmaco-informatics methodology. Pharmacophore-based 3D QSAR models for these two targets were generated using HypoGen and used to screen three commercially available chemical databases to identify dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1. Overall, 18 hits were obtained from the screening process; the hits were filtered based on their drug-like properties and predicted binding affinities (docking analysis). Important amino acid residues were predicted by developing a fingerprint of the active site using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. The stability of the complexes (18 hits with both proteins) and their final binding orientations were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, novel hits have been predicted to have good binding affinities for [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 proteins, which could be further investigated for in vitro/in vivo activity. PMID:27216445

  19. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion differentially activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and Bax to induce nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kay L H; Hsu, Chin; Chan, Julie Y H

    2009-07-01

    We reported previously that complete spinal cord transection (SCT) results in depression of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity that triggers apoptosis via sequential activations of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)- and caspase-dependent cascades in the injured spinal cord. This study tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion (O(2)(.-)) serve as the interposing signals between SCT and impaired mitochondrial respiratory functions. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats manifested a significant increase in NO or O(2)(.-) level in the injured spinal cord during the first 3 days after SCT. The augmented O(2)(.-) production, along with concomitant reduction in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity or ATP level, nuclear translocation of AIF, cytosolic release of cytochrome c, and DNA fragmentation were reversed by osmotic minipump infusion of a NO trapping agent, carboxy-PTIO, or a superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, into the epicenter of the transected spinal cord. Intriguingly, carboxy-PTIO significantly suppressed upregulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in the nucleus, attenuated nuclear translocation of AIF, inhibited mitochondrial translocation of Bax and antagonized mitochondrial release of cytochrome c; whereas tempol only inhibited the later two cellular events after SCT. We conclude that overproduction of NO and O(2)(.-) in the injured spinal cord promulgates mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers AIF- and caspase-dependent apoptotic signaling cascades via differential upregulation of nuclear PARP-1 and mitochondrial translocation of Bax. PMID:19473058

  20. Discovery and Structure–Activity Relationship of Novel 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran-7-carboxamide and 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran-3(2H)-one-7-carboxamide Derivatives as Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Novel substituted 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-7-carboxamide (DHBF-7-carboxamide) and 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-3(2H)-one-7-carboxamide (DHBF-3-one-7-carboxamide) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). A structure-based design strategy resulted in lead compound 3 (DHBF-7-carboxamide; IC50 = 9.45 μM). To facilitate synthetically feasible derivatives, an alternative core was designed, DHBF-3-one-7-carboxamide (36, IC50 = 16.2 μM). The electrophilic 2-position of this scaffold was accessible for extended modifications. Substituted benzylidene derivatives at the 2-position were found to be the most potent, with 3′,4′-dihydroxybenzylidene 58 (IC50 = 0.531 μM) showing a 30-fold improvement in potency. Various heterocycles attached at the 4′-hydroxyl/4′-amino of the benzylidene moiety resulted in significant improvement in inhibition of PARP-1 activity (e.g., compounds 66–68, 70, 72, and 73; IC50 values from 0.718 to 0.079 μM). Compound 66 showed selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient DT40 cells. Crystal structures of three inhibitors (compounds (−)-13c, 59, and 65) bound to a multidomain PARP-1 structure were obtained, providing insights into further development of these inhibitors. PMID:24922587

  1. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and the c-Myb-regulated DNA damage response pathway in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Likun; Chang, Wenjun; Yang, Guang; Ren, Chengzhen; Park, Sanghee; Karantanos, Theodoros; Karanika, Styliani; Wang, Jianxiang; Yin, Jianhua; Shah, Parantu K; Takahiro, Hirayama; Dobashi, Masato; Zhang, Wenling; Efstathiou, Eleni; Maity, Sankar N; Aparicio, Ana M; Li Ning Tapia, Elsa M; Troncoso, Patricia; Broom, Bradley; Xiao, Lianchun; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Ju-Seog; Corn, Paul G; Navone, Nora; Thompson, Timothy C

    2014-05-20

    Androgen deprivation is the standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most patients ultimately develop resistance and tumor recurrence. We found that MYB is transcriptionally activated by androgen deprivation therapy or genetic silencing of the androgen receptor (AR). MYB silencing inhibited PCa growth in culture and xenografts in mice. Microarray data revealed that c-Myb and AR shared a subset of target genes that encode DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, suggesting that c-Myb may supplant AR as the dominant regulator of their common DDR target genes in AR inhibition-resistant or AR-negative PCa. Gene signatures including AR, MYB, and their common DDR-associated target genes positively correlated with metastasis, castration resistance, tumor recurrence, and decreased survival in PCa patients. In culture and in xenograft-bearing mice, a combination strategy involving the knockdown of MYB, BRCA1, or TOPBP1 or the abrogation of cell cycle checkpoint arrest with AZD7762, an inhibitor of the checkpoint kinase Chk1, increased the cytotoxicity of the poly[adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib in PCa cells. Our results reveal new mechanism-based therapeutic approaches for PCa by targeting PARP and the DDR pathway involving c-Myb, TopBP1, ataxia telangiectasia mutated- and Rad3-related (ATR), and Chk1. PMID:24847116

  2. Common and unique genetic interactions of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases PARP1 and PARP2 with DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajib; Roy, Sanchita; Kamyab, Johan; Dantzer, Francoise; Franco, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    In mammalian cells, chromatin poly(ADP-ribos)ylation (PARylation) at sites of DNA Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs) is mediated by two highly related enzymes, PARP1 and PARP2. However, enzyme-specific genetic interactions with other DSB repair factors remain largely undefined. In this context, it was previously shown that mice lacking PARP1 and H2AX, a histone variant that promotes DSB repair throughout the cell cycle, or the core nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) factor Ku80 are not viable, while mice lacking PARP1 and the noncore NHEJ factor DNA-PKcs are severely growth retarded and markedly lymphoma-prone. Here, we have examined the requirement for PARP2 in these backgrounds. We find that, like PARP1, PARP2 is essential for viability in mice lacking H2AX. Moreover, treatment of H2AX-deficient primary fibroblasts or B lymphocytes with PARP inhibitors leads to activation of the G2/M checkpoint and accumulation of chromatid-type breaks in a lineage- and gene-dose dependent manner. In marked contrast to PARP1, loss of PARP2 does not result in additional phenotypes in growth, development or tumorigenesis in mice lacking either Ku80 or DNA-PKcs. Altogether these findings highlight specific nonoverlapping functions of PARP1 and PARP2 at H2AX-deficient chromatin during replicative phases of the cell cycle and uncover a unique requirement for PARP1 in NHEJ-deficient cells. PMID:27373144

  3. Poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in young and old cells: response to cellular stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy, R.W.; Sims, J.L.; Cini, J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the effect of several cellular stresses on poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in human fibroblasts of low passage number derived from young and old donors. Poly(ADP-ribose) was synthesized in response to alkylation of DNA caused by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroguanidine and by hyperthermic treatment at 43 /sup 0/C or 45 /sup 0/C. Ethanol is able to potentiate poly(ADP-ribose) accumulation following these treatments. There was little if any difference in the response of young and old cells to these stresses. Amino acid analogs are thought to induce a response in mammalian cells similar to that caused by hyperthermia and ethanol. However, amino acid analogs such as L-azetidine did not produce effects on poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism like those produced by ethanol or hyperthermia. The authors have also examined the poly(ADP-ribose) content of bovine eye lens. Each eye lens contains populations of young and old cells that are distributed in a fixed graduated manner. Thus, the eye lens allows the study of aging cells with identical genetic backgrounds without the complications of serial passage of young cultures in in vitro aging systems.

  4. Affinity-Based Assays for the Identification and Quantitative Evaluation of Noncovalent Poly(ADP-Ribose)-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Haince, Jean-François; Pic, Émilie; Poirier, Guy G.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases have been linked to several cellular functions, most of which being mediated through the dynamics of poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr). In several pathways, pADPr is the effector molecule that regulates cellular signaling and dictates biological outcomes. pAPDr is a central molecule that is capable of promoting both cell survival through the maintenance of genome integrity and cell death that occurs by way of a signal-mediated apoptotic-like process. Thus, interactions with pADPr are extremely important in bringing about the balanced regulation that controls cell fate. Further clues regarding these functions are emerging from a growing list of proteins with which pADPr interacts. Here, we describe the current approaches for investigating noncovalent protein interactions with pADPr. PMID:21870257

  5. Discovery and structure-activity relationships of modified salicylanilides as cell permeable inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG)

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Coyle, Donna L.; Damodaran, Komath; Beroza, Paul; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in response to DNA strand breaks, which involves the concerted activities of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), modulates cell recovery or cell death depending upon the level of DNA damage. While PARP inhibitors show high promise in clinical trials due to their low toxicity and selectivity for BRCA related cancers, evaluation of the therapeutic potential of PARG is limited by the lack of well-validated cell permeable inhibitors. In this study, Target-related Affinity Profiling (TRAP), an alternative to high-throughput screening, was used to identify a number of drug-like compounds from several chemical classes that demonstrated PARG inhibition in the low-micromolar range. A number of analogs of one of the most active chemotypes were synthesized to explore structure-activity relationship (SAR) for that series. This led to the discovery of a putative pharmacophore for PARG inhibition that contains a modified salicylanilide structure. Interestingly, these compounds also inhibit PARP-1, indicating strong homology in the active sites of PARG and PARP-1, and raising a new challenge for development of PARG specific inhibitors. The cellular activity of a lead inhibitor was demonstrated by the inhibition of both PARP and PARG activity in squamous cell carcinoma cells, although preferential inhibition of PARG relative to PARP was observed. The ability of inhibitors to modulate PAR metabolism via simultaneous effects on PARPs and PARG may represent a new approach for therapeutic development. PMID:21692479

