Science.gov

Sample records for polyadenylation activates oncogenes

  1. Premature polyadenylation of MAGI3 produces a dominantly-acting oncogene in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Thomas K; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutation, chromosomal rearrangement and copy number amplification are common mechanisms responsible for generating gain-of-function, cancer-causing alterations. Here we report a new mechanism by which premature cleavage and polyadenylation (pPA) of RNA can produce an oncogenic protein. We identify a pPA event at a cryptic intronic poly(A) signal in MAGI3, occurring in the absence of local exonic and intronic mutations. The altered mRNA isoform, called MAGI3pPA, produces a truncated protein that acts in a dominant-negative manner to prevent full-length MAGI3 from interacting with the YAP oncoprotein, thereby relieving YAP inhibition and promoting malignant transformation of human mammary epithelial cells. We additionally find evidence for recurrent expression of MAGI3pPAin primary human breast tumors but not in tumor-adjacent normal tissues. Our results provide an example of how pPA contributes to cancer by generating a truncated mRNA isoform that encodes an oncogenic, gain-of-function protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14730.001 PMID:27205883

  2. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  3. Oncogenic Activities of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Münger, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Infectious etiologies for certain human cancers have long been suggested by epidemiological studies and studies with animals. Important support for this concept came from the discovery by Harald zur Hausen’s group that human cervical carcinoma almost universally contains certain “high-risk” human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Over the years, much has been learned about the carcinogenic activities of high-risk HPVs. These studies have revealed that two viral proteins, E6 and E7, that are consistently expressed in HPV-associated carcinomas, are necessary for induction and maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Hence, HPV-associated tumors are unique amongst human solid tumors in that they are universally caused by exposure to the same, molecularly defined oncogenic agents, and the molecular signal transduction pathways subverted by these viral transforming agents are frequently disrupted in other, non-virus associated human cancers. PMID:19540281

  4. Symplekin, a polyadenylation factor, prevents MOZ and MLL activity on HOXA9 in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Largeot, Anne; Paggetti, Jérôme; Broséus, Julien; Aucagne, Romain; Lagrange, Brice; Martin, Romain Z; Berthelet, Jean; Quéré, Ronan; Lucchi, Géraldine; Ducoroy, Patrick; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    MOZ and MLL encoding a histone acetyltransferase and a histone methyltransferase, respectively, are targets for recurrent chromosomal translocations found in acute myeloblastic or lymphoblastic leukemia. We have previously shown that MOZ and MLL cooperate to activate HOXA9 gene expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitors cells. To dissect the mechanism of action of this complex, we decided to identify new proteins interacting with MOZ. We found that the scaffold protein Symplekin that supports the assembly of polyadenylation machinery was identified by mass spectrometry. Symplekin interacts and co-localizes with both MOZ and MLL in immature hematopoietic cells. Its inhibition leads to a decrease of the HOXA9 protein level but not of Hoxa9 mRNA and to an over-recruitment of MOZ and MLL onto the HOXA9 promoter. Altogether, our results highlight the role of Symplekin in transcription repression involving a regulatory network between MOZ, MLL and Symplekin. PMID:23994619

  5. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells. PMID:26940867

  6. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  7. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David JH; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David TW; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimlmg, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Paragraph Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoural heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and Group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for the majority of paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to Groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family protooncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1/GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate ‘enhancer hijacking’ as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer. PMID:25043047

  8. Autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihua; Wang, Xiao Dan; Lapi, Eleonora; Sullivan, Alexandra; Jia, Wei; He, You-Wen; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Zhong, Shan; Goldin, Robert D.; Goemans, Christoph G.; Tolkovsky, Aviva M.; Lu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    RAS is frequently mutated in human cancers and has opposing effects on autophagy and tumorigenesis. Identifying determinants of the cellular responses to RAS is therefore vital in cancer research. Here, we show that autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS. N-terminal Apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2) mediates RAS-induced senescence and inhibits autophagy. Oncogenic RAS-expressing ASPP2(Δ3/Δ3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that escape senescence express a high level of ATG5/ATG12. Consistent with the notion that autophagy levels control the cellular response to oncogenic RAS, overexpressing ATG5, but not autophagy-deficient ATG5 mutant K130R, bypasses RAS-induced senescence, whereas ATG5 or ATG3 deficiency predisposes to it. Mechanistically, ASPP2 inhibits RAS-induced autophagy by competing with ATG16 to bind ATG5/ATG12 and preventing ATG16/ATG5/ATG12 formation. Hence, ASPP2 modulates oncogenic RAS-induced autophagic activity to dictate the cellular response to RAS: to proliferate or senesce. PMID:22847423

  9. Alternative Polyadenylation: Another Foe in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif; Can, Tolga

    2016-06-01

    Advancements in sequencing and transcriptome analysis methods have led to seminal discoveries that have begun to unravel the complexity of cancer. These studies are paving the way toward the development of improved diagnostics, prognostic predictions, and targeted treatment options. However, it is clear that pieces of the cancer puzzle are still missing. In an effort to have a more comprehensive understanding of the development and progression of cancer, we have come to appreciate the value of the noncoding regions of our genomes, partly due to the discovery of miRNAs and their significance in gene regulation. Interestingly, the miRNA-mRNA interactions are not solely dependent on variations in miRNA levels. Instead, the majority of genes harbor multiple polyadenylation signals on their 3' UTRs (untranslated regions) that can be differentially selected on the basis of the physiologic state of cells, resulting in alternative 3' UTR isoforms. Deregulation of alternative polyadenylation (APA) has increasing interest in cancer research, because APA generates mRNA 3' UTR isoforms with potentially different stabilities, subcellular localizations, translation efficiencies, and functions. This review focuses on the link between APA and cancer and discusses the mechanisms as well as the tools available for investigating APA events in cancer. Overall, detection of deregulated APA-generated isoforms in cancer may implicate some proto-oncogene activation cases of unknown causes and may help the discovery of novel cases; thus, contributing to a better understanding of molecular mechanisms of cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 14(6); 507-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27075335

  10. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells toward the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected cells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. Progress is described. 121 refs.

  11. A critical role for alternative polyadenylation factor CPSF6 in targeting HIV-1 integration to transcriptionally active chromatin.

    PubMed

    Sowd, Gregory A; Serrao, Erik; Wang, Hao; Wang, Weifeng; Fadel, Hind J; Poeschla, Eric M; Engelman, Alan N

    2016-02-23

    Integration is vital to retroviral replication and influences the establishment of the latent HIV reservoir. HIV-1 integration favors active genes, which is in part determined by the interaction between integrase and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75. Because gene targeting remains significantly enriched, relative to random in LEDGF/p75 deficient cells, other host factors likely contribute to gene-tropic integration. Nucleoporins 153 and 358, which bind HIV-1 capsid, play comparatively minor roles in integration targeting, but the influence of another capsid binding protein, cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6), has not been reported. In this study we knocked down or knocked out CPSF6 in parallel or in tandem with LEDGF/p75. CPSF6 knockout changed viral infectivity kinetics, decreased proviral formation, and preferentially decreased integration into transcriptionally active genes, spliced genes, and regions of chromatin enriched in genes and activating histone modifications. LEDGF/p75 depletion by contrast preferentially altered positional integration targeting within gene bodies. Dual factor knockout reduced integration into genes to below the levels observed with either single knockout and revealed that CPSF6 played a more dominant role than LEDGF/p75 in directing integration to euchromatin. CPSF6 complementation rescued HIV-1 integration site distribution in CPSF6 knockout cells, but complementation with a capsid binding mutant of CPSF6 did not. We conclude that integration targeting proceeds via two distinct mechanisms: capsid-CPSF6 binding directs HIV-1 to actively transcribed euchromatin, where the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction drives integration into gene bodies. PMID:26858452

  12. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'. PMID:24780858

  13. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Flavahan, William A; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B; Gillespie, Shawn M; Venteicher, Andrew S; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Suvà, Mario L; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  14. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Suvà, Mario L.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas1,2. Mutant IDH protein produces a novel onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), that interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5′-methylcytosine hydroxylases3–7. TET enzymes catalyze a key step in the removal of DNA methylation8,9. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP)10,11, though the functional significance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hyper-methylation at CTCF binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to aberrantly interact with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and down-regulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wildtype gliomaspheres up-regulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  15. Dimerization mediated through a leucine zipper activates the oncogenic potential of the met receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, G A; Park, M

    1993-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of the met (hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor) receptor tyrosine kinase involves a genomic rearrangement that generates a hybrid protein containing tpr-encoded sequences at its amino terminus fused directly to the met-encoded receptor kinase domain. Deletion of Tpr sequences abolishes the transforming ability of this protein, implicating this region in oncogenic activation. We demonstrate, by site-directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, that a leucine zipper motif within Tpr mediates dimerization of the tpr-met product and is essential for the transforming activity of the met oncogene. By analogy with ligand-stimulated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, we propose that constitutive dimerization mediated by a leucine zipper motif within Tpr is responsible for oncogenic activation of the Met kinase. The possibility that this mechanism of activation represents a paradigm for a class of receptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes activated by DNA rearrangement is discussed. Images PMID:8413267

  16. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability. PMID:24113189

  17. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  18. Rodent p53 suppresses the transforming activity of the activated Neu oncogene by modulating the Basal promoter activity of Neu.

    PubMed

    Matin, A; Xie, Y; Kao, M; Hung, M

    1995-05-01

    The rat neu oncogene encodes a dominant transforming oncogene. The mouse wild-type p53 suppresses the transforming activity of the neu oncogene while different p53 mutants demonstrate varying ability to repress neu-induced transformation. Suppression of neu-transforming activity is due to inhibition of transcription. Deletion analysis of the rat neu promoter shows that p53 represses the basal promoter activity of neu. Therefore, rodent p53 suppresses the transforming potential of neu by inhibiting transcription from the basal promoter of neu. PMID:21556644

  19. Opposing oncogenic activities of small DNA tumor virus transforming proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chinnadurai, G.

    2011-01-01

    The E1A gene of species C human adenovirus is an intensely investigated model viral oncogene that immortalizes primary cells and mediates oncogenic cell transformation in cooperation with other viral or cellular oncogenes. Investigations using E1A proteins have illuminated important paradigms in cell proliferation and the functions of cellular proteins such as the retinoblastoma protein. Studies with E1A have led to the surprising discovery that E1A also suppresses cell transformation and oncogenesis. Here, I review our current understanding of the transforming and tumor suppressive functions of E1A, and how E1A studies led to the discovery of a related tumor suppressive function in benign human papillomaviruses. The potential role of these opposing functions in viral replication in epithelial cells is also discussed. PMID:21330137

  20. Polyadenylation occurs at multiple sites in maize mitochondrial cox2 mRNA and is independent of editing status.

    PubMed Central

    Lupold, D S; Caoile, A G; Stern, D B

    1999-01-01

    Polyadenylation of nucleus-encoded transcripts has a well-defined role in gene expression. The extent and function of polyadenylation in organelles and prokaryotic systems, however, are less well documented. Recent reports of polyadenylation-mediated RNA destabilization in Escherichia coli and in vascular plant chloroplasts prompted us to look for polyadenylation in plant mitochondria. Here, we report the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to map multiple polyadenylate addition sites in maize mitochondrial cox2 transcripts. The lack of sequence conservation surrounding these sites suggests that polyadenylation may occur at many 3' termini created by endoribonucleolytic and/or exoribonucleolytic activities, including those activities involved in 3' end maturation. Endogenous transcripts could be efficiently polyadenylated in vitro by using maize mitochondrial lysates with an activity that added AMP more efficiently than GMP. Polyadenylated substrates were tested for stability in maize mitochondrial S100 extracts, and we found that, compared with nonpolyadenylated RNAs, the polyadenylated substrates were less stable. Taken together with the low abundance of polyadenylated RNAs in maize mitochondria, our results are consistent with a degradation-related process. The fact that polyadenylation does not dramatically destabilize plant mitochondrial transcripts, at least in vitro, is in agreement with results obtained for animal mitochondria but differs from those obtained for chloroplasts and E. coli. Because fully edited, partially edited, and unedited transcripts were found among the cloned polyadenylated cox2 cDNAs, we conclude that RNA editing and polyadenylation are independent processes in maize mitochondria. PMID:10449588

  1. Knockin of mutant PIK3CA activates multiple oncogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, John P.; Karakas, Bedri; Weiss, Michele B.; Abukhdeir, Abde M.; Lauring, Josh; Garay, Joseph P.; Cosgrove, David; Tamaki, Akina; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Mohseni, Morassa; Wang, Grace; Rosen, D. Marc; Denmeade, Samuel R.; Higgins, Michaela J.; Vitolo, Michele I.; Bachman, Kurtis E.; Park, Ben Ho

    2009-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase subunit PIK3CA is frequently mutated in human cancers. Here we used gene targeting to “knock in” PIK3CA mutations into human breast epithelial cells to identify new therapeutic targets associated with oncogenic PIK3CA. Mutant PIK3CA knockin cells were capable of epidermal growth factor and mTOR-independent cell proliferation that was associated with AKT, ERK, and GSK3β phosphorylation. Paradoxically, the GSK3β inhibitors lithium chloride and SB216763 selectively decreased the proliferation of human breast and colorectal cancer cell lines with oncogenic PIK3CA mutations and led to a decrease in the GSK3β target gene CYCLIN D1. Oral treatment with lithium preferentially inhibited the growth of nude mouse xenografts of HCT-116 colon cancer cells with mutant PIK3CA compared with isogenic HCT-116 knockout cells containing only wild-type PIK3CA. Our findings suggest GSK3β is an important effector of mutant PIK3CA, and that lithium, an FDA-approved therapy for bipolar disorders, has selective antineoplastic properties against cancers that harbor these mutations. PMID:19196980

  2. Nucleotide sequence and expression in vitro of cDNA derived from mRNA of int-1, a provirally activated mouse mammary oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Y K; Shackleford, G M; Brown, A M; Sanders, G S; Varmus, H E

    1985-01-01

    The mouse int-1 gene is a putative mammary oncogene discovered as a target for transcriptionally activating proviral insertion mutations in mammary carcinomas induced by the mouse mammary tumor virus in C3H mice. We have isolated molecular clones of full- or nearly full-length cDNA transcribed from int-1 RNA (2.6 kilobases) in a virus-induced mammary tumor. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clones with that of the int-1 gene (A. van Ooyen and R. Nusse, Cell 39:233-240, 1984) shows the following. The coding region of the int-1 gene is composed of four exons. The splice donor and acceptor sites conform to consensus; however, at least two closely spaced polyadenylation sites are used, and the transcriptional initiation site remains ambiguous. The major open reading frame is preceded by an open frame 10 codons in length. The mRNA encodes a 41-kilodalton protein with several striking features--a strongly hydrophobic amino terminus, a cysteine-rich carboxy terminus, and four potential glycosylation sites. There are no differences in nucleotide sequence between the known exons of the normal and a provirally activated allele. The length of the deduced open reading frame was further confirmed by in vitro translation of RNA transcribed from the cDNA clones with SP6 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:3018519

  3. CD5 expression is regulated during human T-cell activation by alternative polyadenylation, PTBP1, and miR-204.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Rita G; Lago-Baldaia, Inês; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Fachini, Joseph M; Oliveira, Liliana; Drpic, Danica; Lopes, Nair; Henriques, Telmo; Neilson, Joel R; Carmo, Alexandre M; Moreira, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    T lymphocytes stimulated through their antigen receptor (TCR) preferentially express mRNA isoforms with shorter 3´ untranslated regions (3´-UTRs) derived from alternative pre-mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation (APA). However, the physiological relevance of APA programs remains poorly understood. CD5 is a T-cell surface glycoprotein that negatively regulates TCR signaling from the onset of T-cell activation. CD5 plays a pivotal role in mediating outcomes of cell survival or apoptosis, and may prevent both autoimmunity and cancer. In human primary T lymphocytes and Jurkat cells we found three distinct mRNA isoforms encoding CD5, each derived from distinct poly(A) signals (PASs). Upon T-cell activation, there is an overall increase in CD5 mRNAs with a specific increase in the relative expression of the shorter isoforms. 3´-UTRs derived from these shorter isoforms confer higher reporter expression in activated T cells relative to the longer isoform. We further show that polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB/PTBP1) directly binds to the proximal PAS and PTB siRNA depletion causes a decrease in mRNA derived from this PAS, suggesting an effect on stability or poly(A) site selection to circumvent targeting of the longer CD5 mRNA isoform by miR-204. These mechanisms fine-tune CD5 expression levels and thus ultimately T-cell responses. PMID:27005442

  4. Oncogenic transformation by vrel requires an amino-terminal activation domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kamens, J.; Brent, R. . Dept. of Molecular Biology); Richardson, P.; Gilmore, T. . Dept. of Biology); Mosialos, G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-06-01

    The mechanism by which the products of the v-{ital rel} oncogene, the corresponding c-{ital rel} proto-oncogene, and the related {ital dorsal} gene of {ital Drosophila melanogaster} exert their effects is not clear. The authors show that the v-{ital rel}, chicken c-{ital rel}, and {ital dorsal} proteins activated gene expression when fused to LexA sequences and bound to DNA upstream of target genes in {ital Saccharomyces cerevisiae}. They have defined two distinct activation regions in the c-{ital rel} protein. Region I, located in the amino-terminal half of {ital rel} and {ital dorsal} proteins, contains no stretches of glutamines, prolines, or acidic amino acids and therefore may be a novel activation domain. Lesions in the v-{ital rel} protein that diminished or abolished oncogenic transformation of avian spleen cells correspondingly affected transcription activation by region I. Region II, located in the carboxy terminus of the c-{ital rel} protein, is highly acidic. Region II is not present in the v-{ital rel} protein or in a transforming mutant derivative of the c-{ital rel} protein. The authors' results show that the oncogenicity of Rel proteins requires activation region I and suggest that the biological function of {ital rel} and {ital dorsal} proteins depends on transcription activation by this region.

  5. Oncogenic activation of ERG: A predominant mechanism in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sreenath, Taduru L; Dobi, Albert; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Srivastava, Shiv

    2011-01-01

    Prevalent gene fusions involving regulatory sequences of the androgen receptor (AR) regulated genes (primarily TMPRSS2) and protein coding sequences of nuclear transcription factors of the ETS gene family (predominantly ERG) result in unscheduled androgen dependent ERG expression in prostate cancer (CaP).Cumulative data from a large number of studies in the past six years accentuate ERG alterations in more than half of all CaP patients in Western countries. Studies underscore that ERG functions are involved in the biology of CaP. ERG expression in normal context is selective to endothelial cells, specific hematopoetic cells and pre-cartilage cells. Normal functions of ERG are highlighted in hematopoetic stem cells. Emerging data continues to unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ERG may contribute to CaP. Herein, we focus on biological and clinical aspects of ERG oncogenic alterations, potential of ERG-based stratification of CaP and the possibilities of targeting the ERG network in developing new therapeutic strategies for the disease. PMID:22279422

  6. Netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activities through enhancing Yes-associated protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Li, Dean Y.; Luo, Hongbo R.; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is the major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size control and cancer development. However, how YAP is regulated by extracellular stimuli in tumorigenesis remains incompletely understood. Netrin-1, a laminin-related secreted protein, displays proto-oncogenic activity in cancers. Nonetheless, the downstream signaling mediating its oncogenic effects is not well defined. Here we show that netrin-1 via its transmembrane receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer and uncoordinated-5 homolog, up-regulates YAP expression, escalating YAP levels in the nucleus and promoting cancer cell proliferation and migration. Inactivating netrin-1, deleted in colorectal cancer, or uncoordinated-5 homolog B (UNC5B) decreases YAP protein levels, abrogating cancer cell progression by netrin-1, whereas knockdown of mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) or large tumor suppressor kinase 1/2 (Lats1/2), two sets of upstream core kinases of the Hippo pathway, has no effect in blocking netrin-1–induced up-regulation of YAP. Netrin-1 stimulates phosphatase 1A to dephosphorylate YAP, which leads to decreased ubiquitination and degradation, enhancing YAP accumulation and signaling. Hence, our findings support that netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activity through YAP signaling, providing a mechanism coupling extracellular signals to the nuclear YAP oncogene. PMID:26039999

  7. Estrogen-dependent activation of the avian very low density apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin genes. Transient alterations in mRNA polyadenylation and stability early during induction.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, A W; Deeley, R G

    1988-10-01

    Administration of estrogen to egg-laying vertebrates activates unscheduled, hepatic expression of major, egg-yolk protein genes in immature animals and mature males. Two avian yolk protein genes, encoding very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) and vitellogenin II, are dormant prior to stimulation with estrogen, but within three days their cognate mRNAs accumulate to become two of the most abundant species in the liver. Accumulation of these mRNAs has been attributed to both induction of transcription and selective, estrogen-dependent mRNA stabilization. We have detected alterations in the size of apoVLDLII mRNA that occur during the first 24 hours that are attributable to a shift in the extent of polyadenylation as steady-state is approached. In vitro transcription assays indicate that primary activation of both genes takes place relatively slowly and that maximal rates of mRNA accumulation occur when the apoVLDLII and vitellogenin II genes are expressed at only 30% and 10% of their fully induced levels, respectively. Transcription data combined with the structural alteration of apoVLDLII mRNA suggest that stability of the two mRNAs may change as steady-state is approached. We have assessed the compatibility of this suggestion with earlier estimates of the kinetics of accumulation of both mRNAs by developing a generally useful algorithm that predicts approach to steady-state kinetics under conditions where both the rate of synthesis and mRNA stability change throughout the accumulation phase of the response. The results predict that the stability of both mRNAs decreases by at least two- to threefold during the approach to steady-state and that, although an additional destabilization of apoVLDLII mRNA may occur following withdrawal of estrogen, the steady-state stability of vitellogenin mRNA is not significantly decreased upon removal of hormone. PMID:3210227

  8. Oncogene-induced reactive oxygen species fuel hyperproliferation and DNA damage response activation

    PubMed Central

    Ogrunc, M; Di Micco, R; Liontos, M; Bombardelli, L; Mione, M; Fumagalli, M; Gorgoulis, V G; d'Adda di Fagagna, F

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed to be signaling molecules that mediate proliferative cues. However, ROS may also cause DNA damage and proliferative arrest. How these apparently opposite roles can be reconciled, especially in the context of oncogene-induced cellular senescence, which is associated both with aberrant mitogenic signaling and DNA damage response (DDR)-mediated arrest, is unclear. Here, we show that ROS are indeed mitogenic signaling molecules that fuel oncogene-driven aberrant cell proliferation. However, by their very same ability to mediate cell hyperproliferation, ROS eventually cause DDR activation. We also show that oncogenic Ras-induced ROS are produced in a Rac1 and NADPH oxidase (Nox4)-dependent manner. In addition, we show that Ras-induced ROS can be detected and modulated in a living transparent animal: the zebrafish. Finally, in cancer we show that Nox4 is increased in both human tumors and a mouse model of pancreatic cancer and specific Nox4 small-molecule inhibitors act synergistically with existing chemotherapic agents. PMID:24583638

  9. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  10. CDK1 phosphorylation of TAZ in mitosis inhibits its oncogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) is a downstream effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, which plays important roles in cancer and stem cell biology. Hippo signaling inactivates TAZ through phosphorylation (mainly at S89). In the current study, we define a new layer of regulation of TAZ activity that is critical for its oncogenic function. We found that TAZ is phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by the mitotic kinase CDK1 at S90, S105, T326, and T346 during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Interestingly, mitotic phosphorylation inactivates TAZ oncogenic activity, as the non-phosphorylatable mutant (TAZ-S89A/S90A/S105A/T326A/T346A, TAZ-5A) possesses higher activity in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, anchorage-independent growth, cell migration, and invasion when compared to the TAZ-S89A mutant. Accordingly, TAZ-5A has higher transcriptional activity compared to the TAZ-S89A mutant. Finally, we show that TAZ-S89A or TAZ-5A (to a greater extent) was sufficient to induce spindle and centrosome defects, and chromosome misalignment/missegregation in immortalized epithelial cells. Together, our results reveal a previously unrecognized connection between TAZ oncogenicity and mitotic phospho-regulation. PMID:26375055

  11. Oncogene activation in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors: implications for risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Stowers, S.J.; Patterson, R.M.; Maronpot, R.R.; Anderson, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    The validity of rodent tumor end points in assessing the potential hazards of chemical exposure to humans is a somewhat controversial but very important issue since most chemicals are classified as potentially hazardous to humans on the basis of long-term carcinogenesis studies in rodents. The ability to distinguish between genotoxic, cytotoxic, or receptor-mediated promotion effects of chemical treatment would aid in the interpretation of rodent carcinogenesis data. Activated oncogenes in spontaneously occurring and chemically induced rodent tumors were examined and compared as one approach to determine the mechanism by which chemical treatment caused an increased incidence of rodent tumors. Different patterns of activated oncogenes were found not only in spontaneous versus chemically induced mouse liver tumors but also in a variety of spontaneous rat tumors versus chemically induced rat lung tumors. In the absence of cytotoxic effects, it could be argued that the chemicals in question activated protooncogenes by a direct genotoxic mechanism. These results provided a basis for the analysis of activated oncogenes in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors to provide information at a molecular level to aid in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to human risk assessment.

  12. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  13. The Pbx Interaction Motif of Hoxa1 Is Essential for Its Oncogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Delval, Stéphanie; Taminiau, Arnaud; Lamy, Juliette; Lallemand, Cécile; Gilles, Christine; Noël, Agnès; Rezsohazy, René

    2011-01-01

    Hoxa1 belongs to the Hox family of homeodomain transcription factors involved in patterning embryonic territories and governing organogenetic processes. In addition to its developmental functions, Hoxa1 has been shown to be an oncogene and to be overexpressed in the mammary gland in response to a deregulation of the autocrine growth hormone. It has therefore been suggested that Hoxa1 plays a pivotal role in the process linking autocrine growth hormone misregulation and mammary carcinogenesis. Like most Hox proteins, Hoxa1 can interact with Pbx proteins. This interaction relies on a Hox hexapeptidic sequence centred on conserved Tryptophan and Methionine residues. To address the importance of the Hox-Pbx interaction for the oncogenic activity of Hoxa1, we characterized here the properties of a Hoxa1 variant with substituted residues in the hexapeptide and demonstrate that the Hoxa1 mutant lost its ability to stimulate cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, and loss of contact inhibition. Therefore, the hexapeptide motif of Hoxa1 is required to confer its oncogenic activity, supporting the view that this activity relies on the ability of Hoxa1 to interact with Pbx. PMID:21957483

  14. The Pbx interaction motif of Hoxa1 is essential for its oncogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Delval, Stéphanie; Taminiau, Arnaud; Lamy, Juliette; Lallemand, Cécile; Gilles, Christine; Noël, Agnès; Rezsohazy, René

    2011-01-01

    Hoxa1 belongs to the Hox family of homeodomain transcription factors involved in patterning embryonic territories and governing organogenetic processes. In addition to its developmental functions, Hoxa1 has been shown to be an oncogene and to be overexpressed in the mammary gland in response to a deregulation of the autocrine growth hormone. It has therefore been suggested that Hoxa1 plays a pivotal role in the process linking autocrine growth hormone misregulation and mammary carcinogenesis. Like most Hox proteins, Hoxa1 can interact with Pbx proteins. This interaction relies on a Hox hexapeptidic sequence centred on conserved Tryptophan and Methionine residues. To address the importance of the Hox-Pbx interaction for the oncogenic activity of Hoxa1, we characterized here the properties of a Hoxa1 variant with substituted residues in the hexapeptide and demonstrate that the Hoxa1 mutant lost its ability to stimulate cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, and loss of contact inhibition. Therefore, the hexapeptide motif of Hoxa1 is required to confer its oncogenic activity, supporting the view that this activity relies on the ability of Hoxa1 to interact with Pbx. PMID:21957483

  15. TRIM24 Is an Oncogenic Transcriptional Activator in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Groner, Anna C; Cato, Laura; de Tribolet-Hardy, Jonas; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Janouskova, Hana; Melchers, Diana; Houtman, René; Cato, Andrew C B; Tschopp, Patrick; Gu, Lei; Corsinotti, Andrea; Zhong, Qing; Fankhauser, Christian; Fritz, Christine; Poyet, Cédric; Wagner, Ulrich; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi; Garraway, Levi A; Wild, Peter J; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Myles

    2016-06-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a key driver of prostate cancer (PC). While androgen-deprivation therapy is transiently effective in advanced disease, tumors often progress to a lethal castration-resistant state (CRPC). We show that recurrent PC-driver mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) stabilize the TRIM24 protein, which promotes proliferation under low androgen conditions. TRIM24 augments AR signaling, and AR and TRIM24 co-activated genes are significantly upregulated in CRPC. Expression of TRIM24 protein increases from primary PC to CRPC, and both TRIM24 protein levels and the AR/TRIM24 gene signature predict disease recurrence. Analyses in CRPC cells reveal that the TRIM24 bromodomain and the AR-interacting motif are essential to support proliferation. These data provide a rationale for therapeutic TRIM24 targeting in SPOP mutant and CRPC patients. PMID:27238081

  16. Pin1 is required for sustained B cell proliferation upon oncogenic activation of Myc

    PubMed Central

    D'Artista, Luana; Bisso, Andrea; Piontini, Andrea; Doni, Mirko; Verrecchia, Alessandro; Kress, Theresia R.; Morelli, Marco J.; Del Sal, Giannino; Amati, Bruno; Campaner, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is activated by translocation in Burkitt's lymphoma and substitutions in codon 58 stabilize the Myc protein or augment its oncogenic potential. In wild-type Myc, phosphorylation of Ser 62 and Thr 58 provides a landing pad for the peptidyl prolyl-isomerase Pin1, which in turn promotes Ser 62 dephosphorylation and Myc degradation. However, the role of Pin1 in Myc-induced lymphomagenesis remains unknown. We show here that genetic ablation of Pin1 reduces lymphomagenesis in Eμ-myc transgenic mice. In both Pin1-deficient B-cells and MEFs, the proliferative response to oncogenic Myc was selectively impaired, with no alterations in Myc-induced apoptosis or mitogen-induced cell cycle entry. This proliferative defect wasn't attributable to alterations in either Ser 62 phosphorylation or Myc-regulated transcription, but instead relied on the activity of the ARF-p53 pathway. Pin1 silencing in lymphomas retarded disease progression in mice, making Pin1 an attractive therapeutic target in Myc-driven tumors. PMID:26943576

  17. PAK1 is a breast cancer oncogene that coordinately activates MAPK and MET signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Yashaswi; Schafer, Eric J.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Thomas, Sapana R.; He, Frank; Du, Jinyan; Wang, Shumei; Barretina, Jordi; Weir, Barbara A.; Zhao, Jean J.; Polyak, Kornelia; Golub, Todd R.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Hahn, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Activating mutations in the RAS family or BRAF frequently occur in many types of human cancers but are rarely detected in breast tumors. However, activation of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway is commonly observed in human breast cancers, suggesting that other genetic alterations lead to activation of this signaling pathway. To identify breast cancer oncogenes that activate the MAPK pathway, we screened a library of human kinases for their ability to induce anchorage-independent growth in a derivative of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells (HMLE). We identified PAK1 as a kinase that permitted HMLE cells to form anchorage-independent colonies. PAK1 is amplified in several human cancer types, including 33% of breast tumor samples and cancer cell lines. The kinase activity of PAK1 is necessary for PAK1-induced transformation. Moreover, we show that PAK1 simultaneously activates MAPK and MET signaling; the latter via inhibition of Merlin. Disruption of these activities inhibits PAK1-driven anchorage-independent growth. These observations establish PAK1 amplification as an alternative mechanism for MAPK activation in human breast cancer and credential PAK1 as a breast cancer oncogene that coordinately regulates multiple signaling pathways, the cooperation of which leads to malignant transformation. PMID:22105362

  18. Rab1A is an mTORC1 activator and a colorectal oncogene.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Janice D; Zhang, Yan-Jie; Wei, Yue-Hua; Cho, Jun-Hung; Morris, Laura E; Wang, Hui-Yun; Zheng, X F Steven

    2014-11-10

    Amino acid (AA) is a potent mitogen that controls growth and metabolism. Here we describe the identification of Rab1 as a conserved regulator of AA signaling to mTORC1. AA stimulates Rab1A GTP binding and interaction with mTORC1 and Rheb-mTORC1 interaction in the Golgi. Rab1A overexpression promotes mTORC1 signaling and oncogenic growth in an AA- and mTORC1-dependent manner. Conversely, Rab1A knockdown selectively attenuates oncogenic growth of Rab1-overexpressing cancer cells. Moreover, Rab1A is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC), which is correlated with elevated mTORC1 signaling, tumor invasion, progression, and poor prognosis. Our results demonstrate that Rab1 is an mTORC1 activator and an oncogene and that hyperactive AA signaling through Rab1A overexpression drives oncogenesis and renders cancer cells prone to mTORC1-targeted therapy. PMID:25446900

  19. Proto-oncogenes II.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P

    1988-12-01

    In reviewing recent literature on activated proto-oncogenes including retroviral infection (without oncogene), translocation and inherited childhood cancer, I have come to the conclusion that activated proto-oncogenes are not involved in development of tumors. There is one exception in which a translocated proto-myc leads to transformation. That is the case of the trangenic mouse embryo where faulty development occurs. PMID:3226361

  20. Activation of phospholipase D by growth factors and oncogenes in murine fibroblasts follow alternative but cross-talking pathways.

