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Sample records for polymer bound catalysts

  1. Polymer bound Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, W.-L.; Kurr, R.J.; Maly, N.A.; Parker, D.K.; Stozier, R.W.

    1986-06-24

    A process is described for the conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons which comprises contacting the synthesis gas with a catalyst in the vapor phase at a temperature from 175/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C and a pressure of at least 1000 kPa. The improvement described here comprising using as the catalyst a catalyst.

  2. Synthesis and application of new polymer bound catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, Brandon Michael

    2005-08-01

    Nitric acid has been shown to be a weak acid in acetonitrile. It is conceivable that a nitrate salt of a weakly Lewis acidic cation could furnish a ''naked'' nitrate anion as a basic catalyst in a variety of reactions in non-aqueous solvents. Such a nitrate salt could also be bound to a polymeric support via the cation, thereby allowing for reclamation and recycling of the nitrate ion. This subject is dealt with in Chapter 2, wherein my contributions consisted of performing all the reactions with the polymer supported catalyst and carrying out the experiments necessary to shed light on the reaction mechanisms. Chapter 3 contains a description of the structure and catalytic properties of an azidoproazaphosphatrane. This compound is an air-stable versatile catalyst that has proven useful not only homogeneously, but also when bound to a solid support. The synthesis of a polymer bound proazaphosphatrane containing a trivalent phosphorus is presented in Chapter 4. Such a compound has been sought after by our group for a number of years. Not only does the synthesis I have accomplished for it allow for easier separation of proazaphosphatrane catalysts from reaction mixtures, but recycling of the base is made much simpler. Proazaphosphatranes are useful homogeneous catalysts that activate atoms in other reagents, thus enhancing their reactivity. The next chapters deal with two such reactions with aldehydes and ketones, namely silylcyanations with trialkylsilylcyanides (Chapters 5 and 6) and reductions with poly(methylhydrosiloxane), in Chapter 7. In Chapter 5, Zhigang Wang performed the initial optimization and scoping of the reaction, while repetitions of the scoping experiments for reproducibility, determination of diastereomeric ratios, and experiments aimed at elucidating aspects of the mechanism were performed by me. The proazaphosphatrane coordinates to the silicon atom in both cases, thereby allowing the aforementioned reactions to proceed under much milder

  3. Influence of intraparticle mass transfer on the activity of a gel-form polymer bound transition metal catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Roucis, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to investigate the influence of substrate intraparticle mass transport limitations on the hydrogenation rate of cyclohexene and cyclooctene at 25 to 50 C, one atm hydrogen pressure, over RhCl(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/ bound to polystyrene-divinylbenzene (DVB) polymer beads. Effective substrate diffusion coefficients were determined by studying the diffusion of cyclic hydrocarbons within benzene-swollen, polystyrene-DVB gel-type beads at 25 C. Diffusion coefficients were calculated assuming Fick's law diffusion, and were found to depend on the polymer volume fraction for solute concentrations less than 6.3 x 10/sup -2/M and polymer volume fractions less than 0.6. The dependence suggested that the polymer network acted as a physical obstruction to solute transport. Studies indicated that the solute-solvent interactions affecting diffusion were the same in the solvent-swollen polymer as in the pure benzene solvent. Solute concentrations less than 0.16 M were used for the reaction rate studies. Intraparticle transport limitations were determined to be negligible within the 200-400 mesh, 1, 2, and 3% DVB catalyst beads under the reaction conditions employed. Changes in the reduction rate of cyclooctene relative to cyclohexene were not caused by differences in intraparticle diffusion rates. Alterations in selectivity were related to the catalyst bead swelling ratio implying that steric effects induced by the presence of the polymer support in the vicinity of active rhodium affected intrinsic activity. The mathematical model was found to predict the rate for a mass transport influenced reaction regime, the reduction of cyclohexene at 50 C over an 18-20 mesh, 3% DVB catalyst.

  4. Reactivity of Metal Ions Bound to Water-Soluble Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkins, J.G.; Lin, M.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Robison, T.W.; Smith, B.F.; Gohdes, J.W.; McDonald, J.G.

    1999-06-29

    The intent of this work is to determine the effectiveness of catalysts covalently bound to polymers and to understand the consequences of supporting the catalysts on catalyst efficiency and selectivity. Rhodium phosphine complexes with functional groups for coupling to polymers were prepared. These catalyst precursors were characterized using standard techniques including IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. Studies on the modified catalysts showed that they were still active hydrogenation catalysts. However, tethering of the catalysts to polyamines gave systems with low hydrogenation activity. Analogous biphasic systems were also explored. Phosphine ligands with a surfactant-like structure have been synthesized and used to prepare catalytically active complexes of palladium. The palladium complexes were utilized in Heck-type coupling reactions (e.g. coupling of iodobenzene and ethyl acrylate to produce ethyl cinnamate) under vigorously stirred biphasic reaction conditions, and were found to offer superior performance over a standard water-soluble palladium catalyst under analogous conditions.