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) binding to Chk1 at stalled replication forks is required for S-phase checkpoint activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wookee; Bruhn, Christopher; Grigaravicius, Paulius; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Li, Fu; Krüger, Anja; Siddeek, Bénazir; Greulich, Karl-Otto; Popp, Oliver; Meisezahl, Chris; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.; Bürkle, Alexander; Xu, Xingzhi; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2013-12-01

    Damaged replication forks activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), which catalyses poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) formation; however, how PARP1 or poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is involved in the S-phase checkpoint is unknown. Here we show that PAR, supplied by PARP1, interacts with Chk1 via a novel PAR-binding regulatory (PbR) motif in Chk1, independent of ATR and its activity. iPOND studies reveal that Chk1 associates readily with the unperturbed replication fork and that PAR is required for efficient retention of Chk1 and phosphorylated Chk1 at the fork. A PbR mutation, which disrupts PAR binding, but not the interaction with its partners Claspin or BRCA1, impairs Chk1 and the S-phase checkpoint activation, and mirrors Chk1 knockdown-induced hypersensitivity to fork poisoning. We find that long chains, but not short chains, of PAR stimulate Chk1 kinase activity. Collectively, we disclose a previously unrecognized mechanism of the S-phase checkpoint by PAR metabolism that modulates Chk1 activity at the replication fork.

  7. On PAR with PARP: cellular stress signaling through poly(ADP-ribose) and PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; Kraus, W. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress responses are mediated through a series of regulatory processes that occur at the genomic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels. These responses require a complex network of sensors and effectors from multiple signaling pathways, including the abundant and ubiquitous nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 functions at the center of cellular stress responses, where it processes diverse signals and, in response, directs cells to specific fates (e.g., DNA repair vs. cell death) based on the type and strength of the stress stimulus. Many of PARP-1's functions in stress response pathways are mediated by its regulated synthesis of PAR, a negatively charged polymer, using NAD+ as a donor of ADP-ribose units. Thus, PARP-1's functions are intimately tied to nuclear NAD+ metabolism and the broader metabolic profile of the cell. Recent studies in cell and animal models have highlighted the roles of PARP-1 and PAR in the response to a wide variety of extrinsic and intrinsic stress signals, including those initiated by oxidative, nitrosative, genotoxic, oncogenic, thermal, inflammatory, and metabolic stresses. These responses underlie pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation-related diseases, and metabolic dysregulation. The development of PARP inhibitors is being pursued as a therapeutic approach to these conditions. In this review, we highlight the newest findings about PARP-1's role in stress responses in the context of the historical data. PMID:22391446

  8. PJ34, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, reverses melphalan-resistance and inhibits repair of DNA double-strand breaks by targeting the FA/BRCA pathway in multidrug resistant multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226/R.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ting; Wei, Heng; Chen, Xiaoqiong; Xiao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    There is still no ideal treatment for multidrug resistant multiple myeloma, looking for drugs which can reverse chemotherapy resistance and enhance curative effects of chemotherapy drugs becomes a problem that needs to be solved urgently. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors appear to be an important tool for medical therapy of several malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the potential of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34, in vitro, to further enhance the efficacy of the traditional chemotherapy drug melphalan in the multidrug-resistant multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226/R. The effects of different concentrations of PJ34 and melphalan on cell proliferation were determined by the CCK-8 assay. The expressions of FA/BRCA pathway-related factors were detected by western blotting and RT-PCR. The percentage of cell apoptosis was measured with flow cytometry. DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair was quantified by γH2AX immunofluorescence. In addition, DNA damage repair at the level of the individual cell was determined by comet assay. Co-administration of PJ34 and melphalan had synergistic inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226/R cells, suggesting more powerful antitumor activities. The apoptosis percentage also was increased more obviously by the treatment of melphalan plus PJ34. The activation of FA/BRCA pathway was inhibited by downregulation of related factors including FANCD2, BRCA2 and Rad51. PJ34 significantly increased the ratio of γH2AX-positive cells and the number of foci/cells. The comet tail rate of cells, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment all increased after PJ34 treatment in RPMI8226/R cells. These results indicate that PJ34 combined treatment with melphalan produces synergistic effects and reverses multidrug resistance of RPMI8226/R cells effectively. PJ34 cannot induce DNA damage directly, but it may increase the DNA damage induced by melphalan through inhibiting DNA damage repair. The suppression of FA

  9. Drug repurposing screen identifies lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill breast cancer associated gene-1 mutant and wild type breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a devastating disease that results in approximately 40,000 deaths each year in the USA. Current drug screening and chemopreventatitive methods are suboptimal, due in part to the poor specificity of compounds for cancer cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor (PARPi)-mediated therapy is a promising approach for familial breast cancers caused by mutations of breast cancer-associated gene-1 and -2 (BRCA1/2), yet drug resistance frequently occurs during the treatment. Moreover, PARPis exhibit very little effect on cancers that are proficient for DNA repair and clinical efficacy for PARPis as single-agent therapies has yet to be illustrated. Methods Using a quantitative high-throughput screening approach, we screened a library containing 2,816 drugs, most of which are approved for human or animal use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or other countries, to identify compounds that sensitize breast cancer cells to PARPi. After initial screening, we performed further cellular and molecular analysis on lestaurtinib, which is an orally bioavailable multikinase inhibitor and has been used in clinical trials for myeloproliferative disorders and acute myelogenous leukemia. Results Our study indicated that lestaurtinib is highly potent against breast cancers as a mono-treatment agent. It also strongly enhanced the activity of the potent PARPi AG14361 on breast cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The inhibition of cancer growth is measured by increased apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation. Consistent with this, the treatment results in activation of caspase 3/7, and accumulation of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, irrespective of their BRCA1 status. Finally, we demonstrated that AG14361 inhibits NF-κB signaling, which is further enhanced by lestaurtinib treatment. Conclusions Lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the PARP1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill BRCA1 mutant and wild-type breast cancer

  10. Phase 2 multicentre trial investigating intermittent and continuous dosing schedules of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor rucaparib in germline BRCA mutation carriers with advanced ovarian and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Yvette; Ledermann, Jonathan; Hall, Geoff; Rea, Daniel; Glasspool, Ros; Highley, Martin; Jayson, Gordon; Sludden, Julieann; Murray, James; Jamieson, David; Halford, Sarah; Acton, Gary; Backholer, Zoe; Mangano, Raffaella; Boddy, Alan; Curtin, Nicola; Plummer, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rucaparib is an orally available potent selective small-molecule inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2. Rucaparib induces synthetic lethality in cancer cells defective in the homologous recombination repair pathway including BRCA-1/2. We investigated the efficacy and safety of single-agent rucaparib in germline (g) BRCA mutation carriers with advanced breast and ovarian cancers. Methods: Phase II, open-label, multicentre trial of rucaparib in proven BRCA-1/2 mutation carriers with advanced breast and or ovarian cancer, WHO PS 0–1 and normal organ function. Intravenous (i.v.) and subsequently oral rucaparib were assessed, using a range of dosing schedules, to determine the safety, tolerability, dose-limiting toxic effects and pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles. Results: Rucaparib was well tolerated in patients up to doses of 480 mg per day and is a potent inhibitor of PARP, with sustained inhibition ⩾24 h after single doses. The i.v. rucaparib (intermittent dosing schedule) resulted in an objective response rate (ORR) of only 2% but with 41% (18 out of 44) patients achieved stable disease for ⩾12 weeks and 3 patients maintaining disease stabilisation for >52 weeks. The ORR for oral rucaparib (across all six dose levels) was 15%. In the oral cohorts, 81% (22 out of 27) of the patients had ovarian cancer and 12 out of 13, who were dosed continuously, achieved RECIST complete response/partial response (CR/PR) or stable disease (SD) ⩾12 weeks, with a median duration of response of 179 days (range 84–567 days). Conclusions: Rucaparib is well tolerated and results in high levels of PARP inhibition in surrogate tissues even at the lowest dose levels. Rucaparib is active in gBRCA-mutant ovarian cancer and this activity correlates with platinum-free interval. The key lessons learned from this study is that continuous rucaparib dosing is required for optimal response, the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) for

  11. Visualization of poly(ADP-ribose) bound to PARG reveals inherent balance between exo- and endo-glycohydrolase activities

    PubMed Central

    Barkauskaite, Eva; Brassington, Amy; Tan, Edwin S.; Warwicker, Jim; Dunstan, Mark S.; Banos, Benito; Lafite, Pierre; Ahel, Marijan; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Ahel, Ivan; Leys, David

