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Sample records for polycomb group genes

  1. Cross-Regulation among the Polycomb Group Genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Janann Y.; Bender, Welcome

    2004-01-01

    Genes of the Polycomb group in Drosophila melanogaster function as long-term transcriptional repressors. A few members of the group encode proteins found in two evolutionarily conserved chromatin complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and the ESC-E(Z) complex. The majority of the group, lacking clear biochemical functions, might be indirect regulators. The transcript levels of seven Polycomb group genes were assayed in embryos mutant for various other genes in the family. Three Polycomb group genes were identified as upstream positive regulators of the core components of PRC1. There is also negative feedback regulation of some PRC1 core components by other PRC1 genes. Finally, there is positive regulation of PRC1 components by the ESC-E(Z) complex. These multiple pathways of cross-regulation help to explain the large size of the Polycomb group family of genes, but they complicate the genetic analysis of any single member. PMID:15314179

  2. Nucleotide substitutions revealing specific functions of Polycomb group genes.

    PubMed

    Bajusz, Izabella; Sipos, László; Pirity, Melinda K

    2015-04-01

    POLYCOMB group (PCG) proteins belong to the family of epigenetic regulators of genes playing important roles in differentiation and development. Mutants of PcG genes were isolated first in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, resulting in spectacular segmental transformations due to the ectopic expression of homeotic genes. Homologs of Drosophila PcG genes were also identified in plants and in vertebrates and subsequent experiments revealed the general role of PCG proteins in the maintenance of the repressed state of chromatin through cell divisions. The past decades of gene targeting experiments have allowed us to make significant strides towards understanding how the network of PCG proteins influences multiple aspects of cellular fate determination during development. Being involved in the transmission of specific expression profiles of different cell lineages, PCG proteins were found to control wide spectra of unrelated epigenetic processes in vertebrates, such as stem cell plasticity and renewal, genomic imprinting and inactivation of X-chromosome. PCG proteins also affect regulation of metabolic genes being important for switching programs between pluripotency and differentiation. Insight into the precise roles of PCG proteins in normal physiological processes has emerged from studies employing cell culture-based systems and genetically modified animals. Here we summarize the findings obtained from PcG mutant fruit flies and mice generated to date with a focus on PRC1 and PRC2 members altered by nucleotide substitutions resulting in specific alleles. We also include a compilation of lessons learned from these models about the in vivo functions of this complex protein family. With multiple knockout lines, sophisticated approaches to study the consequences of peculiar missense point mutations, and insights from complementary gain-of-function systems in hand, we are now in a unique position to significantly advance our understanding of the molecular basis of

  3. Altered Expression of Polycomb Group Genes in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Warden, Charles; Zou, Zhaoxia; Neman, Josh; Krueger, Joseph S.; Jain, Alisha; Jandial, Rahul; Chen, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play a critical role in histone mediated epigenetics which has been implicated in the malignant evolution of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). By systematically interrogating The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we discovered widespread aberrant expression of the PcG members in GBM samples compared to normal brain. The most striking differences were upregulation of EZH2, PHF19, CBX8 and PHC2 and downregulation of CBX7, CBX6, EZH1 and RYBP. Interestingly, changes in EZH2, PHF19, CBX7, CBX6 and EZH1 occurred progressively as astrocytoma grade increased. We validated the aberrant expression of CBX6, CBX7, CBX8 and EZH2 in GBM cell lines by Western blotting and qRT-PCR, and further the aberrant expression of CBX6 in GBM tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining. To determine if there was functional significance to the diminished CBX6 levels in GBM, CBX6 was overexpressed in GBM cells resulting in decreased proliferative capacity. In conclusion, aberrant expression of PcG proteins in GBMs may play a role in the development or maintenance of the malignancy. PMID:24260522

  4. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Chan, Shih-Peng; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-09-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  5. Invited Review: Polycomb group genes in the regeneration of the healthy and pathological skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Marino, S; Di Foggia, V

    2016-08-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic repressors required during key developmental processes, such as maintenance of cell identity and stem cell differentiation. To exert their repressive function, PcG proteins assemble on chromatin into multiprotein complexes, known as polycomb repressive complex 1 and 2. In this review, we will focus on the role and mode of function of PcG proteins in the development and regeneration of the skeletal muscle, both in normal and pathological conditions and we will discuss the emerging concept of modulation of their expression to enhance the muscle-specific regenerative process for patient benefit. PMID:26479276

  6. Polycomb group protein bodybuilding: working out the routines.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Cem; Paro, Renato

    2013-09-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate gene expression by modifying chemical and structural properties of chromatin. Isono et al. (2013) now report in Developmental Cell a polymerization-dependent mechanism used by PcG proteins to form higher-order chromatin structures, referred to as Polycomb bodies, and demonstrate its necessity for gene silencing. PMID:24091008

  7. Gene Silencing and Polycomb Group Proteins: An Overview of their Structure, Mechanisms and Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Nazia Abdul; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hadi, A. Hamid A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin configuration are crucially important in the regulation of gene expression. Among these epigenetic mechanisms, silencing the expression of certain genes depending on developmental stage and tissue specificity is a key repressive system in genome programming. Polycomb (Pc) proteins play roles in gene silencing through different mechanisms. These proteins act in complexes and govern the histone methylation profiles of a large number of genes that regulate various cellular pathways. This review focuses on two main Pc complexes, Pc repressive complexes 1 and 2, and their phylogenetic relationship, structures, and function. The dynamic roles of these complexes in silencing will be discussed herein, with a focus on the recruitment of Pc complexes to target genes and the key factors involved in their recruitment. PMID:23692361

  8. Gene silencing and Polycomb group proteins: an overview of their structure, mechanisms and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hadi, A Hamid A

    2013-06-01

    DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin configuration are crucially important in the regulation of gene expression. Among these epigenetic mechanisms, silencing the expression of certain genes depending on developmental stage and tissue specificity is a key repressive system in genome programming. Polycomb (Pc) proteins play roles in gene silencing through different mechanisms. These proteins act in complexes and govern the histone methylation profiles of a large number of genes that regulate various cellular pathways. This review focuses on two main Pc complexes, Pc repressive complexes 1 and 2, and their phylogenetic relationship, structures, and function. The dynamic roles of these complexes in silencing will be discussed herein, with a focus on the recruitment of Pc complexes to target genes and the key factors involved in their recruitment. PMID:23692361

  9. A mosaic genetic screen reveals distinct roles for trithorax and polycomb group genes in Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed Central

    Janody, Florence; Lee, Jeffrey D; Jahren, Neal; Hazelett, Dennis J; Benlali, Aude; Miura, Grant I; Draskovic, Irena; Treisman, Jessica E

    2004-01-01

    The wave of differentiation that traverses the Drosophila eye disc requires rapid transitions in gene expression that are controlled by a number of signaling molecules also required in other developmental processes. We have used a mosaic genetic screen to systematically identify autosomal genes required for the normal pattern of photoreceptor differentiation, independent of their requirements for viability. In addition to genes known to be important for eye development and to known and novel components of the Hedgehog, Decapentaplegic, Wingless, Epidermal growth factor receptor, and Notch signaling pathways, we identified several members of the Polycomb and trithorax classes of genes encoding general transcriptional regulators. Mutations in these genes disrupt the transitions between zones along the anterior-posterior axis of the eye disc that express different combinations of transcription factors. Different trithorax group genes have very different mutant phenotypes, indicating that target genes differ in their requirements for chromatin remodeling, histone modification, and coactivation factors. PMID:15020417

  10. Regulation of cellular plasticity in Drosophila imaginal disc cells by the Polycomb group, trithorax group and lama genes.

    PubMed

    Klebes, Ansgar; Sustar, Anne; Kechris, Katherina; Li, Hao; Schubiger, Gerold; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2005-08-01

    Drosophila imaginal disc cells can switch fates by transdetermining from one determined state to another. We analyzed the expression profiles of cells induced by ectopic Wingless expression to transdetermine from leg to wing by dissecting transdetermined cells and hybridizing probes generated by linear RNA amplification to DNA microarrays. Changes in expression levels implicated a number of genes: lamina ancestor, CG12534 (a gene orthologous to mouse augmenter of liver regeneration), Notch pathway members, and the Polycomb and trithorax groups of chromatin regulators. Functional tests revealed that transdetermination was significantly affected in mutants for lama and seven different PcG and trxG genes. These results validate our methods for expression profiling as a way to analyze developmental programs, and show that modifications to chromatin structure are key to changes in cell fate. Our findings are likely to be relevant to the mechanisms that lead to disease when homologs of Wingless are expressed at abnormal levels and to the manifestation of pluripotency of stem cells. PMID:16077094

  11. The Immediate Early Gene Product EGR1 and Polycomb Group Proteins Interact in Epigenetic Programming during Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Marjolein M. J.; Prickaerts, Peggy; Rofel, Celine; Dahlmans, Vivian E. H.; Surtel, Don A. M.; Paulis, Yvette; Schweizer, Finja; Welting, Tim J. M.; Eijssen, Lars M.; Voncken, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Initiation of and progression through chondrogenesis is driven by changes in the cellular microenvironment. At the onset of chondrogenesis, resting mesenchymal stem cells are mobilized in vivo and a complex, step-wise chondrogenic differentiation program is initiated. Differentiation requires coordinated transcriptomic reprogramming and increased progenitor proliferation; both processes require chromatin remodeling. The nature of early molecular responses that relay differentiation signals to chromatin is poorly understood. We here show that immediate early genes are rapidly and transiently induced in response to differentiation stimuli in vitro. Functional ablation of the immediate early factor EGR1 severely deregulates expression of key chondrogenic control genes at the onset of differentiation. In addition, differentiating cells accumulate DNA damage, activate a DNA damage response and undergo a cell cycle arrest and prevent differentiation associated hyper-proliferation. Failed differentiation in the absence of EGR1 affects global acetylation and terminates in overall histone hypermethylation. We report novel molecular connections between EGR1 and Polycomb Group function: Polycomb associated histone H3 lysine27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) blocks chromatin access of EGR1. In addition, EGR1 ablation results in abnormal Ezh2 and Bmi1 expression. Consistent with this functional interaction, we identify a number of co-regulated targets genes in a chondrogenic gene network. We here describe an important role for EGR1 in early chondrogenic epigenetic programming to accommodate early gene-environment interactions in chondrogenesis. PMID:23483971

  12. Complementary Activities of TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING Proteins and Polycomb Group Complexes in Transcriptional Regulation of Target Genes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Benjamin; James, Geo Velikkakam

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) and PRC2 repress target genes through histone modification and chromatin compaction. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants strongly compromised in the pathway cannot develop differentiated organs. LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1) is so far the only known plant PRC1 component that directly binds to H3K27me3, the histone modification set by PRC2, and also associates genome-wide with trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3). Surprisingly, lhp1 mutants show relatively mild phenotypic alterations. To explain this paradox, we screened for genetic enhancers of lhp1 mutants to identify novel components repressing target genes together with, or in parallel to, LHP1. Two enhancing mutations were mapped to TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING PROTEIN1 (TRB1) and its paralog TRB3. We show that TRB1 binds to thousands of genomic sites containing telobox or related cis-elements with a significant increase of sites and strength of binding in the lhp1 background. Furthermore, in combination with lhp1, but not alone, trb1 mutants show increased transcription of LHP1 targets, such as floral meristem identity genes, which are more likely to be bound by TRB1 in the lhp1 background. By contrast, expression of a subset of LHP1-independent TRB1 target genes, many involved in primary metabolism, is decreased in the absence of TRB1 alone. Thus, TRB1 is a bivalent transcriptional modulator that maintains downregulation of Polycomb Group (PcG) target genes in lhp1 mutants, while it sustains high expression of targets that are regulated independently of PcG. PMID:26721861

  13. Polycomb group gene BMI1 controls invasion of medulloblastoma cells and inhibits BMP-regulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common intracranial childhood malignancy and a genetically heterogeneous disease. Despite recent advances, current therapeutic approaches are still associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent molecular profiling has suggested the stratification of medulloblastoma from one single disease into four distinct subgroups namely: WNT Group (best prognosis), SHH Group (intermediate prognosis), Group 3 (worst prognosis) and Group 4 (intermediate prognosis). BMI1 is a Polycomb group repressor complex gene overexpressed across medulloblastoma subgroups but most significantly in Group 4 tumours. Bone morphogenetic proteins are morphogens belonging to TGF-β superfamily of growth factors, known to inhibit medulloblastoma cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Results Here we demonstrate that human medulloblastoma of Group 4 characterised by the greatest overexpression of BMI1, also display deregulation of cell adhesion molecules. We show that BMI1 controls intraparenchymal invasion in a novel xenograft model of human MB of Group 4, while in vitro assays highlight that cell adhesion and motility are controlled by BMI1 in a BMP dependent manner. Conclusions BMI1 controls MB cell migration and invasion through repression of the BMP pathway, raising the possibility that BMI1 could be used as a biomarker to identify groups of patients who may benefit from a treatment with BMP agonists. PMID:24460684

  14. Short germ insects utilize both the ancestral and derived mode of Polycomb group-mediated epigenetic silencing of Hox genes.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yuji; Bando, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Takahito; Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Noji, Sumihare; Popadić, Aleksandar; Mito, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In insect species that undergo long germ segmentation, such as Drosophila, all segments are specified simultaneously at the early blastoderm stage. As embryogenesis progresses, the expression boundaries of Hox genes are established by repression of gap genes, which is subsequently replaced by Polycomb group (PcG) silencing. At present, however, it is not known whether patterning occurs this way in a more ancestral (short germ) mode of embryogenesis, where segments are added gradually during posterior elongation. In this study, two members of the PcG family, Enhancer of zeste (E(z)) and Suppressor of zeste 12 (Su(z)12), were analyzed in the short germ cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. Results suggest that although stepwise negative regulation by gap and PcG genes is present in anterior members of the Hox cluster, it does not account for regulation of two posterior Hox genes, abdominal-A (abd-A) and Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Instead, abd-A and Abd-B are predominantly regulated by PcG genes, which is the mode present in vertebrates. These findings suggest that an intriguing transition of the PcG-mediated silencing of Hox genes may have occurred during animal evolution. The ancestral bilaterian state may have resembled the current vertebrate mode of regulation, where PcG-mediated silencing of Hox genes occurs before their expression is initiated and is responsible for the establishment of individual expression domains. Then, during insect evolution, the repression by transcription factors may have been acquired in anterior Hox genes of short germ insects, while PcG silencing was maintained in posterior Hox genes. PMID:25948756

  15. Short germ insects utilize both the ancestral and derived mode of Polycomb group-mediated epigenetic silencing of Hox genes

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yuji; Bando, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Takahito; Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Noji, Sumihare; Popadić, Aleksandar; Mito, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In insect species that undergo long germ segmentation, such as Drosophila, all segments are specified simultaneously at the early blastoderm stage. As embryogenesis progresses, the expression boundaries of Hox genes are established by repression of gap genes, which is subsequently replaced by Polycomb group (PcG) silencing. At present, however, it is not known whether patterning occurs this way in a more ancestral (short germ) mode of embryogenesis, where segments are added gradually during posterior elongation. In this study, two members of the PcG family, Enhancer of zeste (E(z)) and Suppressor of zeste 12 (Su(z)12), were analyzed in the short germ cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. Results suggest that although stepwise negative regulation by gap and PcG genes is present in anterior members of the Hox cluster, it does not account for regulation of two posterior Hox genes, abdominal-A (abd-A) and Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Instead, abd-A and Abd-B are predominantly regulated by PcG genes, which is the mode present in vertebrates. These findings suggest that an intriguing transition of the PcG-mediated silencing of Hox genes may have occurred during animal evolution. The ancestral bilaterian state may have resembled the current vertebrate mode of regulation, where PcG-mediated silencing of Hox genes occurs before their expression is initiated and is responsible for the establishment of individual expression domains. Then, during insect evolution, the repression by transcription factors may have been acquired in anterior Hox genes of short germ insects, while PcG silencing was maintained in posterior Hox genes. PMID:25948756

  16. Polycomb group genes Psc and Su(z)2 restrict follicle stem cell self-renewal and extrusion by controlling canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinghua; Han, Yue; Xi, Rongwen

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis and are commonly governed by their niche microenvironment, although the intrinsic mechanisms controlling their multipotency are poorly understood. Polycomb group (PcG) genes are epigenetic silencers, and have emerged recently as important players in maintaining stem cell multipotency by preventing the initiation of differentiation programs. Here we describe an unexpected role of specific PcG genes in allowing adult stem cell differentiation and preventing stem cell-derived tumor development. We show that Posterior sex combs (Psc), which encodes a core Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) component, functions redundantly with a similar gene, Suppressor of zeste two [Su(z)2], to restrict follicle stem cell (FSC) self-renewal in the Drosophila ovary. FSCs carrying deletion mutations of both genes extrude basally from the epithelium and continue to self-propagate at ectopic sites, leading to the development of FSC-like tumors. Furthermore, we show that the propagation of the mutant cells is driven by sustained activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which is essential for FSC self-renewal, whereas the epithelial extrusion is mediated through the planar cell polarity pathway. This study reveals a novel mechanism of epithelial extrusion, and indicates a novel role of polycomb function in allowing adult stem cell differentiation by antagonizing self-renewal programs. Given evolutionary conservation of PcG genes from Drosophila to mammals, they could have similar functions in mammalian stem cells and cancer. PMID:20439432

  17. Regulation of gene transcription by Polycomb proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Mas, Gloria; Di Croce, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins defines a subset of factors that physically associate and function to maintain the positional identity of cells from the embryo to adult stages. PcG has long been considered a paradigmatic model for epigenetic maintenance of gene transcription programs. Despite intensive research efforts to unveil the molecular mechanisms of action of PcG proteins, several fundamental questions remain unresolved: How many different PcG complexes exist in mammalian cells? How are PcG complexes targeted to specific loci? How does PcG regulate transcription? In this review, we discuss the diversity of PcG complexes in mammalian cells, examine newly identified modes of recruitment to chromatin, and highlight the latest insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of PcGs in transcription regulation and three-dimensional chromatin conformation. PMID:26665172

  18. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Damage Repair Gene Expression in Human Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Nair, Sangeeta; Laknaur, Archana; Ismail, Nahed; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign, smooth muscle tumors that occur in approximately 70%-80% of women by age 50 yr. The cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which uterine fibroids (UFs) develop are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that several genetic abnormalities, including deletions, rearrangements, translocations, as well as mutations, have been found in UFs. These genetic anomalies suggest that low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in UF formation. The objective of this study was to determine whether expression levels of DNA damage repair-related genes were altered, and how they were regulated in the pathogenesis of UFs. Expression levels of DNA repair-related genes RAD51 and BRCA1 were deregulated in fibroid tissues as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues. Expression levels of chromatin protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) were higher in a subset of fibroids as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Treatment with an inhibitor of EZH2 markedly increased expression levels of RAD51 and BRCA1 in fibroid cells and inhibited cell proliferation paired with cell cycle arrest. Restoring the expression of RAD51 and BRCA1 by treatment with EZH2 inhibitor was dependent on reducing the enrichment of trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 epigenetic mark in their promoter regions. This study reveals the important role of EZH2-regulated DNA damage-repair genes via histone methylation in fibroid biology, and may provide novel therapeutic targets for the medical treatment of women with symptomatic UFs. PMID:26888970

  19. Adhesive pad differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster depends on the Polycomb group gene Su(z)2.

    PubMed

    Hüsken, Mirko; Hufnagel, Kim; Mende, Katharina; Appel, Esther; Meyer, Heiko; Peisker, Henrik; Tögel, Markus; Wang, Shuoshuo; Wolff, Jonas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Paululat, Achim

    2015-04-15

    The ability of many insects to walk on vertical smooth surfaces such as glass or even on the ceiling has fascinated biologists for a long time, and has led to the discovery of highly specialized adhesive organs located at the distal end of the animals' legs. So far, research has primarily focused on structural and ultrastructural investigations leading to a deeper understanding of adhesive organ functionality and to the development of new bioinspired materials. Genetic approaches, e.g. the analysis of mutants, to achieve a better understanding of adhesive organ differentiation have not been used so far. Here, we describe the first Drosophila melanogaster mutant that develops malformed adhesive organs, resulting in a complete loss of climbing ability on vertical smooth surfaces. Interestingly, these mutants fail to make close contact between the setal tips and the smooth surface, a crucial condition for wet adhesion mediated by capillary forces. Instead, these flies walk solely on their claws. Moreover, we were able to show that the mutation is caused by a P-element insertion into the Su(z)2 gene locus. Remobilization of the P-element restores climbing ability. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the P-element insertion results in an artificial Su(z)2 transcript, which most likely causes a gain-of-function mutation. We presume that this transcript causes deregulation of yet unknown target genes involved in pulvilli differentiation. Our results nicely demonstrate that the genetically treatable model organism Drosophila is highly suitable for future investigations on adhesive organ differentiation. PMID:25714570

  20. Sexual and Apomictic Seed Formation in Hieracium Requires the Plant Polycomb-Group Gene FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM[W

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Julio C.M.; Tucker, Matthew R.; Johnson, Susan D.; Hrmova, Maria; Koltunow, Anna M.G.

    2008-01-01

    A Polycomb-Group (PcG) complex, FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED (FIS), represses endosperm development in Arabidopsis thaliana until fertilization occurs. The Hieracium genus contains apomictic species that form viable seeds asexually. To investigate FIS function during apomictic seed formation, FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE), encoding a WD-repeat member of the FIS complex, was isolated and downregulated in sexual and apomictic Hieracium species. General downregulation led to defects in leaf and seed development, consistent with a role in developmental transitions and cell fate. PcG-like activity of Hieracium FIE was also supported by its interaction in vitro with the Arabidopsis CURLY LEAF PcG protein. By contrast, specific downregulation of FIE in developing seeds of sexual Hieracium did not result in autonomous endosperm proliferation but led to seed abortion after cross-pollination. Furthermore, in apomictic Hieracium, specific FIE downregulation inhibited autonomous embryo and endosperm initiation, and most autonomous seeds displayed defective embryo and endosperm growth. Therefore, FIE is required for both apomictic and fertilization-induced seed initiation in Hieracium. Since Hieracium FIE failed to interact with FIS class proteins in vitro, its partner proteins might differ from those in the FIS complex of Arabidopsis. These differences in protein interaction were attributed to structural modifications predicted from comparisons of Arabidopsis and Hieracium FIE molecular models. PMID:18812497

  1. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis. PMID:22999383

  2. Polycomb-group protein SlMSI1 represses the expression of fruit-ripening genes to prolong shelf life in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Li-Jie; Fang, Mou-Jing; Dong, Qing-Long; An, Xiu-Hong; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) protein MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 (MSI1) protein is an evolutionarily conserved developmental suppressor and plays a crucial role in regulating epigenetic modulations. However, the potential role and function of MSI1 in fleshy fruits remain unknown. In this study, SlMSI1 was cloned and transformed into tomato to explore its function. The quantitative real-time PCR results showed that SlMSI1 was highly expressed in flowers and fruits and that its transcript and protein levels were significantly decreased in fruits after the breaker stage. Additionally, SlMSI1-overexpressing transgenic tomatoes displayed abnormal non-ripening fruit formation, whereas its suppression promoted fruit ripening in transgenic tomatoes. Quantitative real-time PCR assays also showed that RIN and its regulons were decreased in SlMSI1 overexpression transgenic tomato fruits. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis demonstrated that SlMSI1 inhibits fruit ripening by negatively regulating a large set of fruit-ripening genes in addition to RIN and its regulons. Finally, genetic manipulation of SlMSI1 and RIN successfully prolonged the fruit shelf life by regulating the fruit-ripening genes in tomato. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory function of SlMSI1 in fruit ripening and provide a new regulator that may be useful for genetic engineering and modification of fruit shelf life. PMID:27558543

  3. Drosophila O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is encoded by the Polycomb group (PcG) gene, super sex combs (sxc)

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Donald A. R.; Syrzycka, Monika; Macauley, Matthew S.; Rastgardani, Tara; Komljenovic, Ivana; Vocadlo, David J.; Brock, Hugh W.; Honda, Barry M.

    2009-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) reversibly modifies serine and threonine residues of many intracellular proteins with a single β-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine residue (O-GlcNAc), and has been implicated in insulin signaling, neurodegenerative disease, cellular stress response, and other important processes in mammals. OGT also glycosylates RNA polymerase II and various transcription factors, which suggests that it might be directly involved in transcriptional regulation. We report here that the Drosophila OGT is encoded by the Polycomb group (PcG) gene, super sex combs (sxc). Furthermore, major sites of O-GlcNAc modification on polytene chromosomes correspond to PcG protein binding sites. Our results thus suggest a direct role for O-linked glycosylation by OGT in PcG-mediated epigenetic gene silencing, which is important in developmental regulation, stem cell maintenance, genomic imprinting, and cancer. In addition, we observe rescue of sxc lethality by a human Ogt cDNA transgene; thus Drosophila may provide an ideal model to study important functional roles of OGT in mammals. PMID:19666537

  4. Drosophila O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is encoded by the Polycomb group (PcG) gene, super sex combs (sxc).

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Donald A R; Syrzycka, Monika; Macauley, Matthew S; Rastgardani, Tara; Komljenovic, Ivana; Vocadlo, David J; Brock, Hugh W; Honda, Barry M

    2009-08-11

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) reversibly modifies serine and threonine residues of many intracellular proteins with a single beta-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine residue (O-GlcNAc), and has been implicated in insulin signaling, neurodegenerative disease, cellular stress response, and other important processes in mammals. OGT also glycosylates RNA polymerase II and various transcription factors, which suggests that it might be directly involved in transcriptional regulation. We report here that the Drosophila OGT is encoded by the Polycomb group (PcG) gene, super sex combs (sxc). Furthermore, major sites of O-GlcNAc modification on polytene chromosomes correspond to PcG protein binding sites. Our results thus suggest a direct role for O-linked glycosylation by OGT in PcG-mediated epigenetic gene silencing, which is important in developmental regulation, stem cell maintenance, genomic imprinting, and cancer. In addition, we observe rescue of sxc lethality by a human Ogt cDNA transgene; thus Drosophila may provide an ideal model to study important functional roles of OGT in mammals. PMID:19666537

  5. Polycomb-group protein SlMSI1 represses the expression of fruit-ripening genes to prolong shelf life in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Li-Jie; Fang, Mou-Jing; Dong, Qing-Long; An, Xiu-Hong; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) protein MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 (MSI1) protein is an evolutionarily conserved developmental suppressor and plays a crucial role in regulating epigenetic modulations. However, the potential role and function of MSI1 in fleshy fruits remain unknown. In this study, SlMSI1 was cloned and transformed into tomato to explore its function. The quantitative real-time PCR results showed that SlMSI1 was highly expressed in flowers and fruits and that its transcript and protein levels were significantly decreased in fruits after the breaker stage. Additionally, SlMSI1-overexpressing transgenic tomatoes displayed abnormal non-ripening fruit formation, whereas its suppression promoted fruit ripening in transgenic tomatoes. Quantitative real-time PCR assays also showed that RIN and its regulons were decreased in SlMSI1 overexpression transgenic tomato fruits. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis demonstrated that SlMSI1 inhibits fruit ripening by negatively regulating a large set of fruit-ripening genes in addition to RIN and its regulons. Finally, genetic manipulation of SlMSI1 and RIN successfully prolonged the fruit shelf life by regulating the fruit-ripening genes in tomato. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory function of SlMSI1 in fruit ripening and provide a new regulator that may be useful for genetic engineering and modification of fruit shelf life. PMID:27558543

  6. The Polycomb group protein CLF emerges as a specific tri-methylase of H3K27 regulating gene expression and development in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Pereman, Idan; Mosquna, Assaf; Katz, Aviva; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Lang, Daniel; Decker, Eva L; Tamada, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Takaaki; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Reski, Ralf; Ohad, Nir

    2016-07-01

    Packaging of eukaryotic DNA largely depends on histone modifications that affect the accessibility of DNA to transcriptional regulators, thus controlling gene expression. The Polycomb group (PcG) chromatin remodeling complex deposits a methyl group on lysine 27 of histone 3 leading to repressed gene expression. Plants encode homologs of the Enhancer of zeste (E(z)), a component of the PcG complex from Drosophila, one of which is a SET domain protein designated CURLY LEAF (CLF). Although this SET domain protein exhibits a strong correlation with the presence of the H3K27me3 mark in plants, the methyl-transferase activity and specificity of its SET domain have not been directly tested in-vivo. Using the evolutionary early-diverged land plant model species Physcomitrella patens we show that abolishment of a single copy gene PpCLF, as well as an additional member of the PcG complex, FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (PpFIE), results in a specific loss of tri-methylation of H3K27. Using site-directed mutagenesis of key residues, we revealed that H3K27 tri-methylation is mediated by the SET domain of the CLF protein. Moreover, the abolishment of H3K27me3 led to enhanced expression of transcription factor genes. This in turn led to the development of fertilization-independent sporophyte-like structures, as observed in PpCLF and PpFIE null mutants. Overall, our results demonstrate the role of PpCLF as a SET protein in tri-methylation of H3K27 in-vivo and the importance of this modification in regulating the expression of transcription factor genes involved in developmental programs of P. patens. PMID:27179444

  7. Cohesin and Polycomb Proteins Functionally Interact to Control Transcription at Silenced and Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Cheri A.; Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Koenig, Amanda; Gohara, David W.; Watson, Audrey; Dorsett, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Cohesin is crucial for proper chromosome segregation but also regulates gene transcription and organism development by poorly understood mechanisms. Using genome-wide assays in Drosophila developing wings and cultured cells, we find that cohesin functionally interacts with Polycomb group (PcG) silencing proteins at both silenced and active genes. Cohesin unexpectedly facilitates binding of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) to many active genes, but their binding is mutually antagonistic at silenced genes. PRC1 depletion decreases phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and mRNA at many active genes but increases them at silenced genes. Depletion of cohesin reduces long-range interactions between Polycomb Response Elements in the invected-engrailed gene complex where it represses transcription. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized role for PRC1 in facilitating productive gene transcription and provide new insights into how cohesin and PRC1 control development. PMID:23818863

  8. Epigenetic chromatin modifiers in barley: IV. The study of barley Polycomb group (PcG) genes during seed development and in response to external ABA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epigenetic phenomena have been associated with the regulation of active and silent chromatin states achieved by modifications of chromatin structure through DNA methylation, and histone post-translational modifications. The latter is accomplished, in part, through the action of PcG (Polycomb group) protein complexes which methylate nucleosomal histone tails at specific sites, ultimately leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Different PcG complex variants operating during different developmental stages have been described in plants. In particular, the so-called FIE/MEA/FIS2 complex governs the expression of genes important in embryo and endosperm development in Arabidopsis. In our effort to understand the epigenetic mechanisms regulating seed development in barley (Hordeum vulgare), an agronomically important monocot plant cultivated for its endosperm, we set out to characterize the genes encoding barley PcG proteins. Results Four barley PcG gene homologues, named HvFIE, HvE(Z), HvSu(z)12a, and HvSu(z)12b were identified and structurally and phylogenetically characterized. The corresponding genes HvFIE, HvE(Z), HvSu(z)12a, and HvSu(z)12b were mapped onto barley chromosomes 7H, 4H, 2H and 5H, respectively. Expression analysis of the PcG genes revealed significant differences in gene expression among tissues and seed developmental stages and between barley cultivars with varying seed size. Furthermore, HvFIE and HvE(Z) gene expression was responsive to the abiotic stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA) known to be involved in seed maturation, dormancy and germination. Conclusion This study reports the first characterization of the PcG homologues, HvFIE, HvE(Z), HvSu(z)12a and HvSu(z)12b in barley. All genes co-localized with known chromosomal regions responsible for malting quality related traits, suggesting that they might be used for developing molecular markers to be applied in marker assisted selection. The PcG differential expression

  9. Epigenetic balance of gene expression by Polycomb and COMPASS families.

    PubMed

    Piunti, Andrea; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression in metazoans is central for establishing cellular diversity, and its deregulation can result in pathological conditions. Although transcription factors are essential for implementing gene expression programs, they do not function in isolation and require the recruitment of various chromatin-modifying and -remodeling machineries. A classic example of developmental chromatin regulation is the balanced activities of the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins within the PRC1 and PRC2 complexes, and the Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins within the COMPASS family, which are highly mutated in a large number of human diseases. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings regarding the properties of the PcG and COMPASS families and the insight they provide into the epigenetic control of transcription under physiological and pathological settings. PMID:27257261

  10. miR-203 inhibits melanoma invasive and proliferative abilities by targeting the polycomb group gene BMI1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Xiao; Sun, Yong; Han, Siqi; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Haiping; Lian, Shi

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • First reported deregulation of miR-203 and up-regulation of BMI1 in metastatic melanoma. • miR-203 decreased BMI1 expression by directly binding to 3′UTR. • Further found miR-203 overexpression suppressed cell invasion and stemness. • Re-expression of BMI1 rescued miR-203-mediated suppression. • miR-203-BMI1 axis may be potential therapeutic targets of melanoma metastasis. - Abstract: Metastasis is the major problem in malignant melanoma, posing a therapeutic challenge to clinicians. The investigation of the underlying mechanism driving this progress remains a large unmet need. In this study, we revealed a miR-203-BMI1 axis that regulated melanoma metastasis. We found significantly deregulation of miR-203 and up-regulation of BMI1 in melanoma, particularly in metastatic melanoma. An inverse correlation between the levels of miR-203 and BMI1 was further observed in melanoma tissues and cell lines. We also identified BMI1 as a downstream target gene of miR-203, which bound to the 3′UTR of BMI1. Overexpression of miR-203 was associated with decreased BMI1 expression and impaired cell invasion and tumor sphere formation activities. Re-expression of BMI1 markedly rescued miR-203-mediated suppression of these events. Taken together, our results demonstrated that miR-203 regulated melanoma invasive and proliferative abilities in part by targeting BMI1, providing new insights into potential mechanisms of melanoma metastasis.

  11. The controversial role of the Polycomb group proteins in transcription and cancer: how much do we not understand Polycomb proteins?

    PubMed

    Scelfo, Andrea; Piunti, Andrea; Pasini, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcGs) are a large protein family that includes diverse biochemical features assembled together in two large multiprotein complexes. These complexes maintain gene transcriptional repression in a cell type specific manner by modifying the surrounding chromatin to control development, differentiation and cell proliferation. PcGs are also involved in several diseases. PcGs are often directly or indirectly implicated in cancer development for which they have been proposed as potential targets for cancer therapeutic strategies. However, in the last few years a series of discoveries about the basic properties of PcGs and the identification of specific genetic alterations affecting specific Polycomb proteins in different tumours have converged to challenge old dogmas about PcG biological and molecular functions. In this review, we analyse these new data in the context of the old knowledge, highlighting the controversies and providing new models of interpretation and ideas that will perhaps bring some order among apparently contradicting observations. PMID:25315766

  12. Chromatin topology is coupled to Polycomb group protein subnuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Wani, Ajazul H; Boettiger, Alistair N; Schorderet, Patrick; Ergun, Ayla; Münger, Christine; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Kingston, Robert E; Francis, Nicole J

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of metazoa are organized at multiple scales. Many proteins that regulate genome architecture, including Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, form subnuclear structures. Deciphering mechanistic links between protein organization and chromatin architecture requires precise description and mechanistic perturbations of both. Using super-resolution microscopy, here we show that PcG proteins are organized into hundreds of nanoscale protein clusters. We manipulated PcG clusters by disrupting the polymerization activity of the sterile alpha motif (SAM) of the PcG protein Polyhomeotic (Ph) or by increasing Ph levels. Ph with mutant SAM disrupts clustering of endogenous PcG complexes and chromatin interactions while elevating Ph level increases cluster number and chromatin interactions. These effects can be captured by molecular simulations based on a previously described chromatin polymer model. Both perturbations also alter gene expression. Organization of PcG proteins into small, abundant clusters on chromatin through Ph SAM polymerization activity may shape genome architecture through chromatin interactions. PMID:26759081

  13. Chromatin topology is coupled to Polycomb group protein subnuclear organization

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Ajazul H.; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Schorderet, Patrick; Ergun, Ayla; Münger, Christine; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Kingston, Robert E.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of metazoa are organized at multiple scales. Many proteins that regulate genome architecture, including Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, form subnuclear structures. Deciphering mechanistic links between protein organization and chromatin architecture requires precise description and mechanistic perturbations of both. Using super-resolution microscopy, here we show that PcG proteins are organized into hundreds of nanoscale protein clusters. We manipulated PcG clusters by disrupting the polymerization activity of the sterile alpha motif (SAM) of the PcG protein Polyhomeotic (Ph) or by increasing Ph levels. Ph with mutant SAM disrupts clustering of endogenous PcG complexes and chromatin interactions while elevating Ph level increases cluster number and chromatin interactions. These effects can be captured by molecular simulations based on a previously described chromatin polymer model. Both perturbations also alter gene expression. Organization of PcG proteins into small, abundant clusters on chromatin through Ph SAM polymerization activity may shape genome architecture through chromatin interactions. PMID:26759081

  14. Polycomb Group (PcG) Proteins and Human Cancers: Multifaceted Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Nag, Subhasree; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that regulate several crucial developmental and physiological processes in the cell. More recently, they have been found to play important roles in human carcinogenesis and cancer development and progression. The deregulation and dysfunction of PcG proteins often lead to blocking or inappropriate activation of developmental pathways, enhancing cellular proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, and increasing the cancer stem cell population. Genetic and molecular investigations of PcG proteins have long been focused on their PcG functions. However, PcG proteins have recently been shown to exert non-polycomb functions, contributing to the regulation of diverse cellular functions. We and others have demonstrated that PcG proteins regulate the expression and function of several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a PcG-independent manner, and PcG proteins are associated with the survival of patients with cancer. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the research on PcG proteins, including both the polycomb-repressive and non-polycomb functions. We specifically focus on the mechanisms by which PcG proteins play roles in cancer initiation, development, and progression. Finally, we discuss the potential value of PcG proteins as molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer, and as molecular targets for cancer therapy. PMID:26227500

  15. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lei; He, Chongsheng; Shen, Wen-Hui; Jin, Hong; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF), a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN). This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs), including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs. PMID:26760036

  16. Cohesin and Polycomb: Cooperative Checks and Balances in Gene Silencing and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dorsett, Dale; Kassis, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex was discovered for its roles in sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, and the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins for their roles in epigenetic gene silencing during development. Cohesin also controls gene transcription via multiple mechanisms. Genetic and molecular evidence from Drosophila argue that cohesin and the PRC1 PcG complex interact to control transcription of many active genes that are critical for development, and that via these interactions cohesin also controls the availability of PRC1 for gene silencing. PMID:24892918

  17. Polycomb gene expression and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation changes during bovine preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Ragina, Neli P; Rodriguez, Ramon M; Iager, Amy E; Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Lopez-Corrales, Nestor; Cibelli, Jose B

    2008-12-01

    Trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) is established by polycomb group genes and is associated with stable and heritable gene silencing. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression of polycomb genes and the dynamics of H3K27me3 during bovine oocyte maturation and preimplantation development. Oocytes and in vitro-produced embryos were collected at different stages of development. Polycomb gene expression was analyzed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Global H3K27me3 levels were determined by semiquantitative immunofluorescence. Transcripts for EZH2, EED, and SUZ12 were detected at all stages analyzed, with EZH2 levels being the highest of the three at early stages of development. By the time the embryo reached the blastocyst stage, the level of PcG gene mRNA levels significantly increased. Immunofluorescence staining indicated nuclear expression of EZH2 at all stages while nuclear localized EED and SUZ12 were only evident at the morula and blastocyst stages. Semiquantitative analysis of H3K27me3 levels showed that nuclear fluorescence intensity was the highest in immature oocytes, which steadily decreased after fertilization to reach a nadir at the eight-cell stage, and then increased at the blastocyst stage. These results suggest that the absence of polycomb repressive complex 2 proteins localized to the nucleus of early embryos could be responsible for the gradual decrease in H3K27me3 during early preimplantation development. PMID:18784248

  18. Polycomb Repressed Genes have Permissive Enhancers that Initiate Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Taberlay, Phillippa C.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Chun-Chi; You, Jueng Soo; de Carvalho, Daniel D.; Miranda, Tina B.; Zhou, Xianghong J.; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Key regulatory genes, suppressed by Polycomb and H3K27me3, become active during normal differentiation and induced reprogramming. Using the well-characterized enhancer/promoter pair of MYOD1 as a model, we have identified a critical role for enhancers in reprogramming. We observed an unexpected nucleosome depleted region (NDR) at the H3K4me1-enriched enhancer at which transcriptional regulators initially bind, leading to subsequent changes in the chromatin at the cognate promoter. Exogenous Myod1 activates its own transcription by binding first at the enhancer leading to an NDR and transcription-permissive chromatin at the associated MYOD1 promoter. Exogenous OCT4 also binds first to the permissive MYOD1 enhancer, but has a different effect on the cognate promoter, where the monovalent H3K27me3-marks are converted to the bivalent state characteristic of stem cells. Genome-wide, a high percentage of Polycomb targets are associated with putative enhancers in permissive states, suggesting they may provide a widespread avenue for the initiation of cell-fate reprogramming. PMID:22153073

  19. Epigenetic regulation by polycomb group complexes: focus on roles of CBX proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rong-gang; Zhang, Yang; Sun, Ting-ting; Cheng, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes are epigenetic regulatory complexes that conduct transcriptional repression of target genes via modifying the chromatin. The two best characterized forms of PcG complexes, polycomb repressive complexes 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2), are required for maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and many types of adult stem cells. The spectra of target genes for PRCs are dynamically changing with cell differentiation, which is essential for proper decisions on cell fate during developmental processes. Chromobox (CBX) family proteins are canonical components in PRC1, responsible for targeting PRC1 to the chromatin. Recent studies highlight the function specifications among CBX family members in undifferentiated and differentiated stem cells, which reveal the interplay between compositional diversity and functional specificity of PRC1. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about targeting and functional mechanisms of PRCs, emphasizing the recent breakthroughs related to CBX proteins under a number of physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24793759

  20. Polycomb Group Protein Pcgf6 Acts as a Master Regulator to Maintain Embryonic Stem Cell Identity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Shun; Chang, Kung-Yen; Dang, Jason; Rana, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    The polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) is a multi-subunit complex that plays critical roles in the epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Here, we show that the PRC1 component polycomb group ring finger 6 (Pcgf6) is required to maintain embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity. In contrast to canonical PRC1, Pcgf6 acts as a positive regulator of transcription and binds predominantly to promoters bearing active chromatin marks. Pcgf6 is expressed at high levels in ESCs, and knockdown reduces the expression of the core ESC regulators Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog. Conversely, Pcgf6 overexpression prevents downregulation of these factors and impairs differentiation. In addition, Pcgf6 enhanced reprogramming in both mouse and human somatic cells. The genomic binding profile of Pcgf6 is highly similar to that of trithorax group proteins, but not of PRC1 or PRC2 complexes, suggesting that Pcgf6 functions atypically in ESCs. Our data reveal novel roles for Pcgf6 in directly regulating Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Lin28 expression to maintain ESC identity. PMID:27247273

  1. MK3 controls Polycomb target gene expression via negative feedback on ERK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interactions are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Polycomb Group proteins constitute part of an epigenetic cellular transcriptional memory system that is subject to dynamic modulation during differentiation. Molecular insight in processes that control dynamic chromatin association and dissociation of Polycomb repressive complexes during and beyond development is limited. We recently showed that MK3 interacts with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). The functional relevance of this interaction, however, remained poorly understood. MK3 is activated downstream of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (M/SAPKs), all of which fulfill crucial roles during development. We here use activation of the immediate-early response gene ATF3, a bona fide PRC1 target gene, as a model to study how MK3 and its effector kinases MAPK/ERK and SAPK/P38 are involved in regulation of PRC1-dependent ATF3 transcription. Results Our current data show that mitogenic signaling through ERK, P38 and MK3 regulates ATF3 expression by PRC1/chromatin dissociation and epigenetic modulation. Mitogenic stimulation results in transient P38-dependent H3S28 phosphorylation and ERK-driven PRC1/chromatin dissociation at PRC1 targets. H3S28 phosphorylation by itself appears not sufficient to induce PRC1/chromatin dissociation, nor ATF3 transcription, as inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling blocks BMI1/chromatin dissociation and ATF3 expression, despite induced H3S28 phosphorylation. In addition, we establish that concomitant loss of local H3K27me3 promoter marking is not required for ATF3 activation. We identify pERK as a novel signaling-induced binding partner of PRC1, and provide evidence that MK3 controls ATF3 expression in cultured cells via negative regulatory feedback on M/SAPKs. Dramatically increased ectopic wing vein formation in the absence of Drosophila MK in a Drosophila ERK gain-of-function wing vein patterning model, supports the existence of MK

  2. One, Two, Three: Polycomb Proteins Hit All Dimensions of Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    del Prete, Stefania; Mikulski, Pawel; Schubert, Daniel; Gaudin, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the formation and maintenance of a specific repressive chromatin state that prevents the expression of genes in a particular space and time. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) consist of several PcG proteins with specific regulatory or catalytic properties. PRCs are recruited to thousands of target genes, and various recruitment factors, including DNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, are involved in the targeting. PcG proteins contribute to a multitude of biological processes by altering chromatin features at different scales. PcG proteins mediate both biochemical modifications of histone tails and biophysical modifications (e.g., chromatin fiber compaction and three-dimensional (3D) chromatin conformation). Here, we review the role of PcG proteins in nuclear architecture, describing their impact on the structure of the chromatin fiber, on chromatin interactions, and on the spatial organization of the genome in nuclei. Although little is known about the role of plant PcG proteins in nuclear organization, much is known in the animal field, and we highlight similarities and differences in the roles of PcG proteins in 3D gene regulation in plants and animals. PMID:26184319

  3. An AUTS2-Polycomb complex activates gene expression in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhonghua; Lee, Pedro; Stafford, James M; von Schimmelmann, Melanie; Schaefer, Anne; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-12-18

    Naturally occurring variations of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) comprise a core assembly of Polycomb group proteins and additional factors that include, surprisingly, autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2). Although AUTS2 is often disrupted in patients with neuronal disorders, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear. We investigated the role of AUTS2 as part of a previously identified PRC1 complex (PRC1-AUTS2), and in the context of neurodevelopment. In contrast to the canonical role of PRC1 in gene repression, PRC1-AUTS2 activates transcription. Biochemical studies demonstrate that the CK2 component of PRC1-AUTS2 neutralizes PRC1 repressive activity, whereas AUTS2-mediated recruitment of P300 leads to gene activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) demonstrated that AUTS2 regulates neuronal gene expression through promoter association. Conditional targeting of Auts2 in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) leads to various developmental defects. These findings reveal a natural means of subverting PRC1 activity, linking key epigenetic modulators with neuronal functions and diseases. PMID:25519132

  4. Polycomb Group Proteins: Multi-Faceted Regulators of Somatic Stem Cells and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sauvageau, Martin; Sauvageau, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that epigenetically modify chromatin and participate in the establishment and maintenance of cell fates. These proteins play important roles in both stem cell self-renewal and in cancer development. Our understanding of their mechanism of action has greatly advanced over the past 10 years, but many unanswered questions remain. In this review, we present the currently available experimental data that connect PcG protein function with some of the key processes which govern somatic stem cell activity. We also highlight recent studies suggesting that a delicate balance in PcG gene dosage is crucial for proper stem cell homeostasis and prevention of cancer stem cell development. PMID:20804967

  5. Kicking against the PRCs – A Domesticated Transposase Antagonises Silencing Mediated by Polycomb Group Proteins and Is an Accessory Component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pumi; Mora-García, Santiago; de Leau, Erica; Thornton, Harry; de Alves, Flavia Lima; Rapsilber, Juri; Yang, Suxin; James, Geo Velikkakam; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Finnegan, E. Jean; Turck, Franziska; Goodrich, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes play crucial roles in development by regulating expression of homeotic and other genes controlling cell fate. Both groups catalyse modifications of chromatin, particularly histone methylation, leading to epigenetic changes that affect gene activity. The trxG antagonizes the function of PcG genes by activating PcG target genes, and consequently trxG mutants suppress PcG mutant phenotypes. We previously identified the ANTAGONIST OF LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (ALP1) gene as a genetic suppressor of mutants in the Arabidopsis PcG gene LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). Here, we show that ALP1 interacts genetically with several other PcG and trxG components and that it antagonizes PcG silencing. Transcriptional profiling reveals that when PcG activity is compromised numerous target genes are hyper-activated in seedlings and that in most cases this requires ALP1. Furthermore, when PcG activity is present ALP1 is needed for full activation of several floral homeotic genes that are repressed by the PcG. Strikingly, ALP1 does not encode a known chromatin protein but rather a protein related to PIF/Harbinger class transposases. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ALP1 is broadly conserved in land plants and likely lost transposase activity and acquired a novel function during angiosperm evolution. Consistent with this, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP-MS) show that ALP1 associates, in vivo, with core components of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 (PRC2), a widely conserved PcG protein complex which functions as a H3K27me3 histone methyltransferase. Furthermore, in reciprocal pulldowns using the histone methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF), we identify not only ALP1 and the core PRC2 components but also plant-specific accessory components including EMBRYONIC FLOWER 1 (EMF1), a transcriptional repressor previously associated with PRC1-like complexes. Taken together our data suggest that ALP1 inhibits Pc

  6. Imprinting of the MEDEA polycomb gene in the Arabidopsis endosperm.

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, T; Yadegari, R; Harada, J J; Goldberg, R B; Fischer, R L

    1999-01-01

    In flowering plants, two cells are fertilized in the haploid female gametophyte. Egg and sperm nuclei fuse to form the embryo. A second sperm nucleus fuses with the central cell nucleus that replicates to generate the endosperm, which is a tissue that supports embryo development. MEDEA (MEA) encodes an Arabidopsis SET domain Polycomb protein. Inheritance of a maternal loss-of-function mea allele results in embryo abortion and prolonged endosperm production, irrespective of the genotype of the paternal allele. Thus, only the maternal wild-type MEA allele is required for proper embryo and endosperm development. To understand the molecular mechanism responsible for the parent-of-origin effects of mea mutations on seed development, we compared the expression of maternal and paternal MEA alleles in the progeny of crosses between two Arabidopsis ecotypes. Only the maternal MEA mRNA was detected in the endosperm from seeds at the torpedo stage and later. By contrast, expression of both maternal and paternal MEA alleles was observed in the embryo from seeds at the torpedo stage and later, in seedling, leaf, stem, and root. Thus, MEA is an imprinted gene that displays parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic expression specifically in the endosperm. These results suggest that the embryo abortion observed in mutant mea seeds is due, at least in part, to a defect in endosperm function. Silencing of the paternal MEA allele in the endosperm and the phenotype of mutant mea seeds supports the parental conflict theory for the evolution of imprinting in plants and mammals. PMID:10521524

  7. Redistribution of H3K27me3 upon DNA hypomethylation results in de-repression of Polycomb target genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA methylation and the Polycomb repression system are epigenetic mechanisms that play important roles in maintaining transcriptional repression. Recent evidence suggests that DNA methylation can attenuate the binding of Polycomb protein components to chromatin and thus plays a role in determining their genomic targeting. However, whether this role of DNA methylation is important in the context of transcriptional regulation is unclear. Results By genome-wide mapping of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2-signature histone mark, H3K27me3, in severely DNA hypomethylated mouse somatic cells, we show that hypomethylation leads to widespread H3K27me3 redistribution, in a manner that reflects the local DNA methylation status in wild-type cells. Unexpectedly, we observe striking loss of H3K27me3 and Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 from Polycomb target gene promoters in DNA hypomethylated cells, including Hox gene clusters. Importantly, we show that many of these genes become ectopically expressed in DNA hypomethylated cells, consistent with loss of Polycomb-mediated repression. Conclusions An intact DNA methylome is required for appropriate Polycomb-mediated gene repression by constraining Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 targeting. These observations identify a previously unappreciated role for DNA methylation in gene regulation and therefore influence our understanding of how this epigenetic mechanism contributes to normal development and disease. PMID:23531360

  8. Polycomb genes expression as a predictor of poor clinical outcome in children with medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Krzysztof; Grešner, Sylwia M.; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Liberski, Paweł P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Medulloblastoma is the most frequent type of embryonal tumor in the pediatric population, accounting for 20–25% of all brain tumors in children. Recently, the suspected contribution of the Polycomb group (PcG) genes in medulloblastoma development was described. PcG genes play an important role in developmental processes; they are also involved in the self-renewal of hematopoietic and neural stem cells as well as in malignant transformation. Purpose In this study, we evaluated the expression of BMI1and PCGF2, members of family of PcG genes, and their potential target, MYC oncogene, and analyzed their association with demographic and clinical data. Materials and methods Thirty-one children (18 males and 13 females, aged from 0.4 to 17 years) with medulloblastoma were included in this study. The gene’s expression level was measured by quantitative real-time PCR, obtained using the two-color multiplexing technique. Results We found that the higher expression levels of BMI1 and PCGF2 genes were associated with significantly decreased patient survival (p = 0.02 and p = 0.012, respectively). Significant differences between gender were found, with a higher expression level of the PCGF2 gene observed among females (p = 0.02). Conclusion Our analysis showed correlation between BMI1 and PCGF2 gene’s expression and survival in children with medulloblastoma. PMID:20717685

  9. The Polycomb Group Protein Pcgf1 Is Dispensable in Zebrafish but Involved in Early Growth and Aging.

    PubMed

    Dupret, Barbara; Völkel, Pamela; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Angrand, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) 1 regulates the control of gene expression programs via chromatin structure reorganization. Through mutual exclusion, different PCGF members generate a variety of PRC1 complexes with potentially distinct cellular functions. In this context, the molecular function of each of the PCGF family members remains elusive. The study of PCGF family member expression in zebrafish development and during caudal fin regeneration reveals that the zebrafish pcgf genes are subjected to different regulations and that all PRC1 complexes in terms of Pcgf subunit composition are not always present in the same tissues. To unveil the function of Pcgf1 in zebrafish, a mutant line was generated using the TALEN technology. Mutant pcgf1-/- fish are viable and fertile, but the growth rate at early developmental stages is reduced in absence of pcgf1 gene function and a significant number of pcgf1-/- fish show signs of premature aging. This first vertebrate model lacking Pcgf1 function shows that this Polycomb Group protein is involved in cell proliferation during early embryogenesis and establishes a link between epigenetics and aging. PMID:27442247

  10. The Polycomb Group Protein Pcgf1 Is Dispensable in Zebrafish but Involved in Early Growth and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Angrand, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) 1 regulates the control of gene expression programs via chromatin structure reorganization. Through mutual exclusion, different PCGF members generate a variety of PRC1 complexes with potentially distinct cellular functions. In this context, the molecular function of each of the PCGF family members remains elusive. The study of PCGF family member expression in zebrafish development and during caudal fin regeneration reveals that the zebrafish pcgf genes are subjected to different regulations and that all PRC1 complexes in terms of Pcgf subunit composition are not always present in the same tissues. To unveil the function of Pcgf1 in zebrafish, a mutant line was generated using the TALEN technology. Mutant pcgf1-/- fish are viable and fertile, but the growth rate at early developmental stages is reduced in absence of pcgf1 gene function and a significant number of pcgf1-/- fish show signs of premature aging. This first vertebrate model lacking Pcgf1 function shows that this Polycomb Group protein is involved in cell proliferation during early embryogenesis and establishes a link between epigenetics and aging. PMID:27442247

  11. A Cbx8-containing polycomb complex facilitates the transition to gene activation during ES cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Creppe, Catherine; Palau, Anna; Malinverni, Roberto; Valero, Vanesa; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2014-12-01

    Polycomb proteins play an essential role in maintaining the repression of developmental genes in self-renewing embryonic stem cells. The exact mechanism allowing the derepression of polycomb target genes during cell differentiation remains unclear. Our project aimed to identify Cbx8 binding sites in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells. Therefore, we used a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation of endogenous Cbx8 coupled to direct massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Our analysis identified 171 high confidence peaks. By crossing our data with previously published microarray analysis, we show that several differentiation genes transiently recruit Cbx8 during their early activation. Depletion of Cbx8 partially impairs the transcriptional activation of these genes. Both interaction analysis, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments support the idea that activating Cbx8 acts in the context of an intact PRC1 complex. Prolonged gene activation results in eviction of PRC1 despite persisting H3K27me3 and H2A ubiquitination. The composition of PRC1 is highly modular and changes when embryonic stem cells commit to differentiation. We further demonstrate that the exchange of Cbx7 for Cbx8 is required for the effective activation of differentiation genes. Taken together, our results establish a function for a Cbx8-containing complex in facilitating the transition from a Polycomb-repressed chromatin state to an active state. As this affects several key regulatory differentiation genes this mechanism is likely to contribute to the robust execution of differentiation programs. PMID:25500566

  12. The impact of Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group (TrxG) epigenetic factors in plant plasticity.

    PubMed

    de la Paz Sanchez, Maria; Aceves-García, Pamela; Petrone, Emilio; Steckenborn, Stefan; Vega-León, Rosario; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; García-Ponce, Berenice

    2015-11-01

    Current advances indicate that epigenetic mechanisms play important roles in the regulatory networks involved in plant developmental responses to environmental conditions. Hence, understanding the role of such components becomes crucial to understanding the mechanisms underlying the plasticity and variability of plant traits, and thus the ecology and evolution of plant development. We now know that important components of phenotypic variation may result from heritable and reversible epigenetic mechanisms without genetic alterations. The epigenetic factors Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group (TrxG) are involved in developmental processes that respond to environmental signals, playing important roles in plant plasticity. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of TrxG and PcG functions in different developmental processes in response to internal and environmental cues and we also integrate the emerging evidence concerning their function in plant plasticity. Many such plastic responses rely on meristematic cell behavior, including stem cell niche maintenance, cellular reprogramming, flowering and dormancy as well as stress memory. This information will help to determine how to integrate the role of epigenetic regulation into models of gene regulatory networks, which have mostly included transcriptional interactions underlying various aspects of plant development and its plastic response to environmental conditions. PMID:26037337

  13. Selective Interactions between Vertebrate Polycomb Homologs and the SUV39H1 Histone Lysine Methyltransferase Suggest that Histone H3-K9 Methylation Contributes to Chromosomal Targeting of Polycomb Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sewalt, Richard G. A. B.; Lachner, Monika; Vargas, Mark; Hamer, Karien M.; den Blaauwen, Jan L.; Hendrix, Thijs; Melcher, Martin; Schweizer, Dieter; Jenuwein, Thomas; Otte, Arie P.

    2002-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multimeric chromatin-associated protein complexes that are involved in heritable repression of gene activity. Two distinct human PcG complexes have been characterized. The EED/EZH2 PcG complex utilizes histone deacetylation to repress gene activity. The HPC/HPH PcG complex contains the HPH, RING1, BMI1, and HPC proteins. Here we show that vertebrate Polycomb homologs HPC2 and XPc2, but not M33/MPc1, interact with the histone lysine methyltransferase (HMTase) SUV39H1 both in vitro and in vivo. We further find that overexpression of SUV39H1 induces selective nuclear relocalization of HPC/HPH PcG proteins but not of the EED/EZH2 PcG proteins. This SUV39H1-dependent relocalization concentrates the HPC/HPH PcG proteins to the large pericentromeric heterochromatin domains (1q12) on human chromosome 1. Within these PcG domains we observe increased H3-K9 methylation. Finally, we show that H3-K9 HMTase activity is associated with endogenous HPC2. Our findings suggest a role for the SUV39H1 HMTase and histone H3-K9 methylation in the targeting of human HPC/HPH PcG proteins to modified chromatin structures. PMID:12101246

  14. An Integrated Network of Androgen Receptor, Polycomb, and TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusions in Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jindan; Yu, Jianjun; Mani, Ram-Shankar; Cao, Qi; Brenner, Chad J.; Cao, Xuhong; Wang, George X.; Wu, Longtao; Li, James; Hu, Ming; Gong, Yusong; Cheng, Hong; Laxman, Bharathi; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Shankar, Sunita; Li, Yong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Morey, Roger; Barrette, Terrence; Lonigro, Robert J.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY While chromosomal rearrangements fusing the androgen-regulated gene TMPRSS2 to the oncogenic ETS transcription factor ERG occur in approximately 50% of prostate cancers, how the fusion products regulate prostate cancer remains unclear. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq), we found that ERG disrupts androgen receptor (AR) signaling by inhibiting AR expression, binding to and inhibiting AR activity at gene-specific loci, and inducing repressive epigenetic programs via direct activation of the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2, a Polycomb group protein. These findings provide a working model in which TMPRSS2-ERG plays a critical role in cancer progression by disrupting lineage-specific differentiation of the prostate and potentiating the EZH2-mediated de-differentiation program. PMID:20478527

  15. The Arginine Methyltransferase PRMT6 Cooperates with Polycomb Proteins in Regulating HOXA Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Caroline; Bauer, Uta-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) catalyses asymmetric dimethylation of histone H3 at arginine 2 (H3R2me2a), which has been shown to impede the deposition of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) by blocking the binding and activity of the MLL1 complex. Importantly, the genomic occurrence of H3R2me2a has been found to coincide with histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), a repressive histone mark generated by the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). Therefore, we investigate here a putative crosstalk between PRMT6- and PRC-mediated repression in a cellular model of neuronal differentiation. We show that PRMT6 and subunits of PRC2 as well as PRC1 are bound to the same regulatory regions of rostral HOXA genes and that they control the differentiation-associated activation of these genes. Furthermore, we find that PRMT6 interacts with subunits of PRC1 and PRC2 and that depletion of PRMT6 results in diminished PRC1/PRC2 and H3K27me3 occupancy and in increased H3K4me3 levels at these target genes. Taken together, our data uncover a novel, additional mechanism of how PRMT6 contributes to gene repression by cooperating with Polycomb proteins. PMID:26848759

  16. Inhibition of chromatin remodeling by Polycomb Group protein Posterior Sex Combs is mechanistically distinct from nucleosome binding1

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Stanley M.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are essential regulators of development that maintain gene silencing in Drosophila and mammals through alterations of chromatin structure. One key PcG protein, Posterior Sex Combs (PSC), is part of at least two complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) and dRING Associated Factors (dRAF). PRC1-class complexes compact chromatin and inhibit chromatin remodeling, while dRAF has E3 ligase activity for ubiquitylation of histone H2A; activities of both complexes can inhibit transcription. The noncovalent effects of PRC1-class complexes on chromatin can be recapitulated by PSC alone, and the region of PSC required for these activities is essential for PSC function in vivo. To understand how PSC interacts with chromatin to exert its repressive effects, we compared the ability of PSC to bind to and inhibit remodeling of various nucleosomal templates, and determined which regions of PSC are required for mononucleosome binding and inhibition of chromatin remodeling. We find that PSC binds mononucleosome templates but inhibits their remodeling poorly. Addition of linker DNA to mononucleosomes allows their remodeling to be inhibited, although higher concentrations of PSC are required than for inhibition of multi-nucleosome templates. The C-terminal region of PSC (aa 456-1603) is important for inhibition of chromatin remodeling, and we identified aa 456-909 as sufficient for stable nucleosome binding but not for inhibition of chromatin remodeling. Our data suggest distinct mechanistic steps between nucleosome binding and inhibition of chromatin remodeling. PMID:20873869

  17. Genome-wide co-localization of Polycomb orthologs and their effects on gene expression in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycomb group proteins form multicomponent complexes that are important for establishing lineage-specific patterns of gene expression. Mammalian cells encode multiple permutations of the prototypic Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) with little evidence for functional specialization. An aim of this study is to determine whether the multiple orthologs that are co-expressed in human fibroblasts act on different target genes and whether their genomic location changes during cellular senescence. Results Deep sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against CBX6, CBX7, CBX8, RING1 and RING2 reveals that the orthologs co-localize at multiple sites. PCR-based validation at representative loci suggests that a further six PRC1 proteins have similar binding patterns. Importantly, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against different orthologs implies that multiple variants of PRC1 associate with the same DNA. At many loci, the binding profiles have a distinctive architecture that is preserved in two different types of fibroblast. Conversely, there are several hundred loci at which PRC1 binding is cell type-specific and, contrary to expectations, the presence of PRC1 does not necessarily equate with transcriptional silencing. Interestingly, the PRC1 binding profiles are preserved in senescent cells despite changes in gene expression. Conclusions The multiple permutations of PRC1 in human fibroblasts congregate at common rather than specific sites in the genome and with overlapping but distinctive binding profiles in different fibroblasts. The data imply that the effects of PRC1 complexes on gene expression are more subtle than simply repressing the loci at which they bind. PMID:24485159

  18. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4−CD8− thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4−CD8− cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  19. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2.

    PubMed

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4(-)CD8(-) thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4(-)CD8(-) cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  20. The Polycomb Group Protein EED Interacts with YY1, and Both Proteins Induce Neural Tissue in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Satijn, David P. E.; Hamer, Karien M.; den Blaauwen, Jan; Otte, Arie P.