  5. Waste catalysts for waste polymer.

    PubMed

    Salmiaton, A; Garforth, A

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic cracking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) over fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts (1:6 ratio) was carried out using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operating at 450 degrees C. Two fresh and two steam deactivated commercial FCC catalysts with different levels of rare earth oxide (REO) were compared as well as two used FCC catalysts (E-Cats) with different levels of metal poisoning. Also, inert microspheres (MS3) were used as a fluidizing agent to compare with thermal cracking process at BP pilot plant at Grangemouth, Scotland, which used sand as its fluidizing agent. The results of HDPE degradation in terms of yield of volatile hydrocarbon product are fresh FCC catalysts>steamed FCC catalysts approximately used FCC catalysts. The thermal cracking process using MS3 showed that at 450 degrees C, the product distribution gave 46 wt% wax, 14% hydrocarbon gases, 8% gasoline, 0.1% coke and 32% nonvolatile product. In general, the product yields from HDPE cracking showed that the level of metal contamination (nickel and vanadium) did not affect the product stream generated from polymer cracking. This study gives promising results as an alternative technique for the cracking and recycling of polymer waste. PMID:17084608

  6. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander I.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Smola, Matthew J.; Morgunov, Alexey S.; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M.; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers like RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life1, predating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro2. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds3 for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands4 raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (ANA (arabino nucleic acids)5, FANA (2′-fluoroarabino nucleic acids)6, HNA (hexitol nucleic acids) and CeNA (cyclohexene nucleic acids)7 directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature8. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on earth and elsewhere in the universe9. PMID:25470036

  7. Polymer-bound oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes as catalysts for the oxidative desulfurization of model fuel diesel.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Mannar R; Arya, Aarti; Kumar, Amit; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Avecilla, Fernando; Costa Pessoa, João

    2010-07-19

    The Schiff base (Hfsal-dmen) derived from 3-formylsalicylic acid and N,N-dimethyl ethylenediamine has been covalently bonded to chloromethylated polystyrene to give the polymer-bound ligand, PS-Hfsal-dmen (I). Treatment of PS-Hfsal-dmen with [V(IV)O(acac)(2)] in the presence of MeOH gave the oxidovanadium(IV) complex PS-[V(IV)O(fsal-dmen)(MeO)] (1). On aerial oxidation in methanol, complex 1 was oxidized to PS-[V(V)O(2)(fsal-dmen)] (2). The corresponding neat complexes, [V(IV)O(sal-dmen)(acac)] (3) and [V(V)O(2)(sal-dmen)] (4) were similarly prepared. All these complexes are characterized by various spectroscopic techniques (IR, electronic, NMR, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)) and thermal as well as field-emission scanning electron micrographs (FE-SEM) studies, and the molecular structures of 3 and 4 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The EPR spectrum of the polymer supported V(IV)O-complex 1 is characteristic of magnetically diluted V(IV)O-complexes, the resolved EPR pattern indicating that the V(IV)O-centers are well dispersed in the polymer matrix. A good (51)V NMR spectrum could also be measured with 4 suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the chemical shift (-503 ppm) being compatible with a VO(2)(+)-center and a N,O binding set. The catalytic oxidative desulfurization of organosulfur compounds thiophene, dibenzothiophene, benzothiophene, and 2-methyl thiophene (model of fuel diesel) was carried out using complexes 1 and 2. The sulfur in model organosulfur compounds oxidizes to the corresponding sulfone in the presence of H(2)O(2). The systems 1 and 2 do not loose efficiency for sulfoxidation at least up to the third cycle of reaction, this indicating that they preserve their integrity under the conditions used. Plausible intermediates involved in these catalytic processes are established by UV-vis, EPR, (51)V NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) studies, and an outline of the mechanism is proposed. The (51)V NMR spectra

  8. Site-isolated porphyrin catalysts in imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Burri, Estelle; Ohm, Margarita; Daguenet, Corinne; Severin, Kay

    2005-08-19

    A meso-tetraaryl ruthenium porphyrin complex having four polymerizable vinylbenzoxy groups (2) has been synthesized by reaction of pyrrole with 4-(vinylbenzoxy)benzaldehyde and subsequent metalation with [Ru3(CO)12]. The porphyrin complex was immobilized by copolymerization with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The resulting polymer P2 was found to catalyze the oxidation of alcohols and alkanes with 2,6-dichloropyridine N-oxide without activation by mineral acids. Under similar conditions, the homogeneous catalyst 2 was completely inefficient. By using diphenylaminomethane and 1-aminoadamantane as coordinatively bound templates during the polymerization procedure, the molecularly imprinted polymers P3 and P4 have been synthesized. Compared with the polymer P2, the imprinted catalysts displayed a significantly increased activity with rate enhancements of up to a factor of 16. PMID:15977282

  9. Bound zeolite catalyst and process for using the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, J.L.; Poeppelmeier, K.R.; Funk, W.G.; Steger, J.J.; Fung, S.C.; Cross, V.R.

    1987-03-10

    A process is described for reforming naphtha. The process comprises (a) contacting the naphtha in the presence of hydrogen at elevated temperatures with a catalyst comprising a binder, a type L zeolite containing exchangeable cations of which at least 75% are selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, calcium and barium, at least one Group VIII noble metal, the particles of which are well dispersed over the surface of the catalyst and at least 90% of the noble metal associated with the zeolite is in the form of particles having a diameter of less than about 7 A; and (b) recovering reformed product.