    PubMed Central

    del Peso, L; Lucas, L; Esteve, P; Lacal, J C

    1997-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is activated by a variety of stimuli, including mitogenic stimulation by growth factors and oncogene transformation. Activation of PLD by growth factors requires protein kinase C (PKC) since depletion of the enzyme by down-regulation or direct inhibition by specific drugs completely abrogates this effect. Transformation by the ras and src oncogenes is also associated with an increase in basal PLD activity. However, this effect is not dependent on PKC, suggesting that growth factors and oncogenes may activate PLD by two independent mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that activation of PLD by phorbol esters is greatly enhanced in ras-transformed cells, suggesting synergistic activation of PLD by ras oncogenes and PKC. Also, ras-transformed cells showed a dramatic attenuation of the PLD activation induced by growth factors, although receptor function was still detectable. This attenuation paralleled the specific uncoupling of the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) pathway, indicating that activation of PLD by growth factors may be mediated by PI-PLC and PKC activation. Attenuation of PLD activation by platelet-derived growth factor was also observed in several oncogene-transformed cells, as well as the uncoupling of the PI-PLC pathway. Neither the co-operation with PKC activation nor the attenuation of the PLD response to growth factors in ras-transformed cells was a general consequence of cell transformation, since cells transformed by other oncogenes showed a normal response to either treatment. These results support the existence of at least two alternative signalling routes for the activation of PLD, one mediated by the PI-PLC/diacylglycerol/PKC pathway and a second one mediated by several oncogenes, independent of the PKC pathway, which synergizes with the PI-PLC/PKC-dependent pathway. PMID:9065772

  1. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  2. S6K1 alternative splicing modulates its oncogenic activity and regulates mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hur, Vered; Denichenko, Polina; Siegfried, Zahava; Maimon, Avi; Krainer, Adrian; Davidson, Ben; Karni, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) is a major mTOR downstream signaling molecule which regulates cell size and translation efficiency. Here we report that short isoforms of S6K1 are over-produced in breast cancer cell lines and tumors. Overexpression of S6K1 short isoforms induces transformation of human breast epithelial cells. The long S6K1 variant (Iso-1) induced opposite effects: It inhibits Ras-induced transformation and tumor formation, while its knockdown or knockout induced transformation, suggesting that Iso-1 has a tumor suppressor activity. We further found that S6K1 short isoforms bind and activate mTORC1, elevating 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, cap-dependent translation and Mcl-1 protein levels. Both a phosphorylation-defective 4E-BP1 mutant and the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin partially blocked the oncogenic effects of S6K1 short isoforms, suggesting that these are mediated by mTORC1 and 4E-BP1. Thus, alternative splicing of S6K1 acts as a molecular switch in breast cancer cells elevating oncogenic isoforms that activate mTORC1. PMID:23273915

  3. Polyadenylation of stable RNA precursors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongwei; Pandit, Shilpa; Deutscher, Murray P.

    1998-01-01

    Polyadenylation at the 3′ terminus has long been considered a specific feature of mRNA and a few other unstable RNA species. Here we show that stable RNAs in Escherichia coli can be polyadenylated as well. RNA molecules with poly(A) tails are the major products that accumulate for essentially all stable RNA precursors when RNA maturation is slowed because of the absence of processing exoribonucleases; poly(A) tails vary from one to seven residues in length. The polyadenylation process depends on the presence of poly(A) polymerase I. A stochastic competition between the exoribonucleases and poly(A) polymerase is proposed to explain the accumulation of polyadenylated RNAs. These data indicate that polyadenylation is not unique to mRNA, and its widespread occurrence suggests that it serves a more general function in RNA metabolism. PMID:9770456

  4. Activation Mechanism of Oncogenic Deletion Mutations in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2.

    PubMed

    Foster, Scott A; Whalen, Daniel M; Özen, Ayşegül; Wongchenko, Matthew J; Yin, JianPing; Yen, Ivana; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mayfield, John D; Chmielecki, Juliann; Stephens, Philip J; Albacker, Lee A; Yan, Yibing; Song, Kyung; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Eigenbrot, Charles; Yu, Christine; Shaw, Andrey S; Manning, Gerard; Skelton, Nicholas J; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Malek, Shiva

    2016-04-11

    Activating mutations in protein kinases drive many cancers. While how recurring point mutations affect kinase activity has been described, the effect of in-frame deletions is not well understood. We show that oncogenic deletions within the β3-αC loop of HER2 and BRAF are analogous to the recurrent EGFR exon 19 deletions. We identify pancreatic carcinomas with BRAF deletions mutually exclusive with KRAS mutations. Crystal structures of BRAF deletions reveal the truncated loop restrains αC in an active "in" conformation, imparting resistance to inhibitors like vemurafenib that bind the αC "out" conformation. Characterization of loop length explains the prevalence of five amino acid deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 and highlights the importance of this region for kinase activity and inhibitor efficacy. PMID:26996308

  5. Activation of diverse signaling pathways by oncogenic PIK3CA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyan; Renuse, Santosh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kim, Min-Sik; Nirujogi, Raja S.; Mohseni, Morassa; Kumar, Praveen; Raju, Rajesh; Zhong, Jun; Yang, Jian; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Jeong, Jun-Seop; Newman, Robert; Powers, Maureen A.; Somani, Babu Lal; Gabrielson, Edward; Sukumar, Saraswati; Stearns, Vered; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng; Vogelstein, Bert; Park, Ben Ho; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    The PIK3CA gene is frequently mutated in human cancers. Here we carry out a SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis using isogenic knockin cell lines containing ‘driver’ oncogenic mutations of PIK3CA to dissect the signaling mechanisms responsible for oncogenic phenotypes induced by mutant PIK3CA. From 8,075 unique phosphopeptides identified, we observe that aberrant activation of PI3K pathway leads to increased phosphorylation of a surprisingly wide variety of kinases and downstream signaling networks. Here, by integrating phosphoproteomic data with human protein microarray-based AKT1 kinase assays, we discover and validate six novel AKT1 substrates, including cortactin. Through mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of cortactin by AKT1 is important for mutant PI3K enhanced cell migration and invasion. Our study describes a quantitative and global approach for identifying mutation-specific signaling events and for discovering novel signaling molecules as readouts of pathway activation or potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25247763

  6. JNK1 determines the oncogenic or tumor-suppressive activity of the integrin-linked kinase in human rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Somers, Gino R; Forrester, Michael; Pienkowska, Malgorzata; Hannigan, Gregory E; Malkin, David

    2009-06-01

    Although most reports describe the protein kinase integrin-linked kinase (ILK) as a proto-oncogene, occasional studies detail opposing functions in the regulation of normal and transformed cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we demonstrated that ILK functions as an oncogene in the highly aggressive pediatric sarcoma alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) and as a tumor suppressor in the related embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). These opposing functions hinge on signaling through a noncanonical ILK target, JNK1, to the proto-oncogene c-Jun. RNAi-mediated depletion of ILK induced activation of JNK and its target, c-Jun, resulting in growth of ERMS cells, whereas in ARMS cells, it led to loss of JNK/c-Jun signaling and suppression of growth both in vitro and in vivo. Ectopic expression of the fusion gene characteristic of ARMS (paired box 3-forkhead homolog in rhabdomyosarcoma [PAX3-FKHR]) in ERMS cells was sufficient to convert them to an ARMS signaling phenotype and render ILK activity oncogenic. Furthermore, restoration of JNK1 in ARMS reestablished a tumor-suppressive function for ILK. These findings indicate what we believe to be a novel effector pathway regulated by ILK, provide a mechanism for interconversion of oncogenic and tumor-suppressor functions of a single regulatory protein based on the genetic background of the tumor cells, and suggest a rationale for tailored therapy of rhabdomyosarcoma based on the different activities of ILK. PMID:19478459

  7. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25873174

  8. Dual roles of p82, the clam CPEB homolog, in cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational masking.

    PubMed

    Minshall, N; Walker, J; Dale, M; Standart, N

    1999-01-01

    In the transcriptionally inert maturing oocyte and early embryo, control of gene expression is largely mediated by regulated changes in translational activity of maternal mRNAs. Some mRNAs are activated in response to poly(A) tail lengthening; in other cases activation results from de-repression of the inactive or masked mRNA. The 3' UTR cis-acting elements that direct these changes are defined, principally in Xenopus and mouse, and the study of their trans-acting binding factors is just beginning to shed light on the mechanism and regulation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational masking. In the marine invertebrate, Spisula solidissima, the timing of activation of three abundant mRNAs (encoding cyclin A and B and the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, RR) in fertilized oocytes correlates with their cytoplasmic polyadenylation. However, in vitro, mRNA-specific unmasking occurs in the absence of polyadenylation. In Walker et al. (in this issue) we showed that p82, a protein defined as selectively binding the 3' UTR masking elements, is a homolog of Xenopus CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein). In functional studies reported here, the elements that support polyadenylation in clam egg lysates include multiple U-rich CPE-like motifs as well as the nuclear polyadenylation signal AAUAAA. This represents the first detailed analysis of invertebrate cis-acting cytoplasmic polyadenylation signals. Polyadenylation activity correlates with p82 binding in wild-type and CPE-mutant RR 3' UTR RNAs. Moreover, since anti-p82 antibodies specifically neutralize polyadenylation in egg lysates, we conclude that clam p82 is a functional homolog of Xenopus CPEB, and plays a positive role in polyadenylation. Anti-p82 antibodies also result in specific translational activation of masked mRNAs in oocyte lysates, lending support to our original model of clam p82 as a translational repressor. We propose therefore that clam p82/CPEB has dual functions in

  9. BCR first exon sequences specifically activate the BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase oncogene of Philadelphia chromosome-positive human leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, A.J.; Witte, O.N. ); Young, J.C.; Pendergast, A.; Pondel, M. ); Landau, N.R.; Littman, D.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase which is homologous to the src gene product in its kinase domain and in the upstream kinase regulatory domains SH2 (src homology region 2) and SH3 (src homology region 3). The murine v-abl oncogene product has lost the SH3 domain as a consequence of N-terminal fusion of gag sequences. Deletion of the SH3 domain is sufficient to render the murine c-abl proto-oncogene product transforming when myristylated N-terminal membrane localization sequences are also present. In contrast, the human BCR/ABL oncogene of the Philadelphia chromosome translocation has an intact SH3 domain and its product is not myristylated at the N terminus. To analyze the contribution of BCR-encoded sequences to BCR/ABL-mediated transformation, the effects of a series of deletions and substitutions were assessed in fibroblast and hematopoietic-cell transformation assays. BCR first-exon sequences specifically potentiate transformation and tyrosine kinase activation when they are fused to the second exon of otherwise intact c-ABL. This suggests that BCR-encoded sequences specifically interfere with negative regulation of the ABL-encoded tyrosine kinase, which would represent a novel mechanism for the activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase-encoding proto-oncogenes.

  10. His499 Regulates Dimerization and Prevents Oncogenic Activation by Asparagine Mutations of the Human Thrombopoietin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Emilie; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Sato, Takeshi; Dass, Sharmila; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Shwe, Myat M; Staerk, Judith; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2016-02-01

    Ligand binding to the extracellular domain of the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) imparts a specific orientation on the transmembrane (TM) and intracellular domains of the receptors that is required for physiologic activation via receptor dimerization. To map the inactive and active dimeric orientations of the TM helices, we performed asparagine (Asn)-scanning mutagenesis of the TM domains of the murine and human TpoR. Substitution of Asn at only one position (S505N) activated the human receptor, whereas Asn substitutions at several positions activated the murine receptor. Second site mutational studies indicate that His(499) near the N terminus of the TM domain is responsible for protecting the human receptor from activation by Asn mutations. Structural studies reveal that the sequence preceding His(499) is helical in the murine receptor but non-helical in peptides corresponding to the TM domain of the inactive human receptor. The activating S505N mutation and the small molecule agonist eltrombopag both induce helix in this region of the TM domain and are associated with dimerization and activation of the human receptor. Thus, His(499) regulates the activation of human TpoR and provides additional protection against activating mutations, such as oncogenic Asn mutations in the TM domain. PMID:26627830

  11. Discovery of a Selective Inhibitor of Oncogenic B-Raf Kinase With Potent Antimelanoma Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.; Lee, J.T.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Cho, H.; Mamo, S.; Bremer, R.; Gillette, S.; Kong, J.; Haass, N.K.; Sproesser, K.; Li, L.; Smalley, K.S.M.; Fong, D.; Zhu, Y.-L.; Marimuthu, A.; Nguyen, H.; Lam, B.; Liu, J.; Cheung, I.; Rice, J.

    2009-05-26

    BRAF{sup V600E} is the most frequent oncogenic protein kinase mutation known. Furthermore, inhibitors targeting 'active' protein kinases have demonstrated significant utility in the therapeutic repertoire against cancer. Therefore, we pursued the development of specific kinase inhibitors targeting B-Raf, and the V600E allele in particular. By using a structure-guided discovery approach, a potent and selective inhibitor of active B-Raf has been discovered. PLX4720, a 7-azaindole derivative that inhibits B-Raf{sup V600E} with an IC{sub 50} of 13 nM, defines a class of kinase inhibitor with marked selectivity in both biochemical and cellular assays. PLX4720 preferentially inhibits the active B-Raf{sup V600E} kinase compared with a broad spectrum of other kinases, and potent cytotoxic effects are also exclusive to cells bearing the V600E allele. Consistent with the high degree of selectivity, ERK phosphorylation is potently inhibited by PLX4720 in B-Raf{sup V600E}-bearing tumor cell lines but not in cells lacking oncogenic B-Raf. In melanoma models, PLX4720 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis exclusively in B-Raf{sup V600E}-positive cells. In B-Raf{sup V600E}-dependent tumor xenograft models, orally dosed PLX4720 causes significant tumor growth delays, including tumor regressions, without evidence of toxicity. The work described here represents the entire discovery process, from initial identification through structural and biological studies in animal models to a promising therapeutic for testing in cancer patients bearing B-Raf{sup V600E}-driven tumors.

  12. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  13. Intrinsically active variants of Erk oncogenically transform cells and disclose unexpected autophosphorylation capability that is independent of TEY phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smorodinsky-Atias, Karina; Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Shir, Alexei; Mooshayef, Navit; Beenstock, Jonah; Karamansha, Yael; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Livnah, Oded; Ahn, Natalie G.; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-01-01

    The receptor-tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras/Raf pathway is an essential cascade for mediating growth factor signaling. It is abnormally overactive in almost all human cancers. The downstream targets of the pathway are members of the extracellular regulated kinases (Erk1/2) family, suggesting that this family is a mediator of the oncogenic capability of the cascade. Although all oncogenic mutations in the pathway result in strong activation of Erks, activating mutations in Erks themselves were not reported in cancers. Here we used spontaneously active Erk variants to check whether Erk’s activity per se is sufficient for oncogenic transformation. We show that Erk1(R84S) is an oncoprotein, as NIH3T3 cells that express it form foci in tissue culture plates, colonies in soft agar, and tumors in nude mice. We further show that Erk1(R84S) and Erk2(R65S) are intrinsically active due to an unusual autophosphorylation activity they acquire. They autophosphorylate the activatory TEY motif and also other residues, including the critical residue Thr-207 (in Erk1)/Thr-188 (in Erk2). Strikingly, Erk2(R65S) efficiently autophosphorylates its Thr-188 even when dually mutated in the TEY motif. Thus this study shows that Erk1 can be considered a proto-oncogene and that Erk molecules possess unusual autoregulatory properties, some of them independent of TEY phosphorylation. PMID:26658610

  14. Discovery of a selective inhibitor of oncogenic B-Raf kinase with potent antimelanoma activity

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, James; Lee, John T.; Wang, Weiru; Zhang, Jiazhong; Cho, Hanna; Mamo, Shumeye; Bremer, Ryan; Gillette, Sam; Kong, Jun; Haass, Nikolas K.; Sproesser, Katrin; Li, Ling; Smalley, Keiran S. M.; Fong, Daniel; Zhu, Yong-Liang; Marimuthu, Adhirai; Nguyen, Hoa; Lam, Billy; Liu, Jennifer; Cheung, Ivana; Rice, Julie; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Luu, Catherine; Settachatgul, Calvin; Shellooe, Rafe; Cantwell, John; Kim, Sung-Hou; Schlessinger, Joseph; Zhang, Kam Y. J.; West, Brian L.; Powell, Ben; Habets, Gaston; Zhang, Chao; Ibrahim, Prabha N.; Hirth, Peter; Artis, Dean R.; Herlyn, Meenhard; Bollag, Gideon

    2008-01-01

    BRAFV600E is the most frequent oncogenic protein kinase mutation known. Furthermore, inhibitors targeting “active” protein kinases have demonstrated significant utility in the therapeutic repertoire against cancer. Therefore, we pursued the development of specific kinase inhibitors targeting B-Raf, and the V600E allele in particular. By using a structure-guided discovery approach, a potent and selective inhibitor of active B-Raf has been discovered. PLX4720, a 7-azaindole derivative that inhibits B-RafV600E with an IC50 of 13 nM, defines a class of kinase inhibitor with marked selectivity in both biochemical and cellular assays. PLX4720 preferentially inhibits the active B-RafV600E kinase compared with a broad spectrum of other kinases, and potent cytotoxic effects are also exclusive to cells bearing the V600E allele. Consistent with the high degree of selectivity, ERK phosphorylation is potently inhibited by PLX4720 in B-RafV600E-bearing tumor cell lines but not in cells lacking oncogenic B-Raf. In melanoma models, PLX4720 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis exclusively in B-RafV600E-positive cells. In B-RafV600E-dependent tumor xenograft models, orally dosed PLX4720 causes significant tumor growth delays, including tumor regressions, without evidence of toxicity. The work described here represents the entire discovery process, from initial identification through structural and biological studies in animal models to a promising therapeutic for testing in cancer patients bearing B-RafV600E-driven tumors. PMID:18287029

  15. RNA helicase A activity is inhibited by oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Schneider, Jeffrey A.; Sajwan, Kamal; Graham, Garrett T.; Griffin, Brittany; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Youbi, Sarah E.; Kallarakal, Abraham; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Casey, John L.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases impact RNA structure and metabolism from transcription through translation, in part through protein interactions with transcription factors. However, there is limited knowledge on the role of transcription factor influence upon helicase activity. RNA helicase A (RHA) is a DExH-box RNA helicase that plays multiple roles in cellular biology, some functions requiring its activity as a helicase while others as a protein scaffold. The oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1 requires RHA to enable Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncogenesis and growth; a small molecule, YK-4-279 disrupts this complex in cells. Our current study investigates the effect of EWS-FLI1 upon RHA helicase activity. We found that EWS-FLI1 reduces RHA helicase activity in a dose-dependent manner without affecting intrinsic ATPase activity; however, the RHA kinetics indicated a complex model. Using separated enantiomers, only (S)-YK-4-279 reverses the EWS-FLI1 inhibition of RHA helicase activity. We report a novel RNA binding property of EWS-FLI1 leading us to discover that YK-4-279 inhibition of RHA binding to EWS-FLI1 altered the RNA binding profile of both proteins. We conclude that EWS-FLI1 modulates RHA helicase activity causing changes in overall transcriptome processing. These findings could lead to both enhanced understanding of oncogenesis and provide targets for therapy. PMID:25564528

  16. Implications of polyadenylation in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Curinha, Ana; Oliveira Braz, Sandra; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Cruz, Andrea; Moreira, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylation is the RNA processing step that completes the maturation of nearly all eukaryotic mRNAs. It is a two-step nuclear process that involves an endonucleolytic cleavage of the pre-mRNA at the 3'-end and the polymerization of a polyadenosine (polyA) tail, which is fundamental for mRNA stability, nuclear export and efficient translation during development. The core molecular machinery responsible for the definition of a polyA site includes several recognition, cleavage and polyadenylation factors that identify and act on a given polyA signal present in a pre-mRNA, usually an AAUAAA hexamer or similar sequence. This mechanism is tightly regulated by other cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors, and its misregulation can cause inefficient gene expression and may ultimately lead to disease. The majority of genes generate multiple mRNAs as a result of alternative polyadenylation in the 3'-untranslated region. The variable lengths of the 3' untranslated regions created by alternative polyadenylation are a recognizable target for differential regulation and clearly affect the fate of the transcript, ultimately modulating the expression of the gene. Over the past few years, several studies have highlighted the importance of polyadenylation and alternative polyadenylation in gene expression and their impact in a variety of physiological conditions, as well as in several illnesses. Abnormalities in the 3'-end processing mechanisms thus represent a common feature among many oncological, immunological, neurological and hematological disorders, but slight imbalances can lead to the natural establishment of a specific cellular state. This review addresses the key steps of polyadenylation and alternative polyadenylation in different cellular conditions and diseases focusing on the molecular effectors that ensure a faultless pre-mRNA 3' end formation. PMID:25484187

  17. Polyadenylation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    1974-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mRNA isolated from infected cell polysomes contains polyadenylic acid [poly(A)] sequences. Detergent-activated purified virions in vitro can transcribe complementary RNA, which has sedimentation properties similar to mRNA, and this RNA also contains poly(A) sequences. Digestion of virion RNA with U2 RNase under conditions where hydrolysis is specific for purine linkages leaves no sequences of polyuridylic acid corresponding in length to the poly(A) on the transcripts. Growth of infectious virus is not inhibited by 3-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) under conditions in which it inhibits polyadenylation of cellular mRNA. The virus-specific mRNA produced in the presence of cordycepin has poly(A) sequences of the same size distribution as that synthesized in the absence of cordycepin. PMID:4363251

  18. The free energy landscape in translational science: how can somatic mutations result in constitutive oncogenic activation?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2014-04-14

    The free energy landscape theory has transformed the field of protein folding. The significance of perceiving function in terms of conformational heterogeneity is gradually shifting the interest in the community from folding to function. From the free energy landscape standpoint the principles are unchanged: rather than considering the entire protein conformational landscape, the focus is on the ensemble around the bottom of the folding funnel. The protein can be viewed as populating one of two states: active or inactive. The basins of the two states are separated by a surmountable barrier, which allows the conformations to switch between the states. Unless the protein is a repressor, under physiological conditions it typically populates the inactive state. Ligand binding (or post-translational modification) triggers a switch to the active state. Constitutive allosteric mutations work by shifting the population from the inactive to the active state and keeping it there. This can happen by either destabilizing the inactive state, stabilizing the active state, or both. Identification of the mechanism through which they work is important since it may assist in drug discovery. Here we spotlight the usefulness of the free energy landscape in translational science, illustrating how oncogenic mutations can work in key proteins from the EGFR/Ras/Raf/Erk/Mek pathway, the main signaling pathway in cancer. Finally, we delineate the key components which are needed in order to trace the mechanism of allosteric events. PMID:24445437

  19. A complex containing PBX2 contributes to activation of the proto-oncogene HOX11.

    PubMed

    Brake, R L; Kees, U R; Watt, P M

    2002-05-31

    Ectopic expression of the homeobox gene HOX11 is associated with a significant proportion of childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (T-ALLs). We hypothesise that one mechanism of gene deregulation involves overcoming the silencing mechanism(s) of gene expression present in normal cells. Here, we describe a search for trans-acting factors that control transcriptional activity from a distal 5' region of the HOX11 promoter. We have identified a region of this promoter which contributes significantly to HOX11 activation and two distinct regulatory elements are involved. First, a PBX2 Regulatory Element PRE-1048 has been identified which contains a novel DNA-binding sequence and mediates significant activation of the HOX11 gene in K562 cells. This is the first report of a homeobox gene being specifically regulated by PBX2 and the second report of a vertebrate homeobox target gene of a PBX protein. The PREP1 protein was also shown to be part of the PRE-1048-binding complex. The other regulatory element we describe here RE-1019 contains little sequence conservation to known transcription control elements. It appears that this element is a novel sequence that binds an as yet unidentified factor, mediating significant activation of the HOX11 gene in K562 cells. This is the first detailed report of elements that mediate regulation of the proto-oncogene HOX11. PMID:12054735

  20. Novel small molecules targeting ciliary transport of Smoothened and oncogenic Hedgehog pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Messias, Ana C.; Schorpp, Kenji; Geerlof, Arie; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter; Hadian, Kamyar; Sattler, Michael; Wanker, Erich E.; Hasenöder, Stefan; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Smoothened (Smo) to the primary cilium (PC) is a potential target to inhibit oncogenic Hh pathway activation in a large number of tumors. One drawback is the appearance of Smo mutations that resist drug treatment, which is a common reason for cancer treatment failure. Here, we undertook a high content screen with compounds in preclinical or clinical development and identified ten small molecules that prevent constitutive active mutant SmoM2 transport into PC for subsequent Hh pathway activation. Eight of the ten small molecules act through direct interference with the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2)-SmoM2 ciliary targeting complex, whereas one antagonist of ionotropic receptors prevents intracellular trafficking of Smo to the PC. Together, these findings identify several compounds with the potential to treat drug-resistant SmoM2-driven cancer forms, but also reveal off-target effects of established drugs in the clinics. PMID:26931153

  1. Nucleolus-derived mediators in oncogenic stress response and activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2016-08-01

    Rapid growth and division of cells, including tumor ones, is correlated with intensive protein biosynthesis. The output of nucleoli, organelles where translational machineries are formed, depends on a rate of particular stages of ribosome production and on accessibility of elements crucial for their effective functioning, including substrates, enzymes as well as energy resources. Different factors that induce cellular stress also often lead to nucleolar dysfunction which results in ribosome biogenesis impairment. Such nucleolar disorders, called nucleolar or ribosomal stress, usually affect cellular functioning which in fact is a result of p53-dependent pathway activation, elicited as a response to stress. These pathways direct cells to new destinations such as cell cycle arrest, damage repair, differentiation, autophagy, programmed cell death or aging. In the case of impaired nucleolar functioning, nucleolar and ribosomal proteins mediate activation of the p53 pathways. They are also triggered as a response to oncogenic factor overexpression to protect tissues and organs against extensive proliferation of abnormal cells. Intentional impairment of any step of ribosome biosynthesis which would direct the cells to these destinations could be a strategy used in anticancer therapy. This review presents current knowledge on a nucleolus, mainly in relation to cancer biology, which is an important and extremely sensitive element of the mechanism participating in cellular stress reaction mediating activation of the p53 pathways in order to counteract stress effects, especially cancer development. PMID:27142852

  2. SerpinB3 and Yap Interplay Increases Myc Oncogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Turato, Cristian; Cannito, Stefania; Simonato, Davide; Villano, Gianmarco; Morello, Elisabetta; Terrin, Liliana; Quarta, Santina; Biasiolo, Alessandra; Ruvoletto, Mariagrazia; Martini, Andrea; Fasolato, Silvano; Zanus, Giacomo; Cillo, Umberto; Gatta, Angelo; Parola, Maurizio; Pontisso, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    SerpinB3 has been recently described as an early marker of liver carcinogenesis, but the potential mechanistic role of this serpin in tumor development is still poorly understood. Overexpression of Myc often correlates with more aggressive tumour forms, supporting its involvement in carcinogenesis. Yes-associated protein (Yap), the main effector of the Hippo pathway, is a central regulator of proliferation and it has been found up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinomas. The study has been designed to investigate and characterize the interplay and functional modulation of Myc by SerpinB3 in liver cancer. Results from this study indicate that Myc was up-regulated by SerpinB3 through calpain and Hippo-dependent molecular mechanisms in transgenic mice and hepatoma cells overexpressing human SerpinB3, and also in human hepatocellular carcinomas. Human recombinant SerpinB3 was capable to inhibit the activity of Calpain in vitro, likely reducing its ability to cleave Myc in its non oncogenic Myc-nick cytoplasmic form. SerpinB3 indirectly increased the transcription of Myc through the induction of Yap pathway. These findings provide for the first time evidence that SerpinB3 can improve the production of Myc through direct and indirect mechanisms that include the inhibition of generation of its cytoplasmic form and the activation of Yap pathway. PMID:26634820

  3. Biological activities of v-myc and rearranged c-myc oncogenes in rat fibroblast cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Mougneau, E; Lemieux, L; Rassoulzadegan, M; Cuzin, F

    1984-09-01

    Two distinct forms of the myc oncogene were assayed for their ability to induce, in cultured rat fibroblast cells, the alterations of cellular growth controls observed upon transfer of the gene of polyoma virus encoding only the large T protein (plt). Both of these rearranged myc genes and the plt gene had been previously shown to cooperate with ras oncogenes for transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts (REF) and were thought to induce the same early step ("immortalization") of the tumoral transformation pathway. We now report that these two different oncogenes elicite the same response in the following biological assays: (i) reduction of the requirements in serum factors for growth in culture of cells of the established FR3T3 line; (ii) expression of transformed properties in low serum medium after transfer into FR3T3 cells expressing only the middle T protein of polyoma virus (MTT lines); (iii) conferring on REF cells the ability to grow as clonal colonies after seeding at low cell density; (iv) conferring on REF cells the ability to grow continuously in cell culture. These congruent phenotypes suggest that the activities of the large T and myc proteins result in the induction of the same molecular events. These results also provide simple biological assays and selective systems for oncogenes of the myc class. PMID:6091107

  4. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects. PMID:25841994

  5. Transgenic expression of oncogenic BRAF induces loss of stem cells in the mouse intestine, which is antagonized by β-catenin activity.

    PubMed

    Riemer, P; Sreekumar, A; Reinke, S; Rad, R; Schäfer, R; Sers, C; Bläker, H; Herrmann, B G; Morkel, M

    2015-06-11

    Colon cancer cells frequently carry mutations that activate the β-catenin and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Yet how oncogenic alterations interact to control cellular hierarchies during tumor initiation and progression is largely unknown. We found that oncogenic BRAF modulates gene expression associated with cell differentiation in colon cancer cells. We therefore engineered a mouse with an inducible oncogenic BRAF transgene, and analyzed BRAF effects on cellular hierarchies in the intestinal epithelium in vivo and in primary organotypic culture. We demonstrate that transgenic expression of oncogenic BRAF in the mouse strongly activated MAPK signal transduction, resulted in the rapid development of generalized serrated dysplasia, but unexpectedly also induced depletion of the intestinal stem cell (ISC) pool. Histological and gene expression analyses indicate that ISCs collectively converted to short-lived progenitor cells after BRAF activation. As Wnt/β-catenin signals encourage ISC identity, we asked whether β-catenin activity could counteract oncogenic BRAF. Indeed, we found that intestinal organoids could be partially protected from deleterious oncogenic BRAF effects by Wnt3a or by small-molecule inhibition of GSK3β. Similarly, transgenic expression of stabilized β-catenin in addition to oncogenic BRAF partially prevented loss of stem cells in the mouse intestine. We also used BRAF(V637E) knock-in mice to follow changes in the stem cell pool during serrated tumor progression and found ISC marker expression reduced in serrated hyperplasia forming after BRAF activation, but intensified in progressive dysplastic foci characterized by additional mutations that activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Our study suggests that oncogenic alterations activating the MAPK and Wnt/β-catenin pathways must be consecutively and coordinately selected to assure stem cell maintenance during colon cancer initiation and progression. Notably, loss of

  6. Upregulation of p-Smad2 contributes to FAT10-induced oncogenic activities in glioma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Zhang, Yisong; Zhang, Peng; Pan, Changcun; Xu, Cheng; Wan, Weiqing; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Liwei

    2016-07-01

    The human leukocyte antigen f-associated transcript 10 (FAT10) has a similar structure and function with ubiquitin, which efficiently mediate proteasome degradation in an ubiquitin-independent manner. FAT10 expression is upregulated in many tumor tissues and plays a vital role in cell cycle regulation and tumor genesis. However, its role in glioma has not been illuminated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of FAT10 and investigate its functional roles in glioma. The expression of FAT10 in glioma patient samples was examined using quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blotting and immunohistochemistry methods. Glioma cell lines with either FAT10 overexpression or knockdown were created. The effect of FAT10 on glioma cell migration and invasion was investigated using these cells. In the present study, we had shown that FAT10 was elevated significantly in glioma samples and correlated with tumor pathological grade. FAT10 high-expression glioma is associated with a poor clinical prognosis. Overexpression of FAT10 promoted proliferation, invasion, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas downregulation of FAT10 had an opposite effect. Overexpression of FAT10 also promoted the growth of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, FAT10 enhanced the phosphorylation of Smad2, which contributes to FAT10-induced oncogenic activities in glioma. In conclusion, these findings indicate that FAT10 is a critical regulator potential therapeutic target of glioma. PMID:26733179

  7. Activation and repression by oncogenic MYC shape tumour-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Walz, Susanne; Lorenzin, Francesca; Morton, Jennifer; Wiese, Katrin E; von Eyss, Björn; Herold, Steffi; Rycak, Lukas; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Karim, Saadia; Bartkuhn, Marek; Roels, Frederik; Wüstefeld, Torsten; Fischer, Matthias; Teichmann, Martin; Zender, Lars; Wei, Chia-Lin; Sansom, Owen; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin

    2014-07-24

    In mammalian cells, the MYC oncoprotein binds to thousands of promoters. During mitogenic stimulation of primary lymphocytes, MYC promotes an increase in the expression of virtually all genes. In contrast, MYC-driven tumour cells differ from normal cells in the expression of specific sets of up- and downregulated genes that have considerable prognostic value. To understand this discrepancy, we studied the consequences of inducible expression and depletion of MYC in human cells and murine tumour models. Changes in MYC levels activate and repress specific sets of direct target genes that are characteristic of MYC-transformed tumour cells. Three factors account for this specificity. First, the magnitude of response parallels the change in occupancy by MYC at each promoter. Functionally distinct classes of target genes differ in the E-box sequence bound by MYC, suggesting that different cellular responses to physiological and oncogenic MYC levels are controlled by promoter affinity. Second, MYC both positively and negatively affects transcription initiation independent of its effect on transcriptional elongation. Third, complex formation with MIZ1 (also known as ZBTB17) mediates repression of multiple target genes by MYC and the ratio of MYC and MIZ1 bound to each promoter correlates with the direction of response. PMID:25043018

  8. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K.; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R.; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer. PMID:26744320

  9. Anti-tumor activity of ESX1 on cancer cells harboring oncogenic K-ras mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Junta; Ishikawa, Susumu; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Masatomo; Koike, Takao; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2008-05-23

    Human ESX1 is a 65-kilodalton (kDa) paired-like homeoprotein that is proteolytically processed into N-terminal 45-kDa and C-terminal 20-kDa fragments. The N-terminal ESX1 fragment, which contains the homeodomain, localizes to the nucleus and represses mRNA transcription from the K-ras gene. When we inoculated human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 constitutive expressing N-terminal region of ESX1 (N-ESX1) into nude mice, transfectant cells uniformly showed decreased tumor-forming activity compared with that of the parental cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of HCT116 carcinoma cells with a fusion protein consisting of N-ESX1 and the protein-transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 TAT protein gave rise to a dramatic reduction in the tumorigenicity of HCT116 cells in nude mice. Our results provide first in vivo evidence for the molecular targeting therapeutic application of the K-ras repressor ESX1, especially TAT-mediated transduction of N-ESX1, in the treatment of human cancers having oncogenic K-ras mutations.