    2001-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multimeric protein complexes which are involved in the heritable stable repression of genes. Previously, we identified two distinct human PcG protein complexes. The EED-EZH protein complex contains the EED and EZH2 PcG proteins, and the HPC-HPH PcG complex contains the HPC, HPH, BMI1, and RING1 PcG proteins. Here we show that YY1, a homolog of the Drosophila PcG protein pleiohomeotic (Pho), interacts specificially with the human PcG protein EED but not with proteins of the HPC-HPH PcG complex. Since YY1 and Pho are DNA-binding proteins, the interaction between YY1 and EED provides a direct link between the chromatin-associated EED-EZH PcG complex and the DNA of target genes. To study the functional significance of the interaction, we expressed the Xenopus homologs of EED and YY1 in Xenopus embryos. Both Xeed and XYY1 induce an ectopic neural axis but do not induce mesodermal tissues. In contrast, members of the HPC-HPH PcG complex do not induce neural tissue. The exclusive, direct neuralizing activity of both the Xeed and XYY1 proteins underlines the significance of the interaction between the two proteins. Our data also indicate a role for chromatin-associated proteins, such as PcG proteins, in Xenopus neural induction. PMID:11158321

  1. Nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C and Polycomb group of proteins: An evolutionarily conserved interplay

    PubMed Central

    Marullo, F.; Cesarini, E.; Antonelli, L.; Gregoretti, F.; Oliva, G.; Lanzuolo, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear lamins are the main components of the nuclear lamina at the nuclear periphery, providing mechanical support to the nucleus. However, recent findings suggest that lamins also reside in the nuclear interior, as a distinct and dynamic pool with critical roles in transcriptional regulation. In our work we found a functional and evolutionary conserved crosstalk between Lamin A/C and the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, this being required for the maintenance of the PcG repressive functions. Indeed, Lamin A/C knock-down causes PcG foci dispersion and defects in PcG-mediated higher order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG mediated transcriptional repression. By using ad-hoc algorithms for image analysis and PLA approaches we hereby show that PcG proteins are preferentially located in the nuclear interior where they interact with nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C. Taken together, our findings suggest that nuclear components, such as Lamin A/C, functionally interact with epigenetic factors to ensure the correct transcriptional program maintenance. PMID:26930442

  2. Piwi maintains germline stem cells and oogenesis in Drosophila through negative regulation of Polycomb group proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jamy C; Valouev, Anton; Liu, Na; Lin, Haifan

    2016-03-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Piwi protein regulates both niche and intrinsic mechanisms to maintain germline stem cells, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that Piwi interacts with Polycomb group complexes PRC1 and PRC2 in niche and germline cells to regulate ovarian germline stem cells and oogenesis. Piwi physically interacts with the PRC2 subunits Su(z)12 and Esc in the ovary and in vitro. Chromatin coimmunoprecipitation of Piwi, the PRC2 enzymatic subunit E(z), histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and piwi mutant ovaries demonstrates that Piwi binds a conserved DNA motif at ∼ 72 genomic sites and inhibits PRC2 binding to many non-Piwi-binding genomic targets and H3K27 trimethylation. Moreover, Piwi influences RNA polymerase II activities in Drosophila ovaries, likely via inhibiting PRC2. We hypothesize that Piwi negatively regulates PRC2 binding by sequestering PRC2 in the nucleoplasm, thus reducing PRC2 binding to many targets and influencing transcription during oogenesis. PMID:26780607

  3. Nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C and Polycomb group of proteins: An evolutionarily conserved interplay.

    PubMed

    Marullo, F; Cesarini, E; Antonelli, L; Gregoretti, F; Oliva, G; Lanzuolo, C

    2016-04-25

    Nuclear lamins are the main components of the nuclear lamina at the nuclear periphery, providing mechanical support to the nucleus. However, recent findings suggest that lamins also reside in the nuclear interior, as a distinct and dynamic pool with critical roles in transcriptional regulation. In our work we found a functional and evolutionary conserved crosstalk between Lamin A/C and the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, this being required for the maintenance of the PcG repressive functions. Indeed, Lamin A/C knock-down causes PcG foci dispersion and defects in PcG-mediated higher order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG mediated transcriptional repression. By using ad-hoc algorithms for image analysis and PLA approaches we hereby show that PcG proteins are preferentially located in the nuclear interior where they interact with nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C. Taken together, our findings suggest that nuclear components, such as Lamin A/C, functionally interact with epigenetic factors to ensure the correct transcriptional program maintenance. PMID:26930442

  4. Piwi maintains germline stem cells and oogenesis in Drosophila through negative regulation of Polycomb Group proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jamy C.; Valouev, Anton; Liu, Na; Lin, Haifan

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila Piwi protein regulates both niche and intrinsic mechanisms to maintain germline stem cells, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that Piwi cooperates with Polycomb Group complexes PRC1 and PRC2 in niche and germline cells to regulate ovarian germline stem cells and oogenesis. Piwi physically interacts with PRC2 subunits Su(z)12 and Esc in the ovary and in vitro. Chromatin co-immunoprecipitation of Piwi, the PRC2 enzymatic subunit E(z), lysine-27-tri-methylated histone 3 (H3K27m3), and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and piwi mutant ovaries reveals that Piwi binds a conserved DNA motif at ~72 genomic sites, and inhibits PRC2 binding to many non-Piwi-binding genomic targets and H3K27 tri-methylation. Moreover, Piwi influences RNA Polymerase II activities in Drosophila ovaries likely via inhibiting PRC2. We hypothesize that Piwi negatively regulates PRC2 binding by sequestering PRC2 in the nucleoplasm, thus reducing PRC2 binding to many targets and influences transcription during oogenesis. PMID:26780607

  5. Regulation of Peripheral Nerve Myelin Maintenance by Gene Repression through Polycomb Repressive Complex 2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ki H; Hung, Holly A; Srinivasan, Rajini; Xie, Huafeng; Orkin, Stuart H; Svaren, John

    2015-06-01

    Myelination of peripheral nerves by Schwann cells requires coordinate regulation of gene repression as well as gene activation. Several chromatin remodeling pathways critical for peripheral nerve myelination have been identified, but the functions of histone methylation in the peripheral nerve have not been elucidated. To determine the role of histone H3 Lys27 methylation, we have generated mice with a Schwann cell-specific knock-out of Eed, which is an essential subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that catalyzes methylation of histone H3 Lys27. Analysis of this mutant revealed no significant effects on early postnatal development of myelin. However, its loss eventually causes progressive hypermyelination of small-diameter axons and apparent fragmentation of Remak bundles. These data identify the PRC2 complex as an epigenomic modulator of mature myelin thickness, which is associated with changes in Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, we found that Eed inactivation causes derepression of several genes, e.g., Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (Igfbp2), that become activated after nerve injury, but without activation of a primary regulator of the injury program, c-Jun. Analysis of the activated genes in cultured Schwann cells showed that Igfbp2 regulates Akt activation. Our results identify an epigenomic pathway required for establishing thickness of mature myelin and repressing genes that respond to nerve injury. PMID:26041929

  6. MLL repression domain interacts with histone deacetylases, the polycomb group proteins HPC2 and BMI-1, and the corepressor C-terminal-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhen-Biao; Anderson, Melanie; Diaz, Manuel O.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    The MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia) gene is involved in many chromosomal translocations associated with acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. We previously identified a transcriptional repression domain in MLL, which contains a region with homology to DNA methyltransferase. In chromosomal translocations, the MLL repression domain is retained in the leukemogenic fusion protein and is required for transforming activity of MLL fusion proteins. We explored the mechanism of action of the MLL repression domain. Histone deacetylase 1 interacts with the MLL repression domain, partially mediating its activity; binding of Cyp33 to the adjacent MLL-PHD domain potentiates this binding. Because the MLL repression domain activity was only partially relieved with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, we explored other protein interactions with this domain. Polycomb group proteins HPC2 and BMI-1 and the corepressor C-terminal-binding protein also bind the MLL repression domain. Expression of exogenous BMI-1 potentiates MLL repression domain activity. Functional antagonism between Mll and Bmi-1 has been shown genetically in murine knockout models for Mll and Bmi-1. Our new data suggest a model whereby recruitment of BMI-1 to the MLL protein may be able to modulate its function. Furthermore, repression mediated by histone deacetylases and that mediated by polycomb group proteins may act either independently or together for MLL function in vivo. PMID:12829790

  7. PINK1 regulates histone H3 trimethylation and gene expression by interaction with the polycomb protein EED/WAIT1

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Arnaud; Jiménez-Sáinz, Judit; Pulido, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are associated to early-onset recessive forms of Parkinson disease. PINK1 function is related to mitochondria homeostasis, but the molecular pathways in which PINK1 is involved are largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of the embryonic ectoderm development polycomb histone-methylation modulator (EED/WAIT1) as a PINK1-interacting and -regulated protein. The PINK1:EED/WAIT1 physical interaction was mediated by the PINK1 kinase domain and the EED/WAIT1 40 amino acid ending with tryptophan and aspartate (WD40)-repeat region, and PINK1 phosphorylated EED/WAIT1 in vitro. PINK1 associated with EED/WAIT1 in cells and relocated EED/WAIT1 to the mitochondria. This interaction reduced the trimethylation of lysine 27 from histone H3, which affected polycomb-regulated gene transcription during RA differentiation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Our findings unveil a pathway by which PINK1 regulates histone methylation and gene expression through the polycomb repressor complex. PMID:23959866

  8. Polycomb protein EED is required for silencing of pluripotency genes upon ESC differentiation.

    PubMed

    Obier, Nadine; Lin, Qiong; Cauchy, Pierre; Hornich, Vroni; Zenke, Martin; Becker, Matthias; Müller, Albrecht M

    2015-02-01

    Eed (embryonic ectoderm development) is a core component of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) which catalyzes the methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Trimethylated H3K27 (H3K27me3) can act as a signal for PRC1 recruitment in the process of gene silencing and chromatin condensation. Previous studies with Eed KO ESCs revealed a failure to down-regulate a limited list of pluripotency factors in differentiating ESCs. Our aim was to analyze the consequences of Eed KO for ESC differentiation. To this end we first analyzed ESC differentiation in the absence of Eed and employed in silico data to assess pluripotency gene expression and H3K27me3 patterns. We linked these data to expression analyses of wildtype and Eed KO ESCs. We observed that in wildtype ESCs a subset of pluripotency genes including Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 target genes progressively gain H3K27me3 during differentiation. These genes remain expressed in differentiating Eed KO ESCs. This suggests that the deregulation of a limited set of pluripotency factors impedes ESC differentiation. Global analyses of H3K27me3 and Oct4 ChIP-seq data indicate that in ESCs the binding of Oct4 to promoter regions is not a general predictor for PRC2-mediated silencing during differentiation. However, motif analyses suggest a binding of Oct4 together with Sox2 and Nanog at promoters of genes that are PRC2-dependently silenced during differentiation. In summary, our data further characterize Eed function in ESCs by showing that Eed/PRC2 is essential for the onset of ESC differentiation. PMID:25134795

  9. Polycomb-group complex 1 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for Geminin to sustain hematopoietic stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Ohno, Yoshinori; Tsumura, Miyuki; Okada, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Nobutsune; Shirao, Kenichiro; Kikuchi, Akira; Nishitani, Hideo; Kobayashi, Masao; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) genes encode multimeric nuclear protein complexes, PcG complex 1 and 2. PcG complex 2 was proved to induce transcription repression and to further methylate histone H3 at lysine-27 (H3K27). Subsequently PcG complex 1 is recruited through recognition of methylated H3K27 and maintains the transcription silencing by mediating monoubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine-119. Genetic evidence demonstrated a crucial role for PcG complex 1 in stem cells, and Bmi1, a member of PcG complex 1, was shown to sustain adult stem cells through direct repression of the INK4a locus encoding cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p16CKI, and p19ARF. The molecular functions of PcG complex 1, however, remain insufficiently understood. In our study, deficiency of Rae28, a member of PcG complex 1, was found to impair ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of Geminin, an inhibitor of DNA replication licensing factor Cdt1, and to increase protein stability. The resultant accumulation of Geminin, based on evidence from retroviral transduction experiments, presumably eliminated hematopoietic stem cell activity in Rae28-deficient mice. Rae28 mediates recruiting Scmh1, which provides PcG complex 1 an interaction domain for Geminin. Moreover, PcG complex 1 acts as the E3 ubiquitin ligase for Geminin, as we demonstrated in vivo as well as in vitro by using purified recombinant PcG complex 1 reconstituted in insect cells. Our findings suggest that PcG complex 1 supports the activity of hematopoietic stem cells, in which high-level Geminin expression induces quiescence securing genome stability, by enhancing cycling capability and hematopoietic activity through direct regulation of Geminin. PMID:18650381

  10. Polycomb repressive complex 2 epigenomic signature defines age-associated hypermethylation and gene expression changes

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    Although age-associated gene expression and methylation changes have been reported throughout the literature, the unifying epigenomic principles of aging remain poorly understood. Recent explosion in availability and resolution of functional/regulatory genome annotation data (epigenomic data), such as that provided by the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects, provides an opportunity for the identification of epigenomic mechanisms potentially altered by age-associated differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) and regulatory signatures in the promoters of age-associated genes (aGENs). In this study we found that aDMRs and aGENs identified in multiple independent studies share a common Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 signature marked by EZH2, SUZ12, CTCF binding sites, repressive H3K27me3, and activating H3K4me1 histone modification marks, and a “poised promoter” chromatin state. This signature is depleted in RNA Polymerase II-associated transcription factor binding sites, activating H3K79me2, H3K36me3, H3K27ac marks, and an “active promoter” chromatin state. The PRC2 signature was shown to be generally stable across cell types. When considering the directionality of methylation changes, we found the PRC2 signature to be associated with aDMRs hypermethylated with age, while hypomethylated aDMRs were associated with enhancers. In contrast, aGENs were associated with the PRC2 signature independently of the directionality of gene expression changes. In this study we demonstrate that the PRC2 signature is the common epigenomic context of genomic regions associated with hypermethylation and gene expression changes in aging. PMID:25880792

  11. Role of polycomb group protein cbx2/m33 in meiosis onset and maintenance of chromosome stability in the Mammalian germline.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claudia; De La Fuente, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) are major epigenetic regulators, essential for establishing heritable expression patterns of developmental control genes. The mouse PcG family member M33/Cbx2 (Chromobox homolog protein 2) is a component of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1). Targeted deletion of Cbx2/M33 in mice results in homeotic transformations of the axial skeleton, growth retardation and male-to-female sex reversal. In this study, we tested whether Cbx2 is involved in the control of chromatin remodeling processes during meiosis. Our analysis revealed sex reversal in 28.6% of XY(-/-) embryos, in which a hypoplastic testis and a contralateral ovary were observed in close proximity to the kidney, while the remaining male mutant fetuses exhibited bilateral testicular hypoplasia. Notably, germ cells recovered from Cbx2((XY-/-)) testes on day 18.5 of fetal development exhibited premature meiosis onset with synaptonemal complex formation suggesting a role for Cbx2 in the control of meiotic entry in male germ cells. Mutant females exhibited small ovaries with significant germ cell loss and a high proportion of oocytes with abnormal synapsis and non-homologous interactions at the pachytene stage as well as formation of univalents at diplotene. These defects were associated with failure to resolve DNA double strand breaks marked by persistent γH2AX and Rad51 foci at the late pachytene stage. Importantly, two factors required for meiotic silencing of asynapsed chromatin, ubiquitinated histone H2A (ubH2A) and the chromatin remodeling protein BRCA1, co-localized with fully synapsed chromosome axes in the majority of Cbx2((-/-)) oocytes. These results provide novel evidence that Cbx2 plays a critical and previously unrecognized role in germ cell viability, meiosis onset and homologous chromosome synapsis in the mammalian germline. PMID:22200029

  12. The growth-suppressive function of the polycomb group protein polyhomeotic is mediated by polymerization of its sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Angela K; Leal, Belinda Z; Chadwell, Linda V; Wang, Renjing; Ilangovan, Udayar; Kaur, Yogeet; Junco, Sarah E; Schirf, Virgil; Osmulski, Pawel A; Gaczynska, Maria; Hinck, Andrew P; Demeler, Borries; McEwen, Donald G; Kim, Chongwoo A

    2012-03-16

    Polyhomeotic (Ph), a member of the Polycomb Group (PcG), is a gene silencer critical for proper development. We present a previously unrecognized way of controlling Ph function through modulation of its sterile alpha motif (SAM) polymerization leading to the identification of a novel target for tuning the activities of proteins. SAM domain containing proteins have been shown to require SAM polymerization for proper function. However, the role of the Ph SAM polymer in PcG-mediated gene silencing was uncertain. Here, we first show that Ph SAM polymerization is indeed required for its gene silencing function. Interestingly, the unstructured linker sequence N-terminal to Ph SAM can shorten the length of polymers compared with when Ph SAM is individually isolated. Substituting the native linker with a random, unstructured sequence (RLink) can still limit polymerization, but not as well as the native linker. Consequently, the increased polymeric Ph RLink exhibits better gene silencing ability. In the Drosophila wing disc, Ph RLink expression suppresses growth compared with no effect for wild-type Ph, and opposite to the overgrowth phenotype observed for polymer-deficient Ph mutants. These data provide the first demonstration that the inherent activity of a protein containing a polymeric SAM can be enhanced by increasing SAM polymerization. Because the SAM linker had not been previously considered important for the function of SAM-containing proteins, our finding opens numerous opportunities to manipulate linker sequences of hundreds of polymeric SAM proteins to regulate a diverse array of intracellular functions. PMID:22275371

  13. A view of nuclear Polycomb bodies

    PubMed Central

    Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Li, Hua-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are concentrated in nuclear foci called PcG bodies. Although the some of these foci are due to the tendency of PcG binding sites in the genome to occur in linear clusters, distant PcG sites can contact one another and in some cases congregate in the same PcG body when they are repressed. Experiments using transgenes containing PcG binding sites reveal that co-localization depends on the presence of insulator elements rather than of Polycomb Response Elements (PREs) and that it can occur also when the transgenes are in the active state. A model is proposed according to which insulator proteins mediate shuttling of PcG target genes between PcG bodies when repressed to transcription factories when transcriptionally active. PMID:22178420

  14. Polycomb complexes and epigenetic states.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2008-06-01

    Important advances in the study of Polycomb Group (PcG) complexes in the past two years have focused on the role of this repressive system in programing the genome. Genome-wide analyses have shown that PcG mechanisms control a large number of genes regulating many cellular functions and all developmental pathways. Current evidence shows that, contrary to the classical picture of their role, PcG complexes do not set a repressed chromatin state that is maintained throughout development but have a much more dynamic role. PcG target genes can become repressed or be reactivated or exist in intermediate states. What controls the balance between repression and derepression is a crucial question in understanding development and differentiation in higher organisms. PMID:18439810

  15. The Lineage-Specific Transcription Factor PU.1 Prevents Polycomb-Mediated Heterochromatin Formation at Macrophage-Specific Genes.

    PubMed

    Tagore, Mohita; McAndrew, Michael J; Gjidoda, Alison; Floer, Monique

    2015-08-01

    Lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) are important determinants of cellular identity, but their exact mode of action has remained unclear. Here we show using a macrophage differentiation system that the lineage-specific TF PU.1 keeps macrophage-specific genes accessible during differentiation by preventing Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding to transcriptional regulatory elements. We demonstrate that the distal enhancer of a gene becomes bound by PRC2 as cells differentiate in the absence of PU.1 binding and that the gene is wrapped into heterochromatin, which is characterized by increased nucleosome occupancy and H3K27 trimethylation. This renders the gene inaccessible to the transcriptional machinery and prevents induction of the gene in response to an external signal in mature cells. In contrast, if PU.1 is bound at the transcriptional regulatory region of a gene during differentiation, PRC2 is not recruited, nucleosome occupancy is kept low, and the gene can be induced in mature macrophages. Similar results were obtained at the enhancers of other macrophage-specific genes that fail to bind PU.1 as an estrogen receptor fusion (PUER) in this system. These results show that one role of PU.1 is to exclude PRC2 and to prevent heterochromatin formation at macrophage-specific genes. PMID:26012552

  16. The Drosophila esc and E(z) Proteins Are Direct Partners in Polycomb Group-Mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clark A.; Ng, Joyce; Peterson, Aidan J.; Morgan, Kelly; Simon, Jeffrey; Jones, Richard S.

    1998-01-01

    The extra sex combs (esc) and Enhancer of zeste [E(z)] proteins are members of the Drosophila Polycomb group (Pc-G) of transcriptional repressors. Here we present evidence for direct physical interaction between the esc and E(z) proteins using yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays. In addition, coimmunoprecipitation from embryo extracts demonstrates association of esc and E(z) in vivo. We have delimited the esc-binding domain of E(z) to an N-terminal 33-amino-acid region. Furthermore, we demonstrate that site-directed mutations in the esc protein previously shown to impair esc function in vivo disrupt esc-E(z) interactions in vitro. We also show an in vitro interaction between the heed and EZH1 proteins, which are human homologs of esc and E(z), respectively. These results suggest that the esc-E(z) molecular partnership has been conserved in evolution. Previous studies suggested that esc is primarily involved in the early stages of Pc-G-mediated silencing during embryogenesis. However, E(z) is continuously required in order to maintain chromosome binding by other Pc-G proteins. In light of these earlier observations and the molecular data presented here, we discuss how esc-E(z) protein complexes may contribute to transcriptional silencing by the Pc-G. PMID:9566901

  17. The Transcriptional Repressor Polycomb Group Factor 6, PCGF6, Negatively Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Promotes Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Boukhaled, Giselle M; Cordeiro, Brendan; Deblois, Genevieve; Dimitrov, Vassil; Bailey, Swneke D; Holowka, Thomas; Domi, Anisa; Guak, Hannah; Chiu, Huai-Hsuan Clare; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Lupien, Mathieu; White, John H; Krawczyk, Connie M

    2016-08-16

    Pro-inflammatory signals provided by the microenvironment are critical to activate dendritic cells (DCs), components of the innate immune system that shape both innate and adaptive immunity. However, to prevent inappropriate immune activation, mechanisms must be in place to restrain DC activation to ensure DCs are activated only once sufficient stimuli have been received. Here, we report that DC activation and immunogenicity are regulated by the transcriptional repressor Polycomb group factor 6 (PCGF6). Pcgf6 is rapidly downregulated upon stimulation, and this downregulation is necessary to permit full DC activation. Silencing PCGF6 expression enhanced both spontaneous and stimulated DC activation. We show that PCGF6 associates with the H3K4me3 demethylase JARID1c, and together, they negatively regulate H3K4me3 levels in DCs. Our results identify two key regulators, PCGF6 and JARID1c that temper DC activation and implicate active transcriptional silencing via histone demethylation as a previously unappreciated mechanism for regulating DC activation and quiescence. PMID:27498878

  18. Repressing the Keratinocyte Genome: How the Polycomb Complex Subunits Operate in Concert to Control Skin and Hair Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Mardaryev, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The Polycomb group proteins are transcriptional repressors that are critically important in the control of stem cell activity and maintenance of the identity of differentiated cells. Polycomb proteins interact with each other to form chromatin-associated repressive complexes (Polycomb repressive complexes 1 and 2) leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. However, the roles of the distinct components of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 in the control of skin development and keratinocyte differentiation remain obscure. Dauber et al. demonstrate the conditional ablations of three essential Polycomb repressive complex 2 subunits (EED, Suz12, or Ezh1/2) in the epidermal progenitors result in quite similar skin phenotypes including premature acquisition of a functional epidermal barrier, formation of ectopic Merkel cells, and defective postnatal hair follicle development. The reported data demonstrate that in skin epithelia, EED, Suz12, and Ezh1/2 function largely as subunits of the Polycomb repressive complex 2, which is important in the context of data demonstrating their independent activities in other cell types. The report provides an important platform for further analyses of the role of distinct Polycomb components in the control of gene expression programs in the disorders of epidermal differentiation, such as psoriasis and epidermal cancer. PMID:27450498

  19. Genome-wide analysis of Polycomb targets in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Kahn, Tatyana G.; Nix, David A.; Li,Xiao-Yong; Bourgon, Richard; Biggin, Mark; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2006-04-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) complexes are multiprotein assemblages that bind to chromatin and establish chromatin states leading to epigenetic silencing. PcG proteins regulate homeotic genes in flies and vertebrates but little is known about other PcG targets and the role of the PcG in development, differentiation and disease. We have determined the distribution of the PcG proteins PC, E(Z) and PSC and of histone H3K27 trimethylation in the Drosophila genome. At more than 200 PcG target genes, binding sites for the three PcG proteins colocalize to presumptive Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). In contrast, H3 me3K27 forms broad domains including the entire transcription unit and regulatory regions. PcG targets are highly enriched in genes encoding transcription factors but receptors, signaling proteins, morphogens and regulators representing all major developmental pathways are also included.

  20. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development. PMID:25615622

  1. A repetitive elements perspective in Polycomb epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Valentina; Gabellini, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive elements comprise over two-thirds of the human genome. For a long time, these elements have received little attention since they were considered non-functional. On the contrary, recent evidence indicates that they play central roles in genome integrity, gene expression, and disease. Indeed, repeats display meiotic instability associated with disease and are located within common fragile sites, which are hotspots of chromosome re-arrangements in tumors. Moreover, a variety of diseases have been associated with aberrant transcription of repetitive elements. Overall this indicates that appropriate regulation of repetitive elements’ activity is fundamental. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators that are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. Mammalian PcG proteins are involved in fundamental processes, such as cellular memory, cell proliferation, genomic imprinting, X-inactivation, and cancer development. PcG proteins can convey their activity through long-distance interactions also on different chromosomes. This indicates that the 3D organization of PcG proteins contributes significantly to their function. However, it is still unclear how these complex mechanisms are orchestrated and which role PcG proteins play in the multi-level organization of gene regulation. Intriguingly, the greatest proportion of Polycomb-mediated chromatin modifications is located in genomic repeats and it has been suggested that they could provide a binding platform for Polycomb proteins. Here, these lines of evidence are woven together to discuss how repetitive elements could contribute to chromatin organization in the 3D nuclear space. PMID:23060903

  2. RING1B O-GlcNAcylation regulates gene targeting of polycomb repressive complex 1 in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maury, Julien Jean Pierre; El Farran, Chadi A; Ng, Daniel; Loh, Yuin-Han; Bi, Xuezhi; Bardor, Muriel; Choo, Andre Boon-Hwa

    2015-07-01

    O-linked-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) post-translationally modifies and regulates thousands of proteins involved in various cellular mechanisms. Recently, O-GlcNAc has been linked to human embryonic stem cells (hESC) differentiation, however the identity and function of O-GlcNAc proteins regulating hESC remain unknown. Here, we firstly identified O-GlcNAc modified human stem cell regulators such as hnRNP K, HP1γ, and especially RING1B/RNF2. Thereafter, we focused our work on RING1B which is the catalytic subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) a major epigenetic repressor essential for pluripotency maintenance and differentiation. By point-mutation, we show that T(250)/S(251) and S(278) RING1B residues are bearing O-GlcNAc, and that T(250)/S(251) O-GlcNAcylation decreases during differentiation. O-GlcNAc seems to regulate RING1B-DNA binding as suggested by our ChIP-sequencing results. Non-O-GlcNAcylated RING1B is found to be enriched near cell cycle genes whereas O-GlcNAcylated RING1B seems preferentially enriched near neuronal genes. Our data suggest that during hESC differentiation, the decrease of RING1B O-GlcNAcylation might enable PRC1 to switch its target to induce neuron differentiation. Overall, we demonstrate that O-GlcNAc modifies and regulates an essential epigenetic tool, RING1B, which may contribute to hESC pluripotency maintenance and differentiation. PMID:26100231

  3. Regulation of Genome Architecture and Function by Polycomb Proteins.

    PubMed

    Entrevan, Marianne; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins dynamically define cellular identities through the epigenetic repression of key developmental regulatory genes. PcG proteins are recruited to specific regulatory elements to modify the chromatin surrounding them. In addition, they regulate the organization of their target genes in the 3D space of the nucleus, and this regulatory function of the 3D genome architecture is involved in cell differentiation and the maintenance of cellular memory. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how PcG proteins are recruited to chromatin to induce local and global changes in chromosome conformation and regulate their target genes. PMID:27198635

  4. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Fabiana; Vu, Ly P.; Themeli, Maria; Kriks, Sonja; Hoya-Arias, Ruben; Khanin, Raya; Hricik, Todd; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Papapetrou, Eirini P.; Levine, Ross L.; Studer, Lorenz; Sadelain, Michel; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia. PMID:25754204

  5. An H3K9/S10 methyl-phospho switch modulates Polycomb and Pol II binding at repressed genes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sabbattini, Pierangela; Sjoberg, Marcela; Nikic, Svetlana; Frangini, Alberto; Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Kunowska, Natalia; Carroll, Tom; Brookes, Emily; Arthur, Simon J.; Pombo, Ana; Dillon, Niall

    2014-01-01

    Methylated histones H3K9 and H3K27 are canonical epigenetic silencing modifications in metazoan organisms, but the relationship between the two modifications has not been well characterized. H3K9me3 coexists with H3K27me3 in pluripotent and differentiated cells. However, we find that the functioning of H3K9me3 is altered by H3S10 phosphorylation in differentiated postmitotic osteoblasts and cycling B cells. Deposition of H3K9me3/S10ph at silent genes is partially mediated by the mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1/2) and the Aurora B kinase. Acquisition of H3K9me3/S10ph during differentiation correlates with loss of paused S5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, which is present on Polycomb-regulated genes in embryonic stem cells. Reduction of the levels of H3K9me3/S10ph by kinase inhibition results in increased binding of RNAPIIS5ph and the H3K27 methyltransferase Ezh1 at silent promoters. Our results provide evidence of a novel developmentally regulated methyl-phospho switch that modulates Polycomb regulation in differentiated cells and stabilizes repressed states. PMID:24430871

  6. Formation of a Polycomb-Domain in the Absence of Strong Polycomb Response Elements.

    PubMed

    De, Sandip; Mitra, Apratim; Cheng, Yuzhong; Pfeifer, Karl; Kassis, Judith A

    2016-07-01

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) in Drosophila are DNA-elements that recruit Polycomb proteins (PcG) to chromatin and regulate gene expression. PREs are easily recognizable in the Drosophila genome as strong peaks of PcG-protein binding over discrete DNA fragments; many small but statistically significant PcG peaks are also observed in PcG domains. Surprisingly, in vivo deletion of the four characterized strong PREs from the PcG regulated invected-engrailed (inv-en) gene complex did not disrupt the formation of the H3K27me3 domain and did not affect inv-en expression in embryos or larvae suggesting the presence of redundant PcG recruitment mechanism. Further, the 3D-structure of the inv-en domain was only minimally altered by the deletion of the strong PREs. A reporter construct containing a 7.5kb en fragment that contains three weak peaks but no large PcG peaks forms an H3K27me3 domain and is PcG-regulated. Our data suggests a model for the recruitment of PcG-complexes to Drosophila genes via interactions with multiple, weak PREs spread throughout an H3K27me3 domain. PMID:27466807

  7. Formation of a Polycomb-Domain in the Absence of Strong Polycomb Response Elements

    PubMed Central

    De, Sandip; Mitra, Apratim; Cheng, Yuzhong; Pfeifer, Karl; Kassis, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) in Drosophila are DNA-elements that recruit Polycomb proteins (PcG) to chromatin and regulate gene expression. PREs are easily recognizable in the Drosophila genome as strong peaks of PcG-protein binding over discrete DNA fragments; many small but statistically significant PcG peaks are also observed in PcG domains. Surprisingly, in vivo deletion of the four characterized strong PREs from the PcG regulated invected-engrailed (inv-en) gene complex did not disrupt the formation of the H3K27me3 domain and did not affect inv-en expression in embryos or larvae suggesting the presence of redundant PcG recruitment mechanism. Further, the 3D-structure of the inv-en domain was only minimally altered by the deletion of the strong PREs. A reporter construct containing a 7.5kb en fragment that contains three weak peaks but no large PcG peaks forms an H3K27me3 domain and is PcG-regulated. Our data suggests a model for the recruitment of PcG-complexes to Drosophila genes via interactions with multiple, weak PREs spread throughout an H3K27me3 domain. PMID:27466807

  8. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A

    2016-07-01

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1 We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26980282

  9. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A.; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1. We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26980282

  10. Reduction in maternal Polycomb levels contributes to transgenerational inheritance of a response to toxic stress in flies

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Shay; Snir, Orli; Mizrachi, Eran; Galili, Matana; Zaltsman, Inbal; Soen, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Transgenerational persistence of parental responses to environmental stimuli has been reported in various organisms, but the underlying mechanisms remain underexplored. In one of these reported examples, we have shown that exposure of fly larvae to G418 antibiotic leads to non-Mendelian inheritance of ectopic induction of certain developmental genes. Here we investigate if this inheritance involves changes in mRNA composition within the early, maternal-stage offspring embryos of exposed flies. Exposure to G418 in F1 modified the maternal RNA levels of many genes in their early (F2) embryos. This includes reduction of maternal Polycomb group genes which persisted in the following generation of embryos (F3). To investigate the functional meaning of this reduction, we compared genetically normal embryos of Polycomb mutant females to normal embryos of normal females. Analysis with two different alleles of Polycomb, Pc1 and Pc3, revealed that maternal reduction in Polycomb gene dosage has a positive influence on the inheritance of induced expression. Together, this shows that exposure to G418 stress reduces the maternal levels of Polycomb in the offspring embryos and this reduction contributes to the inheritance of induced expression. PMID:24535443

  11. Mechanical regulation of transcription controls Polycomb-mediated gene silencing during lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Le, Huy Quang; Ghatak, Sushmita; Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Tellkamp, Frederik; Günschmann, Christian; Dieterich, Christoph; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Habermann, Bianca; Pombo, Ana; Niessen, Carien M; Wickström, Sara A

    2016-08-01

    Tissue mechanics drive morphogenesis, but how forces are sensed and transmitted to control stem cell fate and self-organization remains unclear. We show that a mechanosensory complex of emerin (Emd), non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) and actin controls gene silencing and chromatin compaction, thereby regulating lineage commitment. Force-driven enrichment of Emd at the outer nuclear membrane of epidermal stem cells leads to defective heterochromatin anchoring to the nuclear lamina and a switch from H3K9me2,3 to H3K27me3 occupancy at constitutive heterochromatin. Emd enrichment is accompanied by the recruitment of NMIIA to promote local actin polymerization that reduces nuclear actin levels, resulting in attenuation of transcription and subsequent accumulation of H3K27me3 at facultative heterochromatin. Perturbing this mechanosensory pathway by deleting NMIIA in mouse epidermis leads to attenuated H3K27me3-mediated silencing and precocious lineage commitment, abrogating morphogenesis. Our results reveal how mechanics integrate nuclear architecture and chromatin organization to control lineage commitment and tissue morphogenesis. PMID:27398909

  12. An Evolutionary Conserved Epigenetic Mark of Polycomb Response Elements Implemented by Trx/MLL/COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Rickels, Ryan; Hu, Deqing; Collings, Clayton K; Woodfin, Ashley R; Piunti, Andrea; Mohan, Man; Herz, Hans-Martin; Kvon, Evgeny; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-07-21

    Polycomb response elements (PREs) are specific DNA sequences that stably maintain the developmental pattern of gene expression. Drosophila PREs are well characterized, whereas the existence of PREs in mammals remains debated. Accumulating evidence supports a model in which CpG islands recruit Polycomb group (PcG) complexes; however, which subset of CGIs is selected to serve as PREs is unclear. Trithorax (Trx) positively regulates gene expression in Drosophila and co-occupies PREs to antagonize Polycomb-dependent silencing. Here we demonstrate that Trx-dependent H3K4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) marks Drosophila PREs and maintains the developmental expression pattern of nearby genes. Similarly, the mammalian Trx homolog, MLL1, deposits H3K4me2 at CpG-dense regions that could serve as PREs. In the absence of MLL1 and H3K4me2, H3K27me3 levels, a mark of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), increase at these loci. By inhibiting PRC2-dependent H3K27me3 in the absence of MLL1, we can rescue expression of these loci, demonstrating a functional balance between MLL1 and PRC2 activities at these sites. Thus, our study provides rules for identifying cell-type-specific functional mammalian PREs within the human genome. PMID:27447986

  13. Identification and Validation of a Putative Polycomb Responsive Element in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Bengani, Hemant; Mendiratta, Shweta; Maini, Jayant; Vasanthi, Dasari; Sultana, Hina; Ghasemi, Mohsen; Ramachandran, Sowmya; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Brahmachari, Vani

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms that involve polycomb and trithorax group of proteins are well conserved across metazoans. The cis-acting elements interacting with these proteins, however, are poorly understood in mammals. In a directed search we identified a potential polycomb responsive element with 25 repeats of YY1 binding motifthatwe designate PRE-PIK3C2B as it occurs in the first intron of human PIK3C2B gene. It down regulates reporter gene expression in HEK cells and the repression is dependent on polycomb group of proteins (PcG). We demonstrate that PRE-PIK3C2B interacts directly with YY1 in vitro and recruits PRC2 complex in vivo. The localization of PcG proteins including YY1 to PRE-PIK3C2B in HEK cells is decreased on knock-down of either YY1 or SUZ12. Endogenous PRE-PIK3C2B shows bivalent marking having H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 for repressed and active state respectively. In transgenic Drosophila, PRE-PIK3C2B down regulates mini-white expression, exhibits variegation and pairing sensitive silencing (PSS), which has not been previously demonstrated for mammalian PRE. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that PRE-PIK3C2B functions as a site of interaction for polycomb proteins. PMID:23805300

  14. A functionally conserved Polycomb response element from mouse HoxD complex responds to heterochromatin factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanthi, Dasari; Nagabhushan, A.; Matharu, Navneet Kaur; Mishra, Rakesh K.

    2013-10-01

    Anterior-posterior body axis in all bilaterians is determined by the Hox gene clusters that are activated in a spatio-temporal order. This expression pattern of Hox genes is established and maintained by regulatory mechanisms that involve higher order chromatin structure and Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins. We identified earlier a Polycomb response element (PRE) in the mouse HoxD complex that is functionally conserved in flies. We analyzed the molecular and genetic interactions of mouse PRE using Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cell culture as the model systems. We demonstrate that the repressive activity of this PRE depends on PcG/trxG genes as well as the heterochromatin components. Our findings indicate that a wide range of factors interact with the HoxD PRE that can contribute to establishing the expression pattern of homeotic genes in the complex early during development and maintain that pattern at subsequent stages.

  15. Zeste maintains repression of Ubx transgenes: Support for a new model of polycomb repression

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Man-Wook; Laney, Jeffrey D.; Jeon, Sang-Hack; Ali, Janann; Biggin, Mark D.

    2001-09-01

    During late embryogenesis, the expression domains of homeotic genes are maintained by two groups of ubiquitously expressed regulators: the Polycomb repressors and the Trithorax activators. It is not known how the activities of the two maintenance systems are initially targeted to the correct genes. Zeste and GAGA are sequence specific DNA binding proteins previously shown to be Trithorax group activators of the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx). Here we demonstrate that Zeste and GAGA DNA binding sites at the proximal promoter are also required to maintain, but not to initiate, repression of Ubx. Further, the repression mediated by Zeste DNA binding site is abolished in zeste null embryos. These data imply that Zeste and probably GAGA mediate Polycomb repression. We present a model in which the dual transcriptional activities of Zeste and GAGA are an essential component of the mechanism that chooses which maintenance system is to be targeted to a given promoter.

  16. The Polycomb group protein RING1B is overexpressed in ductal breast carcinoma and is required to sustain FAK steady state levels in breast cancer epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Almudena; Panoutsopoulou, Konstantina; Corominas, Josep Maria; Gimeno, Ramón; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Morales, Saleta; Lobato, Tania; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Farias, Eduardo F.; Mayol, Xavier; Cano, Amparo; Hernández-Muáoz, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    In early stages of metastasis malignant cells must acquire phenotypic changes to enhance their migratory behavior and their ability to breach the matrix surrounding tumors and blood vessel walls. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression allows the acquisition of these features that, once tumoral cells have escape from the primary tumor, can be reverted. Here we report that the expression of the Polycomb epigenetic repressor Ring1B is enhanced in tumoral cells that invade the stroma in human ductal breast carcinoma and its expression is coincident with that of Fak in these tumors. Ring1B knockdown in breast cancer cell lines revealed that Ring1B is required to sustain Fak expression in basal conditions as well as in Tgfβ-treated cells. Functionally, endogenous Ring1B is required for cell migration and invasion in vitro and for in vivo invasion of the mammary fat pad by tumoral cells. Finally we identify p63 as a target of Ring1B to regulate Fak expression: Ring1B depletion results in enhanced p63 expression, which in turns represses Fak expression. Importantly, Fak downregulation upon Ring1B depletion is dependent on p63 expression. Our findings provide new insights in the biology of the breast carcinoma and open new avenues for breast cancer prognosis and therapy. PMID:24742605

  17. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the Drosophila Polycomb (Pc) chromodomain show developmental alterations: possible role of Pc chromodomain proteins in chromatin-mediated gene regulation in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, R; Charrier, B; Scollan, C; Meyer, P

    1999-01-01

    The chromodomain of the Drosophila Polycomb (Pc) protein has been introduced into tobacco nuclei to determine its location in the nucleus and its effect on plant development. Pc is a repressor of homeotic Drosophila genes that shares a well-conserved, although not identical, chromodomain with a structural heterochromatin component, Heterochromatin Protein 1. The chromodomains might therefore play a common role in chromatin repression. An analysis of transgenic plants expressing the Pc chromodomain, which was linked to the green fluorescent protein, suggested that the Pc chromodomain has distinct target regions in the plant genome. Transgenic plants expressing the Pc chromodomain had phenotypic abnormalities in their leaves and flowers, indicating a disruption in development. In axillary shoot buds of plants displaying altered leaf phenotypes, enhanced expression of a homeodomain gene, which is downregulated in wild-type leaves, was found. In Drosophila, Pc has been shown to possess distinct chromosome binding activity and to be involved in the regulation of development-specific genes. Our results support the assumptions that the heterologous chromodomain affects related functions in Drosophila and in plants, and that chromatin modification mechanisms are involved in the regulation of certain plant genes, in a manner similar to chromatin-mediated gene regulation in Drosophila. PMID:10368176

  18. Mapping polycomb response elements at the Drosophilla melanogaster giant locus.

    PubMed

    Abed, Jumana AlHaj; Cheng, Connie L; Crowell, Chase R; Madigan, Laura L; Onwuegbuchu, Erica; Desai, Siddhi; Benes, Judith; Jones, Richard S

    2013-12-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins are highly conserved epigenetic transcriptional regulators. They are capable of either maintaining the transcriptional silence of target genes through many cell cycles or enabling a dynamic regulation of gene expression in stem cells. In Drosophila melanogaster, recruitment of PcG proteins to targets requires the presence of at least one polycomb response element (PRE). Although the sequence requirements for PREs are not well-defined, the presence of Pho, a PRE-binding PcG protein, is a very good PRE indicator. In this study, we identify two PRE-containing regions at the PcG target gene, giant, one at the promoter, and another approximately 6 kb upstream. PRE-containing fragments, which coincide with localized presence of Pho in chromatin immunoprecipitations, were shown to maintain restricted expression of a lacZ reporter gene in embryos and to cause pairing-sensitive silencing of the mini-white gene in eyes. Our results also reinforce previous observations that although PRE maintenance and pairing-sensitive silencing activities are closely linked, the sequence requirements for these functions are not identical. PMID:24170735

  19. MtVRN2 is a Polycomb VRN2-like gene which represses the transition to flowering in the model legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Jaudal, Mauren; Zhang, Lulu; Che, Chong; Hurley, Daniel G; Thomson, Geoffrey; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Putterill, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Optimising the timing of flowering contributes to successful sexual reproduction and yield in agricultural plants. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) genes, first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), promote flowering universally, but the upstream flowering regulatory pathways can differ markedly among plants. Flowering in the model legume, Medicago truncatula (Medicago) is accelerated by winter cold (vernalisation) followed by long day (LD) photoperiods leading to elevated expression of the floral activator, FT-like gene FTa1. However, Medicago, like some other plants, lacks the activator CONSTANS (CO) and the repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) genes which directly regulate FT and are key to LD and vernalisation responses in Arabidopsis. Conversely, Medicago has a VERNALISATION2-LIKE VEFS-box gene (MtVRN2). In Arabidopsis AtVRN2 is a key member of a Polycomb complex involved in stable repression of Arabidopsis FLC after vernalisation. VRN2-like genes have been identified in other eudicot plants, but their function has never been reported. We show that Mtvrn2 mutants bypass the need for vernalisation for early flowering in LD conditions in Medicago. Investigation of the underlying mechanism by transcriptome analysis reveals that Mtvrn2 mutants precociously express FTa1 and other suites of genes including floral homeotic genes. Double-mutant analysis indicates that early flowering is dependent on functional FTa1. The broad significance of our study is that we have demonstrated a function for a VRN2-like VEFS gene beyond the Brassicaceae. In particular, MtVRN2 represses the transition to flowering in Medicago by regulating the onset of expression of the potent floral activator, FTa1. PMID:26947149

  20. Reprogramming of Polycomb-Mediated Gene Silencing in Embryonic Stem Cells by the miR-290 Family and the Methyltransferase Ash1l

    PubMed Central

    Kanellopoulou, Chryssa; Gilpatrick, Timothy; Kilaru, Gokhul; Burr, Patrick; Nguyen, Cuong K.; Morawski, Aaron; Lenardo, Michael J.; Muljo, Stefan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Members of the miR-290 family are the most abundantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). They regulate aspects of differentiation, pluripotency, and proliferation of ESCs, but the molecular program that they control has not been fully delineated. In the absence of Dicer, ESCs fail to express mature miR-290 miRNAs and have selective aberrant overexpression of Hoxa, Hoxb, Hoxc, and Hoxd genes essential for body plan patterning during embryogenesis, but they do not undergo a full differentiation program. Introduction of mature miR-291 into DCR−/− ESCs restores Hox gene silencing. This was attributed to the unexpected regulation of Polycomb-mediated gene targeting by miR-291. We identified the methyltransferase Ash1l as a pivotal target of miR-291 mediating this effect. Collectively, our data shed light on the role of Dicer in ESC homeostasis by revealing a facet of molecular regulation by the miR-290 family. PMID:26549848

  1. Reprogramming of Polycomb-Mediated Gene Silencing in Embryonic Stem Cells by the miR-290 Family and the Methyltransferase Ash1l.

    PubMed

    Kanellopoulou, Chryssa; Gilpatrick, Timothy; Kilaru, Gokhul; Burr, Patrick; Nguyen, Cuong K; Morawski, Aaron; Lenardo, Michael J; Muljo, Stefan A

    2015-12-01

    Members of the miR-290 family are the most abundantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). They regulate aspects of differentiation, pluripotency, and proliferation of ESCs, but the molecular program that they control has not been fully delineated. In the absence of Dicer, ESCs fail to express mature miR-290 miRNAs and have selective aberrant overexpression of Hoxa, Hoxb, Hoxc, and Hoxd genes essential for body plan patterning during embryogenesis, but they do not undergo a full differentiation program. Introduction of mature miR-291 into DCR(-/-) ESCs restores Hox gene silencing. This was attributed to the unexpected regulation of Polycomb-mediated gene targeting by miR-291. We identified the methyltransferase Ash1l as a pivotal target of miR-291 mediating this effect. Collectively, our data shed light on the role of Dicer in ESC homeostasis by revealing a facet of molecular regulation by the miR-290 family. PMID:26549848

  2. Mechanism of Polycomb recruitment to CpG islands revealed by inherited disease-associated mutation.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Valentina S; Costa, Joana R; Makarona, Kalliopi; Georgiou, Elisabeth; Layton, D Mark; Roberts, Irene; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2013-08-15

    How the transcription repressing complex Polycomb interacts with transcriptional regulators at housekeeping genes in somatic cells is not well understood. By exploiting a CpG island (CGI) point mutation causing a Mendelian disease, we show that DNA binding of activating transcription factor (TF) determines histone acetylation and nucleosomal depletion commensurate with Polycomb exclusion from the target promoter. Lack of TF binding leads to reversible transcriptional repression imposed by nucleosomal compaction and consolidated by Polycomb recruitment and establishment of bivalent chromatin status. Thus, within a functional hierarchy of transcriptional regulators, TF binding is the main determinant of Polycomb recruitment to the CGI of a housekeeping gene in somatic cells. PMID:23591993

  3. Polycomb Controls Gliogenesis by Regulating the Transient Expression of the Gcm/Glide Fate Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Diebold, Celine; Van de Bor, Véronique; Schuettengruber, Bernd; González, Inma; Busturia, Ana; Cavalli, Giacomo; Giangrande, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The Gcm/Glide transcription factor is transiently expressed and required in the Drosophila nervous system. Threshold Gcm/Glide levels control the glial versus neuronal fate choice, and its perdurance triggers excessive gliogenesis, showing that its tight and dynamic regulation ensures the proper balance between neurons and glia. Here, we present a genetic screen for potential gcm/glide interactors and identify genes encoding chromatin factors of the Trithorax and of the Polycomb groups. These proteins maintain the heritable epigenetic state, among others, of HOX genes throughout development, but their regulatory role on transiently expressed genes remains elusive. Here we show that Polycomb negatively affects Gcm/Glide autoregulation, a positive feedback loop that allows timely accumulation of Gcm/Glide threshold levels. Such temporal fine-tuning of gene expression tightly controls gliogenesis. This work performed at the levels of individual cells reveals an undescribed mode of Polycomb action in the modulation of transiently expressed fate determinants and hence in the acquisition of specific cell identity in the nervous system. PMID:23300465

  4. Structural basis for targeting the chromatin repressor Sfmbt to Polycomb response elements

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Claudio; Gambetta, Maria Cristina; Matos, Raquel; Glatt, Sebastian; Sehr, Peter; Fraterman, Sven; Wilm, Matthias; Müller, Jürg; Müller, Christoph W.

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) protein complexes repress developmental regulator genes by modifying their chromatin. How different PcG proteins assemble into complexes and are recruited to their target genes is poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core of the Drosophila PcG protein complex Pleiohomeotic (Pho)-repressive complex (PhoRC), which contains the Polycomb response element (PRE)-binding protein Pho and Sfmbt. The spacer region of Pho, separated from the DNA-binding domain by a long flexible linker, forms a tight complex with the four malignant brain tumor (4MBT) domain of Sfmbt. The highly conserved spacer region of the human Pho ortholog YY1 binds three of the four human 4MBT domain proteins in an analogous manner but with lower affinity. Comparison of the Drosophila Pho:Sfmbt and human YY1:MBTD1 complex structures provides a molecular explanation for the lower affinity of YY1 for human 4MBT domain proteins. Structure-guided mutations that disrupt the interaction between Pho and Sfmbt abolish formation of a ternary Sfmbt:Pho:DNA complex in vitro and repression of developmental regulator genes in Drosophila. PRE tethering of Sfmbt by Pho is therefore essential for Polycomb repression in Drosophila. Our results support a model where DNA tethering of Sfmbt by Pho and multivalent interactions of Sfmbt with histone modifications and other PcG proteins create a hub for PcG protein complex assembly at PREs. PMID:24186981

  5. Genome methylation patterns in male breast cancer - Identification of an epitype with hypermethylation of polycomb target genes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ida; Lauss, Martin; Holm, Karolina; Staaf, Johan; Nilsson, Cecilia; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise; Ringnér, Markus; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease that shares both similarities and differences with female breast cancer (FBC). The aim of this study was to assess genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in MBC and compare them with the previously identified transcriptional subgroups of MBC, luminal M1 and M2, as well as the intrinsic subtypes of FBC. Illumina's 450K Infinium arrays were applied to 47 MBC and 188 FBC tumors. Unsupervised clustering of the most variable CpGs among MBC tumors revealed two stable epitypes, designated ME1 and ME2. The methylation patterns differed significantly between the groups and were closely associated with the transcriptional subgroups luminal M1 and M2. Tumors in the ME1 group were more proliferative and aggressive than ME2 tumors, and showed a tendency toward inferior survival. ME1 tumors also displayed hypermethylation of PRC2 target genes and high expression of EZH2, one of the core components of PRC2. Upon combined analysis of MBC and FBC tumors, ME1 MBCs clustered among luminal B FBC tumors and ME2 MBCs clustered within the predominantly luminal A FBC cluster. The majority of the MBC tumors remained grouped together within the clusters rather than being interspersed among the FBC tumors. Differences in the genomic location of methylated CpGs, as well as in the regulation of central canonical pathways may explain the separation between MBC and FBC tumors in the respective clusters. These findings further suggest that MBC is not readily defined using conventional criteria applied to FBC. PMID:25990542

  6. Expansion of the polycomb system and evolution of complexity.

    PubMed

    Sowpati, Divya Tej; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2015-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate and maintain expression pattern of genes set early during development. Although originally isolated as regulators of homeotic genes, PcG members play a key role in epigenetic mechanisms that maintain the expression state of a large number of genes. All members of the two polycomb repressive complexes (PRC1 and PRC2) are conserved during evolution and while invertebrates generally have one gene for each of these, vertebrates have multiple homologues of them. It remains unclear, however, if different vertebrate PcG homologues have distinct or overlapping functions. We have identified and compared the sequence of PcG homologues in various organisms to analyze similarities and differences that shaped the evolutionary history of these proteins. Comparative analysis of the sequences led to the identification of several novel and signature motifs in the vertebrate homologues of these proteins, which can be directly used to pick respective homologues. Our analysis shows that PcG is an ancient gene group dating back to pre-bilaterian origin that has not only been conserved but also expanded during the evolution of complexity. The presence of unique motifs in each paralogue and its conservation for more than 500 Ma indicates their functional relevance and probable unique role. Although this does not rule out completely any overlapping function, our finding that these homologues only minimally overlap in their nuclear localization suggests that each PcG homologue has distinct function. We further propose distinct complex formation by the PcG members. Taken together, our studies suggest non-redundant and specific role of multiple homologues of PcG proteins in vertebrates and indicate major expansion event preceded by emergence of vertebrates that contributed as enhanced epigenetic resource to the evolution of complexity. PMID:26259680

  7. Functional reconstruction of trans regulation of the ultrabithorax promoter by the products of two antagonistic genes, trithorax and polycomb

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yuh-Long; King, B.O.; Huang, Der-Hwa

    1995-12-01

    This study examined the expression patterns of several transgenes to identify cis-acting sequences that participate in the regulation of Drosophila homeotic genes. The specification of body segments of Drosophila melanogaster requires the activities of at least eight homeotic genes. 88 refs., 9 figs.

  8. A screen for new trithorax group genes identified little imaginal discs, the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of human retinoblastoma binding protein 2.

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, J J; Lopez, R; Shearn, A

    2000-01-01

    The proteins encoded by two groups of conserved genes, the Polycomb and trithorax groups, have been proposed to maintain, at the level of chromatin structure, the expression pattern of homeotic genes during Drosophila development. To identify new members of the trithorax group, we screened a collection of deficiencies for intergenic noncomplementation with a mutation in ash1, a trithorax group gene. Five of the noncomplementing deletions uncover genes previously classified as members of the Polycomb group. This evidence suggests that there are actually three groups of genes that maintain the expression pattern of homeotic genes during Drosophila development. The products of the third group appear to be required to maintain chromatin in both transcriptionally inactive and active states. Six of the noncomplementing deficiencies uncover previously unidentified trithorax group genes. One of these deficiencies removes 25D2-3 to 26B2-5. Within this region, there are two, allelic, lethal P-insertion mutations that identify one of these new trithorax group genes. The gene has been called little imaginal discs based on the phenotype of mutant larvae. The protein encoded by the little imaginal discs gene is the Drosophila homologue of human retinoblastoma binding protein 2. PMID:11014813

  9. Progressive Polycomb Assembly on H3K27me3 Compartments Generates Polycomb Bodies with Developmentally Regulated Motion

    PubMed Central

    Cheutin, Thierry; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are conserved chromatin factors that maintain silencing of key developmental genes outside of their expression domains. Recent genome-wide analyses showed a Polycomb (PC) distribution with binding to discrete PcG response elements (PREs). Within the cell nucleus, PcG proteins localize in structures called PC bodies that contain PcG-silenced genes, and it has been recently shown that PREs form local and long-range spatial networks. Here, we studied the nuclear distribution of two PcG proteins, PC and Polyhomeotic (PH). Thanks to a combination of immunostaining, immuno-FISH, and live imaging of GFP fusion proteins, we could analyze the formation and the mobility of PC bodies during fly embryogenesis as well as compare their behavior to that of the condensed fraction of euchromatin. Immuno-FISH experiments show that PC bodies mainly correspond to 3D structural counterparts of the linear genomic domains identified in genome-wide studies. During early embryogenesis, PC and PH progressively accumulate within PC bodies, which form nuclear structures localized on distinct euchromatin domains containing histone H3 tri-methylated on K27. Time-lapse analysis indicates that two types of motion influence the displacement of PC bodies and chromatin domains containing H2Av-GFP. First, chromatin domains and PC bodies coordinately undergo long-range motions that may correspond to the movement of whole chromosome territories. Second, each PC body and chromatin domain has its own fast and highly constrained motion. In this motion regime, PC bodies move within volumes slightly larger than those of condensed chromatin domains. Moreover, both types of domains move within volumes much smaller than chromosome territories, strongly restricting their possibility of interaction with other nuclear structures. The fast motion of PC bodies and chromatin domains observed during early embryogenesis strongly decreases in late developmental stages, indicating a

  10. Homoeosis in Drosophila: a description of the Polycomb lethal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Denell, R E; Frederick, R D

    1983-05-01

    Adults heterozygous for dominant mutations at the haploabnormal Polycomb (Pc) locus display many homoeotic transformations. E. B. Lewis (1978) first described the cuticular morphology of lethal embryos homozygous for Polycomb mutant alleles, and suggested that the Pc+ gene product acts as a repressor of genes in the Bithorax gene complex. In the present work, we have further examined the Polycomb lethal syndrome by phase-contrast and scanning electron microscopy of whole mounts, and show that the phenotype is more complex than hitherto realized. Many cuticular features characteristic of more anterior body segments are partially or completely transformed to resemble those of more caudal segments; the posteriormost homoeotic features which develop are those of the 8th abdominal segment (rather than the 9th or 10th). Involution and dorsal closure of the head are usually incomplete, and the labium and dorsal head regularly develop cuticular features normally characteristic of abdominal segments. Not all homoeotic alterations are caudal, however, and embryos also display partial transformations of the 9th (or 10th) abdominal segment to 8th and of meso- and metathorax to prothorax. It should be emphasized that Polycomb mutations do not homoeotically transform segments as a whole; various cuticular markers differ considerably in their relative probability and extent of transformation, and a single segment may display features normally specific to several different segments. We suggest that these mutations result in an instability in the transmission of determined states. PMID:6404678

  11. Polycomb/Trithorax response elements and epigenetic memory of cell identity.

    PubMed

    Ringrose, Leonie; Paro, Renato

    2007-01-01

    Polycomb/Trithorax group response elements (PRE/TREs) are fascinating chromosomal pieces. Just a few hundred base pairs long, these elements can remember and maintain the active or silent transcriptional state of their associated genes for many cell generations, long after the initial determining activators and repressors have disappeared. Recently, substantial progress has been made towards understanding the nuts and bolts of PRE/TRE function at the molecular level and in experimentally mapping PRE/TRE sites across whole genomes. Here we examine the insights, controversies and new questions that have been generated by this recent flood of data. PMID:17185323

  12. Probes of chromatin accessibility in the Drosophila bithorax complex respond differently to Polycomb-mediated repression.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, K; Bender, W

    1996-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of genes are required for maintenance of the repressed state of the homeotic genes in Drosophila. There are similarities between the PcG repression and mating-type silencing in yeast or heterochromatic position effect in Drosophila, which suggest that PcG repression may involve a highly compacted chromatin structure. To test for such a structure, heterologous DNA- binding proteins were used as probes for DNA accessibility in Drosophila embryos. Binding sites for the yeast transcriptional activator GAL4 and for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase were inserted into the bithorax (bx) regulatory region of the endogenous Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene, which is regulated by the PcG. Ubiquitously expressed GAL4 protein directs transcription through its binding sites only in the posterior segments where the bx region is active. The block to GAL4 activation in the more anterior segments is dependent on Polycomb (Pc) function. In contrast, T7 RNA polymerase can transcribe from its target promoter in all segments of the embryo. Thus, Pc-mediated repression blocks activated polymerase II transcription, but does not simply exclude all proteins. Images PMID:8599940

  13. The Drosophila gene taranis encodes a novel trithorax group member potentially linked to the cell cycle regulatory apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Calgaro, Stéphane; Boube, Muriel; Cribbs, David L; Bourbon, Henri-Marc

    2002-01-01

    Genes of the Drosophila Polycomb and trithorax groups (PcG and trxG, respectively) influence gene expression by modulating chromatin structure. Segmental expression of homeotic loci (HOM) initiated in early embryogenesis is maintained by a balance of antagonistic PcG (repressor) and trxG (activator) activities. Here we identify a novel trxG family member, taranis (tara), on the basis of the following criteria: (i) tara loss-of-function mutations act as genetic antagonists of the PcG genes Polycomb and polyhomeotic and (ii) they enhance the phenotypic effects of mutations in the trxG genes trithorax (trx), brahma (brm), and osa. In addition, reduced tara activity can mimic homeotic loss-of-function phenotypes, as is often the case for trxG genes. tara encodes two closely related 96-kD protein isoforms (TARA-alpha/-beta) derived from broadly expressed alternative promoters. Genetic and phenotypic rescue experiments indicate that the TARA-alpha/-beta proteins are functionally redundant. The TARA proteins share evolutionarily conserved motifs with several recently characterized mammalian nuclear proteins, including the cyclin-dependent kinase regulator TRIP-Br1/p34(SEI-1), the related protein TRIP-Br2/Y127, and RBT1, a partner of replication protein A. These data raise the possibility that TARA-alpha/-beta play a role in integrating chromatin structure with cell cycle regulation. PMID:11861561

  14. Occupying chromatin: Polycomb mechanisms for getting to genomic targets, stopping transcriptional traffic, and staying put

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jeffrey A.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Polycomb repressive complexes are conserved chromatin regulators with key roles in multicellular development, stem cell biology, and cancer. New findings advance molecular understanding of how they target to sites of action, interact with and alter local chromatin to silence genes, and maintain silencing in successive generations of proliferating cells. Chromatin modification by Polycomb proteins provides an essential strategy for gene silencing in higher eukaryotes. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) silence many key developmental regulators and are centrally integrated in the transcriptional circuitry of embryonic and adult stem cells. PRC2 trimethylates histone H3 on lysine-27 (H3-K27me3) and PRC1-type complexes ubiquitylate histone H2A and compact polynucleosomes. How PRCs and these signature activities are deployed to select and silence genomic targets is the subject of intense current investigation. We review recent advances on targeting, modulation, and functions of PRC1 and PRC2, and we consider progress on defining transcriptional steps impacted in Polycomb silencing. Key recent findings demonstrate PRC1 targeting independent of H3-K27me3 and emphasize nonenzymatic PRC1-mediated compaction. We also evaluate expanding connections between Polycomb machinery and non-coding RNAs. Exciting new studies supply the first systematic analyses of what happens to Polycomb complexes, and associated histone modifications, during the wholesale chromatin reorganizations that accompany DNA replication and mitosis. The stage is now set to reveal fundamental epigenetic mechanisms that determine how Polycomb target genes are silenced and how Polycomb silence is preserved through cell cycle progression. PMID:23473600

  15. Insulators, not Polycomb response elements, are required for long-range interactions between Polycomb targets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Bing; Müller, Martin; Bahechar, Ilham Anne; Kyrchanova, Olga; Ohno, Katsuhito; Georgiev, Pavel; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2011-02-01

    The genomic binding sites of Polycomb group (PcG) complexes have been found to cluster, forming Polycomb "bodies" or foci in mammalian or fly nuclei. These associations are thought to be driven by interactions between PcG complexes and result in enhanced repression. Here, we show that a Polycomb response element (PRE) with strong PcG binding and repressive activity cannot mediate trans interactions. In the case of the two best-studied interacting PcG targets in Drosophila, the Mcp and the Fab-7 regulatory elements, we find that these associations are not dependent on or caused by the Polycomb response elements they contain. Using functional assays and physical colocalization by in vivo fluorescence imaging or chromosome conformation capture (3C) methods, we show that the interactions between remote copies of Mcp or Fab-7 elements are dependent on the insulator activities present in these elements and not on their PREs. We conclude that insulator binding proteins rather than PcG complexes are likely to be the major determinants of the long-range higher-order organization of PcG targets in the nucleus. PMID:21135119

  16. Stuxnet Facilitates the Degradation of Polycomb Protein during Development.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Zhang, Junzheng; He, Tao; Li, Yajuan; Su, Ying; Tie, Feng; Liu, Min; Harte, Peter J; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2016-06-20

    Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins function to ensure correct deployment of developmental programs by epigenetically repressing target gene expression. Despite the importance, few studies have been focused on the regulation of PcG activity itself. Here, we report a Drosophila gene, stuxnet (stx), that controls Pc protein stability. We find that heightened stx activity leads to homeotic transformation, reduced Pc activity, and de-repression of PcG targets. Conversely, stx mutants, which can be rescued by decreased Pc expression, display developmental defects resembling hyperactivation of Pc. Our biochemical analyses provide a mechanistic basis for the interaction between stx and Pc; Stx facilitates Pc degradation in the proteasome, independent of ubiquitin modification. Furthermore, this mode of regulation is conserved in vertebrates. Mouse stx promotes degradation of Cbx4, an orthologous Pc protein, in vertebrate cells and induces homeotic transformation in Drosophila. Our results highlight an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of regulated protein degradation on PcG homeostasis and epigenetic activity. PMID:27326929

  17. Genome-wide profiling of histone H3 lysine 27 and lysine 4 trimethylation in multiple myeloma reveals the importance of Polycomb gene targeting and highlights EZH2 as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Párraga, Alba Atienza; Enroth, Stefan; Singh, Umashankar; Ungerstedt, Johanna; Österborg, Anders; Brown, Peter J.; Ma, Anqi; Jin, Jian; Nilsson, Kenneth; Öberg, Fredrik; Kalushkova, Antonia; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of the antibody-producing plasma cells. MM is a highly heterogeneous disease, which has hampered the identification of a common underlying mechanism for disease establishment as well as the development of targeted therapy. Here we present the first genome-wide profiling of histone H3 lysine 27 and lysine 4 trimethylation in MM patient samples, defining a common set of active H3K4me3-enriched genes and silent genes marked by H3K27me3 (H3K27me3 alone or bivalent) unique to primary MM cells, when compared to normal bone marrow plasma cells. Using this epigenome profile, we found increased silencing of H3K27me3 targets in MM patients at advanced stages of the disease, and the expression pattern of H3K27me3-marked genes correlated with poor patient survival. We also demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 had anti-myeloma effects in both MM cell lines and CD138+ MM patient cells. In addition, EZH2 inhibition decreased the global H3K27 methylation and induced apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest an important role for the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in MM, and highlights the PRC2 component EZH2 as a potential therapeutic target in MM. PMID:26755663

  18. A Long ncRNA Links Copy Number Variation to a Polycomb/Trithorax Epigenetic Switch in FSHD Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cabianca, Daphne S.; Casa, Valentina; Bodega, Beatrice; Xynos, Alexandros; Ginelli, Enrico; Tanaka, Yujiro; Gabellini, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Summary Repetitive sequences account for more than 50% of the human genome. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease associated with reduction in the copy number of the D4Z4 repeat mapping to 4q35. By an unknown mechanism, D4Z4 deletion causes an epigenetic switch leading to de-repression of 4q35 genes. Here we show that the Polycomb group of epigenetic repressors targets D4Z4 in healthy subjects and that D4Z4 deletion is associated with reduced Polycomb silencing in FSHD patients. We identify DBE-T, a chromatin-associated noncoding RNA produced selectively in FSHD patients that coordinates de-repression of 4q35 genes. DBE-T recruits the Trithorax group protein Ash1L to the FSHD locus, driving histone H3 lysine 36 dimethylation, chromatin remodeling, and 4q35 gene transcription. This study provides insights into the biological function of repetitive sequences in regulating gene expression and shows how mutations of such elements can influence the progression of a human genetic disease. PMID:22541069