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that regulates processes involved in genome stability. Breakdown of the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer is catalysed by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), whose endo-glycohydrolase activity generates PAR fragments. Here we present the crystal structure of PARG incorporating the PAR substrate. The two terminal ADP-ribose units of the polymeric substrate are bound in exo-mode. Biochemical and modelling studies reveal that PARG acts predominantly as an exo-glycohydrolase. This preference is linked to Phe902 (human numbering), which is responsible for low-affinity binding of the substrate in endo-mode. Our data reveal the mechanism of poly-ADP-ribosylation reversal, with ADP-ribose as the dominant product, and suggest that the release of apoptotic PAR fragments occurs at unusual PAR/PARG ratios. PMID:23917065

  12. Host Cell Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Is Crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. PMID:23776710

  13. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  14. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W; Caldecott, Keith W

    2015-08-18

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  15. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG) Silencing Suppresses Benzo(a)pyrene Induced Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peiwu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Wei; Liu, Yinpin; Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitously distributed environmental pollutant and known carcinogen, which can induce malignant transformation in rodent and human cells. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), the primary enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), has been known to play an important role in regulating DNA damage repair and maintaining genomic stability. Although PARG has been shown to be a downstream effector of BaP, the role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we used the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cell line (shPARG) as a model to examine how PARG contributed to the carcinogenesis induced by chronic BaP exposure under various concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 40 μM). Our results showed that PARG silencing dramatically reduced DNA damages, chromosome abnormalities, and micronuclei formations in the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cells compared to the control cells (16HBE cells). Meanwhile, the wound healing assay showed that PARG silencing significantly inhibited BaP-induced cell migration. Furthermore, silencing of PARG significantly reduced the volume and weight of tumors in Balb/c nude mice injected with BaP induced transformed human bronchial epithelial cells. This was the first study that reported evidences to support an oncogenic role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis, which provided a new perspective for our understanding in BaP exposure induced cancer. PMID:27003318

  16. Two small enzyme isoforms mediate mammalian mitochondrial poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ralph G. . E-mail: meyerg@vet.upenn.edu; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Whatcott, Clifford J.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2007-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)glycohydrolase (PARG) is the major enzyme capable of rapidly hydrolyzing poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) formed by the diverse members of the PARP enzyme family. This study presents an alternative splice mechanism by which two novel PARG protein isoforms of 60 kDa and 55 kDa are expressed from the human PARG gene, termed hPARG60 and hPARG55, respectively. Homologous forms were found in the mouse (mPARG63 and mPARG58) supporting the hypothesis that expression of small PARG isoforms is conserved among mammals. A PARG protein of {approx} 60 kDa has been described for decades but with its genetic basis unknown, it was hypothesized to be a product of posttranslational cleavage of larger PARG isoforms. While this is not excluded entirely, isolation and expression of cDNA clones from different sources of RNA indicate that alternative splicing leads to expression of a catalytically active hPARG60 in multiple cell compartments. A second enzyme, hPARG55, that can be expressed through alternative translation initiation from hPARG60 transcripts is strictly targeted to the mitochondria. Functional studies of a mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) in PARG exon IV suggest that hPARG60 may be capable of shuttling between nucleus and mitochondria, which would be in line with a proposed function of PAR in genotoxic stress-dependent, nuclear-mitochondrial crosstalk.

  17. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG) Silencing Suppresses Benzo(a)pyrene Induced Cell Transformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Li, Xiyi; Zhu, Zhiliang; Huang, Peiwu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Wei; Liu, Yinpin; Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitously distributed environmental pollutant and known carcinogen, which can induce malignant transformation in rodent and human cells. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), the primary enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), has been known to play an important role in regulating DNA damage repair and maintaining genomic stability. Although PARG has been shown to be a downstream effector of BaP, the role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we used the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cell line (shPARG) as a model to examine how PARG contributed to the carcinogenesis induced by chronic BaP exposure under various concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 40 μM). Our results showed that PARG silencing dramatically reduced DNA damages, chromosome abnormalities, and micronuclei formations in the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cells compared to the control cells (16HBE cells). Meanwhile, the wound healing assay showed that PARG silencing significantly inhibited BaP-induced cell migration. Furthermore, silencing of PARG significantly reduced the volume and weight of tumors in Balb/c nude mice injected with BaP induced transformed human bronchial epithelial cells. This was the first study that reported evidences to support an oncogenic role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis, which provided a new perspective for our understanding in BaP exposure induced cancer. PMID:27003318

  18. Dual inhibitory effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase.

    PubMed

    Banasik, M; Ueda, K

    1999-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a solvent popularly used for dissolving water-insoluble compounds, is a weak inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, that is a nuclear enzyme producing (ADP-ribose)n from NAD+. The inhibitory mode and potency depend on the concentration of substrate, NAD+, as well as the temperature of the reaction; at micromolar concentrations of NAD+, the inhibition by DMSO is biphasic at 37 degrees C, but is monophasic and apparently competitive with NAD+ at 25 degrees C. DMSO, on the other hand, diminishes dose-dependently and markedly the inhibitory potency of benzamide and other inhibitors. Other organic solvents, ethanol and methanol, also show a biphasic effect on the synthetase activity at different concentrations. PMID:10445046

  19. A high-throughput screening-compatible homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay measuring the glycohydrolase activity of human poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Alexandra I J; James, Dominic I; Waddell, Ian D; Bennett, Neil; Truman, Caroline; Hardern, Ian M; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-06-15

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymers are transient post-translational modifications, and their formation is catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes. A number of PARP inhibitors are in advanced clinical development for BRCA-mutated breast cancer, and olaparib has recently been approved for BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer; however, there has already been evidence of developed resistance mechanisms. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the endo- and exo-glycosidic bonds within the PAR polymers. As an alternative strategy, PARG is a potentially attractive therapeutic target. There is only one PARG gene, compared with 17 known PARP family members, and therefore a PARG inhibitor may have wider application with fewer compensatory mechanisms. Prior to the initiation of this project, there were no known existing cell-permeable small molecule PARG inhibitors for use as tool compounds to assess these hypotheses and no suitable high-throughput screening (HTS)-compatible biochemical assays available to identify start points for a drug discovery project. The development of this newly described high-throughput homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) assay has allowed HTS to proceed and, from this, the identification and advancement of multiple validated series of tool compounds for PARG inhibition. PMID:27036617

  20. Readers of poly(ADP-ribose): designed to be fit for purpose

    PubMed Central

    Teloni, Federico; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate many aspects of protein function and are indispensable for the spatio-temporal regulation of cellular processes. The proteome-wide identification of PTM targets has made significant progress in recent years, as has the characterization of their writers, readers, modifiers and erasers. One of the most elusive PTMs is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a nucleic acid-like PTM involved in chromatin dynamics, genome stability maintenance, transcription, cell metabolism and development. In this article, we provide an overview on our current understanding of the writers of this modification and their targets, as well as the enzymes that degrade and thereby modify and erase poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Since many cellular functions of PARylation are exerted through dynamic interactions of PAR-binding proteins with PAR, we discuss the readers of this modification and provide a synthesis of recent findings, which suggest that multiple structurally highly diverse reader modules, ranging from completely folded PAR-binding domains to intrinsically disordered sequence stretches, evolved as PAR effectors to carry out specific cellular functions. PMID:26673700

  1. Bioorthogonally Functionalized NAD(+) Analogues for In-Cell Visualization of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Formation.

    PubMed

    Wallrodt, Sarah; Buntz, Annette; Wang, Yan; Zumbusch, Andreas; Marx, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    Poly(ADP-ribos)ylation (PARylation) is a major posttranslational modification and signaling event in most eukaryotes. Fundamental processes like DNA repair and transcription are coordinated by this transient polymer and its binding to proteins. ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) build complex ADP-ribose chains from NAD(+) onto various acceptor proteins. Molecular studies of PARylation thus remain challenging. Herein, we present the development of bioorthogonally functionalized NAD(+) analogues for the imaging of PARylation in vitro and in cells. Our results show that 2-modified NAD(+) analogues perform remarkably well and can be applied to the in-cell visualization of PARylation simultaneously in two colors. This tool gives insight into the substrate scope of ARTs and will help to further elucidate the biological role of PARylation by offering fast optical, multichannel read-outs. PMID:27080423

  2. Liquid demixing of intrinsically disordered proteins is seeded by poly(ADP-ribose)

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Neelsen, Kai J.; Teloni, Federico; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Pellegrino, Stefania; Grøfte, Merete; Rask, Maj-Britt Druedahl; Streicher, Werner; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Nielsen, Michael Lund; Lukas, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can phase separate from the soluble intracellular space, and tend to aggregate under pathological conditions. The physiological functions and molecular triggers of liquid demixing by phase separation are not well understood. Here we show in vitro and in vivo that the nucleic acid-mimicking biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) nucleates intracellular liquid demixing. PAR levels are markedly induced at sites of DNA damage, and we provide evidence that PAR-seeded liquid demixing results in rapid, yet transient and fully reversible assembly of various intrinsically disordered proteins at DNA break sites. Demixing, which relies on electrostatic interactions between positively charged RGG repeats and negatively charged PAR, is amplified by aggregation-prone prion-like domains, and orchestrates the earliest cellular responses to DNA breakage. We propose that PAR-seeded liquid demixing is a general mechanism to dynamically reorganize the soluble nuclear space with implications for pathological protein aggregation caused by derailed phase separation. PMID:26286827

  3. Poly(ADP-ribose)-synthesis and excision repair in light sensitive skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Horkay, I; Topaloglou, A; Teherani, D K; Kósa, A; Altmann, H