  10. Unraveling the Activation Mechanism of Taspase1 which Controls the Oncogenic AF4-MLL Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Sabiani, Samaneh; Geppert, Tim; Engelbrecht, Christian; Kowarz, Eric; Schneider, Gisbert; Marschalek, Rolf

    2015-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Taspase1-mediated cleavage of the AF4-MLL oncoprotein results in the formation of a stable multiprotein complex which forms the key event for the onset of acute proB leukemia in mice. Therefore, Taspase1 represents a conditional oncoprotein in the context of t(4;11) leukemia. In this report, we used site-directed mutagenesis to unravel the molecular events by which Taspase1 becomes sequentially activated. Monomeric pro-enzymes form dimers which are autocatalytically processed into the enzymatically active form of Taspase1 (αββα). The active enzyme cleaves only very few target proteins, e.g., MLL, MLL4 and TFIIA at their corresponding consensus cleavage sites (CSTasp1) as well as AF4-MLL in the case of leukemogenic translocation. This knowledge was translated into the design of a dominant-negative mutant of Taspase1 (dnTASP1). As expected, simultaneous expression of the leukemogenic AF4-MLL and dnTASP1 causes the disappearance of the leukemogenic oncoprotein, because the uncleaved AF4-MLL protein (328 kDa) is subject to proteasomal degradation, while the cleaved AF4-MLL forms a stable oncogenic multi-protein complex with a very long half-life. Moreover, coexpression of dnTASP1 with a BFP-CSTasp1-GFP FRET biosensor effectively inhibits cleavage. The impact of our findings on future drug development and potential treatment options for t(4;11) leukemia will be discussed. PMID:26137584

  11. YES oncogenic activity is specified by its SH4 domain and regulates RAS/MAPK signaling in colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Fanny; Leroy, Cédric; Simon, Valérie; Benistant, Christine; Roche, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SRC family of tyrosine kinases (SFK) display important functions in human cancer, but their specific role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that YES regulates a unique oncogenic signaling important for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression that is not shared with SRC. Here, we addressed the underlying mechanism involved in this process. We show that YES oncogenic signaling relies on palmitoylation of its SH4 domain that controls YES localization in cholesterol-enriched membrane micro-domains. Specifically, deletion of the palmitoylation site compromised YES transforming activity, while addition of a palmitoylation site in the SH4 domain of SRC was sufficient for SRC to restore the transforming properties of cells in which YES had been silenced. Subsequently, SILAC phosphoproteomic analysis revealed that micro-domain-associated cell adhesive components and receptor tyrosine kinases are major YES substrates. YES also phosphorylates upstream regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling, including EGFR, SHC and SHP2, which were not targeted by SRC due to the absence of palmitoylation. Accordingly, EGFR-induced MAPK activity was attenuated by YES down-regulation, while increased RAS activity significantly restored cell transformation that was lost upon YES silencing. Collectively, these results uncover a critical role for the SH4 domain in the specification of SFK oncogenic activity and a selective role for YES in the induction of RAS/MAPK signaling in CRC cells. PMID:26269757

  12. KLK6-regulated miRNA networks activate oncogenic pathways in breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos G; Ding, Qiang; Pampalakis, Georgios; White, Nicole M A; Boulos, Peter; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Yousef, George M

    2016-08-01

    KLK6 is expressed in normal mammary tissues and is aberrantly regulated in breast cancer. At physiological levels of expression, i.e. those found in normal mammary tissues, KLK6 acts as a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer. However, aberrant overexpression of KLK6 (i.e. 50-100-fold higher than normal), a characteristic of a subset of human breast cancers is associated with increased tumorigenicity (Pampalakis et al. Cancer Res 69:3779-3787, 2009). Here, we stably transfected KLK6-non-expressing MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with the full-length KLK6 cDNA to overexpress KLK6 at levels comparable to those observed in patients, and investigated potential oncogenic miRNA networks regulated by these abnormally high KLK6 expression levels and increased activity of this serine protease. A number of miRNAs that are upregulated (e.g. miR-146a) or downregulated (e.g. miR-34a) via KLK6-induced alterations in the miRNA biogenesis machinery were identified. Integrated experimental and bioinformatics analyses identified convergent miRNA networks targeting the cell cycle, MYC, MAPK, and other signaling pathways. In large clinical datasets, significant correlations between KLK6 and downstream MAPK and MYC targets at both the RNA and protein levels was confirmed, as well as negative correlation with GATA3. It was also demonstrated that KLK6 overexpression and likely its proteolytic activity is associated with alterations in downstream miRNAs and their targets, and these differ with the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The data partly explains the different characteristics of breast cancer subtypes. Importantly, we introduce a combined KLK6-CDKN1B+MYC+CDKN1C score for prediction of long-term patient survival outcomes, with higher scores indicating poor survival. PMID:27093921

  13. Molecular cloning of an activated human oncogene, homologous to v-raf, from primary stomach cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, K; Nakatsu, Y; Sekiguchi, M; Hokamura, K; Tanaka, K; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1985-01-01

    Transfection with high molecular weight DNA from a primary stomach cancer induced foci of transformed NIH 3T3 cells, and the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. By screening with a human Alu-family probe, we isolated the human DNA sequence from the secondary transformant cells. This transforming sequence encompasses about 60 kilobase pairs and is unrelated to known human transforming genes. Examination of homologies between this sequence and retroviral oncogenes revealed that the human transforming sequence is closely related to the v-raf oncogene of murine transforming retrovirus 3611-MSV. Images PMID:3862088

  14. Transcription termination and polyadenylation in retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Guntaka, R V

    1993-09-01

    The provirus structure of retroviruses is bracketed by long terminal repeats (LTRs). The two LTRs (5' and 3') are identical in nucleotide sequence and organization. They contain signals for transcription initiation as well as termination and cleavage polyadenylation. As in eukaryotic pre-mRNAs, the two common signals, the polyadenylation signal, AAUAAA, or a variant AGUAAA, and the G+U-rich sequence are present in all retroviruses. However, the AAUAAA sequence is present in the U3 region in some retroviruses and in the R region in other retroviruses. As in animal cell RNAs, both AAUAAA and G+U-rich sequences apparently contribute to the 3'-end processing of retroviral RNAs. In addition, at least in a few cases examined, the sequences in the U3 region determine the efficiency of 3'-end processing. In retroviruses in which the AAUAAA is localized in the R region, the poly(A) signal in the 3' LTR but not the 5' LTR must be selectively used for the production of genomic RNA. It appears that the short distance between the 5' cap site and polyadenylation signal in the 5' LTR precludes premature termination and polyadenylation. Since 5' and 3' LTRs are identical in sequence and structural organization yet function differently, it is speculated that flanking cellular DNA sequences, chromatin structure, and binding of transcription factors may be involved in the functional divergence of 5' and 3' LTRs of retroviruses. PMID:7902524

  15. Yes-Associated Protein 1 Is Activated and Functions as an Oncogene in Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Baia, Gilson S.; Caballero, Otavia L.; Orr, Brent A.; Lal, Anita; Ho, Janelle S.Y.; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Tihan, Tarik; Mawrin, Christian; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is functionally conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and mammals, and its proposed function is to control tissue homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. The core components are composed of a kinase cascade that culminates with the phosphorylation and inhibition of Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1). Phospho-YAP1 is retained in the cytoplasm. In the absence of Hippo signaling, YAP1 translocates to the nucleus, associates with co-activators TEAD1-4, and functions as a transcriptional factor promoting the expression of key target genes. Components of the Hippo pathway are mutated in human cancers, and deregulation of this pathway plays a role in tumorigenesis. Loss of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene is the most common genetic alteration in meningiomas, and the NF2 gene product, Merlin, acts upstream of the Hippo pathway. Here, we show that primary meningioma tumors have high nuclear expression of YAP1. In meningioma cells, Merlin expression is associated with phosphorylation of YAP1. Using an siRNA transient knockdown of YAP1 in NF2-mutant meningioma cells, we show that suppression of YAP1 impaired cell proliferation and migration. Conversely, YAP1 overexpression led to a strong augment of cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth and restriction of cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of YAP1 in nontransformed arachnoidal cells led to the development of tumors in nude mice. Together, these findings suggest that in meningiomas, deregulation of the Hippo pathway is largely observed in primary tumors and that YAP1 functions as an oncogene promoting meningioma tumorigenesis. PMID:22618028

  16. RABEX-5 plays an oncogenic role in breast cancer by activating MMP-9 pathway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RABEX-5, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RAB-5, plays an important role in cell mobility and altered expression associated with tumor metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the role of RABEX-5 in proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer in vitro and ex vivo. Methods RABEX-5 expression was examined in breast cancer, benign tumor and normal breast tissues by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Two stable cell lines were established, the MCF-7/NC negative control cell line and the MCF-7/KD cell line, which stably expressed an RNA interference (RNAi) construct that induced downregulation of RABEX-5 expression. These cell lines were utilized to evaluate the role of RABEX-5 in cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. The possible role of RABEX-5 in the regulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) was evaluated using western blot and real-time PCR. Results RABEX-5 expression was found to be significantly higher in breast cancer tissues compared with benign tumor and normal breast tissues. High levels of RABEX-5 expression were associated with axillary lymph node metastasis. In addition, RABEX-5 silencing significantly reduced cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and migration ability in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. RABEX −5 knockdown also attenuated the migration of breast cancer cells via modulation of MMP-9 transcriptional activity. Conclusions Our results indicate that RABEX-5 plays an oncogenic role in breast cancer by modulating the proliferation and metastasis potential of breast cancer cells. Thus, RABEX-5 is a promising prognostic indicator for patients with breast cancer. PMID:23941575

  17. Regulation of protein kinase C activity in neuronal differentiation induced by the N-ras oncogene in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, J C; Cuadrado, A; Jones, J E; Trotta, R; Burstein, D E; Thomson, T; Pellicer, A

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the N-ras oncogene under the control of the glucocorticoid-responsive promoter in the pheochromocytoma cell line UR61, a subline of PC-12 cells, has been used to investigate the differentiation process to neuronal cells triggered by ras oncogenes (I. Guerrero, A. Pellicer, and D. E. Burstein, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 150:1185-1192, 1988). Using ras-inducible cell lines, we observed that expression of the oncogenic N-ras p21 protein interferes with the ability of phorbol esters to induce downregulation of protein kinase C. This effect was associated with the appearance of immunologically detectable protein kinase C as well as the activity of the enzyme as analyzed either by binding of [3H]phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate in intact cells or by in vitro kinase activity. These results indicate a relationship between ras p21 and protein kinase C in neuronal differentiation in this model system. Comparison to the murine fibroblast system suggests that this relationship may be functional. Images PMID:2188105

  18. Activated neu oncogene sequences in primary tumors of the peripheral nervous system induced in rats by transplacental exposure to ethylnitrosourea

    SciTech Connect

    Perantoni, A.O.; Rice, J.M.; Reed, C.D.; Watatani, M.; Wenk, M.L.

    1987-09-01

    Neurogenic tumors were selectively induced in high incidence in F344 rats by a single transplacental exposure to the direct-acting alkylating agent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNU). The authors prepared DNA for transfection of NIH 3T3 cells from primary glial tumors of the brain and form schwannomas of the cranial and spinal nerves that developed in the transplacentally exposed offspring between 20 and 40 weeks after birth. DNA preparations from 6 of 13 schwannomas, but not from normal liver, kidney, or intestine of tumor-bearing rats, transformed NIH 3T3 cells. NIH 3T3 clones transformed by schwannoma DNA contained rat repetitive DNA sequences, and all isolates contained rat neu oncogene sequences. A point mutation in the transmembrane region of the putative protein product of neu was identified in all six transformants and in the primary tumors from which they were derived as well as in 5 of 6 schwannomas tested that did not transform NIH 3T3 cells. Of 59 gliomas, only one yielded transforming DNA, and an activated N-ras oncogen was identified. The normal cellular neu sequence for the transmembrane region, but not the mutated sequence, was identified in DNA from all 11 gliomas surveyed by oligonucleotide hybridization. Activation of the neu oncogene, originally identified in cultured cell lines derived from EtNU-induced neurogenic tumors appears specifically associated with tumors of the peripheral nervous system in the F344 inbred strain.

  19. Evaluating the Safety of Retroviral Vectors Based on Insertional Oncogene Activation and Blocked Differentiation in Cultured Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Fatima, Soghra; Ma, Zhijun; Wang, Yong-Dong; Lu, Taihe; Janke, Laura J; Du, Yang; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Insertional oncogenesis due to retroviral (RV) vector integration has caused recurrent leukemia in multiple gene therapy trials, predominantly due to vector integration effects at the LMO2 locus. While currently available preclinical safety models have been used for evaluating vector safety, none have predicted or reproduced the recurrent LMO2 integrations seen in previous X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) and Wiskott–Aldrich clinical gene therapy trials. We now describe a new assay for assessing vector safety that recapitulates naturally occurring insertions into Lmo2 and other T-cell proto-oncogenes leading to a preleukemic developmental arrest in primary murine thymocytes cultured in vitro. This assay was used to compare the relative oncogenic potential of a variety of gamma-RV and lentiviral vectors and to assess the risk conferred by various transcriptional elements contained in these genomes. Gamma-RV vectors that contained full viral long-terminal repeats were most prone to causing double negative 2 (DN2) arrest and led to repeated cases of Lmo2 pathway activation, while lentiviral vectors containing these same elements were significantly less prone to activate proto-oncogenes or cause DN2 arrest. This work provides a new preclinical assay that is especially relevant for assessing safety in SCID disorders and provides a new tool for designing safer RV vectors. PMID:26957223

  20. RNA-Seq profiling of single bovine oocyte transcript abundance and its modulation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Juan M; Chitwood, James L; Ross, Pablo J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular changes occurring during mammalian oocyte maturation are partly regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation (CP) and affect oocyte quality, yet the extent of CP activity during oocyte maturation remains unknown. Single bovine oocyte RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed to examine changes in transcript abundance during in vitro oocyte maturation in cattle. Polyadenylated RNA from individual germinal-vesicle and metaphase-II oocytes was amplified and processed for Illumina sequencing, producing approximately 30 million reads per replicate for each sample type. A total of 10,494 genes were found to be expressed, of which 2,455 were differentially expressed (adjusted P<0.05 and fold change >2) between stages, with 503 and 1,952 genes respectively increasing and decreasing in abundance. Differentially expressed genes with complete 3’-untranslated-region sequence (279 increasing and 918 decreasing in polyadenylated transcript abundance) were examined for the presence, position, and distribution of motifs mediating CP, revealing enrichment (85%) and lack there of (18%) in up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. Examination of total and polyadenylated RNA abundance by quantitative PCR validated these RNA-Seq findings. The observed increases in polyadenylated transcript abundance within the RNA-Seq data are likely due to CP, providing novel insight into targeted transcripts and resultant differential gene expression profiles that contribute to oocyte maturation. PMID:25560149

  1. Complex Selection on Human Polyadenylation Signals Revealed by Polymorphism and Divergence Data.

    PubMed

    Kainov, Yaroslav A; Aushev, Vasily N; Naumenko, Sergey A; Tchevkina, Elena M; Bazykin, Georgii A

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation is a step of mRNA processing which is crucial for its expression and stability. The major polyadenylation signal (PAS) represents a nucleotide hexamer that adheres to the AATAAA consensus sequence. Over a half of human genes have multiple cleavage and polyadenylation sites, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts differing in function, stability, and translational activity. Here, we use available whole-genome human polymorphism data together with data on interspecies divergence to study the patterns of selection acting on PAS hexamers. Common variants of PAS hexamers are depleted of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and SNPs within PAS hexamers have a reduced derived allele frequency (DAF) and increased conservation, indicating prevalent negative selection; at the same time, the SNPs that "improve" the PAS (i.e., those leading to higher cleavage efficiency) have increased DAF, compared to those that "impair" it. SNPs are rarer at PAS of "unique" polyadenylation sites (one site per gene); among alternative polyadenylation sites, at the distal PAS and at exonic PAS. Similar trends were observed in DAFs and divergence between species of placental mammals. Thus, selection permits PAS mutations mainly at redundant and/or weakly functional PAS. Nevertheless, a fraction of the SNPs at PAS hexamers likely affect gene functions; in particular, some of the observed SNPs are associated with disease. PMID:27324920

  2. Complex Selection on Human Polyadenylation Signals Revealed by Polymorphism and Divergence Data

    PubMed Central

    Kainov, Yaroslav A.; Aushev, Vasily N.; Naumenko, Sergey A.; Tchevkina, Elena M.; Bazykin, Georgii A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation is a step of mRNA processing which is crucial for its expression and stability. The major polyadenylation signal (PAS) represents a nucleotide hexamer that adheres to the AATAAA consensus sequence. Over a half of human genes have multiple cleavage and polyadenylation sites, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts differing in function, stability, and translational activity. Here, we use available whole-genome human polymorphism data together with data on interspecies divergence to study the patterns of selection acting on PAS hexamers. Common variants of PAS hexamers are depleted of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and SNPs within PAS hexamers have a reduced derived allele frequency (DAF) and increased conservation, indicating prevalent negative selection; at the same time, the SNPs that “improve” the PAS (i.e., those leading to higher cleavage efficiency) have increased DAF, compared to those that “impair” it. SNPs are rarer at PAS of “unique” polyadenylation sites (one site per gene); among alternative polyadenylation sites, at the distal PAS and at exonic PAS. Similar trends were observed in DAFs and divergence between species of placental mammals. Thus, selection permits PAS mutations mainly at redundant and/or weakly functional PAS. Nevertheless, a fraction of the SNPs at PAS hexamers likely affect gene functions; in particular, some of the observed SNPs are associated with disease. PMID:27324920

  3. Retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene in a Marek's disease T-lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, E; Perbal, B

    1996-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an avian herpesvirus that causes, in chickens, a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by malignant transformation of T lymphocytes. The rapid onset of polyclonal tumors indicates the existence of MDV-encoded oncogenic products. However, the molecular basis of MDV-induced lymphoproliferative disease and latency remains largely unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that MDV and Rous-associated virus (RAV) might cooperate in the development of B-cell lymphomas induced by RAV. Our present results indicate for the first time that MDV and RAV might also act synergistically in the development of T-cell lymphomas. We report an example of an MDV-transformed T-lymphoblastoid cell line (T9) expressing high levels of a truncated C-MYB protein as a result of RAV integration within one c-myb allele. The chimeric RAV-c-myb mRNA species initiated in the 5' long terminal repeat of RAV are deprived of sequences corresponding to c-myb exons 1 to 3. The attenuation of MDV oncogenicity has been strongly related to structural changes in the MDV BamHI-D and BamHI-H DNA fragments. We have established that both DNA restriction fragments are rearranged in the T9 MDV-transformed cells. Our results suggest that retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is a critical factor involved in the maintenance of the transformed phenotype and the tumorigenic potential of this T-lymphoma cell line. PMID:8892859

  4. Deregulated hepsin protease activity confers oncogenicity by concomitantly augmenting HGF/MET signalling and disrupting epithelial cohesion.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, T A; Belitškin, D; Pant, S M; Englund, J I; Marques, E; Ala-Hongisto, H; Nevalaita, L; Sihto, H; Heikkilä, P; Leidenius, M; Hewitson, K; Ramachandra, M; Moilanen, A; Joensuu, H; Kovanen, P E; Poso, A; Klefström, J

    2016-04-01

    Hepsin belongs to a family of cell-surface serine proteases, which have sparked interest as therapeutic targets because of the accessibility of extracellular protease domain for inhibitors. Hepsin is frequently amplified and/or overexpressed in epithelial cancers, but it is not clear how enhanced hepsin expression confers a potential for oncogenicity. We show that hepsin is consistently overexpressed in more than 40% of examined breast cancers, including all major biological subtypes. The effects of doxycycline-induced hepsin overexpression were examined in mammary epithelial organoids, and we found that induced hepsin acutely downmodulates its cognate inhibitor, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activator inhibitor type 1 (HAI-1). Hepsin-induced depletion of cellular HAI-1 led to a sharp increase in pericellular serine protease activity. The derepressed hepsin proteolytically activated downstream serine proteases, augmented HGF/MET signalling and caused deterioration of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes; structures important for cell cohesion and cell-basement membrane interaction. Moreover, chronic induction of hepsin considerably shortened the latency of Myc-dependent tumourigenesis in the mouse mammary gland. The serine protease and uPA system inhibitor WX-UK1, identified as a micromolar range hepsin inhibitor, prevented hepsin from augmenting HGF/MET signalling and disrupting desmosomes and hemidesmosomes. The findings suggest that the oncogenic activity of hepsin arises not only from elevated expression level but also from depletion of HAI-1, events which together trigger gain-of-function activity impacting HGF/MET signalling and epithelial cohesion. Thus, hepsin overexpression is a major oncogenic conferrer to a serine protease activity involved in breast cancer dissemination. PMID:26165838

  5. Multiple proto-oncogene activations in avian leukosis virus-induced lymphomas: evidence for stage-specific events.

    PubMed Central

    Clurman, B E; Hayward, W S

    1989-01-01

    We have examined avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas for multiple, stage-specific oncogene activations. Three targets for viral integration were identified: c-myb, c-myc, and a newly identified locus termed c-bic. The c-myb and c-myc genes were associated with different lymphoma phenotypes. The c-bic locus was a target for integration in one class of lymphomas, usually in conjunction with c-myc activation. The data indicate that c-myc and c-bic may act synergistically during lymphomagenesis and that c-bic is involved in late stages of tumor progression. Images PMID:2548084

  6. The LMP1 oncogene of EBV activates PERK and the unfolded protein response to drive its own synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Yun

    2008-01-01

    The oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) without a ligand drives proliferation of EBV-infected B cells. Its levels vary in cells of clonal populations by more than 100-fold, which leads to multiple distinct activities of the oncogene. At intermediate levels it drives proliferation, and at high levels it inhibits general protein synthesis by inducing phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). We have found that LMP1 activates PERK to induce phosphorylation of eIF2α, which upregulates activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression. ATF4, in turn, transactivates LMP1's own promoter. LMP1 activates not only PERK but also inositol requiring kinase 1 (IRE1) and ATF6, 3 pathways of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Increasing expression levels of LMP1 induced a dose-dependent increase in IRE1 activity, as measured by its “splicing” of XBP-1. These infected B cells secrete immunoglobins independent of the levels of LMP1, indicating that only a threshold level of XBP-1 is required for the secretion. These findings indicate that LMP1's activation of the UPR is a normal event in a continuum of LMP1's expression that leads both to stimulatory and inhibitory functions and regulates the physiology of EBV-infected B cells in multiple, unexpected modes. PMID:18042799

  7. Polyadenylation site choice in yeast is affected by competition between Npl3 and polyadenylation factor CFI

    PubMed Central

    Bucheli, Miriam E.; He, Xiaoyuan; Kaplan, Craig D.; Moore, Claire L.; Buratowski, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Multiple steps in mRNA processing and transcription are coupled. Notably, the processing of mRNA 3′ ends is linked to transcription termination by RNA polymerase II. Previously, we found that the yeast hnRNP protein Npl3 can negatively regulate 3′ end mRNA formation and termination at the GAL1 gene. Here we show that overexpression of the Hrp1 or Rna14 subunits of the CF IA polyadenylation factor increases recognition of a weakened polyadenylation site. Genetic interactions of mutant alleles of NPL3 or HRP1 with RNA15 also indicate antagonism between these factors. Npl3 competes with Rna15 for binding to a polyadenylation precursor and inhibits cleavage and polyadenylation in vitro. These results suggest that an important function of hnRNP proteins is to ensure the fidelity of mRNA processing. Our results support a model in which balanced competition of Npl3 with mRNA processing factors may promote recognition of proper polyadenylation sites while suppressing cryptic sites. PMID:17684230

  8. Intronic cleavage and polyadenylation regulates gene expression during DNA damage response through U1 snRNA

    PubMed Central

    Devany, Emral; Park, Ji Yeon; Murphy, Michael R; Zakusilo, George; Baquero, Jorge; Zhang, Xiaokan; Hoque, Mainul; Tian, Bin; Kleiman, Frida E

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response involves coordinated control of gene expression and DNA repair. Using deep sequencing, we found widespread changes of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation site usage on ultraviolet-treatment in mammalian cells. Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation regulation in the 3ʹ untranslated region is substantial, leading to both shortening and lengthening of 3ʹ untranslated regions of genes. Interestingly, a strong activation of intronic alternative cleavage and polyadenylation sites is detected, resulting in widespread expression of truncated transcripts. Intronic alternative cleavage and polyadenylation events are biased to the 5ʹ end of genes and affect gene groups with important functions in DNA damage response and cancer. Moreover, intronic alternative cleavage and polyadenylation site activation during DNA damage response correlates with a decrease in U1 snRNA levels, and is reversible by U1 snRNA overexpression. Importantly, U1 snRNA overexpression mitigates ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. Together, these data reveal a significant gene regulatory scheme in DNA damage response where U1 snRNA impacts gene expression via the U1-alternative cleavage and polyadenylation axis. PMID:27462460

  9. Pancreatitis promotes oncogenic KrasG12D-induced pancreatic transformation through activation of Nupr1

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Daniel; Garcia, Maria Noé; Hamidi, Tewfik; Cano, Carla; Calvo, Ezequiel; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2014-01-01

    During the initiation stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced by oncogenic Kras, pancreatic cells are exposed to both a protumoral effect and an opposing tumor suppressive process known as oncogene-induced senescence. Pancreatitis disrupts this balance in favor of the transforming effect of oncogenes by lowering the tumor suppressive threshold of oncogene-induced senescence through expression of the stress protein Nupr1. PMID:27308320

  10. The Oncogenic Lung Cancer Fusion Kinase CD74-ROS Activates a Novel Invasiveness Pathway Through E-Syt1 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Johnson, Hannah; Bronson, Roderick T.; de Feraudy, Sebastien; White, Forest; Charest, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer often present with metastatic disease and therefore have a very poor prognosis. The recent discovery of several novel ROS receptor tyrosine kinase molecular alterations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents a therapeutic opportunity for the development of new targeted treatment strategies. Here, we report that the NSCLC-derived fusion CD74-ROS, which accounts for 30% of all ROS fusion kinases in NSCLC, is an active and oncogenic tyrosine kinase. We found that CD74-ROS expressing cells were highly invasive in vitro and metastatic in vivo. Pharmacological inhibition of CD74-ROS kinase activity reversed its transforming capacity by attenuating downstrream signaling networks. Using quantitative phosphoproteomics, we uncovered a mechanism by which CD74-ROS activates a novel pathway driving cell invasion. Expression of CD74-ROS resulted in the phosphorylation of the extended synaptotagmin-like protein E-Syt1. Elimination of E-Syt1 expression drastically reduced invasiveness both in vitro and in vivo without modifying the oncogenic activity of CD74-ROS. Furthermore, expression of CD74-ROS in non-invasive NSCLC cell lines readily confered invasive properties that paralleled the acquisition of E-Syt1 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings indicate that E-Syt1 is a mediator of cancer cell invasion and molecularly define ROS fusion kinases as therapeutic targets in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:22659450

  11. Oncogenic activity of BIRC2 and BIRC3 mutants independent of nuclear factor-κB-activating potential.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Azusa; Soda, Manabu; Ueno, Toshihide; Kojima, Shinya; Sonehara, Kyuto; Kawazu, Masahito; Sai, Eirin; Yamashita, Yoshihiro; Nagase, Takahide; Mano, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    BIRC2 and BIRC3 are closely related members of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family of proteins and play pivotal roles in regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling and apoptosis. Copy number loss for and somatic mutation of BIRC2 and BIRC3 have been frequently detected in lymphoid malignancies, with such genetic alterations being thought to contribute to carcinogenesis through activation of the noncanonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Here we show that BIRC2 and BIRC3 mutations are also present in a wide range of epithelial tumors and that most such nonsense or frameshift mutations confer direct transforming potential. This oncogenic function of BIRC2/3 mutants is largely independent of their ability to activate NF-κB signaling. Rather, all of the transforming mutants lack an intact RING finger domain, with loss of ubiquitin ligase activity being essential for transformation irrespective of NF-κB regulation. The serine-threonine kinase NIK was found to be an important, but not exclusive, mediator of BIRC2/3-driven carcinogenesis, although this function was independent of NF-κB activation. Our data thus suggest that, in addition to the BIRC2/3-NIK-NF-κB signaling pathway, BIRC2/3-NIK signaling targets effectors other than NF-κB and thereby contributes directly to carcinogenesis. Identification of these effectors may provide a basis for the development of targeted agents for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies and other cancers with BIRC2/3 alterations. PMID:26094954

  12. The murine IgM secretory poly(A) site contains dual upstream and downstream elements which affect polyadenylation.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, C; Virtanen, A

    1997-01-01

    Regulation of polyadenylation efficiency at the secretory poly(A) site plays an essential role in gene expression at the immunoglobulin (IgM) locus. At this poly(A) site the consensus AAUAAA hexanucleotide sequence is embedded in an extended AU-rich region and there are two downstream GU-rich regions which are suboptimally placed. As these sequences are involved in formation of the polyadenylation pre-initiation complex, we examined their function in vivo and in vitro . We show that the upstream AU-rich region can function in the absence of the consensus hexanucleotide sequence both in vivo and in vitro and that both GU-rich regions are necessary for full polyadenylation activity in vivo and for formation of polyadenylation-specific complexes in vitro . Sequence comparisons reveal that: (i) the dual structure is distinct for the IgM secretory poly(A) site compared with other immunoglobulin isotype secretory poly(A) sites; (ii) the presence of an AU-rich region close to the consensus hexanucleotide is evolutionarily conserved for IgM secretory poly(A) sites. We propose that the dual structure of the IgM secretory poly(A) site provides a flexibility to accommodate changes in polyadenylation complex components during regulation of polyadenylation efficiency. PMID:9171084

  13. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  14. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  15. The Ubiquitin-associated (UBA) Domain of SCCRO/DCUN1D1 Protein Serves as a Feedback Regulator of Biochemical and Oncogenic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Towe, Christopher W.; Choi, Lydia; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Bains, Sarina; Rechler, Willi; Hao, Bing; Ramanathan, Yegnanarayana; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of squamous cell carcinoma-related oncogene (SCCRO) activates its function as an oncogene in a wide range of human cancers. The oncogenic activity of SCCRO requires its potentiating neddylation domain, which regulates its E3 activity for neddylation. The contribution of the N-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain to SCCRO function remains to be defined. We found that the UBA domain of SCCRO preferentially binds to polyubiquitin chains in a linkage-independent manner. Binding of polyubiquitin chains to the UBA domain inhibits the neddylation activity of SCCRO in vivo by inhibiting SCCRO-promoted nuclear translocation of neddylation components and results in a corresponding decrease in cullin-RING-ligase-promoted ubiquitination. The results of colony formation and xenograft assays showed a mutation in the UBA domain of SCCRO that reduces binding to polyubiquitin chains, significantly enhancing its oncogenic activity. Analysis of 47 lung and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas identified a case with a frameshift mutation in SCCRO that putatively codes for a protein that lacks a UBA domain. Analysis of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas showed that recurrent mutations cluster in the UBA domains of SCCRO, lose the ability to bind to polyubiquitinated proteins, and have increased neddylation and transformation activities. Combined, these data suggest that the UBA domain functions as a negative regulator of SCCRO function. Mutations in the UBA domain lead to loss of inhibitory control, which results in increased biochemical and oncogenic activity. The clustering of mutations in the UBA domain of SCCRO suggests that mutations may be a mechanism of oncogene activation in human cancers. PMID:25411243

  16. Retrograde TrkAIII transport from ERGIC to ER: a re-localisation mechanism for oncogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Antonietta Rosella; Cappabianca, Lucia; Ruggeri, Pierdomenico; Gneo, Luciana; Maccarone, Rita; Mackay, Andrew Reay

    2015-01-01

    In human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma (NB) cells, nascent immature N-glycosylated 110kDa TrkA moves rapidly from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi Network (GN), where it matures into the 140kDa receptor prior to being transported to the cell surface, creating GN and cell surface pools of inactive receptor maintained below the spontaneous activation threshold by a full compliment of inhibitory domains and endogenous PTPases. In contrast, the oncogenic alternative TrkAIII splice variant is not expressed at the cell surface but re-localises to intracellular membranes, within which it exhibits spontaneous ERGIC/COPI-associated activation and oncogenic Akt signalling. In this study, we characterise the mechanism responsible for TrkAIII re-localisation. Spontaneous TrkAIII activation, facilitated by D4 IG-like domain and N-glycosylation site omission, increases spontaneous activation potential by altering intracellular trafficking, inhibiting cell surface expression and eliminating an important inhibitory domain. TrkAIII, spontaneously activated within the permissive ERGIC/COPI compartment, rather than moving in an anterograde direction to the GN exhibits retrograde transport back to the ER, where it is inactivated. This sets-up self-perpetuating TrkAIII re-cycling between the ERGIC and ER, that ensures continual accumulation above the spontaneous activation threshold of the ERGIC/COPI compartment. This is reversed by TrkA tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which promote anterograde transport of inactivated TrkAIII to the GN, resulting in GN-associated TrkAIII maturation to a 120kDa species that is degraded at the proteasome. PMID:26415233

  17. Oncogenic Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Signet Ring Stromal Cell Tumor of the Ovary.

    PubMed

    Kopczynski, Janusz; Kowalik, Artur; Chłopek, Małgorzata; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Góźdź, Stanisław; Lasota, Jerzy; Miettinen, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Signet ring stromal cell tumor (SRSCT) of the ovary is a very rare benign ovarian neoplasm. To date, no underlying genetic mechanism has been identified. In this study, 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were evaluated for mutations in a typical SRSCT using the next-generation DNA sequencing approach. An in-frame deletion of 30 nucleotides in the glycogen serine kinase-3 beta phosphorylation region of the β-catenin gene (CTNNB1) was identified, and the finding was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This deletion (c.68_97del) at the protein level would lead to a p.Ser23_Ser33delinsThr oncogenic-type mutation. Subsequent immunohistochemistry showed prominent nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and cyclin D1 in tumor cells. Thus, mutational activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway could be a crucial event in the molecular pathogenesis of SRSCT of the ovary. These findings may also assist in the diagnosis of this rare tumor. PMID:26509912

  18. The Synovial Sarcoma SYT-SSX2 Oncogene Remodels the Cytoskeleton through Activation of the Ephrin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Roy; Hunt, Laura B.; Frump, Andrea L.; Garcia, Christina B.; Benesh, Andrew; Caldwell, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue cancer associated with a recurrent t(X:18) translocation that generates one of two fusion proteins, SYT-SSX1 or SYT-SSX2. In this study, we demonstrate that SYT-SSX2 is a unique oncogene. Rather than confer enhanced proliferation on its target cells, SYT-SSX2 instead causes a profound alteration of their architecture. This aberrant morphology included elongation of the cell body and formation of neurite-like extensions. We also observed that cells transduced with SYT-SSX2 often repulsed one another. Notably, cell repulsion is a known component of ephrin signaling. Further analysis of SYT-SSX2–infected cells revealed significant increases in the expression and activation of Eph/ephrin pathway components. On blockade of EphB2 signaling SYT-SSX2 infectants demonstrated significant reversion of the aberrant cytoskeletal phenotype. In addition, we discovered, in parallel, that SYT-SSX2 induced stabilization of the microtubule network accompanied by accumulation of detyrosinated Glu tubulin and nocodazole resistance. Glu tubulin regulation was independent of ephrin signaling. The clinical relevance of these studies was confirmed by abundant expression of both EphB2 and Glu tubulin in SYT-SSX2–positive synovial sarcoma tissues. These results indicate that SYT-SSX2 exerts part of its oncogenic effect by altering cytoskeletal architecture in an Eph-dependent manner and cytoskeletal stability through a concurrent and distinct pathway. PMID:17686994

  19. Characterization of the distal polyadenylation site of the ß-adducin (Add2) pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Costessi, Luisa; Porro, Fabiola; Iaconcig, Alessandra; Nedeljkovic, Mirjana; Muro, Andrés Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Most genes have multiple polyadenylation sites (PAS), which are often selected in a tissue-specific manner, altering protein products and affecting mRNA stability, subcellular localization and/or translability. Here we studied the polyadenylation mechanisms associated to the beta-adducin gene (Add2). We have previously shown that the Add2 gene has a very tight regulation of alternative polyadenylation, using proximal PAS in erythroid tissues, and a distal one in brain. Using chimeric minigenes and cell transfections we identified the core elements responsible for polyadenylation at the distal PAS. Deletion of either the hexanucleotide motif (Hm) or the downstream element (DSE) resulted in reduction of mature mRNA levels and activation of cryptic PAS, suggesting an important role for the DSE in polyadenylation of the distal Add2 PAS. Point mutation of the UG repeats present in the DSE, located immediately after the cleavage site, resulted in a reduction of processed mRNA and in the activation of the same cryptic site. RNA-EMSA showed that this region is active in forming RNA-protein complexes. Competition experiments showed that RNA lacking the DSE was not able to compete the RNA-protein complexes, supporting the hypothesis of an essential important role for the DSE. Next, using a RNA-pull down approach we identified some of the proteins bound to the DSE. Among these proteins we found PTB, TDP-43, FBP1 and FBP2, nucleolin, RNA helicase A and vigilin. All these proteins have a role in RNA metabolism, but only PTB has a reported function in polyadenylation. Additional experiments are needed to determine the precise functional role of these proteins in Add2 polyadenylation. PMID:23554949

  20. Loss of MBNL Leads to Disruption of Developmentally Regulated Alternative Polyadenylation in RNA-Mediated Disease

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Ranjan; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Manchanda, Mini; Mohan, Apoorva; Li, Moyi; Finn, Dustin J.; Goodwin, Marianne; Zhang, Chaolin; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A.; Swanson, Maurice S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Inhibition of muscleblind-like (MBNL) activity due to sequestration by microsatellite expansion RNAs is a major pathogenic event in the RNA-mediated disease myotonic dystrophy (DM). Although MBNL1 and MBNL2 bind to nascent transcripts to regulate alternative splicing during muscle and brain development, another major binding site for the MBNL protein family is the 3′ untranslated region of target RNAs. Here, we report that depletion of Mbnl proteins in mouse embryo fibroblasts leads to mis-regulation of thousands of alternative polyadenylation events. HITS-CLIP and minigene reporter analyses indicate that these polyadenylation switches are a direct consequence of MBNL binding to target RNAs. Mis-regulated alternative polyadenylation also occurs in skeletal muscle in a mouse polyCUG model and human DM resulting in the persistence of neonatal polyadenylation patterns. These findings reveal a novel developmental function for MBNL proteins and demonstrate that DM is characterized by mis-regulation of pre-mRNA processing at multiple levels. PMID:25263597

  1. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of fatty-acid synthase gene (FASN).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-10-24

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  2. Metabolic targeting of oncogene MYC by selective activation of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate family of transporters.