  19. Transcriptional read-through is not sufficient to induce an epigenetic switch in the silencing activity of Polycomb response elements

    PubMed Central

    Erokhin, Maksim; Elizar’ev, Pavel; Parshikov, Aleksander; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax (TrxG) group proteins are assembled on Polycomb response elements (PREs) to maintain tissue and stage-specific patterns of gene expression. Critical to coordinating gene expression with the process of differentiation, the activity of PREs can be switched “on” and “off.” When on, the PRE imposes a silenced state on the genes in the same domain that is stably inherited through multiple rounds of cell division. When the PRE is switched off, the domain is in a state permissive for gene expression that can be stably inherited. Previous studies have suggested that a burst of transcription through a PRE sequence displaces PcG proteins and provides a universal mechanism for inducing a heritable switch in PRE activity from on to off; however, the evidence favoring this model is indirect. Here, we have directly tested the transcriptional read-through mechanism. Contrary to previous suggestions, we show that transcription through the PRE is not sufficient for inducing an epigenetic switch in PRE activity. In fact, even high levels of continuous transcription through a PRE fails to dislodge the PcG proteins, nor does it remove repressive histone marks. Our results indicate that other mechanisms involving adjacent DNA regulatory elements must be implicated in heritable switch of PRE activity. PMID:26504232

  20. The Polycomb complex PRC2 supports aberrant self-renewal in a mouse model of MLL-AF9;NrasG12D acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Zuber, Johannes; Rappaport, Amy; Taylor, Meredith; Johns, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Trithorax and Polycomb groups of chromatin regulators are critical for cell-lineage specification during normal development; functions that often become deregulated during tumorigenesis. As an example, oncogenic fusions of the Trithorax-related protein MLL can initiate aggressive leukemias by altering the transcriptional circuitry governing hematopoietic cell differentiation, a process that is known to require additional epigenetic pathways to implement. Here we used shRNA screening to identify chromatin regulators uniquely required in a mouse model of MLL-fusion acute myeloid leukemia, which revealed a role for the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) in maintenance of this disease. shRNA-mediated suppression of PRC2 subunits Eed, Suz12, or Ezh1/Ezh2 led to proliferation-arrest and differentiation of leukemia cells, with a minimal impact on growth of several non-transformed hematopoietic cell lines. The requirement for PRC2 in leukemia is partly due to its role in direct transcriptional repression of genes that limit the self-renewal potential of hematopoietic cells, including Cdkn2a. In addition to implicating a role for PRC2 in the pathogenesis of MLL-fusion leukemia, our results suggest, more generally, that Trithorax and Polycomb group proteins can cooperate with one another to maintain aberrant lineage programs in cancer. PMID:22469984

  1. Genome-wide activities of Polycomb complexes control pervasive transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hun-Goo; Kahn, Tatyana G; Simcox, Amanda; Schwartz, Yuri B; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes PRC1 and PRC2 are well known for silencing specific developmental genes. PRC2 is a methyltransferase targeting histone H3K27 and producing H3K27me3, essential for stable silencing. Less well known but quantitatively much more important is the genome-wide role of PRC2 that dimethylates ∼70% of total H3K27. We show that H3K27me2 occurs in inverse proportion to transcriptional activity in most non-PcG target genes and intergenic regions and is governed by opposing roaming activities of PRC2 and complexes containing the H3K27 demethylase UTX. Surprisingly, loss of H3K27me2 results in global transcriptional derepression proportionally greatest in silent or weakly transcribed intergenic and genic regions and accompanied by an increase of H3K27ac and H3K4me1. H3K27me2 therefore sets a threshold that prevents random, unscheduled transcription all over the genome and even limits the activity of highly transcribed genes. PRC1-type complexes also have global roles. Unexpectedly, we find a pervasive distribution of histone H2A ubiquitylated at lysine 118 (H2AK118ub) outside of canonical PcG target regions, dependent on the RING/Sce subunit of PRC1-type complexes. We show, however, that H2AK118ub does not mediate the global PRC2 activity or the global repression and is predominantly produced by a new complex involving L(3)73Ah, a homolog of mammalian PCGF3. PMID:25986499

  2. Polycomb repressive complex 1 controls uterine decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Fenghua; Gao, Fei; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Jegga, Anil G.; Barski, Artem; Das, Sanjoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine stromal cell decidualization is an essential part of the reproductive process. Decidual tissue development requires a highly regulated control of the extracellular tissue remodeling; however the mechanism of this regulation remains unknown. Through systematic expression studies, we detected that Cbx4/2, Rybp, and Ring1B [components of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)] are predominantly utilized in antimesometrial decidualization with polyploidy. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PRC1 members are co-localized with its functional histone modifier H2AK119ub1 (mono ubiquitination of histone-H2A at lysine-119) in polyploid cell. A potent small-molecule inhibitor of Ring1A/B E3-ubiquitin ligase or siRNA-mediated suppression of Cbx4 caused inhibition of H2AK119ub1, in conjunction with perturbation of decidualization and polyploidy development, suggesting a role for Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 in these processes. Analyses of genetic signatures by RNA-seq studies showed that the inhibition of PRC1 function affects 238 genes (154 up and 84 down) during decidualization. Functional enrichment analyses identified that about 38% genes primarily involved in extracellular processes are specifically targeted by PRC1. Furthermore, ~15% of upregulated genes exhibited a significant overlap with the upregulated Bmp2 null-induced genes in mice. Overall, Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 controls decidualization via regulation of extracellular gene remodeling functions and sheds new insights into underlying molecular mechanism(s) through transcriptional repression regulation. PMID:27181215

  3. Polycomb repressive complex 1 controls uterine decidualization.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fenghua; Gao, Fei; Kartashov, Andrey V; Jegga, Anil G; Barski, Artem; Das, Sanjoy K

    2016-01-01

    Uterine stromal cell decidualization is an essential part of the reproductive process. Decidual tissue development requires a highly regulated control of the extracellular tissue remodeling; however the mechanism of this regulation remains unknown. Through systematic expression studies, we detected that Cbx4/2, Rybp, and Ring1B [components of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)] are predominantly utilized in antimesometrial decidualization with polyploidy. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PRC1 members are co-localized with its functional histone modifier H2AK119ub1 (mono ubiquitination of histone-H2A at lysine-119) in polyploid cell. A potent small-molecule inhibitor of Ring1A/B E3-ubiquitin ligase or siRNA-mediated suppression of Cbx4 caused inhibition of H2AK119ub1, in conjunction with perturbation of decidualization and polyploidy development, suggesting a role for Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 in these processes. Analyses of genetic signatures by RNA-seq studies showed that the inhibition of PRC1 function affects 238 genes (154 up and 84 down) during decidualization. Functional enrichment analyses identified that about 38% genes primarily involved in extracellular processes are specifically targeted by PRC1. Furthermore, ~15% of upregulated genes exhibited a significant overlap with the upregulated Bmp2 null-induced genes in mice. Overall, Cbx4/Ring1B-containing PRC1 controls decidualization via regulation of extracellular gene remodeling functions and sheds new insights into underlying molecular mechanism(s) through transcriptional repression regulation. PMID:27181215

  4. Spatial Interplay between Polycomb and Trithorax Complexes Controls Transcriptional Activity in T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Atsushi; Tumes, Damon J; Watanabe, Yukiko; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Kaneda, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2015-11-01

    Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are two mutually antagonistic chromatin modifying complexes, however, how they together mediate transcriptional counter-regulation remains unknown. Genome-wide analysis revealed that binding of Ezh2 and menin, central members of the PcG and TrxG complexes, respectively, were reciprocally correlated. Moreover, we identified a developmental change in the positioning of Ezh2 and menin in differentiated T lymphocytes compared to embryonic stem cells. Ezh2-binding upstream and menin-binding downstream of the transcription start site was frequently found at genes with higher transcriptional levels, and Ezh2-binding downstream and menin-binding upstream was found at genes with lower expression in T lymphocytes. Interestingly, of the Ezh2 and menin cooccupied genes, those exhibiting occupancy at the same position displayed greatly enhanced sensitivity to loss of Ezh2. Finally, we also found that different combinations of Ezh2 and menin occupancy were associated with expression of specific functional gene groups important for T cell development. Therefore, spatial cooperative gene regulation by the PcG and TrxG complexes may represent a novel mechanism regulating the transcriptional identity of differentiated cells. PMID:26324324

  5. Deciphering the Role of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Variants in Regulating the Acquisition of Flowering Competence in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Picó, Sara; Ortiz-Marchena, M. Isabel; Merini, Wiam; Calonje, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play important roles in regulating developmental phase transitions in plants; however, little is known about the role of the PcG machinery in regulating the transition from juvenile to adult phase. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) B lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region1 homolog (BMI1) POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 (PRC1) components participate in the repression of microRNA156 (miR156). Loss of AtBMI1 function leads to the up-regulation of the primary transcript of MIR156A and MIR156C at the time the levels of miR156 should decline, resulting in an extended juvenile phase and delayed flowering. Conversely, the PRC1 component EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF1) participates in the regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE and MIR172 genes. Accordingly, plants impaired in EMF1 function displayed misexpression of these genes early in development, which contributes to a CONSTANS-independent up-regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) leading to the earliest flowering phenotype described in Arabidopsis. Our findings show how the different regulatory roles of two functional PRC1 variants coordinate the acquisition of flowering competence and help to reach the threshold of FT necessary to flower. Furthermore, we show how two central regulatory mechanisms, such as PcG and microRNA, assemble to achieve a developmental outcome. PMID:25897002

  6. Deciphering the Role of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Variants in Regulating the Acquisition of Flowering Competence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Picó, Sara; Ortiz-Marchena, M Isabel; Merini, Wiam; Calonje, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play important roles in regulating developmental phase transitions in plants; however, little is known about the role of the PcG machinery in regulating the transition from juvenile to adult phase. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) B lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region1 homolog (BMI1) POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 (PRC1) components participate in the repression of microRNA156 (miR156). Loss of AtBMI1 function leads to the up-regulation of the primary transcript of MIR156A and MIR156C at the time the levels of miR156 should decline, resulting in an extended juvenile phase and delayed flowering. Conversely, the PRC1 component EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF1) participates in the regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE and MIR172 genes. Accordingly, plants impaired in EMF1 function displayed misexpression of these genes early in development, which contributes to a CONSTANS-independent up-regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) leading to the earliest flowering phenotype described in Arabidopsis. Our findings show how the different regulatory roles of two functional PRC1 variants coordinate the acquisition of flowering competence and help to reach the threshold of FT necessary to flower. Furthermore, we show how two central regulatory mechanisms, such as PcG and microRNA, assemble to achieve a developmental outcome. PMID:25897002

  7. The Msx1 Homeoprotein Recruits Polycomb to the Nuclear Periphery during Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingqiang; Kumar, Roshan M.; Biggs, Vanessa J.; Lee, Hansol; Chen, Yun; Kagey, Michael H.; Young, Richard A.; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Control of gene expression during development requires the concerted action of sequence-specific transcriptional regulators and epigenetic modifiers, which are spatially coordinated within the nucleus through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we show that transcriptional repression by the Msx1 homeoprotein in myoblast cells requires the recruitment of Polycomb to target genes located at the nuclear periphery. Target genes repressed by Msx1 display an Msx1-dependent enrichment of Polycomb-directed trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3). Association of Msx1 with the Polycomb complex is required for repression and regulation of myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, Msx1 promotes a dynamic spatial redistribution of the H3K27me3 repressive mark to the nuclear periphery in myoblast cells and the developing limb in vivo. Our findings illustrate a hitherto unappreciated spatial coordination of transcription factors with the Polycomb complex for appropriate regulation of gene expression programs during development. PMID:21852201

  8. Characterization of Aquilegia Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 homologs reveals absence of imprinting.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Emily J; Kramer, Elena M

    2012-10-01

    Epigenetic regulation is important for maintaining gene expression patterns in multicellular organisms. The Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins form several complexes with important and deeply conserved epigenetic functions in both the plant and animal kingdoms. The plant Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) contains four core proteins, Enhancer of Zeste (E(z)), Suppressor of Zeste 12 (Su(z)12), Extra Sex Combs (ESC), and Multicopy Suppressor of IRA 1 (MSI1), and functions in many developmental transitions. In some plant species, including rice and Arabidopsis, duplications in the core PRC2 proteins allow the formation of PRC2s with distinct developmental functions. In addition, members of the plant specific VEL PHD family have been shown to associate with the PRC2 complex in Arabidopsis and may play a role in targeting the PRC2 to specific loci. Here we examine the evolution and expression of the PRC2 and VEL PHD families in Aquilegia, a member of the lower eudicot order Ranunculales and an emerging model for the investigation of plant ecology, evolution and developmental genetics. We find that Aquilegia has a relatively simple PRC2 with only one homolog of Su(z)12, ESC and MSI1 and two ancient copies of E(z), AqSWN and AqCLF. Aquilegia has four members of the VEL PHD family, three of which appear to be closely related to Arabidopsis proteins known to associate with the PRC2. The PRC2 and VEL PHD family proteins are expressed at a relatively constant level throughout Aquilegia vulgaris development, with the VEL PHD family and MSI1 expressed at higher levels during and after vernalization and in the inflorescence. Both AqSWN and AqCLF are expressed in Aquilegia endosperm but neither copy is imprinted. PMID:22796128

  9. The SAND domain protein ULTRAPETALA1 acts as a trithorax group factor to regulate cell fate in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During development, trithorax group (trxG) chromatin remodeling complexes counteract repression by Polycomb group (PcG) complexes to sustain active expression of key regulatory genes. Although PcG complexes are well characterized in plants, little is known about trxG activities. Here we demonstrate ...

  10. Long noncoding RNA, polycomb, and the ghosts haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a expression.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J

    2011-08-15

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15(INK4b), p14(ARF), and p16(INK4a), and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  11. Long Noncoding RNA, Polycomb, and the Ghosts Haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15INK4b, p14ARF, and p16INK4a, and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  12. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meireles-Filho, Antonio C. A.; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  13. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation.

    PubMed

    Shlyueva, Daria; Meireles-Filho, Antonio C A; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  14. Polycomb repressive complex PRC1 spatially constrains the mouse embryonic stem cell genome

    PubMed Central

    Mifsud, Borbala; Dimitrova, Emilia; Matheson, Louise; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Jurkowski, Wiktor; Wingett, Steven W.; Tabbada, Kristina; Andrews, Simon; Herman, Bram; LeProust, Emily; Osborne, Cameron S.; Koseki, Haruhiko; Fraser, Peter; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Elderkin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Polycomb Repressive Complexes PRC1 and PRC2 maintain embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency by silencing lineage-specifying developmental regulator genes1. Emerging evidence suggests that Polycomb complexes act through controlling spatial genome organisation2–9. We show that PRC1 functions as a master regulator of ESC genome architecture by organizing genes in three-dimensional interaction networks. The strongest spatial network is composed of the four Hox clusters and early developmental transcription factor genes, the majority of which contact poised enhancers. Removal of Polycomb repression leads to disruption of promoter-promoter contacts in the Hox network. In contrast, promoter-enhancer contacts are maintained, accompanied by widespread acquisition of active chromatin signatures at network enhancers and pronounced transcriptional up-regulation of network genes. Thus, PRC1 physically constrains developmental transcription factor genes and their enhancers in a silenced but poised spatial network. We propose that selective release of genes from this spatial network underlies cell fate specification during early embryonic development. PMID:26323060

  15. The Arabidopsis GAGA-Binding Factor BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 Recruits the POLYCOMB-REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Component LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 to GAGA DNA Motifs1

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Andreas; Brand, Luise H.; Peter, Sébastien; Simoncello, Nathalie; Kilian, Joachim; Gaudin, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb-repressive complexes (PRCs) play key roles in development by repressing a large number of genes involved in various functions. Much, however, remains to be discovered about PRC-silencing mechanisms as well as their targeting to specific genomic regions. Besides other mechanisms, GAGA-binding factors in animals can guide PRC members in a sequence-specific manner to Polycomb-responsive DNA elements. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GAGA-motif binding factor protein BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 (BPC6) interacts with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1), a PRC1 component, and associates with VERNALIZATION2 (VRN2), a PRC2 component, in vivo. By using a modified DNA-protein interaction enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, we could show that BPC6 was required and sufficient to recruit LHP1 to GAGA motif-containing DNA probes in vitro. We also found that LHP1 interacts with VRN2 and, therefore, can function as a possible scaffold between BPC6 and VRN2. The lhp1-4 bpc4 bpc6 triple mutant displayed a pleiotropic phenotype, extreme dwarfism and early flowering, which disclosed synergistic functions of LHP1 and group II plant BPC members. Transcriptome analyses supported this synergy and suggested a possible function in the concerted repression of homeotic genes, probably through histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation. Hence, our findings suggest striking similarities between animal and plant GAGA-binding factors in the recruitment of PRC1 and PRC2 components to Polycomb-responsive DNA element-like GAGA motifs, which must have evolved through convergent evolution. PMID:26025051

  16. Functional analysis of AEBP2, a PRC2 Polycomb protein, reveals a Trithorax phenotype in embryonic development and in ESCs.

    PubMed

    Grijzenhout, Anne; Godwin, Jonathan; Koseki, Haruhiko; Gdula, Michal Ryszard; Szumska, Dorota; McGouran, Joanna F; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Kessler, Benedikt M; Brockdorff, Neil; Cooper, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The Polycomb repressive complexes PRC1 and PRC2 are key mediators of heritable gene silencing in multicellular organisms. Here, we characterise AEBP2, a known PRC2 co-factor which, in vitro, has been shown to stimulate PRC2 activity. We show that AEBP2 localises specifically to PRC2 target loci, including the inactive X chromosome. Proteomic analysis confirms that AEBP2 associates exclusively with PRC2 complexes. However, analysis of embryos homozygous for a targeted mutation of Aebp2 unexpectedly revealed a Trithorax phenotype, normally linked to antagonism of Polycomb function. Consistent with this, we observe elevated levels of PRC2-mediated histone H3K27 methylation at target loci in Aebp2 mutant embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We further demonstrate that mutant ESCs assemble atypical hybrid PRC2 subcomplexes, potentially accounting for enhancement of Polycomb activity, and suggesting that AEBP2 normally plays a role in defining the mutually exclusive composition of PRC2 subcomplexes. PMID:27317809

  17. Functional analysis of AEBP2, a PRC2 Polycomb protein, reveals a Trithorax phenotype in embryonic development and in ESCs

    PubMed Central

    Grijzenhout, Anne; Godwin, Jonathan; Koseki, Haruhiko; Gdula, Michal Ryszard; Szumska, Dorota; McGouran, Joanna F.; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Brockdorff, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The Polycomb repressive complexes PRC1 and PRC2 are key mediators of heritable gene silencing in multicellular organisms. Here, we characterise AEBP2, a known PRC2 co-factor which, in vitro, has been shown to stimulate PRC2 activity. We show that AEBP2 localises specifically to PRC2 target loci, including the inactive X chromosome. Proteomic analysis confirms that AEBP2 associates exclusively with PRC2 complexes. However, analysis of embryos homozygous for a targeted mutation of Aebp2 unexpectedly revealed a Trithorax phenotype, normally linked to antagonism of Polycomb function. Consistent with this, we observe elevated levels of PRC2-mediated histone H3K27 methylation at target loci in Aebp2 mutant embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We further demonstrate that mutant ESCs assemble atypical hybrid PRC2 subcomplexes, potentially accounting for enhancement of Polycomb activity, and suggesting that AEBP2 normally plays a role in defining the mutually exclusive composition of PRC2 subcomplexes. PMID:27317809

  18. A Polycomb and Gaga Dependent Silencer Adjoins the Fab-7 Boundary in the Drosophila Bithorax Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hagstrom, K.; Muller, M.; Schedl, P.

    1997-01-01

    The homeotic genes of the Drosophila bithorax complex are controlled by a large cis-regulatory region that ensures their segmentally restricted pattern of expression. A deletion that removes the Frontabdominal-7 cis-regulatory region (Fab-7(1)) dominantly transforms parasegment 11 into parasegment 12. Previous studies suggested that removal of a domain boundary element on the proximal side of Fab-7(1) is responsible for this gain-of-function phenotype. In this article we demonstrate that the Fab-7(1) deletion also removes a silencer element, the iab-7 PRE, which maps to a different DNA segment and plays a different role in regulating parasegment-specific expression patterns of the Abd-B gene. The iab-7 PRE mediates pairing-sensitive silencing of mini-white, and can maintain the segmentally restricted expression pattern of a BXD, Ubx/lacZ reporter transgene. Both silencing activities depend upon Polycomb Group proteins. Pairing-sensitive silencing is relieved by removing the transvection protein Zeste, but is enhanced in a novel pairing-independent manner by the zeste(1) allele. The iab-7 PRE silencer is contained within a 0.8-kb fragment that spans a nuclease hypersensitive site, and silencing appears to depend on the chromatin remodeling protein, the GAGA factor. PMID:9258680

  19. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Mediates Phosphorylation of Polycomb Ortholog Cbx7*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsan-au; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Chandler, Hollie; Georgilis, Athena; Zullow, Hayley; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Gil, Jesus; Peters, Gordon; Bernstein, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Cbx7 is one of five mammalian orthologs of the Drosophila Polycomb. Cbx7 recognizes methylated lysine residues on the histone H3 tail and contributes to gene silencing in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). However, our knowledge of Cbx7 post-translational modifications remains limited. Through combined biochemical and mass spectrometry approaches, we report a novel phosphorylation site on mouse Cbx7 at residue Thr-118 (Cbx7T118ph), near the highly conserved Polycomb box. The generation of a site-specific antibody to Cbx7T118ph demonstrates that Cbx7 is phosphorylated via MAPK signaling. Furthermore, we find Cbx7T118 phosphorylation in murine mammary carcinoma cells, which can be blocked by MEK inhibitors. Upon EGF stimulation, Cbx7 interacts robustly with other members of PRC1. To test the role of Cbx7T118 phosphorylation in gene silencing, we employed a RAS-induced senescence model system. We demonstrate that Cbx7T118 phosphorylation moderately enhances repression of its target gene p16. In summary, we have identified and characterized a novel MAPK-mediated phosphorylation site on Cbx7 and propose that mitogen signaling to the chromatin template regulates PRC1 function. PMID:24194518

  20. A positive role for polycomb in transcriptional regulation via H4K20me1

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiangdong; Han, Zhijun; Chen, Hao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xia, Yuanxin; Pan, Chenyu; Fu, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Han, Hui; Wu, Min; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Li, Lin; Wei, Gang; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved polycomb group (PcG) proteins maintain heritable transcription repression of the genes essential for development from fly to mammals. However, sporadic reports imply a potential role of PcGs in positive regulation of gene transcription, although systematic investigation of such function and the underlying mechanism has rarely been reported. Here, we report a Pc-mediated, H3K27me3-dependent positive transcriptional regulation of Senseless (Sens), a key transcription factor required for development. Mechanistic studies show that Pc regulates Sens expression by promoting H4K20me1 at the Sens locus. Further bioinformatic analysis at genome-wide level indicates that the existence of H4K20me1 acts as a selective mark for positive transcriptional regulation by Pc/H3K27me3. Both the intensities and specific patterns of Pc and H3K27me3 are important for the fates of target gene transcription. Moreover, binding of transcription factor Broad (Br), which physically interacts with Pc and positively regulates the transcription of Sens, is observed in Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1+ genes, but not in Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1− genes. Taken together, our study reveals that, coupling with the transcription factor Br, Pc positively regulates transcription of Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1+ genes in developing Drosophila wing disc. PMID:27002220

  1. Functional gene group analysis identifies synaptic gene groups as risk factor for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lips, E S; Cornelisse, L N; Toonen, R F; Min, J L; Hultman, C M; Holmans, P A; O'Donovan, M C; Purcell, S M; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Sullivan, P F; Visscher, P M; Posthuma, D

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a polygenic pattern of inheritance and a population prevalence of ∼1%. Previous studies have implicated synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia. We tested the accumulated association of genetic variants in expert-curated synaptic gene groups with schizophrenia in 4673 cases and 4965 healthy controls, using functional gene group analysis. Identifying groups of genes with similar cellular function rather than genes in isolation may have clinical implications for finding additional drug targets. We found that a group of 1026 synaptic genes was significantly associated with the risk of schizophrenia (P=7.6 × 10−11) and more strongly associated than 100 randomly drawn, matched control groups of genetic variants (P<0.01). Subsequent analysis of synaptic subgroups suggested that the strongest association signals are derived from three synaptic gene groups: intracellular signal transduction (P=2.0 × 10−4), excitability (P=9.0 × 10−4) and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling (P=2.4 × 10−3). These results are consistent with a role of synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia and imply that impaired intracellular signal transduction in synapses, synaptic excitability and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling play a role in the pathology of schizophrenia. PMID:21931320

  2. A histone mutant reproduces the phenotype caused by loss of histone-modifying factor Polycomb.

    PubMed

    Pengelly, Ana Raquel; Copur, Ömer; Jäckle, Herbert; Herzig, Alf; Müller, Jürg

    2013-02-01

    Although many metazoan enzymes that add or remove specific modifications on histone proteins are essential transcriptional regulators, the functional significance of posttranslational modifications on histone proteins is not well understood. Here, we show in Drosophila that a point mutation in lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3-K27) fails to repress transcription of genes that are normally repressed by Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), the methyltransferase that modifies H3-K27. Moreover, differentiated H3-K27 mutant cells show homeotic transformations like those seen in PRC2 mutant cells. Taken together, these analyses demonstrate that H3-K27 is the crucial physiological substrate that PRC2 modifies for Polycomb repression. PMID:23393264

  3. The quest for mammalian Polycomb response elements: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Moritz; Trupke, Johanna; Ringrose, Leonie

    2016-06-01

    A long-standing mystery in the field of Polycomb and Trithorax regulation is how these proteins, which are highly conserved between flies and mammals, can regulate several hundred equally highly conserved target genes, but recognise these targets via cis-regulatory elements that appear to show no conservation in their DNA sequence. These elements, termed Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PRE/TREs or PREs), are relatively well characterised in flies, but their mammalian counterparts have proved to be extremely difficult to identify. Recent progress in this endeavour has generated a wealth of data and raised several intriguing questions. Here, we ask why and to what extent mammalian PREs are so different to those of the fly. We review recent advances, evaluate current models and identify open questions in the quest for mammalian PREs. PMID:26453572

  4. ATRX Directs Binding of PRC2 to Xist RNA and Polycomb Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Kavitha; Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Ergun, Ayla; del Rosario, Amanda; Jeon, Yesu; White, Forest; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY X chromosome inactivation (XCI) depends on the long noncoding RNA Xist and its recruitment of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 is also targeted to other sites throughout the genome to effect transcriptional repression. Using XCI as a model, we apply an unbiased proteomics approach to isolate Xist and PRC2 regulators and identified ATRX. ATRX unexpectedly functions as a high-affinity RNA-binding protein that directly interacts with RepA/Xist RNA to promote loading of PRC2 in vivo. Without ATRX, PRC2 cannot load onto Xist RNA nor spread in cis along the X chromosome. Moreover, epigenomic profiling reveals that genome-wide targeting of PRC2 depends on ATRX, as loss of ATRX leads to spatial redistribution of PRC2 and derepression of Polycomb responsive genes. Thus, ATRX is a required specificity determinant for PRC2 targeting and function. PMID:25417162

  5. A cellular chemical probe targeting the chromodomains of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Jacob I; Dickson, Bradley M; Cheng, Nancy; Liu, Yanli; Norris, Jacqueline L; Cholensky, Stephanie H; Tempel, Wolfram; Qin, Su; Huber, Katherine G; Sagum, Cari; Black, Karynne; Li, Fengling; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Baughman, Brandi M; Senisterra, Guillermo; Pattenden, Samantha G; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J; Bedford, Mark T; Min, Jinrong; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2015-01-01

    We report the design and characterization of UNC3866, a potent antagonist of the methyl-lysine (Kme) reading function of the Polycomb CBX and CDY families of chromodomains. Polycomb CBX proteins regulate gene expression by targeting Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 to sites of H3K27me3 via their chromodomains. UNC3866 binds the chromodomains of CBX4 and CBX7 most potently with a Kd of ∼100 nM for each, and is 6- to 18-fold selective versus seven other CBX and CDY chromodomains while being highly selective versus >250 other protein targets. X-ray crystallography revealed that UNC3866 closely mimics the interactions of the methylated H3 tail with these chromodomains. UNC4195, a biotinylated derivative of UNC3866, was used to demonstrate that UNC3866 engages intact PRC1 and that EED incorporation into PRC1 is isoform-dependent in PC3 prostate cancer cells. Finally, UNC3866 inhibits PC3 cell proliferation, a known CBX7 phenotype, while UNC4219, a methylated negative control compound, has negligible effects. PMID:26807715

  6. GRHL3/GET1 and Trithorax Group Members Collaborate to Activate the Epidermal Progenitor Differentiation Program

    PubMed Central

    Hopkin, Amelia Soto; Gordon, William; Klein, Rachel Herndon; Espitia, Francisco; Daily, Kenneth; Zeller, Michael; Baldi, Pierre; Andersen, Bogi

    2012-01-01

    The antagonistic actions of Polycomb and Trithorax are responsible for proper cell fate determination in mammalian tissues. In the epidermis, a self-renewing epithelium, previous work has shown that release from Polycomb repression only partially explains differentiation gene activation. We now show that Trithorax is also a key regulator of epidermal differentiation, not only through activation of genes repressed by Polycomb in progenitor cells, but also through activation of genes independent of regulation by Polycomb. The differentiation associated transcription factor GRHL3/GET1 recruits the ubiquitously expressed Trithorax complex to a subset of differentiation genes. PMID:22829784

  7. Gene for ataxia-telangiectasia complementation group D (ATDC)

    DOEpatents

    Murnane, J.P.; Painter, R.B.; Kapp, L.N.; Yu, L.C.

    1995-03-07

    Disclosed herein is a new gene, an AT gene for complementation group D, the ATDC gene and fragments thereof. Nucleic acid probes for the gene are provided as well as proteins encoded by the gene, cDNA therefrom, preferably a 3 kilobase (kb) cDNA, and recombinant nucleic acid molecules for expression of the proteins. Further disclosed are methods to detect mutations in the gene, preferably methods employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also disclosed are methods to detect AT genes from other AT complementation groups. 30 figs.

  8. Gene for ataxia-telangiectasia complementation group D (ATDC)

    DOEpatents

    Murnane, John P.; Painter, Robert B.; Kapp, Leon N.; Yu, Loh-Chung

    1995-03-07

    Disclosed herein is a new gene, an AT gene for complementation group D, the ATDC gene and fragments thereof. Nucleic acid probes for said gene are provided as well as proteins encoded by said gene, cDNA therefrom, preferably a 3 kilobase (kb) cDNA, and recombinant nucleic acid molecules for expression of said proteins. Further disclosed are methods to detect mutations in said gene, preferably methods employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also disclosed are methods to detect AT genes from other AT complementation groups.

  9. Using Text Analysis to Identify Functionally Coherent Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Schütze, Hinrich; Altman, Russ B.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of large-scale genomic information (such as sequence data or expression patterns) frequently involves grouping genes on the basis of common experimental features. Often, as with gene expression clustering, there are too many groups to easily identify the functionally relevant ones. One valuable source of information about gene function is the published literature. We present a method, neighbor divergence, for assessing whether the genes within a group share a common biological function based on their associated scientific literature. The method uses statistical natural language processing techniques to interpret biological text. It requires only a corpus of documents relevant to the genes being studied (e.g., all genes in an organism) and an index connecting the documents to appropriate genes. Given a group of genes, neighbor divergence assigns a numerical score indicating how “functionally coherent” the gene group is from the perspective of the published literature. We evaluate our method by testing its ability to distinguish 19 known functional gene groups from 1900 randomly assembled groups. Neighbor divergence achieves 79% sensitivity at 100% specificity, comparing favorably to other tested methods. We also apply neighbor divergence to previously published gene expression clusters to assess its ability to recognize gene groups that had been manually identified as representative of a common function. PMID:12368251

  10. The Oncogenic Polycomb Histone Methyltransferase EZH2 Methylates Lysine 120 on Histone H2B and Competes Ubiquitination12

    PubMed Central

    Kogure, Masaharu; Takawa, Masashi; Saloura, Vassiliki; Sone, Kenbun; Piao, Lianhua; Ueda, Koji; Ibrahim, Reem; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Sugiyama, Masanori; Atomi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2) is known to be a polycomb protein homologous to Drosophila enhancer of zeste and catalyzes the addition of methyl groups to histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27). We previously reported that EZH2 was overexpressed in various types of cancer and plays a crucial role in the cell cycle regulation of cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that EZH2 has the function to monomethylate lysine 120 on histone H2B (H2BK120). EZH2-dependent H2BK120 methylation in cancer cells was confirmed with an H2BK120 methylation-specific antibody. Overexpression of EZH2 significantly attenuated the ubiquitination of H2BK120, a key posttranslational modification of histones for transcriptional regulation. Concordantly, knockdown of EZH2 increased the ubiquitination level of H2BK120, suggesting that the methylation of H2BK120 by EZH2 may competitively inhibit the ubiquitination of H2BK120. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq and microarray analyses identified downstream candidate genes regulated by EZH2 through the methylation of H2BK120. This is the first report to describe a novel substrate of EZH2, H2BK120, unveiling a new aspect of EZH2 functions in human carcinogenesis. PMID:24339737

  11. Variable requirements for DNA-binding proteins at polycomb-dependent repressive regions in human HOX clusters.

    PubMed

    Woo, Caroline J; Kharchenko, Peter V; Daheron, Laurence; Park, Peter J; Kingston, Robert E

    2013-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG)-mediated repression is an evolutionarily conserved process critical for cell fate determination and maintenance of gene expression during embryonic development. However, the mechanisms underlying PcG recruitment in mammals remain unclear since few regulatory sites have been identified. We report two novel prospective PcG-dependent regulatory elements within the human HOXB and HOXC clusters and compare their repressive activities to a previously identified element in the HOXD cluster. These regions recruited the PcG proteins BMI1 and SUZ12 to a reporter construct in mesenchymal stem cells and conferred repression that was dependent upon PcG expression. Furthermore, we examined the potential of two DNA-binding proteins, JARID2 and YY1, to regulate PcG activity at these three elements. JARID2 has differential requirements, whereas YY1 appears to be required for repressive activity at all 3 sites. We conclude that distinct elements of the mammalian HOX clusters can recruit components of the PcG complexes and confer repression, similar to what has been seen in Drosophila. These elements, however, have diverse requirements for binding factors, which, combined with previous data on other loci, speaks to the complexity of PcG targeting in mammals. PMID:23775117

  12. Multiple Arkadia/RNF111 structures coordinate its Polycomb body association and transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaiyu; Liu, Yijing; Hunter, Tony

    2014-08-01

    The RING domain protein Arkadia/RNF111 is a ubiquitin ligase in the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway. We previously identified Arkadia as a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-binding protein with clustered SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) that together form a SUMO-binding domain (SBD). However, precisely how SUMO interaction contributes to the function of Arkadia was not resolved. Through analytical molecular and cell biology, we found that the SIMs share redundant function with Arkadia's M domain, a region distinguishing Arkadia from its paralogs ARKL1/ARKL2 and the prototypical SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) RNF4. The SIMs and M domain together promote both Arkadia's colocalization with CBX4/Pc2, a component of Polycomb bodies, and the activation of a TGFβ pathway transcription reporter. Transcriptome profiling through RNA sequencing showed that Arkadia can both promote and inhibit gene expression, indicating that Arkadia's activity in transcriptional control may depend on the epigenetic context, defined by Polycomb repressive complexes and DNA methylation. PMID:24912682

  13. Multiple Arkadia/RNF111 Structures Coordinate Its Polycomb Body Association and Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yijing

    2014-01-01

    The RING domain protein Arkadia/RNF111 is a ubiquitin ligase in the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway. We previously identified Arkadia as a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-binding protein with clustered SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) that together form a SUMO-binding domain (SBD). However, precisely how SUMO interaction contributes to the function of Arkadia was not resolved. Through analytical molecular and cell biology, we found that the SIMs share redundant function with Arkadia's M domain, a region distinguishing Arkadia from its paralogs ARKL1/ARKL2 and the prototypical SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) RNF4. The SIMs and M domain together promote both Arkadia's colocalization with CBX4/Pc2, a component of Polycomb bodies, and the activation of a TGFβ pathway transcription reporter. Transcriptome profiling through RNA sequencing showed that Arkadia can both promote and inhibit gene expression, indicating that Arkadia's activity in transcriptional control may depend on the epigenetic context, defined by Polycomb repressive complexes and DNA methylation. PMID:24912682

  14. The Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto Interacts with Cyclin G in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Salvaing, Juliette; Nagel, Anja C.; Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle; Bloyer, Sébastien; Maier, Dieter; Preiss, Anette; Peronnet, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    Background Polycomb (PcG) and trithorax (trxG) genes encode proteins involved in the maintenance of gene expression patterns, notably Hox genes, throughout development. PcG proteins are required for long-term gene repression whereas TrxG proteins are positive regulators that counteract PcG action. PcG and TrxG proteins form large complexes that bind chromatin at overlapping sites called Polycomb and Trithorax Response Elements (PRE/TRE). A third class of proteins, so-called “Enhancers of Trithorax and Polycomb” (ETP), interacts with either complexes, behaving sometimes as repressors and sometimes as activators. The role of ETP proteins is largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings In a two-hybrid screen, we identified Cyclin G (CycG) as a partner of the Drosophila ETP Corto. Inactivation of CycG by RNA interference highlights its essential role during development. We show here that Corto and CycG directly interact and bind to each other in embryos and S2 cells. Moreover, CycG is targeted to polytene chromosomes where it co-localizes at multiple sites with Corto and with the PcG factor Polyhomeotic (PH). We observed that corto is involved in maintaining Abd-B repression outside its normal expression domain in embryos. This could be achieved by association between Corto and CycG since both proteins bind the regulatory element iab-7 PRE and the promoter of the Abd-B gene. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that CycG could regulate the activity of Corto at chromatin and thus be involved in changing Corto from an Enhancer of TrxG into an Enhancer of PcG. PMID:18286205

  15. RYBP-PRC1 Complexes Mediate H2A Ubiquitylation at Polycomb Target Sites Independently of PRC2 and H3K27me3

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Lígia; Dimitrova, Emilia; Oxley, David; Webster, Judith; Poot, Raymond; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Taylor, Stephen; Ura, Hiroki; Koide, Hiroshi; Wutz, Anton; Vidal, Miguel; Elderkin, Sarah; Brockdorff, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Summary Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) has a central role in the regulation of heritable gene silencing during differentiation and development. PRC1 recruitment is generally attributed to interaction of the chromodomain of the core protein Polycomb with trimethyl histone H3K27 (H3K27me3), catalyzed by a second complex, PRC2. Unexpectedly we find that RING1B, the catalytic subunit of PRC1, and associated monoubiquitylation of histone H2A are targeted to closely overlapping sites in wild-type and PRC2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), demonstrating an H3K27me3-independent pathway for recruitment of PRC1 activity. We show that this pathway is mediated by RYBP-PRC1, a complex comprising catalytic subunits of PRC1 and the protein RYBP. RYBP-PRC1 is recruited to target loci in mESCs and is also involved in Xist RNA-mediated silencing, the latter suggesting a wider role in Polycomb silencing. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding recruitment and function of Polycomb repressors. PMID:22325148

  16. Group II Intron-Anchored Gene Deletion in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kaizhi; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium plays an important role in commercial and medical use, for which targeted gene deletion is difficult. We proposed an intron-anchored gene deletion approach for Clostridium, which combines the advantage of the group II intron “ClosTron” system and homologous recombination. In this approach, an intron carrying a fragment homologous to upstream or downstream of the target site was first inserted into the genome by retrotransposition, followed by homologous recombination, resulting in gene deletion. A functional unknown operon CAC1493–1494 located in the chromosome, and an operon ctfAB located in the megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731 were successfully deleted by using this approach, without leaving antibiotic marker in the genome. We therefore propose this approach can be used for targeted gene deletion in Clostridium. This approach might also be applicable for gene deletion in other bacterial species if group II intron retrotransposition system is established. PMID:21304965

  17. Polycomb dysregulation in gliomagenesis targets a Zfp423-dependent differentiation network

    PubMed Central

    Signaroldi, Elena; Laise, Pasquale; Cristofanon, Silvia; Brancaccio, Arianna; Reisoli, Elisa; Atashpaz, Sina; Terreni, Maria Rosa; Doglioni, Claudio; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Malatesta, Paolo; Testa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas constitute one of the most significant areas of unmet medical need, owing to the invariable failure of surgical eradication and their marked molecular heterogeneity. Accumulating evidence has revealed a critical contribution by the Polycomb axis of epigenetic repression. However, a coherent understanding of the regulatory networks affected by Polycomb during gliomagenesis is still lacking. Here we integrate transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses to define Polycomb-dependent networks that promote gliomagenesis, validating them both in two independent mouse models and in a large cohort of human samples. We find that Polycomb dysregulation in gliomagenesis affects transcriptional networks associated with invasiveness and de-differentiation. The dissection of these networks uncovers Zfp423 as a critical Polycomb-dependent transcription factor whose silencing negatively impacts survival. The anti-gliomagenic activity of Zfp423 requires interaction with the SMAD proteins within the BMP signalling pathway, pointing to a novel synergic circuit through which Polycomb inhibits BMP signalling. PMID:26923714

  18. Polycomb dysregulation in gliomagenesis targets a Zfp423-dependent differentiation network.

    PubMed

    Signaroldi, Elena; Laise, Pasquale; Cristofanon, Silvia; Brancaccio, Arianna; Reisoli, Elisa; Atashpaz, Sina; Terreni, Maria Rosa; Doglioni, Claudio; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Malatesta, Paolo; Testa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas constitute one of the most significant areas of unmet medical need, owing to the invariable failure of surgical eradication and their marked molecular heterogeneity. Accumulating evidence has revealed a critical contribution by the Polycomb axis of epigenetic repression. However, a coherent understanding of the regulatory networks affected by Polycomb during gliomagenesis is still lacking. Here we integrate transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses to define Polycomb-dependent networks that promote gliomagenesis, validating them both in two independent mouse models and in a large cohort of human samples. We find that Polycomb dysregulation in gliomagenesis affects transcriptional networks associated with invasiveness and de-differentiation. The dissection of these networks uncovers Zfp423 as a critical Polycomb-dependent transcription factor whose silencing negatively impacts survival. The anti-gliomagenic activity of Zfp423 requires interaction with the SMAD proteins within the BMP signalling pathway, pointing to a novel synergic circuit through which Polycomb inhibits BMP signalling. PMID:26923714

  19. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2-Dependent and -Independent Functions of Jarid2 in Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Mohan, Man; Garrett, Alexander S.; Miller, Caitlynn; Casto, David; Zhang, Ying; Seidel, Christopher; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Jarid2 was recently identified as an important component of the mammalian Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), where it has a major effect on PRC2 recruitment in mouse embryonic stem cells. Although Jarid2 is conserved in Drosophila, it has not previously been implicated in Polycomb (Pc) regulation. Therefore, we purified Drosophila Jarid2 and its associated proteins and found that Jarid2 associates with all of the known canonical PRC2 components, demonstrating a conserved physical interaction with PRC2 in flies and mammals. Furthermore, in vivo studies with Jarid2 mutants in flies demonstrate that among several histone modifications tested, only methylation of histone 3 at K27 (H3K27), the mark implemented by PRC2, was affected. Genome-wide profiling of Jarid2, Su(z)12 (Suppressor of zeste 12), and H3K27me3 occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicates that Jarid2 and Su(z)12 have very similar distribution patterns on chromatin. However, Jarid2 and Su(z)12 occupancy levels at some genes are significantly different, with Jarid2 being present at relatively low levels at many Pc response elements (PREs) of certain Homeobox (Hox) genes, providing a rationale for why Jarid2 was never identified in Pc screens. Gene expression analyses show that Jarid2 and E(z) (Enhancer of zeste, a canonical PRC2 component) are not only required for transcriptional repression but might also function in active transcription. Identification of Jarid2 as a conserved PRC2 interactor in flies provides an opportunity to begin to probe some of its novel functions in Drosophila development. PMID:22354997

  20. TXTGate: profiling gene groups with text-based information

    PubMed Central

    Glenisson, Patrick; Coessens, Bert; Van Vooren, Steven; Mathys, Janick; Moreau, Yves; De Moor, Bart

    2004-01-01

    We implemented a framework called TXTGate that combines literature indices of selected public biological resources in a flexible text-mining system designed towards the analysis of groups of genes. By means of tailored vocabularies, term- as well as gene-centric views are offered on selected textual fields and MEDLINE abstracts used in LocusLink and the Saccharomyces Genome Database. Subclustering and links to external resources allow for in-depth analysis of the resulting term profiles. PMID:15186494

  1. The Bmi-1 polycomb protein antagonizes the (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-dependent suppression of skin cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L

    2010-03-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of gene expression that enhance cell survival. This regulation is achieved via action of two multiprotein PcG complexes--PRC2 (EED) and PRC1 [B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1)]. These complexes modulate gene expression by increasing histone methylation and reducing acetylation--leading to a closed chromatin conformation. Activity of these proteins is associated with increased cell proliferation and survival. We show increased expression of key PcG proteins in immortalized keratinocytes and skin cancer cell lines. We examine the role of two key PcG proteins, Bmi-1 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), and the impact of the active agent in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the function of these regulators. EGCG treatment of SCC-13 cells reduces Bmi-1 and Ezh2 level and this is associated with reduced cell survival. The reduction in survival is associated with a global reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a hallmark of PRC2 complex action. This change in PcG protein expression is associated with reduced expression of key proteins that enhance progression through the cell cycle [cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin B1] and increased expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression (p21 and p27). Apoptosis is also enhanced, as evidenced by increased caspase 9, 8 and 3 cleavage and increased poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase cleavage. EGCG treatment also increases Bax and suppresses Bcl-xL expression. Vector-mediated enhanced Bmi-1 expression reverses these EGCG-dependent changes. These findings suggest that green tea polyphenols reduce skin tumor cell survival by influencing PcG-mediated epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. PMID:20015867

  2. SWI/SNF mediates polycomb eviction and epigenetic reprogramming of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Kia, Sima Kheradmand; Gorski, Marcin M; Giannakopoulos, Stavros; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2008-05-01

    Stable silencing of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a tumor suppressor locus occurs in a variety of human cancers, including malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs). MRTs are extremely aggressive cancers caused by the loss of the hSNF5 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We found previously that, in MRT cells, hSNF5 is required for p16(INK4a) induction, mitotic checkpoint activation, and cellular senescence. Here, we investigated how the balance between Polycomb group (PcG) silencing and SWI/SNF activation affects epigenetic control of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus in MRT cells. hSNF5 reexpression in MRT cells caused SWI/SNF recruitment and activation of p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a), but not of p14(ARF). Gene activation by hSNF5 is strictly dependent on the SWI/SNF motor subunit BRG1. SWI/SNF mediates eviction of the PRC1 and PRC2 PcG silencers and extensive chromatin reprogramming. Concomitant with PcG complex removal, the mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) protein is recruited and active histone marks supplant repressive ones. Strikingly, loss of PcG complexes is accompanied by DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B dissociation and reduced DNA methylation. Thus, various chromatin states can be modulated by SWI/SNF action. Collectively, these findings emphasize the close interconnectivity and dynamics of diverse chromatin modifications in cancer and gene control. PMID:18332116

  3. Clustering of mammalian Hox genes with other H3K27me3 targets within an active nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Fabre, Pierre J; Leleu, Marion; Duboule, Denis; Noordermeer, Daan

    2015-04-14

    Embryogenesis requires the precise activation and repression of many transcriptional regulators. The Polycomb group proteins and the associated H3K27me3 histone mark are essential to maintain the inactive state of many of these genes. Mammalian Hox genes are targets of Polycomb proteins and form local 3D clusters centered on the H3K27me3 mark. More distal contacts have also been described, yet their selectivity, dynamics, and relation to other layers of chromatin organization remained elusive. We report that repressed Hox genes form mutual intra- and interchromosomal interactions with other genes located in strong domains labeled by H3K27me3. These interactions occur in a central and active nuclear environment that consists of the HiC compartment A, away from peripheral lamina-associated domains. Interactions are independent of nearby H3K27me3-marked loci and determined by chromosomal distance and cell-type-specific scaling factors, thus inducing a moderate reorganization during embryogenesis. These results provide a simplified view of nuclear organization whereby Polycomb proteins may have evolved to repress genes located in gene-dense regions whose position is restricted to central, active, nuclear environments. PMID:25825760

  4. Cohesin: genomic insights into controlling gene transcription and development

    PubMed Central

    Dorsett, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade it has emerged that the cohesin protein complex, which functions in sister chromatid cohesion, chromosome segregation and DNA repair, also regulates gene expression and development. Even minor changes in cohesin activity alter several aspects of development. Genome-wide analysis indicates that cohesin directly regulates transcription of genes involved in cell proliferation, pluripotency, and differentiation through multiple mechanisms. These mechanisms are poorly understood, but involve both partial gene repression in concert with Polycomb group proteins, and facilitating long-range looping, both between enhancers and promoters, and between CTCF protein binding sites. PMID:21324671

  5. Polycomb repressive complex 2 regulates skeletal growth by suppressing Wnt and TGF-β signalling.

    PubMed

    Mirzamohammadi, Fatemeh; Papaioannou, Garyfallia; Inloes, Jennifer B; Rankin, Erinn B; Xie, Huafeng; Schipani, Ernestina; Orkin, Stuart H; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) controls maintenance and lineage determination of stem cells by suppressing genes that regulate cellular differentiation and tissue development. However, the role of PRC2 in lineage-committed somatic cells is mostly unknown. Here we show that Eed deficiency in chondrocytes causes severe kyphosis and a growth defect with decreased chondrocyte proliferation, accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and cell death with reduced Hif1a expression. Eed deficiency also causes induction of multiple signalling pathways in chondrocytes. Wnt signalling overactivation is responsible for the accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and kyphosis, whereas the overactivation of TGF-β signalling is responsible for the reduced proliferation and growth defect. Thus, our study demonstrates that PRC2 has an important regulatory role in lineage-committed tissue cells by suppressing overactivation of multiple signalling pathways. PMID:27329220

  6. Structural basis of histone H3K27 trimethylation by an active polycomb repressive complex 2.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Lianying; Liu, Xin

    2015-10-16

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), a hallmark of gene silencing. Here we report the crystal structures of an active PRC2 complex of 170 kilodaltons from the yeast Chaetomium thermophilum in both basal and stimulated states, which contain Ezh2, Eed, and the VEFS domain of Suz12 and are bound to a cancer-associated inhibiting H3K27M peptide and a S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine cofactor. The stimulated complex also contains an additional stimulating H3K27me3 peptide. Eed is engulfed by a belt-like structure of Ezh2, and Suz12(VEFS) contacts both of these two subunits to confer an unusual split active SET domain for catalysis. Comparison of PRC2 in the basal and stimulated states reveals a mobile Ezh2 motif that responds to stimulation to allosterically regulate the active site. PMID:26472914

  7. Polycomb repressive complex 2 regulates skeletal growth by suppressing Wnt and TGF-β signalling

    PubMed Central

    Mirzamohammadi, Fatemeh; Papaioannou, Garyfallia; Inloes, Jennifer B.; Rankin, Erinn B.; Xie, Huafeng; Schipani, Ernestina; Orkin, Stuart H.; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) controls maintenance and lineage determination of stem cells by suppressing genes that regulate cellular differentiation and tissue development. However, the role of PRC2 in lineage-committed somatic cells is mostly unknown. Here we show that Eed deficiency in chondrocytes causes severe kyphosis and a growth defect with decreased chondrocyte proliferation, accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and cell death with reduced Hif1a expression. Eed deficiency also causes induction of multiple signalling pathways in chondrocytes. Wnt signalling overactivation is responsible for the accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and kyphosis, whereas the overactivation of TGF-β signalling is responsible for the reduced proliferation and growth defect. Thus, our study demonstrates that PRC2 has an important regulatory role in lineage-committed tissue cells by suppressing overactivation of multiple signalling pathways. PMID:27329220

  8. S6K1ing to ResTOR Adipogenesis with Polycomb.

    PubMed

    Juan, Aster H; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2016-05-01

    Signal-directed chromatin recruitment of mammalian Polycomb complexes is a fundamental component of epigenetic regulation. In this issue, Yi et al. (2016) reveal how mTORC1 activation deploys the ribosomal serine/threonine kinase S6K1 and Polycomb proteins at genomic regulatory regions to repress expression of anti-adipogenic developmental regulators. PMID:27153531

  9. The FBXL10/KDM2B scaffolding protein associates with novel polycomb repressive complex-1 to regulate adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Abe, Yohei; Yamasaki, Ayumu; Tsurutani, Yuya; Yoshida, Ayano; Chikaoka, Yoko; Nakamura, Kanako; Magoori, Kenta; Nakaki, Ryo; Osborne, Timothy F; Fukami, Kiyoko; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Juro

    2015-02-13

    Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) plays an essential role in the epigenetic repression of gene expression during development and cellular differentiation via multiple effector mechanisms, including ubiquitination of H2A and chromatin compaction. However, whether it regulates the stepwise progression of adipogenesis is unknown. Here, we show that FBXL10/KDM2B is an anti-adipogenic factor that is up-regulated during the early phase of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and in adipose tissue in a diet-induced model of obesity. Interestingly, inhibition of adipogenesis does not require the JmjC demethylase domain of FBXL10, but it does require the F-box and leucine-rich repeat domains, which we show recruit a noncanonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) containing RING1B, SKP1, PCGF1, and BCOR. Knockdown of either RING1B or SKP1 prevented FBXL10-mediated repression of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation indicating that PRC1 formation mediates the inhibitory effect of FBXL10 on adipogenesis. Using ChIP-seq, we show that FBXL10 recruits RING1B to key specific genomic loci surrounding the key cell cycle and the adipogenic genes Cdk1, Uhrf1, Pparg1, and Pparg2 to repress adipogenesis. These results suggest that FBXL10 represses adipogenesis by targeting a noncanonical PRC1 complex to repress key genes (e.g. Pparg) that control conversion of pluripotent cells into the adipogenic lineage. PMID:25533466

  10. The FBXL10/KDM2B Scaffolding Protein Associates with Novel Polycomb Repressive Complex-1 to Regulate Adipogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Abe, Yohei; Yamasaki, Ayumu; Tsurutani, Yuya; Yoshida, Ayano; Chikaoka, Yoko; Nakamura, Kanako; Magoori, Kenta; Nakaki, Ryo; Osborne, Timothy F.; Fukami, Kiyoko; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Juro

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) plays an essential role in the epigenetic repression of gene expression during development and cellular differentiation via multiple effector mechanisms, including ubiquitination of H2A and chromatin compaction. However, whether it regulates the stepwise progression of adipogenesis is unknown. Here, we show that FBXL10/KDM2B is an anti-adipogenic factor that is up-regulated during the early phase of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and in adipose tissue in a diet-induced model of obesity. Interestingly, inhibition of adipogenesis does not require the JmjC demethylase domain of FBXL10, but it does require the F-box and leucine-rich repeat domains, which we show recruit a noncanonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) containing RING1B, SKP1, PCGF1, and BCOR. Knockdown of either RING1B or SKP1 prevented FBXL10-mediated repression of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation indicating that PRC1 formation mediates the inhibitory effect of FBXL10 on adipogenesis. Using ChIP-seq, we show that FBXL10 recruits RING1B to key specific genomic loci surrounding the key cell cycle and the adipogenic genes Cdk1, Uhrf1, Pparg1, and Pparg2 to repress adipogenesis. These results suggest that FBXL10 represses adipogenesis by targeting a noncanonical PRC1 complex to repress key genes (e.g. Pparg) that control conversion of pluripotent cells into the adipogenic lineage. PMID:25533466

  11. Neuronal activity controls Bdnf expression via Polycomb de-repression and CREB/CBP/JMJD3 activation in mature neurons

    PubMed Central

    Palomer, Ernest; Carretero, Javier; Benvegnù, Stefano; Dotti, Carlos G.; Martin, Mauricio G.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently described that in embryonic stem cells, the expression of some important developmentally regulated genes is repressed, but poised for fast activation under the appropriate stimuli. In this work we show that Bdnf promoters are repressed by Polycomb Complex 2 in mature hippocampal neurons, and basal expression is guaranteed by the coexistence with activating histone marks. Neuronal stimulation triggered by N-methyl-D-aspartate application induces the transcription of these promoters by H3K27Me3 demethylation and H3K27Me3 phosphorylation at Serine 28 leading to displacement of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressor Complex 2. Our data show that the fast transient expression of Bdnf promoters II and VI after neuronal stimulation is dependent on acetylation of histone H3K27 by CREB-p/CBP. Thus, regulatory mechanisms established during development seem to remain after differentiation controlling genes induced by different stimuli, as would be the case of early memory genes in mature neurons. PMID:27010597

  12. A chromatin-independent role of Polycomb-like 1 to stabilize p53 and promote cellular quiescence.

    PubMed

    Brien, Gerard L; Healy, Evan; Jerman, Emilia; Conway, Eric; Fadda, Elisa; O'Donovan, Darragh; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Rice, Alan M; Kearney, Conor J; Flaus, Andrew; McDade, Simon S; Martin, Seamus J; McLysaght, Aoife; O'Connell, David J; Armstrong, Scott A; Bracken, Adrian P

    2015-11-01

    Polycomb-like proteins 1-3 (PCL1-3) are substoichiometric components of the Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that are essential for association of the complex with chromatin. However, it remains unclear why three proteins with such apparent functional redundancy exist in mammals. Here we characterize their divergent roles in both positively and negatively regulating cellular proliferation. We show that while PCL2 and PCL3 are E2F-regulated genes expressed in proliferating cells, PCL1 is a p53 target gene predominantly expressed in quiescent cells. Ectopic expression of any PCL protein recruits PRC2 to repress the INK4A gene; however, only PCL2 and PCL3 confer an INK4A-dependent proliferative advantage. Remarkably, PCL1 has evolved a PRC2- and chromatin-independent function to negatively regulate proliferation. We show that PCL1 binds to and stabilizes p53 to induce cellular quiescence. Moreover, depletion of PCL1 phenocopies the defects in maintaining cellular quiescence associated with p53 loss. This newly evolved function is achieved by the binding of the PCL1 N-terminal PHD domain to the C-terminal domain of p53 through two unique serine residues, which were acquired during recent vertebrate evolution. This study illustrates the functional bifurcation of PCL proteins, which act in both a chromatin-dependent and a chromatin-independent manner to regulate the INK4A and p53 pathways. PMID:26494712

  13. A chromatin-independent role of Polycomb-like 1 to stabilize p53 and promote cellular quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Gerard L.; Healy, Evan; Jerman, Emilia; Conway, Eric; Fadda, Elisa; O'Donovan, Darragh; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Rice, Alan M.; Kearney, Conor J.; Flaus, Andrew; McDade, Simon S.; Martin, Seamus J.; McLysaght, Aoife; O'Connell, David J.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Bracken, Adrian P.

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb-like proteins 1–3 (PCL1–3) are substoichiometric components of the Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that are essential for association of the complex with chromatin. However, it remains unclear why three proteins with such apparent functional redundancy exist in mammals. Here we characterize their divergent roles in both positively and negatively regulating cellular proliferation. We show that while PCL2 and PCL3 are E2F-regulated genes expressed in proliferating cells, PCL1 is a p53 target gene predominantly expressed in quiescent cells. Ectopic expression of any PCL protein recruits PRC2 to repress the INK4A gene; however, only PCL2 and PCL3 confer an INK4A-dependent proliferative advantage. Remarkably, PCL1 has evolved a PRC2- and chromatin-independent function to negatively regulate proliferation. We show that PCL1 binds to and stabilizes p53 to induce cellular quiescence. Moreover, depletion of PCL1 phenocopies the defects in maintaining cellular quiescence associated with p53 loss. This newly evolved function is achieved by the binding of the PCL1 N-terminal PHD domain to the C-terminal domain of p53 through two unique serine residues, which were acquired during recent vertebrate evolution. This study illustrates the functional bifurcation of PCL proteins, which act in both a chromatin-dependent and a chromatin-independent manner to regulate the INK4A and p53 pathways. PMID:26494712

  14. Psoriasis Risk Genes of the Late Cornified Envelope-3 Group Are Distinctly Expressed Compared with Genes of Other LCE Groups

    PubMed Central

    Bergboer, Judith G.M.; Tjabringa, Geuranne S.; Kamsteeg, Marijke; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M.J.J.; Rodijk-Olthuis, Diana; Jansen, Patrick A.M.; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Narita, Masashi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Zeeuwen, Patrick L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2011-01-01

    Deletion of the late cornified envelope (LCE) genes LCE3B and LCE3C has recently been identified as a risk factor for psoriasis. Expression of 16 LCE genes of LCE groups 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 was examined in vivo and in vitro. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that moderate to high LCE expression was largely confined to skin and a few oropharyngeal tissues. Genes of the LCE3 group demonstrated increased expression in lesional psoriatic epidermis and were induced after superficial injury of normal skin, whereas expression of members of other LCE groups was down-regulated under these conditions. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that LCE2 protein expression was restricted to the uppermost granular layer and the stratum corneum. Stimulation of in vitro reconstructed skin by several psoriasis-associated cytokines resulted in induction of LCE3 members. The data suggest that LCE proteins of groups 1, 2, 5, and 6 are involved in normal skin barrier function, whereas LCE3 genes encode proteins involved in barrier repair after injury or inflammation. These findings may provide clues to the mechanistic role of LCE3B/C deletion in psoriasis. PMID:21435436

  15. [Polymorphism of LW blood group gene in Chinese population].

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Qing; Yu, Qiong; Liu, Xu; Liang, Yan-Lian; Wei, Tian-Li

    2008-06-01

    In order to study the polymorphism of Landsteiner-Wiener (LW) blood group gene in Chinese population, peripheral blood samples anticoagulated with EDTA from 160 unrelated volunteer blood donors were randomly collected, and genomic DNA were extracted. 160 DNA samples were analyzed for exon 1 of LW gene by direct DNA sequencing, and detected for LWa/LWb allele by improved PCR-SSP genotyping. The results showed that all LW allele in 160 donors were LWa homozygous, and the LWa allele occurred commonly. In conclusion, LWa allele occurs with incidence of 100% of donors in this study, while LWb allele has not been found in Chinese population. PMID:18549656

  16. The histone H3-K27 demethylase Utx regulates HOX gene expression in Drosophila in a temporally restricted manner.

    PubMed

    Copur, Ömer; Müller, Jürg

    2013-08-01

    Trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3-K27me3) by Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a key step for transcriptional repression by the Polycomb system. Demethylation of H3-K27me3 by Utx and/or its paralogs has consequently been proposed to be important for counteracting Polycomb repression. To study the phenotype of Drosophila mutants that lack H3-K27me3 demethylase activity, we created Utx(Δ), a deletion allele of the single Drosophila Utx gene. Utx(Δ) homozygotes that contain maternally deposited wild-type Utx protein develop into adults with normal epidermal morphology but die shortly after hatching. By contrast, Utx(Δ) homozygotes that are derived from Utx mutant germ cells and therefore lack both maternal and zygotic Utx protein, die as larvae and show partial loss of expression of HOX genes in tissues in which these genes are normally active. This phenotype classifies Utx as a trithorax group regulator. We propose that Utx is needed in the early embryo to prevent inappropriate instalment of long-term Polycomb repression at HOX genes in cells in which these genes must be kept active. In contrast to PRC2, which is essential for, and continuously required during, germ cell, embryonic and larval development, Utx therefore appears to have a more limited and specific function during development. This argues against a continuous interplay between H3-K27me3 methylation and demethylation in the control of gene transcription in Drosophila. Furthermore, our analyses do not support the recent proposal that Utx would regulate cell proliferation in Drosophila as Utx mutant cells generated in wild-type animals proliferate like wild-type cells. PMID:23900545

  17. The histone H3-K27 demethylase Utx regulates HOX gene expression in Drosophila in a temporally restricted manner

    PubMed Central

    Copur, Ömer; Müller, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3-K27me3) by Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a key step for transcriptional repression by the Polycomb system. Demethylation of H3-K27me3 by Utx and/or its paralogs has consequently been proposed to be important for counteracting Polycomb repression. To study the phenotype of Drosophila mutants that lack H3-K27me3 demethylase activity, we created UtxΔ, a deletion allele of the single Drosophila Utx gene. UtxΔ homozygotes that contain maternally deposited wild-type Utx protein develop into adults with normal epidermal morphology but die shortly after hatching. By contrast, UtxΔ homozygotes that are derived from Utx mutant germ cells and therefore lack both maternal and zygotic Utx protein, die as larvae and show partial loss of expression of HOX genes in tissues in which these genes are normally active. This phenotype classifies Utx as a trithorax group regulator. We propose that Utx is needed in the early embryo to prevent inappropriate instalment of long-term Polycomb repression at HOX genes in cells in which these genes must be kept active. In contrast to PRC2, which is essential for, and continuously required during, germ cell, embryonic and larval development, Utx therefore appears to have a more limited and specific function during development. This argues against a continuous interplay between H3-K27me3 methylation and demethylation in the control of gene transcription in Drosophila. Furthermore, our analyses do not support the recent proposal that Utx would regulate cell proliferation in Drosophila as Utx mutant cells generated in wild-type animals proliferate like wild-type cells. PMID:23900545

  18. A human Polycomb isoform lacking the Pc box does not participate to PRC1 complexes but forms protein assemblies and represses transcription.