    1990-01-01

    Several data suggest a relationship of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) synthesis to DNA repair and the influence of some trace elements on the semiconservative and unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). Previously we found certain alterations in the UV-light induced UDS and in the contents of trace elements in the lymphocytes of patients with light sensitive skin disorders. In the recent study in polymorphic light eruption, cutaneous porphyrias and xeroderma pigmentosum the PAR synthesis and zinc, copper and manganese contents in the chromatin of the lymphocytes (measured by neutron activation analysis) were investigated. UV induced PAR synthesis was generally lower in the cells of polymorphic light eruption and especially in xeroderma pigmentosum with a reduced repair capacity whereas in cutaneous porphyrias no difference was observed. Some correlations occurred between the contents of trace elements studied and UDS as well in each group tested. It seems that PAR investigations throw new light upon our understanding of the pathomechanism of photodermatoses. PMID:2094134

  4. Structures of the Human Poly (ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Catalytic Domain Confirm Catalytic Mechanism and Explain Inhibition by ADP-HPD Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Julie A.; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T.; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:23251397

  5. A specific isoform of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by a N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Whatcott, Clifford J.; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2009-12-10

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) convert NAD to polymers of ADP-ribose that are converted to free ADP-ribose by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The activation of the nuclear enzyme PARP-1 following genotoxic stress has been linked to release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria, but the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted between nuclear and mitochondrial compartments are not well understood. The study reported here has examined the relationship between PARG and mitochondria in HeLa cells. Endogenous PARG associated with the mitochondrial fraction migrated in the range of 60 kDa. Transient transfection of cells with PARG expression constructs with amino acids encoded by exon 4 at the N-terminus was targeted to the mitochondria as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy of whole cells. Deletion and missense mutants allowed identification of a canonical N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence consisting of the first 16 amino acids encoded by PARG exon 4. Sub-mitochondrial localization experiments indicate that this mitochondrial PARG isoform is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. The identification of a PARG isoform as a component of the mitochondrial matrix raises several interesting possibilities concerning mechanisms of nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk involved in regulation of cell death pathways.

  6. The PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes poly(ADP-ribose) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Shi, Jiazhong; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-12-15

    Following DNA double-strand breaks, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is quickly and heavily synthesized to mediate fast and early recruitment of a number of DNA damage response factors to the sites of DNA lesions and facilitates DNA damage repair. Here, we found that EXO1, an exonuclease for DNA damage repair, is quickly recruited to the sites of DNA damage via PAR-binding. With further dissection of the functional domains of EXO1, we report that the PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes PAR both in vitro and in vivo and the interaction between the PIN domain and PAR is sufficient for the recruitment. We also found that the R93G variant of EXO1, generated by a single nucleotide polymorphism, abolishes the interaction and the early recruitment. Moreover, our study suggests that the PAR-mediated fast recruitment of EXO1 facilities early DNA end resection, the first step of homologous recombination repair. We observed that other PIN domains could also recognize DNA damage-induced PAR. Taken together, our study demonstrates a novel class of PAR-binding module that plays an important role in DNA damage response. PMID:26400172

  7. Interplay between Ubiquitin, SUMO, and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in the Cellular Response to Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Stefania; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cells employ a complex network of molecular pathways to cope with endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress. This multilayered response ensures that genomic lesions are efficiently detected and faithfully repaired in order to safeguard genome integrity. The molecular choreography at sites of DNA damage relies heavily on post-translational modifications (PTMs). Protein modifications with ubiquitin and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO have recently emerged as important regulatory means to coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair. Both ubiquitylation and SUMOylation can lead to extensive chain-like protein modifications, a feature that is shared with yet another DNA damage-induced PTM, the modification of proteins with poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Chains of ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR all contribute to the multi-protein assemblies found at sites of DNA damage and regulate their spatio-temporal dynamics. Here, we review recent advancements in our understanding of how ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR coordinate the DNA damage response and highlight emerging examples of an intricate interplay between these chain-like modifications during the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27148359

  8. The PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes poly(ADP-ribose) in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Shi, Jiazhong; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Following DNA double-strand breaks, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is quickly and heavily synthesized to mediate fast and early recruitment of a number of DNA damage response factors to the sites of DNA lesions and facilitates DNA damage repair. Here, we found that EXO1, an exonuclease for DNA damage repair, is quickly recruited to the sites of DNA damage via PAR-binding. With further dissection of the functional domains of EXO1, we report that the PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes PAR both in vitro and in vivo and the interaction between the PIN domain and PAR is sufficient for the recruitment. We also found that the R93G variant of EXO1, generated by a single nucleotide polymorphism, abolishes the interaction and the early recruitment. Moreover, our study suggests that the PAR-mediated fast recruitment of EXO1 facilities early DNA end resection, the first step of homologous recombination repair. We observed that other PIN domains could also recognize DNA damage-induced PAR. Taken together, our study demonstrates a novel class of PAR-binding module that plays an important role in DNA damage response. PMID:26400172

  9. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in the regulation of nuclear functions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amours, D; Desnoyers, S; D'Silva, I; Poirier, G G

    1999-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins. During this process, molecules of ADP-ribose are added successively on to acceptor proteins to form branched polymers. This modification is transient but very extensive in vivo, as polymer chains can reach more than 200 units on protein acceptors. The existence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer was first reported nearly 40 years ago. Since then, the importance of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been established in many cellular processes. However, a clear and unified picture of the physiological role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation still remains to be established. The total dependence of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis on DNA strand breaks strongly suggests that this post-translational modification is involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids. This view is also supported by the identification of direct protein-protein interactions involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (113 kDa PARP), an enzyme catalysing the formation of poly(ADP-ribose), and key effectors of DNA repair, replication and transcription reactions. The presence of PARP in these multiprotein complexes, in addition to the actual poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of some components of these complexes, clearly supports an important role for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in DNA transactions. Accordingly, inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by any of several approaches and the analysis of PARP-deficient cells has revealed that the absence of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation strongly affects DNA metabolism, most notably DNA repair. The recent identification of new poly(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzymes with distinct (non-standard) structures in eukaryotes and archaea has revealed a novel level of complexity in the regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:10455009

  10. Iduna protects the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity and stroke by interfering with poly(ADP-ribose) polymer-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Shaida A; Kang, Ho Chul; Haince, Jean-François; Lee, Yun-Il; Zhang, Jian; Chi, Zhikai; West, Andrew B; Koehler, Raymond C; Poirier, Guy G; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2011-06-01

    Glutamate acting on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors induces neuronal injury following stroke, through activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and generation of the death molecule poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer. Here we identify Iduna, a previously undescribed NMDA receptor-induced survival protein that is neuroprotective against glutamate NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo and against stroke through interfering with PAR polymer-induced cell death (parthanatos). Iduna's protective effects are independent and downstream of PARP-1 activity. Iduna is a PAR polymer-binding protein, and mutation at the PAR polymer binding site abolishes the PAR binding activity of Iduna and attenuates its protective actions. Iduna is protective in vivo against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity and middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced stroke in mice. To our knowledge, these results define Iduna as the first known endogenous inhibitor of parthanatos. Interfering with PAR polymer signaling could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurologic disorders. PMID:21602803

  11. Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Nakadate, Yusuke; Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka; Tachibana, Taro; Tamura, Tomohide; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Radiosensitization by PARG silencing was observed in multiple lung cancer cells. •PAR accumulation was enhanced by PARG silencing after DNA damage. •Radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation were impaired by PARG siRNA. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy.

  12. Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Yusuke; Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka; Tachibana, Taro; Tamura, Tomohide; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2013-11-29

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:24211580

  13. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori; Yano, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a new and unique means for life sciences. •Apoptosis was induced by nsPEF exposure in Jurkat cells. •No signs of apoptosis were detected in HeLa S3 cells exposed to nsPEFs. •Formation of poly(ADP-ribose) was induced in nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells. •Two distinct modes of cell death were activated by nsPEF in a cell-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs.