    PubMed

    Gan, L; Xiu, R; Ren, P; Yue, M; Su, H; Guo, G; Xiao, D; Yu, J; Jiang, H; Liu, H; Hu, G; Qing, G

    2016-06-01

    Deregulation of the MYC oncogene produces Myc protein that regulates multiple aspects of cancer cell metabolism, contributing to the acquisition of building blocks essential for cancer cell growth and proliferation. Therefore, disabling Myc function represents an attractive therapeutic option for cancer treatment. However, pharmacological strategies capable of directly targeting Myc remain elusive. Here, we identified that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a drug candidate that primarily inhibits glycolysis, preferentially induced massive cell death in human cancer cells overexpressing the MYC oncogene, in vitro and in vivo, without appreciable effects on those exhibiting low MYC levels. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of glutamine metabolism synergistically potentiated the synthetic lethal targeting of MYC by 3-BrPA due in part to the metabolic disturbance caused by this combination. Mechanistically, we identified that the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and MCT2, which enable efficient 3-BrPA uptake by cancer cells, were selectively activated by Myc. Two regulatory mechanisms were involved: first, Myc directly activated MCT1 and MCT2 transcription by binding to specific recognition sites of both genes; second, Myc transcriptionally repressed miR29a and miR29c, resulting in enhanced expression of their target protein MCT1. Of note, expressions of MCT1 and MCT2 were each significantly elevated in MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas and C-MYC-overexpressing lymphomas than in tumors without MYC overexpression, correlating with poor prognosis and unfavorable patient survival. These results identify a novel mechanism by which Myc sensitizes cells to metabolic inhibitors and validate 3-BrPA as potential Myc-selective cancer therapeutics. PMID:26434591

  3. The proto-oncogene c-ets is preferentially expressed in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J H

    1985-01-01

    The transforming sequences of the avian acute leukemia virus, E26, contain two distinct oncogenes, v-mybE and v-ets, fused together. By using a probe containing v-ets sequences, polyadenylated transcripts of the c-ets proto-oncogene were detected in avian tissues; they included a major 7.0-kilobase and a minor 2.0-kilobase species. These c-ets mRNAs were detected at high levels only in lymphoid organs and in avian T and B lymphoid cell lines. A similar pattern of c-ets transcription was observed in human hematopoietic cell lines, with transcripts detected in lymphoid B and T cells but not in erythroid or myeloid cells. The E26 oncogene was inserted into an inducible expression vector, and a 90-kilodalton protein (bp90) was produced in bacteria. Rabbit antisera raised to purified bp90 precipitated P135gag-mybE-ets, the v-mybE-ets polyprotein expressed in E26-transformed cells, and also reacted with p50v-mybA, the transforming protein of the avian myeloblastosis virus. Antiserum to bp90 was absorbed with a bacterially synthesized v-mybA protein to remove anti-myb activity. The absorbed anti-bp90 serum retained the ability to immunoprecipitate P135gag-mybE-ets from E26-transformed cells and specifically reacted with a 56-kilodalton polypeptide (p56) detected in chicken lymphoid organs and in T and B lymphocytes of both avian and human origin. The data suggest that p56 is a translational product of the c-ets proto-oncogene and imply that p56 may be involved in regulating the growth of lymphoid cells. Images PMID:3018492

  4. HOTAIR IS A NEGATIVE PROGNOSTIC FACTOR AND EXHIBITS PRO-ONCOGENIC ACTIVITY IN PANCREATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyounghyun; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Johnson, Greg; Frank, James; Burghardt, Robert; Kim, Sangbae; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    HOTAIR is a long intervening non-coding RNA (lincRNA) that associates with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) and overexpression is correlated with poor survival for breast, colon and liver cancer patients. In this study, we show that HOTAIR expression is increased in pancreatic tumors compared to non-tumor tissue and is associated with more aggressive tumors. Knockdown of HOTAIR (siHOTAIR) by RNA interference shows that HOTAIR plays an important role in pancreatic cancer cell invasion and as reported in other cancer cell lines. In contrast, HOTAIR knockdown in Panc1 and L3.6pL pancreatic cancer cells that overexpress this lincRNA decreased cell proliferation, altered cell cycle progression, and induced apoptosis, demonstrating an expanded function for HOTAIR in pancreatic cancer cells compared to other cancer cell lines. Results of gene array studies showed that there was minimal overlap between HOTAIR-regulated genes in pancreatic vs. breast cancer cells and HOTAIR uniquely suppressed several interferon-related genes and gene sets related to cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Analysis of selected genes suppressed by HOTAIR in Panc1 and L3.6 pL cells showed by knockdown of EZH2 and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that HOTAIR-mediated gene repression was both PRC2-dependent and -independent. HOTAIR knockdown in L3.6pL cells inhibited tumor growth in mouse xenograft model, further demonstrating the pro-oncogenic function of HOTAIR in pancreatic cancer. PMID:22614017

  5. Rho GTPase Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Oncogenic Roles for Rho GTPase-Activating Proteins in Basal-like Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Campbell D; Fan, Cheng; Mitin, Natalia; Baker, Nicole M; George, Samuel D; Graham, David M; Perou, Charles M; Burridge, Keith; Der, Channing J; Rossman, Kent L

    2016-07-01

    The basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) subtype accounts for a disproportionately high percentage of overall breast cancer mortality. The current therapeutic options for BLBC need improvement; hence, elucidating signaling pathways that drive BLBC growth may identify novel targets for the development of effective therapies. Rho GTPases have previously been implicated in promoting tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. These proteins are inactivated by Rho-selective GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAP), which have generally been presumed to act as tumor suppressors. Surprisingly, RNA-Seq analysis of the Rho GTPase signaling transcriptome revealed high expression of several RhoGAP genes in BLBC tumors, raising the possibility that these genes may be oncogenic. To evaluate this, we examined the roles of two of these RhoGAPs, ArhGAP11A (also known as MP-GAP) and RacGAP1 (also known as MgcRacGAP), in promoting BLBC. Both proteins were highly expressed in human BLBC cell lines, and knockdown of either gene resulted in significant defects in the proliferation of these cells. Knockdown of ArhGAP11A caused CDKN1B/p27-mediated arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, whereas depletion of RacGAP1 inhibited growth through the combined effects of cytokinesis failure, CDKN1A/p21-mediated RB1 inhibition, and the onset of senescence. Random migration was suppressed or enhanced by the knockdown of ArhGAP11A or RacGAP1, respectively. Cell spreading and levels of GTP-bound RhoA were increased upon depletion of either RhoGAP. We have established that, via the suppression of RhoA, ArhGAP11A and RacGAP1 are both critical drivers of BLBC growth, and propose that RhoGAPs can act as oncogenes in cancer. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3826-37. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216196

  6. Oncogenic KRAS sensitizes premalignant, but not malignant cells, to Noxa-dependent apoptosis through the activation of the MEK/ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Annalisa; Majorini, Maria Teresa; Elliott, Richard; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J.; Cancelliere, Carlotta; Bardelli, Alberto; Seneci, Pierfausto; Walczak, Henning; Delia, Domenico; Lecis, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    KRAS is mutated in about 20-25% of all human cancers and especially in pancreatic, lung and colorectal tumors. Oncogenic KRAS stimulates several pro-survival pathways, but it also triggers the trans-activation of pro-apoptotic genes. In our work, we show that G13D mutations of KRAS activate the MAPK pathway, and ERK2, but not ERK1, up-regulates Noxa basal levels. Accordingly, premalignant epithelial cells are sensitized to various cytotoxic compounds in a Noxa-dependent manner. In contrast to these findings, colorectal cancer cell sensitivity to treatment is independent of KRAS status and Noxa levels are not up-regulated in the presence of mutated KRAS despite the fact that ERK2 still promotes Noxa expression. We therefore speculated that other survival pathways are counteracting the pro-apoptotic effect of mutated KRAS and found that the inhibition of AKT restores sensitivity to treatment, especially in presence of oncogenic KRAS. In conclusion, our work suggests that the pharmacological inhibition of the pathways triggered by mutated KRAS could also switch off its oncogene-activated pro-apoptotic stimulation. On the contrary, the combination of chemotherapy to inhibitors of specific pro-survival pathways, such as the one controlled by AKT, could enhance treatment efficacy by exploiting the pro-death stimulation derived by oncogene activation. PMID:26028667

  7. Reversing HOXA9 oncogene activation by PI3K inhibition: epigenetic mechanism and prognostic significance in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bruno M; Smith, Justin S; Chen, Ying; Chen, Justin; Phillips, Heidi S; Aldape, Kenneth D; Zardo, Giuseppe; Nigro, Janice; James, C David; Fridlyand, Jane; Reis, Rui M; Costello, Joseph F

    2010-01-15

    HOXA genes encode critical transcriptional regulators of embryonic development that have been implicated in cancer. In this study, we documented functional relevance and mechanism of activation of HOXA9 in glioblastoma (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor. Expression of HOXA genes was investigated using reverse transcription-PCR in primary gliomas and glioblastoma cell lines and was validated in two sets of expression array data. In a subset of GBM, HOXA genes are aberrently activated within confined chromosomal domains. Transcriptional activation of the HOXA cluster was reversible by a phosphoinostide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor through an epigenetic mechanism involving histone H3K27 trimethylation. Functional studies of HOXA9 showed its capacity to decrease apoptosis and increase cellular proliferation along with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-including ligand resistance. Notably, aberrant expression of HOXA9 was independently predictive of shorter overall and progression-free survival in two GBM patient sets and improved survival prediction by MGMT promoter methylation. Thus, HOXA9 activation is a novel, independent, and negative prognostic marker in GBM that is reversible through a PI3K-associated epigenetic mechanism. Our findings suggest a transcriptional pathway through which PI3K activates oncogenic HOXA expression with implications for mTOR or PI3K targeted therapies. PMID:20068170

  8. Reversing HOXA9 Oncogene Activation by PI3K Inhibition: Epigenetic Mechanism and Prognostic Significance in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Bruno M.; Smith, Justin S.; Chen, Ying; Chen, Justin; Phillips, Heidi S.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Zardo, Giuseppe; Nigro, Janice; James, C. David; Fridlyand, Jane; Reis, Rui M.; Costello, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    HOXA genes encode critical transcriptional regulators of embryonic development that have been implicated in cancer. In this study, we documented functional relevance and mechanism of activation of HOXA9 in glioblastoma (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor. Expression of HOXA genes was investigated using RT-PCR in primary gliomas and glioblastoma cell lines and was validated in two sets of expression array data. In a subset of GBM, HOXA genes are aberrantly activated within confined chromosomal domains. Transcriptional activation of the HOXA cluster was reversible by a PI3K inhibitor through an epigenetic mechanism involving histone H3K27 trimethylation. Functional studies of HOXA9 showed its capacity to decrease apoptosis and increase cellular proliferation along with TRAIL resistance. Notably, aberrant expression of HOXA9 was independently predictive of shorter overall and progression-free survival in two GBM patient sets, and improved survival prediction by MGMT promoter methylation. Thus, HOXA9 activation is a novel, independent and negative prognostic marker in GBM that is reversible through a PI3K-associated epigenetic mechanism. Our findings suggest a transcriptional pathway through which PI3K activates oncogenic HOXA expression with implications for mTOR or PI3K targeted therapies. PMID:20068170

  9. Patterns of Variant Polyadenylation Signal Usage in Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Freier, Susan; Wyatt, Jacqueline R.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Gautheret, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    The formation of mature mRNAs in vertebrates involves the cleavage and polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA, 10–30 nt downstream of an AAUAAA or AUUAAA signal sequence. The extensive cDNA data now available shows that these hexamers are not strictly conserved. In order to identify variant polyadenylation signals on a large scale, we compared over 8700 human 3′ untranslated sequences to 157,775 polyadenylated expressed sequence tags (ESTs), used as markers of actual mRNA 3′ ends. About 5600 EST-supported putative mRNA 3′ ends were collected and analyzed for significant hexameric sequences. Known polyadenylation signals were found in only 73% of the 3′ fragments. Ten single-base variants of the AAUAAA sequence were identified with a highly significant occurrence rate, potentially representing 14.9% of the actual polyadenylation signals. Of the mRNAs, 28.6% displayed two or more polyadenylation sites. In these mRNAs, the poly(A) sites proximal to the coding sequence tend to use variant signals more often, while the 3′-most site tends to use a canonical signal. The average number of ESTs associated with each signal type suggests that variant signals (including the common AUUAAA) are processed less efficiently than the canonical signal and could therefore be selected for regulatory purposes. However, the position of the site in the untranslated region may also play a role in polyadenylation rate. PMID:10899149

  10. Activated Notch1 signaling cooperates with papillomavirus oncogenes in transformation and generates resistance to apoptosis on matrix withdrawal through PKB/Akt.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, A; Syal, R; Selvarajah, S; Chakrabarti, O; Sarin, A; Krishna, S

    2001-07-20

    Invasive cervical tumors, a major subset of human epithelial neoplasms, are characterized by the consistent presence of papillomavirus oncogenes 16 or 18 E6 and E7 products. Cervical tumors also consistently exhibit cytosolic and nuclear forms of Notch1, suggesting the possible persistent activation of the Notch pathway. Here we show that activated Notch1 synergizes with papillomavirus oncogenes in transformation of immortalized epithelial cells and leads to the generation of resistance to anoikis, an apoptotic response induced on matrix withdrawal. This resistance to anoikis by activated Notch1 is mediated through the activation of PKB/Akt, a key effector of activated Ras in transformation. We suggest that activated Notch signaling may serve to substitute for the lack of activated Ras mutations in the majority of human cervical neoplasms. PMID:11448155

  11. Alterations in Polyadenylation and Its Implications for Endocrine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Anders; Plass, Mireya; Krogh, Anders; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-mRNA is cleaved at the poly(A) site and a poly(A) tail is added – a process necessary for normal mRNA formation. Genes with multiple poly(A) sites can undergo alternative polyadenylation (APA), producing distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) and in some cases different coding regions. Two thirds of all human genes undergo APA. The efficiency of the polyadenylation process regulates gene expression and APA plays an important part in post-transcriptional regulation, as the 3′ UTR contains various cis-elements associated with post-transcriptional regulation, such as target sites for micro-RNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Implications of alterations in polyadenylation for endocrine disease: Alterations in polyadenylation have been found to be causative of neonatal diabetes and IPEX (immune dysfunction, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) and to be associated with type I and II diabetes, pre-eclampsia, fragile X-associated premature ovarian insufficiency, ectopic Cushing syndrome, and many cancer diseases, including several types of endocrine tumor diseases. Perspectives: Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing have made it possible to characterize polyadenylation genome-wide. Antisense elements inhibiting or enhancing specific poly(A) site usage can induce desired alterations in polyadenylation, and thus hold the promise of new therapeutic approaches. Summary: This review gives a detailed description of alterations in polyadenylation in endocrine disease, an overview of the current literature on polyadenylation and summarizes the clinical implications of the current state of research in this field. PMID:23658553

  12. Constitutive Macropinocytosis in Oncogene-transformed Fibroblasts Depends on Sequential Permanent Activation of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase and Phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    Amyere, Mustapha; Payrastre, Bernard; Krause, Ulrike; Smissen, Patrick Van Der; Veithen, Alex; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2000-01-01

    Macropinocytosis results from the closure of lamellipodia generated by membrane ruffling, thereby reflecting cortical actin dynamics. Both transformation of Rat-1 fibroblasts by v-Src or K-Ras and stable transfection for expression of dominant-positive, wild-type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) regulatory subunit p85α constitutively led to stress fiber disruption, cortical actin recruitment, extensive ruffling, and macropinosome formation, as measured by a selective acceleration of fluid-phase endocytosis. These alterations closely correlated with activation of PI3K and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), as assayed by 3-phosphoinositide synthesis in situ and in vitro and inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate steady-state levels, respectively; they were abolished by stable transfection of v-Src–transformed cells for dominant-negative truncated p85α expression and by pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and PI-PLC, indicating a requirement for both enzymes. Whereas PI3K activation resisted PI-PLC inhibition, PI-PLC activation was abolished by a PI3K inhibitor and dominant-negative transfection, thus placing PI-PLC downstream of PI3K. Together, these data suggest that permanent sequential activation of both PI3K and PI-PLC is necessary for the dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in oncogene-transformed fibroblasts, resulting in constitutive ruffling and macropinocytosis. PMID:11029048

  13. Oncogenic activation of the Notch1 gene by deletion of its promoter in Ikaros-deficient T-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Jeannet, Robin; Mastio, Jérôme; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Oravecz, Attila; Ashworth, Todd; Geimer Le Lay, Anne-Solen; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Ghysdael, Jacques; Gridley, Thomas; Honjo, Tasuku; Radtke, Freddy; Aster, Jon C.; Kastner, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The Notch pathway is frequently activated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs). Of the Notch receptors, Notch1 is a recurrent target of gain-of-function mutations and Notch3 is expressed in all T-ALLs, but it is currently unclear how these receptors contribute to T-cell transformation in vivo. We investigated the role of Notch1 and Notch3 in T-ALL progression by a genetic approach, in mice bearing a knockdown mutation in the Ikaros gene that spontaneously develop Notch-dependent T-ALL. While deletion of Notch3 has little effect, T cell–specific deletion of floxed Notch1 promoter/exon 1 sequences significantly accelerates leukemogenesis. Notch1-deleted tumors lack surface Notch1 but express γ-secretase–cleaved intracellular Notch1 proteins. In addition, these tumors accumulate high levels of truncated Notch1 transcripts that are caused by aberrant transcription from cryptic initiation sites in the 3′ part of the gene. Deletion of the floxed sequences directly reprograms the Notch1 locus to begin transcription from these 3′ promoters and is accompanied by an epigenetic reorganization of the Notch1 locus that is consistent with transcriptional activation. Further, spontaneous deletion of 5′ Notch1 sequences occurs in approximately 75% of Ikaros-deficient T-ALLs. These results reveal a novel mechanism for the oncogenic activation of the Notch1 gene after deletion of its main promoter. PMID:20829372

  14. Specific Oncogenic Activity of the Src-Family Tyrosine Kinase c-Yes in Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paquay de Plater, Ludmilla; Edmonds, Thomas; David, Géraldine; Jan, Michel; de Montrion, Catherine; Cogé, Francis; Léonce, Stéphane; Burbridge, Michael; Bruno, Alain; Boutin, Jean A.; Lockhart, Brian; Roche, Serge; Cruzalegui, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    c-Yes, a member of the Src tyrosine kinase family, is found highly activated in colon carcinoma but its importance relative to c-Src has remained unclear. Here we show that, in HT29 colon carcinoma cells, silencing of c-Yes, but not of c-Src, selectively leads to an increase of cell clustering associated with a localisation of β-catenin at cell membranes and a reduction of expression of β-catenin target genes. c-Yes silencing induced an increase in apoptosis, inhibition of growth in soft-agar and in mouse xenografts, inhibition of cell migration and loss of the capacity to generate liver metastases in mice. Re-introduction of c-Yes, but not c -Src, restores transforming properties of c-Yes depleted cells. Moreover, we found that c-Yes kinase activity is required for its role in β-catenin localisation and growth in soft agar, whereas kinase activity is dispensable for its role in cell migration. We conclude that c-Yes regulates specific oncogenic signalling pathways important for colon cancer progression that is not shared with c-Src. PMID:21390316

  15. An element in the bovine papillomavirus late 3' untranslated region reduces polyadenylated cytoplasmic RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Furth, P A; Baker, C C

    1991-11-01

    Expression of the two bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) late genes, L1 and L2, coding for the two capsid proteins, is limited to terminally differentiated keratinocytes in bovine fibropapillomas. This pattern of expression is determined both by the activity of the late promoter and by the inhibition of late region expression in less well differentiated cells. Inhibition of L1 and L2 mRNA production in nonpermissive cells must occur since the late region potentially could be transcribed from early region promoters. Nuclear runoff analysis of the late region has demonstrated that up to 95% of transcripts which are initiated in the early region in nonpermissive cells terminate within the late region upstream of the late polyadenylation site (C. C. Baker and J. Noe, J. Virol. 63:3529-3534, 1989). However, very few of the primary transcripts which include the late polyadenylation site are processed into mRNA. In this study, we have used expression vectors to characterize an inhibitory element active in nonpermissive cells which is located in the late 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). While the late polyadenylation site is functional in these cells, a 53-bp element in the late 3'UTR reduces levels of polyadenylated cytoplasmic RNA. This element inhibited chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression 6- to 10-fold when cloned in the sense orientation into the 3'UTR of a CAT expression vector. No block to expression was seen when the fragment was cloned immediately downstream of the poly(A) site, in an intron upstream of the CAT coding sequence, or in an antisense orientation in the 3'UTR. When the same fragment was deleted from a BPV-1 L1 expression vector, a sixfold increase in mRNA levels was seen. Actinomycin D chase experiments using BPV-1 L1 expression vectors indicated that the element does not destabilize cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA. Therefore, the element must act before the mature mRNA reaches the cytoplasm. The data presented are consistent with effects

  16. Oncogenic Activity of miR-650 in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by Suppression of CSR1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Ze-Hua; Yu, Yan P.; Ding, Ying; Liu, Silvia; Martin, Amantha; Tseng, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cellular stress response 1 (CSR1) is a tumor suppressor gene whose expression was frequently down-regulated in prostate cancer. The mechanism of its down-regulation, however, is not clear. Here, we show that the 3′ untranslated region of CSR1 contains a target site of miR-650. High level of miR-650 was found in prostate cancer samples and cell lines. Degradation of miR-650 by specific inhibitor dramatically increased the expression levels of CSR1. Interaction between miR-650 and its target site in the 3′ untranslated region was validated through luciferase reporter system. Mutation at the target site completely abrogated the activity of miR-650 on the 3′ untranslated region of CSR1. Inhibition of miR-650 reversed the expression suppression of CSR1, suppressed colony formation, and blocked cell cycle entry to the S phase of both PC3 and DU145 cells. Animal model showed significant decrease of tumor volume, rate of metastasis, and mortality of severe combined immunodeficient mice xenografted with PC3 or DU145 cells transformed with inhibitor of miR-650. Our analyses demonstrate that suppression of CSR1 expression is a novel mechanism critical for the oncogenic activity of miR-650. PMID:25956032

  17. Oncogenic Activity of miR-650 in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by Suppression of CSR1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ze-Hua; Yu, Yan P; Ding, Ying; Liu, Silvia; Martin, Amantha; Tseng, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Cellular stress response 1 (CSR1) is a tumor suppressor gene whose expression was frequently down-regulated in prostate cancer. The mechanism of its down-regulation, however, is not clear. Here, we show that the 3' untranslated region of CSR1 contains a target site of miR-650. High level of miR-650 was found in prostate cancer samples and cell lines. Degradation of miR-650 by specific inhibitor dramatically increased the expression levels of CSR1. Interaction between miR-650 and its target site in the 3' untranslated region was validated through luciferase reporter system. Mutation at the target site completely abrogated the activity of miR-650 on the 3' untranslated region of CSR1. Inhibition of miR-650 reversed the expression suppression of CSR1, suppressed colony formation, and blocked cell cycle entry to the S phase of both PC3 and DU145 cells. Animal model showed significant decrease of tumor volume, rate of metastasis, and mortality of severe combined immunodeficient mice xenografted with PC3 or DU145 cells transformed with inhibitor of miR-650. Our analyses demonstrate that suppression of CSR1 expression is a novel mechanism critical for the oncogenic activity of miR-650. PMID:25956032

  18. Cigarette smoke activates the proto-oncogene c-src to promote airway inflammation and lung tissue destruction.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew; Foronjy, Robert F

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke-mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  19. Cigarette Smoke Activates the Proto-Oncogene c-Src to Promote Airway Inflammation and Lung Tissue Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke–exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke–mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  20. Alternative polyadenylation and RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of the extent of microRNA-based gene regulation has expanded in an impressive pace over the past decade. Now, we are beginning to better appreciate the role of 3'-UTR (untranslated region) cis-elements which harbor not only microRNA but also RNA-binding protein (RBP) binding sites that have significant effect on the stability and translational rate of mRNAs. To add further complexity, alternative polyadenylation (APA) emerges as a widespread mechanism to regulate gene expression by producing shorter or longer mRNA isoforms that differ in the length of their 3'-UTRs or even coding sequences. Resulting shorter mRNA isoforms generally lack cis-elements where trans-acting factors bind, and hence are differentially regulated compared with the longer isoforms. This review focuses on the RBPs involved in APA regulation and their action mechanisms on APA-generated isoforms. A better understanding of the complex interactions between APA and RBPs is promising for mechanistic and clinical implications including biomarker discovery and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27208003

  1. Somatic Mutations in CCK2R Alter Receptor Activity that Promote Oncogenic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Melinda D.; Lajiness, Mary E.; Wulur, Isabella H.; Feng, Bo; Swearingen, Michelle L.; Uhlik, Mark T.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Sjöblom, Tobias; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Powell, Steven M.; Vogelstein, Bert; Barber, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    The roles of cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R) in numerous physiologic processes in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system are ‘well documented. There has been some evidence that CCK2R alterations play a role in cancers, but the functional significance of these alterations for tumorigenesis is unknown. We have identified six mutations in CCK2R among a panel of 140 colorectal cancers and 44 gastric cancers. We show that these mutations increase receptor activity, activate multiple downstream signaling pathways, increase cell migration, and promote angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that somatic mutations in CCK2R may promote tumorigenesis through deregulated receptor activity and highlight the importance of evaluating CCK2R inhibitors to block both the normal and mutant forms of the receptor. PMID:22516348

  2. Unraveling the Activation Mechanism of Taspase1 which Controls the Oncogenic AF4–MLL Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sabiani, Samaneh; Geppert, Tim; Engelbrecht, Christian; Kowarz, Eric; Schneider, Gisbert; Marschalek, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Taspase1-mediated cleavage of the AF4–MLL oncoprotein results in the formation of a stable multiprotein complex which forms the key event for the onset of acute proB leukemia in mice. Therefore, Taspase1 represents a conditional oncoprotein in the context of t(4;11) leukemia. In this report, we used site-directed mutagenesis to unravel the molecular events by which Taspase1 becomes sequentially activated. Monomeric pro-enzymes form dimers which are autocatalytically processed into the enzymatically active form of Taspase1 (αββα). The active enzyme cleaves only very few target proteins, e.g., MLL, MLL4 and TFIIA at their corresponding consensus cleavage sites (CSTasp1) as well as AF4–MLL in the case of leukemogenic translocation. This knowledge was translated into the design of a dominant-negative mutant of Taspase1 (dnTASP1). As expected, simultaneous expression of the leukemogenic AF4–MLL and dnTASP1 causes the disappearance of the leukemogenic oncoprotein, because the uncleaved AF4–MLL protein (328 kDa) is subject to proteasomal degradation, while the cleaved AF4–MLL forms a stable oncogenic multi-protein complex with a very long half-life. Moreover, coexpression of dnTASP1 with a BFP-CSTasp1-GFP FRET biosensor effectively inhibits cleavage. The impact of our findings on future drug development and potential treatment options for t(4;11) leukemia will be discussed. PMID:26137584

  3. The ciliopathy disease protein NPHP9 promotes nuclear delivery and activation of the oncogenic transcriptional regulator TAZ.