    PubMed

    Völkel, Pamela; Le Faou, Perrine; Vandamme, Julien; Pira, Dorcas; Angrand, Pierre-Olivier

    2012-05-01

    Polycomb repression controls the expression of hundreds of genes involved in development and is mediated by essentially two classes of chromatin-associated protein complexes. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) trimethylates histone H3 at lysine 27, an epigenetic mark that serves as a docking site for the PRC1 protein complex. Drosophila core PRC1 is composed of four subunits: Polycomb (Pc), Posterior sex combs (Psc), Polyhomeotic (Ph) and Sex combs extra (Sce). Each of these proteins has multiple orthologs in vertebrates, thus generating an enormous scope for potential combinatorial diversity. In particular, mammalian genomes encode five Pc family members: CBX2, CBX4, CBX6, CBX7 and CBX8. To complicate matters further, distinct isoforms might arise from single genes. Here, we address the functional role of the two human CBX2 isoforms. Owing to different polyadenylation sites and alternative splicing events, the human CBX2 locus produces two transcripts: a 5-exon transcript that encodes the 532-amino acid CBX2-1 isoform that contains the conserved chromodomain and Pc box and a 4-exon transcript encoding a shorter isoform, CBX2-2, lacking the Pc box but still possessing a chromodomain. Using biochemical approaches and a novel in vivo imaging assay, we show that the short CBX2-2 isoform lacking the Pc box, does not participate in PRC1 protein complexes, but self-associates in vivo and forms complexes of high molecular weight. Furthermore, the CBX2 short isoform is still able to repress transcription, suggesting that Polycomb repression might occur in the absence of PRC1 formation. PMID:22419124

  19. RBFox2 Binds Nascent RNA to Globally Regulate Polycomb Complex 2 Targeting in Mammalian Genomes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chaoliang; Xiao, Rui; Chen, Liang; Cui, Hanwei; Zhou, Yu; Xue, Yuanchao; Hu, Jing; Zhou, Bing; Tsutsui, Taiki; Qiu, Jinsong; Li, Hairi; Tang, Liling; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2016-06-16

    Increasing evidence suggests that diverse RNA binding proteins (RBPs) interact with regulatory RNAs to regulate transcription. RBFox2 is a well-characterized pre-mRNA splicing regulator, but we now encounter an unexpected paradigm where depletion of this RBP induces widespread increase in nascent RNA production in diverse cell types. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) reveals extensive interaction of RBFox2 with chromatin in a nascent RNA-dependent manner. Bayesian network analysis connects RBFox2 to Polycomb complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3, and biochemical experiments demonstrate the ability of RBFox2 to directly interact with PRC2. Strikingly, RBFox2 inactivation eradicates PRC2 targeting on the majority of bivalent gene promoters and leads to transcriptional de-repression. Together, these findings uncover a mechanism underlying the enigmatic association of PRC2 with numerous active genes, highlight the importance of gene body sequences to gauge transcriptional output, and suggest nascent RNAs as critical signals for transcriptional feedback control to maintain homeostatic gene expression in mammalian genomes. PMID:27211866

  20. Polycomb PRC2 complex mediates epigenetic silencing of a critical osteogenic master regulator in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Rodrigo; Bustos, Fernando J; Saez, Mauricio; Rojas, Adriana; Allende, Miguel L; van Wijnen, Andre J; van Zundert, Brigitte; Montecino, Martin

    2016-08-01

    During hippocampal neuron differentiation, the expression of critical inducers of non-neuronal cell lineages must be efficiently silenced. Runx2 transcription factor is the master regulator of mesenchymal cells responsible for intramembranous osteoblast differentiation and formation of the craniofacial bone tissue that surrounds and protects the central nervous system (CNS) in mammalian embryos. The molecular mechanisms that mediate silencing of the Runx2 gene and its downstream target osteogenic-related genes in neuronal cells have not been explored. Here, we assess the epigenetic mechanisms that mediate silencing of osteoblast-specific genes in CNS neurons. In particular, we address the contribution of histone epigenetic marks and histone modifiers on the silencing of the Runx2/p57 bone-related isoform in rat hippocampal tissues at embryonic to adult stages. Our results indicate enrichment of repressive chromatin histone marks and of the Polycomb PRC2 complex at the Runx2/p57 promoter region. Knockdown of PRC2 H3K27-methyltransferases Ezh2 and Ezh1, or forced expression of the Trithorax/COMPASS subunit Wdr5 activates Runx2/p57 mRNA expression in both immature and mature hippocampal cells. Together these results indicate that complementary epigenetic mechanisms progressively and efficiently silence critical osteoblastic genes during hippocampal neuron differentiation. PMID:27216774

  1. How to Group Genes according to Expression Profiles?

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, Julio A.; Valdano, Silvia G.; Fernández, Paula

    2011-01-01

    The most commonly applied strategies for identifying genes with a common response profile are based on clustering algorithms. These methods have no explicit rules to define the appropriate number of groups of genes. Usually the number of clusters is decided on heuristic criteria or through the application of different methods proposed to assess the number of clusters in a data set. The purpose of this paper is to compare the performance of seven of these techniques, including traditional ones, and some recently proposed. All of them produce underestimations of the true number of clusters. However, within this limitation, the gDGC algorithm appears to be the best. It is the only one that explicitly states a rule for cutting a dendrogram on the basis of a testing hypothesis framework, allowing the user to calibrate the sensitivity, adjusting the significance level. PMID:22229026

  2. Polycomb Protein SCML2 Associates with USP7 and Counteracts Histone H2A Ubiquitination in the XY Chromatin during Male Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Mengcheng; Zhou, Jian; Leu, N. Adrian; Abreu, Carla M.; Wang, Jianle; Anguera, Montserrat C.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Jasin, Maria; Wang, P. Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins mediate transcriptional silencing in diverse developmental processes. Sex chromosomes undergo chromosome-wide transcription silencing during male meiosis. Here we report that mouse SCML2 (Sex comb on midleg-like 2), an X chromosome-encoded polycomb protein, is specifically expressed in germ cells, including spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids. SCML2 associates with phosphorylated H2AX and localizes to the XY body in spermatocytes. Loss of SCML2 in mice causes defective spermatogenesis, resulting in sharply reduced sperm production. SCML2 interacts with and recruits a deubiquitinase, USP7, to the XY body in spermatocytes. In the absence of SCML2, USP7 fails to accumulate on the XY body, whereas H2A monoubiquitination is dramatically augmented in the XY chromatin. Our results demonstrate that the SCML2/USP7 complex constitutes a novel molecular pathway in modulating the epigenetic state of sex chromosomes during male meiosis. PMID:25634095

  3. Evolutionary Plasticity of Polycomb/Trithorax Response Elements in Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    Altmutter, Christina; Paro, Renato; Rehmsmeier, Marc

    2008-01-01

    cis-Regulatory DNA elements contain multiple binding sites for activators and repressors of transcription. Among these elements are enhancers, which establish gene expression states, and Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PREs), which take over from enhancers and maintain transcription states of several hundred developmentally important genes. PREs are essential to the correct identities of both stem cells and differentiated cells. Evolutionary differences in cis-regulatory elements are a rich source of phenotypic diversity, and functional binding sites within regulatory elements turn over rapidly in evolution. However, more radical evolutionary changes that go beyond motif turnover have been difficult to assess. We used a combination of genome-wide bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation at specific loci, to evaluate PRE evolution across four Drosophila species. Our results show that PRE evolution is extraordinarily dynamic. First, we show that the numbers of PREs differ dramatically between species. Second, we demonstrate that functional binding sites within PREs at conserved positions turn over rapidly in evolution, as has been observed for enhancer elements. Finally, although it is theoretically possible that new elements can arise out of nonfunctional sequence, evidence that they do so is lacking. We show here that functional PREs are found at nonorthologous sites in conserved gene loci. By demonstrating that PRE evolution is not limited to the adaptation of preexisting elements, these findings document a novel dimension of cis-regulatory evolution. PMID:18959483

  4. The variant Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 component PCGF1 interacts with a pluripotency sub-network that includes DPPA4, a regulator of embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Giorgio; Munawar, Nayla; Watson, Ariane; Streubel, Gundula; Manning, Gwendolyn; Bardwell, Vivian; Bracken, Adrian P; Cagney, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    PCGF1 encodes one of six human Polycomb RING finger homologs that are linked to transcriptional repression and developmental gene regulation. Individual PCGF proteins define discrete Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 (PRC1) multi-protein complexes with diverse subunit composition whose functions are incompletely understood. PCGF1 is a component of a variant PRC1 complex that also contains the BCL6 co-repressor BCOR and the histone demethylase KDM2B. To further investigate the role of PCGF1, we mapped the physical interactions of the protein under endogenous conditions in a cell model of neuronal differentiation. Using stringent statistical cut-offs, 83 highly enriched interacting proteins were identified, including all previously reported members of the variant PRC1 complex containing PCGF1, as well as proteins linked to diverse cellular pathways such as chromatin and cell cycle regulation. Notably, a sub-network of proteins associated with the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency (NANOG, OCT4, PATZ1, and the developmental regulator DPPA4) were found to independently interact with PCGF1 in a subsequent round of physical interaction mapping experiments. Furthermore, knockdown of PCGF1 results in reduced expression of DPPA4 and other subunits of the variant PRC1 complex at both mRNA and protein levels. Thus, PCGF1 represents a physical and functional link between Polycomb function and pluripotency. PMID:26687479

  5. The variant Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 component PCGF1 interacts with a pluripotency sub-network that includes DPPA4, a regulator of embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, Giorgio; Munawar, Nayla; Watson, Ariane; Streubel, Gundula; Manning, Gwendolyn; Bardwell, Vivian; Bracken, Adrian P.; Cagney, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    PCGF1 encodes one of six human Polycomb RING finger homologs that are linked to transcriptional repression and developmental gene regulation. Individual PCGF proteins define discrete Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 (PRC1) multi-protein complexes with diverse subunit composition whose functions are incompletely understood. PCGF1 is a component of a variant PRC1 complex that also contains the BCL6 co-repressor BCOR and the histone demethylase KDM2B. To further investigate the role of PCGF1, we mapped the physical interactions of the protein under endogenous conditions in a cell model of neuronal differentiation. Using stringent statistical cut-offs, 83 highly enriched interacting proteins were identified, including all previously reported members of the variant PRC1 complex containing PCGF1, as well as proteins linked to diverse cellular pathways such as chromatin and cell cycle regulation. Notably, a sub-network of proteins associated with the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency (NANOG, OCT4, PATZ1, and the developmental regulator DPPA4) were found to independently interact with PCGF1 in a subsequent round of physical interaction mapping experiments. Furthermore, knockdown of PCGF1 results in reduced expression of DPPA4 and other subunits of the variant PRC1 complex at both mRNA and protein levels. Thus, PCGF1 represents a physical and functional link between Polycomb function and pluripotency. PMID:26687479

  6. GATA-1 Utilizes Ikaros and Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 To Suppress Hes1 and To Promote Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Julie; Mavoungou, Lionel; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor Hairy Enhancer of Split 1 (HES1), a downstream effector of the Notch signaling pathway, is an important regulator of hematopoiesis. Here, we demonstrate that in primary erythroid cells, Hes1 gene expression is transiently repressed around proerythroblast stage of differentiation. Using mouse erythroleukemia cells, we found that the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of HES1 enhances erythroid cell differentiation, suggesting that this protein opposes terminal erythroid differentiation. This is also supported by the decreased primary erythroid cell differentiation upon HES1 upregulation in Ikaros-deficient mice. A comprehensive analysis led us to determine that Ikaros favors Hes1 repression in erythroid cells by facilitating recruitment of the master regulator of erythropoiesis GATA-1 alongside FOG-1, which mediates Hes1 repression. GATA-1 is then necessary for the chromatin binding of the NuRD remodeling complex ATPase MI-2, the transcription factor GFI1B, and the histone H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2 along with Polycomb repressive complex 2. We show that EZH2 is required for the transient repression of Hes1 in erythroid cells. In aggregate, our results describe a mechanism whereby GATA-1 utilizes Ikaros and Polycomb repressive complex 2 to promote Hes1 repression as an important step in erythroid cell differentiation. PMID:22778136

  7. BRCA1-deficient mammary tumor cells are dependent on EZH2 expression and sensitive to Polycomb Repressive Complex 2-inhibitor 3-deazaneplanocin A

    PubMed Central

    Puppe, Julian; Drost, Rinske; Liu, Xiaoling; Joosse, Simon A; Evers, Bastiaan; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Nederlof, Petra; Yu, Qiang; Jonkers, Jos; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Pietersen, Alexandra M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of breast cancer is becoming more individualized with the recognition of tumor subgroups that respond differently to available therapies. Breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1)-deficient tumors are usually of the basal subtype and associated with poor survival rates, highlighting the need for more effective therapy. Methods We investigated a mouse model that closely mimics breast cancer arising in BRCA1-mutation carriers to better understand the molecular mechanism of tumor progression and tested whether targeting of the Polycomb-group protein EZH2 would be a putative therapy for BRCA1-deficient tumors. Results Gene expression analysis demonstrated that EZH2 is overexpressed in BRCA1-deficient mouse mammary tumors. By immunohistochemistry we show that an increase in EZH2 protein levels is also evident in tumors from BRCA1-mutation carriers. EZH2 is responsible for repression of genes driving differentiation and could thus be involved in the undifferentiated phenotype of these tumors. Importantly, we show that BRCA1-deficient cancer cells are selectively dependent on their elevated EZH2 levels. In addition, a chemical inhibitor of EZH2, 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep), is about 20-fold more effective in killing BRCA1-deficient cells compared to BRCA1-proficient mammary tumor cells. Conclusions We demonstrate by specific knock-down experiments that EZH2 overexpression is functionally relevant in BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells. The effectiveness of a small molecule inhibitor indicates that EZH2 is a druggable target. The overexpression of EZH2 in all basal-like breast cancers warrants further investigation of the potential for targeting the genetic make-up of this particular breast cancer type. PMID:19709408

  8. Polycomb-dependent epigenetic landscape in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Dai; Nakagawa, Shota; Hori, Makoto; Kurokawa, Naoya; Soejima, Ai; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakashima, Makoto; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Iwanaga, Masako; Utsunomiya, Atae; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Yamagishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) shows global gene expression alterations that confer cellular characteristics and unfavorable prognosis. However, molecular mechanisms of the sustained expression changes are largely unknown, because there is no study addressing the relationship between landscapes of the gene expression and epigenetic modifications. Here, we analyzed ATL epigenome and integrated it with transcriptome from primary ATL cells and those from corresponding normal CD4(+)T cells to decipher ATL-specific "epigenetic code" that was critical for cell identity. We found that polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated trimethylation at histone H3Lys27 (H3K27me3) was significantly and frequently reprogrammed at half of genes in ATL cells. A large proportion of the abnormal gene downregulation was detected at the early stage of disease progression and was explained by H3K27me3 accumulation. The global H3K27me3 alterations involved ATL-specific gene expression changes that included several tumor suppressors, transcription factors, epigenetic modifiers, miRNAs, and developmental genes, suggesting diverse outcomes by the PRC2-dependent hierarchical regulation. Interestingly, a key enzyme, EZH2, was sensitive to promiscuous signaling network including the NF-κB pathway and was functionally affected by human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) Tax. The Tax-dependent immortalized cells showed H3K27me3 reprogramming that was significantly similar to that of ATL cells. Of note, a majority of the epigenetic silencing has occurred in leukemic cells from indolent ATL and also in HTLV-1-infected T cells from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. Because pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2 reversed epigenetic disruption and selectively eliminated leukemic and HTLV-1-infected cells, targeting the epigenetic elements will hold great promise in treatment and prevention of the onset of ATL and HTLV-1-related diseases. PMID:26773042

  9. Jarid2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell function by acting with polycomb repressive complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, Sarah A.; Galeev, Roman; Flensburg, Christoffer; Keniry, Andrew; Breslin, Kelsey; Gilan, Omer; Lee, Stanley; Liu, Joy; Chen, Kelan; Gearing, Linden J.; Moore, Darcy L.; Alexander, Warren S.; Dawson, Mark; Majewski, Ian J.; Oshlack, Alicia; Larsson, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) plays a key role in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) function. Analyses of mouse mutants harboring deletions of core components have implicated PRC2 in fine-tuning multiple pathways that instruct HSPC behavior, yet how PRC2 is targeted to specific genomic loci within HSPCs remains unknown. Here we use short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown to survey the function of PRC2 accessory factors that were defined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by testing the competitive reconstitution capacity of transduced murine HSPCs. We find that, similar to the phenotype observed upon depletion of core subunit Suz12, depleting Jarid2 enhances the competitive transplantation capacity of both fetal and adult mouse HSPCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of JARID2 enhances the in vitro expansion and in vivo reconstitution capacity of human HSPCs. Gene expression profiling revealed common Suz12 and Jarid2 target genes that are enriched for the H3K27me3 mark established by PRC2. These data implicate Jarid2 as an important component of PRC2 that has a central role in coordinating HSPC function. PMID:25645357

  10. Jarid2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell function by acting with polycomb repressive complex 2.

    PubMed

    Kinkel, Sarah A; Galeev, Roman; Flensburg, Christoffer; Keniry, Andrew; Breslin, Kelsey; Gilan, Omer; Lee, Stanley; Liu, Joy; Chen, Kelan; Gearing, Linden J; Moore, Darcy L; Alexander, Warren S; Dawson, Mark; Majewski, Ian J; Oshlack, Alicia; Larsson, Jonas; Blewitt, Marnie E

    2015-03-19

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) plays a key role in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) function. Analyses of mouse mutants harboring deletions of core components have implicated PRC2 in fine-tuning multiple pathways that instruct HSPC behavior, yet how PRC2 is targeted to specific genomic loci within HSPCs remains unknown. Here we use short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown to survey the function of PRC2 accessory factors that were defined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by testing the competitive reconstitution capacity of transduced murine HSPCs. We find that, similar to the phenotype observed upon depletion of core subunit Suz12, depleting Jarid2 enhances the competitive transplantation capacity of both fetal and adult mouse HSPCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of JARID2 enhances the in vitro expansion and in vivo reconstitution capacity of human HSPCs. Gene expression profiling revealed common Suz12 and Jarid2 target genes that are enriched for the H3K27me3 mark established by PRC2. These data implicate Jarid2 as an important component of PRC2 that has a central role in coordinating HSPC function. PMID:25645357

  11. The iab-7 polycomb response element maps to a nucleosome-free region of chromatin and requires both GAGA and pleiohomeotic for silencing activity.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Mihaly, J; Barges, S; Spierer, A; Karch, F; Hagstrom, K; Schweinsberg, S E; Schedl, P

    2001-02-01

    In the work reported here we have undertaken a functional dissection of a Polycomb response element (PRE) from the iab-7 cis-regulatory domain of the Drosophila melanogaster bithorax complex (BX-C). Previous studies mapped the iab-7 PRE to an 860-bp fragment located just distal to the Fab-7 boundary. Located within this fragment is an approximately 230-bp chromatin-specific nuclease-hypersensitive region called HS3. We have shown that HS3 is capable of functioning as a Polycomb-dependent silencer in vivo, inducing pairing-dependent silencing of a mini-white reporter. The HS3 sequence contains consensus binding sites for the GAGA factor, a protein implicated in the formation of nucleosome-free regions of chromatin, and Pleiohomeotic (Pho), a Polycomb group protein that is related to the mammalian transcription factor YY1. We show that GAGA and Pho interact with these sequences in vitro and that the consensus binding sites for the two proteins are critical for the silencing activity of the iab-7 PRE in vivo. PMID:11158316

  12. Inactivation of Intergenic Enhancers by EBNA3A Initiates and Maintains Polycomb Signatures across a Chromatin Domain Encoding CXCL10 and CXCL9

    PubMed Central

    Harth-Hertle, Marie L.; Scholz, Barbara A.; Erhard, Florian; Glaser, Laura V.; Dölken, Lars; Zimmer, Ralf; Kempkes, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes a persistent infection in human B cells by establishing specific transcription programs to control B cell activation and differentiation. Transcriptional reprogramming of EBV infected B cells is predominantly driven by the action of EBV nuclear antigens, among them the transcriptional repressor EBNA3A. By comparing gene expression profiles of wt and EBNA3A negative EBV infected B cells, we have previously identified a broad array of cellular genes controlled by EBNA3A. We now find that genes repressed by EBNA3A in these cells are significantly enriched for the repressive histone mark H3K27me3, which is installed by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. This PcG-controlled subset of genes also carries H3K27me3 marks in a variety of other tissues, suggesting that the commitment to PcG silencing is an intrinsic feature of these gene loci that can be used by EBNA3A. In addition, EBNA3A targets frequently reside in co-regulated gene clusters. To study the mechanism of gene repression by EBNA3A and to evaluate the relative contribution of PcG proteins during this process, we have selected the genomic neighbors CXCL10 and CXCL9 as a model for co-repressed and PcG-controlled genes. We show that EBNA3A binds to CBF1 occupied intergenic enhancers located between CXCL10 and CXCL9 and displaces the transactivator EBNA2. This impairs enhancer activity, resulting in a rapid transcriptional shut-down of both genes in a CBF1-dependent manner and initiation of a delayed gain of H3K27me3 marks covering an extended chromatin domain. H3K27me3 marks increase gradually and are maintained by EBNA3A. Our study provides direct evidence that repression by EBNA3A requires CBF1 and that EBNA3A and EBNA2 compete for access to CBF1 at identical genomic sites. Most importantly, our results demonstrate that transcriptional silencing by EBNA3A precedes the appearance of repressive PcG marks and indicate that both events are triggered by loss of enhancer activity. PMID

  13. Inactivation of intergenic enhancers by EBNA3A initiates and maintains polycomb signatures across a chromatin domain encoding CXCL10 and CXCL9.

    PubMed

    Harth-Hertle, Marie L; Scholz, Barbara A; Erhard, Florian; Glaser, Laura V; Dölken, Lars; Zimmer, Ralf; Kempkes, Bettina

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes a persistent infection in human B cells by establishing specific transcription programs to control B cell activation and differentiation. Transcriptional reprogramming of EBV infected B cells is predominantly driven by the action of EBV nuclear antigens, among them the transcriptional repressor EBNA3A. By comparing gene expression profiles of wt and EBNA3A negative EBV infected B cells, we have previously identified a broad array of cellular genes controlled by EBNA3A. We now find that genes repressed by EBNA3A in these cells are significantly enriched for the repressive histone mark H3K27me3, which is installed by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. This PcG-controlled subset of genes also carries H3K27me3 marks in a variety of other tissues, suggesting that the commitment to PcG silencing is an intrinsic feature of these gene loci that can be used by EBNA3A. In addition, EBNA3A targets frequently reside in co-regulated gene clusters. To study the mechanism of gene repression by EBNA3A and to evaluate the relative contribution of PcG proteins during this process, we have selected the genomic neighbors CXCL10 and CXCL9 as a model for co-repressed and PcG-controlled genes. We show that EBNA3A binds to CBF1 occupied intergenic enhancers located between CXCL10 and CXCL9 and displaces the transactivator EBNA2. This impairs enhancer activity, resulting in a rapid transcriptional shut-down of both genes in a CBF1-dependent manner and initiation of a delayed gain of H3K27me3 marks covering an extended chromatin domain. H3K27me3 marks increase gradually and are maintained by EBNA3A. Our study provides direct evidence that repression by EBNA3A requires CBF1 and that EBNA3A and EBNA2 compete for access to CBF1 at identical genomic sites. Most importantly, our results demonstrate that transcriptional silencing by EBNA3A precedes the appearance of repressive PcG marks and indicate that both events are triggered by loss of enhancer activity. PMID

  14. Human xeroderma pigmentosum group G gene encodes a DNA endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Habraken, Y; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1994-01-01

    Because of defective nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers. Cell fusion studies have identified seven XP complementation groups, A to G. Previous studies have implicated the products of these seven XP genes in the recognition of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage and in incision of the damage-containing DNA strand. Here, we express the XPG-encoded protein in Sf9 insect cells and purify it to homogeneity. We demonstrate that XPG is a single-strand specific DNA endonuclease, thus identifying the catalytic role of the protein in nucleotide excision repair. We suggest that XPG nuclease acts on the single-stranded region created as a result of the combined action of the XPB helicase and XPD helicase at the DNA damage site. Images PMID:8078765

  15. Th22 cells control colon tumorigenesis through STAT3 and Polycomb Repression complex 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Danfeng; Lin, Yanwei; Hong, Jie; Chen, Haoyan; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Peng, Dongjun; Wei, Shuang; Huang, Emina; Fang, Jingyuan; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2016-08-01

    Th22 cells traffic to and retain in the colon cancer microenvironment, and target core stem cell genes and promote colon cancer stemness via STAT3 and H3K79me2 signaling pathway and contribute to colon carcinogenesis. However, whether Th22 cells affect colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis remains unknown. We studied the interaction between Th22 cells and colon cancer cells in the colon cancer microenvironment. Colon cancer proliferation was examined by flow cytometry analysis and H(3) thymidine incorporation. Cell cycle related genes were quantified by real-time PCR and Western blotting. We transfected colon cancer cells with lentiviral vector encoding specific gene shRNAs and used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to determine the genetic signaling involved in interleukin (IL)-22-mediated colon cancer cell proliferation. We showed that Th22 cells released IL-22 and stimulated colon cancer proliferation. Mechanistically, IL-22 activated STAT3, and subsequently STAT3 bound to the promoter areas of the Polycomb Repression complex 2 (PRC2) components SUZ12 and EED, and stimulated the expression of PRC2. Consequently, the activated PRC2 catalyzed the promoters of the cell cycle check-point genes p16 and p21, and inhibited their expression through H3K27me3-mediated histone methylation, and ultimately caused colon cancer cell proliferation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the levels of IL-22 expression positively correlated with the levels of genes controlling cancer proliferation and cell cycling in colon cancer. In addition to controlling colon cancer stemness, Th22 cells support colon carcinogenesis via affecting colon cancer cell proliferation through a distinct histone modification. PMID:27622053

  16. Th22 cells control colon tumorigenesis through STAT3 and Polycomb Repression complex 2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Danfeng; Lin, Yanwei; Hong, Jie; Chen, Haoyan; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Peng, Dongjun; Wei, Shuang; Huang, Emina; Fang, Jingyuan; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Th22 cells traffic to and retain in the colon cancer microenvironment, and target core stem cell genes and promote colon cancer stemness via STAT3 and H3K79me2 signaling pathway and contribute to colon carcinogenesis. However, whether Th22 cells affect colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis remains unknown. We studied the interaction between Th22 cells and colon cancer cells in the colon cancer microenvironment. Colon cancer proliferation was examined by flow cytometry analysis and H3 thymidine incorporation. Cell cycle related genes were quantified by real-time PCR and Western blotting. We transfected colon cancer cells with lentiviral vector encoding specific gene shRNAs and used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to determine the genetic signaling involved in interleukin (IL)-22-mediated colon cancer cell proliferation. We showed that Th22 cells released IL-22 and stimulated colon cancer proliferation. Mechanistically, IL-22 activated STAT3, and subsequently STAT3 bound to the promoter areas of the Polycomb Repression complex 2 (PRC2) components SUZ12 and EED, and stimulated the expression of PRC2. Consequently, the activated PRC2 catalyzed the promoters of the cell cycle check-point genes p16 and p21, and inhibited their expression through H3K27me3-mediated histone methylation, and ultimately caused colon cancer cell proliferation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the levels of IL-22 expression positively correlated with the levels of genes controlling cancer proliferation and cell cycling in colon cancer. In addition to controlling colon cancer stemness, Th22 cells support colon carcinogenesis via affecting colon cancer cell proliferation through a distinct histone modification. PMID:27622053

  17. Pleiohomeotic Interacts with the Core Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5 to Regulate Gene Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    The early elongation checkpoint regulated by Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) is a critical control point for the expression of many genes. Spt5 interacts directly with RNA polymerase II and has an essential role in establishing this checkpoint, and also for further transcript elongation. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Spt5 interacts both physically and genetically with the Polycomb Group (PcG) protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho), and the majority of Pho binding sites overlap with Spt5 binding sites across the genome in S2 cells. Our results indicate that Pho can interact with Spt5 to regulate transcription elongation in a gene specific manner. PMID:23894613

  18. Evaluation of emm gene types, toxin gene profiles and clonal relatedness of group A streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Firat Zafer; Aktas, Elif; Otlu, Baris; Cömert, Füsun; Külah, Canan; Tas, Ebru; Sümbüloglu, Vildan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate antibiotic susceptibilities, emm gene types, toxin gene profiles and clonal relatedness of group A streptococci (GAS) isolates obtained from patients and carriers. A total of 79 clinical isolates from patients and 60 isolates from carriers were included in the study. Emm typing, toxin gene detection for speA, speB, speC, speG and smeZ genes and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed. Twenty-one distinct emm types were detected; the most common types were emm12, emm89, emm 1, emm77, emm4 and emm3. The detection rates of both emm types and the toxin genes didn’t differ significantly between patients and carriers. The presence of speA and smeZ was significantly higher in emm1 and speG was significantly lower in emm4 when compared to the other emm types. The rate of clustering obtained with PFGE wasn’t significantly different in patients and carriers. As a result, twelve of the 21 emm types detected in this study were covered by the 26-valent vaccine, constituting 77.7% of the emm typeable isolates; however the emm4 type which is one of the most common types in the present study is not among this coverage. PMID:23988167

  19. The epigenetics of stroke recovery and rehabilitation: from polycomb to histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Elder, Jessica; Cortes, Mar; Rykman, Avrielle; Hill, Justin; Karuppagounder, Saravanan; Edwards, Dylan; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2013-10-01

    Classical de-afferentation studies, as well as experience-dependent visual plasticity paradigms, have confirmed that both the developing and adult nervous system are capable of unexpected levels of plasticity. This capacity is underscored by the significant spontaneous recovery that can occur in patients with mild-to-moderate impairment following stroke. An evolving model is that an interaction of biological and environmental factors during all epochs post-stroke influences the extent and quality of this plasticity. Here, we discuss data that have implicated specific epigenetic proteins as integrators of environmental influences in 3 aspects of stroke recovery: spontaneous impairment reduction in humans; peri-infarct rewiring in animals as a paradigm for developing therapeutically-driven impairment reduction beyond natural spontaneous recovery; and, finally, classical hippocampal learning and memory paradigms that are theoretically important in skill acquisition for both impairment reduction and compensatory strategies in the rehabilitation setting. Our discussion focuses primarily on B lymphoma Mo-MLV1 insertion region proteins of the polycomb repressive complex, alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked chromatin remodeling factors, and the best known and most dynamic gene repressors, histone deacetylases. We will highlight exciting current data associated with these proteins and provide promising speculation about how they can be manipulated by drugs, biologics, or noninvasive stimulation for stroke recovery. PMID:24092615

  20. Polycomb repressive complex 2 structure with inhibitor reveals a mechanism of activation and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brooun, Alexei; Gajiwala, Ketan S.; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Bingham, Patrick; He, You-Ai; Diehl, Wade; Grable, Nicole; Kung, Pei-Pei; Sutton, Scott; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Stewart, Al E.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through chromatin reorganization by methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Overexpression of the complex and point mutations in the individual subunits of PRC2 have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. Several inhibitors of the PRC2 activity have shown efficacy in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and are currently in clinical development, although the molecular basis of inhibitor recognition remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of the inhibitor-bound wild-type and Y641N PRC2. The structures illuminate an important role played by a stretch of 17 residues in the N-terminal region of EZH2, we call the activation loop, in the stimulation of the enzyme activity, inhibitor recognition and the potential development of the mutation-mediated drug resistance. The work presented here provides new avenues for the design and development of next-generation PRC2 inhibitors through establishment of a structure-based drug design platform. PMID:27122193

  1. Characteristic low density and shear sensitivity of cross-linked chromatin containing polycomb complexes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Kahn, Tatyana G; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    Chromatin cross-linking is widely used for mapping the distribution of chromosomal proteins by immunoprecipitation, but our knowledge of the physical properties of chromatin complexes remains rudimentary. Density gradients have been long used to separate fragments of cross-linked chromatin with their bound proteins from free protein or free DNA. We find that the association of DNA fragments with very-high-molecular-weight protein complexes shifts their buoyant density to values much lower then that of bulk chromatin. We show that in a CsCl gradient, Polycomb response elements, promoters of active genes, and insulator or boundary elements are found at buoyant densities similar to those of free protein and are depleted from the bulk chromatin fractions. In these regions, the low density is associated with the presence of large protein complexes and with high sensitivity to sonication. Our results suggest that separation of different chromatin regions according to their buoyant density may bias chromatin immunoprecipitation results. Density centrifugation of cross-linked chromatin may provide a simple approach to investigate the properties of large chromatin complexes in vivo. PMID:15601863

  2. Expression of Polycomb Targets Predicts Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Jene-Sanz, Alba; Váraljai, Renáta; Vilkova, Alexandra V.; Khramtsova, Galina F.; Khramtsov, Andrey I.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2013-01-01

    Global changes in the epigenome are increasingly being appreciated as key events in cancer progression. The pathogenic role of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) has been connected to its histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27) methyltransferase activity and gene repression; however, little is known about relationship of changes in expression of EZH2 target genes to cancer characteristics and patient prognosis. Here we show that through expression analysis of genomic regions with H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and EZH2 binding, breast cancer patients can be stratified into good and poor prognostic groups independent of known cancer gene signatures. The EZH2-bound regions were downregulated in tumors characterized by aggressive behavior, high expression of cell cycle genes, and low expression of developmental and cell adhesion genes. Depletion of EZH2 in breast cancer cells significantly increased expression of the top altered genes, decreased proliferation, and improved cell adhesion, indicating a critical role played by EZH2 in determining the cancer phenotype. PMID:23918806

  3. Cloning of the glutamine synthetase gene from group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Suvorov, A N; Flores, A E; Ferrieri, P

    1997-01-01

    The glnA gene from the human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae was cloned from a genomic library prepared with the lambda phage vector lambdaDASHII. A 4.6-kb DNA fragment of one of the recombinant phages was subcloned in pUC18. This Escherichia coli clone expressed a 52-kDa protein encoded by a 1,341-bp open reading frame. The nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame and the deduced amino acid sequence shared a significant degree of homology with the sequences of other glutamine synthetases (GS). The highest homology was between our deduced protein and GS of gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Plasmids with the cloned streptococcal glnA were able to complement E. coli glnA mutants grown on minimal media. Rabbit antisera to streptococcal GS recombinant protein recognized not only the recombinant protein but also a similar-sized band in mutanolysin extracts of all group B streptococcal strains tested, regardless of polysaccharide type or surface protein profile. The amino acid sequence of the deduced protein had similarities to other streptococcal cell-surface-bound proteins. The possible functional role of the immunological features of streptococcal GS is discussed. PMID:8975911

  4. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  5. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2.

    PubMed

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  6. The morphogen Decapentaplegic employs a two-tier mechanism to activate target retinal determining genes during ectopic eye formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Poonam; Gera, Jayati; Mandal, Lolitika; Mandal, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of morphogen in activating its target genes, otherwise epigenetically repressed, during change in cell fate specification is a very fascinating yet relatively unexplored domain. Our in vivo loss-of-function genetic analyses reveal that specifically during ectopic eye formation, the morphogen Decapentaplegic (Dpp), in conjunction with the canonical signaling responsible for transcriptional activation of retinal determining (RD) genes, triggers another signaling cascade. Involving dTak1 and JNK, this pathway down-regulates the expression of polycomb group of genes to do away with their repressive role on RD genes. Upon genetic inactivation of members of this newly identified pathway, the canonical Dpp signaling fails to trigger RD gene expression beyond a threshold, critical for ectopic photoreceptor differentiation. Moreover, the drop in ectopic RD gene expression and subsequent reduction in ectopic photoreceptor differentiation resulting from inactivation of dTak1 can be rescued by down-regulating the expression of polycomb group of genes. Our results unravel an otherwise unknown role of morphogen in coordinating simultaneous transcriptional activation and de-repression of target genes implicating its importance in cellular plasticity. PMID:27270790

  7. The morphogen Decapentaplegic employs a two-tier mechanism to activate target retinal determining genes during ectopic eye formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Poonam; Gera, Jayati; Mandal, Lolitika; Mandal, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of morphogen in activating its target genes, otherwise epigenetically repressed, during change in cell fate specification is a very fascinating yet relatively unexplored domain. Our in vivo loss-of-function genetic analyses reveal that specifically during ectopic eye formation, the morphogen Decapentaplegic (Dpp), in conjunction with the canonical signaling responsible for transcriptional activation of retinal determining (RD) genes, triggers another signaling cascade. Involving dTak1 and JNK, this pathway down-regulates the expression of polycomb group of genes to do away with their repressive role on RD genes. Upon genetic inactivation of members of this newly identified pathway, the canonical Dpp signaling fails to trigger RD gene expression beyond a threshold, critical for ectopic photoreceptor differentiation. Moreover, the drop in ectopic RD gene expression and subsequent reduction in ectopic photoreceptor differentiation resulting from inactivation of dTak1 can be rescued by down-regulating the expression of polycomb group of genes. Our results unravel an otherwise unknown role of morphogen in coordinating simultaneous transcriptional activation and de-repression of target genes implicating its importance in cellular plasticity. PMID:27270790

  8. Structure-Guided Discovery of Selective Antagonists for the Chromodomain of Polycomb Repressive Protein CBX7.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunyan; Smith, Steven G; Yap, Kyoko; Li, SiDe; Li, Jiaojie; Mezei, Mihaly; Rodriguez, Yoel; Vincek, Adam; Aguilo, Francesca; Walsh, Martin J; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2016-06-01

    The chromobox 7 (CBX7) protein of the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) functions to repress transcription of tumor suppressor p16 (INK4a) through long noncoding RNA, ANRIL (antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus) directed chromodomain (ChD) binding to trimethylated lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3), resulting in chromatin compaction at the INK4a/ARF locus. In this study, we report structure-guided discovery of two distinct classes of small-molecule antagonists for the CBX7ChD. Our Class A compounds, a series including analogues of the previously reported MS452, inhibit CBX7ChD/methyl-lysine binding by occupying the H3K27me3 peptide binding site, whereas our Class B compound, the newly discovered MS351, appears to inhibit H3K27me3 binding when CBX7ChD is bound to RNA. Our crystal structure of the CBX7ChD/MS351 complex reveals the molecular details of ligand recognition by the aromatic cage residues that typically engage in methyl-lysine binding. We further demonstrate that MS351 effectively induces transcriptional derepression of CBX7 target genes, including p16 (INK4a) in mouse embryonic stem cells and human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Thus, MS351 represents a new class of ChD antagonists that selectively targets the biologically active form of CBX7 of the PRC1 in long noncoding RNA- and H3K27me3-directed gene transcriptional repression. PMID:27326334

  9. Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Qüesta, Julia I; Song, Jie; Geraldo, Nuno; An, Hailong; Dean, Caroline

    2016-07-29

    The determinants that specify the genomic targets of Polycomb silencing complexes are still unclear. Polycomb silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) accelerates flowering and involves a cold-dependent epigenetic switch. Here we identify a single point mutation at an intragenic nucleation site within FLC that prevents this epigenetic switch from taking place. The mutation blocks nucleation of plant homeodomain-Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PHD-PRC2) and indicates a role for the transcriptional repressor VAL1 in the silencing mechanism. VAL1 localizes to the nucleation region in vivo, promoting histone deacetylation and FLC transcriptional silencing, and interacts with components of the conserved apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex. Sequence-specific targeting of transcriptional repressors thus recruits the machinery for PHD-PRC2 nucleation and epigenetic silencing. PMID:27471304

  10. Mutations in the Drosophila Melanogaster Gene Encoding S-Adenosylmethionine Suppress Position-Effect Variegation

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, J.; Zhang, J.; Rasmuson-Lestander, A.

    1996-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the study of trans-acting modifier mutations of position-effect variegation and Polycomb group (Pc-G) genes have been useful tools to investigate genes involved in chromatin structure. We have cloned a modifier gene, Suppressor of zeste 5 (Su(z)5), which encodes S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, and we present here molecular results and data concerning its expression in mutants and genetic interactions. The mutant alleles Su(z)5, l(2)R23 and l(2)M6 show suppression of w(m4) and also of two white mutants induced by roo element insertions in the regulatory region i.e., w(is) (in combination with z(1)) and w(sp1). Two of the Su(z)5 alleles, as well as a deletion of the gene, also act as enhancers of Polycomb by increasing the size of sex combs on midleg. The results suggest that Su(z)5 is connected with regulation of chromatin structure. The enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthetase is involved in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine, a methyl group donor and also, after decarboxylation, a propylamino group donor in the bio-synthesis of polyamines. Our results from HPLC analysis show that in ovaries from heterozygous Su(z)5 mutants the content of spermine is significantly reduced. Results presented here suggest that polyamines are an important molecule class in the regulation of chromatin structure. PMID:8725236

  11. Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine suppress position-effect variegation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, J.; Rasmuson-Lestander, A.; Zhang, Jingpu

    1996-06-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the study of trans-acting modifier mutations of position-effect variegation and Polycomb group (Pc-G) genes have been useful tools to investigate genes involved in chromatin structure. We have cloned a modifier gene, Suppressor of zeste 5 (Su(z)5), which encodes S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, and we present here molecular results and data concerning its expression in mutants and genetic interactions. The mutant alleles Su(z)5, l(2)R23 and l(2)M6 show suppression of w{sup m4} and also of two white mutants induced by roo element insertions in the regulatory region i.e., w{sup is} (in combination with z{sup 1}) and w{sup sp1}. Two of the Su(z)5 alleles, as well as a deletion of the gene, also act as enhancers of Polycomb by increasing the size of sex combes on midleg. The results suggest that Su(z)5 is connected with regulation of chromatin structure. The enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthetase is involved in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine, a methyl group donor and also, after decarboxylation, a propylamino group donor in the biosynthesis of polyamines. Our results from HPLC analysis show that in ovaries from heterozygous Su(z)5 mutants the content of spermine is significantly reduced. Results presented here suggest that polyamines are an important molecule class in the regulation of chromatin structure. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. MAMMALIAN CELL GENE MUTATION ASSAYS WORKING GROUP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian cell gene mutation assays have been used for many years and the diversity of the available systems attests to the varied methods found to grow mammalian dells and detect mutations. s part of the International Workshop on Standardization of Genotoxicity Test Procedures, ...

  13. MicroRNA-128 coordinately targets Polycomb Repressor Complexes in glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzi, Pierpaolo; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Nowicki, Michal O.; Wang, Yan; Ogawa, Daisuke; Price, Richard; Nakano, Ichiro; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Hayes, Josie; Lawler, Sean E.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Godlewski, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    Background The Polycomb Repressor Complex (PRC) is an epigenetic regulator of transcription whose action is mediated by 2 protein complexes, PRC1 and PRC2. PRC is oncogenic in glioblastoma, where it is involved in cancer stem cell maintenance and radioresistance. Methods We used a set of glioblastoma patient samples, glioma stem cells, and neural stem cells from a mouse model of glioblastoma. We characterized gene/protein expression and cellular phenotypes by quantitative PCR/Western blotting and clonogenic, cell-cycle, and DNA damage assays. We performed overexpression/knockdown studies by lentiviral infection and microRNA/small interfering RNA oligonucleotide transfection. Results We show that microRNA-128 (miR-128) directly targets mRNA of SUZ12, a key component of PRC2, in addition to BMI1, a component of PRC1 that we previously showed as a target as well. This blocks the partially redundant functions of PRC1/PRC2, thereby significantly reducing PRC activity and its associated histone modifications. MiR-128 and SUZ12/BMI1 show opposite expression in human glioblastomas versus normal brain and in glioma stemlike versus neural stem cells. Furthermore, miR-128 renders glioma stemlike cells less radioresistant by preventing the radiation-induced expression of both PRC components. Finally, miR-128 expression is significantly reduced in neural stem cells from the brain of young, presymptomatic mice in our mouse model of glioblastoma. This suggests that loss of miR-128 expression in brain is an early event in gliomagenesis. Moreover, knockdown of miR-128 expression in nonmalignant mouse and human neural stem cells led to elevated expression of PRC components and increased clonogenicity. Conclusions MiR-128 is an important suppressor of PRC activity, and its absence is an early event in gliomagenesis. PMID:23733246

  14. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs. PMID:26938987

  15. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs. PMID:26938987

  16. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Gene Transcription and Implications for Synaptic Plasticity and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansen; Zhuo, Min

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) initiates a wide variety of signaling pathways. Group I mGluR activation can regulate gene expression at both translational and transcriptional levels, and induces translation or transcription-dependent synaptic plastic changes in neurons. The group I mGluR-mediated translation-dependent neural plasticity has been well reviewed. In this review, we will highlight group I mGluR-induced gene transcription and its role in synaptic plasticity. The signaling pathways (PKA, CaMKs, and MAPKs) which have been shown to link group I mGluRs to gene transcription, the relevant transcription factors (CREB and NF-κB), and target proteins (FMRP and ARC) will be documented. The significance and future direction for characterizing group I mGluR-mediated gene transcription in fragile X syndrome, schizophrenia, drug addiction, and other neurological disorders will also be discussed. PMID:23125836

  17. Misannotation Awareness: A Tale of Two Gene-Groups

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Tania; Campos, M. Doroteia; Lucic-Mercy, Eva; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Incorrectly or simply not annotated data is largely increasing in most public databases, undoubtedly caused by the rise in sequence data and the more recent boom of genomic projects. Molecular biologists and bioinformaticists should join efforts to tackle this issue. Practical challenges have been experienced when studying the alternative oxidase (AOX) gene family, and hence the motivation for the present work. Commonly used databases were screened for their capacity to distinguish AOX from the plastid terminal oxidase (also called plastoquinol terminal oxidase; PTOX) and we put forward a simple approach, based on amino acids signatures, that unequivocally distinguishes these gene families. Further, available sequence data on the AOX family in plants was carefully revised to: (1) confirm the classification as AOX and (2) identify to which AOX family member they belong to. We bring forward the urgent need of misannotation awareness and re-annotation of public AOX sequences by highlighting different types of misclassifications and the large under-estimation of data availability. PMID:27379147

  18. Misannotation Awareness: A Tale of Two Gene-Groups.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Tania; Campos, M Doroteia; Lucic-Mercy, Eva; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Incorrectly or simply not annotated data is largely increasing in most public databases, undoubtedly caused by the rise in sequence data and the more recent boom of genomic projects. Molecular biologists and bioinformaticists should join efforts to tackle this issue. Practical challenges have been experienced when studying the alternative oxidase (AOX) gene family, and hence the motivation for the present work. Commonly used databases were screened for their capacity to distinguish AOX from the plastid terminal oxidase (also called plastoquinol terminal oxidase; PTOX) and we put forward a simple approach, based on amino acids signatures, that unequivocally distinguishes these gene families. Further, available sequence data on the AOX family in plants was carefully revised to: (1) confirm the classification as AOX and (2) identify to which AOX family member they belong to. We bring forward the urgent need of misannotation awareness and re-annotation of public AOX sequences by highlighting different types of misclassifications and the large under-estimation of data availability. PMID:27379147

  19. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  20. No Distinction of Orthology/Paralogy between Human and Chimpanzee Rh Blood Group Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Takashi; Kim, Choong-Gon; Blancher, Antoine; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-01-01

    On human (Homo sapiens) chromosome 1, there is a tandem duplication encompassing Rh blood group genes (Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE). This duplication occurred in the common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and gorillas, after splitting from their common ancestor with orangutans. Although several studies have been conducted on ape Rh blood group genes, the clear genome structures of the gene clusters remain unknown. Here, we determined the genome structure of the gene cluster of chimpanzee Rh genes by sequencing five BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) clones derived from chimpanzees. We characterized three complete loci (Patr_RHα, Patr_RHβ, and Patr_RHγ). In the Patr_RHβ locus, a short version of the gene, which lacked the middle part containing exons 4–8, was observed. The Patr_RHα and Patr_RHβ genes were located on the locations corresponding to Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE, respectively, and Patr_RHγ was in the immediate vicinity of Patr_RHβ. Sequence comparisons revealed high sequence similarity between Patr_RHβ and Hosa_RHCE, while the chimpanzee Rh gene closest to Hosa_RHD was not Patr_RHα but rather Patr_RHγ. The results suggest that rearrangements and gene conversions frequently occurred between these genes and that the classic orthology/paralogy dichotomy no longer holds between human and chimpanzee Rh blood group genes. PMID:26872772

  1. No Distinction of Orthology/Paralogy between Human and Chimpanzee Rh Blood Group Genes.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takashi; Kim, Choong-Gon; Blancher, Antoine; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-03-01

    On human (Homo sapiens) chromosome 1, there is a tandem duplication encompassing Rh blood group genes (Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE). This duplication occurred in the common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and gorillas, after splitting from their common ancestor with orangutans. Although several studies have been conducted on ape Rh blood group genes, the clear genome structures of the gene clusters remain unknown. Here, we determined the genome structure of the gene cluster of chimpanzee Rh genes by sequencing five BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) clones derived from chimpanzees. We characterized three complete loci (Patr_RHα, Patr_RHβ, and Patr_RHγ). In the Patr_RHβ locus, a short version of the gene, which lacked the middle part containing exons 4-8, was observed. The Patr_RHα and Patr_RHβ genes were located on the locations corresponding to Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE, respectively, and Patr_RHγ was in the immediate vicinity of Patr_RHβ. Sequence comparisons revealed high sequence similarity between Patr_RHβ and Hosa_RHCE, while the chimpanzee Rh gene closest to Hosa_RHD was not Patr_RHα but rather Patr_RHγ. The results suggest that rearrangements and gene conversions frequently occurred between these genes and that the classic orthology/paralogy dichotomy no longer holds between human and chimpanzee Rh blood group genes. PMID:26872772

  2. Functional gene group analysis indicates no role for heterotrimeric G proteins in cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Hill, W David; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Davies, Gail; Liewald, David Cherry McLachlan; Payton, Anthony; Craig, Leone C A; Whalley, Lawrence J; Horan, Mike; Ollier, William; Starr, John M; Pendleton, Neil; Posthuma, Danielle; Bates, Timothy C; Deary, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Previous functional gene group analyses implicated common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in heterotrimeric G protein coding genes as being associated with differences in human intelligence. Here, we sought to replicate this finding using five independent cohorts of older adults including current IQ and childhood IQ, and using both gene- and SNP-based analytic strategies. No significant associations were found between variation in heterotrimeric G protein genes and intelligence in any cohort at either of the two time points. These results indicate that, whereas G protein systems are important in cognition, common genetic variation in these genes is unlikely to be a substantial influence on human intelligence differences. PMID:24626473

  3. Mice Expressing RHAG and RHD Human Blood Group Genes

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Dominique; da Silva, Nelly; Metral, Sylvain; Cortes, Ulrich; Callebaut, Isabelle; Picot, Julien; Mouro-Chanteloup, Isabelle; Cartron, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Anti-RhD prophylaxis of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is highly effective, but as the suppressive mechanism remains uncertain, a mouse model would be of interest. Here we have generated transgenic mice expressing human RhAG and RhD erythrocyte membrane proteins in the presence and, for human RhAG, in the absence, of mouse Rhag. Human RhAG associates with mouse Rh but not mouse Rhag on red blood cells. In Rhag knockout mice transgenic for human RHAG, the mouse Rh protein is “rescued” (re-expressed), and co-immunoprecipitates with human RhAG, indicating the presence of hetero-complexes which associate mouse and human proteins. RhD antigen was expressed from a human RHD gene on a BAC or from RHD cDNA under control of β-globin regulatory elements. RhD was never observed alone, strongly indicative that its expression absolutely depends on the presence of transgenic human RhAG. This first expression of RhD in mice is an important step in the creation of a mouse model of RhD allo-immunisation and HDFN, in conjunction with the Rh-Rhag knockout mice we have developed previously. PMID:24260394

  4. Mice expressing RHAG and RHD human blood group genes.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Dominique; da Silva, Nelly; Metral, Sylvain; Cortes, Ulrich; Callebaut, Isabelle; Picot, Julien; Mouro-Chanteloup, Isabelle; Cartron, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Anti-RhD prophylaxis of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is highly effective, but as the suppressive mechanism remains uncertain, a mouse model would be of interest. Here we have generated transgenic mice expressing human RhAG and RhD erythrocyte membrane proteins in the presence and, for human RhAG, in the absence, of mouse Rhag. Human RhAG associates with mouse Rh but not mouse Rhag on red blood cells. In Rhag knockout mice transgenic for human RHAG, the mouse Rh protein is "rescued" (re-expressed), and co-immunoprecipitates with human RhAG, indicating the presence of hetero-complexes which associate mouse and human proteins. RhD antigen was expressed from a human RHD gene on a BAC or from RHD cDNA under control of β-globin regulatory elements. RhD was never observed alone, strongly indicative that its expression absolutely depends on the presence of transgenic human RhAG. This first expression of RhD in mice is an important step in the creation of a mouse model of RhD allo-immunisation and HDFN, in conjunction with the Rh-Rhag knockout mice we have developed previously. PMID:24260394

  5. A comparison of reptilian and avian olfactory receptor gene repertoires: Species-specific expansion of group γ genes in birds

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Silke S; Kuryshev, Vladimir Y; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Kempenaers, Bart; Mueller, Jakob C

    2009-01-01

    Background The detection of odorants is mediated by olfactory receptors (ORs). ORs are G-protein coupled receptors that form a remarkably large protein superfamily in vertebrate genomes. We used data that became available through recent sequencing efforts of reptilian and avian genomes to identify the complete OR gene repertoires in a lizard, the green anole (Anolis carolinensis), and in two birds, the chicken (Gallus gallus) and the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). Results We identified 156 green anole OR genes, including 42 pseudogenes. The OR gene repertoire of the two bird species was substantially larger with 479 and 553 OR gene homologs in the chicken and zebra finch, respectively (including 111 and 221 pseudogenes, respectively). We show that the green anole has a higher fraction of intact OR genes (~72%) compared with the chicken (~66%) and the zebra finch (~38%). We identified a larger number and a substantially higher proportion of intact OR gene homologs in the chicken genome than previously reported (214 versus 82 genes and 66% versus 15%, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis showed that lizard and bird OR gene repertoires consist of group α, θ and γ genes. Interestingly, the vast majority of the avian OR genes are confined to a large expansion of a single branch (the so called γ-c clade). An analysis of the selective pressure on the paralogous genes of each γ-c clade revealed that they have been subjected to adaptive evolution. This expansion appears to be bird-specific and not sauropsid-specific, as it is lacking from the lizard genome. The γ-c expansions of the two birds do not intermix, i.e., they are lineage-specific. Almost all (group γ-c) OR genes mapped to the unknown chromosome. The remaining OR genes mapped to six homologous chromosomes plus three to four additional chromosomes in the zebra finch and chicken. Conclusion We identified a surprisingly large number of potentially functional avian OR genes. Our data supports recent

  6. Classification of Arabidopsis thaliana gene sequences: clustering of coding sequences into two groups according to codon usage improves gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Mathé, C; Peresetsky, A; Déhais, P; Van Montagu, M; Rouzé, P

    1999-02-01

    While genomic sequences are accumulating, finding the location of the genes remains a major issue that can be solved only for about a half of them by homology searches. Prediction methods are thus required, but unfortunately are not fully satisfying. Most prediction methods implicitly assume a unique model for genes. This is an oversimplification as demonstrated by the possibility to group coding sequences into several classes in Escherichia coli and other genomes. As no classification existed for Arabidopsis thaliana, we classified genes according to the statistical features of their coding sequences. A clustering algorithm using a codon usage model was developed and applied to coding sequences from A. thaliana, E. coli, and a mixture of both. By using it, Arabidopsis sequences were clustered into two classes. The CU1 and CU2 classes differed essentially by the choice of pyrimidine bases at the codon silent sites: CU2 genes often use C whereas CU1 genes prefer T. This classification discriminated the Arabidopsis genes according to their expressiveness, highly expressed genes being clustered in CU2 and genes expected to have a lower expression, such as the regulatory genes, in CU1. The algorithm separated the sequences of the Escherichia-Arabidopsis mixed data set into five classes according to the species, except for one class. This mixed class contained 89 % Arabidopsis genes from CU1 and 11 % E. coli genes, mostly horizontally transferred. Interestingly, most genes encoding organelle-targeted proteins, except the photosynthetic and photoassimilatory ones, were clustered in CU1. By tailoring the GeneMark CDS prediction algorithm to the observed coding sequence classes, its quality of prediction was greatly improved. Similar improvement can be expected with other prediction systems. PMID:9925779

  7. Gene arrangement at the Rhesus blood group locus of chimpanzees detected by fiber-FISH.

    PubMed

    Suto, Y; Ishikawa, Y; Hyodo, H; Ishida, T; Kasai, F; Tanoue, T; Hayasaka, I; Uchikawa, M; Juji, T; Hirai, M

    2003-01-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group system in humans is encoded by two genes with high sequence homology. These two genes, namely, RHCE and RHD, have been implied to be duplicated during evolution. However, the genomic organization of Rh genes in chimpanzees and other nonhuman primates has not been precisely studied. We analyzed the arrangement of the Rh genes of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization on chromatin DNA fibers (fiber-FISH) using two genomic DNA probes that respectively contain introns 3 and 7 of human RH genes. Among the five chimpanzees studied, three were found to be homozygous for the two-Rh-gene type, in an arrangement of Rh (5'-->3') - Rh (3'<--5'). Although a similar gene arrangement can be detected in the RH gene locus of typical Rh-positive humans, the distance between the two genes in chimpanzees was about 50 kb longer than that in humans. The remaining two chimpanzees were homozygous for a four-Rh-gene type, in an arrangement of Rh (5'-->3') - Rh (3'<--5') - Rh (3'<--5') - Rh (3'<--5') within a region spanning about 300 kb. This four-Rh-gene type has not been detected in humans. Further analysis of other great apes showed different gene arrangements: a bonobo was homozygous for the three-Rh-gene type; a gorilla was heterozygous for the one-Rh- and two-Rh-gene types; an orangutan was homozygous for the one-Rh-gene type. Our findings on the intra- and interspecific genomic variations in the Rh gene locus in Hominoids would shed further light on reconstructing the genomic pathways of Rh gene duplication during evolution. PMID:14610358

  8. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  9. Evolutionary Genomics of Genes Involved in Olfactory Behavior in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Nicolás; Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Hernán; Hasson, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Previous comparative genomic studies of genes involved in olfactory behavior in Drosophila focused only on particular gene families such as odorant receptor and/or odorant binding proteins. However, olfactory behavior has a complex genetic architecture that is orchestrated by many interacting genes. In this paper, we present a comparative genomic study of olfactory behavior in Drosophila including an extended set of genes known to affect olfactory behavior. We took advantage of the recent burst of whole genome sequences and the development of powerful statistical tools to analyze genomic data and test evolutionary and functional hypotheses of olfactory genes in the six species of the Drosophila melanogaster species group for which whole genome sequences are available. Our study reveals widespread purifying selection and limited incidence of positive selection on olfactory genes. We show that the pace of evolution of olfactory genes is mostly independent of the life cycle stage, and of the number of life cycle stages, in which they participate in olfaction. However, we detected a relationship between evolutionary rates and the position that the gene products occupy in the olfactory system, genes occupying central positions tend to be more constrained than peripheral genes. Finally, we demonstrate that specialization to one host does not seem to be associated with bursts of adaptive evolution in olfactory genes in D. sechellia and D. erecta, the two specialists species analyzed, but rather different lineages have idiosyncratic evolutionary histories in which both historical and ecological factors have been involved. PMID:22346339

  10. Selective Inhibition of CBX6: A Methyllysine Reader Protein in the Polycomb Family.

    PubMed

    Milosevich, Natalia; Gignac, Michael C; McFarlane, James; Simhadri, Chakravarthi; Horvath, Shanti; Daze, Kevin D; Croft, Caitlin S; Dheri, Aman; Quon, Taylor T H; Douglas, Sarah F; Wulff, Jeremy E; Paci, Irina; Hof, Fraser

    2016-02-11

    The polycomb paralogs CBX2, CBX4, CBX6, CBX7, and CBX8 are epigenetic readers that rely on "aromatic cage" motifs to engage their partners' methyllysine side chains. Each CBX carries out distinct functions, yet each includes a highly similar methyllysine-reading chromodomain as a key element. CBX7 is the only chromodomain that has yet been targeted by chemical inhibition. We report a small set of peptidomimetic agents in which a simple chemical modification switches the ligands from one with promiscuity across all polycomb paralogs to one that provides selective inhibition of CBX6. The structural basis for this selectivity, which involves occupancy of a small hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the aromatic cage, was confirmed through molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate the increases in affinity and selectivity generated by ligands that engage extended regions of chromodomain binding surfaces. PMID:26985288

  11. Functional characterization of an apple apomixis-related MhFIE gene in reproduction development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Dong, Qing-Long; Sun, Chao; Wang, Qing-Lian; You, Chun-Xiang; Yao, Yu-Xin; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2012-04-01

    The products of the FIS genes play important regulatory roles in diverse developmental processes, especially in seed formation after fertilization. In this study, a FIS-class gene MhFIE was isolated from apple. It encoded a predicted protein highly similar to polycomb group (PcG) protein FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE). MhFIE functioned as an Arabidopsis FIE homologue, as indicated by functional complementation experiment using Arabidopsis fie mutant. In addition, BiFC assay showed that MhFIE protein interacted with AtCLF. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis ectopically expressing MhFIE produced less APETALA3 (AtAP3) and AGAMOUS (AtAG) transcripts than WT control, and therefore exhibited abnormal flower, seed development. These results suggested that polycomb complex including FIE and CLF proteins played an important role in reproductive development by regulating the expression of its downstream genes. In addition, it was found that MhFIE constitutively expressed in various tissues tested. Its expression levels were lower in apomictic apple species than the sexual reproductive species, suggested it was possibly involved into apomixis in apple. Furthermore, the hybrids of tea crabapple generated MhFIE transcripts at different levels. The parthenogenesis capacity was negatively correlated with MhFIE expression level in these hybrids. These results suggested that MhFIE was involved into the regulation of flower development and apomixis in apple. PMID:22325871

  12. An integrative evolution theory of histo-blood group ABO and related genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Saitou, Naruya; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The ABO system is one of the most important blood group systems in transfusion/transplantation medicine. However, the evolutionary significance of the ABO gene and its polymorphism remained unknown. We took an integrative approach to gain insights into the significance of the evolutionary process of ABO genes, including those related not only phylogenetically but also functionally. We experimentally created a code table correlating amino acid sequence motifs of the ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases with GalNAc (A)/galactose (B) specificity, and assigned A/B specificity to individual ABO genes from various species thus going beyond the simple sequence comparison. Together with genome information and phylogenetic analyses, this assignment revealed early appearance of A and B gene sequences in evolution and potentially non-allelic presence of both gene sequences in some animal species. We argue: Evolution may have suppressed the establishment of two independent, functional A and B genes in most vertebrates and promoted A/B conversion through amino acid substitutions and/or recombination; A/B allelism should have existed in common ancestors of primates; and bacterial ABO genes evolved through horizontal and vertical gene transmission into 2 separate groups encoding glycosyltransferases with distinct sugar specificities. PMID:25307962

  13. The Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 Protein BMI1 Is Required for Constitutive Heterochromatin Formation and Silencing in Mammalian Somatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Abdouh, Mohamed; Hanna, Roy; El Hajjar, Jida; Flamier, Anthony; Bernier, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    The polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), containing the core BMI1 and RING1A/B proteins, mono-ubiquitinylates histone H2A (H2A(ub)) and is associated with silenced developmental genes at facultative heterochromatin. It is, however, assumed that the PRC1 is excluded from constitutive heterochromatin in somatic cells based on work performed on mouse embryonic stem cells and oocytes. We show here that BMI1 is required for constitutive heterochromatin formation and silencing in human and mouse somatic cells. BMI1 was highly enriched at intergenic and pericentric heterochromatin, co-immunoprecipitated with the architectural heterochromatin proteins HP1, DEK1, and ATRx, and was required for their localization. In contrast, BRCA1 localization was BMI1-independent and partially redundant with that of BMI1 for H2A(ub) deposition, constitutive heterochromatin formation, and silencing. These observations suggest a dynamic and developmentally regulated model of PRC1 occupancy at constitutive heterochromatin, and where BMI1 function in somatic cells is to stabilize the repetitive genome. PMID:26468281

  14. Structural basis of oncogenic histone H3K27M inhibition of human polycomb repressive complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Justin, Neil; Zhang, Ying; Tarricone, Cataldo; Martin, Stephen R.; Chen, Shuyang; Underwood, Elizabeth; De Marco, Valeria; Haire, Lesley F.; Walker, Philip A.; Reinberg, Danny; Wilson, Jon R.; Gamblin, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) silences gene expression through trimethylation of K27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) via its catalytic SET domain. A missense mutation in the substrate of PRC2, histone H3K27M, is associated with certain pediatric brain cancers and is linked to a global decrease of H3K27me3 in the affected cells thought to be mediated by inhibition of PRC2 activity. We present here the crystal structure of human PRC2 in complex with the inhibitory H3K27M peptide bound to the active site of the SET domain, with the methionine residue located in the pocket that normally accommodates the target lysine residue. The structure and binding studies suggest a mechanism for the oncogenic inhibition of H3K27M. The structure also reveals how binding of repressive marks, like H3K27me3, to the EED subunit of the complex leads to enhancement of the catalytic efficiency of the SET domain and thus the propagation of this repressive histone modification. PMID:27121947

  15. Structural basis of oncogenic histone H3K27M inhibition of human polycomb repressive complex 2.

    PubMed

    Justin, Neil; Zhang, Ying; Tarricone, Cataldo; Martin, Stephen R; Chen, Shuyang; Underwood, Elizabeth; De Marco, Valeria; Haire, Lesley F; Walker, Philip A; Reinberg, Danny; Wilson, Jon R; Gamblin, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) silences gene expression through trimethylation of K27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) via its catalytic SET domain. A missense mutation in the substrate of PRC2, histone H3K27M, is associated with certain pediatric brain cancers and is linked to a global decrease of H3K27me3 in the affected cells thought to be mediated by inhibition of PRC2 activity. We present here the crystal structure of human PRC2 in complex with the inhibitory H3K27M peptide bound to the active site of the SET domain, with the methionine residue located in the pocket that normally accommodates the target lysine residue. The structure and binding studies suggest a mechanism for the oncogenic inhibition of H3K27M. The structure also reveals how binding of repressive marks, like H3K27me3, to the EED subunit of the complex leads to enhancement of the catalytic efficiency of the SET domain and thus the propagation of this repressive histone modification. PMID:27121947