  14. Effect of mild temperature shift on poly(ADP-ribose) and γH2AX levels in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Sachiko; Tanaka, Masakazu; Sato, Teruaki; Ida, Chieri; Ohta, Narumi; Hamada, Takashi; Uetsuki, Taichi; Nishi, Yoshisuke; Moss, Joel; Miwa, Masanao

    2016-08-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) is rapidly synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs) upon activation by DNA single- and double-strand breaks. In this study, we examined the quantitative amount of PAR in HeLa cells cultured within the physiological temperatures below 41 °C for verification of the effect of shifting-up or -down the temperature from 37.0 °C on the DNA breaks, whether the temperature-shift caused breaks that could be monitored by the level of PAR. While PAR level did not change significantly when HeLa cells were cultured at 33.5 °C or 37.0 °C, it was significantly increased 2- and 3-fold when cells were cultured for 12 h and 24 h, respectively, at 40.5 °C as compared to 37.0 °C. Similar to the results with HeLa cells, PAR level was increased 2-fold in CHO-K1 cells cultured at 40.5 °C for 24 h as compared to 37.0 °C. As the cellular levels of PAR polymerase1 (PARP1) and PAR glycohydrolase (PARG), a major degradation enzyme for PAR, did not seem to change significantly, this increase could be caused by activation of PARP1 by DNA strand breaks. In fact, γH2AX, claimed to be a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, was found in cell extracts of HeLa cells and CHO-K1 cells at elevated temperature vs. 37.0 °C, and these γH2AX signals were intensified in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide, a PARP inhibitor. The γH2AX immunohistochemistry results in HeLa cells were consistent with Western blot analyses. In HeLa cells, proliferation was significantly suppressed at 40.5 °C in 72 h-continuous cultures and decreased viabilities were also observed after 24-72 h at 40.5 °C. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the HeLa cells were arrested at G2/M after temperature shift-up to 40.5 °C. These physiological changes were potentiated in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide. Decrease in growth rates, increased cytotoxicity and G2/M arrest, were associated with the temperature-shift to 40.5 °C and are indirect evidence of DNA breaks. In addition to γH2AX

  15. Identification of three critical acidic residues of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase involved in catalysis: determining the PARG catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chandra N.; Koh, David W.; Jacobson, Myron K.; Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2005-01-01

    PARG [poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase] catalyses the hydrolysis of α(1″→2′) or α(1‴→2″) O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers to produce free ADP-ribose. We investigated possible mechanistic similarities between PARG and glycosidases, which also cleave O-glycosidic linkages. Glycosidases typically utilize two acidic residues for catalysis, thus we targeted acidic residues within a conserved region of bovine PARG that has been shown to contain an inhibitor-binding site. The targeted glutamate and aspartate residues were changed to asparagine in order to minimize structural alterations. Mutants were purified and assayed for catalytic activity, as well as binding, to an immobilized PARG inhibitor to determine ability to recognize substrate. Our investigation revealed residues essential for PARG catalytic activity. Two adjacent glutamic acid residues are found in the conserved sequence Gln755-Glu-Glu757, and a third residue found in the conserved sequence Val737-Asp-Phe-Ala-Asn741. Our functional characterization of PARG residues, along with recent identification of an inhibitor-binding residue Tyr796 and a glycine-rich region Gly745-Gly-Gly747 important for PARG function, allowed us to define a PARG ‘signature sequence’ [vDFA-X3-GGg-X6–8-vQEEIRF-X3-PE-X14-E-X12-YTGYa], which we used to identify putative PARG sequences across a range of organisms. Sequence alignments, along with our mapping of PARG functional residues, suggest the presence of a conserved catalytic domain of approx. 185 residues which spans residues 610–795 in bovine PARG. PMID:15658938

  16. Benadrostin, new inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, produced by actinomycetes. I. Taxonomy, production, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Yoshida, S; Harada, S; Okuyama, A; Nakayama, C; Yoshida, T; Hamada, M; Takeuchi, T; Umezawa, H

    1988-08-01

    Benadrostin, a new inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was discovered in the fermentation broth of Streptomyces flavovirens MH499-O'F1. It was purified by chromatography followed by solvent extraction and then isolated as colorless prisms. Benadrostin has the molecular formula of C8H5NO4. It was competitive with the substrate, and the inhibition constant (Ki) was 34 microM. PMID:3139601

  17. Approche morphologique de la fragmentation de l'ADN radio-induite par immunomarquage anti-poly (ADP-ribose) polymérase (PARP) : étude de cultures d'oligodendrogliomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlet, P.; Beuvon, F.; Cervera, P.; Averbeck, D.; Daumas-Duport, C.

    1998-04-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a nuclear enzyme encompassing two zinc finger motifs which specifically binds to radiation induced DNA strand breaks. We develop a new immuno-labelling of poly ADP-ribose which coupled together with the immunodetection of cells in cycle with MIB1, permits to detect and quantify the DNA fragmentation induced by radiations (Cesium137). This method, applied to organotypical cultures of human oligodendroglioma, submitted to radiation, a dose dependant nuclear signal. This one increased significantly in the presence of a radiosensitizer like iododeoxyuridine (IUDR 5 g/ml). This poly ADP-ribose immunodetection can be useful, to detect furtherly the individual radiosensitivity of human glioma. Les protéases “ICE-like" ou caspases, sont les homologues humaines du produit du gène ced-3 du ver Caenorhabditis elegans et sont activées lors des étapes précoces de l'apoptose. L'objectif de ce travail vise à déterminer dans quelle mesure l'inhibition de l'une d'entre elles, la caspase-3 est susceptible de modifier la sensibilité des cellules vis-à-vis de l'apoptose radioinduite. Des lymphocytes spléniques murins irradiés en présence de Ac-DVED-CHO un inhibiteur spécifique de la caspase-3 présentent un taux de particules hypodiploïdes radioinduites bien inférieur à celui des contrôles et une diminution drastique de la fragmentation internucléosomale de l'ADN. Toutefois, ni l'externalisation des phospholipides anioniques, autre marqueur spécifique de l'apoptose, ni la viabilité ne sont affectées.

  18. Molecular biology basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to dna damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Final report, 30 April 1990-30 July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1994-08-30

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments whose intent has been to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) in cultured keratinocytes. During this study, human keratinocyte lines were stably transfected with the cDNA for human PADPRP in the antisense orientation under an inducible promoter. Induction of this antisense RNA by dexamethasone in cultured cells selectively lowered levels of PADPRP in RNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Induction of antisense RNA led to a reduction in the levels of PADPRP in individual cell nuclei, as well as the loss of the ability of cells to synthesize and modify proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer in response to an alkylating agent. When keratinocyte clones containing the antisense construct or empty vector alone were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. The PADPRP antisense construct was also inducible in vivo by the topical application of dexamethasone to the reconstituted epidermis. In addition, poly(ADP-ribose) polymer could be induced and detected in vivo following the topical application of a sulfur mustard to the grafted transfected skin layers. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PADPRP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in cell culture, and potentially in reconstituted epidermis as well.

  19. Ring finger protein 146/Iduna is a Poly (ADP-ribose) polymer binding and PARsylation dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-dong; Chan, Christine Hui-shan; Xiao, Zhi-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that Ring finger protein 146 (RNF146), also called Iduna, have neuroprotective property due to its inhibition of Parthanatos via binding with Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The Parthanatos is a PAR dependent cell death that has been implicated in many human diseases. RNF146/Iduna acts as a PARsylation-directed E3 ubquitin ligase to mediate tankyrase-dependent degradation of axin, thereby positively regulates Wnt signaling. RNF146/Iduna can also facilitate DNA repair and protect against cell death induced by DNA damaging agents or γ-irradiation. It can translocate to the nucleus after cellular injury and promote the ubiquitination and degradation of various nuclear proteins involved in DNA damage repair. The PARsylation-directed ubquitination mediated by RNF146/Iduna is analogous to the phosphorylation-directed ubquitination catalyzed by Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin complex. RNF146/Iduna has been found to be implicated in neurodegenerative disease and cancer development. Therefore modulation of the PAR-binding and PARsylation dependent E3 ligase activity of RNF146/Iduna could have therapeutic significance for diseases, in which PAR and PAR-binding proteins play key pathophysiologic roles. PMID:22274711

  20. Mono-galloyl glucose derivatives are potent poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitors and partially reduce PARP-1-dependent cell death

    PubMed Central

    Formentini, L; Arapistas, P; Pittelli, M; Jacomelli, M; Pitozzi, V; Menichetti, S; Romani, A; Giovannelli, L; Moroni, F; Chiarugi, A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Maintenance of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymers at homoeostatic levels by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG) is central in cell functioning and survival. Yet the pharmacological relevance of PARG inhibitors is still debated. Gallotannin, a complex mixture of hydrolysable tannins from oak gall, inhibits PARG but which of its constituents is responsible for the inhibition and whether the pharmacodynamic properties are due to its antioxidant properties, has not yet been established. Experimental approach: A structure–activity relationship study was conducted on different natural and synthetic tannins/galloyl derivatives as potential PARG inhibitors, using a novel in vitro enzymic assay. Cytotoxicity was assayed in cultured HeLa cells. Key results: Mono-galloyl glucose compounds were potent inhibitors of PARG, with activities similar to that of ADP-(hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol, the most potent PARG inhibitor yet identified. When tested on HeLa cells exposed to the PAR polymerase (PARP)-1-activating compound 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), 3-galloyl glucose weakly inhibited PAR degradation. Conversely, the more lipophilic, 3-galloyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene glucose, despite being inactive on the pure enzyme, efficiently prolonged the half-life of the polymers in intact HeLa cells. Also, PARG inhibitors, but not radical scavengers, reduced, in part, cell death caused by MNNG. Conclusions and implications: Taken together, our findings identify mono-galloyl glucose derivatives as potent PARG inhibitors, and emphasize the active function of this enzyme in cell death. PMID:18806807

  1. Protein Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Regulates Arabidopsis Immune Gene Expression and Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V. V.; Intorne, Aline C.; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A.; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks. PMID:25569773

  2. Peroxynitrite-induced thymocyte apoptosis: the role of caspases and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) activation.