    PubMed

    Habbig, Sandra; Bartram, Malte P; Sägmüller, Josef G; Griessmann, Anabel; Franke, Mareike; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Schwarz, Ricarda; Hoehne, Martin; Bergmann, Carsten; Tessmer, Claudia; Reinhardt, H Christian; Burst, Volker; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2012-12-15

    Nephronophthisis (NPH) is a genetically heterogenous kidney disease and represents the most common genetic cause for end-stage renal disease in children. It is caused by the mutation of genes encoding for the nephrocystin proteins (NPHPs) which localize to primary cilia or centrosomes, classifying this disease as a 'ciliopathy'. Recently, it has been shown that NPHP4 acts as a potent negative regulator of mammalian Hippo signalling by interacting with the Lats protein kinase and controlling the phosphorylation of the oncogenic transcriptional activator TAZ. Here, we demonstrate that NPHP9, another NPH family member, also controls TAZ activity by a distinct mechanism. NPHP9, which is also called NEK8, directly interacted with TAZ and induced nuclear translocation of the TAZ/NPHP9 protein complex. Binding of NPHP9 to TAZ was enhanced in a TAZ mutant that lost its ability to bind 14-3-3, suggesting that 14-3-3 and NPHP9 may compete for TAZ binding, with 14-3-3 favouring cytoplasmic retention and NPHP9 mediating nuclear delivery. Consistently, co-expression of NPHP4, which inhibits TAZ phosphorylation at the 14-3-3 binding site through the inhibition of Lats kinase activity, induced efficient nuclear delivery of the TAZ/NPHP9 protein pair. Consistent with a role for TAZ in controlling proliferation and tumorigenesis, the downregulation of NPHP9 inhibited the TAZ-dependent proliferation of hippo-responsive normal epithelial and also breast cancer cells. As NPHP9 has been shown to be upregulated in breast cancer, these data do not only support a critical role for TAZ/hippo signalling in the pathogenesis of NPH but may also imply a possible role for NPHP9 in TAZ-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:23026745

  4. CREB Binding Protein Interacts with Nucleoporin-Specific FG Repeats That Activate Transcription and Mediate NUP98-HOXA9 Oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Lawryn H.; Brindle, Paul K.; Schnabel, Catherine A.; Pritchard, Colin E. J.; Cleary, Michael L.; van Deursen, Jan M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Genes encoding the Phe-Gly (FG) repeat-containing nucleoporins NUP98 and CAN/NUP214 are at the breakpoints of several chromosomal translocations associated with human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their role in oncogenesis is unclear. Here we demonstrate that the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene encodes two nuclear oncoproteins with either 19 or 37 NUP98 FG repeats fused to the DNA binding and PBX heterodimerization domains of the transcription factor HOXA9. Both NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, and this transformation required the HOXA9 domains for DNA binding and PBX interaction. Surprisingly, the FG repeats acted as very potent transactivators of gene transcription. This NUP98-derived activity is essential for transformation and can be replaced by the bona fide transactivation domain of VP16. Interestingly, FG repeat-containing segments derived from the nucleoporins NUP153 and CAN/NUP214 functioned similarly to those from NUP98. We further demonstrate that transactivation by FG repeat-rich segments of NUP98 correlates with their ability to interact functionally and physically with the transcriptional coactivators CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300. This finding shows, for the first time, that a translocation-generated fusion protein appears to recruit CBP/p300 as an important step of its oncogenic mechanism. Together, our results suggest that NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras are aberrant transcription factors that deregulate HOX-responsive genes through the transcriptional activation properties of nucleoporin-specific FG repeats that recruit CBP/p300. Indeed, FG repeat-mediated transactivation may be a shared pathogenic function of nucleoporins implicated human AML. PMID:9858599

  5. Oncogenic Stress Induced by Acute Hyper-Activation of Bcr-Abl Leads to Cell Death upon Induction of Excessive Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Dengler, Michael A.; Staiger, Annette M.; Gutekunst, Matthias; Hofmann, Ute; Doszczak, Malgorzata; Scheurich, Peter; Schwab, Matthias; Aulitzky, Walter E.; van der Kuip, Heiko

    2011-01-01

    In response to deregulated oncogene activation, mammalian cells activate disposal programs such as programmed cell death. To investigate the mechanisms behind this oncogenic stress response we used Bcr-Abl over-expressing cells cultivated in presence of imatinib. Imatinib deprivation led to rapid induction of Bcr-Abl activity and over-stimulation of PI3K/Akt-, Ras/MAPK-, and JAK/STAT pathways. This resulted in a delayed necrosis-like cell death starting not before 48 hours after imatinib withdrawal. Cell death was preceded by enhanced glycolysis, glutaminolysis, and amino acid metabolism leading to elevated ATP and protein levels. This enhanced metabolism could be linked to induction of cell death as inhibition of glycolysis or glutaminolysis was sufficient to sustain cell viability. Therefore, these data provide first evidence that metabolic changes induced by Bcr-Abl hyper-activation are important mediators of oncogenic stress-induced cell death. During the first 30 hours after imatinib deprivation, Bcr-Abl hyper-activation did not affect proliferation but resulted in cellular swelling, vacuolization, and induction of eIF2α phosphorylation, CHOP expression, as well as alternative splicing of XPB, indicating endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Cell death was dependent on p38 and RIP1 signaling, whereas classical death effectors of ER stress, namely CHOP-BIM were antagonized by concomitant up-regulation of Bcl-xL. Screening of 1,120 compounds for their potential effects on oncogenic stress-induced cell death uncovered that corticosteroids antagonize cell death upon Bcr-Abl hyper-activation by normalizing cellular metabolism. This protective effect is further demonstrated by the finding that corticosteroids rendered lymphocytes permissive to the transforming activity of Bcr-Abl. As corticosteroids are used together with imatinib for treatment of Bcr-Abl positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia these data could have important implications for the design of

  6. MTDH-SND1 Interaction is Essential for the Expansion and Activity of Tumor-Initiating Cells in Diverse Oncogene- and Carcinogen-Induced Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Liling; Lu, Xin; Yuan, Salina; Wei, Yong; Guo, Feng; Shen, Minhong; Yuan, Min; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Hua, Yuling; Smith, Heath A.; Blanco, Mario Andres; Chekmareva, Marina; Wu, Hao; Bronson, Roderick T.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Xing, Yongna; Kang, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The Metadherin gene (MTDH) is prevalently amplified in breast cancer and associated with poor prognosis but its functional contribution to tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Using mouse models representing different subtypes of breast cancer, we demonstrated that MTDH plays a critical role in mammary tumorigenesis by regulating oncogene-induced expansion and activities of tumor-initiating cells (TICs), whereas it is largely dispensable for normal development. Mechanistically, MTDH supports the survival of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) under oncogenic/stress conditions by interacting with and stabilizing Staphylococcal nuclease domain-containing 1 (SND1). Silencing MTDH or SND1 individually or disrupting their interaction compromises tumorigenenic potential of TICs in vivo. Finally, this functional significance of MTDH-SND1 interaction is supported by clinical analysis of human breast cancer samples. PMID:24981741

  7. STAT3 transcription factor is constitutively activated and is oncogenic in nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, Paul; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Huang, Yenlin; Bouhlal, Hicham; Bouamar, Hakim; Bouchet, Sandrine; Perrot, Christine; Vieillard, Vincent; Dartigues, Peggy; Gaulard, Philippe; Agbalika, Félix; Douay, Luc; Lassoued, Kaiss; Gorin, Norbert-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Nasal-type natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma is an infrequent aggressive malignant disease with very poor prognosis. We aimed to explore the possible role of the transcription factor STAT3 in the pathophysiology of this malignancy, as it was involved in oncogenesis and chemoresistance. For this, we established and characterized a continuous interleukin 2-dependent NK cell line (MEC04) from a patient with a fatal nasal-type NK cell lymphoma. Cells harbored poor cytotoxic activity against K562 cells, and spontaneously secreted interferon-γ, IL-10 and vascular-endothelium growth factor in vitro. STAT3 was phosphorylated in Y705 dimerization residue in MEC04 cells and restricted to the nucleus. Y705 STAT3 phosphorylation involved JAK2, since exposure of cells to AG490 inhibitor inhibited Y705 STAT3 phosphorylation. By using recombinant transducible TAT-STAT3β (βisoform), TAT-STAT3Y705F (a STAT3 protein mutated on Y705 residue which prevents STAT3 dimerization), and peptides inhibiting specifically STAT3 dimerization, we inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and cell growth, with cell death induction. Finally, STAT3 was phosphorylated in Y705 residue in the nuclei of lymphoma cells in 8/9 patients with nasal-type NK/T cell lymphoma and in YT, another NK cell line. Our results suggest that STAT3 protein has a major role in the oncogenic process of nasal-type NK cell lymphomas, and may represent a promising therapeutical target. PMID:19421230

  8. Global expression profiling reveals gain-of-function onco-genic activity of a mutated thyroid hormone receptor in thyroid carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Mishra, Alok; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are critical in regulating gene expression in normal physiological processes. Decreased expression and/or somatic mutations of TRs have been shown to be associated several types of human cancers including liver, breast, lung, and thyroid. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which mutated TRs promote carcinogenesis, an animal model of follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) (Thrbpv/pv mice) was used in the present study. The Thrbpv/pv mouse harbors a knockin dominant negative PV mutation, identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone. To understand whether oncogenic actions of PV involve not only the loss of normal TR functions but also gain-of-function activities, we compared the gene expression profiles of thyroid lesions in Thrbpv/pv mice and Thra1-/- Thrb-/- mice that also spontaneously develop FTC, but with less severe malignancy. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data derived from microdissected thyroid tumor cells of these two mice showed contrasting global gene expression profiles. With stringent selection using 2.5-fold change (p<0.01) in cDNA microarray analysis, 241 genes with altered gene expression were identified. Nearly half of the genes (n=103: 42.7% of total) with altered gene expression in thyroid tumor cells of Thrbpv/pv mice were associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis; some of these genes function as oncogenes in human thyroid cancers. The remaining genes were found to function in transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cytoskeleton modification. These results indicate that the more aggressive thyroid tumor progression in Thrbpv/pv mice was not due simply to the loss of tumor suppressor functions of TR via mutation but also, importantly, to gain-of-function in the oncogenic activities of PV to drive thyroid carcinogenesis. Thus, the present study identifies a novel mechanism by which a mutated TRβ evolves with an oncogenic advantage to promote

  9. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hye Jin; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun; An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm; Moon, Yuseok

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  10. Analysis of figwort mosaic virus (plant pararetrovirus) polyadenylation signal.

    PubMed

    Sanfaçon, H

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal has revealed several striking differences to poly(A) signals from animal genes such as the absence of activating sequences downstream from the cleavage site. Instead, upstream sequences were shown to induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence. To test whether these features are representative of other plant pararetrovirus poly(A) signals, a characterization of the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) poly(A) signal is presented here. The FMV RNAs were isolated from infected plants and mapped, and the different elements composing the FMV poly(A) signal were identified. Multiple upstream sequences were found to be essential for efficient processing at the FMV poly(A) site and could be replaced by the CaMV upstream elements. The FMV upstream sequences showed homologies to other characterized upstream sequences from CaMV, from animal viruses, and from plant poly(A) signals. Surprisingly, neither the FMV nor the CaMV upstream elements could induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence present in the FMV poly(A) signal, instead a UAUAAA sequence 55 nucleotides further downstream was utilized. It is proposed that additional features may be required for appropriate cleavage such as the context of the AAUAAA-like sequence or perhaps the cleavage site itself. PMID:8259677

  11. XPO1 (CRM1) inhibition represses STAT3 activation to drive a survivin-dependent oncogenic switch in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan; Holloway, Michael P; Nguyen, Kevin; McCauley, Dilara; Landesman, Yosef; Kauffman, Michael G; Shacham, Sharon; Altura, Rachel A

    2014-03-01

    Inhibition of XPO1 (CRM1)-mediated nuclear export of multiple tumor suppressor proteins has been proposed as a novel cancer therapeutic strategy to turn off oncogenic signals and enhance tumor suppression. Survivin is a multifunctional protein with oncogenic properties when expressed in the cytoplasm that requires the XPO1-RanGTP complex for its nuclear export. We investigated the antitumor mechanisms of the drug-like selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) XPO1 antagonists KPT-185, KPT-251 KPT-276, and KPT-330 in estrogen receptor-positive and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines and xenograft models of human breast tumors. KPT compounds significantly inhibited breast cancer cell growth and induced tumor cell death, both in vitro and in vivo. These drugs initially promoted survivin accumulation within tumor cell nuclei. However, their major in vitro effect was to decrease survivin cytoplasmic protein levels, correlating with the onset of apoptosis. XPO1 inhibition repressed Survivin transcription by inhibiting CREB-binding protein-mediated STAT3 acetylation, and blocking STAT3 binding to the Survivin promoter. In addition, caspase-3 was activated to cleave survivin, rendering it unavailable to bind X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and block the caspase cascade. Collectively, these data demonstrate that XPO1 inhibition by SINE compounds represses STAT3 transactivation to block the selective oncogenic properties of survivin and supports their clinical use in TNBC. PMID:24431073

  12. Stilbenoids remodel the DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells and inhibit oncogenic NOTCH signaling through epigenetic regulation of MAML2 transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Lubecka, Katarzyna; Kurzava, Lucinda; Flower, Kirsty; Buvala, Hannah; Zhang, Hao; Teegarden, Dorothy; Camarillo, Ignacio; Suderman, Matthew; Kuang, Shihuan; Andrisani, Ourania; Flanagan, James M.; Stefanska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    DNA hypomethylation was previously implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to examine whether stilbenoids, resveratrol and pterostilbene thought to exert anticancer effects, target genes with oncogenic function for de novo methylation and silencing, leading to inactivation of related signaling pathways. Following Illumina 450K, genome-wide DNA methylation analysis reveals that stilbenoids alter DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells. On average, 75% of differentially methylated genes have increased methylation, and these genes are enriched for oncogenic functions, including NOTCH signaling pathway. MAML2, a coactivator of NOTCH targets, is methylated at the enhancer region and transcriptionally silenced in response to stilbenoids, possibly explaining the downregulation of NOTCH target genes. The increased DNA methylation at MAML2 enhancer coincides with increased occupancy of repressive histone marks and decrease in activating marks. This condensed chromatin structure is associated with binding of DNMT3B and decreased occupancy of OCT1 transcription factor at MAML2 enhancer, suggesting a role of DNMT3B in increasing methylation of MAML2 after stilbenoid treatment. Our results deliver a novel insight into epigenetic regulation of oncogenic signals in cancer and provide support for epigenetic-targeting strategies as an effective anticancer approach. PMID:27207652

  13. Stilbenoids remodel the DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells and inhibit oncogenic NOTCH signaling through epigenetic regulation of MAML2 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Lubecka, Katarzyna; Kurzava, Lucinda; Flower, Kirsty; Buvala, Hannah; Zhang, Hao; Teegarden, Dorothy; Camarillo, Ignacio; Suderman, Matthew; Kuang, Shihuan; Andrisani, Ourania; Flanagan, James M; Stefanska, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    DNA hypomethylation was previously implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to examine whether stilbenoids, resveratrol and pterostilbene thought to exert anticancer effects, target genes with oncogenic function for de novo methylation and silencing, leading to inactivation of related signaling pathways. Following Illumina 450K, genome-wide DNA methylation analysis reveals that stilbenoids alter DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells. On average, 75% of differentially methylated genes have increased methylation, and these genes are enriched for oncogenic functions, including NOTCH signaling pathway. MAML2, a coactivator of NOTCH targets, is methylated at the enhancer region and transcriptionally silenced in response to stilbenoids, possibly explaining the downregulation of NOTCH target genes. The increased DNA methylation at MAML2 enhancer coincides with increased occupancy of repressive histone marks and decrease in activating marks. This condensed chromatin structure is associated with binding of DNMT3B and decreased occupancy of OCT1 transcription factor at MAML2 enhancer, suggesting a role of DNMT3B in increasing methylation of MAML2 after stilbenoid treatment. Our results deliver a novel insight into epigenetic regulation of oncogenic signals in cancer and provide support for epigenetic-targeting strategies as an effective anticancer approach. PMID:27207652

  14. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of a polyadenylate synthase from Megavirus.

    PubMed

    Lartigue, Audrey; Jeudy, Sandra; Bertaux, Lionel; Abergel, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Megavirus chilensis, a close relative of the Mimivirus giant virus, is also the most complex virus sequenced to date, with a 1.26 Mb double-stranded DNA genome encoding 1120 genes. The two viruses share common regulatory elements such as a peculiar palindrome governing the termination/polyadenylation of viral transcripts. They also share a predicted polyadenylate synthase that presents a higher than average percentage of residue conservation. The Megavirus enzyme Mg561 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. A 2.24 Å resolution MAD data set was recorded from a single crystal on the ID29 beamline at the ESRF. PMID:23295487

  15. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of a polyadenylate synthase from Megavirus

    PubMed Central

    Lartigue, Audrey; Jeudy, Sandra; Bertaux, Lionel; Abergel, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Megavirus chilensis, a close relative of the Mimivirus giant virus, is also the most complex virus sequenced to date, with a 1.26 Mb double-stranded DNA genome encoding 1120 genes. The two viruses share common regulatory elements such as a peculiar palindrome governing the termination/polyadenylation of viral transcripts. They also share a predicted polyadenylate synthase that presents a higher than average percentage of residue conservation. The Megavirus enzyme Mg561 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. A 2.24 Å resolution MAD data set was recorded from a single crystal on the ID29 beamline at the ESRF. PMID:23295487

  16. Transcriptional repression of Sin3B by Bmi-1 prevents cellular senescence and is relieved by oncogene activation.

    PubMed

    DiMauro, T; Cantor, D J; Bainor, A J; David, G

    2015-07-23

    The Polycomb group protein Bmi-1 is an essential regulator of cellular senescence and is believed to function largely through the direct repression of the Ink4a/Arf locus. However, concurrent deletion of Ink4a/Arf does not fully rescue the defects detected in Bmi-1(-/-) mice, indicating that additional Bmi-1 targets remain to be identified. The expression of the chromatin-associated Sin3B protein is stimulated by oncogenic stress, and is required for oncogene-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that oncogenic stress leads to the dissociation of Bmi-1 from the Sin3B locus, resulting in increased Sin3B expression and subsequent entry into cellular senescence. Furthermore, Sin3B is required for the senescent phenotype and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species elicited upon Bmi-1 depletion. Altogether, these results identify Sin3B as a novel direct target of Bmi-1, and establish Bmi-1-driven repression of Sin3B as an essential regulator of cellular senescence. PMID:25263442

  17. Transcriptional repression of Sin3B by Bmi-1 prevents cellular senescence and is relieved by oncogene activation

    PubMed Central

    Bainor, Anthony J.; David, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The Polycomb group protein Bmi-1 is an essential regulator of cellular senescence and is believed to function largely through the direct repression of the Ink4a/Arf locus. However, concurrent deletion of Ink4a/Arf does not fully rescue the defects detected in Bmi-1−/− mice, indicating that additional Bmi-1 targets remain to be identified. The expression of the chromatin associated Sin3B protein is stimulated by oncogenic stress, and is required for oncogene-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that oncogenic stress leads to the dissociation of Bmi-1 from the Sin3B locus, resulting in increased Sin3B expression and subsequent entry into cellular senescence. Furthermore, Sin3B is required for the senescent phenotype and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species elicited upon Bmi-1 depletion. Altogether, these results identify Sin3B as a novel direct target of Bmi-1, and establish Bmi-1-driven repression of Sin3B as an essential regulator of cellular senescence. PMID:25263442

  18. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. PMID:23948303

  19. Loss of Keratinocytic RXRα Combined with Activated CDK4 or oncogenic NRAS Generates UVB-induced Melanomas via Loss of p53 and PTEN in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Chagani, Sharmeen; Hyter, Stephen; Sherman, Anna M.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Liang, Xiaobo; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind formation of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is crucial for improved diagnosis and treatment. One key is to better understand the cross-talk between epidermal keratinocytes and pigment-producing melanocytes. Here, using a bigenic mouse model system combining mutant oncogenic NRASQ61K (constitutively active RAS) or mutant activated CDK4R24C/R24C (prevents binding of CDK4 by kinase inhibitor p16INK4A) with an epidermis-specific knockout of the nuclear retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRαep−/−) results in increased melanoma formation after chronic ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation compared to control mice with functional RXRα. Melanomas from both groups of bigenic RXRαep−/− mice are larger in size with higher proliferative capacity, and exhibit enhanced angiogenic properties and increased expression of malignant melanoma markers. Analysis of tumor adjacent normal skin from these mice revealed altered expression of several biomarkers indicative of enhanced melanoma susceptibility, including reduced expression of tumor suppressor p53 and loss of PTEN, with concomitant increase in activated AKT. Loss of epidermal RXRα in combination with UVB significantly enhances invasion of melanocytic cells to draining lymph nodes in bigenic mice expressing oncogenic NRASQ61K compared to controls with functional RXRα. These results suggest a crucial role of keratinocytic RXRα to suppress formation of UVB-induced melanomas and their progression to malignant cancers in the context of driver mutations such as activated CDK4R24C/R24C or oncogenic NRASQ61K. PMID:25189354

  20. Aurora Kinase A Is Not Involved in CPEB1 Phosphorylation and cyclin B1 mRNA Polyadenylation during Meiotic Maturation of Porcine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komrskova, Pavla; Susor, Andrej; Malik, Radek; Prochazkova, Barbora; Liskova, Lucie; Supolikova, Jaroslava; Hladky, Stepan; Kubelka, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation is known to be important for oocyte maturation and further development. This process is generally controlled by phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1). The aim of this study is to determine the role of Aurora kinase A in CPEB1 phosphorylation and the consequent CPEB1-dependent polyadenylation of maternal mRNAs during mammalian oocyte meiosis. For this purpose, we specifically inhibited Aurora kinase A with MLN8237 during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes. Using poly(A)-test PCR method, we monitored the effect of Aurora kinase A inhibition on poly(A)-tail extension of long and short cyclin B1 encoding mRNAs as markers of CPEB1-dependent cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Our results show that inhibition of Aurora kinase A activity impairs neither cyclin B1 mRNA polyadenylation nor its translation and that Aurora kinase A is unlikely to be involved in CPEB1 activating phosphorylation. PMID:24983972

  1. MicroRNA-211 Enhances the Oncogenicity of Carcinogen-Induced Oral Carcinoma by Repressing TCF12 and Increasing Antioxidant Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fen; Yang, Cheng-Chieh; Kao, Shou-Yen; Liu, Chung-Ji; Lin, Shu-Chun; Chang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-08-15

    miR-211 expression in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been implicated in poor patient survival. To investigate the oncogenic roles of miR-211, we generated K14-EGFP-miR-211 transgenic mice tagged with GFP. Induction of oral carcinogenesis in transgenic mice using 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) resulted in more extensive and severe tongue tumorigenesis compared with control animals. We found that 4NQO and arecoline upregulated miR-211 expression in OSCC cells. In silico and experimental evidence further revealed that miR-211 directly targeted transcription factor 12 (TCF12), which mediated suppressor activities in OSCC cells and was drastically downregulated in tumor tissues. We used GeneChip analysis and bioinformatic algorithms to identify transcriptional targets of TCF12 and confirmed through reporter and ChIP assays that family with sequence similarity 213, member A (FAM213A), a peroxiredoxin-like antioxidative protein, was repressed transcriptionally by TCF12. FAM213A silencing in OSCC cells diminished oncogenic activity, reduced the ALDH1-positive cell population, and increased reactive oxygen species. TCF12 and FAM213A expression was correlated inversely in head and neck carcinoma samples according to The Cancer Genome Atlas. OSCC patients bearing tumors with high FAM213A expression tended to have worse survival. Furthermore, 4NQO treatment downregulated TCF12 and upregulated FAM213A by modulating miR-211 both in vitro and in vivo Overall, our findings develop a mouse model that recapitulates the molecular and histopathologic alterations of human OSCC pathogenesis and highlight a new miRNA-mediated oncogenic mechanism. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4872-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27221705

  2. Proviral activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is detectable in preleukemic mice infected neonatally with Moloney murine leukemia virus but not in resulting end stage T lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Belli, B; Wolff, L; Nazarov, V; Fan, H

    1995-08-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus induces myeloid leukemia when inoculated intravenously into pristane-primed adult BALB/c mice. One hundred percent of these tumors show insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene, and reverse transcriptase PCR assays have shown that the c-myb activation could be detected soon after infection. We tested BALB/c and NIH Swiss mice that had been inoculated as newborns with Moloney murine leukemia virus, under which conditions they develop T lymphomas exclusively. Reverse transcriptase-PCR assays indicated that c-myb activations were detectable soon after neonatal infection. However, none of the resulting T lymphomas contained c-myb activations. The implications of these results to the timing of proto-oncogene activations in leukemogenesis and the specificity of proto-oncogene activations for different diseases are discussed. PMID:7609084

  3. Oncogenic activation of the PI3-kinase p110β isoform via the tumor-derived PIK3Cβ(D1067V) kinase domain mutation.

    PubMed

    Pazarentzos, E; Giannikopoulos, P; Hrustanovic, G; St John, J; Olivas, V R; Gubens, M A; Balassanian, R; Weissman, J; Polkinghorn, W; Bivona, T G

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway occurs widely in human cancers. Although somatic mutations in the PI3K pathway genes PIK3CA and PTEN are known to drive PI3K pathway activation and cancer growth, the significance of somatic mutations in other PI3K pathway genes is less clear. Here, we establish the signaling and oncogenic properties of a recurrent somatic mutation in the PI3K p110β isoform that resides within its kinase domain (PIK3Cβ(D1067V)). We initially observed PIK3Cβ(D1067V) by exome sequencing analysis of an EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor biopsy from a patient with acquired erlotinib resistance. On the basis of this finding, we hypothesized that PIK3Cβ(D1067V) might function as a novel tumor-promoting genetic alteration, and potentially an oncogene, in certain cancers. Consistent with this hypothesis, analysis of additional tumor exome data sets revealed the presence of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) at low frequency in other patient tumor samples (including renal cell carcinoma, glioblastoma multiforme, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, thyroid carcinoma and endometrial carcinoma). Functional studies revealed that PIK3Cβ(D1067V) promoted PI3K pathway signaling, enhanced cell growth in vitro, and was sufficient for tumor formation in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of PIK3Cβ with TGX-221 (isoform-selective p110β inhibitor) specifically suppressed growth in patient-derived renal-cell carcinoma cells with endogenous PIK3Cβ(D1067V) and in NIH-3T3 and human EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells engineered to express this mutant PI3K. In the EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells, expression of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) also promoted erlotinib resistance. Our data establish a novel oncogenic form of PI3K, revealing the signaling and oncogenic properties of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) and its potential therapeutic relevance in cancer. Our findings provide new insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying PI3K pathway activation in

  4. Oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation find their sites of expression in the changes in time and space of the age-adjusted cancer incidence rate.

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Kodama, T; Murakami, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation is to elucidate the relation between the distribution pattern of the age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) changes in time and space of 15 tumors of bothe sexes and the locations of centers of centripetal-(oncogene type) and centrifugal-(tumoe suppressor gene type) forces. The fitness of the observed log AAIR data sets to the oncogene type- and the tumor suppressor gene type-equilibrium models and the locations of 2 force centers were calculated by applying the least square method of Gauss to log AAIR pair data series with and without topological data manipulations, which are so designed as to let log AAIR pair data series fit to 2 variant (x, y) frameworks, the Rect-coordinates and the Para-coordinates. The 2 variant (x, y) coordinates are defined each as an (x, y) framework with its X axis crossed at a right angle to the regression line of the original log AAIR data (the Rect-coordinates) and as another framework with its X axis run in parallel with the regression line of the original log AAIR pair data series (the Para-coordinates). The fitness test of log AAIR data series to either the oncogene activation type equilibrium model (r = -1.000) or the tumor suppressor gene inactivation type (r = 1.000) was conducted for each of the male-female type pair data and the female-male type data, for each of log AAIR changes in space and log AAIR changes in time, and for each of the 3 (x, y) frameworks in a given neoplasia of both sexes. The results obtained are given as follows: 1) The positivity rates of the fitness test to the oncogene type equilibrium model and the tumor suppressor gene type model were each 63.3% and 56.7% with the log AAIR changes in space, and 73.3% and 73.3% with log AAIR changes in time, as tested in 15 human neoplasias of both sexes. 2) Evidence was presented to indicate that the clearance of oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation is the sine qua non premise of carciniogenesis. 3) The r

  5. MECP2 Is a Frequently Amplified Oncogene with a Novel Epigenetic Mechanism that Mimics the Role of Activated RAS in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Manish; Clark, Allison P.; Landini, Serena; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Eklund, Aron C.; Lim, Elgene; Culhane, Aedin C.; Barry, William T.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Szallasi, Zoltan; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Silver, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    An unbiased genome-scale screen for unmutated genes that drive cancer growth when overexpressed identified MECP2 as a novel oncogene. MECP2 resides in a region of the X-chromosome that is significantly amplified across 18% of cancers, and many cancer cell lines have amplified, overexpressed MECP2 and are dependent on MECP2 expression for growth. MECP2 copy number gain and RAS family member alterations are mutually exclusive in several cancer types. The MECP2 splicing isoforms activate the major growth factor pathways targeted by activated RAS, the MAPK and PI3K pathways. MECP2 rescued the growth of a KRASG12C-addicted cell line after KRAS down-regulation, and activated KRAS rescues the growth of an MECP2-addicted cell line after MECP2 downregulation. MECP2 binding to the epigenetic modification 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is required for efficient transformation. These observations suggest that MECP2 is a commonly amplified oncogene with an unusual epigenetic mode of action. PMID:26546296

  6. NSD2 contributes to oncogenic RAS-driven transcription in lung cancer cells through long-range epigenetic activation.

    PubMed

    García-Carpizo, Verónica; Sarmentero, Jacinto; Han, Bomie; Graña, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Pisano, David G; Serrano, Manuel; Brooks, Harold B; Campbell, Robert M; Barrero, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET is overexpressed in a number of solid tumors but its contribution to the biology of these tumors is not well understood. Here, we describe that NSD2 contributes to the proliferation of a subset of lung cancer cell lines by supporting oncogenic RAS transcriptional responses. NSD2 knock down combined with MEK or BRD4 inhibitors causes co-operative inhibitory responses on cell growth. However, while MEK and BRD4 inhibitors converge in the downregulation of genes associated with cancer-acquired super-enhancers, NSD2 inhibition affects the expression of clusters of genes embedded in megabase-scale regions marked with H3K36me2 and that contribute to the RAS transcription program. Thus, combinatorial therapies using MEK or BRD4 inhibitors together with NSD2 inhibition are likely to be needed to ensure a more comprehensive inhibition of oncogenic RAS-driven transcription programs in lung cancers with NSD2 overexpression. PMID:27604143

  7. NSD2 contributes to oncogenic RAS-driven transcription in lung cancer cells through long-range epigenetic activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Carpizo, Verónica; Sarmentero, Jacinto; Han, Bomie; Graña, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Pisano, David G.; Serrano, Manuel; Brooks, Harold B.; Campbell, Robert M.; Barrero, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET is overexpressed in a number of solid tumors but its contribution to the biology of these tumors is not well understood. Here, we describe that NSD2 contributes to the proliferation of a subset of lung cancer cell lines by supporting oncogenic RAS transcriptional responses. NSD2 knock down combined with MEK or BRD4 inhibitors causes co-operative inhibitory responses on cell growth. However, while MEK and BRD4 inhibitors converge in the downregulation of genes associated with cancer-acquired super-enhancers, NSD2 inhibition affects the expression of clusters of genes embedded in megabase-scale regions marked with H3K36me2 and that contribute to the RAS transcription program. Thus, combinatorial therapies using MEK or BRD4 inhibitors together with NSD2 inhibition are likely to be needed to ensure a more comprehensive inhibition of oncogenic RAS-driven transcription programs in lung cancers with NSD2 overexpression. PMID:27604143

  8. Tumor suppressor ASXL1 is essential for the activation of INK4B expression in response to oncogene activity and anti-proliferative signals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Bekker-Jensen, Ida Holst; Christensen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler; Sidoli, Simone; Qi, Yan; Kong, Yu; Wang, Xi; Cui, Yajuan; Xiao, Zhijian; Xu, Guogang; Williams, Kristine; Rappsilber, Juri; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Winther, Ole; Jensen, Ole N; Helin, Kristian

    2015-11-01

    ASXL1 mutations are frequently found in hematological tumors, and loss of Asxl1 promotes myeloid transformation in mice. Here we present data supporting a role for an ASXL1-BAP1 complex in the deubiquitylation of mono-ubiquitylated lysine 119 on Histone H2A (H2AK119ub1) in vivo. The Polycomb group proteins control the expression of the INK4B-ARF-INK4A locus during normal development, in part through catalyzing mono-ubiquitylation of H2AK119. Since the activation of the locus INK4B-ARF-INK4A plays a fail-safe mechanism protecting against tumorigenesis, we investigated whether ASXL1-dependent H2A deubiquitylation plays a role in its activation. Interestingly, we found that ASXL1 is specifically required for the increased expression of p15(INK4B) in response to both oncogenic signaling and extrinsic anti-proliferative signals. Since we found that ASXL1 and BAP1 both are enriched at the INK4B locus, our results suggest that activation of the INK4B locus requires ASXL1/BAP1-mediated deubiquitylation of H2AK119ub1. Consistently, our results show that ASXL1 mutations are associated with lower expression levels of p15(INK4B) and a proliferative advantage of hematopoietic progenitors in primary bone marrow cells, and that depletion of ASXL1 in multiple cell lines results in resistance to growth inhibitory signals. Taken together, this study links ASXL1-mediated H2A deubiquitylation and transcriptional activation of INK4B expression to its tumor suppressor functions. PMID:26470845

  9. Polyadenylation Factor CPSF-73 is the Pre-mRNA 3'-end-processing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel,C.; Kaneko, S.; Zhang, H.; Gebauer, D.; Vethantham, V.; Manley, J.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Most eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) undergo extensive maturational processing, including cleavage and polyadenylation at the 3'-end. Despite the characterization of many proteins that are required for the cleavage reaction, the identity of the endonuclease is not known. Recent analyses indicated that the 73-kDa subunit of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF-73) might be the endonuclease for this and related reactions, although no direct data confirmed this. Here we report the crystal structures of human CPSF-73 at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with zinc ions and a sulphate that might mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, and the related yeast protein CPSF-100 (Ydh1) at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Both CPSF-73 and CPSF-100 contain two domains, a metallo-{beta}-lactamase domain and a novel -CASP (named for metallo-{beta}-lactamase, CPSF, Artemis, Snm1, Pso2) domain. The active site of CPSF-73, with two zinc ions, is located at the interface of the two domains. Purified recombinant CPSF-73 possesses RNA endonuclease activity, and mutations that disrupt zinc binding in the active site abolish this activity. Our studies provide the first direct experimental evidence that CPSF-73 is the pre-mRNA 3'-end-processing endonuclease.

  10. Connecting RNA Processing to Abiotic Environmental Response in Arabidopsis: the role of a polyadenylation factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. Q.; Xu, R.; Hunt, A. G.; Falcone, D. L.

    Plants are constantly challenged by numerous environmental stresses both biotic and abiotic It is clear that plants have evolved to counter these stresses using all but limited means We recently discovered the potential role of a messenger RNA processing factor namely the Arabidopsis cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 kDa subunit AtCPSF30 when a mutant deficient in this factor displayed altered responses to an array of abiotic stresses This AtCPSF30 mutant named oxt6 exhibited an elevated tolerance to oxidative stress Microarray experiments of oxt6 and its complemented lines revealed an altered gene expression profile among which were antioxidative defense genes Interestingly the same gene encoding AtCPSF30 can also be transcribed into a large transcript that codes for a potential splicing factor Both protein products have a domain for RNA binding and a calmodulin binding domain activities of which have been confirmed by biochemical assays Surprisingly binding of AtCPSF30 to calmodulin inhibits the RNA-binding activity of the protein Mutational analysis shows that a small part of the protein is responsible for calmodulin binding and point mutations in this region abolished both RNA binding activity and the inhibition of this activity by calmodulin Analyses of the potential splicing factor are on going and the results will be presented The interesting possibilities for both the interplay between splicing and polyadenylation and the regulation of these processes by stimuli that act through

  11. [Is it reality that the endonuclease that cleaves pre-mRNA on polyadenylation has not been discovered?].