  10. Using soluble polymers to enforce catalyst-phase-selective solubility and as antileaching agents to facilitate homogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yannan; Harrell, Mary L; Bergbreiter, David E

    2014-07-28

    The enforced phase-selective solubility of polyisobutylene (PIB)-bound Rh(II) catalysts in biphasic heptane/acetonitrile mixtures can be used not only to recycle these catalysts but also to minimize bimolecular reactions with ethyl diazoacetate. When cyclopropanation and O-H insertion reactions are carried out with PIB-bound Rh(II) catalysts either with or without addition of an unfunctionalized hydrocarbon polymer cosolvent, dimer by-product formation is suppressed even without slow syringe pump addition of the ethyl diazoacetate. This suppression of by-product formation is shown to be due to increased phase segregation of the soluble polymer-bound catalyst and the ethyl diazoacetate reactant. These studies also reveal that added hydrocarbon polymer cosolvents can function as antileaching agents, decreasing the already small amount of a soluble polymer-bound species that leaches into a polar phase in a biphasic mixture during a liquid/liquid separation step. PMID:24888338

  11. Method of making metal-polymer composite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Zelena, Piotr; Bashyam, Rajesh

    2009-06-23

    A metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst for use as a cathode electrocatalyst in fuel cells. The catalyst includes a heteroatomic polymer; a transition metal linked to the heteroatomic polymer by one of nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus, and a recast ionomer dispersed throughout the heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite. The method includes forming a heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite and loading the transition metal onto the composite. The invention also provides a method of making a membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell that includes the metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst.

  12. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  13. Recycling of polymer waste with fluid catalytic cracking catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ali, Salmiaton; Garforth, Arthur; Fakhru'l-Razi, A

    2006-01-01

    Feedstock recycling of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) over fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts (1:6 ratio) was carried out using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operating at 450 degrees C. Fresh and steam deactivated commercial FCC catalysts with different levels of rare earth oxide (REO) were compared as well as used FCC catalysts (E-Cats) with different levels of metal poisoning. Fresh FCC catalysts gave the highest results of HDPE degradation in terms of yield of volatile hydrocarbon product. Meanwhile, steamed FCC catalysts and used FCC catalysts showed similar but lower yields. Overall, the product yields from HDPE cracking showed that the level of metal contamination (nickel and vanadium) did not affect the product stream generated from polymer cracking. This study gives promising results as an alternative technique for the cracking and recycling of polymer waste. PMID:16760091

  14. Poly(fluoroalkyl acrylate)-bound ruthenium carbene complex: a fluorous and recyclable catalyst for ring-closing olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Zhang, Yiliang

    2004-01-14

    The synthesis of a fluorous olefin metathesis catalyst derived from the Grubbs second-generation ruthenium carbene complex is described. The air stable fluorous polymer-bound ruthenium carbene complex 1 shows high reactivity in effecting the ring-closing metathesis of a broad spectrum of diene and enyne substrates leading to the formation of di-, tri-, and tetrasubstituted cyclic olefins in minimally fluorous solvent systems (PhCF3/CH2Cl2, 1:9-1:49 v/v). The catalyst can be readily separated from the reaction mixture by fluorous extraction with FC-72 and repeatedly reused. The practical advantage offered by the fluorous catalyst is demonstrated by its sequential use in up to five different metathesis reactions. PMID:14709066

  15. Equilibrium chain conformations of bound polymers at the polymer melt/solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Mani; Jiang, Naisheng; Sendogdular, Levent; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tadanori

    2014-03-01

    We report the equilibrium conformations of bound polymer chains formed on planar solids. In this study, bound polystyrene (PS) layers onto silicon (Si) substrates were used as a model system. Three 50 nm-thick PS thin films were prepared by using different film processes (i.e., spin coating, dip coating, and floating) following prolonged thermal annealing and subsequent solvent leaching. The structures of the bound layers on Si were then characterized by using x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy. We found that the adsorption kinetics for the dip coating film is much longer than that for the spun cast film or the floating film. It was also found that all the bound PS layers are composed of two different nanoarchitectures: flattened chains that constitute the inner higher density region of the bound layers and loosely adsorbed polymer chains that form the outer bulk-like density region. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-084626.

  16. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li(+)Cl(-) catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  17. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  18. Transesterification catalyzed by ionic liquids on superhydrophobic mesoporous polymers: heterogeneous catalysts that are faster than homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fujian; Wang, Liang; Sun, Qi; Zhu, Longfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2012-10-17

    Homogeneous catalysts usually show higher catalytic activities than heterogeneous catalysts because of their high dispersion of catalytically active sites. We demonstrate here that heterogeneous catalysts of ionic liquids functionalized on superhydrophobic mesoporous polymers exhibit much higher activities in transesterification to form biodiesel than homogeneous catalysts of the ionic liquids themselves. This phenomenon is strongly related to the unique features of high enrichment and good miscibility of the superhydrophobic mesoporous polymers for the reactants. These features should allow the design and development of a wide variety of catalysts for the conversion of organic compounds. PMID:23009896

  19. Synthesis and electrocatalytic water oxidation by electrode-bound helical peptide chromophore-catalyst assemblies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Derek M; Coggins, Michael K; Concepcion, Javier J; Ashford, Dennis L; Fang, Zhen; Alibabaei, Leila; Ma, Da; Meyer, Thomas J; Waters, Marcey L

    2014-08-01

    Artificial photosynthesis based on dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells requires the assembly of a chromophore and catalyst in close proximity on the surface of a transparent, high band gap oxide semiconductor for integrated light absorption and catalysis. While there are a number of approaches to assemble mixtures of chromophores and catalysts on a surface for use in artificial photosynthesis based on dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells, the synthesis of discrete surface-bound chromophore-catalyst conjugates is a challenging task with few examples to date. Herein, a versatile synthetic approach and electrochemical characterization of a series of oligoproline-based light-harvesting chromophore-water-oxidation catalyst assemblies is described. This approach combines solid-phase peptide synthesis for systematic variation of the backbone, copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) as an orthogonal approach to install the chromophore, and assembly of the water-oxidation catalyst in the final step. Importantly, the catalyst was found to be incompatible with the conditions both for amide bond formation and for the CuAAC reaction. The modular nature of the synthesis with late-stage assembly of the catalyst allows for systematic variation in the spatial arrangement of light-harvesting chromophore and water-oxidation catalyst and the role of intrastrand distance on chromophore-catalyst assembly properties. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments verified that the surface-bound assemblies function as water-oxidation electrocatalysts, and electrochemical kinetics data demonstrate that the assemblies exhibit greater than 10-fold rate enhancements compared to the homogeneous catalyst alone. PMID:25046035