  16. DNMT3A R882 mutants interact with polycomb proteins to block haematopoietic stem and leukaemic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Junji; Kataoka, Keisuke; Sato, Tomohiko; Bando, Masashige; Kato, Yuki; Tsuruta-Kishino, Takako; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Narukawa, Kensuke; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical impact of DNMT3A mutation on acute myeloid leukaemia, the molecular mechanisms regarding how this mutation causes leukaemogenesis in vivo are largely unknown. Here we show that, in murine transplantation experiments, recipients transplanted with DNMT3A mutant-transduced cells exhibit aberrant haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) accumulation. Differentiation-associated genes are downregulated without accompanying changes in methylation status of their promoter-associated CpG islands in DNMT3A mutant-transduced stem/progenitor cells, representing a DNA methylation-independent role of mutated DNMT3A. DNMT3A R882H also promotes monoblastic transformation in vitro in combination with HOXA9. Molecularly, the DNMT3A mutant interacts with polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), causing transcriptional silencing, revealing a DNA methylation-independent role of DNMT3A mutation. Suppression of PRC1 impairs aberrant HSC accumulation and monoblastic transformation. From our data, it is shown that DNMT3A mutants can block the differentiation of HSCs and leukaemic cells via PRC1. This interaction could be targetable in DNMT3A-mutated leukaemias. PMID:27010239

  17. Statistical methods in detecting differential expressed genes, analyzing insertion tolerance for genes and group selection for survival data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangfang

    The thesis is composed of three independent projects: (i) analyzing transposon-sequencing data to infer functions of genes on bacteria growth (chapter 2), (ii) developing semi-parametric Bayesian method for differential gene expression analysis with RNA-sequencing data (chapter 3), (iii) solving group selection problem for survival data (chapter 4). All projects are motivated by statistical challenges raised in biological research. The first project is motivated by the need to develop statistical models to accommodate the transposon insertion sequencing (Tn-Seq) data, Tn-Seq data consist of sequence reads around each transposon insertion site. The detection of transposon insertion at a given site indicates that the disruption of genomic sequence at this site does not cause essential function loss and the bacteria can still grow. Hence, such measurements have been used to infer the functions of each gene on bacteria growth. We propose a zero-inflated Poisson regression method for analyzing the Tn-Seq count data, and derive an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain parameter estimates. We also propose a multiple testing procedure that categorizes genes into each of the three states, hypo-tolerant, tolerant, and hyper-tolerant, while controlling false discovery rate. Simulation studies show our method provides good estimation of model parameters and inference on gene functions. In the second project, we model the count data from RNA-sequencing experiment for each gene using a Poisson-Gamma hierarchical model, or equivalently, a negative binomial (NB) model. We derive a full semi-parametric Bayesian approach with Dirichlet process as the prior for the fold changes between two treatment means. An inference strategy using Gibbs algorithm is developed for differential expression analysis. We evaluate our method with several simulation studies, and the results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods including the popularly applied ones such as edge

  18. Superantigen genes in group A streptococcal isolates and their relationship with emm types.

    PubMed

    Commons, Robert; Rogers, Susan; Gooding, Travis; Danchin, Margie; Carapetis, Jonathan; Robins-Browne, Roy; Curtis, Nigel

    2008-10-01

    Superantigens are important virulence factors in the pathogenesis of invasive disease caused by group A streptococcus (GAS). There has been a recent re-emergence of this disease worldwide. A number of novel superantigens have been described recently. This study investigated 107 isolates of GAS for possession of each of the 11 currently known superantigen genes to determine the prevalence, co-occurrence and genetic restriction amongst different emm types of GAS. The results were compared with those in previously published studies. Superantigen genes were not randomly distributed amongst GAS isolates. Certain combinations of superantigen genes were more common and the majority of emm types showed restricted superantigen profiles. This is the first prevalence study of GAS isolates to include the complete range of known superantigen genes and their restriction amongst emm types. This study contributes to the understanding of the relationship between superantigen genes and emm types, and highlights the importance of comprehensive studies in different populations. PMID:18809552

  19. Statistical Assessment of Crosstalk Enrichment between Gene Groups in Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Alexeyenko, Andrey; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Analyzing groups of functionally coupled genes or proteins in the context of global interaction networks has become an important aspect of bioinformatic investigations. Assessing the statistical significance of crosstalk enrichment between or within groups of genes can be a valuable tool for functional annotation of experimental gene sets. Results Here we present CrossTalkZ, a statistical method and software to assess the significance of crosstalk enrichment between pairs of gene or protein groups in large biological networks. We demonstrate that the standard z-score is generally an appropriate and unbiased statistic. We further evaluate the ability of four different methods to reliably recover crosstalk within known biological pathways. We conclude that the methods preserving the second-order topological network properties perform best. Finally, we show how CrossTalkZ can be used to annotate experimental gene sets using known pathway annotations and that its performance at this task is superior to gene enrichment analysis (GEA). Availability and Implementation CrossTalkZ (available at http://sonnhammer.sbc.su.se/download/software/CrossTalkZ/) is implemented in C++, easy to use, fast, accepts various input file formats, and produces a number of statistics. These include z-score, p-value, false discovery rate, and a test of normality for the null distributions. PMID:23372799

  20. CpG island erosion, polycomb occupancy and sequence motif enrichment at bivalent promoters in mammalian embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mantsoki, Anna; Devailly, Guillaume; Joshi, Anagha

    2015-01-01

    In embryonic stem (ES) cells, developmental regulators have a characteristic bivalent chromatin signature marked by simultaneous presence of both activation (H3K4me3) and repression (H3K27me3) signals and are thought to be in a ‘poised’ state for subsequent activation or silencing during differentiation. We collected eleven pairs (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) of ChIP sequencing datasets in human ES cells and eight pairs in murine ES cells, and predicted high-confidence (HC) bivalent promoters. Over 85% of H3K27me3 marked promoters were bivalent in human and mouse ES cells. We found that (i) HC bivalent promoters were enriched for developmental factors and were highly likely to be differentially expressed upon transcription factor perturbation; (ii) murine HC bivalent promoters were occupied by both polycomb repressive component classes (PRC1 and PRC2) and grouped into four distinct clusters with different biological functions; (iii) HC bivalent and active promoters were CpG rich while H3K27me3-only promoters lacked CpG islands. Binding enrichment of distinct sets of regulators distinguished bivalent from active promoters. Moreover, a ‘TCCCC’ sequence motif was specifically enriched in bivalent promoters. Finally, this analysis will serve as a resource for future studies to further understand transcriptional regulation during embryonic development. PMID:26582124

  1. Reptin and Pontin function antagonistically with PcG and TrxG complexes to mediate Hox gene control

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Soda Balla; Bertaux, Karine; Vasanthi, Dasari; Sarkeshik, Ali; Goirand, Benjamin; Aragnol, Denise; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Cole, Michael D; Pradel, Jacques; Yates, John R; Mishra, Rakesh K; Graba, Yacine; Saurin, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Pontin (Pont) and Reptin (Rept) are paralogous ATPases that are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. They are recruited in multiprotein complexes that function in various aspects of DNA metabolism. They are essential for viability and have antagonistic roles in tissue growth, cell signalling and regulation of the tumour metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, indicating that the balance of Pont and Rept regulates epigenetic programmes critical for development and cancer progression. Here, we describe Pont and Rept as antagonistic mediators of Drosophila Hox gene transcription, functioning with Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group proteins to maintain correct patterns of expression. We show that Rept is a component of the PRC1 PcG complex, whereas Pont purifies with the Brahma complex. Furthermore, the enzymatic functions of Rept and Pont are indispensable for maintaining Hox gene expression states, highlighting the importance of these two antagonistic factors in transcriptional output. PMID:18259215

  2. Genome-wide analysis of the maize (Zea may L.) CPP-like gene family and expression profiling under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Song, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Wu, F C; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine-rich polycomb-like (CPP) proteins are members of a small family of transcription factors, which have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis, rice, and soybean. In this study, we investigated CPP-like genes in the maize genome. The results revealed 13 putative CPP-like genes, which were found to encode 17 distinct transcripts and were distributed unequally on 7 of 10 maize chromosomes. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships showed that Arabidopsis, rice, and maize CPP-like transcription factors can be grouped into two subfamilies. We also used real-time RT-PCR to evaluate changes in the transcript levels of ZmCPP genes in response to abiotic stresses (heat, cold, salt, and drought stresses). These findings provide an overview of the evolution of the ZmCPP gene family, which will aid in the functional characterization of CPP-like genes in maize growth and development. PMID:27525875

  3. Overexpression of HOX genes is prevalent in Ewing sarcoma and is associated with altered epigenetic regulation of developmental transcription programs

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Laurie K; Harris, Ashley; Bailey, Natashay J; Schwentner, Raphaela; Tomazou, Eleni; von Levetzow, Cornelia; Magnuson, Brian; Ljungman, Mats; Kovar, Heinrich; Lawlor, Elizabeth R

    2014-01-01

    The polycomb proteins BMI-1 and EZH2 are highly overexpressed by Ewing sarcoma (ES), a tumor of stem cell origin that is driven by EWS-ETS fusion oncogenes, most commonly EWS-FLI1. In the current study we analyzed expression of transcription programs that are controlled by polycomb proteins during embryonic development to determine if they are abnormal in ES. Our results show that polycomb target gene expression in ES deviates from normal tissues and stem cells and that, as expected, most targets are relatively repressed. However, we also discovered a paradoxical up regulation of numerous polycomb targets and these were highly enriched for homeobox (HOX) genes. Comparison of HOX profiles between malignant and non-malignant tissues revealed a distinctive HOX profile in ES, which was characterized by overexpression of posterior HOXD genes. In addition, ectopic expression of EWS-FLI1 during stem cell differentiation led to aberrant up regulation of posterior HOXD genes. Mechanistically, this up regulation was associated with altered epigenetic regulation. Specifically, ES and EWS-FLI1+ stem cells displayed a relative loss of polycomb-dependent H3K27me3 and gain of trithorax-dependent H3K4me3 at the promoters of posterior HOXD genes and also at the HOXD11.12 polycomb response element. In addition, a striking correlation was evident between HOXD13 and other genes whose regulation is coordinately regulated during embryonic development by distal enhancer elements. Together, these studies demonstrate that epigenetic regulation of polycomb target genes, in particular HOXD genes, is altered in ES and that these changes are mediated downstream of EWS-FLI1. PMID:25625846

  4. PCR detection of cytK gene in Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food samples.

    PubMed

    Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    A method for detection of the cytotoxin K cytK structural gene and its active promoter preceded by the PlcR-binding box, controlling the expression level of this enterotoxin, was developed. The method was applied for the purpose of the analysis of 47 bacterial strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group isolated from different food products. It was found that the majority of the analyzed strains carried the fully functional cytK gene with its PlcR regulated promoter. The cytK gene was not detected in four emetic strains of Bacillus cereus carrying the cesB gene and potentially producing an emetic toxin - cereulide. The cytotoxin K gene was detected in 4 isolates classified as Bacillus mycoides and one reference strain B. mycoides PCM 2024. The promoter region and the N-terminal part of the cytK gene from two strains of B. mycoides (5D and 19E) showed similarities to the corresponding sequences of Bacillus cereus W23 and Bacillus thuringiensis HD-789, respectively. It was shown for the first time that the cytK gene promoter region from strains 5D and 19E of Bacillus mycoides had a similar arrangement to the corresponding sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. The presence of the cytK gene in Bacillus mycoides shows that this species, widely recognized as nonpathogenic, may pose potential biohazard to human beings. PMID:24060693

  5. Toxigenic genes, spoilage potential, and antimicrobial resistance of Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Seza; Eyi, Ayla; Küçüksarı, Rümeysa

    2014-02-01

    Bacillus spp. can be recovered from almost every environment. It is also found readily in foods, where it may cause food spoilage and/or food poisoning due to its toxigenic and pathogenic nature, and extracellular enzymes. In this study, 29 Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream were examined for the presence of following virulence genes hblC, nheA, cytK and ces genes, and tested for a range of the extracellular enzymes, and antimicrobial susceptibility. The strains were found to produce extracellular enzymes: proteolytic and lipolytic activity, gelatin hydrolysis and lecithinase production (100%), DNase production (93.1%) and amylase activity (93.1%). Of 29 strains examined, 24 (82.8%) showed hemolytic activity on blood agar. Beta-lactamase enzyme was only produced by 20.7% of B. cereus group. Among 29 B. cereus group from ice cream, nheA was the most common virulence gene detected in 44.8% of the strains, followed by hblC gene with 17.2%. Four (13.8%) of the 29 strains were positive for both hblC gene and nheA gene. Contrarily, cytK and ces genes were not detected in any of the strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility of ice cream isolates was tested to 14 different antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. We detected resistance to penicillin and ampicillin with the same rate of 89.7%. Thirty-one percent of the strains were multiresistant to three or more antibiotics. This study emphasizes that the presence of natural isolates of Bacillus spp. harboring one or more enterotoxin genes, producing extracellular enzymes which may cause spoilage and acquiring antibiotic resistance might hold crucial importance in the food safety and quality. PMID:24309214

  6. Identification of genes affecting expression of phosphoglycerate kinase on the surface of group B streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Boone, Tyler J; Tyrrell, Gregory J

    2012-04-01

    Group B streptococcal phosphoglycerate kinase (GBS-PGK), a glycolytic enzyme, has previously been identified on the surface of group B streptococcus (GBS). To identify genes involved in surface expression of GBS-PGK, we performed Tn917 mutagenesis followed by quantification of PGK expressed on the GBS surface. Tn917 mutagenesis identified 4 genes (sag0966, sag0979, sag0980, and sag1003) that when disrupted, alter expression of GBS-PGK on the bacterial surface. Three of the identified genes were localized to a region of the GBS genome containing genes (sag0973-sag0977) predicted to be involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptides. One mutant isolate, designated NCS13sag1003::Tn917, was found to have increased sensitivity to the antimicrobial peptides bacitracin and nisin. In addition, all of the mutant strains assayed were found to have decreased β-hemolysis. In conclusion, we have identified genes involved in surface expression of GBS-PGK. These genes also appear to be involved in antimicrobial peptide resistance and regulate expression of the β-hemolysin. PMID:22444251

  7. PCR-based approach to distinguish group A human rotavirus genotype 1 vs. genotype 2 genes.

    PubMed

    McKell, Allison O; Nichols, Joshua C; McDonald, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are eleven-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of severe diarrhea in children. A full-genome classification system is readily used to describe the genetic makeup of individual RV strains. In this system, each viral gene is assigned a specific genotype based upon its nucleotide sequence and established percent identity cut-off values. However, a faster and more cost-effective approach to determine RV gene genotypes is to utilize specific oligonucleotide primer sets in RT-PCR/PCR. Such primer sets and PCR-based genotyping methods have already been developed for the VP7-, VP6-, VP4- and NSP4-coding gene segments. In this study, primers were developed for the remaining seven RV gene segments, which encode proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, and NSP5/6. Specifically, primers were designed to distinguish the two most common human RV genotypes (1 vs. 2) for these genes and were validated on several cell culture-adapted human and animal RV strains, as well as on human RVs from clinical fecal specimens. As such, primer sets now exist for all eleven genes of common human RVs, allowing for the identification of reassortant strains with mixed constellations of both genotype 1 and 2 genes using a rapid and economical RT-PCR/PCR method. PMID:24012969

  8. Phosphorylation events in the multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus significantly influence global gene expression and virulence.

    PubMed

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Gavagan, Maire; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J; Musser, James M; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2015-06-01

    Whole-genome sequencing analysis of ∼800 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) found that the gene encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of GAS (mga) is highly polymorphic in serotype M59 strains but not in strains of other serotypes. To help understand the molecular mechanism of gene regulation by Mga and its contribution to GAS pathogenesis in serotype M59 GAS, we constructed an isogenic mga mutant strain. Transcriptome studies indicated a significant regulatory influence of Mga and altered metabolic capabilities conferred by Mga-regulated genes. We assessed the phosphorylation status of Mga in GAS cell lysates with Phos-tag gels. The results revealed that Mga is phosphorylated at histidines in vivo. Using phosphomimetic and nonphosphomimetic substitutions at conserved phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase regulation domain (PRD) histidines of Mga, we demonstrated that phosphorylation-mimicking aspartate replacements at H207 and H273 of PRD-1 and at H327 of PRD-2 are inhibitory to Mga-dependent gene expression. Conversely, non-phosphorylation-mimicking alanine substitutions at H273 and H327 relieved inhibition, and the mutant strains exhibited a wild-type phenotype. The opposing regulatory profiles observed for phosphorylation- and non-phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions at H273 extended to global gene regulation by Mga. Consistent with these observations, the H273D mutant strain attenuated GAS virulence, whereas the H273A strain exhibited a wild-type virulence phenotype in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. Together, our results demonstrate phosphoregulation of Mga and its direct link to virulence in M59 GAS strains. These data also lay a foundation toward understanding how naturally occurring gain-of-function variations in mga, such as H201R, may confer an advantage to the pathogen and contribute to M59 GAS pathogenesis. PMID:25824840

  9. Phosphorylation Events in the Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Influence Global Gene Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Gavagan, Maire; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing analysis of ∼800 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) found that the gene encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of GAS (mga) is highly polymorphic in serotype M59 strains but not in strains of other serotypes. To help understand the molecular mechanism of gene regulation by Mga and its contribution to GAS pathogenesis in serotype M59 GAS, we constructed an isogenic mga mutant strain. Transcriptome studies indicated a significant regulatory influence of Mga and altered metabolic capabilities conferred by Mga-regulated genes. We assessed the phosphorylation status of Mga in GAS cell lysates with Phos-tag gels. The results revealed that Mga is phosphorylated at histidines in vivo. Using phosphomimetic and nonphosphomimetic substitutions at conserved phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase regulation domain (PRD) histidines of Mga, we demonstrated that phosphorylation-mimicking aspartate replacements at H207 and H273 of PRD-1 and at H327 of PRD-2 are inhibitory to Mga-dependent gene expression. Conversely, non-phosphorylation-mimicking alanine substitutions at H273 and H327 relieved inhibition, and the mutant strains exhibited a wild-type phenotype. The opposing regulatory profiles observed for phosphorylation- and non-phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions at H273 extended to global gene regulation by Mga. Consistent with these observations, the H273D mutant strain attenuated GAS virulence, whereas the H273A strain exhibited a wild-type virulence phenotype in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. Together, our results demonstrate phosphoregulation of Mga and its direct link to virulence in M59 GAS strains. These data also lay a foundation toward understanding how naturally occurring gain-of-function variations in mga, such as H201R, may confer an advantage to the pathogen and contribute to M59 GAS pathogenesis. PMID:25824840

  10. Embryonic stem cell gene expression signatures in the canine mammary tumor: a bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    Canine breast cancer was considered as an ideal model of comparative oncology for the human breast cancer, as there is significant overlap between biological and clinical characteristics of the human and canine breast cancer. We attempt to clarify expression profile of the embryonic stem cell (ES) gene signatures in canine breast cancer. Using microarray datasets (GSE22516 and GSE20718), expression of the three major ES gene signatures (modules or gene-sets), including Myc, ESC-like, and PRC modules, was primarily analyzed through Gene-Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) method in tumor and healthy datasets. For confirmation of the primary results, an additional 13 ES gene-sets which were categorized into four groups including ES expressed (ES exp1 and ES exp2), NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, NOS targets, and NOS TFs), Polycomb targets (Suz12 targets, Eed targets, H3K27 bound, and PRC2 targets), and Myc targets (Myc targets1, and Myc targets2) were tested in the tumor and healthy datasets. Our results revealed that there is a valuable overlap between canine and human breast cancer ES gene-sets expression profile, where Myc and ESC-like modules were up-regulated and PRC module was down-regulated in metastatic canine mammary gland tumors. Further analysis of the secondary gene-sets indicated overexpression of the ES expressed, NOS targets (Nanog targets, Oct4 targets, Sox2 targets, and NOS targets), and Myc targets and underexpression of the Polycomb targets in metastatic canine breast cancer. PMID:27307036

  11. The spxB gene as a target to identify Lactobacillus casei group species in cheese.

    PubMed

    Savo Sardaro, Maria Luisa; Levante, Alessia; Bernini, Valentina; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo; Lazzi, Camilla

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on the spxB gene, which encodes for pyruvate oxidase. The presence of spxB in the genome and its transcription could be a way to produce energy and allow bacterial growth during carbohydrate starvation. In addition, the activity of pyruvate oxidase, which produces hydrogen peroxide, could be a mechanism for interspecies competition. Because this gene seems to provide advantages for the encoding species for adaptation in complex ecosystems, we studied spxB in a large set of cheese isolates belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group. Through this study, we demonstrated that this gene is widely found in the genomes of members of the L. casei group and shows variability useful for taxonomic studies. In particular, the HRM analysis method allowed for a specific discrimination between Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus paracasei and L. casei. Regarding the coding region, the spxB functionality in cheese was shown for the first time by real-time PCR, and by exploiting the heterogeneity between the L. casei group species, we identified the bacterial communities encoding the spxB gene in this ecosystem. This study allowed for monitoring of the active bacterial community involved in different stages of ripening by following the POX pathway. PMID:27375244

  12. Molecular Mapping of Wheat: Major Genes and Rearrangements in Homoeologous Groups 4, 5, and 7

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J. C.; Sorrells, M. E.; Van-Deynze, A. E.; Lu, Y. H.; Atkinson, M.; Bernard, M.; Leroy, P.; Faris, J. D.; Anderson, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    A molecular-marker linkage map of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell) provides a framework for integration with the classical genetic map and a record of the chromosomal rearrangements involved in the evolution of this crop species. We have constructed restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) maps of the A-, B-, and D-genome chromosomes of homoeologous groups 4, 5, and 7 of wheat using 114 F(7) lines from a synthetic X cultivated wheat cross and clones from 10 DNA libraries. Chromosomal breakpoints for known ancestral reciprocal translocations involving these chromosomes and for a known pericentric inversion on chromosome 4A were localized by linkage and aneuploid analysis. Known genes mapped include the major vernalization genes Vrn1 and Vrn3 on chromosome arms 5AL and 5DL, the red-coleoptile gene Rc1 on 7AS, and presumptively the leaf-rust (Puccinia recondita f.sp. tritici) resistance gene Lr34 on 7DS and the kernel-hardness gene Ha on 5DS. RFLP markers previously obtained for powdery-mildew (Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici) resistance genes Pm2 and Pm1 were localized on chromosome arms 5DS and 7AL. PMID:8647405

  13. Detection of avian group D rotavirus using the polymerase chain reaction for the VP6 gene.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Delana Andreza Melo; da Silva, René Ribeiro; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza Oliveira, Darleise; Linhares, Alexandre C; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2012-11-01

    Group D rotaviruses (RVs-D) have been documented in birds and, while they may be common in these animals, few molecular studies are available for this specific group. In this study, specific primers for the gene that encodes for the RVs-D VP6 protein were designed and used in a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Thirty pools of samples were tested by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) yielding a 30% (9/30) positivity. These pools were subjected subsequently to RT-PCR, with a 53% (16/30) positivity rate. The sensitivity of the PCR assay was demonstrated up to a dilution of 5 × 10(-4)ng/μL (0.5 pg/μL) of the cloned VP6 gene. The four samples were sequenced and showed 90.8-91.1% similarity with regards to the RVs-D VP6 gene. To assess for specificity our RT-PCR was applied to nine samples known to contain enteric viral agents other than group D rotaviruses including picobirnavirus, rotavirus group A, and reovirus with negative results. Overall, the data confirm the specificity of the primers used for detecting the RVs-D by RT-PCR, suggesting that this assay can be used for diagnostic purposes. PMID:22820073

  14. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Drosophila Ash2, a Member of the Trithorax Group Required for Imaginal Disc Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, A. L.; Shearn, A.

    1996-01-01

    The ash2 gene is a member of the trithorax group of genes whose products function to maintain active transcription of homeotic selector genes. Mutations in ash2 cause the homeotic transformations expected for a gene in this group but, in addition, cause a variety of pattern formation defects that are not necessarily expected. The ash2 gene is located in cytogenetic region 96A17-19 flanked by slowpoke and tolloid and is included in a cosmid that contains part of slowpoke. The ash2 transcript is 2.0 kb and is present throughout development. The ASH2 protein predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame has a putative double zinc-finger domain, called a PHD finger, that is present not only in the products of other trithorax group genes such as TRX and ASH1, but also in the product of a Polycomb group gene, PCL. Polyclonal antibodies directed against ASH2 detect the protein in imaginal discs and in the nuclei of salivary gland and fat body cells. On immunoblots these affinity-purified antibodies detect a 70-kDa protein in larvae and a 53-kDa protein in pupae. PMID:8889525

  15. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  16. Chloroplast gene arrangement variation within a closely related group of green algae (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Letsch, Molly R; Lewis, Louise A

    2012-09-01

    The 22 published chloroplast genomes of green algae, representing sparse taxonomic sampling of diverse lineages that span over one billion years of evolution, each possess a unique gene arrangement. In contrast, many of the >190 published embryophyte (land plant) chloroplast genomes have relatively conserved architectures. To determine the phylogenetic depth at which chloroplast gene rearrangements occur in green algae, a 1.5-4 kb segment of the chloroplast genome was compared across nine species in three closely related genera of Trebouxiophyceae (Chlorophyta). In total, four distinct gene arrangements were obtained for the three genera Elliptochloris, Hemichloris, and Coccomyxa. In Elliptochloris, three distinct chloroplast gene arrangements were detected, one of which is shared with members of its sister genus Hemichloris. Both species of Coccomyxa examined share the fourth arrangement of this genome region, one characterized by very long spacers. Next, the order of genes found in this segment of the chloroplast genome was compared across green algae and land plants. As taxonomic ranks are not equivalent among different groups of organisms, the maximum molecular divergence among taxa sharing a common gene arrangement in this genome segment was compared. Well-supported clades possessing a single gene order had similar phylogenetic depth in green algae and embryophytes. When the dominant gene order of this chloroplast segment in embryophytes was assumed to be ancestral for land plants, the maximum molecular divergence was found to be over two times greater in embryophytes than in trebouxiophyte green algae. This study greatly expands information about chloroplast genome variation in green algae, is the first to demonstrate such variation among congeneric green algae, and further illustrates the fluidity of green algal chloroplast genome architecture in comparison to that of many embryophytes. PMID:22659018

  17. Comparative analysis of Hox paralog group 2 gene expression during Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Le Pabic, Pierre; Stellwag, Edmund J; Brothers, Shelby N; Scemama, Jean-Luc

    2007-12-01

    The hindbrain and pharyngeal arch-derived structures of vertebrates are determined, at least in part, by Hox paralog group 2 genes. In sarcopterygians, the Hoxa2 gene alone appears to specify structures derived from the second pharyngeal arch (PA2), while in zebrafish (Danio rerio), either of the two Hox PG2 genes, hoxa2b or hoxb2a, can specify PA2-derived structures. We previously reported three Hox PG2 genes in striped bass (Morone saxatilis), including hoxa2a, hoxa2b, and hoxb2a and observed that only HoxA cluster genes are expressed in PA2, indicative that they function alone or together to specify PA2. In this paper, we present the cloning and expression analysis of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) Hox PG2 genes and show that all three genes are expressed in the hindbrain and in PA2. The expression of hoxb2a in PA2 was unexpected given the close phylogenetic relationship of Nile tilapia and striped bass, both of which are members of the order Perciformes. A reanalysis of striped bass hoxb2a expression demonstrated that it is expressed in PA2 with nearly the same temporal and spatial expression pattern as its Nile tilapia ortholog. Further, we determined that Nile tilapia and striped bass hoxa2a orthologs are expressed in PA2 well beyond the onset of chondrogenesis whereas neither hoxa2b nor hoxb2a expression persist until this stage, which, according to previous hypotheses, suggests that hoxa2a orthologs in these two species function alone as selector genes of PA2 identity. PMID:17924140

  18. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V. Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. PMID:27060167

  19. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. PMID:27060167

  20. NAT2 gene polymorphisms in three indigenous groups in the Colombian Caribbean Coast region

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Isis; Lecompte, Nelly; Visbal, Lila; Curiel, Iliana; Hernández, Enio; Garavito, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the NAT2 gene polymorphisms 481T, 590A and 857A in the Chimila, Wiwa and Wayuu indigenous groups of the Colombian Caribbean to determine the frequencies of the alleles NAT2*4, NAT2*5, NAT2*6, and NAT2*7 and to determine the types of acetylators present in these populations. Methods: A total of 202 subjects were studied: 47 Chimila, 55 Wiwa, and 100 Wayuu. The polymorphisms were identified using a real-time PCR method for allelic discrimination designed using Taqman of Applied Biosystems. Results: The following alleles were found at the highest frequency in the following groups: the NAT2*4 allele (wild type) in the Wayuu group (55.3%), the NAT2*5 allele in the Wiwa group (34.5%), and the NAT2*7 allele in the Chimila group (24.2%). A higher frequency of the rapid acetylator status was found in the Wayuu group (31.3%) and Chimila group (29.5%) compared with the Wiwa group (12.7%). The intermediate acetylator status distribution was very similar in all three groups, and the frequency of the slow acetylator status was higher in the Wiwa group (32.7%) compared with the Chimila and Wayuu groups (20.5% and 21.2%, respectively). Conclusion: The results demonstrated the allelic distribution and pharmacogenetic differences of the three groups studied and revealed the most frequent acetylator status and phenotype. Because of the high prevalence of slow acetylators, a greater incidence of tuberculosis (TB) drug-induced hepatotoxicity is predicted in these populations, with a higher frequency in the Wiwa group. PMID:25767302

  1. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

    PubMed

    Perdigoto, Carolina N; Dauber, Katherine L; Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J; Zhao, Dejian; Zheng, Deyou; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  2. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J.; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J.; Zhao, Dejian; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  3. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene diversity in the Tibetan ethnic minority group of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo-feng; Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Deng, Ya-jun; Yang, Guang; Wu, Qing-ju; Xu, Peng; Qin, Hai-xia; Fan, Shuan-liang; Huang, Ping; Deng, Li-bin; Lucas, Rudolf; Wang, Zhen-Yuan

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene polymorphisms in the Tibetan ethnic minority of China. To that purpose, we have studied KIR gene frequencies and genotype diversities of 16 KIR genes and three pseudogenes (2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL4, 2DL5A, 2DL5B, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4*001/002, 2DS4*003-007, 2DS5, 3DL1, 3DL2, 3DL3, 3DS1, 2DP1, 3DP1*001/002/004, and 3DP1*003) in a population sample of 102 unrelated healthy individuals of the Tibetan population living in Lhasa city, Tibet Autonomous Region of China. Tibetans mainly live in "the roof of the world," the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau of China and surrounding areas stretching from central Asia in the North and West to Myanmar and mainland China in the East, and India, Nepal, and Bhutan to the south. KIR gene frequencies and statistical parameters of Tibetan ethnic minority were calculated. Fifteen KIR genes were observed in the 102 tested Tibetan individuals with different frequencies. The allelic frequencies of the 15 KIR genes ranged from 0.06 to 0.86. In addition, KIR 2DL1, 2DL4, 3DL2, and 3DL3 were found to be present in every individual. Variable gene content, together with allelic polymorphisms, can result in individualized human KIR genotypes and haplotypes, with the A haplotypes being predominantly observed. The results of tested linkage disequilibrium (LD) among KIR genes demonstrated that KIR genes present a wide range of linkage disequilibrium. Moreover, a comparison of the population data of our study with previously published population data of other ethnic groups or areas was performed. The differences of allelic frequency distribution in KIR2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL5, 3DL1, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 3DS1, and 2DP1 were statistically significant among different populations using the statistical method of the standard χ(2) test. In conclusion, the results of the present study can be valuable for enriching the Chinese ethnical gene information resources of the KIR gene pool and for

  4. Invasion of protein coding genes by green algal ribosomal group I introns.

    PubMed

    McManus, Hilary A; Lewis, Louise A; Fučíková, Karolina; Haugen, Peik

    2012-01-01

    The spread of group I introns depends on their association with intron-encoded homing endonucleases. Introns that encode functional homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are highly invasive, whereas introns that only encode the group I ribozyme responsible for self-splicing are generally stably inherited (i.e., vertical inheritance). A number of recent case studies have provided new knowledge on the evolution of group I introns, however, there are still large gaps in understanding of their distribution on the tree of life, and how they have spread into new hosts and genic sites. During a larger phylogenetic survey of chlorophyceaen green algae, we found that 23 isolates contain at least one group I intron in the rbcL chloroplast gene. Structural analyses show that the introns belong to one of two intron lineages, group IA2 intron-HEG (GIY-YIG family) elements inserted after position 462 in the rbcL gene, and group IA1 introns inserted after position 699. The latter intron type sometimes encodes HNH homing endonucleases. The distribution of introns was analyzed on an exon phylogeny and patterns were recovered that are consistent with vertical inheritance and possible horizontal transfer. The rbcL 462 introns are thus far reported only within the Volvocales, Hydrodictyaceae and Bracteacoccus, and closely related isolates of algae differ in the presence of rbcL introns. Phylogenetic analysis of the intron conserved regions indicates that the rbcL699 and rbcL462 introns have distinct evolutionary origins. The rbcL699 introns were likely derived from ribosomal RNA L2449 introns, whereas the rbcL462 introns form a close relationship with psbA introns. PMID:22056605

  5. Prevalent emm types and superantigen gene patterns of group A Streptococcus in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Paveenkittiporn, W; Nozawa, T; Dejsirilert, S; Nakagawa, I; Hamada, S

    2016-03-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) are globally distributed bacterial pathogens. We examined the emm genotypes, which are important indicators of virulence, of 349 clinical GAS isolates collected using two surveillance systems, i.e. Invasive Bacterial Infection Surveillance (IBIS) from 2010 to 2011 (234 isolates) and routine surveillance of clinically isolated bacteria from various hospitals during 1996-2011 (115 isolates) in Thailand. The major emm genotypes in IBIS samples were emm44 (12·0%), emm104 (6·8%), emm22 (5·6%), and emm81 (5·6%), whereas only one isolate (0·4%) had the emm1 genotype, which is significantly more common in invasive cases in the Western world. In samples collected during routine surveillance, emm238 (10·4%), emm44 (8·7%), and emm165 (7·0%) were dominant. The major superantigen gene profiles were similar between the groups, and 30·1% of isolates did not possess the phage-encoded superantigens (speA, speC, speH, speI, speK, speL, speM, ssa). Although most isolates exhibited limited gene profiles, emm44 isolates had highly variable gene profiles (15 patterns). We conclude that emm44 is the predominant GAS genotype in Thailand, and isolates varied in superantigen gene profiles. PMID:26265024

  6. Group I intron located in PR protein homologue gene in Youngia japonica.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Ogura, A; Yokota, A; Yamaguchi, I; Sugiyama, J

    2000-03-01

    A Youngia japonica strain had a group I intron that was suggested to have been transferred from Protomyces inouyei, a pathogenic fungus of Y. japonica. It was located in the miraculin homologue coding gene by reverse complementation. The deduced amino acid sequence of this miraculin homologue of Y. japonica was similar to the amino acid sequences of tobacco and tomato pathogenesis-related proteins. PMID:10803963

  7. A group III twintron encoding a maturase-like gene excises through lariat intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Copertino, D W; Hall, E T; Van Hook, F W; Jenkins, K P; Hallick, R B

    1994-01-01

    The 1605 bp intron 4 of the Euglena gracilis chloroplast psbC gene was characterized as a group III twintron composed of an internal 1503 nt group III intron with an open reading frame of 1374 nt (ycf13, 458 amino acids), and an external group III intron of 102 nt. Twintron excision proceeds by a sequential splicing pathway. The splicing of the internal and external group III introns occurs via lariat intermediates. Branch sites were mapped by primer extension RNA sequencing. The unpaired adenosines in domains VI of the internal and external introns are covalently linked to the 5' nucleotide of the intron via 2'-5' phosphodiester bonds. This bond is susceptible to hydrolysis by the debranching activity of the HeLa nuclear S100 fraction. The internal intron and presumptive ycf13 mRNA accumulates primarily as a linear RNA, although a lariat precursor can also be detected. The ycf13 gene encodes a maturase-like protein that may be involved in group III intron metabolism. Images PMID:7512259

  8. Molecular and functional characterization of broccoli EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Chen, Long-Fang O; Lin, Chun-Hung; Lai, Ying-Mi; Huang, Jia-Yuan; Sung, Zinmay Renee

    2012-07-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate major developmental processes in Arabidopsis. EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 (EMF2), the VEFS domain-containing PcG gene, regulates diverse genetic pathways and is required for vegetative development and plant survival. Despite widespread EMF2-like sequences in plants, little is known about their function other than in Arabidopsis and rice. To study the role of EMF2 in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica cv. Elegance) development, we identified two broccoli EMF2 (BoEMF2) genes with sequence homology to and a similar gene expression pattern to that in Arabidopsis (AtEMF2). Reducing their expression in broccoli resulted in aberrant phenotypes and gene expression patterns. BoEMF2 regulates genes involved in diverse developmental and stress programs similar to AtEMF2 in Arabidopsis. However, BoEMF2 differs from AtEMF2 in the regulation of flower organ identity, cell proliferation and elongation, and death-related genes, which may explain the distinct phenotypes. The expression of BoEMF2.1 in the Arabidopsis emf2 mutant (Rescued emf2) partially rescued the mutant phenotype and restored the gene expression pattern to that of the wild type. Many EMF2-mediated molecular and developmental functions are conserved in broccoli and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the restored gene expression pattern in Rescued emf2 provides insights into the molecular basis of PcG-mediated growth and development. PMID:22537758

  9. Differential expression of var gene groups is associated with morbidity caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection in Tanzanian children.

    PubMed

    Rottmann, Matthias; Lavstsen, Thomas; Mugasa, Joseph Paschal; Kaestli, Mirjam; Jensen, Anja T R; Müller, Dania; Theander, Thor; Beck, Hans-Peter

    2006-07-01

    The var gene family of Plasmodium falciparum encodes the variant surface antigen Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). PfEMP1 is considered an important pathogenicity factor in P. falciparum infection because it mediates cytoadherence to host cell endothelial receptors. var genes can be grouped into three major groups, A, B, and C, and the conserved var genes, var1-4, according to sequence similarities in coding and noncoding upstream regions. Using real-time quantitative PCR in a study conducted in Tanzania, the var transcript abundances of the different var gene groups were compared among patients with severe, uncomplicated, and asymptomatic malaria. Transcripts of var group A and B genes were more abundant in patients with severe malaria than in patients with uncomplicated malaria. In general, the transcript abundances of var group A and B genes were higher for children with clinical malaria than for children with asymptomatic infections. The var group C and var1-like transcript abundances were similar between the three sample groups. A transcript abundance pattern similar to that for var group A was observed for var2csa and var3-like genes. These results suggest that substantial and systematic differences in var gene expression exist between different clinical presentations. PMID:16790763

  10. Structural analysis of the RH-like blood group gene products in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Salvignol, I.; Calvas, P.; Blancher, A.; Socha, W.W.; Colin, Y.; Le Van Kim, C.; Bailly, P.; Cartron, J.P.; Ruffie, J.; Blancher, A.

    1995-03-01

    Rh-related transcripts present in bone marrow samples from several species of nonhuman primates (chimpanzee, gorilla, gibbon, crab-eating macaque) have been amplified by RT-polymerase chain reaction using primers deduced from the sequence of human RH genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the nonhuman transcripts revealed a high degree of similarity to human blood group Rh sequences, suggesting a great conservation of the RH genes throughout evolution. Full-length transcripts, potentially encoding 417 amino acid long proteins homologous to Rh polypeptides, were characterized, as well as mRNA isoforms which harbored nucleotide deletions or insertions and potentially encode truncated proteins. Proteins of 30-40,000 M{sub r}, immunologically related to human Rh proteins, were detected by western blot analysis with antipeptide antibodies, indicating that Rh-like transcripts are translated into membrane proteins. Comparison of human and nonhuman protein sequences was pivotal in clarifying the molecular basis of the blood group C/c polymorphism, showing that only the Pro103Ser substitution was correlated with C/c polymorphism. In addition, it was shown that a proline residue at position 102 was critical in the expression of C and c epitopes, most likely by providing an appropriate conformation of Rh polypeptides. From these data a phylogenetic reconstruction of the RH locus evolution has been calculated from which an unrooted phylogenetic tree could be proposed, indicating that African ape Rh-like genes would be closer to the human RhD gene than to the human RhCE gene. 55 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Suppression of Host Gene Expression by nsp1 Proteins of Group 2 Bat Coronaviruses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tohya, Yukinobu; Narayanan, Krishna; Kamitani, Wataru; Huang, Cheng; Lokugamage, Kumari; Makino, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    nsp1 protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a group 2b CoV, suppresses host gene expression by promoting host mRNA degradation and translation inhibition. The present study analyzed the activities of nsp1 proteins from the group 2 bat CoV strains Rm1, 133, and HKU9-1, belonging to groups 2b, 2c, and 2d, respectively. The host mRNA degradation and translational suppression activities of nsp1 of SARS-CoV and Rm1 nsp1 were similar and stronger than the activities of the nsp1 proteins of 133 and HKU9-1. Rm1 nsp1 expression in trans strongly inhibited the induction of type I interferon (IFN-I) and IFN-stimulated genes in cells infected with an IFN-inducing SARS-CoV mutant, while 133 and HKU9-1 nsp1 proteins had relatively moderate IFN-inhibitory activities. The results of our studies suggested a conserved function among nsp1 proteins of SARS-CoV and group 2 bat CoVs. PMID:19264783

  12. Virulence Gene Pool Detected in Bovine Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae Isolates by Use of a Group A S. pyogenes Virulence Microarray ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rato, Márcia G.; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, René; Bexiga, Ricardo; Nunes, Sandro F.; Vilela, Cristina L.; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.

    2011-01-01

    A custom-designed microarray containing 220 virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) was used to test group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (GCS) field strains causing bovine mastitis and group C or group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (GCS/GGS) isolates from human infections, with the latter being used for comparative purposes, for the presence of virulence genes. All bovine and all human isolates carried a fraction of the 220 genes (23% and 39%, respectively). The virulence genes encoding streptolysin S, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the plasminogen-binding M-like protein PAM, and the collagen-like protein SclB were detected in the majority of both bovine and human isolates (94 to 100%). Virulence factors, usually carried by human beta-hemolytic streptococcal pathogens, such as streptokinase, laminin-binding protein, and the C5a peptidase precursor, were detected in all human isolates but not in bovine isolates. Additionally, GAS bacteriophage-associated virulence genes encoding superantigens, DNase, and/or streptodornase were detected in bovine isolates (72%) but not in the human isolates. Determinants located in non-bacteriophage-related mobile elements, such as the gene encoding R28, were detected in all bovine and human isolates. Several virulence genes, including genes of bacteriophage origin, were shown to be expressed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of superantigen gene sequences revealed a high level (>98%) of identity among genes of bovine GCS, of the horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and of the human pathogen GAS. Our findings indicate that alpha-hemolytic bovine GCS, an important mastitis pathogen and considered to be a nonhuman pathogen, carries important virulence factors responsible for virulence and pathogenesis in humans. PMID:21525223

  13. The decrease in histone methyltransferase EZH2 in response to fluid shear stress alters endothelial gene expression and promotes quiescence.

    PubMed

    Maleszewska, Monika; Vanchin, Byambasuren; Harmsen, Martin C; Krenning, Guido

    2016-01-01

    High uniform fluid shear stress (FSS) is atheroprotective and preserves the endothelial phenotype and function through activation of downstream mediators such as MAPK7 (Erk5). Endothelial cells respond to FSS thanks to mechanotransduction. However, how the resulting signaling is integrated and resolved at the epigenetic level remains elusive. We hypothesized that Polycomb methyltransferase EZH2 is involved in the effects of FSS in human endothelial cells. We showed that FSS decreases the expression of the Polycomb methyltransferase EZH2. Despite simultaneous activation of MAPK7, MAPK7 pathway does not directly influence the transcription of EZH2. Interestingly though, the knockdown of EZH2 activates the protective MAPK7 signaling in endothelial cells, even in the absence of FSS. To understand the influence of the FSS-decreased expression of EZH2 on endothelial transcriptome, we performed RNA-seq and differential gene expression analysis. We identified candidate groups of genes dependent on both EZH2 and FSS. Among those, Gene Ontology overrepresentation analysis revealed highly significant enrichment of the cell cycle-related genes, suggesting changes in proliferation. Indeed, the depletion of EZH2 strongly inhibited endothelial proliferation, indicating cell cycle arrest. The concomitant decrease in CCNA expression suggests the transition of endothelial cells into a quiescent phenotype. Further bioinformatical analysis suggested TXNIP as a possible mediator between EZH2 and cell cycle-related gene network. Our data show that EZH2 is a FSS-responsive gene. Decreased EZH2 levels enhance the activation of the atheroprotective MAPK7 signaling. Decrease in EZH2 under FSS mediates the decrease in the expression of the network of cell cycle-related genes, which allows the cells to enter quiescence. EZH2 is therefore important for the protective effects of FSS in endothelium. PMID:26416763

  14. Differential gene expression in small and large rainbow trout derived from two seasonal spawning groups

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Growth in fishes is regulated via many environmental and physiological factors and is shaped by the genetic background of each individual. Previous microarray studies of salmonid growth have examined fish experiencing either muscle wastage or accelerated growth patterns following refeeding, or the influence of growth hormone and transgenesis. This study determines the gene expression profiles of genetically unmanipulated large and small fish from a domesticated salmonid strain reared on a typical feeding regime. Gene expression profiles of white muscle and liver from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from two seasonal spawning groups (September and December lots) within a single strain were examined when the fish were 15 months of age to assess the influence of season (late fall vs. onset of spring) and body size (large vs. small). Results Although IGFBP1 gene expression was up-regulated in the livers of small fish in both seasonal lots, few expression differences were detected in the liver overall. Faster growing Dec. fish showed a greater number of differences in white muscle expression compared to Sept. fish. Significant differences in the GO Generic Level 3 categories ‘response to external stimulus’, ‘establishment of localization’, and ‘response to stress’ were detected in white muscle tissue between large and small fish. Larger fish showed up-regulation of cytoskeletal component genes while many genes related to myofibril components of muscle tissue were up-regulated in small fish. Most of the genes up-regulated in large fish within the ‘response to stress’ category are involved in immunity while in small fish most of these gene functions are related to apoptosis. Conclusions A higher proportion of genes in white muscle compared to liver showed similar patterns of up- or down-regulation within the same size class across seasons supporting their utility as biomarkers for growth in rainbow trout. Differences between large and small

  15. Viridans Group Streptococci Clinical Isolates: MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry versus Gene Sequence-Based Identification

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Silvia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Dedej, Etleva; Vailati, Francesca; Farina, Claudio; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS) species-level identification is fundamental for patients management. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization—time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been used for VGS identification but discrimination within the Mitis group resulted difficult. In this study, VGS identifications with two MALDI-TOF instruments, the Biotyper (Bruker) and the VITEK MS (bioMérieux) have been compared to those derived from tuf, soda and rpoB genes sequencing. VGS isolates were clustered and a dendrogram constructed using the Biotyper 3.0 software (Bruker). RpoB gene sequencing resulted the most sensitive and specific molecular method for S. pneumonia identification and was used as reference method. The sensitivity and the specificity of the VITEK MS in S. pneumonia identification were 100%, while the Biotyper resulted less specific (92.4%). In non pneumococcal VGS strains, the group-level correlation between rpoB and the Biotyper was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 61% after database upgrading (than 37% before upgrading). The group-level correlation between rpoB and the VITEK MS was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 36% and increases at 69% if isolates identified as S. mitis/S. oralis are included. The less accurate performance of the VITEK MS in VGS identification within the Mitis group was due to the inability to discriminate between S. mitis and S. oralis. Conversely, the Biotyper, after the release of the upgraded database, was able to discriminate between the two species. In the dendrogram, VGS strains from the same group were grouped into the same cluster and had a good correspondence with the gene-based clustering reported by other authors, thus confirming the validity of the upgraded version of the database. Data from this study demonstrated that MALDI-TOF technique can represent a rapid and cost saving method for VGS identification even within the Mitis group but improvements of spectra database are

  16. Genome-wide identification of genes required for fitness of group A Streptococcus in human blood.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; Mistry, Pragnesh; Valdes, Kayla M; Quigley, Jeffrey; Kumar, Nikhil; Tettelin, Hervé; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-03-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a strict human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. Although GAS genome sequences are available, functional genomic analyses have been limited. We developed a mariner-based transposon, osKaR, designed to perform Transposon-Site Hybridization (TraSH) in GAS and successfully tested its use in several invasive serotypes. A complex osKaR mutant library in M1T1 GAS strain 5448 was subjected to negative selection in human blood to identify genes important for GAS fitness in this clinically relevant environment. Mutants underrepresented after growth in blood (output pool) compared to growth in rich media (input pool) were identified using DNA microarray hybridization of transposon-specific tags en masse. Using blood from three different donors, we identified 81 genes that met our criteria for reduced fitness in blood from at least two individuals. Genes known to play a role in survival of GAS in blood were found, including those encoding the virulence regulator Mga (mga), the peroxide response regulator PerR (perR), and the RofA-like regulator Ralp-3 (ralp3). We also identified genes previously reported for their contribution to sepsis in other pathogens, such as de novo nucleotide synthesis (purD, purA, pyrB, carA, carB, guaB), sugar metabolism (scrB, fruA), zinc uptake (adcC), and transcriptional regulation (cpsY). To validate our findings, independent mutants with mutations in 10 different genes identified in our screen were confirmed to be defective for survival in blood bactericidal assays. Overall, this work represents the first use of TraSH in GAS to identify potential virulence genes. PMID:23297387

  17. Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Required for Fitness of Group A Streptococcus in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; Mistry, Pragnesh; Valdes, Kayla M.; Quigley, Jeffrey; Kumar, Nikhil; Tettelin, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a strict human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. Although GAS genome sequences are available, functional genomic analyses have been limited. We developed a mariner-based transposon, osKaR, designed to perform Transposon-Site Hybridization (TraSH) in GAS and successfully tested its use in several invasive serotypes. A complex osKaR mutant library in M1T1 GAS strain 5448 was subjected to negative selection in human blood to identify genes important for GAS fitness in this clinically relevant environment. Mutants underrepresented after growth in blood (output pool) compared to growth in rich media (input pool) were identified using DNA microarray hybridization of transposon-specific tags en masse. Using blood from three different donors, we identified 81 genes that met our criteria for reduced fitness in blood from at least two individuals. Genes known to play a role in survival of GAS in blood were found, including those encoding the virulence regulator Mga (mga), the peroxide response regulator PerR (perR), and the RofA-like regulator Ralp-3 (ralp3). We also identified genes previously reported for their contribution to sepsis in other pathogens, such as de novo nucleotide synthesis (purD, purA, pyrB, carA, carB, guaB), sugar metabolism (scrB, fruA), zinc uptake (adcC), and transcriptional regulation (cpsY). To validate our findings, independent mutants with mutations in 10 different genes identified in our screen were confirmed to be defective for survival in blood bactericidal assays. Overall, this work represents the first use of TraSH in GAS to identify potential virulence genes. PMID:23297387

  18. Mutation at codon 322 in the human acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) gene accounts for YT blood group polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, C.F.; Lockridge, O. ); Zelinski, T. )

    1993-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is present in innervated tissues, where its function is to terminate nerve impulse transmission. It is also found in the red blood cell membrane, where its function is unknown. The authors report the first genetic variant of human acetylcholinesterase and support the identity of acetylcholinesterase as the YT blood group antigen. DNA sequencing shows that the wild-type sequence of acetylcholinesterase with His322 (CAC) is the YT1 blood group antigen and that the rare variant of acetylcholinesterase with Asn322 (AAC) is the YT2 blood group antigen. Two additional point mutations in the acetylcholinesterase gene do not affect the amino acid sequence of the mature enzyme. 41 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Unusual properties of regulatory DNA from the Drosophila engrailed gene: three "pairing-sensitive" sites within a 1.6-kb region.

    PubMed

    Kassis, J A

    1994-03-01

    We have previously shown that a 2-kb fragment of engrailed DNA can suppress expression of a linked marker gene, white, in the P element vector CaSpeR. This suppression is dependent on the presence of two copies of engrailed DNA-containing P elements (P[en]) in proximity in the Drosophila genome (either in cis or in trans). In this study, the 2-kb fragment was dissected and found to contain three fragments of DNA which could mediate white suppression [called "pairing-sensitive sites" (PS)]. A PS site was also identified in regulatory DNA from the Drosophila escargot gene. The eye colors of six different P[en] insertions in the escargot gene suggest an interaction between P[en]-encoded and genome-encoded PS sites. I hypothesize that white gene expression from P[en] is repressed by the formation of a protein complex which is initiated at the engrailed PS sites and also requires interactions with flanking genomic DNA. Genes were sought which influence the function of PS sites. Mutations in some Polycomb and trithorax group genes were found to affect the eye color from some P[en] insertion sites. However, different mutations affected expression from different P[en] insertion sites and no one mutation was found to affect expression from all P[en] insertion sites examined. These results suggest that white expression from P[en] is not directly regulated by members of the Polycomb and trithorax group genes, but in some cases can be influenced by them. I propose that engrailed PS sites normally act to promote interactions between distantly located engrailed regulatory sites and the engrailed promoter. PMID:8005412

  20. Yeast RAD14 and human xeroderma pigmentosum group A DNA-repair genes encode homologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Bankmann, M; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1992-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a human autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by extreme sensitivity to sunlight and high incidence of skin cancers. XP cells are defective in the incision step of excision repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Cell fusion studies have defined seven XP complementation groups, XP-A to XP-G. Similar genetic complexity of excision repair is observed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in any one of five yeast genes, RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD4, and RAD10, cause a total defect in incision and an extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light. Here we report the characterization of the yeast RAD14 gene. The available rad14 point mutant is only moderately ultraviolet-sensitive, and it performs a substantial amount of incision of damaged DNA. Our studies with the rad14 deletion (delta) mutation indicate an absolute requirement of RAD14 in incision. RAD14 encodes a highly hydrophilic protein of 247 amino acids containing zinc-finger motifs, and it is similar to the protein encoded by the human XPAC gene that complements XP group A cell lines. PMID:1741034

  1. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene in patients with oculocutaneous albinism from various ethnic groups in Israel

    SciTech Connect

    Gershoni-Baruch, R. ); Rosenmann, A. ); Droetto, S.; Holmes, S.; Tripathi, R.K.; Spritz, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    The authors have analyzed the tyrosinase (TYR) gene in 38 unrelated patients with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), derived from several different ethnic groups of the diverse population of Israel. They detected TYR gene mutations in 23 of the 34 patients with apparent type I (i.e., tyrosinase-deficient) OCA and in none of the patients with other clinical forms of albinism. Among Moroccan Jews with type IA (i.e., tyrosinase-negative) OCA, they detected a highly predominant mutant allele containing a missense substitution, Gly47Asp (G47D). This mutation occurs on the same haplotype as in patients from the Canary Islands and Puerto Rico, suggesting that the G47D mutation in these ethnically distinct populations may stem from a common origin. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Cohesin, Gene Expression and Development: Lessons from Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dorsett, Dale

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin complex, discovered for its role in sister chromatid cohesion, also plays roles in gene expression and development in organisms from yeast to man. This review highlights what has been learned about the gene control and developmental functions of cohesin and the Nipped-B (NIPBL/Scc2) cohesin loading factor in Drosophila. The Drosophila studies have provided unique insights into the etiology of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), which is caused by mutations affecting sister chromatid cohesion proteins in humans. In vivo experiments with Drosophila show that cohesin and Nipped-B have dosage-sensitive effects on the functions of many evolutionarily conserved genes and developmental pathways. Genome-wide studies with Drosophila cultured cells show that Nipped-B and cohesin co-localize on chromosomes, and bind preferentially, but not exclusively, to many actively-transcribed genes and their regulatory sequences, including many of the proposed in vivo target genes. In contrast, the cohesion factors are largely excluded from genes silenced by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. Combined, the in vivo genetic data and the binding patterns of cohesin and Nipped-B in cultured cells are consistent with the hypothesis that they control the action of gene regulatory sequences, including transcriptional enhancers and insulators, and suggest that they might also help define active chromatin domains and influence transcriptional elongation. PMID:19308700

  3. Regulation of proboscipedia in Drosophila by homeotic selector genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rusch, D B; Kaufman, T C

    2000-01-01

    The gene proboscipedia (pb) is a member of the Antennapedia complex in Drosophila and is required for the proper specification of the adult mouthparts. In the embryo, pb expression serves no known function despite having an accumulation pattern in the mouthpart anlagen that is conserved across several insect orders. We have identified several of the genes necessary to generate this embryonic pattern of expression. These genes can be roughly split into three categories based on their time of action during development. First, prior to the expression of pb, the gap genes are required to specify the domains where pb may be expressed. Second, the initial expression pattern of pb is controlled by the combined action of the genes Deformed (Dfd), Sex combs reduced (Scr), cap'n'collar (cnc), and teashirt (tsh). Lastly, maintenance of this expression pattern later in development is dependent on the action of a subset of the Polycomb group genes. These interactions are mediated in part through a 500-bp regulatory element in the second intron of pb. We further show that Dfd protein binds in vitro to sequences found in this fragment. This is the first clear demonstration of autonomous positive cross-regulation of one Hox gene by another in Drosophila melanogaster and the binding of Dfd to a cis-acting regulatory element indicates that this control might be direct. PMID:10978284

  4. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species—reflecting the respective species' lifestyles—and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (∼2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory. PMID:25053675

  5. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Yoshihito; Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-09-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species--reflecting the respective species' lifestyles--and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (∼ 2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory. PMID:25053675

  6. Polycomb complex PRC1 as gatekeeper of intestinal stem cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Léveillé, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are adult multipotent cells essential for the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis. Wnt signaling activity ensures that the pool of ISCs at the basis of the intestinal crypts is preserved. Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway is often observed in cancer and supports malignant progression. Chiacchiera and colleagues recently demonstrated the implication of the polycomb complex PRC1 in the regulation of the Wnt pathway in adult ISCs. The authors show that PRC1 maintains intestinal homeostasis by repressing the expression of ZICs, a family of transcription factors inactivating the β-catenin/TCF complex. Importantly, interfering with PRC1 activity completely inhibits the formation of Wnt-dependent tumors. These findings reveal a new layer of epigenetic regulation of the Wnt pathway and open novel opportunities for cancer stem cell targeted therapy. PMID:27488310

  7. Pharmacological inhibition of polycomb repressive complex-2 activity induces apoptosis in human colon cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Yannick D.; Witherspoon, Mavee S.; Laursen, Kristian B.; Guezguez, Amel; Beauséjour, Marco; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois; Lipkin, Steven M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death in the USA. The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), including core components SUZ12 and EZH2, represents a key epigenetic regulator of digestive epithelial cell physiology and was previously shown to promote deleterious effects in a number of human cancers, including colon. Using colon cancer stem cells (CCSC) isolated from human primary colorectal tumors, we demonstrate that SUZ12 knockdown and treatment with DZNep, one of the most potent EZH2 inhibitors, increase apoptosis levels, marked by decreased Akt phosphorylation, in CCSCs, while embryonic stem (ES) cell survival is not affected. Moreover, DZNep treatments lead to increased PTEN expression in these highly tumorigenic cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity may constitute a new, epigenetic therapeutic strategy to target highly tumorigenic and metastatic colon cancer stem cells. PMID:23588203

  8. Polycomb complex PRC1 as gatekeeper of intestinal stem cell identity.

    PubMed

    Léveillé, Nicolas; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are adult multipotent cells essential for the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis. Wnt signaling activity ensures that the pool of ISCs at the basis of the intestinal crypts is preserved. Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway is often observed in cancer and supports malignant progression. Chiacchiera and colleagues recently demonstrated the implication of the polycomb complex PRC1 in the regulation of the Wnt pathway in adult ISCs. The authors show that PRC1 maintains intestinal homeostasis by repressing the expression of ZICs, a family of transcription factors inactivating the β-catenin/TCF complex. Importantly, interfering with PRC1 activity completely inhibits the formation of Wnt-dependent tumors. These findings reveal a new layer of epigenetic regulation of the Wnt pathway and open novel opportunities for cancer stem cell targeted therapy. PMID:27488310

  9. Mariner Transposons Contain a Silencer: Possible Role of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Beauclair, Linda; Moiré, Nathalie; Arensbuger, Peter; Bigot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are driving forces for establishing genetic innovations such as transcriptional regulatory networks in eukaryotic genomes. Here, we describe a silencer situated in the last 300 bp of the Mos1 transposase open reading frame (ORF) which functions in vertebrate and arthropod cells. Functional silencers are also found at similar locations within three other animal mariner elements, i.e. IS630-Tc1-mariner (ITm) DD34D elements, Himar1, Hsmar1 and Mcmar1. These silencers are able to impact eukaryotic promoters monitoring strong, moderate or low expression as well as those of mariner elements located upstream of the transposase ORF. We report that the silencing involves at least two transcription factors (TFs) that are conserved within animal species, NFAT-5 and Alx1. These cooperatively act with YY1 to trigger the silencing activity. Four other housekeeping transcription factors (TFs), neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF), GAGA factor (GAF) and GTGT factor (GTF), were also found to have binding sites within mariner silencers but their impact in modulating the silencer activity remains to be further specified. Interestingly, an NRSF binding site was found to overlap a 30 bp motif coding a highly conserved PHxxYSPDLAPxD peptide in mariner transposases. We also present experimental evidence that silencing is mainly achieved by co-opting the host Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 pathway. However, we observe that when PRC2 is impaired another host silencing pathway potentially takes over to maintain weak silencer activity. Mariner silencers harbour features of Polycomb Response Elements, which are probably a way for mariner elements to self-repress their transcription and mobility in somatic and germinal cells when the required TFs are expressed. At the evolutionary scale, mariner elements, through their exaptation, might have been a source of silencers playing a role in the chromatin configuration in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:26939020

  10. High Novelty-Seeking Predicts Aggression and Gene Expression Differences within Defined Serotonergic Cell Groups

    PubMed Central

    Kerman, Ilan A.; Clinton, Sarah M.; Bedrosian, Tracy A.; Abraham, Antony D.; Rosenthal, Devin T.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    Aggression frequently coincides with specific dimensions of emotionality, such as impulsivity, risk-taking, and drug abuse. Serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurotransmission contributes to the regulation of numerous neurobiological functions, and is thought to play a key role in modulating aggressive responses. The current study uses selectively-bred High (bHR) and Low (bLR) Responder rats that exhibit differences in emotionality and behavioral control, with bHRs exhibiting heightened novelty-induced exploration, impulsivity, and increased sensitivity to drugs of abuse, and with bLRs characterized by exaggerated depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Based on this behavioral profile we hypothesized that bHR rats exhibit increased aggression along with changes in testosterone and corticosterone secretion characteristic of aggression, and that these changes are accompanied by alterations in the expression of key genes that regulate 5-HTergic neurotransmission (Tph2 and Sert) as well as in the activation of 5-HTergic cell groups following aggressive encounter. Our data demonstrate that when compared to bLR rats, bHRs express increased baseline Tph2 and Sert in select brainstem nuclei, and when tested on the resident-intruder test they exhibited: 1) increased aggressive behavior; 2) potentiated corticosterone and testosterone secretion; and 3) diminished intrusion-induced c-fos expression in select 5-HTergic brainstem cell groups. The most prominent gene expression differences occurred in the B9 cell group, pontomesencephalic reticular formation, median raphe, and the gigantocellular nucleus pars α. These data are consistent with the notion that altered 5-HT neurotransmission contributes to bHRs’ heightened aggression. Furthermore, they indicate that a specific subset of brainstem 5-HTergic cell groups contributes to the regulation of intrusion-elicited behavioral responses. PMID:21925645

  11. Distribution and sequence variations of selected virulence genes among group A streptococcal isolates from western Norway.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, H; Bjorvatn, B; Osland, A

    2000-11-01

    In order to compare the distribution of selected virulence genes among group A streptococci recovered from invasive disease and superficial infections, 42 isolates were screened for mga, speB, speA, ssa and ska, by PCR. The isolates were predominantly of the sequence types emm1, emm3 and emm6, but also included a few of the types emm22, emm28, emm75 and emm78. The phage-mediated speA seemed to be prevalent in emm types 1 and 3, and its distribution was not related to disease severity. The other genes were present in all isolates. The mga, speB and speA were further studied by sequence analysis. Although allotypic associations with invasiveness were not found, allelic specificity to the emm sequence type was observed. In addition, the mga sequences indicated two lineages, related to opacity factor production. A possible recombination between these two main divergent mga genes was observed in isolates of the types emm22 and emm75. A logical nomenclature of the alleles of mga and speB is suggested. PMID:11211972

  12. Understanding Xeroderma Pigmentosum Complementation Groups Using Gene Expression Profiling after UV-Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Nikola A.; Beveridge, Natalie J.; Ashton, Katie A.; Baines, Katherine J.; Scott, Rodney J.

    2015-01-01

    Children with the recessive genetic disorder Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) have extreme sensitivity to UV-light, a 10,000-fold increase in skin cancers from age 2 and rarely live beyond 30 years. There are seven genetic subgroups of XP, which are all resultant of pathogenic mutations in genes in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway and a XP variant resultant of a mutation in translesion synthesis, POLH. The clinical symptoms and severity of the disease is varied across the subgroups, which does not correlate with the functional position of the affected protein in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to further understand the biology of XP subgroups, particularly those that manifest with neurological symptoms. Whole genome gene expression profiling of fibroblasts from each XP complementation group was assessed before and after UV-light exposure. The biological pathways with altered gene expression after UV-light exposure were distinct for each subtype and contained oncogenic related functions such as perturbation of cell cycle, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation. Patients from the subgroups XP-B and XP-F were the only subgroups to have transcripts associated with neuronal activity altered after UV-light exposure. This study will assist in furthering our understanding of the different subtypes of XP which will lead to better diagnosis, treatment and management of the disease. PMID:26184184

  13. A dehydration-inducible gene in the truffle Tuber borchii identifies a novel group of dehydrins

    PubMed Central

    Abba', Simona; Ghignone, Stefano; Bonfante, Paola

    2006-01-01

    Background The expressed sequence tag M6G10 was originally isolated from a screening for differentially expressed transcripts during the reproductive stage of the white truffle Tuber borchii. mRNA levels for M6G10 increased dramatically during fruiting body maturation compared to the vegetative mycelial stage. Results Bioinformatics tools, phylogenetic analysis and expression studies were used to support the hypothesis that this sequence, named TbDHN1, is the first dehydrin (DHN)-like coding gene isolated in fungi. Homologs of this gene, all defined as "coding for hypothetical proteins" in public databases, were exclusively found in ascomycetous fungi and in plants. Although complete (or almost complete) fungal genomes and EST collections of some Basidiomycota and Glomeromycota are already available, DHN-like proteins appear to be represented only in Ascomycota. A new and previously uncharacterized conserved signature pattern was identified and proposed to Uniprot database as the main distinguishing feature of this new group of DHNs. Expression studies provide experimental evidence of a transcript induction of TbDHN1 during cellular dehydration. Conclusion Expression pattern and sequence similarities to known plant DHNs indicate that TbDHN1 is the first characterized DHN-like protein in fungi. The high similarity of TbDHN1 with homolog coding sequences implies the existence of a novel fungal/plant group of LEA Class II proteins characterized by a previously undescribed signature pattern. PMID:16512918

  14. Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration.