    PubMed

    Zarudnaia, M I; Govorun, D N

    2001-01-01

    Specific cleavage of transcript by a complex of multisubunit proteins is the first stage of polyadenylation of eukaryotic pre-mRNAs. The main participant of this reaction--endonuclease--is not discovered yet. However it is known that proteins CPSF-30 (mammalian) and Yth 1p (yeast) are homologues of the drosofila protein clipper (CLP), which displays endoribonucleolytic activity. In the N-terminal region all three proteins contain five copies of CCCH zinc finger motif that are associated with nucleolytic activity in the case of CLP. Literature data on the three above-mentioned proteins has been analysed. The results of these works do not contradict the hypothesis that exactly CPSF-30 and its homologues are the actual nucleases that cleave pre-mRNA in the process of polyadenylation. PMID:12035497

  12. The Oncogenic Activity of RET Point Mutants for Follicular Thyroid Cells May Account for the Occurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients Affected by Familial Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; De Falco, Valentina; Bellantoni, Marie; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo; Carlomagno, Francesca; Picascia, Antonella; Tramontano, Donatella; Tallini, Giovanni; Santoro, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Activating germ-line point mutations in the RET receptor are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), whereas somatic RET rearrangements are prevalent in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). Some rare kindreds, carrying point mutations in RET, are affected by both cancer types, suggesting that, under specific circumstances, point mutations in RET can drive the generation of PTC. Here we describe a family whose siblings, affected by both PTC and MTC, carried a germ-line point mutation in the RET extracellular domain, converting cysteine 634 into serine. We tested on thyroid follicular cells the transforming activity of RET(C634S), RET(K603Q), another mutant identified in a kindred with both PTC and MTC, RET(C634R) a commonly isolated allele in MEN2A, RET(M918T) responsible for MEN2B and also identified in kindreds with both PTC and MTC, and RET/PTC1 the rearranged oncogene that characterizes bona fide PTC in patients without MTC. We show that the various RET point mutants, but not wild-type RET, scored constitutive kinase activity and exerted mitogenic effects for thyroid PC Cl 3 cells, albeit at significantly lower levels compared to RET/PTC1. The low mitogenic activity of RET point mutants paralleled their reduced kinase activity compared to RET/PTC. Furthermore, RET point mutants maintained a protein domain, the intracellular juxtamembrane domain, that exerted negative effects on the mitogenic activity. In conclusion, RET point mutants can behave as dominant oncogenes for thyroid follicular cells. Their transforming activity, however, is rather modest, providing a possible explanation for the rare association of MTC with PTC. PMID:15277225

  13. Inhibition of ligand-independent constitutive activation of the Met oncogenic receptor by the engineered chemically-modified antibody DN30.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Elisa; Chiriaco, Cristina; Cignetto, Simona; Fontani, Lara; Basilico, Cristina; Petronzelli, Fiorella; Comoglio, Paolo M

    2015-11-01

    An awesome number of experimental and clinical evidences indicate that constitutive activation of the Met oncogenic receptor plays a critical role in the progression of cancer toward metastasis and/or resistance to targeted therapies. While mutations are rare, the common mechanism of Met activation is overexpression, either by gene amplification ('addiction') or transcriptional activation ('expedience'). In the first instance ligand-independent kinase activation plays a major role in sustaining the transformed phenotype. Anti-Met antibodies directed against the receptor binding site behave essentially as ligand (Hepatocyte Growth Factor, HGF) antagonists and are ineffective to counteract ligand-independent activation. The monovalent chimeric MvDN30 antibody fragment, PEGylated to extend its half-life, binds the fourth IPT domain and induces 'shedding' of the Met extracellular domain, dramatically reducing both the number of receptors on the surface and their phosphorylation. Downstream signaling is thus inhibited, both in the absence or in the presence of the ligand. In vitro, MvDN30 is a strong inhibitor not only of ligand-dependent invasive growth, sustained by both paracrine and autocrine HGF, but notably, also of ligand-independent growth of 'Met-addicted' cells. In immunocompromised mice, lacking expression of Hepatocyte Growth Factor cross-reacting with the human receptor - thus providing, by definition, a model of 'ligand-independent' Met activation - PEGylated MvDN30 impairs growth of Met 'addicted' human gastric carcinoma cells. In a Met-amplified patient-derived colo-rectal tumor (xenopatient) MvDN30-PEG overcomes the resistance to EGFR targeted therapy (Cetuximab). The PEGylated MvDN30 is thus a strong candidate for targeting tumors sustained by ligand-independent Met oncogenic activation. PMID:26119717

  14. RAS oncogenes: weaving a tumorigenic web

    PubMed Central

    Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    RAS proteins are essential components of signalling pathways that emanate from cell surface receptors. Oncogenic activation of these proteins owing to missense mutations is frequently detected in several types of cancer. A wealth of biochemical and genetic studies indicates that RAS proteins control a complex molecular circuitry that consists of a wide array of interconnecting pathways. In this Review, we describe how RAS oncogenes exploit their extensive signalling reach to affect multiple cellular processes that drive tumorigenesis. PMID:21993244

  15. Function of oncogenes in cancer development: a changing paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated oncogenes induce unscheduled proliferation as well as genomic and chromosomal instability. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumour cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that oncogenes are only essential for the proliferation of some specific tumour cell types, but not all. Indeed, the latest studies of the interactions between the oncogene and its target cell have shown that oncogenes contribute to cancer development not only by inducing proliferation but also by developmental reprogramming of the epigenome. This provides the first evidence that tumorigenesis can be initiated by stem cell reprogramming, and uncovers a new role for oncogenes in the origin of cancer. Here we analyse these evidences and propose an updated model of oncogene function that can explain the full range of genotype–phenotype associations found in human cancer. Finally, we discuss how this vision opens new avenues for developing novel anti-cancer interventions. PMID:23632857

  16. Genomic deregulation of the E2F/Rb pathway leads to activation of the oncogene EZH2 in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Coe, Bradley P; Thu, Kelsie L; Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Vucic, Emily A; Gazdar, Adi F; Lam, Stephen; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Lam, Wan L

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive lung neoplasm with extremely poor clinical outcomes and no approved targeted treatments. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for driving the SCLC phenotype in hopes of revealing novel therapeutic targets, we studied copy number and methylation profiles of SCLC. We found disruption of the E2F/Rb pathway was a prominent feature deregulated in 96% of the SCLC samples investigated and was strongly associated with increased expression of EZH2, an oncogene and core member of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Through its catalytic role in the PRC2 complex, EZH2 normally functions to epigenetically silence genes during development, however, it aberrantly silences genes in human cancers. We provide evidence to support that EZH2 is functionally active in SCLC tumours, exerts pro-tumourigenic functions in vitro, and is associated with aberrant methylation profiles of PRC2 target genes indicative of a "stem-cell like" hypermethylator profile in SCLC tumours. Furthermore, lentiviral-mediated knockdown of EZH2 demonstrated a significant reduction in the growth of SCLC cell lines, suggesting EZH2 has a key role in driving SCLC biology. In conclusion, our data confirm the role of EZH2 as a critical oncogene in SCLC, and lend support to the prioritization of EZH2 as a potential therapeutic target in clinical disease. PMID:23967231

  17. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  18. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  19. Long conserved fragments upstream of Mammalian polyadenylation sites.

    PubMed

    Ho, Eric S; Gunderson, Samuel I

    2011-01-01

    Polyadenylation is a cotranscriptional nuclear RNA processing event involving endonucleolytic cleavage of the nascent, emerging pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) from the RNA polymerase, immediately followed by the polymerization of adenine ribonucleotides, called the poly(A) tail, to the cleaved 3' end of the polyadenylation site (PAS). This apparently simple molecular processing step has been discovered to be connected to transcription and splicing therefore increasing its potential for regulation of gene expression. Here, through a bioinformatic analysis of cis-PAS-regulatory elements in mammals that includes taking advantage of multiple evolutionary time scales, we find unexpected selection pressure much further upstream, up to 200 nt, from the PAS than previously thought. Strikingly, close to 3,000 long (30-500 nt) noncoding conserved fragments (CFs) were discovered in the PAS flanking region of three remotely related mammalian species, human, mouse, and cow. When an even more remote transitional mammal, platypus, was included, still over a thousand CFs were found in the proximity of the PAS. Even though the biological function of these CFs remains unknown, their considerable sizes makes them unlikely to serve as protein recognition sites, which are typically ≤15 nt. By harnessing genome wide DNaseI hypersensitivity data, we have discovered that the presence of CFs correlates with chromatin accessibility. Our study is important in highlighting novel experimental targets, which may provide new understanding about the regulatory aspects of polyadenylation. PMID:21705472

  20. Involvement of V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 in regulation of transcription activity of MDR1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zeng, Xiaoqing; Luo, Tiancheng; Jin, Wei; Chen, Shiyao

    2012-09-01

    Over-expression of MDR1 confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancers and remains a major cause for the failure of chemotherapy. In the present study, we found that V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) could activate MDR1 transcription and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in SGC7901 cells. Knockdown of ETS2 attenuated MDR1 transcription and P-gp expression, and increased the sensitivity of MDR cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs that were transported by P-gp in SGC7901/VCR cells. ETS2 could bind to the ETS2 sites on the MDR1 promoter and activate its transcription. The regulation of MDR1 expression by ETS2 may provide potential ways to overcome MDR in cancer treatment. PMID:22819965

  1. Targeting oncogenic Ras signaling in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ashley F.; Braun, Benjamin S.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are critical nodes in cellular signaling that integrate inputs from activated cell surface receptors and other stimuli to modulate cell fate through a complex network of effector pathways. Oncogenic RAS mutations are found in ∼ 25% of human cancers and are highly prevalent in hematopoietic malignancies. Because of their structural and biochemical properties, oncogenic Ras proteins are exceedingly difficult targets for rational drug discovery, and no mechanism-based therapies exist for cancers with RAS mutations. This article reviews the properties of normal and oncogenic Ras proteins, the prevalence and likely pathogenic role of NRAS, KRAS, and NF1 mutations in hematopoietic malignancies, relevant animal models of these cancers, and implications for drug discovery. Because hematologic malignancies are experimentally tractable, they are especially valuable platforms for addressing the fundamental question of how to reverse the adverse biochemical output of oncogenic Ras in cancer. PMID:22898602

  2. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 Synergistically Activate Transcription of Fatty-acid Synthase Gene (FASN)*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F.; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  3. Systemic delivery of siRNA by actively targeted polyion complex micelles for silencing the E6 and E7 human papillomavirus oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Haruka; Matsumoto, Yoko; Kawana, Kei; Christie, R James; Naito, Mitsuru; Kim, Beob Soo; Toh, Kazuko; Min, Hyun Su; Yi, Yu; Matsumoto, Yu; Kim, Hyun Jin; Miyata, Kanjiro; Taguchi, Ayumi; Tomio, Kensuke; Yamashita, Aki; Inoue, Tomoko; Nakamura, Hiroe; Fujimoto, Asaha; Sato, Masakazu; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Arimoto, Takahide; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-06-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes are essential for the immortalization and maintenance of HPV-associated cancer and are ubiquitously expressed in cervical cancer lesions. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) coding for E6 and E7 oncogenes is a promising approach for precise treatment of cervical cancer, yet a delivery system is required for systemic delivery to solid tumors. Here, an actively targeted polyion complex (PIC) micelle was applied to deliver siRNAs coding for HPV E6/E7 to HPV cervical cancer cell tumors in immune-incompetent tumor-bearing mice. A cell viability assay revealed that both HPV type 16 and 18 E6/E7 siRNAs (si16E6/E7 and si18E6/E7, respectively) interfered with proliferation of cervical cancer cell lines in an HPV type-specific manner. A fluorescence imaging biodistribution analysis further revealed that fluorescence dye-labeled siRNA-loaded PIC micelles efficiently accumulated within the tumor mass after systemic administration. Ultimately, intravenous injection of si16E6/E7 and si18E6/E7-loaded PIC micelles was found to significantly suppress the growth of subcutaneous SiHa and HeLa tumors, respectively. The specific activity of siRNA treatment was confirmed by the observation that p53 protein expression was restored in the tumors excised from the mice treated with si16E6/E7- and si18E6/E7-loaded PIC micelles for SiHa and HeLa tumors, respectively. Therefore, the actively targeted PIC micelle incorporating HPV E6/E7-coding siRNAs demonstrated its therapeutic potential against HPV-associated cancer. PMID:26979870

  4. Global profiling of stimulus-induced polyadenylation in cells using a poly(A) trap

    PubMed Central

    Curanovic, Dusica; Cohen, Michael; Singh, Irtisha; Slagle, Christopher E.; Leslie, Christina S.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2013-01-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA leads to increased protein expression in response to diverse stimuli, but it is difficult to identify mRNAs that become polyadenylated in living cells. Here we describe a click chemistry-compatible nucleoside analog that is selectively incorporated into poly(A) tails of transcripts in cells. Next-generation sequencing of labeled mRNAs enables a transcriptome-wide profile of polyadenylation and provides insights into the mRNA sequence elements that are correlated with polyadenylation. PMID:23995769

  5. Hippo-independent activation of YAP by the GNAQ uveal melanoma oncogene through a trio-regulated rho GTPase signaling circuitry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaodong; Degese, Maria Sol; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Vaque, Jose P; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Rodrigues, Murilo; Zaidi, M Raza; Ksander, Bruce R; Merlino, Glenn; Sodhi, Akrit; Chen, Qianming; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2014-06-16

    Mutually exclusive activating mutations in the GNAQ and GNA11 oncogenes, encoding heterotrimeric Gαq family members, have been identified in ∼ 83% and ∼ 6% of uveal and skin melanomas, respectively. However, the molecular events underlying these GNAQ-driven malignancies are not yet defined, thus limiting the ability to develop cancer-targeted therapies. Here, we focused on the transcriptional coactivator YAP, a critical component of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls organ size. We found that Gαq stimulates YAP through a Trio-Rho/Rac signaling circuitry promoting actin polymerization, independently of phospholipase Cβ and the canonical Hippo pathway. Furthermore, we show that Gαq promotes the YAP-dependent growth of uveal melanoma cells, thereby identifying YAP as a suitable therapeutic target in uveal melanoma, a GNAQ/GNA11-initiated human malignancy. PMID:24882515

  6. p38γ Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Contributes to Oncogenic Properties Maintenance and Resistance to Poly (ADP-Ribose)-Polymerase-1 Inhibition in Breast Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyan; Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Gang; Kreike, Bas; Chen, Wei; Sethi, Seema; Miller, Fred R; Wu, Guojun

    2011-01-01

    p38γ MAPK, one of the four members of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), has previously been shown to harbor oncogenic functions. However, the biologic function of p38γ MAPK in breast cancer has not been well defined. In this study, we have shown that p38γ MAPK is overexpressed in highly metastatic human and mouse breast cancer cell lines and p38γ MAPK expression is preferentially associated with basal-like and metastatic phenotypes of breast tumor samples. Ectopic expression of p38γ MAPK did not lead to an increase in oncogenic properties in vitro in most tested mammary epithelial cells. However, knockdown of p38γ MAPK expression resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, invasion in vitro and significant retardation of tumorigenesis, and long-distance metastasis to the lungs in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of p38γ MAPK triggered the activation of AKT signaling. Inhibition of this feedback loop with various PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitors facilitated the effect of targeting p38γ MAPK. We further found that overexpression of p38γ MAPK did not promote cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin and paclitaxel but significantly increased cell resistance to PJ-34, a DNA damage agent poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP) inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we identified that p38γ MAPK overexpression led to marked cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Our study for the first time clearly demonstrates that p38γ MAPK is a promising target for the design of targeted therapies for basal-like breast cancer with metastatic characteristics and for overcoming potential resistance against the PARP inhibitor. PMID:21532888

  7. Context-dependent modulation of Pol II CTD phosphatase SSUP-72 regulates alternative polyadenylation in neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Zhou, Yu; Qi, Yingchuan B.; Khivansara, Vishal; Li, Hairi; Chun, Sang Young; Kim, John K.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is widespread in neuronal development and activity-mediated neural plasticity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We used systematic genetic studies and genome-wide surveys of the transcriptional landscape to identify a context-dependent regulatory pathway controlling APA in the Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system. Loss of function in ssup-72, a Ser5 phosphatase for the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD), dampens transcription termination at a strong intronic polyadenylation site (PAS) in unc-44/ankyrin yet promotes termination at the weak intronic PAS of the MAP kinase dlk-1. A nuclear protein, SYDN-1, which regulates neuronal development, antagonizes the function of SSUP-72 and several nuclear polyadenylation factors. This regulatory pathway allows the production of a neuron-specific isoform of unc-44 and an inhibitory isoform of dlk-1. Dysregulation of the unc-44 and dlk-1 mRNA isoforms in sydn-1 mutants impairs neuronal development. Deleting the intronic PAS of unc-44 results in increased pre-mRNA processing of neuronal ankyrin and suppresses sydn-1 mutants. These results reveal a mechanism by which regulation of CTD phosphorylation controls coding region APA in the nervous system. PMID:26588990

  8. In utero exposure to second-hand smoke activates pro-asthmatic and oncogenic miRNAs in adult asthmatic mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rui; Noël, Alexandra; Perveen, Zakia; Penn, Arthur L

    2016-04-01

    Exposures to environmental pollutants contribute to dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles, which have been implicated in various diseases. Previously, we reported aggravated asthmatic responses in ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged adult mice that had been exposed in utero to second-hand smoke (SHS). Whether in utero SHS exposure dysregulates miRNA expression patterns in the adult asthma model has not been investigated. Pregnant BALB/c mice were exposed (days 6-19 of pregnancy) to SHS (10 mg/m(3)) or HEPA-filtered air. All offspring were sensitized and challenged with OVA (19-23 weeks) before sacrifice. RNA samples extracted from lung homogenates, were subjected to RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq identified nine miRNAs that were most significantly up-regulated by in utero SHS exposure. Among these nine, miR-155-5p, miR-21-3p, and miR-18a-5p were also highly correlated with pro-asthmatic Th2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further analysis indicated that these up-regulated miRNAs shared common chromosome locations, particularly Chr 11C, with pro-asthmatic genes. These three miRNAs have also been characterized as oncogenic miRNAs (oncomirs). We cross-referenced miRNA-mRNA expression profiles and identified 16 tumor suppressor genes that were down-regulated in the in utero-exposed offspring and that are predicted targets of the up-regulated oncomirs. In conclusion, in utero SHS exposure activates pro-asthmatic genes and miRNAs, which colocalize at specific chromosome locations, in OVA-challenged adult mice. The oncogenic characteristics of the miRNAs and putative miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks suggest that the synergistic effect of in utero SHS exposure and certain adult irritants may promote an oncogenic milieu in mouse lungs via inhibition of miRNA-regulated tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26859758

  9. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  10. Honokiol activates LKB1-miR-34a axis and antagonizes the oncogenic actions of leptin in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Avtanski, Dimiter B; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L; Saxena, Neeraj K; Sharma, Dipali

    2015-10-01

    Leptin, a major adipocytokine produced by adipocytes, is emerging as a key molecule linking obesity with breast cancer therefore, it is important to find effective strategies to antagonize oncogenic effects of leptin to disrupt obesity-cancer axis. Here, we examine the potential of honokiol (HNK), a bioactive polyphenol from Magnolia grandiflora, as a leptin-antagonist and systematically elucidate the underlying mechanisms. HNK inhibits leptin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), and mammosphere-formation along with a reduction in the expression of stemness factors, Oct4 and Nanog. Investigating the downstream mediator(s), that direct leptin-antagonist actions of HNK; we discovered functional interactions between HNK, LKB1 and miR-34a. HNK increases the expression and cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1 while HNK-induced SIRT1/3 accentuates the cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1. We found that HNK increases miR-34a in LKB1-dependent manner as LKB1-silencing impedes HNK-induced miR-34a which can be rescued by LKB1-overexpression. Finally, an integral role of miR-34a is discovered as miR-34a mimic potentiates HNK-mediated inhibition of EMT, Zeb1 expression and nuclear-localization, mammosphere-formation, and expression of stemness factors. Leptin-antagonist actions of HNK are further enhanced by miR-34a mimic whereas miR-34a inhibitor results in inhibiting HNK's effect on leptin. These data provide evidence for the leptin-antagonist potential of HNK and reveal the involvement of LKB1 and miR-34a. PMID:26359358

  11. Honokiol activates LKB1-miR-34a axis and antagonizes the oncogenic actions of leptin in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Dipali

    2015-01-01

    Leptin, a major adipocytokine produced by adipocytes, is emerging as a key molecule linking obesity with breast cancer therefore, it is important to find effective strategies to antagonize oncogenic effects of leptin to disrupt obesity-cancer axis. Here, we examine the potential of honokiol (HNK), a bioactive polyphenol from Magnolia grandiflora, as a leptin-antagonist and systematically elucidate the underlying mechanisms. HNK inhibits leptin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), and mammosphere-formation along with a reduction in the expression of stemness factors, Oct4 and Nanog. Investigating the downstream mediator(s), that direct leptin-antagonist actions of HNK; we discovered functional interactions between HNK, LKB1 and miR-34a. HNK increases the expression and cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1 while HNK-induced SIRT1/3 accentuates the cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1. We found that HNK increases miR-34a in LKB1-dependent manner as LKB1-silencing impedes HNK-induced miR-34a which can be rescued by LKB1-overexpression. Finally, an integral role of miR-34a is discovered as miR-34a mimic potentiates HNK-mediated inhibition of EMT, Zeb1 expression and nuclear-localization, mammosphere-formation, and expression of stemness factors. Leptin-antagonist actions of HNK are further enhanced by miR-34a mimic whereas miR-34a inhibitor results in inhibiting HNK's effect on leptin. These data provide evidence for the leptin-antagonist potential of HNK and reveal the involvement of LKB1 and miR-34a. PMID:26359358

  12. Oncogenic TPM3-ALK activation requires dimerization through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Rie; Sakatani, Toshio; Ichinose, Junji; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Nakajima, Jun; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2015-02-13

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a mesenchymal tumor that can arise from anywhere in the body. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements, most often resulting in the tropomyosin 3 (TPM3)-ALK fusion gene, are the main causes of IMT. However, the mechanism of malignant transformation in IMT has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the TPM3 region in the transformation of IMT via TPM3-ALK. Lentivirus vectors containing a TPM3-ALK fusion gene lacking various lengths of TPM3 were constructed and expressed in HEK293T and NIH3T3 cell lines. Focus formation assay revealed loss of contact inhibition in NIH3T3 cells transfected with full-length TPM3-ALK, but not with ALK alone. Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed that TPM3-ALK dimerization increased in proportion to the length of TPM3. Western blot showed phosphorylation of ALK, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in HEK293T cells transfected with TPM3-ALK. Thus, the coiled-coil structure of TPM3 contributes to the transforming ability of the TPM3-ALK fusion protein, and longer TPM3 region leads to higher dimer formation. - Highlights: • TPM3-ALK fusion protein dimerizes through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3. • Longer coiled-coil structure of TPM3 leads to higher TPM3-ALK dimer formation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK dimer leads to ALK, STAT3, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK leads to loss of contact inhibition. • BN-PAGE is a simple technique for visualizing oncogenic dimerization.

  13. Activating Mutations in PIK3CB Confer Resistance to PI3K Inhibition and Define a Novel Oncogenic Role for p110β.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Yoshito; Walter, Kimberly; Spoerke, Jill M; O'Brien, Carol; Huw, Ling Y; Hampton, Garret M; Lackner, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the PI3K pathway occurs commonly in a wide variety of cancers. Experience with other successful targeted agents suggests that clinical resistance is likely to arise and may reduce the durability of clinical benefit. Here, we sought to understand mechanisms underlying resistance to PI3K inhibition in PTEN-deficient cancers. We generated cell lines resistant to the pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 from parental PTEN-null breast cancer cell lines and identified a novel PIK3CB D1067Y mutation in both cell lines that was recurrent in cancer patients. Stable expression of mutant PIK3CB variants conferred resistance to PI3K inhibition that could be overcome by downstream AKT or mTORC1/2 inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that the p110β D1067Y mutant was highly activated and induced PIP3 levels at the cell membrane, subsequently promoting the localization and activation of AKT and PDK1 at the membrane and driving PI3K signaling to a level that could withstand treatment with proximal inhibitors. Finally, we demonstrate that the PIK3CB D1067Y mutant behaved as an oncogene and transformed normal cells, an activity that was enhanced by PTEN depletion. Collectively, these novel preclinical and clinical findings implicate the acquisition of activating PIK3CB D1067 mutations as an important event underlying the resistance of cancer cells to selective PI3K inhibitors. PMID:26759240

  14. Polyadenylated RNA isolated from the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.W.; Reeve, J.N.

    1986-05-01

    Polyadenylated (poly(A)/sup +/) RNA has been isolated from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium by binding, at 4/sup 0/C, to oligo(dT)-cellulose. H. halobium contains approximately 12 times more poly(A) per unit of RNA than does the methanogenic archaebacterium Methanococcus vannielii. The 3' poly(A) tracts in poly(A)/sup +/ RNA molecules are approximately twice as long (average length of 20 nucleotides) in H. halobium as in M. vannielii. In both archaebacterial species, poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs are unstable.

  15. (Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. Ring Finger Protein 149 Is an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Active on Wild-type v-Raf Murine Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homolog B1 (BRAF)*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung-Woo; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Jae-Sik; Moon, Jai-Hee; Na, Young-Soon; Jung, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Seung-Mi; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Tae Won

    2012-01-01

    Members of the RAF family (ARAF, BRAF, and CRAF/RAF-1) are involved in a variety of cellular activities, including growth, survival, differentiation, and transformation. An oncogene encodes BRAF, the function of which is linked to MEK activation. BRAF is the most effective RAF kinase in terms of induction of MEK/ERK activity. However, the mechanisms involved in BRAF regulation remain unclear. In the present work, we used a tandem affinity purification approach to show that RNF149 (RING finger protein 149) interacts with wild-type BRAF. The latter protein is a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in control of gene transcription, translation, cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion, and epithelial development. We showed that RNF149 bound directly to the C-terminal kinase-containing domain of wild-type BRAF and induced ubiquitination, followed by proteasome-dependent degradation, of the latter protein. Functionally, RNF149 attenuated the increase in cell growth induced by wild-type BRAF. However, RNF149 did not bind to mutant BRAF or induce ubiquitination thereof. Thus, we show that RNF149 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase active on wild-type BRAF. PMID:22628551

  17. Loss of E-Cadherin–mediated Cell–Cell Contacts Activates a Novel Mechanism for Up-Regulation of the Proto-Oncogene c-Jun

    PubMed Central

    Knirsh, Revital; Ben-Dror, Iris; Spangler, Barbara; Matthews, Gideon D.; Kuphal, Silke; Bosserhoff, Anja K.

    2009-01-01

    Loss of E-cadherin–mediated cell–cell contacts can elicit a signaling pathway that leads to acquisition of an invasive phenotype. Here, we show that at the receiving end of this pathway is the proto-oncogene c-Jun, a member of the activator protein-1 family of transcription factors that play a key role in stimulation of cell proliferation and tumor promotion. Cell separation or abrogation of E-cadherin–mediated cell–cell contacts both cause a dramatic increase in accumulation of the c-Jun protein. Unlike growth factors that enhance the expression of c-Jun by activating the transcription of the c-jun gene, the cell contact-dependent increase in c-Jun accumulation is not accompanied by a corresponding increase in c-Jun mRNA or c-Jun protein stability but rather in the translatability of the c-Jun transcript. Consistently, the increase in c-Jun accumulation is not dependent on activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or β-catenin pathways but is mediated by signals triggered by the restructured cytoskeleton. Depolymerization of the cytoskeleton can mimic the effect of cell separation and cause a dramatic increase in c-Jun accumulation, whereas Taxol inhibits the cell contact-dependent increase. This novel mechanism of c-Jun regulation seems to underlie the robust overexpression of c-Jun in tumor cells of patients with colon carcinoma. PMID:19193763

  18. Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway predict for antitumor activity of the inhibitor PX-866 while oncogenic Ras is a dominant predictor for resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ihle, NathanT.; Lemos, Robert; Wipf, Peter; Yacoub, Adly; Mitchell, Clint; Siwak, Doris; Mills, Gordon B.; Dent, Paul; Kirkpatrick, D Lynn.; Powis, Garth

    2008-01-01

    The novel phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) inhibitor PX-866 was tested against 13 experimental human tumor xenografts derived from cell lines of various tissue origins. Mutant PI-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and loss of PTEN activity were sufficient but not necessary as predictors of sensitivity to the antitumor activity of the PI-3-K inhibitor PX-866 in the presence of wild type Ras, while mutant oncogenic Ras was a dominant determinant of resistance, even in tumors with coexisting mutations in PIK3CA. The level of activation of PI-3-kinase signaling measured by tumor phospho-Ser473-Akt was insufficient to predict in vivo antitumor response to PX-866. Reverse phase protein array (RPPA) revealed that the Ras dependent down stream targets c-Myc and cyclin B were elevated in cell lines resistant to PX-866 in vivo. Studies using an H-Ras construct to constitutively and preferentially activate the three best defined downstream targets of Ras, namely Raf, RalGDS, and PI-3-kinase, showed that mutant Ras mediates resistance through its ability to utilize multiple pathways for tumorigenesis. The identification of Ras and downstream signaling pathways driving resistance to PI-3-kinase inhibition may serve as an important guide for patient selection as inhibitors enter clinical trials, and for the development of rational combinations with other molecularly targeted agents. PMID:19117997

  19. Metabolic alterations accompanying oncogene-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Aird, Katherine M; Zhang, Rugang

    2014-01-01

    Senescence is defined as a stable cell growth arrest. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) occurs in normal primary human cells after activation of an oncogene in the absence of other cooperating oncogenic stimuli. OIS is therefore considered a bona fide tumor suppression mechanism in vivo. Indeed, overcoming OIS-associated stable cell growth arrest can lead to tumorigenesis. Although cells that have undergone OIS do not replicate their DNA, they remain metabolically active. A number of recent studies report significant changes in cellular metabolism during OIS, including alterations in nucleotide, glucose, and mitochondrial metabolism and autophagy. These alterations may be necessary for stable senescence-associated cell growth arrest, and overcoming these shifts in metabolism may lead to tumorigenesis. This review highlights what is currently known about alterations in cellular metabolism during OIS and the implication of OIS-associated metabolic changes in cellular transformation and the development of cancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27308349

  20. Changes in nuclear and polysomal polyadenylated RNA sequences during rat-liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, P R; Birnie, G D; Paul, J

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear and polysomal polyadenylated RNA populations of normal and 16 hour regenerating rat liver have been compared by mRNA-cDNA hybridisations and by unique DNA saturation experiments. It was found that nuclear polyadenylated RNA hybridises to 6.8% of unique DNA in both normal and 16 hour regenerating rat liver. However, cross-hybridisation experiments using cDNA have shown that 10-15% by weight of nuclear polyadenylated RNA sequences are specific to 16 hour regenerating rat-liver. Since both unique DNA and cDNA hybridisation have shown that normal and 16 hour regenerating rat-liver polysomal polyadenylated RNA populations are qualitatively very similar sequences specific to 16 hour regenerating rat-liver nuclear polyadenylated RNA are nucleus confined. Polysomal RNA sequences which were abundant in normal rat-liver have become less abundant in regenerating rat liver. PMID:461186

  1. Dose-dependent carcinogenicity and frequent Ki-ras proto-oncogene activation by dietary N-nitrosodiethylamine in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, J D; Cheng, R; Shelton, D W; Pereira, C B; Bailey, G S

    1994-07-01

    While the experimental data upon which current concepts in mechanistically based risk assessment and molecular epidemiology are grounded derive almost entirely from rodent models, fish models have several attributes (e.g., low background incidence, extremely low cost tumor studies, nonmammalian comparative status for extrapolation of mechanisms to humans) that make them valuable adjuncts for addressing these concepts. This report provides an initial characterization of the dose dependency of dietary N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) hepatocarcinogenicity in Shasta strain rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the potential of DEN to elicit ras proto-oncogene activation in this species. Carcinogen was administered in the diet at five concentrations for 12 months. Necropsies were performed at 9, 12, and 18 months, the latter on fish maintained on control diet for 6 months after cessation of DEN exposure. The incidence of hepatic neoplasms at the lower dietary concentrations (< or = 70 ppm) did not consistently exceed that for control groups, which were higher in this particular study (2%) than expected (historically 0.1%). For the higher DEN concentrations, a linear relationship between the hepatic tumor incidence (expressed as log odds, log [p/(1-p)], where p = proportion of fish bearing tumors), and the logarithm of total cumulative dose was observed, with response being independent of the length of time (9 or 12 months) during which the dose was accumulated. The dose-response curve for fish maintained an additional 6 months postexposure was shifted toward higher incidence but was parallel to the curve for fish killed at cessation of exposure. The model predicts that doubling the dose will produce somewhat more than a doubling of the odds (p/(100-p)) for tumor incidence and that the odds for lesions 6 months postexposure will be approximately double those at cessation of exposure. Comparison of these results with previous studies using rats suggests an overall

  2. Regulation of the herpesvirus saimiri oncogene stpC, similar to that of T-cell activation genes, in growth-transformed human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fickenscher, H; Biesinger, B; Knappe, A; Wittmann, S; Fleckenstein, B

    1996-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri strain C488, a T-cell tumor virus of New World primates, transforms human T lymphocytes to stable interleukin-2-dependent growth without need for further stimulation by antigen or mitogen. The transformed cell lines show the phenotype of activated mature T cells and retain many essential features of the primary parental cells, e.g., antigen specificity. In contrast to transformed New World monkey T cells, the human lines do not support lytic growth of the virus, even after chemical stimulation. Here we show that many viral genes remain silent during episomal persistence. However, the viral oncogene stpC is predominantly transcribed and translated to a stable cytoplasmic protein of 20 kDa that is heterogeneously expressed in individual cells. This 1.7-kb mRNA is bicistronic, encoding also Tip, a viral protein interacting with the T-cell-specific tyrosine kinase Lck. stpC/tip transcripts are heavily induced upon stimulation by mitogen or phorbol ester. Block of protein synthesis does not abolish transcription: treatment with cycloheximide greatly induces stpC/tip mRNA levels. Thus, this gene complex is regulated similarly to early T-cell activation genes. Constitutive and induced expression engage different transcription start sites. The T-cell regulation of the viral genes stpC and tip may contribute to the T-cell tropism of growth transformation by herpesvirus saimiri. PMID:8709223

  3. The copy number of Epstein-Barr virus latent genome correlates with the oncogenicity by the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lielian; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lingzhi; Tang, Yunlian; Wu, Hongzhuan; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Meijuan; Du, Shujuan; Zhao, Lian; Cao, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Lu, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    A tumor model that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection facilitated the tumorigenicity was previously established using the Maxi-EBV system. In the present approach, EBV-lost cell clones demonstrated significantly decreased tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the LMP1 gene in Maxi-EBV genome was replaced by that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma origin. The resultant cell line, 293–1/NL showed much lower malignancy than the original 293-EBV. The result was opposite to our expectation. The change of 293 sublineage cells for EBV harboring also got similar result. To seek the underlying reason, the copy number of EBV genome in all the cell lines was detected. The result indicated that 293-EBV contained about 4.5-fold higher EBV copies than 293–1/NL did. Parallel EBV genomes led to relatively stable copies in different 293 sublineages, suggesting the viral genome structure is a factor for the sustainability of EBV's copy number. Moreover, the LMP1 transcription in high copy-containing cells showed abnormally high level. Furthermore, the main LMP1-driven pathway, transcription factor NF-κB, was highly activated in high-copy cells. Here we first manifest by experimental model that the copy number of EBV latent genome correlates with the viral pathogenesis, which depends on the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB. Overall, both the presence and amount of EBV genome are crucial for the viral oncogenicity. PMID:26517512

  4. Lymphatic Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus Promotes the Oncogenic Activity of the Virus-Encoded G-protein Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Berenice; Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong Sun; Lee, Ha Neul; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Kim, Nam Yoon; Baik, Jae Myung; Jung, Jae U.; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in HIV-positive individuals, is caused by endothelial transformation mediated by the KS herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded G-protein coupled receptor (vGPCR). Infection of blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) by KSHV reactivates an otherwise silenced embryonic program of lymphatic differentiation. Thus, KS tumors express numerous lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)-signature genes. A key unanswered question is how lymphatic reprogramming by the virus promotes tumorigenesis leading to KS formation. In this study, we present evidence that this process creates an environment needed to license the oncogenic activity of vGPCR. We found that the G-protein regulator RGS4 is an inhibitor of vGPCR that is expressed in BECs, but not in LECs. RGS4 was downregulated by the master regulator of LEC differentiation PROX1, which is upregulated by KSHV and directs KSHV-induced lymphatic reprogramming. Moreover, we found that KSHV upregulates the nuclear receptor LRH1, which physically interacts with PROX1 and synergizes with it to mediate repression of RGS4 expression. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RGS4 reduced vGPCR-enhanced cell proliferation, migration, VEGF expression and Akt activation and to suppress tumor formation induced by vGPCR. Our findings resolve long-standing questions about the pathological impact of KSHV-induced reprogramming of host cell identity, and they offer biological and mechanistic insights supporting the hypothesis that a lymphatic microenvironment is more favorable for KS tumorigenesis. PMID:22942256

  5. Oncogenic mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) activate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in mice and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Valvezan, Alexander J.; Huang, Jian; Lengner, Christopher J.; Pack, Michael; Klein, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Truncating mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) are strongly linked to colorectal cancers. APC is a negative regulator of the Wnt pathway and constitutive Wnt activation mediated by enhanced Wnt–β-catenin target gene activation is believed to be the predominant mechanism responsible for APC mutant phenotypes. However, recent evidence suggests that additional downstream effectors contribute to APC mutant phenotypes. We previously identified a mechanism in cultured human cells by which APC, acting through glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), suppresses mTORC1, a nutrient sensor that regulates cell growth and proliferation. We hypothesized that truncating Apc mutations should activate mTORC1 in vivo and that mTORC1 plays an important role in Apc mutant phenotypes. We find that mTORC1 is strongly activated in apc mutant zebrafish and in intestinal polyps in Apc mutant mice. Furthermore, mTORC1 activation is essential downstream of APC as mTORC1 inhibition partially rescues Apc mutant phenotypes including early lethality, reduced circulation and liver hyperplasia. Importantly, combining mTORC1 and Wnt inhibition rescues defects in morphogenesis of the anterior-posterior axis that are not rescued by inhibition of either pathway alone. These data establish mTORC1 as a crucial, β-catenin independent effector of oncogenic Apc mutations and highlight the importance of mTORC1 regulation by APC during embryonic development. Our findings also suggest a new model of colorectal cancer pathogenesis in which mTORC1 is activated in parallel with Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24092877

  6. Oncogenes and growth control

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, P.; Graf, T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: A Role for Proto-Oncogenes in Differentiation.; The ras Gene Family; Regulation of Human Globin Gene Expression; Regulation of Gene Expression by Steroid Hormones; The Effect of DNA Methylation on DNA-Protein Interactions and on the Regulation of Gene Expression; and Trans-Acting Elements Encoded in Immediate Early Genes of DNA Tumor Viruses.