    PubMed Central

    Virág, L; Scott, G S; Cuzzocrea, S; Marmer, D; Salzman, A L; Szabó, C

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms by which immature thymocyte apoptosis is induced during negative selection are poorly defined. Reports demonstrated that cross-linking of T-cell receptor leads to stromal cell activation, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, subsequently, to thymocyte apoptosis. Therefore we examined, whether NO directly or indirectly, through peroxynitrite formation, causes thymocyte apoptosis. Immuno-histochemical detection of nitrotyrosine revealed in vivo peroxynitrite formation in the thymi of naive mice. Nitrotyrosine, the footprint of peroxynitrite, was predominantly found in the corticomedullary junction and the medulla of naive mice. In the thymi of mice deficient in the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase, considerably less nitrotyrosine was found. Exposure of thymocytes in vitro to low concentrations (10 microM) of peroxynitrite led to apoptosis, whereas higher concentrations (50 microM) resulted in intense cell death with the characteristics of necrosis. We also investigated the effect of poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) inhibition on thymocyte apoptosis. Using the PARS inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), or thymocytes from PARS-deficient animals, we established that PARS determines the fate of thymocyte death. Suppression of cellular ATP levels, and the cellular necrosis in response to peroxynitrite were prevented by PARS inhibition. Therefore, in the absence of PARS, cells are diverted towards the pathway of apoptotic cell death. Similar results were obtained with H2O2 treatment, while apoptosis induced by non-oxidative stimuli such as dexamethasone or anti-FAS antibody was unaffected by PARS inhibition. In conclusion, we propose that peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis may play a role in the process of thymocyte negative selection. Furthermore, we propose that the physiological role of PARS cleavage by apopain during apoptosis may serve as an energy-conserving step, enabling the cell to complete the process of apoptosis

  3. Molecular biological basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to DNA damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Midterm report

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1996-07-01

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), in cultured keratinocytes. This enzyme modifies a variety of nuclear proteins utilizing NAD. DNA is required for the catalytic activity of the enzyme and the activity is dependent upon the presence of strand breaks in this DNA. It has been hypothesized that human skin exposed to mustards may develop blisters due to a generalized lowering of NAD in exposed skin cells. During the contract period, we have established a stably transfected human keratinocyte cell line which expresses antisense transcripts to PARP mRNA when these keratinocyte were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PARP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in reconstituted epidermis as well. We also showed that PARP was proteolytically cleaved at the onset of spontaneous apoptosis following proteolytic conversion of CPP32b to its active form, termed `apopain`. Having characterized the events associated with apoptosis, we determined, during the last period, whether any or all of these features could be observed following exposure of keratinocytes to SM.

  4. Studies on protein poly(ADP-ribosylation) using high resolution gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Boulikas, T

    1990-08-25

    Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cellular lysates or in isolated nuclei on 100-cm-long thin gels of 20% polyacrylamide, 2.5 M urea permits determination of the exact size of poly(ADP-ribose) molecules using labeled oligonucleotides as molecular weight markers. The size and concentration of poly(ADP-ribose) molecules increase at time intervals during its synthesis. Differences in the concentration of poly(ADP-ribose) size classes among cell lines are also shown. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) degradation by ethacridine that directly interacts with the polymer and inhibits its hydrolysis by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase shows a dramatic increase in both polymer size and concentration. Use of alkaline conditions for the hydrolysis of poly(ADP-ribose)-protein linkages reveals a specific shortening of all size classes of poly(ADP-ribose) compared with its size in preparations obtained by extensive digestion of nuclei with nucleases, RNases, and proteases. PMID:2167322

  5. Fragmentation radioinduite de l'ADN et réparation étudiée par immunomarquage anti poly(ADP-ribose)polymérase (PARP) dans les cellules de hamster chinois (CHO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidon, N.; Varlet, P.; Noël, G.; Demurcia, G.; Salamero, J.; Averbeck, D.

    1998-04-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase is a nuclear ubiquitous enzyme capable of binding to DNA breaks. Chinese hamster ovary cells were (CHO-K1) cultured on slides and γ-irradiated (137Cs) at a high (12.8 Gy/min) or medium dose rate (5 Gy/min), and immunolabelling against (ADP-ribose) polymers immediatly or three hours after irradiation. Quantification and localisation of γ-ray induced breaks was performed by confocal microscopy. The results show a dose effect relationship, a dose-rate effect and the signal disappearence after 3 hours at 37 °C. The presence of PARP activity appears to reflect γ-rays induced DNA fragmentation. Le poly(ADP-ribose)polymérase est une enzyme nucléaire ubiquitaire capable de se fixer sur les cassures de l'ADN. Sur une lignée sauvage de cellules d'ovaire de hamster chinois (CHO-K1) cultivée sur lame et irradiée aux rayons γ à haut débit de dose (HD) 12,8 Gy/min ou à moyen débit de dose (MD) 5 Gy/min, nous avons réalisé un immunomarquage anti-polymères d'ADP-ribose immédiatement après l'irradiation γ ou après trois heures d'incubation à 37 °C. La quantification et la localisation des lésions radioinduites ont été réalisées par microscopie confocale. Les résultats montrent une relation dose-effet et un effet de débit de dose, ainsi qu'une disparition du signal après 3 heures à 37 °C. La présence de la PARP semble donc bien refléter la fragmentation radioinduite de l'ADN.

  6. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Beneke, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose), the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor. PMID:22969794

  7. TFIIF, a basal eukaryotic transcription factor, is a substrate for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed Central

    Rawling, J M; Alvarez-Gonzalez, R

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the susceptibility of some of the basal eukaryotic transcription factors as covalent targets for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Human recombinant TATA-binding protein, transcription factor (TF)IIB and TFIIF (made up of the 30 and 74 kDa RNA polymerase II-associated proteins RAP30 and RAP74) were incubated with calf thymus poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and [32P]NAD+ at 37 degrees C. On lithium dodecyl sulphate/PAGE and autoradiography, two bands of radioactivity, coincident with RAP30 and RAP74, were observed. No radioactivity co-migrated with TATA-binding protein or TFIIB. The phenomenon was dependent on the presence of nicked DNA, which is essential for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. Covalent modification of TFIIF increased with time of incubation, with increasing TFIIF concentration and with increasing NAD+ concentration. High-resolution PAGE confirmed that the radioactive species associated with RAP30 and RAP74 were ADP-ribose polymers. From these observations, we conclude that both TFIIF subunits are highly specific substrates for covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. PMID:9164864

  8. Ibrutinib synergizes with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors to induce cell death in AML cells via a BTK-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rotin, Lianne E.; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Hurren, Rose; Wang, XiaoMing; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Wrana, Jeff; Datti, Alessandro; Barber, Dwayne L.; Minden, Mark D.; Slassi, Malik; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with the small molecule BTK inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly improved patient outcomes in several B-cell malignancies, with minimal toxicity. Given the reported expression and constitutive activation of BTK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, there has been recent interest in investigating the anti-AML activity of ibrutinib. We noted that ibrutinib had limited single-agent toxicity in a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML samples, and therefore sought to identify ibrutinib-sensitizing drugs. Using a high-throughput combination chemical screen, we identified that the poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitor ethacridine lactate synergized with ibrutinib in TEX and OCI-AML2 leukemia cell lines. The combination of ibrutinib and ethacridine induced a synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species that was functionally important to explain the observed cell death. Interestingly, synergistic cytotoxicity of ibrutinib and ethacridine was independent of the inhibitory effect of ibrutinib against BTK, as knockdown of BTK did not sensitize TEX and OCI-AML2 cells to ethacridine treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that ibrutinib may have a BTK-independent role in AML and that PARG inhibitors may have utility as part of a combination therapy for this disease. PMID:26624983

  9. Ibrutinib synergizes with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors to induce cell death in AML cells via a BTK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rotin, Lianne E; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Hurren, Rose; Wang, XiaoMing; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Wrana, Jeff; Datti, Alessandro; Barber, Dwayne L; Minden, Mark D; Slassi, Malik; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2016-01-19

    Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with the small molecule BTK inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly improved patient outcomes in several B-cell malignancies, with minimal toxicity. Given the reported expression and constitutive activation of BTK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, there has been recent interest in investigating the anti-AML activity of ibrutinib. We noted that ibrutinib had limited single-agent toxicity in a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML samples, and therefore sought to identify ibrutinib-sensitizing drugs. Using a high-throughput combination chemical screen, we identified that the poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitor ethacridine lactate synergized with ibrutinib in TEX and OCI-AML2 leukemia cell lines. The combination of ibrutinib and ethacridine induced a synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species that was functionally important to explain the observed cell death. Interestingly, synergistic cytotoxicity of ibrutinib and ethacridine was independent of the inhibitory effect of ibrutinib against BTK, as knockdown of BTK did not sensitize TEX and OCI-AML2 cells to ethacridine treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that ibrutinib may have a BTK-independent role in AML and that PARG inhibitors may have utility as part of a combination therapy for this disease. PMID:26624983

  10. Effect of genetic disruption of poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase on delayed production of inflammatory mediators and delayed necrosis during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Zingarelli, B; Szabó, C

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear enzyme poly (ADP ribose) synthetase (PARS) has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various forms of ischemia or reperfusion injury and circulatory shock. Recent studies demonstrated that inhibition or genetic inactivation of PARS is beneficial in the early phase of myocardial reperfusion injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether inactivation of PARS influences the delayed myocardial necrosis and the production of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), and the free radical nitric oxide in the late stage of myocardial reperfusion injury. The results demonstrate that genetic disruption of PARS provides marked protection against the delayed myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. In addition, in the absence of functional PARS, a suppression of TNFalpha, IL-10, and nitric oxide production was found. These findings provide direct evidence that PARS activation participates in the development of delayed cell injury and delayed mediator production in myocardial reperfusion injury. PMID:10638671