  20. Synthesis of novel metallocenes: Asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts to conductive polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this research was to synthesize conductive polymers based on repeating ferrocene units. During the course of this study, the design of the conductive polymers evolved from the initial model based on [open quotes]stacked[open quotes] ferrocenes where ethano bridged cyclophentadienyl rings are linked by iron(II), to the latest ferrocene-diene model where ferrocene units were linked by double bonds. In the pursuit of these elusive monomers, attempts at their synthesis led down dead-end routes, even though new molecules were synthesized. Some of these dead-end routes, even though new molecules were synthesized. All the work reported in this dissertation had the eventual goal of synthesizing potential monomers for ferrocene conductive polymers. This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Chapter one describes the attempted synthesis of thiophene derivatives where a cyclopentadienyl ring is fused to the [c]-face. Although the target molecule was never synthesized, a convenient and safe new synthesis of 3,4-dibromo=2,5-dimethyl thiophene was developed along with the synthesis and full characterization of 3-bromo-4-trimethylsilyl-2,5-dimethylthiophene. Chapter two describes the design of asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts and the convenient synthesis of chiral titanocene derivatives. Chapter three summarizes the history of the attempts to prepare ferrocene containing conductive polymers and describes the synthesis of ferrocenophenes and diethano bridged bis(cyclophentadienyl) compounds for use as monomeric precursors to conductive polymers based on repeating ferrocene units.

  1. Hydrogenation of furfural on polymer-containing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Karakhanov, E.A.; Neimerovets, E.B.; Pshezhetskii, V.S.; Dedov, A.G.

    1986-09-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of furfural with molecular hydrogen has been investigated under mild conditions in the presence of metal complex catalysts with a polymeric macroligand. It has been shown that the reaction proceeds according to a consecutive scheme with the formation of furfuryl and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohols. The kinetics of furfural hydrogenation has been investigated and the order of the reaction established; the rate constants of the first and second stages have been determined. The influence of the solvent and of the metal-to-polymer ratio on the furfural conversion have been investigated.

  2. Efficient Pt catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, J.; Gaubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires an important decrease in their production cost. Cost reduction for the electrodes principally concerns the decrease in the amount of Pt catalyst necessary for the functioning of the PEFC without affecting cell performance. The first PEFCs used in the Gemini Space Program had a loading of 4-10 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The cost of the electrodes was drastically reduced when pure colloidal Pt was replaced by Pt supported on carbon (Pt/C) with a Pt content of 0.4 Mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the occurrence of that breakthrough, many studies have been aimed at further lowering the Pt loading. Today, the lowest loadings reported for oxygen reduction are of the order of 0.05 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The carbon support of commercial catalysts is Vulcan XC-72 from Cabot, a carbon black with a specific area of 254 m{sup 2}/g. Graphites with specific areas ranging from 20 to 305 m{sup 2}/g are now available from Lonza. The first aim of the present study was to determine the catalytic properties for 02 reduction of Pt supported on these high specific area graphites. The second aim was to use Pt inclusion synthesis on these high area graphites, and to measure the catalytic performances of these materials. Lastly, this same Pt-inclusion synthesis was extended even for use with Vulcan and Black Pearls as substrates (two carbon blacks from Cabot). All these catalysts have been labelled Pt-included materials to distinguish them from the Pt-supported ones. It will be shown that the reduced Pt content Pt-included materials obtained with high specific area substrates a are excellent catalysts for oxygen reduction, especially at high currents. Therefore, Pt inclusion synthesis appears to be a new method to decrease the cathodic Pt loading.

  3. Review: radiolabeled polymers containing covalently bound (3) H and (14) C.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jeremy R

    2016-02-01

    Radiolabeled compounds are invaluable tools used to study synthetic and biological processes. Radiolabeled polymers find uses in mechanistic pathway elucidation, bioincorporation studies, biodegradation studies, and drug delivery applications. This literature review examines the syntheses (or biosyntheses), physical properties, and applications of radiolabeled polymers which contain covalently bound tritium and carbon-14 atoms. PMID:26762187

  4. Interplay of electron hopping and bounded diffusion during charge transport in redox polymer electrodes.

    PubMed

    Akhoury, Abhinav; Bromberg, Lev; Hatton, T Alan

    2013-01-10

    Redox polymer electrodes (RPEs) have been prepared both by attachment of random copolymers of hydroxybutyl methacrylate and vinylferrocene (poly(HBMA-co-VF)) to carbon substrates by grafting either "to" or "from" the substrate surfaces, and by impregnation of porous carbon substrates with redox polymer gels of similar composition. An observed linear dependence of peak current on the square root of the applied voltage scan rate in cyclic voltammetry (CV) led to the conclusion that the rate controlling step in the redox process was the diffusive transfer of electrons through the redox polymer layer. The variation in the peak current with increasing concentration of the redox species in the polymer indicated that the electron transport transitioned from bounded diffusion to electron hopping. A modified form of the Blauch-Saveant equation for apparent diffusivity of electrons through a polymer film indicated that bounded diffusion was the dominant mechanism of electron transport in RPEs with un-cross-linked polymer chains at low concentrations of the redox species, but, as the concentration of the redox species increased, electron hopping became more dominant, and was the primary mode of electron diffusion above a certain concentration level of redox species. In the cross-linked polymer gels, bounded diffusion was limited because of the restricted mobility of the polymer chains. Electron hopping was the primary mode of electron diffusion in such systems at all concentrations of the redox species. PMID:23137318