  7. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  8. [Hypophosphatemic oncogenic osteomalacia].

    PubMed

    Mátyus, J; Szebenyi, B; Rédl, P; Mikita, J; Gáspár, L; Haris, A; Radó, J; Kakuk, G

    2000-12-17

    The first case of oncogen osteomalacia in Hungary is reported, to draw the attention of the medical profession to it and to present the new data about its pathomechanism. Pathological hip fracture caused by hypophosphataemic osteomalacia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting was found in a previously healthy 19 years old sportsman. In spite of daily 1.5 micrograms calcitriol treatment and phosphate supplementation, hypophosphataemia persisted for 13 years and he needed regular indometacin medication for his bone pain. During that time an 1.5 cm gingival tumour was found and radically removed. The serum phosphate level returned to normal in a few hours after the operation (preoperative 0.51, after 2, 4 and 8 hours 0.61, 0.68 and 0.79 mmol/l respectively), and remained normal without calcitriol. The histological examination showed epulis with fibroblast and vascular cell proliferation, which has never been previously reported in connection with oncogenic osteomalacia. The pain resolved after 3 months and the bone density became normal in one year. Oncogenic osteomalacia must be considered in every case presenting with atypical hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Careful dental examination is needed also in the course of search for the underlying tumour. Every tumour-like growth, even the common epulis, has to be operated radically and serum phosphate monitored in the postoperative period in all such cases. PMID:11196239

  9. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bmi1 modulates its oncogenic potential, E3 ligase activity, and DNA damage repair activity in mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nacerddine, Karim; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Westerman, Bart; Mattiroli, Francesca; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Poel, Henk; Ponz, Olga Balagué; Pritchard, Colin; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Zevenhoven, John; Tanger, Ellen; Sixma, Titia K.; Ganesan, Shridar; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major lethal malignancy in men, but the molecular events and their interplay underlying prostate carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Epigenetic events and the upregulation of polycomb group silencing proteins including Bmi1 have been described to occur during PCa progression. Here, we found that conditional overexpression of Bmi1 in mice induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and elicited invasive adenocarcinoma when combined with PTEN haploinsufficiency. In addition, Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway were coactivated in a substantial fraction of human high-grade tumors. We found that Akt mediated Bmi1 phosphorylation, enhancing its oncogenic potential in an Ink4a/Arf-independent manner. This process also modulated the DNA damage response and affected genomic stability. Together, our findings demonstrate the etiological role of Bmi1 in PCa, unravel an oncogenic collaboration between Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway, and provide mechanistic insights into the modulation of Bmi1 function by phosphorylation during prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22505453

  10. Activation of the oncogenic potential of the avian cellular src protein by specific structural alteration of the carboxy terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A B; Vila, J; Lansing, T J; Potts, W M; Weber, M J; Parsons, J T

    1987-01-01

    The role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the regulation of tyrosine protein kinase activity was investigated using site-directed mutagenesis to alter the structure and environment of the three tyrosine residues present in the C terminus of avian pp60c-src. Mutations that change Tyr 527 to Phe or Ser activate in vivo tyrosine protein kinase activity and induce cellular transformation of chicken cells in culture. In contrast, alterations of tyrosine residues present at positions 511 or 519 in c-src do not induce transformation or in vivo tyrosine protein kinase activity. Amber mutations, which alter the structure of the pp60c-src C terminus by inducing premature termination of the c-src protein at either residue 518 or 523 also induce morphological transformation and increase in vivo tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas removal of the last four residues of c-src by chain termination at residue 530 does not alter the kinase activity or the biological activity of the resultant c-src protein. We conclude from these studies that C-terminal alterations which either remove or replace Tyr 527 serve to activate the c-src protein resulting in cellular transformation and increased in vivo tyrosine protein kinase activity. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2822389

  11. HTLV-1 tax-induced NF-kappaB activation is synergistically enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate: mechanism and implications for Tax oncogenicity.

    PubMed

    Azran-Shaish, Inbal; Tabakin-Fix, Yulia; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Bakhanashvili, Mary; Aboud, Mordechai

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) factors regulate a wide range of physiological and oncogenic processes. Normally, these factors are transiently activated by specific external signals which induce their dissociation from inhibitors of kappaB (IkappaB) and subsequent translocation to the nucleus where p65 links to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CBP)-p300 and P/CAF coactivators that are essential for its transcriptional activity. The pathogenic potential of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein is partly ascribed to its capacity to constitutively activate NF-kappaB factors because constitutive activity of these factors play an important role in the pathophysiology of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and tropical spastic paraparesis-HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP-HAM). In assessing the possibility of modulating Tax pathogenic potential by external factors, we focused here on 12-O -tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) which is a potent protein kinase C (PKC) activator. There are conflicting reports regarding the effect of TPA and PKC on NF-kappaB. Therefore, we reassessed this issue and also investigated their influence on Tax-mediated activation of these factors. We found that TPA promoted NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of p65 dimers through PKC activation. However, both TPA and ectopically expressed PKC had only a marginal effect on the transcriptional competence of these dimers, indicating that the DNA binding of such dimers is insufficient by itself for gene activation. Notably, however, both TPA and the ectopic PKC displayed strong synergistic enhancement of the Tax-induced activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptional function. In contrast, TPA and the ectopic PKC only slightly elevated the low activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptional capacity by cytoplasmic Tax mutants, indicating that the nuclear translocation of Tax was essential for this synergism. Subsequent experiments suggested

  12. Identification of polymorphisms and transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene KIT located on both autosomal and B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, W J; Yan, S Q; Sun, J H

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable and co-exist with autosomal and sex chromosomes. The karyotype of the Chinese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides) comprises 0-4 B chromosomes. The proto-oncogene KIT is found on all B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog. In the present study, partial DNA and mRNA sequences of KIT were amplified and sequenced from four individuals containing B chromosomes. Sequence analyses revealed that polymorphisms including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inserts/deletions were rich in the KIT gene of Chinese raccoon dog at the genomic level. However, no polymorphism was detected at the mRNA level. A comparison of mRNA sequences from Chinese raccoon dogs with the corresponding sequences derived from arctic fox and dog, which do not contain B chromosomes, revealed the mRNA sequences of the 10 SNPs to be identical between these three species. Therefore, these findings suggest that KIT located on the B chromosomes in Chinese raccoon dog lacks transcriptional activity. PMID:26909958

  13. Responsive Fluorescent PNA Analogue as a Tool for Detecting G-quadruplex Motifs of Oncogenes and Activity of Toxic Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sabale, Pramod M; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescent oligomers that are resistant to enzymatic degradation and report their binding to target oligonucleotides (ONs) by changes in fluorescence properties are highly useful in developing nucleic-acid-based diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies. Here, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of fluorescent peptide nucleic acid (PNA) building blocks made of microenvironment-sensitive 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)- and 5-(benzothiophen-2-yl)-uracil cores. The emissive monomers, when incorporated into PNA oligomers and hybridized to complementary ONs, are minimally perturbing and are highly sensitive to their neighboring base environment. In particular, benzothiophene-modified PNA reports the hybridization process with significant enhancement in fluorescence intensity, even when placed in the vicinity of guanine residues, which often quench fluorescence. This feature was used in the turn-on detection of G-quadruplex-forming promoter DNA sequences of human proto-oncogenes (c-myc and c-kit). Furthermore, the ability of benzothiophene-modified PNA oligomer to report the presence of an abasic site in RNA enabled us to develop a simple fluorescence hybridization assay to detect and estimate the depurination activity of ribosome-inactivating protein toxins. Our results demonstrate that this approach with responsive PNA probes will provide new opportunities to develop robust tools to study nucleic acids. PMID:27271025

  14. Tumor suppressor p53 inhibits transcriptional activation of invasion gene thromboxane synthase mediated by the proto-oncogenic factor ets-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ella; Günther, Willy; Yoshizato, Kimio; Meissner, Hildegard; Zapf, Srenja; Nüsing, Rolf M; Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Van Meir, Erwin G; Deppert, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf

    2003-10-30

    Cancer formation and progression is a complex process determined by several mechanisms that promote cell growth, invasiveness, neo-angiogenesis, and render neoplastic cells resistant to apoptosis. The tumor suppressor p53 and the proto-oncogenic factor ets-1 are important regulators of such mechanisms. While it is well established that p53 and ets-1 influence various aspects of cell behavior by regulating the transcription of specific genes, little is known about the functional relationship between these transcription factors. We found that the gene encoding thromboxane synthase (TXSA), which we recently identified as a factor promoting invasion and resistance to apoptosis in gliomas, is a novel target gene for both p53 and ets-1. We demonstrate that p53 and ets-1 coregulate TXSA in an antagonistic and inter-related manner, with ets-1 being a potent transcriptional activator and p53 inhibiting ets-1-dependent transcription. Negative interference with ets-1 transcription requires functional p53 and is lost in mutant p53 proteins. We show that ets-1 and p53 associate physically in vitro and in vivo and that their interaction, rather than a direct binding of p53 to the TXSA promoter, is required for transcriptional repression of TXSA by wild-type p53. An important implication of our findings is that the loss of p53-mediated negative control over ets-1-dependent transcription may lead to the acquisition of an invasive phenotype in tumor cells. PMID:14586398

  15. The regulatory c1 locus of Zea mays encodes a protein with homology to myb proto-oncogene products and with structural similarities to transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Ares, J; Ghosal, D; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the wild-type c1 locus of Zea mays was determined by sequence analysis of one genomic and two cDNA clones. The coding region is composed of three exons (150 bp, 129 bp and one, at least 720 bp) and two small introns (88 bp and 145 bp). Transcription of the mRNAs corresponding to the two cDNA clones cLC6 (1.1 kb) and cLC28 (2.1 kb) starts from the same promoter. Both cDNAs are identical except that cLC28 extends further at its 3' end. A putative protein, 273 amino acids in length was deduced from the sequence of both transcripts. It contains two domains, one basic and the other acidic and might function as a transcriptional activator. The basic domain of this c1-encoded protein shows 40% sequence homology to the protein products of animal myb proto-oncogenes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3428265

  16. P120-GAP associated with syndecan-2 to function as an active switch signal for Src upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-W.; Chen, C.-L.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-04-15

    BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus were applied to reveal a complex of p120-GAP/syndecan-2 being highly expressed upon transformation. Of interest, most of the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was localized at caveolae, a membrane microdomain enriched with caveolin-1. To confirm the molecular interaction between syndecan-2 and p120-GAP, we further purified p120-GAP protein from mouse brains by using an affinity column of HiTrap-RACK1 and expressed mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein and mouse syndecan-2-encoded fusion protein in bacteria. We report molecular affinities exist between p120-GAP and RACK1, syndecan-2 and RACK1 as well as p120-GAP and syndecan-2. The selective affinity between p120-GAP and syndecan-2 was found to be sufficient to detach RACK1. The p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was demonstrated to keep Src tyrosine kinase in an activated form. On the other hand, the syndecan-2/RACK1 complex was found to have Src in an inactivated form. These data indicate that the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex at caveolae could provide a docking site for Src to transmit tyrosine signaling, implying that syndecan-2/p120-GAP functions as a tumor promoter upon transformation with oncogenic ras of shrimp P. japonicus.

  17. SIRT1 activation by a c-MYC oncogenic network promotes the maintenance and drug resistance of human FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Osdal, Tereza; Ho, Yinwei; Chun, Sookhee; McDonald, Tinisha; Agarwal, Puneet; Lin, Allen; Chu, Su; Qi, Jing; Li, Liang; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Dos Santos, Cedric; Yuan, Hongfeng; Ha, Trung-Quang; Popa, Mihaela; Hovland, Randi; Bruserud, Oystein; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Chen, Wenyong; Lain, Sonia; McCormack, Emmet; Bhatia, Ravi

    2014-10-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis. In such patients, FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are only partially effective and do not eliminate the leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are assumed to be the source of treatment failure. Here, we show that the NAD-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase is selectively overexpressed in primary human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs. This SIRT1 overexpression is related to enhanced expression of the USP22 deubiquitinase induced by c-MYC, leading to reduced SIRT1 ubiquitination and enhanced stability. Inhibition of SIRT1 expression or activity reduced the growth of FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and significantly enhanced TKI-mediated killing of the cells. Therefore, these results identify a c-MYC-related network that enhances SIRT1 protein expression in human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and contributes to their maintenance. Inhibition of this oncogenic network could be an attractive approach for targeting FLT3-ITD AML LSCs to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25280219

  18. SIRT1 Activation by a c-MYC Oncogenic Network Promotes the Maintenance and Drug Resistance of Human FLT3-ITD Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Osdal, Tereza; Ho, Yinwei; Chun, Sookhee; McDonald, Tinisha; Agarwal, Puneet; Lin, Allen; Chu, Su; Qi, Jing; Li, Liang; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Santos, Cedric Dos; Yuan, Hongfeng; Ha, Trung-Quang; Popa, Mihaela; Hovland, Randi; Bruserud, Øystein; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Chen, Wenyong; Lain, Sonia; McCormack, Emmet; Bhatia, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The FLT3-ITD mutation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis. In such patients, FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are only partially effective and do not eliminate the leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are assumed to be the source of treatment failure. Here, we show that the NAD-dependent SIRT1 de-acetylase is selectively overexpressed in primary human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs. This SIRT1 overexpression is related to enhanced expression of the USP22 deubiquitinase induced by c-MYC, leading to reduced SIRT1 ubiquitination and enhanced stability. Inhibition of SIRT1 expression or activity reduced the growth of FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and significantly enhanced TKI-mediated killing of the cells. Therefore, these results identify a c-MYC-related network that enhances SIRT1 protein expression in human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and contributes to their maintenance. Inhibition of this oncogenic network could be an attractive approach for targeting FLT3-ITD AML LSCs to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25280219

  19. The circadian clock gene Bmal1 acts as a potential anti-oncogene in pancreatic cancer by activating the p53 tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiliang; Zhao, Senlin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Erquan; Hu, Guoyong; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Ping; Xiao, Junhua; Lu, Zhanjun; Lu, Yingying; Ni, Jianbo; Chen, Congying; Wang, Xingpeng; Yang, Lijuan; Wan, Rong

    2016-02-28

    Disruption of the circadian clock has been shown to be associated with tumor development. This study aimed to investigate the role of the core circadian gene Bmal1 in pancreatic cancer (PC). We first found that the levels of Bmal1 were downregulated in PC samples and were closely correlated with the clinicopathological features of patients. To dissect the underlying mechanism, we performed a RNA-seq assay followed by systematic gene function and pathway enrichment analyses. We detected an anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative transcriptome profile after Bmal1 knockdown in PC cells. Further in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that Bmal1 overexpression significantly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, whereas Bmal1 knockdown promoted PC growth, as demonstrated in Bmal1-manipulated AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cell lines. Our mechanistic studies indicated that Bmal1 could directly bind to the p53 gene promoter and thereby transcriptionally activate the downstream tumor suppressor pathway in a p53-dependent manner. In sum, our findings suggest that Bmal1 acts as an anti-oncogene in PC and represents a potential biomarker for its diagnosis. PMID:26683776

  20. Pleiotropic Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Oncogenic Activities of the Novel Mithralog Demycarosyl-3D-ß-D-Digitoxosyl-Mithramycin SK (EC-8042)

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; López-Soto, Alejandro; Acebes-Huerta, Andrea; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Villa-Álvarez, Mónica; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Morís, Francisco; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2015-01-01

    Demycarosyl-3D-ß-D-digitoxosyl-mithramycin SK (DIG-MSK) is a recently isolated analogue of mithramycin A (MTA) that showed differences with MTA in the DNA binding strength and selectivity. These differences correlated with a better therapeutic index and less toxicity in animal studies. Herein, we show that DIG-MSK displays a potent anti-tumor activity against different types of cancer cell lines, ovarian tumor cells being particularly sensitive to this drug. Of relevance, DIG-MSK exerts low toxicity on fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, this toxicity being significantly lower than that of MTA. In correlation with its antitumor activity, DIG-MSK strongly inhibited Sp1-mediated transcription and endogenous Sp1 mRNA expression, which correlated with the inhibition of the expression of key Sp1-regulated genes involved in tumorigenesis, including VEGFA, BCL2L1 (Bcl-XL), hTERT, BRCA2, MYC and SRC in several ovarian cells. Significantly, DIG-MSK was a stronger inhibitor of VEGFA expression than MTA. Accordingly, DIG-MSK also exhibited potent anti-angiogenic activity on microvascular endothelial cells. Likewise, it significantly inhibited the gene expression of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, FGFR, PDGFB and PDGFRA and, additionally, it induced the expression of the anti-angiogenic factors angiostatin and tunstatin. These effects correlated with a pro-apoptotic effect on proliferating microvascular endothelial cells and the inhibition of the formation of endothelial capillary structures. Overall, the pleiotropic activity of DIG-MSK in inhibiting key oncogenic and angiogenic pathways, together with its low toxicity profile, highlight the therapeutic potential of this new drug. PMID:26536461

  1. Pleiotropic Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Oncogenic Activities of the Novel Mithralog Demycarosyl-3D-ß-D-Digitoxosyl-Mithramycin SK (EC-8042).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; López-Soto, Alejandro; Acebes-Huerta, Andrea; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Villa-Álvarez, Mónica; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Morís, Francisco; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2015-01-01

    Demycarosyl-3D-ß-D-digitoxosyl-mithramycin SK (DIG-MSK) is a recently isolated analogue of mithramycin A (MTA) that showed differences with MTA in the DNA binding strength and selectivity. These differences correlated with a better therapeutic index and less toxicity in animal studies. Herein, we show that DIG-MSK displays a potent anti-tumor activity against different types of cancer cell lines, ovarian tumor cells being particularly sensitive to this drug. Of relevance, DIG-MSK exerts low toxicity on fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, this toxicity being significantly lower than that of MTA. In correlation with its antitumor activity, DIG-MSK strongly inhibited Sp1-mediated transcription and endogenous Sp1 mRNA expression, which correlated with the inhibition of the expression of key Sp1-regulated genes involved in tumorigenesis, including VEGFA, BCL2L1 (Bcl-XL), hTERT, BRCA2, MYC and SRC in several ovarian cells. Significantly, DIG-MSK was a stronger inhibitor of VEGFA expression than MTA. Accordingly, DIG-MSK also exhibited potent anti-angiogenic activity on microvascular endothelial cells. Likewise, it significantly inhibited the gene expression of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, FGFR, PDGFB and PDGFRA and, additionally, it induced the expression of the anti-angiogenic factors angiostatin and tunstatin. These effects correlated with a pro-apoptotic effect on proliferating microvascular endothelial cells and the inhibition of the formation of endothelial capillary structures. Overall, the pleiotropic activity of DIG-MSK in inhibiting key oncogenic and angiogenic pathways, together with its low toxicity profile, highlight the therapeutic potential of this new drug. PMID:26536461

  2. Complex and dynamic landscape of RNA polyadenylation revealed by PAS-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Peter J.; Choi, Eun-A; Lu, Jente; Flanagan, Lisa A.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Shi, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) of mRNAs has emerged as an important mechanism for post-transcriptional gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. Although microarrays have recently been used to characterize APA globally, they have a number of serious limitations that prevents comprehensive and highly quantitative analysis. To better characterize APA and its regulation, we have developed a deep sequencing-based method called Poly(A) Site Sequencing (PAS-Seq) for quantitatively profiling RNA polyadenylation at the transcriptome level. PAS-Seq not only accurately and comprehensively identifies poly(A) junctions in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, but also provides quantitative information on the relative abundance of polyadenylated RNAs. PAS-Seq analyses of human and mouse transcriptomes showed that 40%–50% of all expressed genes produce alternatively polyadenylated mRNAs. Furthermore, our study detected evolutionarily conserved polyadenylation of histone mRNAs and revealed novel features of mitochondrial RNA polyadenylation. Finally, PAS-Seq analyses of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, neural stem/progenitor (NSP) cells, and neurons not only identified more poly(A) sites than what was found in the entire mouse EST database, but also detected significant changes in the global APA profile that lead to lengthening of 3′ untranslated regions (UTR) in many mRNAs during stem cell differentiation. Together, our PAS-Seq analyses revealed a complex landscape of RNA polyadenylation in mammalian cells and the dynamic regulation of APA during stem cell differentiation. PMID:21343387

  3. Cleavage factor Im (CFIm) as a regulator of alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Jessica G; Norbury, Chris J

    2016-08-15

    Most mammalian protein coding genes are subject to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), which can generate distinct mRNA 3'UTRs with differing regulatory potential. Although this process has been intensely studied in recent years, it remains unclear how and to what extent cleavage site selection is regulated under different physiological conditions. The cleavage factor Im (CFIm) complex is a core component of the mammalian cleavage machinery, and the observation that its depletion causes transcriptome-wide changes in cleavage site use makes it a key candidate regulator of APA. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of the CFIm complex, and explores the evidence surrounding its potential contribution to regulation of APA. PMID:27528751

  4. Poly(adenylic acid) in small amounts, free or covalently linked to substrate, protects RNA from hydrolysis by ribonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Karpetsky, T P; Shriver, K K; Levy, C C

    1981-01-01

    Short lengths (18 residues) of poly(A), covalently linked to the 3'-termini of Escherichia coli 5 S rRNA, induce powerful inhibitions (38-87%) of the activities of RNAases (ribonucleases) from Citrobacter sp., Enterobacter sp., bovine pancreas, human spleen and human plasma. As the polypurine chain length is extended, enzyme activity declines. Furthermore, poly(A) sequences, present only on a small subpopulation of RNA, and accounting for less than 1% of total RNA, serve to protect all RNA, polyadenylated or not, from enzyme-catalysed degradation. The quantity of 3'-terminal adenylic acid residues, relative to the amount of substrate, determines enzyme activity. The exact distribution of a fixed amount of poly(A) residues on the 3'-termini of substrate molecules is unimportant in this respect. Comparison of the efficacies of inhibition of RNAase activity, by using linked poly(A) and similar quantities of free poly(A), revealed that although the free polypurine inhibits RNAase activity, covalent linkage of poly(A) to RNA is more advantageous to the stability of an RNA substrate. However, the ratio of inhibited activities obtained by using linked or free poly(A) may change considerably with alterations in either substrate concentration or polyadenylic acid segment length. PMID:6171250

  5. SCCRO3 (DCUN1D3) Antagonizes the Neddylation and Oncogenic Activity of SCCRO (DCUN1D1)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Stock, Cameron; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Weeda, Víola B.; Shah, Kushyup; Bains, Sarina; Buss, Elizabeth; Shaha, Manish; Rechler, Willi; Ramanathan, Suresh Y.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2014-01-01

    The activity of cullin-RING type ubiquitination E3 ligases is regulated by neddylation, a process analogous to ubiquitination that culminates in covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to cullins. As a component of the E3 for neddylation, SCCRO/DCUN1D1 plays a key regulatory role in neddylation and, consequently, cullin-RING ligase activity. The essential contribution of SCCRO to neddylation is to promote nuclear translocation of the cullin-ROC1 complex. The presence of a myristoyl sequence in SCCRO3, one of four SCCRO paralogues present in humans that localizes to the membrane, raises questions about its function in neddylation. We found that although SCCRO3 binds to CAND1, cullins, and ROC1, it does not efficiently bind to Ubc12, promote cullin neddylation, or conform to the reaction processivity paradigms, suggesting that SCCRO3 does not have E3 activity. Expression of SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO-promoted neddylation by sequestering cullins to the membrane, thereby blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO transforming activity. The inhibitory effects of SCCRO3 on SCCRO-promoted neddylation and transformation require both an intact myristoyl sequence and PONY domain, confirming that membrane localization and binding to cullins are required for in vivo functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that SCCRO3 functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing the neddylation activity of SCCRO. PMID:25349211

  6. Conservation of alternative polyadenylation patterns in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Takeshi; Lopez, Fabrice; Ritchie, William; Benech, Philippe; Gautheret, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternative polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism contributing to transcript diversity in eukaryotes. Over half of mammalian genes are alternatively polyadenylated. Our understanding of poly(A) site evolution is limited by the lack of a reliable identification of conserved, equivalent poly(A) sites among species. We introduce here a working definition of conserved poly(A) sites as sites that are both (i) properly aligned in human and mouse orthologous 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and (ii) supported by EST or cDNA data in both species. Results We identified about 4800 such conserved poly(A) sites covering one third of the orthologous gene set studied. Characteristics of conserved poly(A) sites such as processing efficiency and tissue-specificity were analyzed. Conserved sites show a higher processing efficiency but no difference in tissular distribution when compared to non-conserved sites. In general, alternative poly(A) sites are species-specific and involve minor, non-conserved sites that are unlikely to play essential roles. However, there are about 500 genes with conserved tandem poly(A) sites. A significant fraction of these conserved tandems display a conserved arrangement of major/minor sites in their 3' UTR, suggesting that these alternative 3' ends may be under selection. Conclusion This analysis allows us to identify potential functional alternative poly(A) sites and provides clues on the selective mechanisms at play in the appearance of multiple poly(A) sites and their maintenance in the 3' UTRs of genes. PMID:16872498

  7. Adiponectin inhibits leptin-induced oncogenic signalling in oesophageal cancer cells by activation of PTP1B.

    PubMed

    Beales, Ian L P; Garcia-Morales, Carla; Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O; Mutungi, Gabriel

    2014-01-25

    Obesity is characterised by hyperleptinaemia and hypoadiponectinaemia and these metabolic abnormalities may contribute to the progression of several obesity-associated cancers including oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). We have examined the effects of leptin and adiponectin on OE33 OAC cells. Leptin stimulated proliferation, invasion and migration and inhibited apoptosis in a STAT3-dependant manner. Leptin-stimulated MMP-2 secretion in a partly STAT3-dependent manner and MMP-9 secretion via a STAT3-independent pathway. Adiponectin inhibited leptin-induced proliferation, migration, invasion, MMP secretion and reduced the anti-apoptotic effects: these effects of adiponectin were ameliorated by both a non-specific tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor and a specific PTP1B inhibitor. Adiponectin reduced leptin-stimulated JAK2 activation and STAT3 transcriptional activity in a PTP1B-sensitive manner and adiponectin increased both PTP1B protein and activity. We conclude that adiponectin restrains leptin-induced signalling and pro-carcinogenic behaviour by inhibiting the early events in leptin-induced signal transduction by activating PTP1B. Relative adiponectin deficiency in obesity may contribute to the promotion of OAC. PMID:23994026

  8. Activation of the proto-oncogene p60c-src by point mutations in the SH2 domain.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M C; Fukui, Y; Hanafusa, H

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the importance of a conserved region spanning residues 137 to 241 in the noncatalytic domain of p60c-src (SH2 region), we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to change residues that are highly conserved in this region. Chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with a p60c-src variant containing arginine instead of tryptophan at residue 148 (W148R) appeared more rounded than cells overexpressing a normal c-src gene, and they formed colonies in soft agar. p60c-src variants containing serine instead of arginine at residue 155 (R155S) or isoleucine instead of glycine at residue 170 (G170I) also appeared transformed and were anchorage independent, but to a lesser extent than W148R. Mutation of residue 201 from histidine to leucine (H201L) had no observable effect. The in vitro kinase activity of cells infected with W148R or G170I was elevated twofold. Expression of p60W148R (or, to a lesser extent, of p60G170I) increased the number of proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in infected cells. All of the mutants were phosphorylated in vivo on Tyr-527, instead of Tyr-416 as observed for p60v-src. Immunoprecipitated p60W148R and p60G170I were found to be associated with a phosphatidylinositol kinase activity, a factor which appears to be necessary for transformation by tyrosine-specific protein kinases. These results show that a single point mutation in the SH2 region of the cellular src gene can activate its transforming potential. This type of activation is in a new category of alterations at the amino terminus that activate but do not cause a shift in phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus. Images PMID:2111444

  9. Mitogenic and Oncogenic Stimulation of K433 Acetylation Promotes PKM2 Protein Kinase Activity and Nuclear Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Lei; Xu, Yan-Ping; Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-Long; Wang, Wei; Sasaki, Naoya; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Xin; Li, Ting-Ting; Guan, Kun-Liang; Lei, Qun-Ying; Xiong, Yue

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing of the PKM2 gene produces two isoforms, M1 and M2, which are preferentially expressed in adult and embryonic tissues, respectively. The M2 isoform is reexpressed in human cancer and has nonmetabolic functions in the nucleus as a protein kinase. Here, we report that PKM2 is acetylated by p300 acetyltransferase at K433, which is unique to PKM2 and directly contacts its allosteric activator, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). Acetylation prevents PKM2 activation by interfering with FBP binding and promotes the nuclear accumulation and protein kinase activity of PKM2. Acetylationmimetic PKM2(K433) mutant promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. K433 acetylation is decreased by serum starvation and cell-cell contact, increased by cell cycle stimulation, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and oncoprotein E7, and enriched in breast cancers. Hence, K433 acetylation links cell proliferation and transformation to the switch of PKM2 from a cytoplasmic metabolite kinase to a nuclear protein kinase. PMID:24120661

  10. Targeted Disruption of the Murine fps/fes Proto-Oncogene Reveals that Fps/Fes Kinase Activity Is Dispensable for Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Senis, Yotis; Zirngibl, Ralph; McVeigh, Jennifer; Haman, Andre; Hoang, Trang; Greer, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase that is functionally implicated in the survival and terminal differentiation of myeloid progenitors and in signaling from several members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. To gain further insight into the physiological function of fps/fes, we targeted the mouse locus with a kinase-inactivating missense mutation. Mutant Fps/Fes protein was expressed at normal levels in these mice, but it lacked detectable kinase activity. Homozygous mutant animals were viable and fertile, and they showed no obvious defects. Flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow showed no statistically significant differences in the levels of myeloid, erythroid, or B-cell precursors. Subtle abnormalities observed in mutant mice included slightly elevated total leukocyte counts and splenomegaly. In bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cell colony-forming assays, mutant mice gave slightly elevated numbers and variable sizes of CFU-granulocyte macrophage in response to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 and Stat5A in bone marrow-derived macrophages was dramatically reduced in response to GM-CSF but not to IL-3 or IL-6. This suggests a distinct nonredundant role for Fps/Fes in signaling from the GM-CSF receptor that does not extend to the closely related IL-3 receptor. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Erk1/2 activation was also reduced in mutant macrophages. These subtle molecular phenotypes suggest a possible nonredundant role for Fps/Fes in myelopoiesis and immune responses. PMID:10523632

  11. Activating the Expression of Human K-rasG12D Stimulates Oncogenic Transformation in Transgenic Goat Fetal Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianhua; Wang, Zhongde; Polejaeva, Irina; Salgia, Ravi; Kao, Chien-Min; Chen, Chin-Tu; Chen, Guangchun; Chen, Liaohai

    2014-01-01

    Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF) cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D) was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency), hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established. PMID:24594684

  12. Transcriptomic profiling of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis reveals polyadenylation of the large subunit ribosomal RNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyadenylation of eukaryotic transcripts is usually restricted to mRNA, whereby providing transcripts with stability from degradation by nucleases. Conversely, an RNA degradation pathway can be signaled through poly (A) tailing in prokaryotic, archeal, and organeller biology. Recently polyadenyla...