    PubMed

    Bégat, Christophe; Bailly, Pascal; Chiaroni, Jacques; Mazières, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration. PMID:26148209

  15. Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration

    PubMed Central

    Bégat, Christophe; Bailly, Pascal; Chiaroni, Jacques; Mazières, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration. PMID:26148209

  16. Role of RAD52 Epistasis Group Genes in Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    2002-01-01

    The process of homologous recombination is a major DNA repair pathway that operates on DNA double-strand breaks, and possibly other kinds of DNA lesions, to promote error-free repair. Central to the process of homologous recombination are the RAD52 group genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RDH54/TID1, RAD55, RAD57, RAD59, MRE11, and XRS2), most of which were identified by their requirement for the repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Rad52 group proteins are highly conserved among eukaryotes, and Rad51, Mre11, and Rad50 are also conserved in prokaryotes and archaea. Recent studies showing defects in homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in several human cancer-prone syndromes have emphasized the importance of this repair pathway in maintaining genome integrity. Although sensitivity to ionizing radiation is a universal feature of rad52 group mutants, the mutants show considerable heterogeneity in different assays for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks and spontaneous mitotic recombination. Herein, I provide an overview of recent biochemical and structural analyses of the Rad52 group proteins and discuss how this information can be incorporated into genetic studies of recombination. PMID:12456786

  17. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns. PMID:24214997

  18. Mutations of the Fanconi anemia group A gene (FAA) in Italian patients.

    PubMed Central

    Savino, M; Ianzano, L; Strippoli, P; Ramenghi, U; Arslanian, A; Bagnara, G P; Joenje, H; Zelante, L; Savoia, A

    1997-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive pancytopenia, congenital malformations, and predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. At least five complementation groups (FA-A-FA-E) have been identified. The relative prevalence of FA-A has been estimated at an average of approximately 65% but may widely vary according to ethnic background. In Italy, 11 of 12 patients analyzed by cell-fusion studies were assigned to group FA-A, suggesting an unusually high relative prevalence of this FA subtype in patients of Italian ancestry. We have screened the 43 exons of the FAA gene and their flanking intronic sequences in 38 Italian FA patients, using RNA-SSCP. Ten different mutations were detected: three nonsense and one missense substitutions, four putative splice mutations, an insertion, and a duplication. Most of the mutations are expected to cause a premature termination of the FAA protein at various sites throughout the molecule. Four protein variants were also found, three of which were polymorphisms. The missense mutation D1359Y, not found in chromosomes from healthy unrelated individuals, was responsible for a local alteration of hydrophobicity in the FAA protein, and it was likely to be pathogenic. Thus, the mutations so far encountered in the FAA gene are essentially all different. Since screening based on the analysis of single exons by genomic DNA amplification apparently detects only a minority of the mutations, methods designed to detect alterations in the genomic structure of the gene or in the FAA polypeptide may be helpful in the identification of FAA mutations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9399890

  19. Heterogeneity and diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in select Saudi Arabian populations.

    PubMed

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Malik, S

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in the Saudi Arabian population, we assembled the phenotypic data of approximately 66,000 subjects from ten representative Saudi populations: Al-Khobar, Riyadh, Tabuk/Madina Al-Munawaara, Jeddah, Abha, South region, Sakaka, Domah, Al-Qurayat, and Sweer. The frequencies of p[A], q[B], and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus were observed to be 0.1688, 0.1242, and 0.7070, respectively, and the frequency of the D allele at the Rh locus was 0.7138. The heterozygosities at the ABO and Rh loci were 0.4563 and 0.4086, respectively, while the combined heterozygosity was 0.4324. Homogeneity tests revealed the population of Abha to be the most heterogeneous while that of Tabuk/Madina was found to be the least heterogeneous. Homogeneity was higher among the Northern populations while Southern populations demonstrated subdivisions and stratification. Gene diversity analyses yielded a total heterozygosity value of 0.4449. The coefficient of gene differentiation was 0.0090. Nei's genetic distance analyses showed that there was close affinity between the populations of Al-Khobar and Riyadh. The largest differences were observed between the populations of Sakaka and Domah. Furthermore, negative correlations were found between p[A] and r[O] alleles, and between q[B] and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus. Clinal analyses revealed that the r[O] allele showed an increasing trend from North-East to South-West, and conversely the q[B] allele exhibited a decreasing trend at these coordinates. These analyses present interesting aspects of the blood group allele distribution across the geography of Saudi Arabia. PMID:26214466

  20. Evaluation of α-Globin Gene Mutations Among Different Ethnic Groups in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Abbas; Jalali-Far, Mohammadali; Saki, Najmaldin; Hosseini, Hossein; Galehdari, Hamid; Kiani-Ghalesardi, Omid; Paridar, Mostafa; Azarkeivan, Azita; Magaji-Hamid, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) is one of the most common inherited hemoglobin (Hb) disorders in the world. In addition to large deletions, over 50 different α-thal point mutations were detected around the world, thus, patients showed different phenotypes with regard to genotype. This study evaluated the genetic frequency of α-thal in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran, to help implement premarital and prenatal screening programs. The study was conducted on couples proposing to get married and parents who were referred to the genetic center of Shafa Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran, for prenatal diagnosis (PND) in 2012. Genomic DNA was purified by the salting-out method and tested using multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR), amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (ARMS-PCR), reverse hybridization test strips and DNA sequencing. Overall, 11 mutations were found on the α-globin genes. Based on gene frequency, the most common mutant allele was -α(3.7) (rightward) (71.3%) followed by the two gene deletion - -(MED) (9.7%). Other common mutations were α(codon 19)α (GCG>GC-, α2) (8.4%), the polyadenylation (polyA1) site α(polyA1)α (AATAAA>AATAAG) (2.8%), and α(-5 nt)α (-TGAGG) (2.0%). In addition, an extremely rare mutation at α(codon 21)α [Hb Fontainebleau, HBA2: c.64G > C (or HBA1)] was also found. The results of this study are critical for correct diagnosis of α-thal carriers, premarriage counseling and PND. This study suggests that the distribution of mutations on the α-globin genes differs among the ethnic groups in Khuzestan Province as well as in other provinces. PMID:26878087

  1. The finding of a group IIE phospholipase A2 gene in a specified segment of Protobothrops flavoviridis genome and its possible evolutionary relationship to group IIA phospholipase A2 genes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Chijiwa, Takahito; Ikeda, Naoki; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Hattori, Shosaku; Ohno, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    The genes encoding group IIE phospholipase A2, abbreviated as IIE PLA2, and its 5' and 3' flanking regions of Crotalinae snakes such as Protobothrops flavoviridis, P. tokarensis, P. elegans, and Ovophis okinavensis, were found and sequenced. The genes consisted of four exons and three introns and coded for 22 or 24 amino acid residues of the signal peptides and 134 amino acid residues of the mature proteins. These IIE PLA2s show high similarity to those from mammals and Colubridae snakes. The high expression level of IIE PLA2s in Crotalinae venom glands suggests that they should work as venomous proteins. The blast analysis indicated that the gene encoding OTUD3, which is ovarian tumor domain-containing protein 3, is located in the 3' downstream of IIE PLA2 gene. Moreover, a group IIA PLA2 gene was found in the 5' upstream of IIE PLA2 gene linked to the OTUD3 gene (OTUD3) in the P. flavoviridis genome. It became evident that the specified arrangement of IIA PLA2 gene, IIE PLA2 gene, and OTUD3 in this order is common in the genomes of humans to snakes. The present finding that the genes encoding various secretory PLA2s form a cluster in the genomes of humans to birds is closely related to the previous finding that six venom PLA2 isozyme genes are densely clustered in the so-called NIS-1 fragment of the P. flavoviridis genome. It is also suggested that venom IIA PLA2 genes may be evolutionarily derived from the IIE PLA2 gene. PMID:25529307

  2. The Finding of a Group IIE Phospholipase A2 Gene in a Specified Segment of Protobothrops flavoviridis Genome and Its Possible Evolutionary Relationship to Group IIA Phospholipase A2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Chijiwa, Takahito; Ikeda, Naoki; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Hattori, Shosaku; Ohno, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    The genes encoding group IIE phospholipase A2, abbreviated as IIE PLA2, and its 5' and 3' flanking regions of Crotalinae snakes such as Protobothrops flavoviridis, P. tokarensis, P. elegans, and Ovophis okinavensis, were found and sequenced. The genes consisted of four exons and three introns and coded for 22 or 24 amino acid residues of the signal peptides and 134 amino acid residues of the mature proteins. These IIE PLA2s show high similarity to those from mammals and Colubridae snakes. The high expression level of IIE PLA2s in Crotalinae venom glands suggests that they should work as venomous proteins. The blast analysis indicated that the gene encoding OTUD3, which is ovarian tumor domain-containing protein 3, is located in the 3' downstream of IIE PLA2 gene. Moreover, a group IIA PLA2 gene was found in the 5' upstream of IIE PLA2 gene linked to the OTUD3 gene (OTUD3) in the P. flavoviridis genome. It became evident that the specified arrangement of IIA PLA2 gene, IIE PLA2 gene, and OTUD3 in this order is common in the genomes of humans to snakes. The present finding that the genes encoding various secretory PLA2s form a cluster in the genomes of humans to birds is closely related to the previous finding that six venom PLA2 isozyme genes are densely clustered in the so-called NIS-1 fragment of the P. flavoviridis genome. It is also suggested that venom IIA PLA2 genes may be evolutionarily derived from the IIE PLA2 gene. PMID:25529307

  3. Distinct Cellular Assembly Stoichiometry of Polycomb Complexes on Chromatin Revealed by Single-molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Balas, Maggie M; Johnson, Aaron M; Ren, Xiaojun

    2015-11-20

    Epigenetic complexes play an essential role in regulating chromatin structure, but information about their assembly stoichiometry on chromatin within cells is poorly understood. The cellular assembly stoichiometry is critical for appreciating the initiation, propagation, and maintenance of epigenetic inheritance during normal development and in cancer. By combining genetic engineering, chromatin biochemistry, and single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we developed a novel and sensitive approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) to enable investigation of the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was validated by using chromatin complexes with known stoichiometry. The stoichiometry of subunits within a polycomb complex and the assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin have been extensively studied but reached divergent views. Moreover, the cellular assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin remains unexplored. Using Sm-ChIPi, we demonstrated that within mouse embryonic stem cells, one polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 associates with multiple nucleosomes, whereas two PRC2s can bind to a single nucleosome. Furthermore, we obtained direct physical evidence that the nucleoplasmic PRC1 is monomeric, whereas PRC2 can dimerize in the nucleoplasm. We showed that ES cell differentiation induces selective alteration of the assembly stoichiometry of Cbx2 on chromatin but not other PRC1 components. We additionally showed that the PRC2-mediated trimethylation of H3K27 is not required for the assembly stoichiometry of PRC1 on chromatin. Thus, these findings uncover that PRC1 and PRC2 employ distinct mechanisms to assemble on chromatin, and the novel Sm-ChIPi technique could provide single-molecule insight into other epigenetic complexes. PMID:26381410

  4. A multi-gene approach reveals a complex evolutionary history in the Cyanistes species group.

    PubMed

    Illera, Juan Carlos; Koivula, Kari; Broggi, Juli; Päckert, Martin; Martens, Jochen; Kvist, Laura

    2011-10-01

    Quaternary climatic oscillations have been considered decisive in shaping much of the phylogeographic structure around the Mediterranean Basin. Within this paradigm, peripheral islands are usually considered as the endpoints of the colonization processes. Here, we use nuclear and mitochondrial markers to investigate the phylogeography of the blue tit complex (blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus, Canary blue tit C. teneriffae and azure tit C. cyanus), and assess the role of the Canary Islands for the geographic structuring of genetic variation. The Canary blue tit exhibits strong genetic differentiation within the Canary Islands and, in combination with other related continental species, provides an ideal model in which to examine recent differentiation within a closely related group of continental and oceanic island avian species. We analysed DNA sequences from 51 breeding populations and more than 400 individuals in the blue tit complex. Discrepancies in the nuclear and mitochondrial gene trees provided evidence of a complex evolutionary process around the Mediterranean Basin. Coalescent analyses revealed gene flow between C. caeruleus and C. teneriffae suggesting a dynamic process with multiple phases of colonization and geographic overlapping ranges. Microsatellite data indicated strong genetic differentiation among the Canary Islands and between the Canary archipelago and the close continental areas, indicating limited contemporary gene flow. Diversification of the blue tit complex is estimated to have started during the early Pliocene (≈ 5 Ma), coincident with the end of Messinian salinity crisis. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the North African blue tit is derived from the Canary blue tits, a pattern is avian 'back colonization' that contrasts with more traditionally held views of islands being sinks rather than sources. PMID:21880092

  5. Regulation of human epidermal stem cell proliferation and senescence requires polycomb- dependent and -independent functions of Cbx4.

    PubMed

    Luis, Nuno Miguel; Morey, Lluis; Mejetta, Stefania; Pascual, Gloria; Janich, Peggy; Kuebler, Bernd; Cozutto, Luca; Roma, Guglielmo; Nascimento, Elisabete; Frye, Michaela; Di Croce, Luciano; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2011-09-01

    Human epidermal stem cells transit from a slow cycling to an actively proliferating state to contribute to homeostasis. Both stem cell states differ in their cell cycle profiles but must remain guarded from differentiation and senescence. Here we show that Cbx4, a Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1)-associated protein, maintains human epidermal stem cells as slow-cycling and undifferentiated, while protecting them from senescence. Interestingly, abrogating the polycomb activity of Cbx4 impairs its antisenescent function without affecting stem cell differentiation, indicating that differentiation and senescence are independent processes in human epidermis. Conversely, Cbx4 inhibits stem cell activation and differentiation through its SUMO ligase activity. Global transcriptome and chromatin occupancy analyses indicate that Cbx4 regulates modulators of epidermal homeostasis and represses factors such as Ezh2, Dnmt1, and Bmi1 to prevent the active stem cell state. Our results suggest that distinct Polycomb complexes balance epidermal stem cell dormancy and activation, while continually preventing senescence and differentiation. PMID:21885019

  6. Phi Class of Glutathione S-transferase Gene Superfamily Widely Exists in Nonplant Taxonomic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes involved in detoxification of noxious compounds and protection against oxidative damage. GST class Phi (GSTF), one of the important classes of plant GSTs, has long been considered as plant specific but was recently found in basidiomycete fungi. However, the range of nonplant taxonomic groups containing GSTFs remains unknown. In this study, the distribution and phylogenetic relationships of nonplant GSTFs were investigated. We identified GSTFs in ascomycete fungi, myxobacteria, and protists Naegleria gruberi and Aureococcus anophagefferens. GSTF occurrence in these bacteria and protists correlated with their genome sizes and habitats. While this link was missing across ascomycetes, the distribution and abundance of GSTFs among ascomycete genomes could be associated with their lifestyles to some extent. Sequence comparison, gene structure, and phylogenetic analyses indicated divergence among nonplant GSTFs, suggesting polyphyletic origins during evolution. Furthermore, in silico prediction of functional partners suggested functional diversification among nonplant GSTFs. PMID:26884677

  7. Genetic disorders of vitamin B12 metabolism: eight complementation groups – eight genes

    PubMed Central

    Froese, D. Sean; Gravel, Roy A.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) is an essential nutrient in human metabolism. Genetic diseases of vitamin B12 utilisation constitute an important fraction of inherited newborn disease. Functionally, B12 is the cofactor for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl CoA mutase. To function as a cofactor, B12 must be metabolised through a complex pathway that modifies its structure and takes it through subcellular compartments of the cell. Through the study of inherited disorders of vitamin B12 utilisation, the genes for eight complementation groups have been identified, leading to the determination of the general structure of vitamin B12 processing and providing methods for carrier testing, prenatal diagnosis and approaches to treatment. PMID:21114891

  8. Identification and physical localization of useful genes and markers to a major gene-rich region on wheat group 1S chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, D; Champoux, J A; Bondareva, S N; Gill, K S

    2001-01-01

    The short arm of Triticeae homeologous group 1 chromosomes is known to contain many agronomically important genes. The objectives of this study were to physically localize gene-containing regions of the group 1 short arm, enrich these regions with markers, and study the distribution of genes and recombination. We focused on the major gene-rich region ("1S0.8 region") and identified 75 useful genes along with 93 RFLP markers by comparing 35 different maps of Poaceae species. The RFLP markers were tested by gel blot DNA analysis of wheat group 1 nullisomic-tetrasomic lines, ditelosomic lines, and four single-break deletion lines for chromosome arm 1BS. Seventy-three of the 93 markers mapped to group 1 and detected 91 loci on chromosome 1B. Fifty-one of these markers mapped to two major gene-rich regions physically encompassing 14% of the short arm. Forty-one marker loci mapped to the 1S0.8 region and 10 to 1S0.5 region. Two cDNA markers mapped in the centromeric region and the remaining 24 loci were on the long arm. About 82% of short arm recombination was observed in the 1S0.8 region and 17% in the 1S0.5 region. Less than 1% recombination was observed for the remaining 85% of the physical arm length. PMID:11290727

  9. Distinctive origins of group I introns found in the COXI genes of three gree algae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K I; Ehara, M; Inagaki, Y; Ohama, T

    1998-06-15

    Upon surveying the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COXI) gene of green algae, we found group I introns in three species of algae, Chlorella vulgaris (Cv), Scenedesmus quadricauda (Sq) and Protosiphon botryoides (Pb). The comparative analysis of these nucleotide sequences and their secondary structures revealed that the introns of Cv, Sq, and Pb belong to groups IB1, ID, and IB2, respectively. Each of the three introns contained an open reading frame (ORF) that showed a similarity to the sequence of the LAGLIDADG endonuclease family. However, each of the intronic ORFs in Sq and Pb had a discontinuity in the middle of' the sequences coding for the LAGLIDADG endonuclease. Either of the two ORFs could be restored to a sequence homologous to the LAGLIDADG endonuclease by the insertion of a nucleotide in the appropriate position. In Sq, a putative pseudo-knot structure was detected in the intronic ORF This suggests the occurrence of a ribosomal frameshift in the translation of the ORF. because such pseudo-knot structures are common in viral ORFs employing a (-1) ribosomal frameshift. In the phylogenetic tree that was inferred from the amino acid sequences of algal and non-algal intronic ORFs, the three algal ORFs did not make a cluster, but were scattered throughout the tree. In addition. each of the three algal ORFs showed a close relationship to the ORFs of non-algal introns that were inserted at the corresponding site of the COX] gene, suggesting distinctive origins of the three algal introns via independent horizontal transfers. PMID:9714606

  10. Multilocus analysis of extracellular putative virulence proteins made by group A Streptococcus: population genetics, human serologic response, and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Reid, S D; Green, N M; Buss, J K; Lei, B; Musser, J M

    2001-06-19

    Species of pathogenic microbes are composed of an array of evolutionarily distinct chromosomal genotypes characterized by diversity in gene content and sequence (allelic variation). The occurrence of substantial genetic diversity has hindered progress in developing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of virulence and new therapeutics such as vaccines. To provide new information that bears on these issues, 11 genes encoding extracellular proteins in the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus identified by analysis of four genomes were studied. Eight of the 11 genes encode proteins with a LPXTG(L) motif that covalently links Gram-positive virulence factors to the bacterial cell surface. Sequence analysis of the 11 genes in 37 geographically and phylogenetically diverse group A Streptococcus strains cultured from patients with different infection types found that recent horizontal gene transfer has contributed substantially to chromosomal diversity. Regions of the inferred proteins likely to interact with the host were identified by molecular population genetic analysis, and Western immunoblot analysis with sera from infected patients confirmed that they were antigenic. Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (TaqMan) assays found that transcription of six of the 11 genes was substantially up-regulated in the stationary phase. In addition, transcription of many genes was influenced by the covR and mga trans-acting gene regulatory loci. Multilocus investigation of putative virulence genes by the integrated approach described herein provides an important strategy to aid microbial pathogenesis research and rapidly identify new targets for therapeutics research. PMID:11416223

  11. Three Classes of Plasmid (47–63 kb) Carry the Type B Neurotoxin Gene Cluster of Group II Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47–63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin–antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4. PMID:25079343

  12. Hematopoietic gene promoters subjected to a group-combinatorial study of DNA samples: identification of a megakaryocytic selective DNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Hazony, Yehonathan; Lu, Jun; St. Hilaire, Cynthia; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Identification of common sub-sequences for a group of functionally related DNA sequences can shed light on the role of such elements in cell-specific gene expression. In the megakaryocytic lineage, no one single unique transcription factor was described as linage specific, raising the possibility that a cluster of gene promoter sequences presents a unique signature. Here, the megakaryocytic gene promoter group, which consists of both human and mouse 5′ non-coding regions, served as a case study. A methodology for group-combinatorial search has been implemented as a customized software platform. It extracts the longest common sequences for a group of related DNA sequences and allows for single gaps of varying length, as well as double- and multiple-gap sequences. The results point to common DNA sequences in a group of genes that is selectively expressed in megakaryocytes, and which does not appear in a large group of control, random and specific sequences. This suggests a role for a combination of these sequences in cell-specific gene expression in the megakaryocytic lineage. The data also point to an intrinsic cross-species difference in the organization of 5′ non-coding sequences within the mammalian genomes. This methodology may be used for the identification of regulatory sequences in other lineages. PMID:16936310

  13. CYP2E1 gene rs6413420 polymorphism was first found in the Bouyei ethnic group of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zhou, Li; Wang, Hongju; Zheng, Bo; Wu, Desheng; Yang, Xifei; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Background: China is a multinational country. The relationship between gene polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and national ethnicity has not previously investigated among Chinese people. The aim of this study was to investigate distributions of CYP1A1 and CYP2E1 gene polymorphisms in five ethnic groups of China. Methods: 829 blood samples were collected from five ethnic groups (Han, Shui, Miao, Zhuang, Bouyei). Taqman-MGB probe was used in Real-time PCR to test the gene polymorphisms of CYP1A1 (rs1048943 and rs4646903) and CYP2E1 (rs2031920 and rs6413420). We further validate the SNP genotyping results through DNA sequencing. Results: The genotype distribution of all four SNPs was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except the genotype distribution of rs4646903 in Han and Bouyei ethnic groups (p=0.013 and 0.0005, respectively). CYP2E1 gene rs6413420 polymorphism was first found in the Bouyei ethnic group in China. The results of DNA sequencing were entirely in line with the SNP genotyping assay. Conclusions: The CYP1A1 and CYP2E1 genetic polymorphisms were different in different ethnic groups in China. CYP2E1 gene rs6413420 polymorphism was first found in the Bouyei ethnic group of China. PMID:25419409

  14. A Stem Cell-Like Chromatin Pattern May Predispose Tumor Suppressor Genes to DNA Hypermethylation and Silencing in Adult Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ohm, Joyce E.; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Yu, Xiaobing; Cheng, Linzhao; Schuebel, Kornel E.; Cope, Leslie; Mohammad, Helai P.; Chen, Wei; Daniel, Vincent C.; Yu, Wayne; Berman, David M.; Jenuwein, Thomas; Pruitt, Kevin; Sharkis, Saul J.; Watkins, D. Neil; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Adult cancers may derive from stem or early progenitor cells1,2. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression is essential for normal function of these early cells, but is highly abnormal in cancers, which often exhibit aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes and pro-differentiation factors3-5. We find that, for such genes, both normal and malignant embryonic cells generally lack the gene DNA hypermethylation found in adult cancers. In embryonic stem (ES) cells, these genes are held in a “transcription ready” state mediated by a “bivalent” promoter chromatin pattern consisting of the repressive polycomb group (PcG) H3K27me mark plus the active mark, H3K4me. However, embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells add two key repressive marks, H3K9me2 and H3K9me3, both associated with DNA hypermethylated genes in adult cancers6-8. We hypothesize that cell chromatin patterns and transient silencing of these important growth regulatory genes in stem or progenitor cells of origin for cancer may leave these genes vulnerable to aberrant DNA hypermethylation and heritable gene silencing in adult tumors. PMID:17211412

  15. Identification and high-density mapping of gene-rich regions in chromosome group 1 of wheat.

    PubMed

    Gill, K S; Gill, B S; Endo, T R; Taylor, T

    1996-12-01

    We studied the distribution of genes and recombination in wheat (Triticum aestivum) group 1 chromosomes by comparing high-density physical and genetic maps. Physical maps of chromosomes 1A, 1B, and 1D were generated by mapping 50 DNA markers on 56 single-break deletion lines. A consensus physical map was compared with the 1D genetic map of Triticum tauschii (68 markers) and a Triticeae group 1 consensus map (288 markers) to generate a cytogenetic ladder map (CLM). Most group 1 markers (86%) were present in five clusters that encompassed only 10% of the group 1 chromosome. This distribution may reflect that of genes because more than half of the probes were cDNA clones and 30% were PstI genomic. All 14 agronomically important genes in group 1 chromosomes were present in these clusters. Most recombination occurred in gene-cluster regions. Markers fell at an average distance of 244 kb in these regions. The CLM involving the Triticeae consensus genetic map revealed that the above distribution of genes and recombination is the same in other Triticeae species. Because of a significant number of common markers, our CLM can be used for comparative mapping and to estimate physical distances among markers in many Poaceae species including rice and maize. PMID:8978071

  16. Polycomb repressive complex 2 component Suz12 is required for hematopoietic stem cell function and lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley C W; Miller, Sarah; Hyland, Craig; Kauppi, Maria; Lebois, Marion; Di Rago, Ladina; Metcalf, Donald; Kinkel, Sarah A; Josefsson, Emma C; Blewitt, Marnie E; Majewski, Ian J; Alexander, Warren S

    2015-07-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a chromatin modifier that regulates stem cells in embryonic and adult tissues. Loss-of-function studies of PRC2 components have been complicated by early embryonic dependence on PRC2 activity and the partial functional redundancy of enhancer of zeste homolog 1 (Ezh1) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), which encode the enzymatic component of PRC2. Here, we investigated the role of PRC2 in hematopoiesis by conditional deletion of suppressor of zeste 12 protein homolog (Suz12), a core component of PRC2. Complete loss of Suz12 resulted in failure of hematopoiesis, both in the embryo and the adult, with a loss of maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In contrast, partial loss of PRC2 enhanced HSC self-renewal. Although Suz12 was required for lymphoid development, deletion in individual blood cell lineages revealed that it was dispensable for the development of granulocytic, monocytic, and megakaryocytic cells. Collectively, these data reveal the multifaceted role of PRC2 in hematopoiesis, with divergent dose-dependent effects in HSC and distinct roles in maturing blood cells. Because PRC2 is a potential target for cancer therapy, the significant consequences of modest changes in PRC2 activity, as well as the cell and developmental stage-specific effects, will need to be carefully considered in any therapeutic context. PMID:26036803

  17. Site- and allele-specific polycomb dysregulation in T-cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Jean-Marc; Touzart, Aurore; Pradel, Lydie C; Loosveld, Marie; Koubi, Myriam; Fenouil, Romain; Le Noir, Sandrine; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Morgado, Ester; Gregoire, Claude; Jaeger, Sebastien; Mamessier, Emilie; Pignon, Charles; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Malissen, Bernard; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth A; Howe, Steven J; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J; Ifrah, Norbert; Payet-Bornet, Dominique; Duprez, Estelle; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Asnafi, Vahid; Nadel, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (T-ALL) are aggressive malignant proliferations characterized by high relapse rates and great genetic heterogeneity. TAL1 is amongst the most frequently deregulated oncogenes. Yet, over half of the TAL1(+) cases lack TAL1 lesions, suggesting unrecognized (epi)genetic deregulation mechanisms. Here we show that TAL1 is normally silenced in the T-cell lineage, and that the polycomb H3K27me3-repressive mark is focally diminished in TAL1(+) T-ALLs. Sequencing reveals that >20% of monoallelic TAL1(+) patients without previously known alterations display microinsertions or RAG1/2-mediated episomal reintegration in a single site 5' to TAL1. Using 'allelic-ChIP' and CrispR assays, we demonstrate that such insertions induce a selective switch from H3K27me3 to H3K27ac at the inserted but not the germline allele. We also show that, despite a considerable mechanistic diversity, the mode of oncogenic TAL1 activation, rather than expression levels, impact on clinical outcome. Altogether, these studies establish site-specific epigenetic desilencing as a mechanism of oncogenic activation. PMID:25615415

  18. Dissecting the Roles of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Subunits in the Control of Skin Development.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Katherine L; Perdigoto, Carolina N; Valdes, Victor J; Santoriello, Francis J; Cohen, Idan; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is an essential regulator of cell physiology. Although there have been numerous studies on PRC2 function in somatic tissue development and stem cell control, these have focused on the loss of a single PRC2 subunit. Recent studies, however, have shown that PRC2 subunits may function independently of the PRC2 complex. To investigate the function of PRC2 in the control of skin development, we generated and analyzed three conditional knockout mouse lines, in which the essential PRC2 subunits embryonic ectoderm development (EED), suppressor of zeste 12 homolog (Suz12), and enhancer of zeste homologs 1 and 2 (Ezh1/2) are conditionally ablated in the embryonic epidermal progenitors that give rise to the epidermis, hair follicles, and Merkel cells. Our studies showed that the observed loss-of-function phenotypes are shared between the three knockouts, indicating that in the skin epithelium, EED, Suz12, and Ezh1/2 function largely as subunits of the PRC2 complex. Interestingly, the absence of PRC2 results in dramatically different phenotypes across the different skin lineages: premature acquisition of a functional epidermal barrier, formation of ectopic Merkel cells, and defective postnatal development of hair follicles. The strikingly different roles of PRC2 in the formation of three lineages exemplify the complex outcomes that the lack of PRC2 can have in a somatic stem cell system. PMID:26994968

  19. Product binding enforces the genomic specificity of a yeast Polycomb repressive complex

    PubMed Central

    Dumesic, Phillip A.; Homer, Christina M.; Moresco, James J.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Shanle, Erin K.; Coyle, Scott M.; Strahl, Brian D.; Fujimori, Danica G.; Yates, John R.; Madhani, Hiten D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We characterize the Polycomb system that assembles repressive subtelomeric domains of H3K27 methylation (H3K27me) in the yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. Purification of this PRC2-like protein complex reveals orthologs of animal PRC2 components as well as a chromodomain-containing subunit, Ccc1, which recognizes H3K27me. Whereas removal of either the EZH or EED ortholog eliminates H3K27me, disruption of mark recognition by Ccc1 causes H3K27me to redistribute. Strikingly, the resulting pattern of H3K27me coincides with domains of heterochromatin marked by H3K9me. Indeed, additional removal of the C. neoformans H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4 results in loss of both H3K9me and the redistributed H3K27me marks. These findings indicate that the anchoring of a chromatin-modifying complex to its product suppresses its attraction to a different chromatin type, explaining how enzymes that act on histones, which often harbor product recognition modules, may deposit distinct chromatin domains despite sharing a highly abundant and largely identical substrate—the nucleosome. PMID:25533783

  20. CURLY LEAF Regulates Gene Sets Coordinating Seed Size and Lipid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Deng, Shulin; Wang, Huan; Ye, Jian; Wu, Hui-Wen; Sun, Hai-Xi; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-05-01

    CURLY LEAF (CLF), a histone methyltransferase of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) for trimethylation of histone H3 Lys 27 (H3K27me3), has been thought as a negative regulator controlling mainly postgermination growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Approximately 14% to 29% of genic regions are decorated by H3K27me3 in the Arabidopsis genome; however, transcriptional repression activities of PRC2 on a majority of these regions remain unclear. Here, by analysis of transcriptome profiles, we found that approximately 11.6% genes in the Arabidopsis genome were repressed by CLF in various organs. Unexpectedly, approximately 54% of these genes were preferentially repressed in siliques. Further analyses of 118 transcriptome datasets uncovered a group of genes that was preferentially expressed and repressed by CLF in embryos at the mature-green stage. This observation suggests that CLF mediates a large-scale H3K27me3 programming/reprogramming event during embryonic development. Plants of clf-28 produced bigger and heavier seeds with higher oil content, larger oil bodies, and altered long-chain fatty acid composition compared with wild type. Around 46% of CLF-repressed genes were associated with H3K27me3 marks; moreover, we verified histone modification and transcriptional repression by CLF on regulatory genes. Our results suggest that CLF silences specific gene expression modules. Genes operating within a module have various molecular functions, but they cooperate to regulate a similar physiological function during embryo development. PMID:26945048

  1. CURLY LEAF Regulates Gene Sets Coordinating Seed Size and Lipid Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Ye, Jian; Wu, Hui-Wen; Sun, Hai-Xi; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-01-01

    CURLY LEAF (CLF), a histone methyltransferase of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) for trimethylation of histone H3 Lys 27 (H3K27me3), has been thought as a negative regulator controlling mainly postgermination growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Approximately 14% to 29% of genic regions are decorated by H3K27me3 in the Arabidopsis genome; however, transcriptional repression activities of PRC2 on a majority of these regions remain unclear. Here, by analysis of transcriptome profiles, we found that approximately 11.6% genes in the Arabidopsis genome were repressed by CLF in various organs. Unexpectedly, approximately 54% of these genes were preferentially repressed in siliques. Further analyses of 118 transcriptome datasets uncovered a group of genes that was preferentially expressed and repressed by CLF in embryos at the mature-green stage. This observation suggests that CLF mediates a large-scale H3K27me3 programming/reprogramming event during embryonic development. Plants of clf-28 produced bigger and heavier seeds with higher oil content, larger oil bodies, and altered long-chain fatty acid composition compared with wild type. Around 46% of CLF-repressed genes were associated with H3K27me3 marks; moreover, we verified histone modification and transcriptional repression by CLF on regulatory genes. Our results suggest that CLF silences specific gene expression modules. Genes operating within a module have various molecular functions, but they cooperate to regulate a similar physiological function during embryo development. PMID:26945048

  2. The active gene that encodes human High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1) contains introns and maps to chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, S.; Finelli, P.; Rocchi, M.

    1996-07-15

    The human genome contains a large number of sequences related to the cDNA for High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1), which so far has hampered the cloning and mapping of the active HMG1 gene. We show that the human HMG1 gene contains introns, while the HMG1-related sequences do not and most likely are retrotransposed pseudogenes. We identified eight YACs from the ICI and CEPH libraries that contain the human HMG1 gene. The HMG1 gene is similar in structure to the previously characterized murine homologue and maps to human chromosome 13 and q12, as determined by in situ hybridization. The mouse Hmg1 gene maps to the telomeric region of murine Chromosome 5, which is syntenic to the human 13q12 band. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Molecular characterization of CONSTANS-Like (COL) genes in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA Group, cv. Grand Nain).

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Patil, Hemant Bhagwan; Azeez, Abdul; Subramaniam, Vadakanthara Ramakrishnan; Krishna, Bal; Sane, Aniruddha Prafullachandra; Sane, Prafullachandra Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    The CONSTANS (CO) family is an important regulator of flowering in photoperiod sensitive plants. But information regarding their role in day neutral plants is limited. We report identification of nine Group I type CONSTANS-like (COL) genes of banana and their characterization for their age dependent, diurnal and tissue-specific expression. Our studies show that the Group I genes are conserved in structure to members in other plants. Expression of these genes shows a distinct circadian regulation with a peak during light period. Developmental stage specific expression reveals high level transcript accumulation of two genes, MaCOL3a and MaCOL3b, well before flowering and until the initiation of flowering. A decrease in their transcript levels after initiation of flowering is followed by an increase in transcription of other members that coincides with the continued development of the inflorescence and fruiting. CO binding cis-elements are observed in at least three FT -like genes in banana suggesting possible CO-FT interactions that might regulate flowering. Distinct tissue specific expression patterns are observed for different family members in mature leaves, apical inflorescence, bracts, fruit skin and fruit pulp suggesting possible roles other than flowering. This is the first exhaustive study of the COL genes belonging to Group I of banana. PMID:27186015

  4. A phylogenomic gene cluster resource: The phylogeneticallyinferred groups (PhlGs) database

    SciTech Connect

    Dehal, Paramvir S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-08-25

    We present here the PhIGs database, a phylogenomic resource for sequenced genomes. Although many methods exist for clustering gene families, very few attempt to create truly orthologous clusters sharing descent from a single ancestral gene across a range of evolutionary depths. Although these non-phylogenetic gene family clusters have been used broadly for gene annotation, errors are known to be introduced by the artifactual association of slowly evolving paralogs and lack of annotation for those more rapidly evolving. A full phylogenetic framework is necessary for accurate inference of function and for many studies that address pattern and mechanism of the evolution of the genome. The automated generation of evolutionary gene clusters, creation of gene trees, determination of orthology and paralogy relationships, and the correlation of this information with gene annotations, expression information, and genomic context is an important resource to the scientific community.

  5. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Satokata, I; Ogita, Z; Uchida, T; Okada, Y

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene. Images PMID:2748601

  6. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-07-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene.

  7. emm gene diversity, superantigen gene profiles and presence of SlaA among clinical isolates of group A, C and G streptococci from western Norway.

    PubMed

    Kittang, B R; Skrede, S; Langeland, N; Haanshuus, C G; Mylvaganam, H

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate molecular characteristics of beta-hemolytic streptococcal isolates from western Norway, we analysed the entire emm gene sequences, obtained superantigen gene profiles and determined the prevalence of the gene encoding streptococcal phospholipase A2 (SlaA) of 165 non-invasive and 34 contemporary invasive group A, C and G streptococci (GAS, GCS and GGS). Among the 25 GAS and 26 GCS/GGS emm subtypes identified, only emm3.1 was significantly associated with invasive disease. M protein size variation within GAS and GCS/GGS emm types was frequently identified. Two non-invasive and one invasive GGS possessed emm genes that translated to truncated M proteins as a result of frameshift mutations. Results suggestive of recombinations between emm or emm-like gene segments were found in isolates of emm4 and stG485 types. One non-invasive GGS possessed speC, speG, speH, speI and smeZ, and another non-invasive GGS harboured SlaA. speA and SlaA were over-represented among invasive GAS, probably because they were associated with emm3. speG(dys) was identified in 83% of invasive and 63% of non-invasive GCS/GGS and correlated with certain emm subtypes. Our results indicate the invasive potential of isolates belonging to emm3, and show substantial emm gene diversity and possible lateral gene transfers in our streptococcal population. PMID:21103900

  8. Investigation of Specific Substitutions in Virulence Genes Characterizing Phenotypic Groups of Low-Virulence Field Strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Roche, S. M.; Gracieux, P.; Milohanic, E.; Albert, I.; Virlogeux-Payant, I.; Témoin, S.; Grépinet, O.; Kerouanton, A.; Jacquet, C.; Cossart, P.; Velge, P.

    2005-01-01

    Several models have shown that virulence varies from one strain of Listeria monocytogenes to another, but little is known about the cause of low virulence. Twenty-six field L. monocytogenes strains were shown to be of low virulence in a plaque-forming assay and in a subcutaneous inoculation test in mice. Using the results of cell infection assays and phospholipase activities, the low-virulence strains were assigned to one of four groups by cluster analysis and then virulence-related genes were sequenced. Group I included 11 strains that did not enter cells and had no phospholipase activity. These strains exhibited a mutated PrfA; eight strains had a single amino acid substitution, PrfAK220T, and the other three had a truncated PrfA, PrfAΔ174-237. These genetic modifications could explain the low virulence of group I strains, since mutated PrfA proteins were inactive. Group II and III strains entered cells but did not form plaques. Group II strains had low phosphatidylcholine phospholipase C activity, whereas group III strains had low phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C activity. Several substitutions were observed for five out of six group III strains in the plcA gene and for one out of three group II strains in the plcB gene. Group IV strains poorly colonized spleens of mice and were practically indistinguishable from fully virulent strains on the basis of the above-mentioned in vitro criteria. These results demonstrate a relationship between the phenotypic classification and the genotypic modifications for at least group I and III strains and suggest a common evolution of these strains within a group. PMID:16204519

  9. Different patterns of evolution for duplicated DNA repair genes in bacteria of the Xanthomonadales group

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Galhardo, Rodrigo S; Lage, Claudia; Lima-Bessa, Keronninn M; Aires, Karina A; Menck, Carlos FM

    2004-01-01

    Background DNA repair genes encode proteins that protect organisms against genetic damage generated by environmental agents and by-products of cell metabolism. The importance of these genes in life maintenance is supported by their high conservation, and the presence of duplications of such genes may be easily traced, especially in prokaryotic genomes. Results The genome sequences of two Xanthomonas species were used as the basis for phylogenetic analyses of genes related to DNA repair that were found duplicated. Although 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses confirm their classification at the basis of the gamma proteobacteria subdivision, differences were found in the origin of the various genes investigated. Except for lexA, detected as a recent duplication, most of the genes in more than one copy are represented by two highly divergent orthologs. Basically, one of such duplications is frequently positioned close to other gamma proteobacteria, but the second is often positioned close to unrelated bacteria. These orthologs may have occurred from old duplication events, followed by extensive gene loss, or were originated from lateral gene transfer (LGT), as is the case of the uvrD homolog. Conclusions Duplications of DNA repair related genes may result in redundancy and also improve the organisms' responses to environmental challenges. Most of such duplications, in Xanthomonas, seem to have arisen from old events and possibly enlarge both functional and evolutionary genome potentiality. PMID:15333143

  10. The Reasoned Arguments of a Group of Future Biotechnology Technicians on a Controversial Socio-Scientific Issue: Human Gene Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonneaux, Laurence; Chouchane, Habib

    2011-01-01

    We tried to determine the reasoning behind the stances taken by a group of 19-21-year-old students on the controversial issue of the feasibility and acceptability of human gene therapy. The students were in training at a biotechnology institute. We organised classroom debates, punctuated by phases of epistemological "disturbances". We used a…

  11. Neurobehavioral Integrity of Chimpanzee Newborns: Comparisons across groups and across species reveal gene-environment interaction effects

    PubMed Central

    Bard, Kim A.; Brent, Linda; Lester, Barry; Worobey, John; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this article are to describe the neurobehavioral integrity of chimpanzee newborns, to investigate how early experiences affect the neurobehavioral organization of chimpanzees, and to explore species differences by comparing chimpanzee newborns to a group of typically developing human newborns. Neurobehavioral integrity related to orientation, motor performance, arousal, and state regulation of 55 chimpanzee (raised in four different settings) and 42 human newborns was measured with the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS) a semi-structured 25-minute interactive assessment. Thirty-eight chimpanzees were tested every other day from birth, and analyses revealed significant developmental changes in 19 of 27 NBAS scores. The cross-group and cross-species comparisons were conducted at 2 and 30 days of age. Among the 4 chimpanzee groups, significant differences were found in 23 of 24 NBAS scores. Surprisingly, the cross-species comparisons revealed that the human group was distinct in only 1 of 25 NBAS scores (the human group had significantly less muscle tone than all the chimpanzee groups). The human group was indistinguishable from at least one of the chimpanzee groups in the remaining 24 of 25 NBAS scores. The results of this study support the conclusion that the interplay between genes and environment, rather than genes alone or environment alone, accounts for phenotypic expressions of newborn neurobehavioral integrity in hominids. PMID:25110465

  12. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors. PMID:20368967

  13. Highly Frequent Mutations in Negative Regulators of Multiple Virulence Genes in Group A Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors. PMID:20368967

  14. Identification of a group of XTHs genes responding to heavy metal mercury, salinity and drought stresses in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yun; Zhou, Zhao Sheng; Li, Hai Bo; Yang, Zhi Min

    2016-10-01

    Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTH) are one of the key enzymes regulating cell wall construction, extension and metabolism. In the study, 44 XTH protein genes from Medicago truncatula genome were identified using bioinformatics, microarray and RT-PCR. Each XTH was showed to possess a highly conserved domain ((D/N)-E-(I/L/F/V)-D-(F/I/L)-E-(F/L)-L-G), and most of XTHs possess four Cys in the C terminal region, which suggests the potential for generating disulfide bonds. Based on the XTH protein sequences, these XTHscan be classified into three major families and each family can be subdivided into more groups. Examination of the genomic location of XTH genes on M. truncatula chromosomes showed that the evolutional expansion of the genes was possibly attributed to localized gene duplications. To investigate the possible involvement of the XTHs responding to heavy metals and other abiotic stresses, the XTH genes were exposed to heavy metal (Hg or Cu), salt and drought stresses. There were 28, 21 and 21 MtXTH genes found to respond to HgCl2, salt and drought stresses, respectively, but their expression were different under the stresses. Some of the XTH genes were well confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). We further specified expression of a XTH gene Medtr4g128580 (MtXTH3) under different environmental stresses, and showed that MtXTH3 was induced by Hg exposure. These results indicated that a group of MtXTHs could be differentially expressed under the environmental stresses. PMID:27318197

  15. Characterization of non-canonical Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 subunits during early mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eid, André; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2016-06-01

    An intense period of chromatin remodeling takes place after fertilization in mammals, which is thought necessary for epigenetic reprogramming to start a new developmental program. While much attention has been given to the role of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) and to canonical PRC1 complexes during this process, little is known as to whether there is any contribution of non-canonical PRC1 in shaping the chromatin landscape after fertilization. Here, we first describe in detail the temporal dynamics and abundance of H2A ubiquitylation (H2AK119ub), a histone modification catalyzed by PRC1, during pre-implantation mouse development. In addition, we have analyzed the presence of the 2 characteristic subunits of non-canonical PRC1 complexes, RYBP and its homolog YAF-2. Our results indicate that H2AK119ub is inherited from the sperm, rapidly removed from the paternal chromatin after fertilization, but detected again prior to the first mitosis, suggesting that PRC1 activity occurs as early as the zygotic stage. RYBP and YAF-2, together with the non-canonical subunit L3MBTL2, are all present during pre-implantation development but show different temporal dynamics. While RYBP is absent in the zygote, it is strongly induced from the 4-cell stage onwards. YAF-2 is inherited maternally and localizes to the pericentromeric regions in the zygote, is strongly induced between the 2- and 4-cell stages but then remains weak to undetectable subsequently. All together, our data suggest that non-canonical PRC1 is active during pre-implantation development and should be regarded as an additional component during epigenetic reprogramming and in the establishment of cellular plasticity of the early embryo. PMID:27081692

  16. A Polycomb-mir200 loop regulates clinical outcome in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feber, Andrew; Segovia, Cristina; García-Escudero, Ramón; Rubio, Carolina; López-Calderón, Fernando F.; Díaz-García, Claudio; Villacampa, Felipe; Duarte, José; Gómez-Rodriguez, María J.; Castellano, Daniel; Rodriguez-Peralto, José L.; de la Rosa, Federico; Beck, Stephan; Paramio, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is a highly prevalent disease, ranking fifth in the most common cancers worldwide. Various miRNAs have recently emerged as potential prognostic biomarkers in cancer. The miR-200 family, which repressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is repressed in multiple advanced cancers. However, its expression and function in BC is still poorly understood. Here we show that miR-200 family displays increased expression, probably due to the activation of specific oncogenic signaling pathways, and reduced promoter methylation, in BC compared to normal bladder samples. Furthermore, we show that the expression of these miRNAs is decreased in high grade and stage tumors, and the down-regulation is associated with patient's poor clinical outcome. Our data indicate that the miR-200 family plays distinct roles in Non-Muscle (NMIBC) and Muscle-Invasive BC (MIBC). In MIBC, miR-200 expression post transcriptionally regulates EMT-promoting transcription factors ZEB1 and ZEB2, whereas suppresses BMI1 expression in NMIBC. Interestingly, we show that increased EZH2 and/or BMI1 expression repress the expression of miR-200 family members. Collectively, these findings support a model of BC progression through a coordinated action between the Polycomb Repression Complex (PRC) members repressing the miR-200 expression, which ultimately favors invasive BC development. Since pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 in BC cell lines lead to increased miR-200 expression, our findings may support new therapeutic strategies for BC clinical management. PMID:26517683

  17. Tumor-secreted Hsp90 Subverts Polycomb Function to Drive Prostate Tumor Growth and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Krystal D.; Franco, Omar E.; Hance, Michael W.; Hayward, Simon W.; Isaacs, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second highest contributor to male cancer-related lethality. The transition of a subset of tumors from indolent to invasive disease is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Activation of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) genetic program is a major risk factor for cancer progression. We recently reported that secreted extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) initiates EMT in prostate cancer cells, coincident with its enhanced expression in mesenchymal models. Our current work substantially extended these findings in defining a pathway linking eHsp90 signaling to EZH2 function, a methyltransferase of the Polycomb repressor complex. EZH2 is also implicated in EMT activation, and its up-regulation represents one of the most frequent epigenetic alterations during prostate cancer progression. We have now highlighted a novel epigenetic function for eHsp90 via its modulation of EZH2 expression and activity. Mechanistically, eHsp90 initiated sustained activation of MEK/ERK, a signal critical for facilitating EZH2 transcriptional up-regulation and recruitment to the E-cadherin promoter. We further demonstrated that an eHsp90-EZH2 pathway orchestrates an expanded repertoire of EMT-related events including Snail and Twist expression, tumor cell motility, and anoikis resistance. To evaluate the role of eHsp90 in vivo, eHsp90 secretion was stably enforced in a prostate cancer cell line resembling indolent disease. Remarkably, eHsp90 was sufficient to induce tumor growth, suppress E-cadherin, and initiate localized invasion, events that are exquisitely dependent upon EZH2 function. In summary, our findings illuminate a hitherto unknown epigenetic function for eHsp90 and support a model wherein tumor eHsp90 functions as a rheostat for EZH2 expression and activity to orchestrate mesenchymal properties and coincident aggressive behavior. PMID:25670862

  18. Initiating Hox gene expression: in the early chick neural tube differential sensitivity to FGF and RA signaling subdivides the HoxB genes in two distinct groups.

    PubMed

    Bel-Vialar, Sophie; Itasaki, Nobue; Krumlauf, Robb

    2002-11-01

    Initiation of Hox genes requires interactions between numerous factors and signaling pathways in order to establish their precise domain boundaries in the developing nervous system. There are distinct differences in the expression and regulation of members of Hox genes within a complex suggesting that multiple competing mechanisms are used to initiate their expression domains in early embryogenesis. In this study, by analyzing the response of HoxB genes to both RA and FGF signaling in neural tissue during early chick embryogenesis (HH stages 7-15), we have defined two distinct groups of Hox genes based on their reciprocal sensitivity to RA or FGF during this developmental period. We found that the expression domain of 5' members from the HoxB complex (Hoxb6-Hoxb9) can be expanded anteriorly in the chick neural tube up to the level of the otic vesicle following FGF treatment and that these same genes are refractory to RA treatment at these stages. Furthermore, we showed that the chick caudal-related genes, cdxA and cdxB, are also responsive to FGF signaling in neural tissue and that their anterior expansion is also limited to the level of the otic vesicle. Using a dominant negative form of a Xenopus Cdx gene (XcadEnR) we found that the effect of FGF treatment on 5' HoxB genes is mediated in part through the activation and function of CDX activity. Conversely, the 3' HoxB genes (Hoxb1 and Hoxb3-Hoxb5) are sensitive to RA but not FGF treatments at these stages. We demonstrated by in ovo electroporation of a dominant negative retinoid receptor construct (dnRAR) that retinoid signaling is required to initiate expression. Elevating CDX activity by ectopic expression of an activated form of a Xenopus Cdx gene (XcadVP16) in the hindbrain ectopically activates and anteriorly expands Hoxb4 expression. In a similar manner, when ectopic expression of XcadVP16 is combined with FGF treatment, we found that Hoxb9 expression expands anteriorly into the hindbrain region. Our

  19. The genomic organization of the Fanconi anemia group A (FAA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianzano, L.; Centra, M.; Savino, M.

    1997-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving at least five genes on the basis of complementation analysis (FAA to FAE). The FAA gene has been recently isolated by two independent approaches, positional and functional cloning. In the present study we describe the genomic structure of the FAA gene. The gene contains 43 exons spanning approximately 80 kb as determined by the alignment of four cosmids and the fine localization of the first and the last exons in restriction fragments of these clones. Exons range from 34 to 188 bp. All but three of the splice sites were consistent with the ag-gt rule. We also describe three alternative splicing events in cDNA clones that result in the loss of exon 37, a 23-bp deletion at the 5{prime} end of exon 41. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} region upstream of the putative transcription start site showed no obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, but did show a GC-rich region, typical of housekeeping genes. Knowledge of the structure of the FAA gene will provide an invaluable resource for the discovery of mutations in the gene that accounts for about 60-66% of FA patients. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Evolution of small putative group I introns in the SSU rRNA gene locus of Phialophora species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Group I introns (specifically subgroup IC1) are common in the nuclear ribosomal RNA genes of fungi. While most range in length from more than 200 to nearly 1800 nucleotides (nt) in length, several small putative (or degenerate) group I introns have been described that are between 56 and 81 nt. Although small, previously we demonstrated that the PaSSU intron in the rRNA small subunit gene of Phialophora americana isolate Wang 1046 is capable of in vitro splicing using a standard group I intron pathway, thus qualifying it as a functional ribozyme. Findings Here, we describe eight short putative group I introns, ranging in length from 63 to 75 nt, in the rRNA small subunit genes of Phialophora isolates, a fungal genus that ranges from saprobic to pathogenic on plants and animals. All contain putative pairing regions P1, P7, and P10, as well as a pairing region formed between the middle of the intron and part of the 3' exon. The other pairing regions common in the core of standard group I introns are absent. However, parts of the 3' exon may aid in the stabilization of these small introns. Although the eight putative group I introns were from at least three species of Phialophora, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the eight are monophyletic. They are also monophyletic with the small introns of two lichen-forming fungi, Porpidia crustulata and Arthonia lapidicola. Conclusions The small putative group I introns in Phialophora have common features that may represent group I introns at their minima. They appear to have a single origin as indicated by their monophyly in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:21781325

  1. Identification of the gene responsible for the cblA complementation group of vitamin B12-responsive methylmalonic acidemia based on analysis of prokaryotic gene arrangements.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C Melissa; Wai, Timothy; Leclerc, Daniel; Wilson, Aaron; Wu, Xuchu; Doré, Carole; Hudson, Thomas; Rosenblatt, David S; Gravel, Roy A

    2002-11-26

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) is an essential cofactor of two enzymes, methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. The conversion of the vitamin to its coenzymes requires a series of biochemical modifications for which several genetic diseases are known, comprising eight complementation groups (cblA through cblH). The objective of this study was to clone the gene responsible for the cblA complementation group thought to represent a mitochondrial cobalamin reductase. Examination of bacterial operons containing genes in close proximity to the gene for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and searching for orthologous sequences in the human genome yielded potential candidates. A candidate gene was evaluated for deleterious mutations in cblA patient cell lines, which revealed a 4-bp deletion in three cell lines, as well as an 8-bp insertion and point mutations causing a stop codon and an amino acid substitution. These data confirm that the identified gene, MMAA, corresponds to the cblA complementation group. It is located on chromosome 4q31.1-2 and encodes a predicted protein of 418 aa. A Northern blot revealed RNA species of 1.4, 2.6, and 5.5 kb predominating in liver and skeletal muscle. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals a domain structure, which belongs to the AAA ATPase superfamily that encompasses a wide variety of proteins including ATP-binding cassette transporter accessory proteins that bind ATP and GTP. We speculate that we have identified a component of a transporter or an accessory protein that is involved in the translocation of vitamin B(12) into mitochondria. PMID:12438653

  2. Overexpression of two chrysanthemum DgDREB1 group genes causing delayed flowering or dwarfism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zheng; Hong, Bo; Yang, Yingjie; Li, Qiuhua; Ma, Nan; Ma, Chao; Gao, Junping

    2009-09-01

    We isolated 13 DREB1 (dehydration responsive element binding factor 1) genes from chrysanthemum and further divided them into three groups, DgDREB1A, DgDREB1B and DgDREB1C, based on the phylogenetic analysis. Each group showed their unique expression patterns under cold, dehydration and salt stress conditions. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing DgDREB1A (1A plants) exhibited significantly stronger tolerance to freezing and drought than those overexpressing DgDREB1B (1B plants) and the control plants. In addition, 1A plants showed delayed flowering, but not dwarfism; while 1B plants showed dwarfism, but not delayed flowering. In 1A plants, the expression of three stress-related DREB1-downstream genes, COR47, COR15A, and RD29A, was strongly induced while the expression of CO and FT, two photoperiod responsive flowering-time genes, was inhibited. In 1B plants, the expression of GA2ox7, a GA-deactivation enzyme gene, was dramatically enhanced. The results above strongly suggest that members from different DgDREB1 groups may have distinct effects on plant development: DgDREB1A may be involved in photoperiod-related flowering-time determination and DgDREB1B in GA-mediated plant development. PMID:19544047

  3. Identification of wheat gene Sr35 that confers resistance to Ug99 stem rust race group.

    PubMed

    Saintenac, Cyrille; Zhang, Wenjun; Salcedo, Andres; Rouse, Matthew N; Trick, Harold N; Akhunov, Eduard; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2013-08-16

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A previously uncharacterized Pgt race, designated Ug99, has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is threatening major wheat production areas. Here, we demonstrate that the Sr35 gene from Triticum monococcum is a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat gene that confers near immunity to Ug99 and related races. This gene is absent in the A-genome diploid donor and in polyploid wheat but is effective when transferred from T. monococcum to polyploid wheat. The cloning of Sr35 opens the door to the use of biotechnological approaches to control this devastating disease and to analyses of the molecular interactions that define the wheat-rust pathosystem. PMID:23811222

  4. Influence of microarrays experiments missing values on the stability of gene groups by hierarchical clustering

    PubMed Central

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Hazout, Serge; Malpertuy, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Background Microarray technologies produced large amount of data. The hierarchical clustering is commonly used to identify clusters of co-expressed genes. However, microarray datasets often contain missing values (MVs) representing a major drawback for the use of the clustering methods. Usually the MVs are not treated, or replaced by zero or estimated by the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) approach. The topic of the paper is to study the stability of gene clusters, defined by various hierarchical clustering algorithms, of microarrays experiments including or not MVs. Results In this study, we show that the MVs have important effects on the stability of the gene clusters. Moreover, the magnitude of the gene misallocations is depending on the aggregation algorithm. The most appropriate aggregation methods (e.g. complete-linkage and Ward) are highly sensitive to MVs, and surprisingly, for a very tiny proportion of MVs (e.g. 1%). In most of the case, the MVs must be replaced by expected values. The MVs replacement by the kNN approach clearly improves the identification of co-expressed gene clusters. Nevertheless, we observe that kNN approach is less suitable for the extreme values of gene expression. Conclusion The presence of MVs (even at a low rate) is a major factor of gene cluster instability. In addition, the impact depends on the hierarchical clustering algorithm used. Some methods should be used carefully. Nevertheless, the kNN approach constitutes one efficient method for restoring the missing expression gene values, with a low error level. Our study highlights the need of statistical treatments in microarray data to avoid misinterpretation. PMID:15324460

  5. The platypus is in its place: nuclear genes and indels confirm the sister group relation of monotremes and Therians.

    PubMed

    van Rheede, Teun; Bastiaans, Trijntje; Boone, David N; Hedges, S Blair; de Jong, Wilfried W; Madsen, Ole

    2006-03-01

    Morphological data supports monotremes as the sister group of Theria (extant marsupials + eutherians), but phylogenetic analyses of 12 mitochondrial protein-coding genes have strongly supported the grouping of monotremes with marsupials: the Marsupionta hypothesis. Various nuclear genes tend to support Theria, but a comprehensive study of long concatenated sequences and broad taxon sampling is lacking. We therefore determined sequences from six nuclear genes and obtained additional sequences from the databases to create two large and independent nuclear data sets. One (data set I) emphasized taxon sampling and comprised five genes, with a concatenated length of 2,793 bp, from 21 species (two monotremes, six marsupials, nine placentals, and four outgroups). The other (data set II) emphasized gene sampling and comprised eight genes and three proteins, with a concatenated length of 10,773 bp or 3,669 amino acids, from five taxa (a monotreme, a marsupial, a rodent, human, and chicken). Both data sets were analyzed by parsimony, minimum evolution, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods using various models and data partitions. Data set I gave bootstrap support values for Theria between 55% and 100%, while support for Marsupionta was at most 12.3%. Taking base compositional bias into account generally increased the support for Theria. Data set II exclusively supported Theria, with the highest possible values and significantly rejected Marsupionta. Independent phylogenetic evidence in support of Theria was obtained from two single amino acid deletions and one insertion, while no supporting insertions and deletions were found for Marsupionta. On the basis of our data sets, the time of divergence between Monotremata and Theria was estimated at 231-217 MYA and between Marsupialia and Eutheria at 193-186 MYA. The morphological evidence for a basal position of Monotremata, well separated from Theria, is thus fully supported by the available molecular data from nuclear genes

  6. A Naturally Occurring Single Amino Acid Replacement in Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Increases Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; O'Neill, Brian E.; Kachroo, Priyanka; Anderson, Jeff R.; Flores, Anthony R.; Valson, Chandni; Cantu, Concepcion C.; Makthal, Nishanth; Karmonik, Christof; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Musser, James M.; Olsen, Randall J.

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation within a species; however, few investigations demonstrate how naturally occurring SNPs may increase strain virulence. We recently used group A Streptococcus as a model pathogen to study bacteria strain genotype–patient disease phenotype relationships. Whole-genome sequencing of approximately 800 serotype M59 group A Streptococcus strains, recovered during an outbreak of severe invasive infections across North America, identified a disproportionate number of SNPs in the gene encoding multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus (mga). Herein, we report results of studies designed to test the hypothesis that the most commonly occurring SNP, encoding a replacement of arginine for histidine at codon 201 of Mga (H201R), significantly increases virulence. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the H201R replacement significantly increased expression of mga and 54 other genes, including many proven virulence factors. Compared to the wild-type strain, a H201R isogenic mutant strain caused significantly larger skin lesions in mice. Serial quantitative bacterial culture and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that the isogenic H201R strain was significantly more virulent in a nonhuman primate model of joint infection. These findings show that the H201R replacement in Mga increases the virulence of M59 group A Streptococcus and provide new insight to how a naturally occurring SNP in bacteria contributes to human disease phenotypes. PMID:25476528

  7. A naturally occurring single amino acid replacement in multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus significantly increases virulence.