  5. Photoinduced charge separation by polymer-bound chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1991-09-01

    This project has examined the photodynamic behavior of water-soluble polymers that have covalently linked hydrophobic chromophores spaced along the chains. These polymeric systems have been examined for photoinduced charge separation with electron-accepting ions having different total charge. Focus has been on the excited singlet (S{sub 1}) state formed by laser flash absorption. The effects of pH and ionic strength -- factors that govern the conformational nature of the polymer in solution -- have been studied. A second major effort has been to study photoinduced redox processes involving excited states of water-soluble variants of anthracene and acridine. 27 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Nanoscale Control of Polymer Assembly on a Synthetic Catalyst-Bilayer System.

    PubMed

    Gorgoll, Ricardo M; Harano, Koji; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-08-01

    The use of the interior of self-assembled membrane as a template for polymer synthesis and assembly has long attracted the interest of chemists. However, it is difficult to utilize a lipid membrane as a chemical reactor for controlled assembly for polymers because lipid membrane is easily destabilized by loading of extraneous molecules. We found that a several-nanometer-thick bilayer vesicle made by self-assembly of an organic fullerene amphiphile doped with a metathesis catalyst serves as a nanosized chemical reactor in water, where a polymer is synthesized and assembled, depending on the affinity of the growing polymer to the organic groups on the amphiphile. This catalyst-bilayer system can thus control supramolecular assembly of the ester-functionalized polymer product into different nanoscale structures: a nanoparticle made of a single polymer chain and a nanocapsule made of several tens of polymer chains. PMID:27404736

  7. Copper on responsive polymer microgels: a recyclable catalyst exhibiting tunable catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingshi; Cheng, Han; Chang, Aiping; Bai, Xue; Lu, Fan; Wu, Weitai

    2014-11-25

    Copper has been immobilized on a chitosan-based responsive polymer microgel by simply stirring the microgel dispersion with copper sulfate. The ensuing catalyst is highly active for a model azide-alkyne [3+2]-cycloaddition reaction, and can be recycled at least 5 times; the catalytic activity can be tuned via swelling-deswelling transitions of the polymer gels. PMID:25283806

  8. Titanium compounds as catalysts of higher alpha-olefin-based super-high-molecular polymers synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, K. B.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Manzhay, V. N.; Vetrova, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of polymers of 10 million or more molecular weight is a difficult task even in a chemical lab. Higher α-olefin-based polymer agents of such kind have found a narrow but quite important niche, the reduction of drag in the turbulent flow of hydrocarbon fluids such as oil and oil-products. In its turn, searching for a catalytic system capable to produce molecules of such a high length and to synthesize polymers of a low molecular-mass distribution is part of a global task of obtaining a high-quality product. In this paper we had observed a number of industrial catalysts with respect to their suitability for higher poly-α- olefins synthesis. A number samples representing copolymers of 1-hexene with 1-decene obtained on a previous generation catalyst, a microsphere titanium chloride catalytic agent had been compared to samples synthesized using a titanium-magnesium catalyst both in solution and in a polymer medium.

  9. Fundamental studies of the properties of photoresists based on resins containing polymer-bound photoacid generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Tsung; Jarnagin, Nathan D.; Wang, Mingxing; Gonsalves, Kenneth E.; Robert, Jeanette M.; Yueh, Wang; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2006-03-01

    Conventional chemically amplified photoresist formulations are complex mixtures that include a protected polymer resin and a small molecule photoacid generator (PAG). The limited compatibility of the PAG with resist resin and the mobility of the small molecule additive can lead to problems including PAG phase separation, non-uniform initial PAG and photoacid distribution, and acid migration during the post-exposure baking (PEB) processes. The incorporation of PAG units into the main chain of the polymer resin is one possible method to alleviate these problems. Recently, we have investigated methacrylate based resists which incorporate novel PAG functional groups into the polymer main chain. These materials have demonstrated good resolution performance for both 193 nm and EUV exposure for sub-100 nm patterning. However, limited information is available on the effect of binding the PAG to the polymer on PAG photoreactivity and photoacid diffusivity. In this work, the photoacid generation rate constant (commonly referred to as the Dill C parameter for the PAG) of both triflate polymer-bound PAG and blended PAG photoresists based on poly(γ-butyrolactone methacrylate -co-2-ethyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate ) resists were determined by a new technique utilizing both quantitative FTIR spectroscopy and kinetic model fitting. The results indicate that the polymer-bound PAG resist has a lower photoacid generation rate constant (C=0.0122) than the blend PAG one (C=0.2647). This large difference in Dill C parameters would indicate that the sensitivity of the polymer-bound PAG resist is substantially lower than that of the analogous blended sample which is consistent with contrast curve data for these two samples.