  11. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Affects Histone Acetylation and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Verdone, Loredana; La Fortezza, Marco; Ciccarone, Fabio; Caiafa, Paola; Zampieri, Michele; Caserta, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a posttranslational protein modification catalyzed by members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme family. PARylation regulates a wide variety of biological processes in most eukaryotic cells including energy metabolism and cell death, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and transcription. Inside the nucleus, cross-talk between PARylation and other epigenetic modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, was already described. In the present work, using PJ34 or ABT888 to inhibit PARP activity or over-expressing poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), we show decrease of global histone H3 and H4 acetylation. This effect is accompanied by a reduction of the steady state mRNA level of p300, Pcaf, and Tnfα, but not of Dnmt1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses, performed at the level of the Transcription Start Site (TSS) of these four genes, reveal that changes in histone acetylation are specific for each promoter. Finally, we demonstrate an increase of global deacetylase activity in nuclear extracts from cells treated with PJ34, whereas global acetyltransferase activity is not affected, suggesting a role for PARP in the inhibition of histone deacetylases. Taken together, these results show an important link between PARylation and histone acetylation regulated transcription. PMID:26636673

  12. Oxidant injury of cells. DNA strand-breaks activate polyadenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase and lead to depletion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstatter, I U; Hinshaw, D B; Hyslop, P A; Spragg, R G; Cochrane, C G

    1986-01-01

    To determine the biochemical basis of the oxidant-induced injury of cells, we have studied early changes after exposure of P388D1 murine macrophages to hydrogen peroxide. Total intracellular NAD+ levels in P388D1 cells decreased with H2O2 concentrations of 40 microM or higher. Doses of H2O2 between 0.1 and 2.5 mM led to an 80% depletion of NAD within 20 min. With doses of H2O2 of 250 microM or lower, the fall in NAD and, as shown previously, ATP, was reversible. Higher doses of H2O2 that cause ultimate lysis of the cells, induced an irreversible depletion of NAD and ATP. Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, a nuclear enzyme associated with DNA damage and repair, which catalyzes conversion of NAD to nicotinamide and protein-bound poly-ADP-ribose, was activated by exposure of the cells to concentrations of 40 microM H2O2 or higher. Activation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase was also observed in peripheral lymphocytes incubated in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Examination of the possibility that DNA alteration was involved was performed by measurement of thymidine incorporation and determination of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in cells exposed to H2O2. H2O2 at 40 microM or higher inhibited DNA synthesis, and induced SSB within less than 30 s. These results suggest that DNA damage induced within seconds after addition of oxidant may lead to stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, and a consequent fall in NAD. Excessive stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase leads to a fall in NAD sufficient to interfere with ATP synthesis. PMID:2937805

  13. Phosphoproteomic Approach to Characterize Protein Mono- and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Sites from Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), or PAR, is a cellular polymer implicated in DNA/RNA metabolism, cell death, and cellular stress response via its role as a post-translational modification, signaling molecule, and scaffolding element. PAR is synthesized by a family of proteins known as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, or PARPs, which attach PAR polymers to various amino acids of substrate proteins. The nature of these polymers (large, charged, heterogeneous, base-labile) has made these attachment sites difficult to study by mass spectrometry. Here we propose a new pipeline that allows for the identification of mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation sites via the enzymatic product of phosphodiesterase-treated ADP-ribose, or phospho(ribose). The power of this method lies in the enrichment potential of phospho(ribose), which we show to be enriched by phosphoproteomic techniques when a neutral buffer, which allows for retention of the base-labile attachment site, is used for elution. Through the identification of PARP-1 in vitro automodification sites as well as endogenous ADP-ribosylation sites from whole cells, we have shown that ADP-ribose can exist on adjacent amino acid residues as well as both lysine and arginine in addition to known acidic modification sites. The universality of this technique has allowed us to show that enrichment of ADP-ribosylated proteins by macrodomain leads to a bias against ADP-ribose modifications conjugated to glutamic acids, suggesting that the macrodomain is either removing or selecting against these distinct protein attachments. Ultimately, the enrichment pipeline presented here offers a universal approach for characterizing the mono- and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteome. PMID:24920161

  14. The promising role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2016-01-01

    The TOPARP study showed the beneficial utility of olaparib in a heavily pretreated population of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who were biomarker-positive for aberrations in DNA repair gene. A higher response rate to olaparib of 88% (14 out of 16 patients), time to radiographic progression as well as overall survival, was seen in patients who were biomarker-positive compared to those who were not. This study showed a promising way of targeting prostate cancer with an enriched population of patients who harbor these deleterious genes. This paves the way for offering new therapeutic opportunities for men who have otherwise few remaining options. PMID:26908063

  15. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (PARP3), a potential repressor of telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering previous result in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), we investigated in human cancer cells the role of PARP3 in the regulation of telomerase activity. Methods We selected A549 (lung adenocarcinoma cell line) and Saos-2 (osteosarcoma cell line), with high and low telomerase activity levels, respectively. The first one was transfected using a plasmid construction containing a PARP3 sequence, whereas the Saos-2 cells were submitted to shRNA transfection to get PARP3 depletion. PARP3 expression on both cell systems was evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR and PARP3 protein levels, by Western-blot. Telomerase activity was determined by TRAP assay. Results In A549 cells, after PARP3 transient transfection, data obtained indicated that twenty-four hours after transfection, up to 100-fold increased gene expression levels were found in the transfected cells with pcDNA/GW-53/PARP3 in comparison to transfected cells with the empty vector. Moreover, 48 hours post-transfection, telomerase activity decreased around 33%, and around 27%, 96 hours post-transfection. Telomerase activity average ratio was 0.67 ± 0.05, and 0.73 ± 0.06, respectively, with significant differences. In Saos-2 cells, after shRNA-mediated PARP3 silencing, a 2.3-fold increase in telomerase activity was detected in relation to the control. Conclusion Our data indicated that, at least in some cancer cells, repression of PARP3 could be responsible for an increased telomerase activity, this fact contributing to telomere maintenance and, therefore, avoiding genome instability. PMID:24528514

  16. Distribution of protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation systems across all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Dragutin; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Josip; Ćetković, Helena; Žaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in regulation of many cellular pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) consists of chains of repeating ADP-ribose nucleotide units and is synthesized by the family of enzymes called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification can be removed by the hydrolytic action of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3 (ARH3). Hydrolytic activity of macrodomain proteins (MacroD1, MacroD2 and TARG1) is responsible for the removal of terminal ADP-ribose unit and for complete reversion of protein ADP-ribosylation. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is widely utilized in eukaryotes and PARPs are present in representatives from all six major eukaryotic supergroups, with only a small number of eukaryotic species that do not possess PARP genes. The last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed at least five types of PARP proteins that include both mono and poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases. Distribution of PARGs strictly follows the distribution of PARP proteins in eukaryotic species. At least one of the macrodomain proteins that hydrolyse terminal ADP-ribose is also always present. Therefore, we can presume that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed a fully functional and reversible PAR metabolism and that PAR signalling provided the conditions essential for survival of the ancestral eukaryote in its ancient environment. PARP proteins are far less prevalent in bacteria and were probably gained through horizontal gene transfer. Only eleven bacterial species possess all proteins essential for a functional PAR metabolism, although it is not known whether PAR metabolism is truly functional in bacteria. Several dsDNA viruses also possess PARP homologues, while no PARP proteins have been identified in any archaeal genome. Our analysis of the distribution of enzymes involved in PAR metabolism provides insight into the evolution of these important signalling systems, as well as

  17. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  18. 50Years of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed

    Virág, László

    2013-12-01

    The seminal paper published in 1963 by Chambon, Weil and Mandel reporting a new NAD-dependent protein modification now known as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) marked the launch of a new era in both protein research and cell biology. In the coming decades, the identity, biochemical characteristics and regulation of enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of protein-bound poly(ADP-ribose) have been discovered and the surprisingly multifarious biological roles of PARylation have not ceased to amaze cell and molecular biologists ever since. The review series on PARylation following this preface is comprised of ten papers written by great experts of the field and aims to provide practicing physicians and basic scientists with the state-of-the-art on the "writers, readers and erasers" of poly(ADP-ribose), some recent paradigm shifts of the field and its translational potential. PMID:23727362

  19. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure.

    PubMed

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1(-/-) compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  20. Synthesis and SAR of novel tricyclic quinoxalinone inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashiro, Julie; Woods, Keith W.; Park, Chang H.; Liu, Xuesong; Shi, Yan; Johnson, Eric F.; Bouska, Jennifer J.; Olson, Amanda M.; Luo, Yan; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Giranda, Vincent L.; Penning, Thomas D.

    2010-09-03

    Based on screening hit 1, a series of tricyclic quinoxalinones have been designed and evaluated for inhibition of PARP-1. Substitutions at the 7- and 8-positions of the quinoxalinone ring led to a number of compounds with good enzymatic and cellular potency. The tricyclic quinoxalinone class is sensitive to modifications of both the amine substituent and the tricyclic core. The synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies are presented.