  13. Oncogenic RAS pathway activation promotes resistance to anti-VEGF therapy through G-CSF-induced neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Phan, Vernon T; Wu, Xiumin; Cheng, Jason H; Sheng, Rebecca X; Chung, Alicia S; Zhuang, Guanglei; Tran, Christopher; Song, Qinghua; Kowanetz, Marcin; Sambrone, Amy; Tan, Martha; Meng, Y Gloria; Jackson, Erica L; Peale, Franklin V; Junttila, Melissa R; Ferrara, Napoleone

    2013-04-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes mobilization of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cells and has been implicated in resistance to anti-VEGF therapy in mouse models. High G-CSF production has been associated with a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Here we show that activation of the RAS/MEK/ERK pathway regulates G-CSF expression through the Ets transcription factor. Several growth factors induced G-CSF expression by a MEK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of G-CSF release with a MEK inhibitor markedly reduced G-CSF production in vitro and synergized with anti-VEGF antibodies to reduce CD11b(+)Ly6G(+) neutrophil mobilization and tumor growth and led to increased survival in animal models of cancer, including a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Analysis of biopsies from pancreatic cancer patients revealed increased phospho-MEK, G-CSF, and Ets expression and enhanced neutrophil recruitment compared with normal pancreata. These results provide insights into G-CSF regulation and on the mechanism of action of MEK inhibitors and point to unique anticancer strategies. PMID:23530240

  14. Oncogenic RAS pathway activation promotes resistance to anti-VEGF therapy through G-CSF–induced neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Vernon T.; Wu, Xiumin; Cheng, Jason H.; Sheng, Rebecca X.; Chung, Alicia S.; Zhuang, Guanglei; Tran, Christopher; Song, Qinghua; Kowanetz, Marcin; Sambrone, Amy; Tan, Martha; Meng, Y. Gloria; Jackson, Erica L.; Peale, Franklin V.; Junttila, Melissa R.; Ferrara, Napoleone

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes mobilization of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid cells and has been implicated in resistance to anti-VEGF therapy in mouse models. High G-CSF production has been associated with a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Here we show that activation of the RAS/MEK/ERK pathway regulates G-CSF expression through the Ets transcription factor. Several growth factors induced G-CSF expression by a MEK-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of G-CSF release with a MEK inhibitor markedly reduced G-CSF production in vitro and synergized with anti-VEGF antibodies to reduce CD11b+Ly6G+ neutrophil mobilization and tumor growth and led to increased survival in animal models of cancer, including a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Analysis of biopsies from pancreatic cancer patients revealed increased phospho-MEK, G-CSF, and Ets expression and enhanced neutrophil recruitment compared with normal pancreata. These results provide insights into G-CSF regulation and on the mechanism of action of MEK inhibitors and point to unique anticancer strategies. PMID:23530240

  15. Complementation of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 by Jagged1-specific Notch1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling involves pleiotropic oncogenic functions independent of CBF1;Su(H);Lag-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavalu, Karthikeyan; Subbaiah, Vanitha K; Srivastava, Sweta; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Syal, Ruchi; Krishna, Sudhir

    2005-06-01

    We have analyzed the induction and role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) by Notch signaling in human papillomavirus (HPV)-derived cancers. Jagged1, in contrast to Delta1, is preferentially upregulated in human cervical tumors. Jagged1 and not Delta1 expression sustained in vivo tumors by HPV16 oncogenes in HaCaT cells. Further, Jagged1 expression correlates with the rapid induction of PI3K-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in both HaCaT cells and a human cervical tumor-derived cell line, suggestive of Delta1;Serrate/Jagged;Lag2 ligand-specific roles. Microarray analysis and dominant-negatives reveal that Notch-PI3K oncogenic functions can be independent of CBF1;Su(H);Lag-1 activation and instead relies on Deltex1, an alternative Notch effector. PMID:15919944

  16. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of the GASC1 Oncogene with Active Tumor-Targeted siRNA-Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Movassaghian, Sara; Xie, Yuran; Hildebrandt, Claudia; Rosati, Rayna; Li, Ying; Kim, Na Hyung; Conti, Denise S; da Rocha, Sandro R P; Yang, Zeng-Quan; Merkel, Olivia M

    2016-08-01

    Basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) accounts for the most aggressive types of breast cancer, marked by high rates of relapse and poor prognoses and with no effective clinical therapy yet. Therefore, investigation of new targets and treatment strategies is more than necessary. Here, we identified a receptor that can be targeted in BLBC for efficient and specific siRNA mediated gene knockdown of therapeutically relevant genes such as the histone demethylase GASC1, which is involved in multiple signaling pathways leading to tumorigenesis. Breast cancer and healthy breast cell lines were compared regarding transferrin receptor (TfR) expression via flow cytometry and transferrin binding assays. Nanobioconjugates made of low molecular weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) and transferrin (Tf) were synthesized to contain a bioreducible disulfide bond. siRNA complexation was characterized by condensation assays and dynamic light scattering. Cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency, and the targeting specificity of the conjugates were investigated in TfR positive and negative healthy breast and breast cancer cell lines by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, RT-PCR, and Western blot. Breast cancer cell lines revealed a significantly higher TfR expression than healthy breast cells. The conjugates efficiently condensed siRNA into particles with 45 nm size at low polymer concentrations, showed no apparent toxicity on different breast cancer cell lines, and had significantly greater transfection and gene knockdown activity on mRNA and protein levels than PEI/siRNA leading to targeted and therapeutic growth inhibition post GASC1 knockdown. The synthesized nanobioconjugates improved the efficiency of gene transfer and targeting specificity in transferrin receptor positive cells but not in cells with basal receptor expression. Therefore, these materials in combination with our newly identified siRNA sequences are promising candidates for therapeutic targeting of hard-to-treat BLBC and are

  17. The proto-oncogene Myc drives expression of the NK cell-activating NKp30 ligand B7-H6 in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Textor, Sonja; Bossler, Felicitas; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Pollmann, Julia; Fiegler, Nathalie; Arnold, Annette; Westermann, Frank; Waldburger, Nina; Breuhahn, Kai; Golfier, Sven; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-07-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate effector cells that are able to recognize and eliminate tumor cells through engagement of their surface receptors. NKp30 is a potent activating NK cell receptor that elicits efficient NK cell-mediated target cell killing. Recently, B7-H6 was identified as tumor cell surface expressed ligand for NKp30. Enhanced B7-H6 mRNA levels are frequently detected in tumor compared to healthy tissues. To gain insight in the regulation of expression of B7-H6 in tumors, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms driving B7-H6 expression by promoter analyses. Using luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we mapped a functional binding site for Myc, a proto-oncogene overexpressed in certain tumors, in the B7-H6 promoter. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA/shRNA-mediated knock-down of c-Myc or N-Myc significantly decreased B7-H6 expression on a variety of tumor cells including melanoma, pancreatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In tumor cell lines from different origin and primary tumor tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lymphoma and neuroblastoma, mRNA levels of c-Myc positively correlated with B7-H6 expression. Most importantly, upon inhibition or knock-down of c-Myc in tumor cells impaired NKp30-mediated degranulation of NK cells was observed. Thus, our data imply that Myc driven tumors could be targets for cancer immunotherapy exploiting the NKp30/B7-H6 axis. PMID:27622013

  18. Experimental Genome-Wide Determination of RNA Polyadenylation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephen A.; Shen, Chi; Brown, Alishea; Hunt, Arthur G.

    2016-01-01

    The polyadenylation of RNA is a near-universal feature of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. This process has been studied in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-throughput (gene-by-gene) and high-throughput (transcriptome sequencing) approaches that recovered poly(A)-containing sequence tags which revealed interesting features of this critical process in Chlamydomonas. In this study, RNA polyadenylation has been studied using the so-called Poly(A) Tag Sequencing (PAT-Seq) approach. Specifically, PAT-Seq was used to study poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in four different media types—Tris-Phosphate (TP), Tris-Phosphate-Acetate (TAP), High-Salt (HS), and High-Salt-Acetate (HAS). The results indicate that: 1. As reported before, the motif UGUAA is the primary, and perhaps sole, cis-element that guides mRNA polyadenylation in the nucleus; 2. The scope of alternative polyadenylation events with the potential to change the coding sequences of mRNAs is limited; 3. Changes in poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in the different media types are very few in number and do not affect protein-coding potential; 4. Organellar polyadenylation is considerable and affects primarily ribosomal RNAs in the chloroplast and mitochondria; and 5. Organellar RNA polyadenylation is a dynamic process that is affected by the different media types used for cell growth. PMID:26730730

  19. Oncogene-dependent apoptosis is mediated by caspase-9

    PubMed Central

    Fearnhead, Howard O.; Rodriguez, Joe; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Guo, Wenjun; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Hannon, Greg; Lazebnik, Yuri A.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding how oncogenic transformation sensitizes cells to apoptosis may provide a strategy to kill tumor cells selectively. We previously developed a cell-free system that recapitulates oncogene dependent apoptosis as reflected by activation of caspases, the core of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we show that this activation requires a previously identified apoptosis-promoting complex consisting of caspase-9, APAF-1, and cytochrome c. As predicted by the in vitro system, preventing caspase-9 activation blocked drug-induced apoptosis in cells sensitized by E1A, an adenoviral oncogene. Oncogenes, such as E1A, appear to facilitate caspase-9 activation by several mechanisms, including the control of cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. PMID:9811857

  20. Principles of Cancer Therapy: Oncogene and Non-oncogene Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ji; Solimini, Nicole L.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a complex collection of distinct genetic diseases united by common hallmarks. Here, we expand upon the classic hallmarks to include the stress phenotypes of tumorigenesis. We describe a conceptual framework of how oncogene and non-oncogene addictions contribute to these hallmarks and how they can be exploited through stress sensitization and stress overload to selectively kill cancer cells. In particular, we present evidence for a large class of non-oncogenes that are essential for cancer cell survival and present attractive drug targets. Finally, we discuss the path ahead to therapeutic discovery and provide theoretical considerations for combining orthogonal cancer therapies. PMID:19269363

  1. Principles of cancer therapy: oncogene and non-oncogene addiction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ji; Solimini, Nicole L; Elledge, Stephen J

    2009-03-01

    Cancer is a complex collection of distinct genetic diseases united by common hallmarks. Here, we expand upon the classic hallmarks to include the stress phenotypes of tumorigenesis. We describe a conceptual framework of how oncogene and non-oncogene addictions contribute to these hallmarks and how they can be exploited through stress sensitization and stress overload to selectively kill cancer cells. In particular, we present evidence for a large class of non-oncogenes that are essential for cancer cell survival and present attractive drug targets. Finally, we discuss the path ahead to therapeutic discovery and provide theoretical considerations for combining orthogonal cancer therapies. PMID:19269363

  2. Mitochondrial Polyadenylation Is a One-Step Process Required for mRNA Integrity and tRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Maffezzini, Camilla; Felser, Andrea; Wibom, Rolf; Wedell, Anna; Wredenberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation has well characterised roles in RNA turnover and translation in a variety of biological systems. While polyadenylation on mitochondrial transcripts has been suggested to be a two-step process required to complete translational stop codons, its involvement in mitochondrial RNA turnover is less well understood. We studied knockdown and knockout models of the mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase (MTPAP) in Drosophila melanogaster and demonstrate that polyadenylation of mitochondrial mRNAs is exclusively performed by MTPAP. Further, our results show that mitochondrial polyadenylation does not regulate mRNA stability but protects the 3' terminal integrity, and that despite a lack of functioning 3' ends, these trimmed transcripts are translated, suggesting that polyadenylation is not required for mitochondrial translation. Additionally, loss of MTPAP leads to reduced steady-state levels and disturbed maturation of tRNACys, indicating that polyadenylation in mitochondria might be important for the stability and maturation of specific tRNAs. PMID:27176048

  3. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Regulation of oncogene-induced cell cycle exit and senescence by chromatin modifiers

    PubMed Central

    David, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Oncogene activation leads to dramatic changes in numerous biological pathways controlling cellular division, and results in the initiation of a transcriptional program that promotes transformation. Conversely, it also triggers an irreversible cell cycle exit called cellular senescence, which allows the organism to counteract the potentially detrimental uncontrolled proliferation of damaged cells. Therefore, a tight transcriptional control is required at the onset of oncogenic signal, coordinating both positive and negative regulation of gene expression. Not surprisingly, numerous chromatin modifiers contribute to the cellular response to oncogenic stress. While these chromatin modifiers were initially thought of as mere mediators of the cellular response to oncogenic stress, recent studies have uncovered a direct and specific regulation of chromatin modifiers by oncogenic signals. We review here the diverse functions of chromatin modifiers in the cellular response to oncogenic stress, and discuss the implications of these findings on the regulation of cell cycle progression and proliferation by activated oncogenes. PMID:22825329

  5. TARGETING ONCOGENIC BRAF IN HUMAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine; Xing, Feng; Solit, David

    2012-01-01

    MAPK pathway activation is a frequent event in human cancer and is often the result of activating mutations in the BRAF and RAS oncogenes. BRAF missense kinase domain mutations, the vast majority of which are V600E, occur in approximately 8% of human tumors. These mutations, which are non-overlapping in distribution with RAS mutations, are observed most frequently in melanoma but also in tumors arising in the colon, thyroid, lung and other sites. Supporting its classification as an oncogene, V600EBRAF stimulates ERK signaling, induces proliferation and is capable of promoting transformation. Given the frequent occurrence of BRAF mutations in human cancer and the continued requirement for BRAF activity in the tumors in which it is mutated, efforts are underway to develop targeted inhibitors of BRAF and its downstream effectors. These agents offer the possibility of greater efficacy and less toxicity than the systemic therapies currently available for tumors driven by activating mutations in the MAPK pathway. Early clinical results with the BRAF-selective inhibitors PLX4032 and GSK2118436 suggest that this strategy will prove successful in a select group of patients whose tumors are driven by oncogenic BRAF. PMID:21818706

  6. Oncogenic Ras stimulates Eiger/TNF exocytosis to promote growth

    PubMed Central

    Chabu, Chiswili; Xu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in Ras deregulate cell death and proliferation to cause cancer in a significant number of patients. Although normal Ras signaling during development has been well elucidated in multiple organisms, it is less clear how oncogenic Ras exerts its effects. Furthermore, cancers with oncogenic Ras mutations are aggressive and generally resistant to targeted therapies or chemotherapy. We identified the exocytosis component Sec15 as a synthetic suppressor of oncogenic Ras in an in vivo Drosophila mosaic screen. We found that oncogenic Ras elevates exocytosis and promotes the export of the pro-apoptotic ligand Eiger (Drosophila TNF). This blocks tumor cell death and stimulates overgrowth by activating the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signal from the neighboring wild-type cells. Inhibition of Eiger/TNF exocytosis or interfering with the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signaling at various steps suppresses oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth. Our findings highlight important cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic roles of exocytosis during oncogenic growth and provide a new class of synthetic suppressors for targeted therapy approaches. PMID:25411211

  7. Noncanonical Roles of the Immune System in Eliciting Oncogene Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Bellovin, David I.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cancer is highly complex. The magnitude of this complexity makes it highly surprising that even the brief suppression of an oncogene can sometimes result in rapid and sustained tumor regression illustrating that cancers can be “oncogene addicted” [1-10]. The essential implication is that oncogenes may not only fuel the initiation of tumorigenesis, but in some cases necessarily their surfeit of activation is paramaount to maintain a neoplastic state [11]. Oncogene suppression acutely restores normal physiological programs that effectively overrides secondary genetic events and a cancer collapses [12,13]. Oncogene addiction is mediated both through both tumor intrinsic cell-autonomous mechanisms including proliferative arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and cellular senescence [1,2,4,12] but also host-dependent mechanisms that interact with these tumor intrinsic programs [14,15]. Notably, oncogene inactivation elicits a host immune response that involves specific immune effectors and cytokines that facilitate a remodeling of the tumor microenvironment including the shut down of angiogenesis and the induction of cellular senescence of tumor cells [16]. Hence, immune effectors are critically involved in tumor initiation and prevention [17-19] and progression [20], but also appear to be essential to tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation [21-23]. The understanding how the inactivation of an oncogene elicits a systemic signal in the host that prompts a deconstruction of a tumor could have important implications. The combination of oncogene-targeted therapy together with immunomodulatory therapy may be ideal for the development of both a robust tumor intrinsic as well as immunological effectively leading to sustained tumor regression. PMID:23571026

  8. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  9. Characteristics and significance of intergenic polyadenylated RNA transcription in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Seddon, Alex E; Yin, Shan; Chen, Yani; Juntawong, Piyada; Brandizzi, Federica; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome is the most well-annotated plant genome. However, transcriptome sequencing in Arabidopsis continues to suggest the presence of polyadenylated (polyA) transcripts originating from presumed intergenic regions. It is not clear whether these transcripts represent novel noncoding or protein-coding genes. To understand the nature of intergenic polyA transcription, we first assessed its abundance using multiple messenger RNA sequencing data sets. We found 6,545 intergenic transcribed fragments (ITFs) occupying 3.6% of Arabidopsis intergenic space. In contrast to transcribed fragments that map to protein-coding and RNA genes, most ITFs are significantly shorter, are expressed at significantly lower levels, and tend to be more data set specific. A surprisingly large number of ITFs (32.1%) may be protein coding based on evidence of translation. However, our results indicate that these "translated" ITFs tend to be close to and are likely associated with known genes. To investigate if ITFs are under selection and are functional, we assessed ITF conservation through cross-species as well as within-species comparisons. Our analysis reveals that 237 ITFs, including 49 with translation evidence, are under strong selective constraint and relatively distant from annotated features. These ITFs are likely parts of novel genes. However, the selective pressure imposed on most ITFs is similar to that of randomly selected, untranscribed intergenic sequences. Our findings indicate that despite the prevalence of ITFs, apart from the possibility of genomic contamination, many may be background or noisy transcripts derived from "junk" DNA, whose production may be inherent to the process of transcription and which, on rare occasions, may act as catalysts for the creation of novel genes. PMID:23132786

  10. A Genome-wide Study of “Non-3UTR” Polyadenylation Sites in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cheng; Spinelli, Matthew; Liu, Man; Li, Qingshun Q.; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation has been recognized as a key contributor of gene expression regulation by generating different transcript isoforms with altered 3′ ends. Although polyadenylation is well known for marking the end of a 3′ UTR, an increasing number of studies have reported previously less-addressed polyadenylation events located in other parts of genes in many eukaryotic organisms. These other locations include 5′ UTRs, introns and coding sequences (termed herein as non-3UTR), as well as antisense and intergenic polyadenlation. Focusing on the non-3UTR polyadenylation sites (n3PASs), we detected and characterized more than 11000 n3PAS clusters in the Arabidopsis genome using poly(A)-tag sequencing data (PAT-Seq). Further analyses suggested that the occurrence of these n3PASs were positively correlated with certain characteristics of their respective host genes, including the presence of spliced, diminutive or diverse beginning of 5′ UTRs, number of introns and whether introns have extreme lengths. The interaction of the host genes with surrounding genetic elements, like a convergently overlapped gene and associated transposable element, may contribute to the generation of a n3PAS as well. Collectively, these results provide a better understanding of n3PASs, and offer some new insights of the underlying mechanisms for non-3UTR polyadenylation and its regulation in plants. PMID:27301740

  11. Use of intron-disrupted polyadenylation sites to enhance expression and safety of retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ismail, S I; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Uden, M

    2001-01-01

    Normal mRNA polyadenylation signals are composed of an AAUAAA motif and G/U box spaced 20 to 30 bp apart. If this spacing is increased further, then polyadenylation is disrupted. Previously it has been demonstrated that insertion of an intron will similarly disrupt this signal even though such introns are removed during a nuclear splicing reaction (X. Liu and J. Mertz, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:5256-5263, 1993). This observation has led to the suggestion that polyadenylation site selection is undertaken prior to intron excision. We now present results that both support and extend these observations and in doing so create a novel class of retroviral expression vector with improved qualities. We found that when an intron-disrupted polyadenylation signal is inserted within a retroviral expression vector, such a signal, although reformed in the producer cell, remains benign until transduction, where it is then preferentially used. Thus, we demonstrate that upon transduction these vectors now produce a majority of shortened subgenomic species and as a consequence have a reduced tendency for subsequent mobilization from transduced cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the use of this internal signal leads to enhanced expression from such vectors and that this is achieved without any loss in titer. Therefore, split polyadenylation signals confer enhanced performance and improved safety upon retroviral expression vectors into which they are inserted. Such split signals may prove useful for the future optimization of retroviral vectors in gene therapy. PMID:11119589

  12. Use of Intron-Disrupted Polyadenylation Sites To Enhance Expression and Safety of Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Said I.; Rohll, Jonathan B.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Kingsman, Alan J.; Uden, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Normal mRNA polyadenylation signals are composed of an AAUAAA motif and G/U box spaced 20 to 30 bp apart. If this spacing is increased further, then polyadenylation is disrupted. Previously it has been demonstrated that insertion of an intron will similarly disrupt this signal even though such introns are removed during a nuclear splicing reaction (X. Liu and J. Mertz, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:5256–5263, 1993). This observation has led to the suggestion that polyadenylation site selection is undertaken prior to intron excision. We now present results that both support and extend these observations and in doing so create a novel class of retroviral expression vector with improved qualities. We found that when an intron-disrupted polyadenylation signal is inserted within a retroviral expression vector, such a signal, although reformed in the producer cell, remains benign until transduction, where it is then preferentially used. Thus, we demonstrate that upon transduction these vectors now produce a majority of shortened subgenomic species and as a consequence have a reduced tendency for subsequent mobilization from transduced cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the use of this internal signal leads to enhanced expression from such vectors and that this is achieved without any loss in titer. Therefore, split polyadenylation signals confer enhanced performance and improved safety upon retroviral expression vectors into which they are inserted. Such split signals may prove useful for the future optimization of retroviral vectors in gene therapy. PMID:11119589

  13. A Genome-wide Study of "Non-3UTR" Polyadenylation Sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng; Spinelli, Matthew; Liu, Man; Li, Qingshun Q; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation has been recognized as a key contributor of gene expression regulation by generating different transcript isoforms with altered 3' ends. Although polyadenylation is well known for marking the end of a 3' UTR, an increasing number of studies have reported previously less-addressed polyadenylation events located in other parts of genes in many eukaryotic organisms. These other locations include 5' UTRs, introns and coding sequences (termed herein as non-3UTR), as well as antisense and intergenic polyadenlation. Focusing on the non-3UTR polyadenylation sites (n3PASs), we detected and characterized more than 11000 n3PAS clusters in the Arabidopsis genome using poly(A)-tag sequencing data (PAT-Seq). Further analyses suggested that the occurrence of these n3PASs were positively correlated with certain characteristics of their respective host genes, including the presence of spliced, diminutive or diverse beginning of 5' UTRs, number of introns and whether introns have extreme lengths. The interaction of the host genes with surrounding genetic elements, like a convergently overlapped gene and associated transposable element, may contribute to the generation of a n3PAS as well. Collectively, these results provide a better understanding of n3PASs, and offer some new insights of the underlying mechanisms for non-3UTR polyadenylation and its regulation in plants. PMID:27301740

  14. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death. PMID:27486347

  15. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death. PMID:27486347

  16. Arabidopsis EDM2 promotes IBM1 distal polyadenylation and regulates genome DNA methylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Mingguang; La, Honggui; Lu, Kun; Wang, Pengcheng; Miki, Daisuke; Ren, Zhizhong; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Tang, Kai; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; Zhang, Heng; Nie, Wenfeng; Liu, Pan; Zhou, Jianping; Liu, Renyi; Zhong, Yingli; Liu, Dong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is important for the silencing of transposons and other repetitive elements in many higher eukaryotes. However, plant and mammalian genomes have evolved to contain repetitive elements near or inside their genes. How these genes are kept from being silenced by DNA methylation is not well understood. A forward genetics screen led to the identification of the putative chromatin regulator Enhanced Downy Mildew 2 (EDM2) as a cellular antisilencing factor and regulator of genome DNA methylation patterns. EDM2 contains a composite Plant Homeo Domain that recognizes both active and repressive histone methylation marks at the intronic repeat elements in genes such as the Histone 3 lysine 9 demethylase gene Increase in BONSAI Methylation 1 (IBM1) and is necessary for maintaining the expression of these genes by promoting mRNA distal polyadenylation. Because of its role in maintaining IBM1 expression, EDM2 is required for preventing CHG methylation in the bodies of thousands of genes. Our results thus increase the understanding of antisilencing, genome methylation patterns, and regulation of alternative RNA processing by intronic heterochromatin. PMID:24248388

  17. Regulation of alternative polyadenylation by Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 during mouse heart development.

    PubMed

    Nimura, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Takeichi, Makiko; Saga, Kotaro; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Kawamura, Norihiko; Nitta, Hirohisa; Nagano, Hiromichi; Ishino, Saki; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Schwartz, Robert J; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors organize gene expression profiles by regulating promoter activity. However, the role of transcription factors after transcription initiation is poorly understood. Here, we show that the homeoprotein Nkx2-5 and the 5'-3' exonuclease Xrn2 are involved in the regulation of alternative polyadenylation (APA) during mouse heart development. Nkx2-5 occupied not only the transcription start sites (TSSs) but also the downstream regions of genes, serving to connect these regions in primary embryonic cardiomyocytes (eCMs). Nkx2-5 deficiency affected Xrn2 binding to target loci and resulted in increases in RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occupancy and in the expression of mRNAs with long 3'untranslated regions (3' UTRs) from genes related to heart development. siRNA-mediated suppression of Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 led to heart looping anomaly. Moreover, Nkx2-5 genetically interacts with Xrn2 because Nkx2-5(+/-)Xrn2(+/-), but neither Nkx2-5(+/-)nor Xrn2(+/-), newborns exhibited a defect in ventricular septum formation, suggesting that the association between Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 is essential for heart development. Our results indicate that Nkx2-5 regulates not only the initiation but also the usage of poly(A) sites during heart development. Our findings suggest that tissue-specific transcription factors is involved in the regulation of APA. PMID:27331609

  18. The histone H3 and H4 mRNAs are polyadenylated in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Chaubet, N; Chaboute, M E; Clément, B; Ehling, M; Philipps, G; Gigot, C

    1988-01-01

    Northern blot analysis revealed that the histone H3 and H4 mRNAs are of unusual large size in germinating maize embryos. S1-mapping experiments show that the 3'-untranslated regions of the mRNAs transcribed from 3 H3 and 2 H4 maize genes previously described are much longer than in the non-polyadenylated histone mRNAs which represent a major class in animals. Moreover, oligo d(T) cellulose fractionation of RNAs isolated at different developmental stages indicates that more than 99% of the maize H3 and H4 mRNAs are polyadenylated. A putative polyadenylation signal is present in all five genes 17 to 27 nucleotides before the 3'-ends of the mRNAs. Images PMID:2831497

  19. New alternative splicing BCR/ABL-OOF shows an oncogenic role by lack of inhibition of BCR GTPase activity and an increased of persistence of Rac activation in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Volpe, Gisella; Cibrario Rocchietti, Elisa; Casnici, Claudia; Crotta, Katia; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Lorenzatti, Roberta; Peracino, Barbara; Torti, Davide; Morotti, Alessandro; Camacho-Leal, Maria Pilar; Defilippi, Paola; Marelli, Ornella; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia 80% of patients present alternative splice variants involving BCR exons 1, 13 or 14 and ABL exon 4, with a consequent impairment in the reading frame of the ABL gene. Therefore BCR/ABL fusion proteins (BCR/ABL-OOF) are characterized by an in-frame BCR portion followed by an amino acids sequence arising from the out of frame (OOF) reading of the ABL gene. The product of this new transcript contains the characteristic BCR domains while lacking the COOH-terminal Rho GTPase GAP domain. The present work aims to characterize the protein functionality in terms of cytoskeleton (re-)modelling, adhesion and activation of canonical oncogenic signalling pathways. Here, we show that BCR/ABL-OOF has a peculiar endosomal localization which affects EGF receptor activation and turnover. Moreover, we demonstrate that BCR/ABL-OOF expression leads to aberrant cellular adhesion due to the activation of Rac GTPase, increase in cellular proliferation, migration and survival. When overexpressed in a BCR/ABL positive cell line, BCR/ABL-OOF induces hyperactivation of Rac signaling axis offering a therapeutic window for Rac-targeted therapy. Our data support a critical role of BCR/ABL-OOF in leukemogenesis and identify a subset of patients that may benefit from Rac-targeted therapies. PMID:26682280

  20. Oncogenes in Cell Survival and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, Jake; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2012-01-01

    The transforming effects of proto-oncogenes such as MYC that mediate unrestrained cell proliferation are countered by “intrinsic tumor suppressor mechanisms” that most often trigger apoptosis. Therefore, cooperating genetic or epigenetic effects to suppress apoptosis (e.g., overexpression of BCL2) are required to enable the dual transforming processes of unbridled cell proliferation and robust suppression of apoptosis. Certain oncogenes such as BCR-ABL are capable of concomitantly mediating the inhibition of apoptosis and driving cell proliferation and therefore are less reliant on cooperating lesions for transformation. Accordingly, direct targeting of BCR-ABL through agents such as imatinib have profound antitumor effects. Other oncoproteins such as MYC rely on the anti-apoptotic effects of cooperating oncoproteins such as BCL2 to facilitate tumorigenesis. In these circumstances, where the primary oncogenic driver (e.g., MYC) cannot yet be therapeutically targeted, inhibition of the activity of the cooperating antiapoptotic protein (e.g., BCL2) can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:23209150

  1. Targeting energy metabolic and oncogenic signaling pathways in triple-negative breast cancer by a novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Hsu, En-Chi; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K; Shapiro, Charles L; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2011-11-11

    The antitumor activities of the novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, OSU-53, were assessed in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer. OSU-53 directly stimulated recombinant AMPK kinase activity (EC(50), 0.3 μM) and inhibited the viability and clonogenic growth of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells with equal potency (IC(50), 5 and 2 μM, respectively) despite lack of LKB1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Nonmalignant MCF-10A cells, however, were unaffected. Beyond AMPK-mediated effects on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and lipogenesis, OSU-53 also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition. OSU-53 also modulated energy homeostasis by suppressing fatty acid biosynthesis and shifting the metabolism to oxidation by up-regulating the expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and the transcription factor nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, OSU-53 suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation, and inhibited hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in association with the silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and the E-cadherin repressor Snail. In MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice, daily oral administration of OSU-53 (50 and 100 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth by 47-49% and modulated relevant intratumoral biomarkers of drug activity. However, OSU-53 also induced protective autophagy that attenuated its antiproliferative potency. Accordingly, cotreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine increased the in vivo tumor-suppressive activity of OSU-53. OSU-53 is a potent, orally bioavailable AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of antitumor activities. PMID

  2. A small portion of plastid transcripts is polyadenylated in the flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Záhonová, Kristína; Hadariová, Lucia; Vacula, Rostislav; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Eliáš, Marek; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej

    2014-03-01

    Euglena gracilis possesses secondary plastids of green algal origin. In this study, E. gracilis expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from polyA-selected mRNA were searched and several ESTs corresponding to plastid genes were found. PCR experiments failed to detect SL sequence at the 5'-end of any of these transcripts, suggesting plastid origin of these polyadenylated molecules. Quantitative PCR experiments confirmed that polyadenylation of transcripts occurs in the Euglena plastids. Such transcripts have been previously observed in primary plastids of plants and algae as low-abundance intermediates of transcript degradation. Our results suggest that a similar mechanism exists in secondary plastids. PMID:24492004

  3. Inactivation of oncogenic cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4D by miR-139-5p in response to p53 activation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Wang, Kebing; Liao, Jun-Ming; Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Peng; Zeng, Shelya X; He, Meifang; Chen, Lianzhou; He, Yulong; Li, Wen; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights the important roles of microRNAs in mediating p53’s tumor suppression functions. Here, we report miR-139-5p as another new p53 microRNA target. p53 induced the transcription of miR-139-5p, which in turn suppressed the protein levels of phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), an oncogenic protein involved in multiple tumor promoting processes. Knockdown of p53 reversed these effects. Also, overexpression of miR-139-5p decreased PDE4D levels and increased cellular cAMP levels, leading to BIM-mediated cell growth arrest. Furthermore, our analysis of human colorectal tumor specimens revealed significant inverse correlation between the expression of miR-139-5p and that of PDE4D. Finally, overexpression of miR-139-5p suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors, accompanied by decrease in PDE4D and increase in BIM. These results demonstrate that p53 inactivates oncogenic PDE4D by inducing the expression of miR-139-5p. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15978.001 PMID:27383270

  4. The H3K27me3 demethylase JMJD3 contributes to the activation of the INK4A–ARF locus in response to oncogene- and stress-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Karl; Cloos, Paul A.C.; Rudkjær, Lise; Williams, Kristine; Andersen, Gitte; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor proteins p16INK4A and p14ARF, encoded by the INK4A–ARF locus, are key regulators of cellular senescence. The locus is epigenetically silenced by the repressive H3K27me3 mark in normally growing cells, but becomes activated in response to oncogenic stress. Here, we show that expression of the histone H3 Lys 27 (H3K27) demethylase JMJD3 is induced upon activation of the RAS–RAF signaling pathway. JMJD3 is recruited to the INK4A–ARF locus and contributes to the transcriptional activation of p16INK4A in human diploid fibroblasts. Additionally, inhibition of Jmjd3 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts results in suppression of p16Ink4a and p19Arf expression and in their immortalization. PMID:19451217

  5. Oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity in pancreatic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shields, DJ; Murphy, EA; Desgrosellier, JS; Mielgo, A; Lau, SKM; Barnes, LA; Lesperance, J; Huang, M; Schmedt, C; Tarin, D; Lowy, AM; Cheresh, DA

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies and is characterized by activating mutations of Kras, present in 95% of patients. More than 60% of pancreatic cancers also display increased c-Src activity, which is associated with poor prognosis. Although loss of tumor suppressor function (for example, p16, p53, Smad4) combined with oncogenic Kras signaling has been shown to accelerate pancreatic duct carcinogenesis, it is unclear whether elevated Src activity contributes to Kras-dependent tumorigenesis or is simply a biomarker of disease progression. Here, we demonstrate that in the context of oncogenic Kras, activation of c-Src through deletion of C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) results in the development of invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) by 5–8 weeks. In contrast, deletion of CSK alone fails to induce neoplasia, while oncogenic Kras expression yields PDA at low frequency after a latency of 12 months. Analysis of cell lines derived from Ras/Src-induced PDA’s indicates that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity may lead to genomic instability, yet Ras/Src-driven tumor cells remain dependent on Src signaling and as such, Src inhibition suppresses growth of Ras/Src-driven tumors. These findings demonstrate that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperate to accelerate PDA onset and support further studies of Src-directed therapies in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21242978

  6. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  7. The PRKCI and SOX2 Oncogenes are Co-amplified and Cooperate to Activate Hedgehog Signaling in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Justilien, Verline; Walsh, Michael P.; Ali, Syed A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We report that two oncogenes co-amplified on chromosome 3q26, PRKCI and SOX2, cooperate to drive a stem-like phenotype in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). PKCι phosphorylates SOX2, a master transcriptional regulator of stemness, and recruits it to the promoter of Hedgehog Acyl Transferase (HHAT), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in Hh ligand production. PKCι-mediated SOX2 phosphorylation is required for HHAT promoter occupancy, HHAT expression, and maintenance of a stem-like phenotype. Primary LSCC tumors coordinately overexpress PKCι, SOX2, and HHAT, and require PKCι-SOX2-HHAT signaling to maintain a stem-like phenotype. Thus, PKCι and SOX2 are genetically, biochemically and functionally linked in LSCC, and together they drive tumorigenesis by establishing a cell autonomous Hh signaling axis. PMID:24525231

  8. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  9. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 by Inhibition of Transcription Activation by p53 and Sp1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1–3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  10. Identification of Alternate Polyadenylation Sites and Analysis of their Tissue Distribution Using EST Data

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Gautheret, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Alternate polyadenylation affects a large fraction of higher eucaryote mRNAs, producing mature transcripts with 3′ ends of variable length. This variation is poorly represented in the current transcript catalogs derived from whole genome sequences, mostly because such posttranscriptional events are not detectable directly at the DNA level. Alternate polydenylation of an mRNA is better understood by comparision to EST databases. Comparing ESTs to mRNAs, however, is a difficult task subjected to the pitfalls of internal priming, presence of intron sequences, repeated elements, chimerical ESTs or matches with EST from paralogous genes. We present here a computer program that addresses these problems and displays ESTs matches to a query mRNA sequence to predict alternate polyadenylation and to suggest library-specific forms. The output highlights effective polyadenylation signals, possible sources of artifacts such as A-rich stretches in the mRNA sequences, and allows for a direct visualization of EST libraries using color codes. Statistical biases in the distribution of alternative mRNA forms among EST libraries were systematically sought. About 1450 human and 200 mouse mRNAs displayed such biases, suggesting in each case a tissue- or disease-specific regulation of polyadenylation. PMID:11544195