  10. Entropic (de)stabilization of surface-bound peptides conjugated with polymers.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Scott P; Shell, M Scott

    2015-12-28

    In many emerging biotechnologies, functional proteins must maintain their native structures on or near interfaces (e.g., tethered peptide arrays, protein coated nanoparticles, and amphiphilic peptide micelles). Because the presence of a surface is known to dramatically alter the thermostability of tethered proteins, strategies to stabilize surface-bound proteins are highly sought. Here, we show that polymer conjugation allows for significant control over the secondary structure and thermostability of a model surface-tethered peptide. We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the folding behavior of a coarse-grained helical peptide that is conjugated to polymers of various lengths and at various conjugation sites. These polymer variations reveal surprisingly diverse behavior, with some stabilizing and some destabilizing the native helical fold. We show that ideal-chain polymer entropies explain these varied effects and can quantitatively predict shifts in folding temperature. We then develop a generic theoretical model, based on ideal-chain entropies, that predicts critical lengths for conjugated polymers to effect changes in the folding of a surface-bound protein. These results may inform new design strategies for the stabilization of surface-associated proteins important for a range technological applications. PMID:26723588

  11. Entropic (de)stabilization of surface-bound peptides conjugated with polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Scott P.; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-12-01

    In many emerging biotechnologies, functional proteins must maintain their native structures on or near interfaces (e.g., tethered peptide arrays, protein coated nanoparticles, and amphiphilic peptide micelles). Because the presence of a surface is known to dramatically alter the thermostability of tethered proteins, strategies to stabilize surface-bound proteins are highly sought. Here, we show that polymer conjugation allows for significant control over the secondary structure and thermostability of a model surface-tethered peptide. We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the folding behavior of a coarse-grained helical peptide that is conjugated to polymers of various lengths and at various conjugation sites. These polymer variations reveal surprisingly diverse behavior, with some stabilizing and some destabilizing the native helical fold. We show that ideal-chain polymer entropies explain these varied effects and can quantitatively predict shifts in folding temperature. We then develop a generic theoretical model, based on ideal-chain entropies, that predicts critical lengths for conjugated polymers to effect changes in the folding of a surface-bound protein. These results may inform new design strategies for the stabilization of surface-associated proteins important for a range technological applications.

  12. Alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells completely free from noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shanfu; Pan, Jing; Huang, Aibin; Zhuang, Lin; Lu, Juntao

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, fuel cell technology has been undergoing revolutionary developments, with fundamental progress being the replacement of electrolyte solutions with polymer electrolytes, making the device more compact in size and higher in power density. Nowadays, acidic polymer electrolytes, typically Nafion, are widely used. Despite great success, fuel cells based on acidic polyelectrolyte still depend heavily on noble metal catalysts, predominantly platinum (Pt), thus increasing the cost and hampering the widespread application of fuel cells. Here, we report a type of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) employing a hydroxide ion-conductive polymer, quaternary ammonium polysulphone, as alkaline electrolyte and nonprecious metals, chromium-decorated nickel and silver, as the catalyst for the negative and positive electrodes, respectively. In addition to the development of a high-performance alkaline polymer electrolyte particularly suitable for fuel cells, key progress has been achieved in catalyst tailoring: The surface electronic structure of nickel has been tuned to suppress selectively the surface oxidative passivation with retained activity toward hydrogen oxidation. This report of a H2–O2 PEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts in both the positive and negative electrodes represents an important advancement in the research and development of fuel cells.

  13. Carbon dioxide-soluble polymers and swellable polymers for carbon dioxide applications

    DOEpatents

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Birnbaum, Eva; Carbonell, Ruben G.; Crette, Stephanie; McClain, James B.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Powell, Kimberly R.; Romack, Timothy J.; Tumas, William

    2004-06-08

    A method for carrying out a catalysis reaction in carbon dioxide comprising contacting a fluid mixture with a catalyst bound to a polymer, the fluid mixture comprising at least one reactant and carbon dioxide, wherein the reactant interacts with the catalyst to form a reaction product. A composition of matter comprises carbon dioxide and a polymer and a reactant present in the carbon dioxide. The polymer has bound thereto a catalyst at a plurality of chains along the length of the polymer, and wherein the reactant interacts with the catalyst to form a reaction product.

  14. ATR-IR Investigation of Solvent Interactions with Surface-Bound Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solvent interactions with bulk and surface-bound polymer brushes are crucial for functionalities such as controlled friction and thermoresponsive adhesion. To study such interactions, the temperature-induced solvent-quality changes and the effect of surface tethering on the mechanical and tribological properties of poly(dodecyl methacrylate) (P12MA) brushes have been investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM). These results have been compared with temperature-dependent UV–visible spectrophotometry (UV–vis) data for the corresponding bulk polymer solutions. The ATR-IR results clearly show that increasing temperature enhances ethanol uptake in P12MA, which results in film swelling. This is accompanied by a marked increase in both adhesion and friction. We have also shown that a combination of solvents, such as toluene and ethanol, can lead to a temperature-dependent solvent partitioning within the polymer brush. To our knowledge this is the first time preferential solvent uptake in a grafted-from brush has been monitored via in situ ATR-IR. Moreover, we have observed remarkably different behavior for polymer chains in solution compared to the behavior of similar chains bound to a surface. The presented findings on the temperature-dependent solvent interactions of surface-grafted P12MA reveal previously unknown solvation phenomena and open up a range of possible applications in the area of stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:27397856

  15. ATR-IR Investigation of Solvent Interactions with Surface-Bound Polymers.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Christian H; Divandari, Mohammad; Simic, Rok; Naik, Vikrant V; Benetti, Edmondo M; Isa, Lucio; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2016-08-01