  1. Mechanisms controlling the smooth muscle cell death in progeria via down-regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoyue; Xiong, Zheng-Mei; Cao, Kan

    2014-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a severe human premature aging disorder caused by a lamin A mutant named progerin. Death occurs at a mean age of 13 y from cardiovascular problems. Previous studies revealed loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of large arteries in a patient with HGPS and two mouse models, suggesting a causal connection between the SMC loss and cardiovascular malfunction. However, the mechanisms of how progerin leads to massive SMC loss are unknown. In this study, using SMCs differentiated from HGPS induced pluripotent stem cells, we show that HGPS SMCs exhibit a profound proliferative defect, which is primarily caused by caspase-independent cell death. Importantly, progerin accumulation stimulates a powerful suppression of PARP1 and consequently triggers an activation of the error-prone nonhomologous end joining response. As a result, most HGPS SMCs exhibit prolonged mitosis and die of mitotic catastrophe. This study demonstrates a critical role of PARP1 in mediating SMC loss in patients with HGPS and elucidates a molecular pathway underlying the progressive SMC loss in progeria. PMID:24843141

  2. Identification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 as the OXPHOS-generated ATP sensor of nuclei of animal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kun, Ernest Kirsten, Eva; Hakam, Alaeddin; Bauer, Pal I.; Mendeleyev, Jerome

    2008-02-08

    Our results show that in the intact normal animal cell mitochondrial ATP is directly connected to nuclear PARP-1 by way of a specific adenylate kinase enzymatic path. This mechanism is demonstrated in two models: (a) by its inhibition with a specific inhibitor of adenylate kinase, and (b) by disruption of ATP synthesis through uncoupling of OXPHOS. In each instance the de-inhibited PARP-1 is quantitatively determined by enzyme kinetics. The nuclear binding site of PARP-1 is Topo I, and is identified as a critical 'switchpoint' indicating the nuclear element that connects OXPHOS with mRNA synthesis in real time. The mitochondrial-nuclear PARP-1 pathway is not operative in cancer cells.

  3. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor CEP-8983 synergizes with bendamustine in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dilley, Robert L.; Poh, Weijie; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Herman, James G.; Showel, Margaret M.; Karp, Judith E.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Pratz, Keith W.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair aberrations and associated chromosomal instability is a feature of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To evaluate if DNA repair insufficiencies are related to methylation changes, we examined the methylation of nine promoter regions of DNA repair proteins by bisulfide sequencing in 26 CLL primary samples and performed quantitative PCR on a subset of samples to examine BRCA1 expression. We also investigated if changes in cytogenetic or expression level of DNA repair proteins led to changes in sensitivity to a novel PARP inhibitor, CEP-8983, alone and in combination with bendamustine. No changes in promoter methylation were identified in BRCA1, BRCA2, FANC-C, FANC-F, FANC-L, ATM, MGMT, hMLH1 and H2AX except for two cases of minor BRCA1 hypermethylation. CLL samples appeared to have reduced BRCA1 mRNA expression uniformly in comparison to non-malignant lymphocytes irrespective of promoter hypermethylation. CEP-8983 displayed single agent cytotoxicity and the combination with bendamustine demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity in the majority of CLL samples. These results were consistent across cytogenetic subgroups, including 17p deleted and previously treated patients. Our results provide rationale for further exploration of the combination of a PARP inhibitor and DNA damaging agents as a novel therapeutic strategy in CLL. PMID:24439051

  4. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  5. How to kill tumor cells with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2011-01-15

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification catalyzed by the enzyme family of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs exhibit pleiotropic cellular functions ranging from maintenance of genomic stability and chromatin remodeling to regulation of cell death, thereby rendering PARP homologues promising targets in cancer therapy. Depending on the molecular status of a cancer cell, low-molecular weight PARP inhibitors can (i) either be used as monotherapeutic agents following the concept of synthetic lethality or (ii) to support classical chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The rationales are the following: (i) in cancers with selective defects in homologous recombination repair, inactivation of PARPs directly causes cell death. In cancer treatment, this phenomenon can be employed to specifically target tumor cells while sparing nonmalignant tissue. (ii) PARP inhibitors can also be used to sensitize cells to cytotoxic DNA-damaging treatments, as some PARPs actively participate in genomic maintenance. Apart from that, PARP inhibitors possess antiangiogenic functions, thus opening up a further option to inhibit tumor growth. In view of the above, a number of high-potency PARP inhibitors have been developed during the last decade and are currently evaluated as cancer therapeutics in clinical trials by several leading pharmaceutical companies. PMID:20853319

  6. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Is Required to Modulate Chromatin Changes at c-MYC Promoter during Emergence from Quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Battistelli, Cecilia; Ciotti, Agnese; Amati, Paolo; Maione, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of various proteins and participates in the regulation of chromatin structure and transcription through complex mechanisms not completely understood. We have previously shown that PARP-1, the major family member of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases, plays an important role in the cell cycle reactivation of resting cells by regulating the expression of Immediate Early Response Genes, such as c-MYC, c-FOS, JUNB and EGR-1. In the present work we have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the enzyme induces c-MYC transcription upon serum stimulation of quiescent cells. We show that PARP-1 is constitutively associated in vivo to a c-MYC promoter region recognized as biologically relevant for the transcriptional regulation of the gene. Moreover, we report that serum stimulation causes the prompt accumulation of ADP-ribose polymers on the same region and that this modification is required for chromatin decondensation and for the exchange of negative for positive transcriptional regulators. Finally we provide evidence that the inhibition of PARP activity along with serum stimulation impairs c-MYC induction by preventing the proper accumulation of histone H3 phosphoacetylation, a specific chromatin mark for the activation of Immediate Early Response Genes. These findings not only suggest a novel strategy by which PARP-1 regulates the transcriptional activity of promoters but also provide new information about the complex regulation of c-MYC expression, a critical determinant of the transition from quiescence to proliferation. PMID:25047032

  7. ADP-Ribosyltransferases and Poly ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Yu, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Protein ADP-ribosylation is an important posttranslational modification that plays versatile roles in multiple biological processes. ADP-ribosylation is catalyzed by a group of enzymes known as ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs). Using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as the donor, ARTs covalently link single or multiple ADP-ribose moieties from NAD+ to the substrates, forming mono ADP-ribosylation or poly ADP-ribosylation (PARylation). Novel functions of ARTs and ADP-ribosylation have been revealed over the past few years. Here we summarize the current knowledge on ARTs and PARylation. PMID:25938242

  8. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu; Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  9. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Apoptosis Antagonizing Transcription Factor Involved in Hydroquinone-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao Xuan; Liu, Jia Xian; Yun, Lin; DU, Yu Jun; Chen, Shao Qian; Chen, Jia Long; Tang, Huan Wen; Liu, Lin Hua

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of DNA damage induced by hydroquinone (HQ) remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) usually works as a DNA damage sensor, and hence, it is possible that PARP-1 is involved in the DNA damage response induced by HQ. In TK6 cells treated with HQ, PARP activity as well as the expression of apoptosis antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), PARP-1, and phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were maximum at 0.5 h, 6 h, 3 h, and 3 h, respectively. To explore the detailed mechanisms underlying the prompt DNA repair reaction, the above indicators were investigated in PARP-1-silenced cells. PARP activity and expression of AATF and PARP-1 decreased to 36%, 32%, and 33%, respectively, in the cells; however, γ-H2AX expression increased to 265%. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether PARP-1 and AATF formed protein complexes. The interaction between these proteins together with the results from IP assays and confocal microscopy indicated that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) regulated AATF expression. In conclusion, PARP-1 was involved in the DNA damage repair induced by HQ via increasing the accumulation of AATF through PARylation. PMID:26822515

  10. Allosteric Activation of the RNF146 Ubiquitin Ligase by a Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Signal

    PubMed Central

    DaRosa, Paul A.; Wang, Zhizhi; Jiang, Xiaomo; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Cong, Feng; Klevit, Rachel E.; Xu, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) plays a role in diverse cellular processes such as DNA repair, transcription, Wnt signaling, and cell death1–6. Recent studies have shown that PARylation can serve as a signal for the polyubiquitination and degradation of several critical regulatory proteins, including Axin and 3BP2 (refs 7–9). The RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF146 (a.k.a. Iduna) is responsible for PARylation-dependent ubiquitination (PARdU)10–12. Here we provide a structural basis for RNF146 catalyzed PARdU and how PARdU specificity is achieved. First, we show that iso-ADPr, the smallest internal poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) structural unit, binds between the WWE and RING domains of RNF146 and functions as an allosteric signal that switches the RING domain from a catalytically inactive state to an active one. In the absence of PAR, the RING domain is unable to efficiently bind and activate an E2. Binding of PAR/iso-ADPr induces a major conformational change that creates a functional RING structure. Thus RNF146 represents a new mechanistic class of RING E3 ligases whose activities are regulated by non-covalent ligand binding, which may provide a template for designing inducible protein-degradation systems. Second, we found that RNF146 directly interacts with the PAR polymerase tankyrase (TNKS). Disruption of the RNF146/TNKS interaction inhibits turnover of the substrate Axin in cells. Thus, both substrate PARylation and PARdU are catalyzed by enzymes within the same protein complex, and PARdU substrate specificity may be primarily determined by the substrate-TNKS interaction. We propose that maintenance of unliganded RNF146 in an inactive state may serve to maintain the stability of the RNF146-TNKS complex, which in turn regulates the homeostasis of PARdU activity in the cell. PMID:25327252