    PubMed

    Sanson, Misu; O'Neill, Brian E; Kachroo, Priyanka; Anderson, Jeff R; Flores, Anthony R; Valson, Chandni; Cantu, Concepcion C; Makthal, Nishanth; Karmonik, Christof; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Musser, James M; Olsen, Randall J

    2015-02-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation within a species; however, few investigations demonstrate how naturally occurring SNPs may increase strain virulence. We recently used group A Streptococcus as a model pathogen to study bacteria strain genotype-patient disease phenotype relationships. Whole-genome sequencing of approximately 800 serotype M59 group A Streptococcus strains, recovered during an outbreak of severe invasive infections across North America, identified a disproportionate number of SNPs in the gene encoding multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus (mga). Herein, we report results of studies designed to test the hypothesis that the most commonly occurring SNP, encoding a replacement of arginine for histidine at codon 201 of Mga (H201R), significantly increases virulence. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the H201R replacement significantly increased expression of mga and 54 other genes, including many proven virulence factors. Compared to the wild-type strain, a H201R isogenic mutant strain caused significantly larger skin lesions in mice. Serial quantitative bacterial culture and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that the isogenic H201R strain was significantly more virulent in a nonhuman primate model of joint infection. These findings show that the H201R replacement in Mga increases the virulence of M59 group A Streptococcus and provide new insight to how a naturally occurring SNP in bacteria contributes to human disease phenotypes. PMID:25476528

  8. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  9. The Association between Apolipoprotein E Gene Polymorphism and Mild Cognitive Impairment among Different Ethnic Minority Groups in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ZhiZhong; Ma, Wanrui; Liu, Lan

    2014-01-01

    The association, in different ethnic groups, of apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene polymorphism with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been unclear. Few studies have examined the association in Chinese minorities. The current study explores the association between apoE gene polymorphism and MCI in one of the biggest ethnic groups—the Hui—and compares it with the Han. The Minimental State Exam, Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Geriatric Depression Scale were administered to 306 ethnic Hui and 618 ethnic Han people aged ≥55 years. ApoE genotypes were determined using the high resolution melting curve method. The distribution of the apoE genotype and the frequency of alleles ε2, ε3, and ε4 were similar in the Hui and Han groups. In analyses adjusted for age, gender, and education level, the ε4 allele was a risk factor for MCI in both the Hui group (OR = 2.61, 95% CI: 1.02–6.66) and the Han group (OR = 2.36, 95% CI: 1.19–4.67), but the apoE ε2 allele was protective for MCI only in the Han group (OR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.38–0.88). The association of some apoE genotypes with MCI may differ in different ethnic groups in China. Further studies are needed to explore this effect among different populations. PMID:25161798

  10. Jarid1b targets genes regulating development and is involved in neural differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Sandra U; Albert, Mareike; Malatesta, Martina; Morey, Lluis; Johansen, Jens V; Bak, Mads; Tommerup, Niels; Abarrategui, Iratxe; Helin, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    H3K4 methylation is associated with active transcription and in combination with H3K27me3 thought to keep genes regulating development in a poised state. The contribution of enzymes regulating trimethylation of lysine 4 at histone 3 (H3K4me3) levels to embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and differentiation is just starting to emerge. Here, we show that the H3K4me2/3 histone demethylase Jarid1b (Kdm5b/Plu1) is dispensable for ESC self-renewal, but essential for ESC differentiation along the neural lineage. By genome-wide location analysis, we demonstrate that Jarid1b localizes predominantly to transcription start sites of genes encoding developmental regulators, of which more than half are also bound by Polycomb group proteins. Virtually all Jarid1b target genes are associated with H3K4me3 and depletion of Jarid1b in ESCs leads to a global increase of H3K4me3 levels. During neural differentiation, Jarid1b-depleted ESCs fail to efficiently silence lineage-inappropriate genes, specifically stem and germ cell genes. Our results delineate an essential role for Jarid1b-mediated transcriptional control during ESC differentiation. PMID:22020125

  11. Environmental regulation of virulence in group A streptococci: transcription of the gene encoding M protein is stimulated by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Caparon, M G; Geist, R T; Perez-Casal, J; Scott, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have found that different atmospheres can have significant effects on the transcription of emm, the gene that encodes M protein, the major virulence factor of the group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). Expression of emm was monitored by constructing a transcriptional fusion of the promoter for emm6.1 from S. pyogenes JRS4 to a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Transcription, as measured by determining chloramphenicol acetyltransferase specific activity, was stimulated by as much as 25-fold by increased carbon dioxide tension. Expression was greater in the latter stages of growth and was not affected by growth at 30 instead of 37 degrees C. Insertional inactivation of mry, a gene encoding a positive regulator of emm6.1, reduced chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity below the detectable level. We conclude that expression of emm is influenced by environmental factors and that the level of carbon dioxide is one signal that may influence expression of M protein during infection. Images PMID:1512202

  12. Identification of the gene responsible for the cblB complementation group of vitamin B12-dependent methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C Melissa; Wai, Timothy; Leclerc, Daniel; Kadir, Hakan; Narang, Monica; Lerner-Ellis, Jordan P; Hudson, Thomas J; Rosenblatt, David S; Gravel, Roy A

    2002-12-15

    The methylmalonic acidurias are metabolic disorders resulting from deficient methylmalonyl-CoA mutase activity, a vitamin B(12)-dependent enzyme. We have cloned the gene for the cblB complementation group caused by deficient activity of a cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase. This was accomplished by searching bacterial genomes for genes in close proximity to the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene that might encode a protein with the properties of an adenosyltransferase. A candidate was identified in the Archaeoglobus fulgidus genome and was used to probe the human genome database. It yielded a gene on chromosome 12q24 that encodes a predicted protein of 250 amino acids with 45% similarity to PduO in Salmonella enterica, a characterized cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase. A northern blot revealed an RNA species of 1.1 kb predominating in liver and skeletal muscle. The gene was evaluated for deleterious mutations in cblB patient cell lines. Several mutations were identified including a 5 bp deletion (5del572gggcc576), two splice site mutations (IVS2-1G>T, IVS3-1G>A), andt several point mutations (A135T, R186W, R191W and E193K). Two additional amino acid substitutions (R19Q and M239K) were found in several patient cell lines but were found to be common polymorphisms (36% and 46%) in control alleles. The R186W mutation, which we suggest is disease-linked, is present in four of the six patient cell lines examined (homoallelic in two) and in 4 of 240 alleles in control samples. These data confirm that the identified gene, MMAB, corresponds to the cblB complementation group and has the appearance of a cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase, as predicted from biochemical data. PMID:12471062

  13. Genetic analysis of mecA gene and detection of homologue pbpD in Stahylococcus sciuri group

    PubMed Central

    Calazans-Silva, Amanda C.; Medeiros, Pedro T.C.; Araujo, Dayanne M.; Carvalho, Bruno O.; Coelho, Irene S.; Coelho, Shana M.O.; Souza, Miliane M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxacillin/methicillin-resistance is related to the mecA and its regulatory genes mecR1 and mecI. Its origin is still unknown, although evidences support that it is related to CNS, once mecA and a homologue gene, pbpD, were both detected in Staphylococcus sciuri species group. The present work evaluated 210 samples of skin and ear swabs from rodents and 60 nasal swabs from equines of Army Biologic Institute, Rio de Janeiro. Pheno- and genotypic characterization provided 59.52% (25/42) and 78.57% (11/14) S. lentus and S. sciuri, respectively. It was observed that although all S. sciuri isolates tested positive for pbpD, there was no correlation with oxacillin-resistance. On the other hand, isolates tested positive for mecA gene also presented phenotypic oxacillin-resistance in at least one assay. The alignment of the mecA gene showed that the nucleotide sequences were sorted into 2 different groups, one comprising the bovine strains and the other containing human and equine strains. PMID:25242954

  14. A molecular test of alternative hypotheses of tetraodontiform (Acanthomorpha: Tetraodontiformes) sister group relationships using data from the RAG1 gene.

    PubMed

    Holcroft, Nancy I

    2004-09-01

    Two primary competing hypotheses regarding the identity of the sister group of the order Tetraodontiformes exist. The first hypothesis holds that some or all acanthuroid fishes represent the sister of Tetraodontiformes. The second, proposed in 1984 by Rosen, holds that the order Zeiformes is sister to Tetraodontiformes and that the family Caproidae is sister to this Zeiformes + Tetraodontiformes clade. These two hypotheses were tested using data from the single-copy nuclear gene RAG1. Representatives of most major orders of acanthomorph fishes were included to provide an appropriate context in which to place Tetraodontiformes and its hypothesized sister groups. The results of an unweighted parsimony analysis indicate that Zeiformes is not the sister group of Tetraodontiformes. In addition, Caproidae appears unrelated to Zeiformes. A monophyletic Tetraodontiformes was recovered as the sister group of the clade Ephippidae + Drepanidae and was more distantly related to the included zeiform and caproid representatives. PMID:15288052

  15. Prevalence of the β(S) gene among scheduled castes, scheduled tribes and other backward class groups in Central India.

    PubMed

    Shrikhande, Anuradha V; Arjunan, Aishwarya; Agarwal, Amit; Dani, Aarti; Tijare, Jayashri; Gettig, Elizabeth; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited disorder of the blood, and characterized by vasoocclusive crises (VOC), risks for pneumococcal infections and organ toxicities, is associated with morbidity and premature mortality. India, with a population of 1.2 billion individuals, is estimated to be home to over 50.0% of the world's patients with sickle cell disease. The β(S) gene [β6(A3)Glu→Val; HBB: c.20A>T] has the highest prevalence in three socio-economically disadvantaged ethnic categories: the Scheduled Castes (SC), the Scheduled Tribes (ST), and Other Backward Class (OBC) groups in India. The tradition of endogamy practiced by the ethnic groups in India provides the rationale for the screening of individual populations to better understand the distribution of the β(S) gene, guide counseling and awareness programs and aid development of public policy. We undertook a study to describe the prevalence of the β(S) gene in these ethnic groups in the district of Nagpur, Maharashtra in Central India. Through community screening and subsequent targeted screening of high risk individuals, 35,636 individuals were screened, of whom 5466 were found to have sickle cell trait and 1010 were identified with sickle cell disease. Community screening revealed a sickle cell trait prevalence of 13.0% in the SC, 12.0% in the ST and 3.4% in the OBC population. This study describes the prevalence of the β(S) gene within these groups in Central India determined by large scale community screening. This program has uncovered previously undiagnosed cases, provided detailed information to guide population-based disease counseling, prevention and comprehensive care programs. PMID:25023085

  16. Regulation of the Drosophila Enhancer of split and invected-engrailed Gene Complexes by Sister Chromatid Cohesion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, Gurmukh; Siddiqui, Akbar M.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Kahn, Tatyana G.; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Gause, Maria; Dorsett, Dale

    2009-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex was first recognized for holding sister chromatids together and ensuring proper chromosome segregation. Cohesin also regulates gene expression, but the mechanisms are unknown. Cohesin associates preferentially with active genes, and is generally absent from regions in which histone H3 is methylated by the Enhancer of zeste [E(z)] Polycomb group silencing protein. Here we show that transcription is hypersensitive to cohesin levels in two exceptional cases where cohesin and the E(z)-mediated histone methylation simultaneously coat the entire Enhancer of split and invected-engrailed gene complexes in cells derived from Drosophila central nervous system. These gene complexes are modestly transcribed, and produce seven of the twelve transcripts that increase the most with cohesin knockdown genome-wide. Cohesin mutations alter eye development in the same manner as increased Enhancer of split activity, suggesting that similar regulation occurs in vivo. We propose that cohesin helps restrain transcription of these gene complexes, and that deregulation of similarly cohesin-hypersensitive genes may underlie developmental deficits in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. PMID:19587787

  17. Bmi1 represses Ink4a/Arf and Hox genes to regulate stem cells in the rodent incisor

    PubMed Central

    Biehs, Brian; Hu, Jimmy Kuang-Hsien; Strauli, Nicolas B.; Sangiorgi, Eugenio; Jung, Heekyung; Heber, Ralf-Peter; Ho, Sunita; Goodwin, Alice F.; Dasen, Jeremy S.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2013-01-01

    The polycomb group gene Bmi1 is required for maintenance of adult stem cells in many organs1, 2. Inactivation of Bmi1 leads to impaired stem cell self-renewal due to deregulated gene expression. One critical target of BMI1 is Ink4a/Arf, which encodes the cell cycle inhibitors p16ink4a and p19Arf3. However, deletion of Ink4a/Arf only partially rescues Bmi1 null phenotypes4, indicating that other important targets of BMI1 exist. Here, using the continuously-growing mouse incisor as a model system, we report that Bmi1 is expressed by incisor stem cells and that deletion of Bmi1 resulted in fewer stem cells, perturbed gene expression, and defective enamel production. Transcriptional profiling revealed that Hox expression is normally repressed by BMI1 in the adult, and functional assays demonstrated that BMI1-mediated repression of Hox genes preserves the undifferentiated state of stem cells. As Hox gene upregulation has also been reported in other systems when Bmi1 is inactivated1, 2, 5–7, our findings point to a general mechanism whereby BMI1-mediated repression of Hox genes is required for the maintenance of adult stem cells and for prevention of inappropriate differentiation. PMID:23728424

  18. Spectrum of MTHFR gene SNPs C677T and A1298C: a study among 23 population groups of India.

    PubMed

    Saraswathy, Kallur Nava; Asghar, Mohammad; Samtani, Ratika; Murry, Benrithung; Mondal, Prakash Ranjan; Ghosh, Pradeep Kumar; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal

    2012-04-01

    Elevated homocysteine is a risk factor for many complex disorders. The role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene in methylation of homocysteine makes it one of the most important candidate genes for these disorders. Considering the heterogeneity in its distribution in world populations, we screened MTHFR C677T and A1298C single nucleotide polymorphisms in a total of 23 Indian caste, tribal and religious population groups from five geographical regions of India and belonging to four major linguistic groups. The frequencies of MTHFR 677T and 1298C alleles were found to be 10.08 and 20.66%, respectively. MTHFR homozygous genotype 677TT was absent in eight population groups and homozygous 1298CC was absent in two population groups. 677T allele was found to be highest among north Indian populations with Indo-European tongue and 1298C was high among Dravidian-speaking tribes of east India and south India. The less common mutant haplotype 677T-1298C was observed among seven population groups and overall the frequency of this haplotype was 0.008, which is similar to that of African populations. cis configuration of 677T and 1298C was 0.94%. However, we could not find any individual with four mutant alleles which supports the earlier observation that presence of more than two mutant alleles may decrease the viability of foetus and possibly be a selective disadvantage in the population. PMID:22147263

  19. Haploinsufficiency screen highlights two distinct groups of ribosomal protein genes essential for embryonic stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Simon; MacRae, Tara; Bilodeau, Mélanie; Sargeant, Tobias; Sauvageau, Guy

    2015-01-01

    In a functional genomics screen of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with nested hemizygous chromosomal deletions, we reveal that ribosomal protein (RP) genes are the most significant haploinsufficient determinants for embryoid body (EB) formation. Hemizygocity for three RP genes (Rps5, Rps14, or Rps28), distinguished by the proximity of their corresponding protein to the ribosome's mRNA exit site, is associated with the most profound phenotype. This EB phenotype was fully rescued by BAC or cDNA complementation but not by the reduction of p53 levels, although such reduction was effective with most other RP-deleted clones corresponding to non-mRNA exit-site proteins. RNA-sequencing studies further revealed that undifferentiated ESCs hemizygous for Rps5 showed reduced expression levels of several mesoderm-specific genes as compared with wild-type counterparts. Together, these results reveal that RP gene dosage limits the differentiation, not the self-renewal, of mouse ESCs. They also highlight two separate mechanisms underlying this process, one of which is p53 independent. PMID:25646475

  20. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  1. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  2. Identification of wheat gene Sr35 that confers resistance to Ug99 stem rust race group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A new Pgt race designated Ug99 has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is spreading through Africa and Asia threatening major wheat production areas. We re...

  3. Functional grouping of similar genes using eigenanalysis on minimum spanning tree based neighborhood graph.

    PubMed

    Jothi, R; Mohanty, Sraban Kumar; Ojha, Aparajita

    2016-04-01

    Gene expression data clustering is an important biological process in DNA microarray analysis. Although there have been many clustering algorithms for gene expression analysis, finding a suitable and effective clustering algorithm is always a challenging problem due to the heterogeneous nature of gene profiles. Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) based clustering algorithms have been successfully employed to detect clusters of varying shapes and sizes. This paper proposes a novel clustering algorithm using Eigenanalysis on Minimum Spanning Tree based neighborhood graph (E-MST). As MST of a set of points reflects the similarity of the points with their neighborhood, the proposed algorithm employs a similarity graph obtained from k(') rounds of MST (k(')-MST neighborhood graph). By studying the spectral properties of the similarity matrix obtained from k(')-MST graph, the proposed algorithm achieves improved clustering results. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithm on 12 gene expression datasets. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard clustering algorithms. PMID:26945461

  4. Delinquent Peer Group Formation: Evidence of a Gene X Environment Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; Wright, John Paul; DeLisi, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that variants of specific genes may influence some youths to seek out or associate with antisocial peers. Using genotypic data (N = 1,816) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (J. R. Udry, 1998, 2003), the authors tested this possibility. They found that the 10R allele of the dopamine transporter…

  5. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C cells remove pyrimidine dimers selectively from the transcribed strand of active genes

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, J.; van Hoffen, A.; Karcagi, V.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mullenders, L.H. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA fragments of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes in primary normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells. Using strand-specific probes, we show that in normal cells, preferential repair of the 5{prime} part of the ADA gene is due to the rapid and efficient repair of the transcribed strand. Within 8 h after irradiation with UV at 10 J m-2, 70% of the pyrimidine dimers in this strand are removed. The nontranscribed strand is repaired at a much slower rate, with 30% dimers removed after 8 h. Repair of the transcribed strand in XP-C cells occurs at a rate indistinguishable from that in normal cells, but the nontranscribed strand is not repaired significantly in these cells. Similar results were obtained for the DHFR gene. In the 3{prime} part of the ADA gene, however, both normal and XP-C cells perform fast and efficient repair of either strand, which is likely to be caused by the presence of transcription units on both strands. The factor defective in XP-C cells is apparently involved in the processing of DNA damage in inactive parts of the genome, including nontranscribed strands of active genes. These findings have important implications for the understanding of the mechanism of UV-induced excision repair and mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  6. Heterogeneity of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 gene expression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    SMIRNOV, SERHEY; PASHKEVICH, ANASTASIYA; LIUNDYSHEVA, VALERIYA; BABENKO, ANDREY; SMOLYAKOVA, RAISA

    2015-01-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) gene expression analysis is currently used widely in the molecular diagnosis of cancer. According to numerous studies, ERCC1 gene expression correlates with overall survival and effectiveness of chemotherapy with platinum agents. However, the degree of this correlation differs among various studies, with certain authors reporting a complete lack of such a correlation. These contradictions may be attributed to a number of factors, including the heterogeneity of the tumor tissue. In this study, we attempted to assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity exhibited by tissue samples obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through the expression of the ERCC1 gene. This study included 25 samples of tumor tissue from patients with a morphologically confirmed NSCLC diagnosis. A total of three randomized sections of each specimen were used. The ERCC1 gene expression was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the TaqMan format. When planning the experiment and analysis of qPCR data, the MIQE guidelines were taken into consideration. We established that the coefficient of variation of the relative level of ERCC1 gene expression in the majority of the samples exceeded 33% (P<0.05), indicating the significant heterogeneity of the sample. We also demonstrated that the degree of heterogeneity of the tumor tissue is largely dependent on disease stage. PMID:25469300

  7. p13 from group II baculoviruses is a killing-associated gene

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Nan; Du, Enqi; Liu, Yangkun; Qiao, Hong; Yao, Lunguang; Pan, Zishu; Lu, Songya; Qi, Yipeng

    2012-01-01

    p13 gene was first described in Leucania separata multinuclear polyhedrosis virus (Ls-p13) several years ago, but the function of P13 protein has not been experimentally investigated to date. In this article, we indicated that the expression of p13 from Heliothis armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (Ha-p13) was regulated by both early and late promoter. Luciferase assay demonstrated that the activity of Ha-p13 promoter with hr4 enhancer was more than 100 times in heterologous Sf9 cells than that in nature host Hz-AM1 cells. Both Ls-P13 and Ha-P13 are transmembrane proteins. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that both mainly located in the cytoplasm membrane at 48 h. Results of RNA interference indicated that Ha-p13 was a killing-associated gene for host insects H. armigera. The AcMNPV acquired the mentioned killing activity and markedly accelerate the killing rate when expressing Ls-p13. In conclusion, p13 is a killing associated gene in both homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedrovirus. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 730-735] PMID:23261060

  8. Identification of an Unusual Pattern of Global Gene Expression in Group B Streptococcus Grown in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Mereghetti, Laurent; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Green, Nicole M.; Musser, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Because passage of the bacterium to blood is a crucial step in the pathogenesis of many group B Streptococcus (GBS) invasive infections, we recently conducted a whole-genome transcriptome analysis during GBS incubation ex vivo with human blood. In the current work, we sought to analyze in detail the difference in GBS gene expression that occurred in one blood sample (donor A) relative to other blood samples. We incubated GBS strain NEM316 with fresh heparinized human blood obtained from healthy volunteers, and analyzed GBS genome expression and cytokine production. Principal component analysis identified extensive clustering of the transcriptome data among all samples at time 0. In striking contrast, the whole bacterial gene expression in the donor A blood sample was significantly different from the gene expression in all other blood samples studied, both after 30 and 90 min of incubation. More genes were up-regulated in donor A blood relative to the other samples, at 30 min and 90 min. Furthermore, there was significant variation in transcript levels between donor A blood and other blood samples. Notably, genes with the highest transcript levels in donor A blood were those involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We also discovered an unusual production of proinflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines: MIF, tPAI-1 and IL-1β were produced at higher levels in donor A blood relative to the other blood samples, whereas GM-CSF, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-7 and IL-10 remained at lower levels in donor A blood. Potential reasons for our observations are that the immune response of donor A significantly influenced the bacterial transcriptome, or both GBS gene expression and immune response were influenced by the metabolic status of donor A. PMID:19774088

  9. Genetics of Glossina palpalis palpalis: designation of linkage groups and the mapping of eight biochemical and visible marker genes.

    PubMed

    Gooding, R H; Rolseth, B M

    1995-10-01

    The loci for three enzymes (hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and testicular esterase) and two eye-color mutants (brick and tan) are mapped on the X chromosome of Glossina palpalis palpalis. The loci occur in the order brick Hex (tan/Pgm) Est-t, with a recombination frequency of approximately 78% between the outer two loci. The locus for octanol dehydrogenase is located in linkage group II and the loci for malate dehydrogenase and phosphoglucose isomerase are separated by a recombination frequency of about 42.5% in linkage group III. Intrachromosomal recombination occurs at a much lower frequency in males than in females. The distribution of five biochemical marker genes in the linkage groups of G. p. palpalis is markedly different from that found in other higher flies. PMID:8536997

  10. Detection, epidemiology and characterization of VP6 and VP7 genes of group D rotavirus in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Delana Andreza Melo; da Silva, René Ribeiro; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; de Souza Oliveira, Darleise; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Linhares, Alexandre Costa; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses infect humans and animals and are classified into eight groups (A to H). Group D rotavirus (RVD) has been described in birds, although relatively few reports are available. The present study focused on RVD, including epidemiological and molecular aspects of samples collected from broiler chickens in the state of Pará, Brazil. A total of 85 faecal samples were collected between 2008 and 2011 from 37 chicken farms located in eight different municipalities. The viral double-stranded RNA was extracted from faecal suspensions and analysed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), followed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nucleotide sequencing of the VP6 and VP7 genes. Comparing the positive results, 16.5% (14/85) were obtained by PAGE and 35.3% (30/85) by RT-PCR. Samples from seven of eight municipalities were positive for RVD and infections were recorded in 17 (45.9%) of 37 chicken farms. The RVD infection rate was significantly higher in the 16-day to 30-day age group (62.2%; 23/37) compared with other ages. No consistent relationship was found between the infection rate and either the population density in poultry houses or the climatic conditions. The nucleotide sequences of the VP6 gene were 89.9 to 90.9% similar to the prototype strain 05V0049 and were 88.3 to 100% similar among themselves; VP7 gene nucleotide sequences were 84.3 to 85.4% similar to the prototype strain 05V0049 and 93.8 to 100% similar among themselves. Overall, this study provides new insights into the epidemiology and genome characterization of group D rotaviruses. PMID:24875189

  11. Use of the computer-retargeted group II intron RmInt1 of Sinorhizobium meliloti for gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    M García-Rodríguez, Fernando; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Teresa; Díaz-Prado, Vanessa; Toro, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Gene-targeting vectors derived from mobile group II introns capable of forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex containing excised intron lariat RNA and an intron-encoded protein (IEP) with reverse transcriptase (RT), maturase, and endonuclease (En) activities have been described. RmInt1 is an efficient mobile group II intron with an IEP lacking the En domain. We performed a comprehensive study of the rules governing RmInt1 target site recognition based on selection experiments with donor and recipient plasmid libraries, with randomization of the elements of the intron RNA involved in target recognition and the wild-type target site. The data obtained were used to develop a computer algorithm for identifying potential RmInt1 targets in any DNA sequence. Using this algorithm, we modified RmInt1 for the efficient recognition of DNA target sites at different locations in the Sinorhizobium meliloti chromosome. The retargeted RmInt1 integrated efficiently into the chromosome, regardless of the location of the target gene. Our results suggest that RmInt1 could be efficiently adapted for gene targeting. PMID:24646865

  12. Polyurethane dispersion containing quaternized ammonium groups: An efficient nanosize gene delivery carrier for A549 cancer cell line transfection.

    PubMed

    Yousefpour Marzbali, Mahsa; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad; Movassaghpour, AliAkbar; Yeganeh, Hamid

    2016-01-25

    A novel polyurethane containing cationic ammonium groups (QPU) was synthesized and used as vector for gene therapy and cancer gene targeting. The synthesized QPU was characterized by Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy methods. An agarose gel retardation electrophoresis assay was conducted to verify the complete complex formation between QPU and pDNA. The particles size and zeta potential of neat polymers, plasmid DNA, polymers/DNA polyplexes were determined by the dynamic light scattering technique. The polyplexes cytotoxicity was determined using [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and its transfection efficiency was examined qualitatively by fluorescent microscopy and quantitatively by flow cytometery methods. The gel retardation assay, particle size and zeta potential measurements were confirmed that the synthesized cationic polymer could condense DNA efficiently in the physiologic condition. QPU polyplexes showed a significantly lower cytotoxicity compared to Polyfect polyplexes in the examined human cancerous (A549) or normal cells (KDR). Based on our findings, the transfection efficiency by QPU was 2.2 fold higher than Polyfect in the A549 cells whereas in the KDR cells, the cell transfection by Polyfect was 18.1 fold higher than QPU. Due to low cytotoxicity for normal cells and high transfection efficiency in cancer cells, the potential applicability of designed QPU as a non-viral gene carrier for targeting of cancer gene therapy was confirmed. PMID:26658031

  13. Differential Virulence Gene Expression of Group A Streptococcus Serotype M3 in Response to Co-Culture with Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegh, Suzanne J. C.; Flores, Anthony R.; van Belkum, Alex; Musser, James M.; Hays, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus, GAS) and Moraxella catarrhalis are important colonizers and (opportunistic) pathogens of the human respiratory tract. However, current knowledge regarding colonization and pathogenic potential of these two pathogens is based on work involving single bacterial species, even though the interplay between respiratory bacterial species is increasingly important in niche occupation and the development of disease. Therefore, to further define and understand polymicrobial species interactions, we investigated whether gene expression (and hence virulence potential) of GAS would be affected upon co-culture with M. catarrhalis. For co-culture experiments, GAS and M. catarrhalis were cultured in Todd-Hewitt broth supplemented with 0.2% yeast extract (THY) at 37°C with 5% CO2 aeration. Each strain was grown in triplicate so that triplicate experiments could be performed. Bacterial RNA was isolated, cDNA synthesized, and microarray transcriptome expression analysis performed. We observed significantly increased (≥4-fold) expression for genes playing a role in GAS virulence such as hyaluronan synthase (hasA), streptococcal mitogenic exotoxin Z (smeZ) and IgG endopeptidase (ideS). In contrast, significantly decreased (≥4-fold) expression was observed in genes involved in energy metabolism and in 12 conserved GAS two-component regulatory systems. This study provides the first evidence that M. catarrhalis increases GAS virulence gene expression during co-culture, and again shows the importance of polymicrobial infections in directing bacterial virulence. PMID:23626831

  14. Niemeyer Virus: A New Mimivirus Group A Isolate Harboring a Set of Duplicated Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Arantes, Thalita S.; Silva, Lorena C. F.; Assis, Felipe L.; Kroon, Erna G.; La Scola, Bernard; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that gene duplication/acquisition is a key factor for molecular evolution, being directly related to the emergence of new genetic variants. The importance of such phenomena can also be expanded to the viral world, with impacts on viral fitness and environmental adaptations. In this work we describe the isolation and characterization of Niemeyer virus, a new mimivirus isolate obtained from water samples of an urban lake in Brazil. Genomic data showed that Niemeyer harbors duplicated copies of three of its four aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes (cysteinyl, methionyl, and tyrosyl RS). Gene expression analysis showed that such duplications allowed significantly increased expression of methionyl and tyrosyl aaRS mRNA by Niemeyer in comparison to APMV. Remarkably, phylogenetic data revealed that Niemeyer duplicated gene pairs are different, each one clustering with a different group of mimivirus strains. Taken together, our results raise new questions about the origins and selective pressures involving events of aaRS gain and loss among mimiviruses. PMID:26635738

  15. What does "a gene for heart disease" mean? A focus group study of public understandings of genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bates, Benjamin R; Templeton, Alan; Achter, Paul J; Harris, Tina M; Condit, Celeste M

    2003-06-01

    There is growing concern in the medical community about potential genetic determinism in the patient population. Limited information about the public understanding of genetic factors in disease formation is available. To access public perceptions of potentially deterministic phrasing of genetic risk factors, we sought to establish interpretations of the phrase, "a gene for heart disease." Focus groups in urban, suburban, and rural communities were conducted from July through October, 2001 in Georgia. A total of 108 participants were recruited. Participants were recruited to balance sex and racial representation. We used three outcome measures for participants understandings of the phrase: (1) participants' statements of the meaning of the phrase; (2) the level of determinism assigned to genetic factors by participants; and (3) participant reports of the health consequences of having "a gene for heart disease." Participants did not report a single interpretation of the phrase. There were dominant participant interpretations under each outcome measure: (1) "a gene for heart disease" was interpreted as meaning genetic and environmental factors both played roles in disease formation; (2) genetic predisposition was perceived as heightened, not absolute, risk; (3) the perceived health impact was a greater risk of becoming sick. Minority interpretations were found under each measure. Overall, naming "a gene for heart disease" does not appear to have a deterministic impact on a plurality of participants' perceptions of risks associated with genetic factors. Genetic fatalism in patient populations may be confined to a sizable minority. Important considerations for provider intervention and patient education are indicated. PMID:12749055

  16. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships and protein modelling revealed two distinct subfamilies of group II HKT genes between crop and model grasses.

    PubMed

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Francki, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Molecular evolution of large protein families in closely related species can provide useful insights on structural functional relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the grass-specific group II HKT genes identified two distinct subfamilies, I and II. Subfamily II was represented in all species, whereas subfamily I was identified only in the small grain cereals and possibly originated from an ancestral gene duplication post divergence from the coarse grain cereal lineage. The core protein structures were highly analogous despite there being no more than 58% amino acid identity between members of the two subfamilies. Distinctly variable regions in known functional domains, however, indicated functional divergence of the two subfamilies. The subsets of codons residing external to known functional domains predicted signatures of positive Darwinian selection potentially identifying new domains of functional divergence and providing new insights on the structural function and relationships between protein members of the two subfamilies. PMID:27203707

  18. High mobility group (HMG-box) genes in the honeybee fungal pathogen Ascosphaera apis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the honey bee fungal pathogen, Ascosphaera apis (Maassen), encodes three putative high mobility group (HMG-box) transcription factors. The predicted proteins (MAT1-2, STE11 and HTF), each of which contain a single strongly conserved HMG-box, exhibit high similarity to mating type prote...

  19. Evolutionary dynamics of the mS952 intron: a novel mitochondrial group II intron encoding a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene.

    PubMed

    Mullineux, Sahra-Taylor; Willows, Karla; Hausner, Georg

    2011-06-01

    Examination of the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA (rns) gene of five species of the fungal genus Leptographium revealed that the gene has been invaded at least once at position 952 by a group II intron encoding a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene. Phylogenetic analyses of the intron and homing endonuclease sequences indicated that each element in Leptographium species forms a single clade and is closely related to the group II intron/homing endonuclease gene composite element previously reported at position 952 of the mitochondrial rns gene of Cordyceps species and of Cryphonectria parasitica. The results of an intron survey of the mt rns gene of Leptographium species superimposed onto the phylogenetic analysis of the host organisms suggest that the composite element was transmitted vertically in Leptographium lundbergii. However, its stochastic distribution among strains of L. wingfieldii, L. terebrantis, and L. truncatum suggests that it has been horizontally transmitted by lateral gene transfer among these species, although the random presence of the intron may reflect multiple random loss events. A model is proposed describing the initial invasion of the group II intron in the rns gene of L. lundbergii by a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene and subsequent evolution of this gene to recognize a novel DNA target site, which may now promote the mobility of the intron and homing endonuclease gene as a composite element. PMID:21479820

  20. Q-GDEMAR: a general method for the identification of differentially expressed genes in microarrays with unbalanced groups.

    PubMed

    Guebel, Daniel V; Perera-Alberto, Montserrat; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis is a powerful tool to simultaneously determine the pattern of transcription of large amounts of genes. For data post-processing distinct computational methods are currently used that, however, lead to different results regarding the genes expressed differentially. Herein, a new methodology for microarray data analysis named Q-GDEMAR is presented. It combines the quantile characterization of the entire distribution together with the Gaussian deconvolution of the central region of the microarray data distribution. Three discriminant variable variants are proposed that allow us to summarize data and compare groups even when their size is strongly unbalanced. In addition, a simple procedure to compute the false discovery rate (FDR) is also presented. The performance of the method is compared with that observed when using LIMMA (Linear Models Microarray) software as reference. In 58 out of 68 cases, Q-GDEMAR showed a higher sensitivity than LIMMA to detect differentially expressed genes (p = 1 × 10(-10)). The proposed method does not produce biased information, detecting genes with high sensitivity equally well at both tails of the distribution (p = 0.7428). Moreover, all detected genes were associated with very low levels of FDR (median value = 0.67%, interquartile range = 0.87%). Q-GDEMAR can be used as a general method for microarray analysis, but is particularly indicated when the conditions to be compared are unbalanced. The superior performance of Q-GEDEMAR is the consequence of its higher discriminative power and, the fact that it yields a univocal correspondence between the p-values and the values of the discriminating variable. Q-GDEMAR was tested only using Affymetrix microarrays. However, given that it operates after the step of data standardization, it can be used with the same quality features on any of the available mono- or dual-channel microarray platforms. PMID:26563436

  1. Differential Epigenetic Regulation of TOX Subfamily High Mobility Group Box Genes in Lung and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Mathewos; Yingling, Christin M.; Grimes, Marcie J.; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Liu, Yushi; Leng, Shuguang; Joste, Nancy; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine methylation affects regulation of hundreds of genes during cancer development. In this study, a novel aberrantly hypermethylated CpG island in cancer was discovered within the TOX2 promoter. TOX2 was unmethylated in normal cells but 28% lung (n = 190) and 23% breast (n = 80) tumors were methylated. Expression of two novel TOX2 transcripts identified was significantly reduced in primary lung tumors than distant normal lung (p<0.05). These transcripts were silenced in methylated lung and breast cancer cells and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment re-expressed both. Extension of these assays to TOX, TOX3, and TOX4 genes that share similar genomic structure and protein homology with TOX2 revealed distinct methylation profiles by smoking status, histology, and cancer type. TOX was almost exclusively methylated in breast (43%) than lung (5%) cancer, whereas TOX3 was frequently methylated in lung (58%) than breast (30%) tumors. TOX4 was unmethylated in all samples and showed the highest expression in normal lung. Compared to TOX4, expression of TOX, TOX2 and TOX3 in normal lung was 25, 44, and 88% lower, respectively, supporting the premise that reduced promoter activity confers increased susceptibility to methylation during lung carcinogenesis. Genome-wide assays revealed that siRNA-mediated TOX2 knockdown modulated multiple pathways while TOX3 inactivation targeted neuronal development and function. Although these knockdowns did not result in further phenotypic changes of lung cancer cells in vitro, the impact on tissue remodeling, inflammatory response, and cell differentiation pathways suggest a potential role for TOX2 in modulating tumor microenvironment. PMID:22496870

  2. Antibiotic susceptibilities, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene profiles among clinical isolates of group C or G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis & of group G S. anginosus group at a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Bijayini; Mathur, Purva; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Jain, Neetu; Misra, M. C.; Kapil, Arti; Singh, Sarman

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Group C and group G streptococci (together GCGS) are often regarded as commensal bacteria and their role in streptococcal disease burden is under-recognized. While reports of recovery of GCGS from normally sterile body sites are increasing, their resistance to macrolides, fluoroquinolone further warrants all invasive β haemolytic streptococci to be identified to the species level and accurately tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence, clinical profile, antimicrobial susceptibility and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene profile (speA, speB, speC, speF, smeZ, speI, speM, speG, speH and ssa) of GCGS obtained over a period of two years at a tertiary care centre from north India. Methods: The clinical samples were processed as per standard microbiological techniques. β-haemolytic streptococci (BHS) were characterized and grouped. Antimicrobial susceptibility of GCGS was performed using disk diffusion method. All GCGS were characterized for the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins (spe) and spe genes were amplified by PCR method. Results: GCGS (23 GGS, 2GCS) comprised 16 per cent of β haemolytic streptococci (25/142 βHS, 16%) isolated over the study period. Of the 25 GCGS, 22 (88%) were recovered from pus, two (8%) from respiratory tract, whereas one isolate was recovered from blood of a fatal case of septicaemia. Of the total 23 GGS isolates, 18 (78%) were identified as Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp equisimilis (SDSE, large-colony phenotype), five (21%) were Streptococcus anginosus group (SAG, small-colony phenotype). The two GCS were identified as SDSE. All GCGS isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, and linezolid. Tetracycline resistance was noted in 50 per cent of SDSE isolates. The rates of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance in SDSE were low. Twelve of the 20 SDSE isolates were positive for one or more spe genes, with five of the SDSE isolates

  3. Identification of CiaR Regulated Genes That Promote Group B Streptococcal Virulence and Interaction with Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosario, Yvette; Villarino, Nicholas; Stewart, Lara; Weston, Thomas A.; Patras, Kathryn A.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major causative agent of neonatal meningitis due to its ability to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the central nervous system (CNS). It has been demonstrated that GBS can invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC), a primary component of the BBB; however, the mechanism of intracellular survival and trafficking is unclear. We previously identified a two component regulatory system, CiaR/H, which promotes GBS intracellular survival in hBMEC. Here we show that a GBS strain deficient in the response regulator, CiaR, localized more frequently with Rab5, Rab7 and LAMP1 positive vesicles. Further, lysosomes isolated from hBMEC contained fewer viable bacteria following initial infection with the ΔciaR mutant compared to the WT strain. To characterize the contribution of CiaR-regulated genes, we constructed isogenic mutant strains lacking the two most down-regulated genes in the CiaR-deficient mutant, SAN_2180 and SAN_0039. These genes contributed to bacterial uptake and intracellular survival. Furthermore, competition experiments in mice showed that WT GBS had a significant survival advantage over the Δ2180 and Δ0039 mutants in the bloodstream and brain. PMID:27100296

  4. Identification of CiaR Regulated Genes That Promote Group B Streptococcal Virulence and Interaction with Brain Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Rong; Cutting, Andrew S; Del Rosario, Yvette; Villarino, Nicholas; Stewart, Lara; Weston, Thomas A; Patras, Kathryn A; Doran, Kelly S

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major causative agent of neonatal meningitis due to its ability to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter the central nervous system (CNS). It has been demonstrated that GBS can invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC), a primary component of the BBB; however, the mechanism of intracellular survival and trafficking is unclear. We previously identified a two component regulatory system, CiaR/H, which promotes GBS intracellular survival in hBMEC. Here we show that a GBS strain deficient in the response regulator, CiaR, localized more frequently with Rab5, Rab7 and LAMP1 positive vesicles. Further, lysosomes isolated from hBMEC contained fewer viable bacteria following initial infection with the ΔciaR mutant compared to the WT strain. To characterize the contribution of CiaR-regulated genes, we constructed isogenic mutant strains lacking the two most down-regulated genes in the CiaR-deficient mutant, SAN_2180 and SAN_0039. These genes contributed to bacterial uptake and intracellular survival. Furthermore, competition experiments in mice showed that WT GBS had a significant survival advantage over the Δ2180 and Δ0039 mutants in the bloodstream and brain. PMID:27100296

  5. Tissue-specific regulatory network extractor (TS-REX): a database and software resource for the tissue and cell type-specific investigation of transcription factor-gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Colecchia, Federico; Kottwitz, Denise; Wagner, Mandy; Pfenninger, Cosima V.; Thiel, Gerald; Tamm, Ingo; Peterson, Carsten; Nuber, Ulrike A.

    2009-01-01

    The prediction of transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences is in principle very useful to identify upstream regulatory factors. However, when applying this concept to genomes of multicellular organisms such as mammals, one has to deal with a large number of false positive predictions since many transcription factor genes are only expressed in specific tissues or cell types. We developed TS-REX, a database/software system that supports the analysis of tissue and cell type-specific transcription factor-gene networks based on expressed sequence tag abundance of transcription factor-encoding genes in UniGene EST libraries. The use of expression levels of transcription factor-encoding genes according to hierarchical anatomical classifications covering different tissues and cell types makes it possible to filter out irrelevant binding site predictions and to identify candidates of potential functional importance for further experimental testing. TS-REX covers ESTs from H. sapiens and M. musculus, and allows the characterization of both presence and specificity of transcription factors in user-specified tissues or cell types. The software allows users to interactively visualize transcription factor-gene networks, as well as to export data for further processing. TS-REX was applied to predict regulators of Polycomb group genes in six human tumor tissues and in human embryonic stem cells. PMID:19443447

  6. Tissue-specific regulatory network extractor (TS-REX): a database and software resource for the tissue and cell type-specific investigation of transcription factor-gene networks.

    PubMed

    Colecchia, Federico; Kottwitz, Denise; Wagner, Mandy; Pfenninger, Cosima V; Thiel, Gerald; Tamm, Ingo; Peterson, Carsten; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2009-06-01

    The prediction of transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences is in principle very useful to identify upstream regulatory factors. However, when applying this concept to genomes of multicellular organisms such as mammals, one has to deal with a large number of false positive predictions since many transcription factor genes are only expressed in specific tissues or cell types. We developed TS-REX, a database/software system that supports the analysis of tissue and cell type-specific transcription factor-gene networks based on expressed sequence tag abundance of transcription factor-encoding genes in UniGene EST libraries. The use of expression levels of transcription factor-encoding genes according to hierarchical anatomical classifications covering different tissues and cell types makes it possible to filter out irrelevant binding site predictions and to identify candidates of potential functional importance for further experimental testing. TS-REX covers ESTs from H. sapiens and M. musculus, and allows the characterization of both presence and specificity of transcription factors in user-specified tissues or cell types. The software allows users to interactively visualize transcription factor-gene networks, as well as to export data for further processing. TS-REX was applied to predict regulators of Polycomb group genes in six human tumor tissues and in human embryonic stem cells. PMID:19443447

  7. KOMODO: a web tool for detecting and visualizing biased distribution of groups of homologous genes in monophyletic taxa.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Francisco P; Rodrigues, Maíra R; Rodrigues, Gisele O L; Hilário, Heron O; Souza, Raoni A; Tauch, Andreas; Miyoshi, Anderson; Franco, Glaura C; Azevedo, Vasco; Franco, Glória R

    2012-07-01

    The enrichment analysis is a standard procedure to interpret 'omics' experiments that generate large gene lists as outputs, such as transcriptomics and protemics. However, despite the huge success of enrichment analysis in these classes of experiments, there is a surprising lack of application of this methodology to survey other categories of large-scale biological data available. Here, we report Kegg Orthology enrichMent-Online DetectiOn (KOMODO), a web tool to systematically investigate groups of monophyletic genomes in order to detect significantly enriched groups of homologous genes in one taxon when compared with another. The results are displayed in their proper biochemical roles in a visual, explorative way, allowing users to easily formulate and investigate biological hypotheses regarding the taxonomical distribution of genomic elements. We validated KOMODO by analyzing portions of central carbon metabolism in two taxa extensively studied regarding their carbon metabolism profile (Enterobacteriaceae family and Lactobacillales order). Most enzymatic activities significantly biased were related to known key metabolic traits in these taxa, such as the distinct fates of pyruvate (the known tendency of lactate production in Lactobacillales and its complete oxidation in Enterobacteriaceae), demonstrating that KOMODO could detect biologically meaningful differences in the frequencies of shared genomic elements among taxa. KOMODO is freely available at http://komodotool.org. PMID:22675073

  8. KOMODO: a web tool for detecting and visualizing biased distribution of groups of homologous genes in monophyletic taxa

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Francisco P.; Rodrigues, Maíra R.; Rodrigues, Gisele O. L.; Hilário, Heron O.; Souza, Raoni A.; Tauch, Andreas; Miyoshi, Anderson; Franco, Glaura C.; Azevedo, Vasco; Franco, Glória R.

    2012-01-01

    The enrichment analysis is a standard procedure to interpret ‘omics’ experiments that generate large gene lists as outputs, such as transcriptomics and protemics. However, despite the huge success of enrichment analysis in these classes of experiments, there is a surprising lack of application of this methodology to survey other categories of large-scale biological data available. Here, we report Kegg Orthology enrichMent-Online DetectiOn (KOMODO), a web tool to systematically investigate groups of monophyletic genomes in order to detect significantly enriched groups of homologous genes in one taxon when compared with another. The results are displayed in their proper biochemical roles in a visual, explorative way, allowing users to easily formulate and investigate biological hypotheses regarding the taxonomical distribution of genomic elements. We validated KOMODO by analyzing portions of central carbon metabolism in two taxa extensively studied regarding their carbon metabolism profile (Enterobacteriaceae family and Lactobacillales order). Most enzymatic activities significantly biased were related to known key metabolic traits in these taxa, such as the distinct fates of pyruvate (the known tendency of lactate production in Lactobacillales and its complete oxidation in Enterobacteriaceae), demonstrating that KOMODO could detect biologically meaningful differences in the frequencies of shared genomic elements among taxa. KOMODO is freely available at http://komodotool.org. PMID:22675073

  9. Molecular analysis of the rfb gene cluster of a group D2 Salmonella enterica strain: evidence for its origin from an insertion sequence-mediated recombination event between group E and D1 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, S. H.; Hobbs, M.; Reeves, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica O antigen is a highly variable surface polysaccharide composed of a repeated oligosaccharide (the O unit). The O unit produced by serogroup D2 has structural features in common with those of groups D1 and E1, and hybridization studies had previously suggested that the D2 rfb gene cluster responsible for O-unit biosynthesis is indeed a hybrid of the two. In this study, the rfb gene cluster was cloned from a group D2 strain of S. enterica sv. Strasbourg. Mapping, hybridization, and DNA sequencing showed that the organization of the D2 rfb genes is similar to that of group D1, with the alpha-mannosyl transferase gene rfbU replaced by rfbO, the E1-specific beta-mannosyl transferase gene. The E1-specific polymerase gene (rfc) has also been acquired. Interestingly, the D1-like and E1-like rfb regions are separated by an additional sequence closely related to an element (Hinc repeat [H-rpt]) associated with the Rhs loci of Escherichia coli. The H-rpt resembles an insertion sequence and possibly mediated the intraspecific recombination events which produced the group D2 rfb gene organization. Images PMID:8021222

  10. Target gene enrichment in the cyclophyllidean cestodes, the most diverse group of tapeworms.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hao; Jiang, Jiamei; Jiménez, Francisco Agustín; Hoberg, Eric P; Cook, Joseph A; Galbreath, Kurt E; Li, Chenhong

    2016-09-01

    The Cyclophyllidea is the most diverse order of tapeworms, encompassing species that infect all classes of terrestrial tetrapods including humans and domesticated animals. Available phylogenetic reconstructions based either on morphology or molecular data lack the resolution to allow scientists to either propose a solid taxonomy or infer evolutionary associations. Molecular markers available for the Cyclophyllidea mostly include ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial loci. In this study, we identified 3641 single-copy nuclear coding loci by comparing the genomes of Hymenolepis microstoma, Echinococcus granulosus and Taenia solium. We designed RNA baits based on the sequence of H. microstoma, and applied target enrichment and Illumina sequencing to test the utility of those baits to recover loci useful for phylogenetic analyses. We captured DNA from five species of tapeworms representing two families of cyclophyllideans. We obtained an average of 3284 (90%) of the targets from the test samples and then used captured sequences (2 181 361 bp in total; fragment size ranging from 301 to 6969 bp) to reconstruct a phylogeny for the five test species plus the three species for which genomic data are available. The results were consistent with the current consensus regarding cyclophyllidean relationships. To assess the potential for our method to yield informative genetic variation at intraspecific scales, we extracted 14 074 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from alignments of four Arostrilepis macrocirrosa and two A. cooki and successfully inferred their relationships. The results showed that our target gene tools yield data sets that provide robust inferences at a range of taxonomic scales in the Cyclophyllidea. PMID:27037792

  11. Virulence Gene- and Pandemic Group-Specific Marker Profiling of Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Carolyn E.; Parsons, Michele M.; Bopp, Cheryl A.; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Painter, John A.; Vora, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophilic bacterium capable of causing food- and waterborne gastroenteritis, wound infections, and septicemia in humans. The organism has recently received increasing attention, as the emergence of a new clone, V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6, has resulted in the first documented pandemic spread of V. parahaemolyticus. We used microarray analyses to explore the presence of known virulence factors and genetic markers thought to be specific for V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 and its clonal derivatives. Analyses of 48 human clinical isolates collected between 1997 and 2005 revealed that the V. parahaemolyticus chromosome 2 type III secretion system is not specifically associated with pandemic strains and can be found in tdh-negative (i.e., Kanagawa-negative) clinical isolates. These results highlight the genetic dynamism of V. parahaemolyticus and aid in refining the genetic definition of the pandemic group members. PMID:17301274

  12. Dual-site phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator impacts group a streptococcal global gene expression and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Nicola; Saldaña, Miguel; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Thompson, Erika; Koller, Antonius; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorylation relays are a major mechanism by which bacteria alter transcription in response to environmental signals, but understanding of the functional consequences of bacterial response regulator phosphorylation is limited. We sought to characterize how phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein from the major human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) influences GAS global gene expression and pathogenesis. CovR mainly serves to repress GAS virulence factor-encoding genes and has been shown to homodimerize following phosphorylation on aspartate-53 (D53) in vitro. We discovered that CovR is phosphorylated in vivo and that such phosphorylation is partially heat-stable, suggesting additional phosphorylation at non-aspartate residues. Using mass spectroscopy along with targeted mutagenesis, we identified threonine-65 (T65) as an additional CovR phosphorylation site under control of the serine/threonine kinase (Stk). Phosphorylation on T65, as mimicked by the recombinant CovR T65E variant, abolished in vitro CovR D53 phosphorylation. Similarly, isoallelic GAS strains that were either unable to be phosphorylated at D53 (CovR-D53A) or had functional constitutive phosphorylation at T65 (CovR-T65E) had essentially an identical gene repression profile to each other and to a CovR-inactivated strain. However, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E isoallelic strains retained the ability to positively influence gene expression that was abolished in the CovR-inactivated strain. Consistent with these observations, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E strains were hypervirulent compared to the CovR-inactivated strain in a mouse model of invasive GAS disease. Surprisingly, an isoalleic strain unable to be phosphorylated at CovR T65 (CovR-T65A) was hypervirulent compared to the wild-type strain, as auto-regulation of covR gene expression resulted in lower covR gene transcript and CovR protein levels in the CovR-T65A strain. Taken together, these data establish that Cov

  13. Dual-Site Phosphorylation of the Control of Virulence Regulator Impacts Group A Streptococcal Global Gene Expression and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Nicola; Saldaña, Miguel; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Thompson, Erika; Koller, Antonius; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation relays are a major mechanism by which bacteria alter transcription in response to environmental signals, but understanding of the functional consequences of bacterial response regulator phosphorylation is limited. We sought to characterize how phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein from the major human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) influences GAS global gene expression and pathogenesis. CovR mainly serves to repress GAS virulence factor-encoding genes and has been shown to homodimerize following phosphorylation on aspartate-53 (D53) in vitro. We discovered that CovR is phosphorylated in vivo and that such phosphorylation is partially heat-stable, suggesting additional phosphorylation at non-aspartate residues. Using mass spectroscopy along with targeted mutagenesis, we identified threonine-65 (T65) as an additional CovR phosphorylation site under control of the serine/threonine kinase (Stk). Phosphorylation on T65, as mimicked by the recombinant CovR T65E variant, abolished in vitro CovR D53 phosphorylation. Similarly, isoallelic GAS strains that were either unable to be phosphorylated at D53 (CovR-D53A) or had functional constitutive phosphorylation at T65 (CovR-T65E) had essentially an identical gene repression profile to each other and to a CovR-inactivated strain. However, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E isoallelic strains retained the ability to positively influence gene expression that was abolished in the CovR-inactivated strain. Consistent with these observations, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E strains were hypervirulent compared to the CovR-inactivated strain in a mouse model of invasive GAS disease. Surprisingly, an isoalleic strain unable to be phosphorylated at CovR T65 (CovR-T65A) was hypervirulent compared to the wild-type strain, as auto-regulation of covR gene expression resulted in lower covR gene transcript and CovR protein levels in the CovR-T65A strain. Taken together, these data establish that Cov

  14. Survey of the bp/tee genes from clinical group A streptococcus isolates in New Zealand - implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Steemson, John D; Moreland, Nicole J; Williamson, Deborah; Morgan, Julie; Carter, Philip E; Proft, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for a wide range of diseases ranging from superficial infections, such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to life-threatening diseases, such as toxic shock syndrome and acute rheumatic fever (ARF). GAS pili are hair-like extensions protruding from the cell surface and consist of highly immunogenic structural proteins: the backbone pilin (BP) and one or two accessory pilins (AP1 and AP2). The protease-resistant BP builds the pilus shaft and has been recognized as the T-antigen, which forms the basis of a major serological typing scheme that is often used as a supplement to M typing. A previous sequence analysis of the bp gene (tee gene) in 39 GAS isolates revealed 15 different bp/tee types. In this study, we sequenced the bp/tee gene from 100 GAS isolates obtained from patients with pharyngitis, ARF or invasive disease in New Zealand. We found 20 new bp/tee alleles and four new bp/tee types/subtypes. No association between bp/tee type and clinical outcome was observed. We confirmed earlier reports that the emm type and tee type are associated strongly, but we also found exceptions, where multiple tee types could be found in certain M/emm type strains, such as M/emm89. We also reported, for the first time, the existence of a chimeric bp/tee allele, which was assigned into a new subclade (bp/tee3.1). A strong sequence conservation of the bp/tee gene was observed within the individual bp/tee types/subtypes (>97 % sequence identity), as well as between historical and contemporary New Zealand and international GAS strains. This temporal and geographical sequence stability provided further evidence for the potential use of the BP/T-antigen as a vaccine target. PMID:25190737

  15. The BET protein FSH functionally interacts with ASH1 to orchestrate global gene activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The question of how cells re-establish gene expression states after cell division is still poorly understood. Genetic and molecular analyses have indicated that Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins are critical for the long-term maintenance of active gene expression states in many organisms. A generally accepted model suggests that TrxG proteins contribute to maintenance of transcription by protecting genes from inappropriate Polycomb group (PcG)-mediated silencing, instead of directly promoting transcription. Results and discussion Here we report a physical and functional interaction in Drosophila between two members of the TrxG, the histone methyltransferase ASH1 and the bromodomain and extraterminal family protein FSH. We investigated this interface at the genome level, uncovering a widespread co-localization of both proteins at promoters and PcG-bound intergenic elements. Our integrative analysis of chromatin maps and gene expression profiles revealed that the observed ASH1-FSH binding pattern at promoters is a hallmark of active genes. Inhibition of FSH-binding to chromatin resulted in global down-regulation of transcription. In addition, we found that genes displaying marks of robust PcG-mediated repression also have ASH1 and FSH bound to their promoters. Conclusions Our data strongly favor a global coactivator function of ASH1 and FSH during transcription, as opposed to the notion that TrxG proteins impede inappropriate PcG-mediated silencing, but are dispensable elsewhere. Instead, our results suggest that PcG repression needs to overcome the transcription-promoting function of ASH1 and FSH in order to silence genes. PMID:23442797

  16. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Scovell, William M

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome (N) in a nonenzymatic, adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor (ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes (N’ and N’’) remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed (1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and (2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siRNA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome. PMID:27247709

  17. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scovell, William M

    2016-05-26

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome (N) in a nonenzymatic, adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor (ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes (N' and N'') remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed (1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and (2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siRNA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome. PMID:27247709

  18. Linkage Groups of Protein-Coding Genes in Western Palearctic Water Frogs Reveal Extensive Evolutionary Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, H.; Uzzell, T.; Berger, L.

    1997-01-01

    Among progeny of a hybrid (Rana shqiperica X R. lessonae) X R. lessonae, 14 of 22 loci form four linkage groups (LGs): (1) mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, carbonate dehydratase-2, esterase 4, peptidase D; (2) mannosephosphate isomerase, lactate dehydrogenase-B, sex, hexokinase-1, peptidase B; (3) albumin, fructose-biphosphatase-1, guanine deaminase; (4) mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, cytosolic malic enzyme, xanthine oxidase. Fructose-biphosphate aldolase-2 and cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase possibly form a fifth LG. Mitochondrial aconitate hydratase, α-glucosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglucomutase-2 are unlinked to other loci. All testable linkages (among eight loci of LGs 1, 2, 3, and 4) are shared with eastern Palearctic water frogs. Including published data, 44 protein loci can be assigned to 10 of the 13 chromosomes in Holarctic Rana. Of testable pairs among 18 protein loci, agreement between Palearctic and Nearctic Rana is complete (125 unlinked, 14 linked pairs among 14 loci of five syntenies), and Holarctic Rana and Xenopus laevis are highly concordant (125 shared nonlinkages, 13 shared linkages, three differences). Several Rana syntenies occur in mammals and fish. Many syntenies apparently have persisted for 60-140 X 10(6) years (frogs), some even for 350-400 X 10(6) years (mammals and teleosts). PMID:9286685

  19. RING1A and BMI1 bookmark active genes via ubiquitination of chromatin-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mansi; Packard, Colin Z.; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Parvin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis the chromatin undergoes dramatic architectural changes with the halting of the transcriptional processes and evacuation of nearly all transcription associated machinery from genes and promoters. Molecular bookmarking of genes during mitosis is a mechanism of faithfully transmitting cell-specific transcription patterns through cell division. We previously discovered chromatin ubiquitination at active promoters as a potential mitotic bookmark. In this study, we identify the enzymes involved in the deposition of ubiquitin before mitosis. We find that the polycomb complex proteins BMI1 and RING1A regulate the ubiquitination of chromatin associated proteins bound to promoters, and this modification is necessary for the expression of marked genes once the cells enter G1. Depletion of RING1A, and thus inactivation of mitotic bookmarking by ubiquitination, is deleterious to progression through G1, cell survival and proliferation. Though the polycomb complex proteins are thought to primarily regulate gene expression by transcriptional repression, in this study, we discover that these two polycomb proteins regulate the transcription of active genes during the mitosis to G1 transition. PMID:26578590

  20. Comparative analysis of agr groups and virulence genes among subclinical and clinical mastitis Staphylococcus aureus isolates from sheep flocks of the Northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Lara M; de Almeida, Mayra Zilta P R B; de Mendonça, Carla L; Mamizuka, Elsa M

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent mastitis causative agents in small ruminants. The expression of most virulence genes of S. aureus is controlled by an accessory gene regulator (agr) locus. This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups and to evaluate the occurrence of encoding genes for cytotoxin, adhesins and toxins with superantigen activity in S. aureus isolates from milk of ewes with clinical and subclinical mastitis in sheep flocks raised for meat production The agr groups I and II were identified in both cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis. Neither the arg groups III and IV nor negative agr were found. The presence of cflA gene was identified in 100% of the isolates. The frequency of hla and lukE-D genes was high - 77.3 and 82.8%, respectively and all isolates from clinical mastitis presented these genes. The sec gene, either associated to tst gene or not, was identified only in isolates from subclinical mastitis. None of the following genes were identified: bbp, ebpS, cna, fnbB, icaA, icaD, bap, hlg, lukM-lukF-PV and se-a-b-d-e. PMID:24294245

  1. Enrichr: interactive and collaborative HTML5 gene list enrichment analysis tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background System-wide profiling of genes and proteins in mammalian cells produce lists of differentially expressed genes/proteins that need to be further analyzed for their collective functions in order to extract new knowledge. Once unbiased lists of genes or proteins are generated from such experiments, these lists are used as input for computing enrichment with existing lists created from prior knowledge organized into gene-set libraries. While many enrichment analysis tools and gene-set libraries databases have been developed, there is still room for improvement. Results Here, we present Enrichr, an integrative web-based and mobile software application that includes new gene-set libraries, an alternative approach to rank enriched terms, and various interactive visualization approaches to display enrichment results using the JavaScript library, Data Driven Documents (D3). The software can also be embedded into any tool that performs gene list analysis. We applied Enrichr to analyze nine cancer cell lines by comparing their enrichment signatures to the enrichment signatures of matched normal tissues. We observed a common pattern of up regulation of the polycomb group PRC2 and enrichment for the histone mark H3K27me3 in many cancer cell lines, as well as alterations in Toll-like receptor and interlukin signaling in K562 cells when compared with normal myeloid CD33+ cells. Such analyses provide global visualization of critical differences between normal tissues and cancer cell lines but can be applied to many other scenarios. Conclusions Enrichr is an easy to use intuitive enrichment analysis web-based tool providing various types of visualization summaries of collective functions of gene lists. Enrichr is open source and freely available online at: http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/Enrichr. PMID:23586463

  2. Three Phylogenetic Groups of nodA and nifH Genes in Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium Isolates from Leguminous Trees Growing in Africa and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Haukka, Kaisa; Lindström, Kristina; Young, J. Peter W.