    Solvent interactions with bulk and surface-bound polymer brushes are crucial for functionalities such as controlled friction and thermoresponsive adhesion. To study such interactions, the temperature-induced solvent-quality changes and the effect of surface tethering on the mechanical and tribological properties of poly(dodecyl methacrylate) (P12MA) brushes have been investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM). These results have been compared with temperature-dependent UV-visible spectrophotometry (UV-vis) data for the corresponding bulk polymer solutions. The ATR-IR results clearly show that increasing temperature enhances ethanol uptake in P12MA, which results in film swelling. This is accompanied by a marked increase in both adhesion and friction. We have also shown that a combination of solvents, such as toluene and ethanol, can lead to a temperature-dependent solvent partitioning within the polymer brush. To our knowledge this is the first time preferential solvent uptake in a grafted-from brush has been monitored via in situ ATR-IR. Moreover, we have observed remarkably different behavior for polymer chains in solution compared to the behavior of similar chains bound to a surface. The presented findings on the temperature-dependent solvent interactions of surface-grafted P12MA reveal previously unknown solvation phenomena and open up a range of possible applications in the area of stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:27397856

  16. Nano mineral fiber enhanced catalyst coated membranes for improving polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Xu, Ran; Mu, Shichun

    In order to protect the perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer from an attack of contaminant metal ions as well as to enhance the mechanical stability of catalyst layers, palygorskite (PGS) is introduced into the catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. PGS is a widely used natural nano-sized silicate mineral fiber with unique nano-sized channel structure, has a strong absorption capacity for heavy metal ions. We identify a negative influence of Fe 2+ on PFSA membranes to make a comparative study. Subsequently catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) prepared with a PGS-Pt/C composite catalyst show a great effect in reducing Fe 2+ ion crossover. Results display that PGS absorbs Fe 2+ in nano-structure channels, and effectively protect PFSA ionomer in both the catalyst layer and membrane from hydroxyl radicals (OH rad) attack. Thus, the chemical stability of PFSA ionomer in both the catalyst layer and membrane is greatly improved. Furthermore, the enhancement of the mechanical performance of catalyst layers is discussed.

  17. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br- afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity.

  18. Role of bound polymer mobility on multiscale dynamics of PEO in attractive nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Faraone, Antonio; Akcora, Pinar

    We study intermediate and large scale chain dynamics in nanocomposites where particle-bound polymer (PMMA) and matrix (PEO) chains are chemically different, miscible, and have very large Tg difference (ΔTg ~ 200 K). These nanocomposites with dynamically asymmetric `polymer blend interphases' were shown to exhibit an unusual reversible thermal-stiffening accompanied by vitreous-to-rubbery transition of PMMA.* Using quasi-elastic neutron scattering, this work examines the impact of mobility of the bound-polymer on segmental and collective dynamics of the matrix chains at sub-ns to 100 ns range. While bare silica particles appear to slow down the segmental relaxation, in the composites with PMMA coated particles the Rouse dynamics of PEO is identical to its bulk behavior, possibly due to the negligible enthalpic interaction inherent to this blend system. On larger scale, we observed ~25% increase in the apparent tube diameter of PEO when PMMA is glassy. Remarkably, the tube size recovers its bulk value as PMMA softens at elevated temperatures. The resulting disentanglement-entanglement transition of PEO under hard and soft confinement well relates to the macroscopic softening-stiffening transition of these composites as evidenced from the bulk rheology. (*ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces ,2015, 7 (27), pp 14682-14689)

  19. Calcium isotope separation by chemical exchange with polymer-bound crown compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jepson, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Chromatographic separation of calcium isotopes by chemical exchange with polymer-bound 18-crown-6 was investigated. The breakthrough technique of column chromatography was employed to determine the influence of solvent composition and ligand-tether structure on separation coefficients and heterogeneous calcium complex stability. The separation coefficient, {epsilon}, was found to be strongly dependent upon solvent composition. An {epsilon} of 0. 0025{plus minus}0.0002 (95% C.L.) for the {sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca isotope pair was obtained with a 70/30 (by volume) methanol/chloroform solvent mixture at 20.0{degree}C. Differences in the structure of the tether binding the crown ring to the polymer had no influence on {epsilon} at that solvent composition. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Water-soluble polymer exfoliated graphene: as catalyst support and sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Xia, Baoyu; Yan, Ya; Li, Nan; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Xin

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we obtained various water-soluble polymer functionalized graphene in dimethyl sulfoxide under ultrasonication. The atomic force microscope analysis and control experiment shows the water-soluble polymer is the crucial part to help solvent molecules separate interlayer. Such polymer/graphene exhibits high conductivity and tunable surface property, as confirmed by the selected area electron diffraction and Raman and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. As a result, a catalyst based on polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)/graphene shows better methanol oxidation performance than that based on PVP/reduced graphene oxide. By changing to another polymer, poly(4-vinylpyridine)/graphene shows a stable and reversible response to pH, and demonstrates its potential for sensor application. PMID:23574310

  1. Performance and degradation of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, A. S.; Stassi, A.; Modica, E.; Ornelas, R.; Gatto, I.; Passalacqua, E.; Antonucci, V.

    An investigation of carbon-supported Pt/C and PtCo/C catalysts was carried out with the aim to evaluate their stability under high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) operation. Carbon-supported nanosized Pt and PtCo particles with a mean particle size between 1.5 nm and 3 nm were prepared by using a colloidal route. A suitable degree of alloying was obtained for the PtCo catalyst by using a carbothermal reduction. The catalyst stability was investigated to understand the influence of carbon black corrosion, platinum dissolution and sintering in gas-fed sulphuric acid electrolyte half-cell at 75 °C and in PEMFC at 130 °C. Electrochemical active surface area and catalyst performance were determined in PEMFC at 80 °C and 130 °C. A maximum power density of about 700 mW cm -2 at 130 °C and 3 bar abs. O 2 pressure with 0.3 mg Pt cm -2 loading was achieved. The PtCo alloy showed a better stability than Pt in sulphuric acid after cycling; yet, the PtCo/C catalyst showed a degradation after the carbon corrosion test. The PtCo/C catalyst showed smaller sintering effects than Pt/C after accelerated degradation tests in PEMFC at 130 °C.