    1998-01-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of nodA and nifH genes were studied by using 52 rhizobial isolates from Acacia senegal, Prosopis chilensis, and related leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America. All of the strains had similar host ranges and belonged to the genera Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium, as previously determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The restriction patterns and a sequence analysis of the nodA and nifH genes divided the strains into the following three distinct groups: sinorhizobia from Africa, sinorhizobia from Latin America, and mesorhizobia from both regions. In a phylogenetic tree also containing previously published sequences, the nodA genes of our rhizobia formed a branch of their own, but within the branch no correlation between symbiotic genes and host trees was apparent. Within the large group of African sinorhizobia, similar symbiotic gene types were found in different chromosomal backgrounds, suggesting that transfer of symbiotic genes has occurred across species boundaries. Most strains had plasmids, and the presence of plasmid-borne nifH was demonstrated by hybridization for some examples. The nodA and nifH genes of Sinorhizobium teranga ORS1009T grouped with the nodA and nifH genes of the other African sinorhizobia, but Sinorhizobium saheli ORS609T had a totally different nodA sequence, although it was closely related based on the 16S rRNA gene and nifH data. This might be because this S. saheli strain was originally isolated from Sesbania sp., which belongs to a different cross-nodulation group than Acacia and Prosopis spp. The factors that appear to have influenced the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic genes vary in importance at different taxonomic levels. PMID:9464375

  3. Association of breast cancer progression with a vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism. South-East Sweden Breast Cancer Group.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A C; Söderkvist, P; Eriksson, B; Bergman-Jungeström, M; Wingren, S

    1999-05-15

    The vitamin D3 receptor gene (VDR) contains a TaqI RFLP that is associated with increased VDR mRNA stability, increased serum levels of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3), and decreased risk for prostate cancer. Determination of the TaqI genotype, in a group of young women with breast cancer (n = 111; age, <37 years) and a control population (n = 130), revealed no overall association to risk for breast cancer. However, patients without TaqI site (TT genotype) showed a significantly increased risk for lymph node metastasis (relative risk, 1.8, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.6). Furthermore, a tendency toward an increased survival was found among estrogen receptor-positive, tamoxifen-treated patients who were homozygous for the TaqI site (P = 0.075). We conclude that polymorphism in the VDR gene may influence tumor progression and tamoxifen treatment response in early-onset breast carcinomas. PMID:10344739

  4. The two faces of Janus: virulence gene regulation by CovR/S in group A streptococci.

    PubMed

    Churchward, Gordon

    2007-04-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a variety of human diseases, including toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis, which are both associated with significant mortality. Even the superficial self-limiting diseases caused by GAS, such as pharyngitis, impose a significant economic burden on society. GAS can cause a wide spectrum of diseases because it elaborates virulence factors that enable it to spread and survive in different environmental niches within the human host. The production of many of these virulence factors is directly controlled by the activity of the CovR/S two-component regulatory system. CovS acts in one direction as a kinase primarily to activate the response regulator CovR and repress the expression of major virulence factors and in the other direction as a phosphatase to permit gene expression in response to environmental changes that mimic conditions found during human infection. This Janus-like behaviour of the CovR/S system is recapitulated in the binding of CovR to the promoters that it directly regulates. Interactions between different faces of the CovR DNA binding domain appear to depend upon DNA sequence, leading to the potential for differential regulation of virulence gene expression. PMID:17376070

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription. PMID:26168478

  6. Group II Intron-Mediated Trans-Splicing in the Gene-Rich Mitochondrial Genome of an Enigmatic Eukaryote, Diphylleia rotans

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Miyashita, Hideaki; Roger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondria have evolved from a single endosymbiotic event, present day mitochondria of diverse eukaryotes display a great range of genome structures, content and features. Group I and group II introns are two features that are distributed broadly but patchily in mitochondrial genomes across branches of the tree of eukaryotes. While group I intron-mediated trans-splicing has been reported from some lineages distantly related to each other, findings of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing has been restricted to members of the Chloroplastida. In this study, we found the mitochondrial genome of the unicellular eukaryote Diphylleia rotans possesses currently the second largest gene repertoire. On the basis of a probable phylogenetic position of Diphylleia, which is located within Amorphea, current mosaic gene distribution in Amorphea must invoke parallel gene losses from mitochondrial genomes during evolution. Most notably, although the cytochrome c oxidase subunit (cox) 1 gene was split into four pieces which located at a distance to each other, we confirmed that a single mature mRNA that covered the entire coding region could be generated by group II intron-mediated trans-splicing. This is the first example of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing outside Chloroplastida. Similar trans-splicing mechanisms likely work for bipartitely split cox2 and nad3 genes to generate single mature mRNAs. We finally discuss origin and evolution of this type of trans-splicing in D. rotans as well as in eukaryotes. PMID:26833505

  7. Group II Intron-Mediated Trans-Splicing in the Gene-Rich Mitochondrial Genome of an Enigmatic Eukaryote, Diphylleia rotans.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Miyashita, Hideaki; Roger, Andrew J

    2016-02-01

    Although mitochondria have evolved from a single endosymbiotic event, present day mitochondria of diverse eukaryotes display a great range of genome structures, content and features. Group I and group II introns are two features that are distributed broadly but patchily in mitochondrial genomes across branches of the tree of eukaryotes. While group I intron-mediated trans-splicing has been reported from some lineages distantly related to each other, findings of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing has been restricted to members of the Chloroplastida. In this study, we found the mitochondrial genome of the unicellular eukaryote Diphylleia rotans possesses currently the second largest gene repertoire. On the basis of a probable phylogenetic position of Diphylleia, which is located within Amorphea, current mosaic gene distribution in Amorphea must invoke parallel gene losses from mitochondrial genomes during evolution. Most notably, although the cytochrome c oxidase subunit (cox) 1 gene was split into four pieces which located at a distance to each other, we confirmed that a single mature mRNA that covered the entire coding region could be generated by group II intron-mediated trans-splicing. This is the first example of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing outside Chloroplastida. Similar trans-splicing mechanisms likely work for bipartitely split cox2 and nad3 genes to generate single mature mRNAs. We finally discuss origin and evolution of this type of trans-splicing in D. rotans as well as in eukaryotes. PMID:26833505

  8. A strand-specific switch in noncoding transcription switches the function of a Polycomb/Trithorax response element

    PubMed Central

    Trupke, Johanna; Okulski, Helena; Altmutter, Christina; Ruge, Frank; Boidol, Bernd; Kubicek, Stefan; Schmauss, Gerald; Aumayr, Karin; Ruf, Marius; Pospisilik, Andrew; Dimond, Andrew; Senergin, Hasene Basak; Vargas, Marcus L.; Simon, Jeffrey A.; Ringrose, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PRE/TREs) can switch their function reversibly between silencing and activation, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we show that a switch in forward and reverse noncoding transcription from the Drosophila vestigial (vg) PRE/TRE switches the status of the element between silencing (induced by the forward strand) and activation (induced by the reverse strand). In vitro, both ncRNAs inhibit PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity, but in vivo only the reverse strand binds PRC2. Over-expression of the reverse strand evicts PRC2 from chromatin and inhibits its enzymatic activity. We propose that interactions of RNAs with PRC2 are differentially regulated in vivo, allowing regulated inhibition of local PRC2 activity. Genome-wide analysis shows that strand switching of ncRNAs occurs at several hundred PcG binding sites in fly and vertebrate genomes. This work identifies a novel and potentially widespread class of PRE/TREs that switch function by switching the direction of ncRNA transcription. PMID:25108384

  9. The BMI1 polycomb protein represses cyclin G2-induced autophagy to support proliferation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Mourgues, L; Imbert, V; Nebout, M; Colosetti, P; Neffati, Z; Lagadec, P; Verhoeyen, E; Peng, C; Duprez, E; Legros, L; Rochet, N; Maguer-Satta, V; Nicolini, F-E; Mary, D; Peyron, J-F

    2015-10-01

    The BMI1 polycomb protein regulates self-renewal, proliferation and survival of cancer-initiating cells essentially through epigenetic repression of the CDKN2A tumor suppressor locus. We demonstrate here for the first time that BMI1 also prevents autophagy in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines, to support their proliferation and clonogenic activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified CCNG2/cyclin G2 (CCNG2) as a direct BMI1 target. BMI1 downregulation in CD34+ CML cells by PTC-209 pharmacological treatment or shBMI1 transduction triggered CCNG2 expression and decreased clonogenic activity. Also, ectopic expression of CCNG2 in CD34+ CML cells strongly decreased their clonogenicity. CCNG2 was shown to act by disrupting the phosphatase 2A complex, which activates a PKCζ-AMPK-JNK-ERK pathway that engages autophagy. We observed that BMI1 and CCNG2 levels evolved inversely during the progression of CML towards an acute deadly phase, and therefore hypothesized that BMI1 could support acute transformation of CML through the silencing of a CCNG2-mediated tumor-suppressive autophagy response. PMID:25925206

  10. Analysis of a human DNA excision repair gene involved in group A xeroderma pigmentosum and containing a zinc-finger domain.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Miura, N; Satokata, I; Miyamoto, I; Yoshida, M C; Satoh, Y; Kondo, S; Yasui, A; Okayama, H; Okada, Y

    1990-11-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease, characterized by a high incidence of sunlight-induced skin cancer. Cells from people with this condition are hypersensitive to ultraviolet because of a defect in DNA repair. There are nine genetic complementation groups of XP, groups A-H and a variant. We have cloned the mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group A, the XPAC gene. Here we report molecular cloning of human and mouse XPAC complementary DNAs. Expression of XPAC cDNA confers ultraviolet-resistance on several group A cell lines, but not on lines of other XP groups. Almost all group A lines tested showed abnormality or absence of XPAC messenger RNAs. These results indicate that a defective XPAC gene causes group A XP. The human and mouse XPAC genes are located on chromosome 9q34.1 and chromosome 4C2, respectively. Human XPAC cDNA encodes a protein of 273 amino acids with a zinc-finger motif. PMID:2234061

  11. Whole-genome phylogenies of the family Bacillaceae and expansion of the sigma factor gene family in the Bacillus cereus species-group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group consists of six species (B. anthracis, B. cereus, B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides, B. thuringiensis, and B. weihenstephanensis). While classical microbial taxonomy proposed these organisms as distinct species, newer molecular phylogenies and comparative genome sequencing suggests that these organisms should be classified as a single species (thus, we will refer to these organisms collectively as the Bc species-group). How do we account for the underlying similarity of these phenotypically diverse microbes? It has been established for some time that the most rapidly evolving and evolutionarily flexible portions of the bacterial genome are regulatory sequences and transcriptional networks. Other studies have suggested that the sigma factor gene family of these organisms has diverged and expanded significantly relative to their ancestors; sigma factors are those portions of the bacterial transcriptional apparatus that control RNA polymerase recognition for promoter selection. Thus, examining sigma factor divergence in these organisms would concurrently examine both regulatory sequences and transcriptional networks important for divergence. We began this examination by comparison to the sigma factor gene set of B. subtilis. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the Bc species-group utilizing 157 single-copy genes of the family Bacillaceae suggests that several taxonomic revisions of the genus Bacillus should be considered. Within the Bc species-group there is little indication that the currently recognized species form related sub-groupings, suggesting that they are members of the same species. The sigma factor gene family encoded by the Bc species-group appears to be the result of a dynamic gene-duplication and gene-loss process that in previous analyses underestimated the true heterogeneity of the sigma factor content in the Bc species-group. Conclusions Expansion of the sigma factor gene family appears to have preferentially

  12. ATTED-II: a database of co-expressed genes and cis elements for identifying co-regulated gene groups in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakai, Kenta; Shibaoka, Masayuki; Hayashi, Shinpei; Saeki, Motoshi; Shibata, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    Publicly available database of co-expressed gene sets would be a valuable tool for a wide variety of experimental designs, including targeting of genes for functional identification or for regulatory investigation. Here, we report the construction of an Arabidopsis thaliana trans-factor and cis-element prediction database (ATTED-II) that provides co-regulated gene relationships based on co-expressed genes deduced from microarray data and the predicted cis elements. ATTED-II () includes the following features: (i) lists and networks of co-expressed genes calculated from 58 publicly available experimental series, which are composed of 1388 GeneChip data in A.thaliana; (ii) prediction of cis-regulatory elements in the 200 bp region upstream of the transcription start site to predict co-regulated genes amongst the co-expressed genes; and (iii) visual representation of expression patterns for individual genes. ATTED-II can thus help researchers to clarify the function and regulation of particular genes and gene networks. PMID:17130150

  13. Gene VI of figwort mosaic virus (caulimovirus group) functions in posttranscriptional expression of genes on the full-length RNA transcript.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1989-12-01

    Experimental evidence for a molecular function for gene VI of the caulimoviruses is presented. Based on experiments with the figwort mosaic virus (FMV), it appears that gene VI has a role in the posttranscriptional expression of the closely packed genes (VII and I-V), which appear on the larger, full-length RNA transcript of this virus. Gene VI with its flanking 5'/3' expression signals included as a separate plasmid during electroporation of DNA into protoplasts of Nicotiana edwardsonii shows an unusual type of transactivation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene fused at its 5' end to a small open reading frame (gene VII) of the long 5' leader of the full-length RNA transcript of the FMV genome. The level of activity of the CAT gene is increased up to 20-fold over the activity of control plasmids when gene VI is included in the electroporation mixture. Mutagenesis of the coding portions of gene VI of pGS1 RVI, a transactivating plasmid used in the electroporation experiments, demonstrated that it was probably the polypeptide product of gene VI that was responsible for the transactivating effect. Experiments with various portions of the 5' leader of the large, full-length RNA of FMV showed that the coding region of gene VII is necessary for the transactivation event. Clones of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or FMV with intact gene VI were found to reciprocally transactivate gene VII-CAT fusions (FMV) or gene I-CAT fusions (CaMV) located downstream of the 5' leader sequences of either viral genome. PMID:2594762

  14. Diversity of group A rotavirus genes detected in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dulgheroff, Ana Carolina Bernardes; Silva, George Allan Villarouco da; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Oliveira, Adriana Gonçalves de; Domingues, André Luiz da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses are the main causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis. The segmented nature of the viral genome allows reassortment of genome segments, which can generate genetic variants. In this study, we characterized the diversity of the VP7, VP4 (VP8*), VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes of the rotaviruses that circulated from 2005 to 2011 in the Triângulo Mineiro (TM) region of Brazil. Samples with genotypes G2 (sublineages IVa-1 and IVa-3), G1 (sublineage I-A), G9 (lineage III), G12 (lineages II and III), G8 (lineage II), G3 (lineage III), P[4] (sublineages IVa and IVb), P[8] (sublineages P[8]-3.6, P[8]-3.3, and P[8]-3.1), I2 (lineage VII), E2 (lineages VI, XII, and X), and H2 (lineage III) were identified. The associations found in the samples were G1, G9, or G12 with P[8]-I1-E1-H1; G2 or G8 with P[4]-I2-E2-H2; G12 with I3-E3-H6; and G3 with P[4]-I2-E3-H3 (previously unreported combination). Reassortment events in G2P[4] strains and an apparent pattern of temporal segregation within the lineages were observed. Five TM samples contained genes that exhibited high nucleotide and amino acid identities with strains of animal origin. The present study includes a period of pre- and post-introduction of rotavirus vaccination in all Brazilian territories, thereby serving as a basis for monitoring changes in the genetic constitution of rotaviruses. The results also contribute to the understanding of the diversity and evolution of rotaviruses in a global context. PMID:27266629

  15. Loss of dysbindin-1, a risk gene for schizophrenia, leads to impaired group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Sanjeev K.; Ryan, Richard T.; Wong, Tak Pan; Srivastava, Lalit K.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of dysbindin-1, a protein coded by the risk gene dtnbp1, is reduced in the brains of schizophrenia patients. Evidence indicates a role of dysbindin-1 in dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission. Glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at excitatory synapses is critically regulated by G-protein coupled metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) family members, that have been implicated in schizophrenia. Here, we report a role of dysbindin-1 in hippocampal group 1 mGluR (mGluRI) function in mice. In hippocampal synaptoneurosomal preparations from sandy (sdy) mice, that have a loss of function mutation in dysbindin-1 gene, we observed a striking reduction in mGluRI agonist [(S)-3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] (DHPG)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). This mGluR-ERK1/2 deficit occurred in the absence of significant changes in protein levels of the two members of the mGluRI family (i.e., mGluR1 and mGluR5) or in another mGluRI signaling pathway, i.e., protein kinase C (PKC). Aberrant mGluRI-ERK1/2 signaling affected hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the sdy mutants as DHPG-induced long-term depression (LTD) at CA1 excitatory synapses was significantly reduced. Behavioral data suggest that the mGluRI hypofunction may underlie some of the cognitive abnormalities described in sdy mice as the administration of CDPPB (3-cyano-N-(1, 3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl benzamide), a positive allosteric modulator of mGluR5, rescued short-term object recognition and spatial learning and memory deficits in these mice. Taken together, our data suggest a novel role of dysbindin-1 in regulating mGluRI functions. PMID:25859193

  16. Retinal determination genes coordinate neuroepithelial specification and neurogenesis modes in the Drosophila optic lobe.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Holger; Salecker, Iris

    2016-07-01

    Differences in neuroepithelial patterning and neurogenesis modes contribute to area-specific diversifications of neural circuits. In the Drosophila visual system, two neuroepithelia, the outer (OPC) and inner (IPC) proliferation centers, generate neuron subtypes for four ganglia in several ways. Whereas neuroepithelial cells in the medial OPC directly convert into neuroblasts, in an IPC subdomain they generate migratory progenitors by epithelial-mesenchymal transition that mature into neuroblasts in a second proliferative zone. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the identity of these neuroepithelia, including their neurogenesis modes, remain poorly understood. Analysis of Polycomblike revealed that loss of Polycomb group-mediated repression of the Hox gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B) caused the transformation of OPC to IPC neuroepithelial identity. This suggests that the neuroepithelial default state is IPC-like, whereas OPC identity is derived. Ectopic Abd-B blocks expression of the highly conserved retinal determination gene network members Eyes absent (Eya), Sine oculis (So) and Homothorax (Hth). These factors are essential for OPC specification and neurogenesis control. Finally, eya and so are also sufficient to confer OPC-like identity, and, in parallel with hth, the OPC-specific neurogenesis mode on the IPC. PMID:27381228

  17. Retinal determination genes coordinate neuroepithelial specification and neurogenesis modes in the Drosophila optic lobe

    PubMed Central

    Apitz, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Differences in neuroepithelial patterning and neurogenesis modes contribute to area-specific diversifications of neural circuits. In the Drosophila visual system, two neuroepithelia, the outer (OPC) and inner (IPC) proliferation centers, generate neuron subtypes for four ganglia in several ways. Whereas neuroepithelial cells in the medial OPC directly convert into neuroblasts, in an IPC subdomain they generate migratory progenitors by epithelial-mesenchymal transition that mature into neuroblasts in a second proliferative zone. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the identity of these neuroepithelia, including their neurogenesis modes, remain poorly understood. Analysis of Polycomblike revealed that loss of Polycomb group-mediated repression of the Hox gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B) caused the transformation of OPC to IPC neuroepithelial identity. This suggests that the neuroepithelial default state is IPC-like, whereas OPC identity is derived. Ectopic Abd-B blocks expression of the highly conserved retinal determination gene network members Eyes absent (Eya), Sine oculis (So) and Homothorax (Hth). These factors are essential for OPC specification and neurogenesis control. Finally, eya and so are also sufficient to confer OPC-like identity, and, in parallel with hth, the OPC-specific neurogenesis mode on the IPC. PMID:27381228

  18. emm and sof gene sequence variation in relation to serological typing of opacity-factor-positive group A streptococci.

    PubMed

    Beall, B; Gherardi, G; Lovgren, M; Facklam, R R; Forwick, B A; Tyrrell, G J

    2000-05-01

    Approximately 40-60% of group A streptococcal (GAS) isolates are capable of opacifying sera, due to the expression of the sof (serum opacity factor) gene. The emm (M protein gene) and sof 5' sequences were obtained from a diverse set of GAS reference strains and clinical isolates, and correlated with M serotyping and anti-opacity-factor testing results. Attempts to amplify sof from strains with M serotypes or emm types historically associated with the opacity-factor-negative phenotype were negative, except for emm12 strains, which were found to contain a highly conserved sof sequence. There was a strong correlation of certain M serotypes with specific emm sequences regardless of strain background, and likewise a strong association of specific anti-opacity-factor (AOF) types to sof gene sequence types. In several examples, M type identity, or partial identity shared between strains with differing emm types, was correlated with short, highly conserved 5' emm sequences likely to encode M-type-specific epitopes. Additionally, each of three pairs of historically distinct M type reference strains found to share the same 5' emm sequence, were also found to share M serotype specificity. Based upon sof sequence comparisons between strains of the same and of differing AOF types, an approximately 450 residue domain was determined likely to contain key epitopes required for AOF type specificity. Analysis of two Sof sequences that were not highly homologous, yet shared a common AOF type, further implicated a 107 aa portion of this 450-residue domain in putatively containing AOF-specific epitopes. Taken together, the serological data suggest that AOF-specific epitopes for all Sof proteins may reside within a region corresponding to this 107-residue sequence. The presence of specific, hypervariable emm/sof pairs within multiple isolates appears likely to be a reliable indicator of their overall genetic relatedness, and to be very useful for accurate subtyping of GAS isolates by

  19. Molecular Genetics of the Posterior Sex Combs/Suppressor 2 of Zeste Region of Drosophila: Aberrant Expression of the Suppressor 2 of Zeste Gene Results in Abnormal Bristle Development

    PubMed Central

    Brunk, B. P.; Martin, E. C.; Adler, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    We report the molecular characterization of the Posterior sex combs-Suppressor 2 of zeste region of Drosophila melanogaster. The distal breakpoint of the Aristapedioid inversion divides the region into two parts. We have molecularly mapped the lesions associated with several loss of function mutations in the Polycomb group gene Posterior sex combs (Psc) proximal to this breakpoint. In addition, we have found that lesions associated with several loss of function mutations in the Suppressor 2 of zeste [Su(z)2] gene lie distal to this breakpoint. Since the breakpoint does not cause a loss of function in either gene, no essential sequences are shared by these two neighboring genes. There are three dominant gain of function mutations in the region that result in abnormal bristle development. We find that all three juxtapose foreign DNA sequences upstream of the Su(z)2 gene, and that at least two of these mutations (Arp(1) and vg(D)) behave genetically as gain of function mutations in Su(z)2. Northern and in situ hybridization analyses show that the mutations result in increased accumulation of the Su(z)2 mRNA, which we argue is responsible for the bristle loss phenotype. PMID:1905661

  20. Identification of a family of bacteriophage T4 genes encoding proteins similar to those present in group I introns of fungi and phage.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, M; Ellis, R L; Hinton, D M

    1992-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 segA gene lies in a genetically unmapped region between the gene beta gt (beta-glucosyltransferase) and uvsX (recombination protein) and encodes a protein of 221 amino acids. We have found that the first 100 amino acids of the SegA protein are highly similar to the N termini of four other predicted T4 proteins, also of unknown function. Together these five proteins, SegA-E (similar to endonucleases of group I introns), contain regions of similarity to the endonuclease I-Tev I, which is encoded by the mobile group I intron of the T4 td gene, and to putative endonucleases of group I introns present in the mitochondria of Neurospora crassa, Podospora anserina, and Saccharomyces douglasii. Intron-encoded endonucleases are required for the movement (homing) of the intron DNA into an intronless gene, cutting at or near the site of intron insertion. Our in vitro assays indicate that SegA, like I-Tev I, is a Mg(2+)-dependent DNA endonuclease that has preferred sites for cutting. Unlike the I-Tev I gene, however, there is no evidence that segA (or the other seg genes) resides within introns. Thus, it is possible that segA encodes an endonuclease that is involved in the movement of the endonuclease-encoding DNA rather than in the homing of an intron. Images PMID:1631169

  1. Co-expression analysis reveals a group of genes potentially involved in regulation of plant response to iron-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wang, Lei; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth and development. Iron deficiency results in abnormal metabolisms from respiration to photosynthesis. Exploration of Fe-deficient responsive genes and their networks is critically important to understand molecular mechanisms leading to the plant adaptation to soil Fe-limitation. Co-expression genes are a cluster of genes that have a similar expression pattern to execute relatively biological functions at a stage of development or under a certain environmental condition. They may share a common regulatory mechanism. In this study, we investigated Fe-starved-related co-expression genes from Arabidopsis. From the biological process GO annotation of TAIR (The Arabidopsis Information Resource), 180 iron-deficient responsive genes were detected. Using ATTED-II database, we generated six gene co-expression networks. Among these, two modules of PYE and IRT1 were successfully constructed. There are 30 co-expression genes that are incorporated in the two modules (12 in PYE-module and 18 in IRT1-module). Sixteen of the co-expression genes were well characterized. The remaining genes (14) are poorly or not functionally identified with iron stress. Validation of the 14 genes using real-time PCR showed differential expression under iron-deficiency. Most of the co-expression genes (23/30) could be validated in pye and fit mutant plants with iron-deficiency. We further identified iron-responsive cis-elements upstream of the co-expression genes and found that 22 out of 30 genes contain the iron-responsive motif IDE1. Furthermore, some auxin and ethylene-responsive elements were detected in the promoters of the co-expression genes. These results suggest that some of the genes can be also involved in iron stress response through the phytohormone-responsive pathways. PMID:25300251

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Ewing Sarcoma Tumors Reveals the Prognostic Importance of Tumor-Stromal Interactions: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Volchenboum, Samuel L.; Andrade, Jorge; Huang, Lei; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Krailo, Mark; Womer, Richard B.; Ranft, Andreas; Potratz, Jenny; Dirksen, Uta; Triche, Timothy J.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of Ewing sarcoma (ES) can occur months or years after initial remission and salvage therapy for relapsed disease is usually ineffective. Thus, there is great need to develop biomarkers that can predict which patients are at risk for relapse so that therapy and post-therapy evaluation can be adjusted accordingly. For the current study we performed whole genome expression profiling on two independent cohorts of clinically annotated ES tumors in an effort to identify and validate prognostic gene signatures. ES specimens were obtained from the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) and whole genome expression profiling performed using Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays. Lists of differentially expressed genes between survivors and non-survivors were used to identify prognostic gene signatures. An independent cohort of tumors from the Euro-Ewing cooperative group was similarly analyzed as a validation cohort. Unsupervised clustering of gene expression data failed to segregate tumors based on outcome. Supervised analysis of survivors vs. non-survivors revealed a small number of differentially expressed genes and several statistically significant gene signatures. Gene specific enrichment analysis (GSEA) demonstrated that integrin and chemokine genes were associated with survival in tumors where stromal contamination was present. Tumors that did not harbor stromal contamination showed no association of any genes or pathways with clinical outcome. Our results reflect the challenges of performing RNA-based assays on archived bone tumor specimens. In addition, they reveal a key role for tumor stroma in determining ES prognosis. Future biologic and clinical investigations should focus on elucidating the contribution of tumor:microenvironment interactions on ES progression and response to therapy. Key words: ES, gene expression profiling, prognostic signature PMID:26052443

  3. Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers for Amplification of Priming Glycosyltransferase Genes of the Exopolysaccharide Locus in Strains of the Lactobacillus casei Group

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, Cathy; LaPointe, Gisèle; Sirois, Stéphane; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Roy, Denis

    2003-01-01

    A primer design strategy named CODEHOP (consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primer) for amplification of distantly related sequences was used to detect the priming glycosyltransferase (GT) gene in strains of the Lactobacillus casei group. Each hybrid primer consisted of a short 3′ degenerate core based on four highly conserved amino acids and a longer 5′ consensus clamp region based on six sequences of the priming GT gene products from exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacteria. The hybrid primers were used to detect the priming GT gene of 44 commercial isolates and reference strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. casei, Lactobacillus zeae, and Streptococcus thermophilus. The priming GT gene was detected in the genome of both non-EPS-producing (EPS−) and EPS-producing (EPS+) strains of L. rhamnosus. The sequences of the cloned PCR products were similar to those of the priming GT gene of various gram-negative and gram-positive EPS+ bacteria. Specific primers designed from the L. rhamnosus RW-9595M GT gene were used to sequence the end of the priming GT gene in selected EPS+ strains of L. rhamnosus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Lactobacillus spp. form a distinctive group apart from other lactic acid bacteria for which GT genes have been characterized to date. Moreover, the sequences show a divergence existing among strains of L. rhamnosus with respect to the terminal region of the priming GT gene. Thus, the PCR approach with consensus-degenerate hybrid primers designed with CODEHOP is a practical approach for the detection of similar genes containing conserved motifs in different bacterial genomes. PMID:12788729

  4. Intraspecific Phylogeny and Lineage Group Identification Based on the prfA Virulence Gene Cluster of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Todd J.; Gorski, Lisa; Borucki, Monica K.; Mandrell, Robert E.; Hutchins, Jan; Pupedis, Kitty

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a serious food-borne pathogen that can cause invasive disease in humans and other animals and has been the leading cause of food recalls due to microbiological concerns in recent years. In order to test hypotheses regarding L. monocytogenes lineage composition, evolution, ecology, and taxonomy, a robust intraspecific phylogeny was developed based on prfA virulence gene cluster sequences from 113 L. monocytogenes isolates. The results of the multigene phylogenetic analyses confirm that L. monocytogenes comprises at least three evolutionary lineages, demonstrate that lineages most frequently (lineage 1) and least frequently (lineage 3) associated with human listeriosis are sister-groups, and reveal for the first time that the human epidemic associated serotype 4b is prevalent among strains from lineage 1 and lineage 3. In addition, a PCR-based test for lineage identification was developed and used in a survey of food products demonstrating that the low frequency of association between lineage 3 isolates and human listeriosis cases likely reflects rarity of exposure and not reduced virulence for humans as has been previously suggested. However, prevalence data do suggest lineage 3 isolates may be better adapted to the animal production environment than the food-processing environment. Finally, analyses of haplotype diversity indicate that lineage 1 has experienced a purge of genetic variation that was not observed in the other lineages, suggesting that the three L. monocytogenes lineages may represent distinct species within the framework of the cohesion species concept. PMID:15262937

  5. Improved group-specific primers based on the full SILVA 16S rRNA gene reference database.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Stefan; Pastar, Milica; Mitter, Birgit; Lippert, Kathrin; Hackl, Evelyn; Lojan, Paul; Oswald, Andreas; Sessitsch, Angela

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and community fingerprinting methods, such as the Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis,are well-suited techniques for the examination of microbial community structures. The use of phylum and class-specific primers can provide enhanced sensitivity and phylogenetic resolution as compared with domain-specific primers. To date, several phylum- and class-specific primers targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene have been published. However, many of these primers exhibit low discriminatory power against non-target bacteria in PCR. In this study, we evaluated the precision of certain published primers in silico and via specific PCR. We designed new qPCR and T-RFLP primer pairs (for the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, and the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria) by combining the sequence information from a public dataset (SILVA SSU Ref 102 NR) with manual primer design. We evaluated the primer pairs via PCR using isolates of the above-mentioned groups and via screening of clone libraries from environmental soil samples and human faecal samples. As observed through theoretical and practical evaluation, the primers developed in this study showed a higher level of precision than previously published primers, thus allowing a deeper insight into microbial community dynamics. PMID:25229098

  6. The high mobility group A2 protein epigenetically silences the Cdh1 gene during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Tan, E-Jean; Kahata, Kaoru; Idås, Oskar; Thuault, Sylvie; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2015-01-01

    The loss of the tumour suppressor E-cadherin (Cdh1) is a key event during tumourigenesis and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) triggers EMT by inducing the expression of non-histone chromatin protein High Mobility Group A2 (HMGA2). We have previously shown that HMGA2, together with Smads, regulate a network of EMT-transcription factors (EMT-TFs) like Snail1, Snail2, ZEB1, ZEB2 and Twist1, most of which are well-known repressors of the Cdh1 gene. In this study, we show that the Cdh1 promoter is hypermethylated and epigenetically silenced in our constitutive EMT cell model, whereby HMGA2 is ectopically expressed in mammary epithelial NMuMG cells and these cells are highly motile and invasive. Furthermore, HMGA2 remodels the chromatin to favour binding of de novo DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) to the Cdh1 promoter. E-cadherin expression could be restored after treatment with the DNA de-methylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Here, we describe a new epigenetic role for HMGA2, which follows the actions that HMGA2 initiates via the EMT-TFs, thus achieving sustained silencing of E-cadherin expression and promoting tumour cell invasion. PMID:25492890

  7. The human gene for xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group G (XPG) maps to 13q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, S.; Corlet, J.; Scherly, D.; Clarkson, S.G. ); Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D. ); Wood, R.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Recently, a human cDNA was isolated that restores normal levels of UV resistance and DNA repair synthesis when expressed in vivo in a lymphoblastoid cell line representing XP group G. The XP-G complementing gene (XPG) generates an mRNA of [approximately]4 kb and encodes a protein (XPGC) with homology to the RAD2 DNA repair protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One hundred twenty nanograms of labeled probe was mixed with 2 [mu]g of human C[sub 0]t-1 DNA as a competitor for repetitive elements. Denaturation, dehydration, hybridization, and washing were performed as described. Probe detection was achieved by incubating metaphase spreads sequentially with 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red, 5 [mu]g/ml biotinylated goat anti-avidin antibody, and 2 [mu]g/ml avidin-Texas Red. R-banding was revealed after incubation with fluorescein-labeled anti-BrdU mouse monoclonal antibody. Chromosomes were counter-stained with 0.06 [mu]g/ml DAPI in Citifluor. Analysis of 40 metaphase spreads showed paired signals on both copies of chromosome 13 at band 13q33. No other paired signals were seen consistently on any other chromosome. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in Stem Cells and Correlation to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Lesley A.; Crea, Francesco; Farrar, W. L.

    2009-01-01

    Through the classic study of genetics, much has been learned about the regulation and progression of human disease. Specifically, cancer has been defined as a disease driven by genetic alterations, including mutations in tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. However, the study of normal human development has identified that in addition to classical genetics, regulation of gene expression is also modified by ‘epigenetic’ alterations including chromatin remodeling and histone variants, DNA methylation, the regulation of polycomb group proteins and the epigenetic function of non-coding RNA. These changes are modifications inherited both during meiosis and mitosis, yet they do not result in alterations of the actual DNA sequence. A number of biological questions are directly influenced by epigenetics, such as how does a cell know when to divide, differentiate or remain quiescent, and more importantly, what happens when these pathways become altered? Do these alterations lead to the development and/or progression of cancer? This review will focus on summarizing the limited current literature involving epigenetic alterations in the context of human cancer stems cells (CSCs). The extent to which epigenetic changes define cell fate, identity, and phenotype are still under intense investigation, and many questions remain largely unanswered. Before discussing epigenetic gene silencing in CSCs, the different classifications of stem cells and their properties will be introduced. This will be followed by an introduction to the different epigenetic mechanisms Finally, there will be a discussion of the current knowledge of epigenetic modifications in stem cells, specifically what is known from rodent systems and established cancer cell lines, and how they are leading us to understand human stem cells. PMID:19443100

  9. Average correlation clustering algorithm (ACCA) for grouping of co-regulated genes with similar pattern of variation in their expression values.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; De, Rajat K

    2010-08-01

    Distance based clustering algorithms can group genes that show similar expression values under multiple experimental conditions. They are unable to identify a group of genes that have similar pattern of variation in their expression values. Previously we developed an algorithm called divisive correlation clustering algorithm (DCCA) to tackle this situation, which is based on the concept of correlation clustering. But this algorithm may also fail for certain cases. In order to overcome these situations, we propose a new clustering algorithm, called average correlation clustering algorithm (ACCA), which is able to produce better clustering solution than that produced by some others. ACCA is able to find groups of genes having more common transcription factors and similar pattern of variation in their expression values. Moreover, ACCA is more efficient than DCCA with respect to the time of execution. Like DCCA, we use the concept of correlation clustering concept introduced by Bansal et al. ACCA uses the correlation matrix in such a way that all genes in a cluster have the highest average correlation values with the genes in that cluster. We have applied ACCA and some well-known conventional methods including DCCA to two artificial and nine gene expression datasets, and compared the performance of the algorithms. The clustering results of ACCA are found to be more significantly relevant to the biological annotations than those of the other methods. Analysis of the results show the superiority of ACCA over some others in determining a group of genes having more common transcription factors and with similar pattern of variation in their expression profiles. Availability of the software: The software has been developed using C and Visual Basic languages, and can be executed on the Microsoft Windows platforms. The software may be downloaded as a zip file from http://www.isical.ac.in/~rajat. Then it needs to be installed. Two word files (included in the zip file) need to

  10. Amh and Dmrta2 genes map to tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) linkage group 23 within quantitative trait locus regions for sex determination.

    PubMed

    Shirak, Andrey; Seroussi, Eyal; Cnaani, Avner; Howe, Aimee E; Domokhovsky, Raisa; Zilberman, Noam; Kocher, Thomas D; Hulata, Gideon; Ron, Micha

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the major genes of the mammalian sex determination pathway are also involved in sex determination of fish. Several studies have reported QTL in various species and strains of tilapia, regions contributing to sex determination have been identified on linkage groups 1, 3, and 23. Genes contributing to sex-specific mortality have been detected on linkage groups 2, 6, and 23. To test whether the same genes might control sex determination in mammals and fishes, we mapped 11 genes that are considered putative master key regulators of sex determination: Amh, Cyp19, Dax1, Dmrt2, Dmrta2, Fhl3l, Foxl2, Ixl, Lhx9, Sf1, and Sox8. We identified polymorphisms in noncoding regions of these genes and genotyped these sites for 90 individuals of an F2 mapping family. Mapping of Dax1 joined LG16 and LG21 into a single linkage group. The Amh and Dmrta2 genes were mapped to two distinct regions of LG23. The Amh gene was mapped 5 cM from UNH879 within a QTL region for sex determination and 2 cM from UNH216 within a QTL region for sex-specific mortality. Dmrta2 was mapped 4 cM from UNH848 within another QTL region for sex determination. Cyp19 was mapped to LG1 far from a previously reported QTL region for sex determination on this chromosome. Seven other candidate genes mapped to LG4, -11, -12, -14, and -17. PMID:16951079

  11. Gene-Set Local Hierarchical Clustering (GSLHC)—A Gene Set-Based Approach for Characterizing Bioactive Compounds in Terms of Biological Functional Groups

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Hsu, Chueh-Lin; Liu, Hsueh-Chuan; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Gene-set-based analysis (GSA), which uses the relative importance of functional gene-sets, or molecular signatures, as units for analysis of genome-wide gene expression data, has exhibited major advantages with respect to greater accuracy, robustness, and biological relevance, over individual gene analysis (IGA), which uses log-ratios of individual genes for analysis. Yet IGA remains the dominant mode of analysis of gene expression data. The Connectivity Map (CMap), an extensive database on genomic profiles of effects of drugs and small molecules and widely used for studies related to repurposed drug discovery, has been mostly employed in IGA mode. Here, we constructed a GSA-based version of CMap, Gene-Set Connectivity Map (GSCMap), in which all the genomic profiles in CMap are converted, using gene-sets from the Molecular Signatures Database, to functional profiles. We showed that GSCMap essentially eliminated cell-type dependence, a weakness of CMap in IGA mode, and yielded significantly better performance on sample clustering and drug-target association. As a first application of GSCMap we constructed the platform Gene-Set Local Hierarchical Clustering (GSLHC) for discovering insights on coordinated actions of biological functions and facilitating classification of heterogeneous subtypes on drug-driven responses. GSLHC was shown to tightly clustered drugs of known similar properties. We used GSLHC to identify the therapeutic properties and putative targets of 18 compounds of previously unknown characteristics listed in CMap, eight of which suggest anti-cancer activities. The GSLHC website http://cloudr.ncu.edu.tw/gslhc/ contains 1,857 local hierarchical clusters accessible by querying 555 of the 1,309 drugs and small molecules listed in CMap. We expect GSCMap and GSLHC to be widely useful in providing new insights in the biological effect of bioactive compounds, in drug repurposing, and in function-based classification of complex diseases. PMID:26473729

  12. Gene-Set Local Hierarchical Clustering (GSLHC)--A Gene Set-Based Approach for Characterizing Bioactive Compounds in Terms of Biological Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Jin, Zhen-Hua; Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Hsu, Chueh-Lin; Liu, Hsueh-Chuan; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Gene-set-based analysis (GSA), which uses the relative importance of functional gene-sets, or molecular signatures, as units for analysis of genome-wide gene expression data, has exhibited major advantages with respect to greater accuracy, robustness, and biological relevance, over individual gene analysis (IGA), which uses log-ratios of individual genes for analysis. Yet IGA remains the dominant mode of analysis of gene expression data. The Connectivity Map (CMap), an extensive database on genomic profiles of effects of drugs and small molecules and widely used for studies related to repurposed drug discovery, has been mostly employed in IGA mode. Here, we constructed a GSA-based version of CMap, Gene-Set Connectivity Map (GSCMap), in which all the genomic profiles in CMap are converted, using gene-sets from the Molecular Signatures Database, to functional profiles. We showed that GSCMap essentially eliminated cell-type dependence, a weakness of CMap in IGA mode, and yielded significantly better performance on sample clustering and drug-target association. As a first application of GSCMap we constructed the platform Gene-Set Local Hierarchical Clustering (GSLHC) for discovering insights on coordinated actions of biological functions and facilitating classification of heterogeneous subtypes on drug-driven responses. GSLHC was shown to tightly clustered drugs of known similar properties. We used GSLHC to identify the therapeutic properties and putative targets of 18 compounds of previously unknown characteristics listed in CMap, eight of which suggest anti-cancer activities. The GSLHC website http://cloudr.ncu.edu.tw/gslhc/ contains 1,857 local hierarchical clusters accessible by querying 555 of the 1,309 drugs and small molecules listed in CMap. We expect GSCMap and GSLHC to be widely useful in providing new insights in the biological effect of bioactive compounds, in drug repurposing, and in function-based classification of complex diseases. PMID:26473729

  13. β-Lactamases Encoded by blaCTX-M Group I Genes as Determinants of Resistance of Esbl-Positive Enterobacteriaceae in European Soldiers in Tropical Mali

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Hinz, Rebecca; Frickmann, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    ESBL (extended-spectrum-β-lactamase)-positive Enterobacteriaceae, which colonized European soldiers in tropical Western African Mali, were subjected to a molecular assessment of their resistance determinants. By doing so, a better insight into the locally endemic pattern of ESBL-associated β-lactamase genes was aspired. From a previous study on diarrhea in European soldiers on deployment in tropical Mali, 15 ESBL-positive Escherichia coli with demonstrated high clonal diversity and one positive Klebsiella pneumoniae were assessed. Polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for blaTEM and blaSHV β-lactamase genes with subsequent sequencing for the discrimination of ESBL- and non-ESBL variants were performed, followed by four group-specific PCRs for blaCTX-M genes. Non-ESBL-associated blaTEM-1 was identified in six out of 15 (40%) E. coli strains, while 100% of the assessed strains were positive for group I blaCTX-M. Considering the known clonal diversity of the assessed strains, the striking restriction to one group of blaCTX-M genes accounting for the ESBL phenotypes of the isolates suggests little genetic exchange in the local setting. Under such circumstances of restricted numbers of locally endemic target genes, PCR-based screening approaches for ESBL colonization might be promising. PMID:26716016

  14. Group I introns interrupt the chloroplast psaB and psbC and the mitochondrial rrnL gene in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, M; Mercier, J P; Côté, M J

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to identify novel IAI subgroup introns in cpDNA-enriched preparations from the interfertile green algae Chlamydomonas eugametos and Chlamydomonas moewusii. These experiments along with sequence analysis disclosed the presence, in both green algae, of a single IA1 intron in the psaB gene and of two group I introns (IA2 and IA1) in the psbC gene. In addition, two group I introns (IA1 and IB4) were found in the peptidyltransferase region of the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA gene at the same positions as previously reported Chlamydomonas chloroplast introns. The 188 bp segment preceding the first mitochondrial intron revealed extensive sequence similarity to the distantly spaced rRNA-coding modules L7 and L8 in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondrial DNA, indicating that these two modules have undergone rearrangements in Chlamydomonas. The IA1 introns in psaB and psbC were found to be related in sequence to the first intron in the C. moewusii chloroplast psbA gene. The similarity between the former introns extends to the immediate 5' flanking exon sequence, suggesting that group I intron transposition occurred from one of the two genes to the other through reverse splicing. PMID:7504814

  15. A spermine conjugated stearic acid-g-chitosan oligosaccharide polymer with different types of amino groups for efficient p53 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tingting; Wu, Jie; Yi, Hanxi; Liu, Jingwen; Lu, Binbin; Yuan, Ming; Huang, Xuan; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various amino groups on gene vector is different. In order to combine their effect in one vector and finally promote the transfection efficiency, a biogenic tetra-amine spermine was introduced to modify the stearic acid-grafted chitosan oligosaccharide (CSOSA) polymer to build a new gene delivery system. The spermine linked CSOSA (SP-CSOSA) polymer consists two types of amino groups with 73.3%, 19.3% of all nitrogen atoms for primary and secondary amine groups, respectively. The SP modified CSOSA showed strong DNA condensation capability and obviously enhanced proton binding ability especially at about pH 5.0, which significantly promoted the escape of SP-CSOSA/pDNA complexes from endo-lysosoms. Moreover, the transfection efficiency at the N/P ratio of 10 could compete with that of Lipofectamine 2000 and PEI 25K, but with lower cytotoxicities. The therapeutic wild type p53 gene transfected by the SP-CSOSA polymer restored the function of aberrant p53 gene and induced obvious cell apoptosis and G1 phase arrest. We concluded that the new vector SP-CSOSA polymer proved to be a potential delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27289311

  16. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals activation of unique gene groups as a consequence of stem cell-parenchymal cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brian T; Jung, Jangwook P; Ogle, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of donor mesenchymal stem cells with parenchymal cells of the recipient can occur in the brain, liver, intestine and heart following transplantation. The therapeutic benefit or detriment of resultant hybrids is unknown. Here we sought a global view of phenotypic diversification of mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte hybrids and associated time course. Using single-cell RNA-seq, we found hybrids consistently increase ribosome components and decrease genes associated with the cell cycle suggesting an increase in protein production and decrease in proliferation to accommodate the fused state. But in the case of most other gene groups, hybrids were individually distinct. In fact, though hybrids can express a transcriptome similar to individual fusion partners, approximately one-third acquired distinct expression profiles in a single day. Some hybrids underwent reprogramming, expressing pluripotency and cardiac precursor genes latent in parental cells and associated with developmental and morphogenic gene groups. Other hybrids expressed genes associated with ontologic cancer sets and two hybrids of separate experimental replicates clustered with breast cancer cells, expressing critical oncogenes and lacking tumor suppressor genes. Rapid transcriptional diversification of this type garners consideration in the context of cellular transplantation to damaged tissues, those with viral infection or other microenvironmental conditions that might promote fusion. PMID:26997336

  17. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals activation of unique gene groups as a consequence of stem cell-parenchymal cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Brian T.; Jung, Jangwook P.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of donor mesenchymal stem cells with parenchymal cells of the recipient can occur in the brain, liver, intestine and heart following transplantation. The therapeutic benefit or detriment of resultant hybrids is unknown. Here we sought a global view of phenotypic diversification of mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte hybrids and associated time course. Using single-cell RNA-seq, we found hybrids consistently increase ribosome components and decrease genes associated with the cell cycle suggesting an increase in protein production and decrease in proliferation to accommodate the fused state. But in the case of most other gene groups, hybrids were individually distinct. In fact, though hybrids can express a transcriptome similar to individual fusion partners, approximately one-third acquired distinct expression profiles in a single day. Some hybrids underwent reprogramming, expressing pluripotency and cardiac precursor genes latent in parental cells and associated with developmental and morphogenic gene groups. Other hybrids expressed genes associated with ontologic cancer sets and two hybrids of separate experimental replicates clustered with breast cancer cells, expressing critical oncogenes and lacking tumor suppressor genes. Rapid transcriptional diversification of this type garners consideration in the context of cellular transplantation to damaged tissues, those with viral infection or other microenvironmental conditions that might promote fusion. PMID:26997336

  18. Virulence control in group A Streptococcus by a two-component gene regulatory system: global expression profiling and in vivo infection modeling.

    PubMed

    Graham, Morag R; Smoot, Laura M; Migliaccio, Cristi A Lux; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Federle, Michael J; Adams, Gerald J; Scott, June R; Musser, James M

    2002-10-15

    Two-component gene regulatory systems composed of a membrane-bound sensor and cytoplasmic response regulator are important mechanisms used by bacteria to sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Group A Streptococcus, the causative agent of mild infections and life-threatening invasive diseases, produces many virulence factors that promote survival in humans. A two-component regulatory system, designated covRS (cov, control of virulence; csrRS), negatively controls expression of five proven or putative virulence factors (capsule, cysteine protease, streptokinase, streptolysin S, and streptodornase). Inactivation of covRS results in enhanced virulence in mouse models of invasive disease. Using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that CovR influences transcription of 15% (n = 271) of all chromosomal genes, including many that encode surface and secreted proteins mediating host-pathogen interactions. CovR also plays a central role in gene regulatory networks by influencing expression of genes encoding transcriptional regulators, including other two-component systems. Differential transcription of genes influenced by covR also was identified in mouse soft-tissue infection. This analysis provides a genome-scale overview of a virulence gene network in an important human pathogen and adds insight into the molecular mechanisms used by group A Streptococcus to interact with the host, promote survival, and cause disease. PMID:12370433

  19. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:26231317

  20. Long Non-coding RNA ANRIL and Polycomb in Human Cancers and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Cecilia, Serena Di; Walsh, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA CDKN2B-AS1, commonly referred to as the Antisense Non-coding RNA in the INK4 Locus (ANRIL), is a 3.8-kb-long RNA transcribed from the short arm of human chromosome 9 on p21.3 that overlaps a critical region encompassing three major tumor suppressor loci juxtaposed to the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster and the methyl-thioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) gene. Genome-wide association studies have identified this region with a remarkable and growing number of disease-associated DNA alterations and single nucleotide polymorphisms, which corresponds to increased susceptibility to human disease. Recent attention has been devoted on whether these alterations in the ANRIL sequence affect its expression levels and/or its splicing transcript variation, and in consequence, global cellular homeostasis. Moreover, recent evidence postulates that ANRIL not only can regulate their immediate genomic neighbors in cis, but also has the capacity to regulate additional loci in trans. This action would further increase the complexity for mechanisms imposed through ANRIL and furthering the scope of this lncRNA in disease pathogenesis. In this chapter, we summarize the most recent findings on the investigation of ANRIL and provide a perspective on the biological and clinical significance of ANRIL as a putative biomarker, specifically, its potential role in directing cellular fates leading to cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26220772

  1. Polycomb repressive complex PRC2 regulates Xenopus retina development downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aldiri, Issam; Moore, Kathryn B.; Hutcheson, David A.; Zhang, Jianmin; Vetter, Monica L.

    2013-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase complex PRC2 controls key steps in developmental transitions and cell fate choices; however, its roles in vertebrate eye development remain unknown. Here, we report that in Xenopus, PRC2 regulates the progression of retinal progenitors from proliferation to differentiation. We show that the PRC2 core components are enriched in retinal progenitors and downregulated in differentiated cells. Knockdown of the PRC2 core component Ezh2 leads to reduced retinal progenitor proliferation, in part due to upregulation of the Cdk inhibitor p15Ink4b. In addition, although PRC2 knockdown does not alter eye patterning, retinal progenitor gene expression or expression of the neural competence factor Sox2, it does cause suppression of proneural bHLH gene expression, indicating that PRC2 is crucial for the initiation of neural differentiation in the retina. Consistent with this, knocking down or blocking PRC2 function constrains the generation of most retinal neural cell types and promotes a Müller glial cell fate decision. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling acting through the receptor Frizzled 5, but independent of Sox2, regulates expression of key PRC2 subunits in the developing retina. This is consistent with a role for this pathway in coordinating proliferation and the transition to neurogenesis in the Xenopus retina. Our data establish PRC2 as a regulator of proliferation and differentiation during eye development. PMID:23739135

  2. DNA polymerase gene sequences indicate western and forest tent caterpillar viruses form a new taxonomic group within baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Cydney B; Cooper, Dawn; Short, Steven M; Myers, Judith H; Suttle, Curtis A

    2002-11-01

    Baculoviruses infect larval lepidopterans, and thus have potential value as microbial controls of agricultural and forest pests. Understanding their genetic relatedness and host specificity is relevant to the risk assessment of viral insecticides if non-target impacts are to be avoided. DNA polymerase gene sequences have been demonstrated to be useful for inferring genetic relatedness among dsDNA viruses. We have adopted this approach to examine the relatedness among natural isolates of two uncharacterized caterpillar-infecting baculoviruses, Malacosoma californicum pluviale nucleopolyhedrovirus (McplMNPV) and Malacosoma disstria nucleopolyhedrovirus (MadiMNPV), which infect two closely related host species with little to no cross-infectivity. We designed two degenerate primers (BVP1 and BVP2) based on protein motifs conserved among baculoviruses. McplMNPV and MadiMNPV viral DNA was obtained from naturally infected caterpillars collected from geographically distinct sites in the Southern Gulf Islands and Prince George regions of British Columbia, Canada. Sequencing of 0.9 kb PCR amplicons from six McplMNPV and six MadiMNPV isolates obtained from a total of eight sites, revealed very low nucleotide variation among McplMNPV isolates (99.2-100% nucleotide identity) and among MadiMNPV isolates (98.9-100% nucleotide identity). Greater nucleotide variation was observed between viral isolates from the two different caterpillar species (only 84.7-86.1% nucleotide identity). Both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses support placement of McplMNPV and MadiMNPV in a clade that is distinct from other groups of baculoviruses. PMID:12507483

  3. Group III-A XTH genes of Arabidopsis encode predominant xyloglucan endohydrolases that are dispensable for normal growth.

    PubMed

    Kaewthai, Nomchit; Gendre, Delphine; Eklöf, Jens M; Ibatullin, Farid M; Ezcurra, Ines; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P; Brumer, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of primary wall extension endures as one of the central enigmas in plant cell morphogenesis. Classical cell wall models suggest that xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase activity is the primary catalyst (together with expansins) of controlled cell wall loosening through the transient cleavage and religation of xyloglucan-cellulose cross links. The genome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains 33 phylogenetically diverse XYLOGLUCAN ENDO-TRANSGLYCOSYLASE/HYDROLASE (XTH) gene products, two of which were predicted to be predominant xyloglucan endohydrolases due to clustering into group III-A. Enzyme kinetic analysis of recombinant AtXTH31 confirmed this prediction and indicated that this enzyme had similar catalytic properties to the nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) xyloglucanase1 responsible for storage xyloglucan hydrolysis during germination. Global analysis of Genevestigator data indicated that AtXTH31 and the paralogous AtXTH32 were abundantly expressed in expanding tissues. Microscopy analysis, utilizing the resorufin β-glycoside of the xyloglucan oligosaccharide XXXG as an in situ probe, indicated significant xyloglucan endohydrolase activity in specific regions of both roots and hypocotyls, in good correlation with transcriptomic data. Moreover, this hydrolytic activity was essentially completely eliminated in AtXTH31/AtXTH32 double knockout lines. However, single and double knockout lines, as well as individual overexpressing lines, of AtXTH31 and AtXTH32 did not demonstrate significant growth or developmental phenotypes. These results suggest that although xyloglucan polysaccharide hydrolysis occurs in parallel with primary wall expansion, morphological effects are subtle or may be compensated by other mechanisms. We hypothesize that there is likely to be an interplay between these xyloglucan endohydrolases and recently discovered apoplastic exo-glycosidases in the hydrolytic modification of matrix xyloglucans. PMID:23104861

  4. The EZH1-SUZ12 complex positively regulates the transcription of NF-κB target genes through interaction with UXT.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuai-Kun; Li, Chun-Yuan; Lei, Pin-Ji; Wang, Xiang; Zhao, Quan-Yi; Cai, Yang; Wang, Zhen; Li, Lianyun; Wu, Min

    2016-06-15

    Unlike other members of the polycomb group protein family, EZH1 has been shown to positively associate with active transcription on a genome-wide scale. However, the underlying mechanism for this behavior still remains elusive. Here, we report that EZH1 physically interacts with UXT, a small chaperon-like transcription co-activator. UXT specifically interacts with EZH1 and SUZ12, but not EED. Similar to upon knockdown of UXT, knockdown of EZH1 or SUZ12 through RNA interference in the cell impairs the transcriptional activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB target genes induced by TNFα. EZH1 deficiency also increases TNFα-induced cell death. Interestingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation and the following next-generation sequencing analysis show that H3K27 mono-, di- and tri-methylation on NF-κB target genes are not affected in EZH1- or UXT-deficient cells. EZH1 also does not affect the translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB (also known as RELA) from the cytosol to the nucleus. Instead, EZH1 and SUZ12 regulate the recruitment of p65 and RNA Pol II to target genes. Taken together, our study shows that EZH1 and SUZ12 act as positive regulators for NF-κB signaling and demonstrates that EZH1, SUZ12 and UXT work synergistically to regulate pathway activation in the nucleus. PMID:27127229

  5. Physical mapping of puroindoline b-2 genes in wheat using the 'Chinese Spring' chromosome group 7 deletion lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The puroindoline genes (puroindoline a and puroindoline b), located on the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 5D, have a significant effect on grain hardness. Puroindoline b-2 was another puroindoline-like gene after Gsp-1 (Grain Softness Protein). The detail position Puroindoline b-2 is stil...

  6. Molecular characterization of a new group of puroindoline-like genes and their physical mapping in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb) are the functional components of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain hardness locus that are responsible for kernel texture. Puroindoline a and b proteins soften the endosperm of wheat kernels. When the underlying puroindoline genes are altered by mutatio...

  7. The Histone Demethylase Jarid1b Ensures Faithful Mouse Development by Protecting Developmental Genes from Aberrant H3K4me3

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Susanne M.; Malatesta, Martina; Morales Torres, Cristina; Rekling, Jens C.; Johansen, Jens V.; Abarrategui, Iratxe; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development is tightly regulated by transcription factors and chromatin-associated proteins. H3K4me3 is associated with active transcription and H3K27me3 with gene repression, while the combination of both keeps genes required for development in a plastic state. Here we show that deletion of the H3K4me2/3 histone demethylase Jarid1b (Kdm5b/Plu1) results in major neonatal lethality due to respiratory failure. Jarid1b knockout embryos have several neural defects including disorganized cranial nerves, defects in eye development, and increased incidences of exencephaly. Moreover, in line with an overlap of Jarid1b and Polycomb target genes, Jarid1b knockout embryos display homeotic skeletal transformations typical for Polycomb mutants, supporting a functional interplay between Polycomb proteins and Jarid1b. To understand how Jarid1b regulates mouse development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications, which demonstrated that normally inactive genes encoding developmental regulators acquire aberrant H3K4me3 during early embryogenesis in Jarid1b knockout embryos. H3K4me3 accumulates as embryonic development proceeds, leading to increased expression of neural master regulators like Pax6 and Otx2 in Jarid1b knockout brains. Taken together, these results suggest that Jarid1b regulates mouse development by protecting developmental genes from inappropriate acquisition of active histone modifications. PMID:23637629

  8. In Vivo mRNA Profiling of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Diverse Phylogroups Reveals Common and Group-Specific Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Bielecki, Piotr; Muthukumarasamy, Uthayakumar; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Pohl, Sarah; Schanz, Ansgar; Niemeyer, Ute; Oumeraci, Tonio; von Neuhoff, Nils; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT mRNA profiling of pathogens during the course of human infections gives detailed information on the expression levels of relevant genes that drive pathogenicity and adaptation and at the same time allows for the delineation of phylogenetic relatedness of pathogens that cause specific diseases. In this study, we used mRNA sequencing to acquire information on the expression of Escherichia coli pathogenicity genes during urinary tract infections (UTI) in humans and to assign the UTI-associated E. coli isolates to different phylogenetic groups. Whereas the in vivo gene expression profiles of the majority of genes were conserved among 21 E. coli strains in the urine of elderly patients suffering from an acute UTI, the specific gene expression profiles of the flexible genomes was diverse and reflected phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, genes transcribed in vivo relative to laboratory media included well-described virulence factors, small regulatory RNAs, as well as genes not previously linked to bacterial virulence. Knowledge on relevant transcriptional responses that drive pathogenicity and adaptation of isolates to the human host might lead to the introduction of a virulence typing strategy into clinical microbiology, potentially facilitating management and prevention of the disease. PMID:25096872

  9. The high-mobility group A-type protein CarD of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus as a transcription factor for several distinct vegetative genes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbis-Martínez, Marisa; Fontes, Marta; Murillo, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    CarD is the only reported prokaryotic protein showing structural and functional features typical of eukaryotic high-mobility group A transcription factors. In prokaryotes, proteins similar to CarD appear to be confined primarily to myxobacteria. In Myxococcus xanthus, CarD has been previously shown to act as a positive element in two different regulatory networks: one for light-induced synthesis of carotenoids and the other for starvation-induced fruiting body formation. We have now tested the effect of a loss-of-function mutation in the carD gene (carD1) on the expression of a random collection of lacZ-tagged genes, which are normally expressed in the dark during vegetative growth in rich medium. Our results indicate that CarD plays a significant role in the transcriptional regulation of various indicated genes. The carD1 mutation downregulates some genes and upregulates others. Also reported here is the isolation of several mutations that suppress the strong effect of carD1 on the expression of a particular vegetative gene. One of them (sud-2) also suppresses the effect of carD1 on other vegetative genes and on fruiting-body formation. Thus, CarD and the sud-2 gene product appear to participate in a single mechanism, which underlies various apparently diverse regulatory phenomena ascribed to CarD. PMID:15342500

  10. The miR-15/107 group of microRNA genes: evolutionary biology, cellular functions, and roles in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, John R.; Wang, Wang-Xia; Hébert, Sébastien S.; Wilfred, Bernard R.; Mao, Guogen; Nelson, Peter T.

    2010-01-01

    The miR-15/107 group of microRNA (miRNA) genes is increasingly appreciated to serve key functions in humans. These miRNAs regulate gene expression involved in cell division, metabolism, stress response, and angiogenesis in vertebrate species. The miR-15/107 group has also been implicated in human cancers, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we provide an overview of (1) the evolution of miR-15/107 group member genes, (2) the expression levels of the miRNAs in mammalian tissues, (3) evidence for overlapping gene regulatory functions by the different miRNAs, (4) the normal biochemical pathways regulated by miR-15/107 group miRNAs, and (5) the roles played by these miRNAs in human diseases. Membership in this group is defined on the basis of sequence similarity near the mature miRNAs’ 5′ end: all include the sequence AGCAGC. Phylogeny of this group of miRNAs is incomplete so a definitive taxonomic classification (for example, designation as a “superfamily”) is currently not possible. While all vertebrates studied to date express miR-15a, -15b, -16, -103, and -107, mammals alone are known to express miR-195, -424, -497, -503, and -646. Multiple different miRNAs in the miR-15/107 group are expressed at moderate-to-high levels in human tissues. We present data on the expression of all known miR-15/107 group members in human cerebral cortical gray and white matter using new miRNA profiling microarrays. There is extensive overlap in the mRNAs targeted by miR-15/107 group members. We show new data from cultured H4 cancer cells that demonstrate similarities in mRNAs targeted by miR-16 and miR-103, and also support the importance of the mature miRNAs’ 5′ seed region in mRNA target recognition. In conclusion, the miR-15/107 group of miRNA genes is a fascinating topic of study for evolutionary biologists, miRNA biochemists, and clinically-oriented translational researchers alike. PMID:20678503

  11. System-Wide Associations between DNA-Methylation, Gene Expression, and Humoral Immune Response to Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michael T.; Oberg, Ann L.; Grill, Diane E.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Failure to achieve a protected state after influenza vaccination is poorly understood but occurs commonly among aged populations experiencing greater immunosenescence. In order to better understand immune response in the elderly, we studied epigenetic and transcriptomic profiles and humoral immune response outcomes in 50–74 year old healthy participants. Associations between DNA methylation and gene expression reveal a system-wide regulation of immune-relevant functions, likely playing a role in regulating a participant’s propensity to respond to vaccination. Our findings show that sites of methylation regulation associated with humoral response to vaccination impact known cellular differentiation signaling and antigen presentation pathways. We performed our analysis using per-site and regionally average methylation levels, in addition to continuous or dichotomized outcome measures. The genes and molecular functions implicated by each analysis were compared, highlighting different aspects of the biologic mechanisms of immune response affected by differential methylation. Both cis-acting (within the gene or promoter) and trans-acting (enhancers and transcription factor binding sites) sites show significant associations with measures of humoral immunity. Specifically, we identified a group of CpGs that, when coordinately hypo-methylated, are associated with lower humoral immune response, and methylated with higher response. Additionally, CpGs that individually predict humoral immune responses are enriched for polycomb-group and FOXP2 transcription factor binding sites. The most robust associations implicate differential methylation affecting gene expression levels of genes with known roles in immunity (e.g. HLA-B and HLA-DQB2) and immunosenescence. We believe our data and analysis strategy highlight new and interesting epigenetic trends affecting humoral response to vaccination against influenza; one of the most common and impactful viral pathogens. PMID:27031986

  12. Characterization of group A Streptococcus strains recovered from Mexican children with pharyngitis by automated DNA sequencing of virulence-related genes: unexpectedly large variation in the gene (sic) encoding a complement-inhibiting protein.

    PubMed

    Mejia, L M; Stockbauer, K E; Pan, X; Cravioto, A; Musser, J M

    1997-12-01

    Sequence variation was studied in several target genes in 54 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) cultured from children with pharyngitis in Mexico City. Although 16 distinct emm alleles were identified, only 4 had not been previously described. Virtually all bacteria (31 of 33 [94%] with the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene (speA) had emm1-related, emm3, or emm6 alleles. The gene (sic) encoding an extracellular GAS protein that inhibits complement function was unusually variable among isolates with the emm1 family of alleles, with a total of seven variants identified. The data suggest that many GAS strains infecting Mexican children are genetically similar to organisms commonly encountered in the United States and western Europe. Sequence variation in the sic gene is useful for rapid differentiation among GAS isolates with the emm1 family of alleles. PMID:9399523

  13. Characterization of group A Streptococcus strains recovered from Mexican children with pharyngitis by automated DNA sequencing of virulence-related genes: unexpectedly large variation in the gene (sic) encoding a complement-inhibiting protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, L M; Stockbauer, K E; Pan, X; Cravioto, A; Musser, J M

    1997-01-01

    Sequence variation was studied in several target genes in 54 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) cultured from children with pharyngitis in Mexico City. Although 16 distinct emm alleles were identified, only 4 had not been previously described. Virtually all bacteria (31 of 33 [94%] with the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene (speA) had emm1-related, emm3, or emm6 alleles. The gene (sic) encoding an extracellular GAS protein that inhibits complement function was unusually variable among isolates with the emm1 family of alleles, with a total of seven variants identified. The data suggest that many GAS strains infecting Mexican children are genetically similar to organisms commonly encountered in the United States and western Europe. Sequence variation in the sic gene is useful for rapid differentiation among GAS isolates with the emm1 family of alleles. PMID:9399523

  14. Absence of a functional erm gene in isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group, based on in vitro clarithromycin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E Susan; Wallace, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  15. Identification and expression analysis of four 14-3-3 genes during fruit ripening in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Brazilian).

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Ying; Xu, Bi-Yu; Liu, Ju-Hua; Yang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Jia, Cai-Hong; Ren, Li-Cheng; Jin, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Brazilian) fruit postharvest ripening, four cDNAs encoding 14-3-3 proteins were isolated from banana and designated as Ma-14-3-3a, Ma-14-3-3c, Ma-14-3-3e, and Ma-14-3-3i, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment showed that the four 14-3-3 proteins shared a highly conserved core structure and variable C-terminal as well as N-terminal regions with 14-3-3 proteins from other plant species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four 14-3-3 genes belong to the non-ε groups. They were differentially and specifically expressed in various tissues. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that these four genes function differentially during banana fruit postharvest ripening. Three genes, Ma-14-3-3a, Ma-14-3-3c, and Ma-14-3-3e, were significantly induced by exogenous ethylene treatment. However, gene function differed in naturally ripened fruits. Ethylene could induce Ma-14-3-3c expression during postharvest ripening, but expression patterns of Ma-14-3-3a and Ma-14-3-3e suggest that these two genes appear to be involved in regulating ethylene biosynthesis during fruit ripening. No obvious relationship emerged between Ma-14-3-3i expression in naturally ripened and 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene)-treated fruit groups during fruit ripening. These results indicate that the 14-3-3 proteins might be involved in various regulatory processes of banana fruit ripening. Further studies will mainly focus on revealing the detailed biological mechanisms of these four 14-3-3 genes in regulating banana fruit postharvest ripening. PMID:22009053

  16. CovS simultaneously activates and inhibits the CovR-mediated repression of distinct subsets of group A Streptococcus virulence factor-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Jeanette; Perez, Nataly; Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Liu, Zhuyun; Shelburne, Samuel A; Musser, James M; Sumby, Paul

    2009-08-01

    To colonize and cause disease at distinct anatomical sites, bacterial pathogens must tailor gene expression in a microenvironment-specific manner. The molecular mechanisms that control the ability of the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) to transition between infection sites have yet to be fully elucidated. A key regulator of GAS virulence gene expression is the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system (also known as CsrR-CsrS). covR and covS mutant strains arise spontaneously during invasive infections and, in in vivo models of infection, rapidly become dominant. Here, we compared wild-type GAS with covR, covS, and covRS isogenic mutant strains to investigate the heterogeneity in the types of natural mutations that occur in covR and covS and the phenotypic consequences of covR or covS mutation. We found that the response regulator CovR retains some regulatory function in the absence of CovS and that CovS modulates CovR to significantly enhance repression of one group of genes (e.g., the speA, hasA, and ska genes) while it reduces repression of a second group of genes (e.g., the speB, grab, and spd3 genes). We also found that different in vivo-induced covR mutations can lead to strikingly different transcriptomes. While covS mutant strains show increased virulence in several invasive models of infection, we determined that these mutants are significantly outcompeted by wild-type GAS during growth in human saliva, an ex vivo model of upper respiratory tract infection. We propose that CovS-mediated regulation of CovR activity plays an important role in the ability of GAS to cycle between pharyngeal and invasive infections. PMID:19451242

  17. CBX7 gene expression plays a negative role in adipocyte cell growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Forzati, Floriana; Federico, Antonella; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Colamaio, Marianna; Esposito, Francesco; Sepe, Romina; Gargiulo, Sara; Luciano, Antonio; Arra, Claudio; Palma, Giuseppe; Bon, Giulia; Bucher, Stefania; Falcioni, Rita; Brunetti, Arturo; Battista, Sabrina; Fedele, Monica; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    We have recently generated knockout mice for the Cbx7 gene, coding for a polycomb group protein that is downregulated in human malignant neoplasias. These mice develop liver and lung adenomas and carcinomas, which confirms a tumour suppressor role for CBX7. The CBX7 ability to downregulate CCNE1 expression likely accounts for the phenotype of the Cbx7-null mice. Unexpectedly, Cbx7-knockout mice had a higher fat tissue mass than wild-type, suggesting a role of CBX7 in adipogenesis. Consistently, we demonstrate that Cbx7-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts go towards adipocyte differentiation more efficiently than their wild-type counterparts, and this effect is Cbx7 dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained when Cbx7-null embryonic stem cells were induced to differentiate into adipocytes. Conversely, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human adipose-derived stem cells overexpressing CBX7 show an opposite behaviour. These findings support a negative role of CBX7 in the control of adipocyte cell growth and differentiation. PMID:25190058

  18. CBX7 gene expression plays a negative role in adipocyte cell growth and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Forzati, Floriana; Federico, Antonella; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Colamaio, Marianna; Esposito, Francesco; Sepe, Romina; Gargiulo, Sara; Luciano, Antonio; Arra, Claudio; Palma, Giuseppe; Bon, Giulia; Bucher, Stefania; Falcioni, Rita; Brunetti, Arturo; Battista, Sabrina; Fedele, Monica; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently generated knockout mice for the Cbx7 gene, coding for a polycomb group protein that is downregulated in human malignant neoplasias. These mice develop liver and lung adenomas and carcinomas, which confirms a tumour suppressor role for CBX7. The CBX7 ability to downregulate CCNE1 expression likely accounts for the phenotype of the Cbx7-null mice. Unexpectedly, Cbx7-knockout mice had a higher fat tissue mass than wild-type, suggesting a role of CBX7 in adipogenesis. Consistently, we demonstrate that Cbx7-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts go towards adipocyte differentiation more efficiently than their wild-type counterparts, and this effect is Cbx7 dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained when Cbx7-null embryonic stem cells were induced to differentiate into adipocytes. Conversely, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human adipose-derived stem cells overexpressing CBX7 show an opposite behaviour. These findings support a negative role of CBX7 in the control of adipocyte cell growth and differentiation. PMID:25190058

  19. In vivo mRNA profiling of uropathogenic Escherichia coli from diverse phylogroups reveals common and group-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Piotr; Muthukumarasamy, Uthayakumar; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Pohl, Sarah; Schanz, Ansgar; Niemeyer, Ute; Oumeraci, Tonio; von Neuhoff, Nils; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Häussler, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    mRNA profiling of pathogens during the course of human infections gives detailed information on the expression levels of relevant genes that drive pathogenicity and adaptation and at the same time allows for the delineation of phylogenetic relatedness of pathogens that cause specific diseases. In this study, we used mRNA sequencing to acquire information on the expression of Escherichia coli pathogenicity genes during urinary tract infections (UTI) in humans and to assign the UTI-associated E. coli isolates to different phylogenetic groups. Whereas the in vivo gene expression profiles of the majority of genes<