  2. Gas Transport Resistance in Polymer Electrolyte Thin Films on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hang; Epting, William K; Litster, Shawn

    2015-09-15

    Significant reductions in expensive platinum catalyst loading for the oxygen reduction reaction are needed for commercially viable fuel cell electric vehicles as well as other important applications. In reducing loading, a resistance at the Pt surface in the presence of thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) electrolyte film, on the order of 10 nm thick, becomes a significant barrier to adequate performance. However, the resistance mechanism is unresolved and could be due to gas dissolution kinetics, increased diffusion resistance in thin films, or electrolyte anion interactions. A common hypothesis for the origin of the resistance is a highly reduced oxygen permeability in the thin polymer electrolyte films that coat the catalyst relative to bulk permeability that is caused by nanoscale confinement effects. Unfortunately, the prior work has not separated the thin-film gas transport resistance from that associated with PFSA interactions with a polarized catalyst surface. Here, we present the first characterization of the thin-film O2 transport resistance in the absence of a polarized catalyst, using a nanoporous substrate that geometrically mimics the active catalyst particles. Through a parametric study of varying PFSA film thickness, as thin as 50 nm, we observe no enhanced gas transport resistance in thin films as a result of either interfacial effects or structural changes in the PFSA. Our results suggest that other effects, such as anion poisoning at the Pt catalyst, could be the source of the additional resistance observed at low Pt loading. PMID:26299282

  3. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20–450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load–displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  4. Facile one-pot synthesis of porphyrin based porous polymer networks (PPNs) as biomimetic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, LF; Feng, DW; Liu, TF; Chen, YP; Fordham, S; Yuan, S; Tian, J; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-01

    Stable porphyrin based porous polymer networks, PPN-23 and PPN-24, have been synthesized through a facile one-pot approach by the aromatic substitution reactions of pyrrole and aldehydes. PPN-24(Fe) shows high catalytic efficiency as a biomimetic catalyst in the oxidation reaction of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) in the presence of H2O2.

  5. Catalyst free visible light induced cycloaddition as an avenue for polymer ligation.

    PubMed

    Lederhose, Paul; Wüst, Kilian N R; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Blinco, James P

    2016-05-21

    The current study introduces a tetrazole species able to perform a rapid, visible light induced nitrile imine-mediated tetrazole-ene cycloaddition (NITEC). Full conversion of the tetrazole species under mild, catalyst free conditions is reported. Importantly, the visible light ligation technology is applied as a method for the modification and ligation of polymers featuring the rapid, clean and exclusive formation of the desired cycloadduct. PMID:27004740

  6. Multifunctionality of organometallic quinonoid metal complexes: surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Pike, Robert D; Sweigart, Dwight A

    2013-11-19

    Quinonoid metal complexes have potential applications in surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts. Although quinonoid manganese tricarbonyl complexes have been used as secondary building units (SBUs) in the formation of novel metal-organometallic coordination networks and polymers, the potentially wider applications of these versatile linkers have not yet been recognized. In this Account, we focus on these diverse new applications of quinonoid metal complexes, and report on the variety of quinonoid metal complexes that we have synthesized. Through the use of [(η(6)-hydroquinone)Mn(CO)3](+), we are able to modify the surface of Fe3O4 and FePt nanoparticles (NPs). This process occurs either by the replacement of oleylamine with neutral [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface, or by the binding of anionic [(η(4)-quinone)Mn(CO)3](-) upon further deprotonation of [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface. We have demonstrated chemistry at the intersection of surface-modified NPs and coordination polymers through the growth of organometallic coordination polymers onto the surface modified Fe3O4 NPs. The resulting magnetic NP/organometallic coordination polymer hybrid material exhibited both the unique superparamagnetic behavior associated with Fe3O4 NPs and the paramagnetism attributable to the metal nodes, depending upon the magnetic range examined. By the use of functionalized [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] complexes, we attained the formation of an organometallic monolayer on the surface of highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). The resulting organometallic monolayer was not simply a random array of manganese atoms on the surface, but rather consisted of an alternating "up and down" spatial arrangement of Mn atoms extending from the HOPG surface due to hydrogen bonding of the quinonoid complexes. We also showed that the topology of metal atoms on the surface could be controlled through the use of quinonoid metal complexes. A quinonoid

  7. Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking.

    PubMed

    Salmiaton, A; Garforth, A A

    2011-06-01

    Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C(2)-C(7)) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that "waste" FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity. PMID:21324661

  8. Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Salmiaton, A.; Garforth, A.A.

    2011-06-15

    Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidised bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C{sub 2}-C{sub 7}) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that 'waste' FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity.

  9. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  10. Automated ARGET ATRP Accelerates Catalyst Optimization for the Synthesis of Thiol-Functionalized Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Siegwart, Daniel J.; Leiendecker, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional synthesis of polymers by ATRP is relatively low throughput, involving iterative optimization of conditions in an inert atmosphere. Automated, high-throughput controlled radical polymerization was developed to accelerate catalyst optimization and production of disulfide-functionalized polymers without the need of an inert gas. Using ARGET ATRP, polymerization conditions were rapidly identified for eight different monomers, including the first ARGET ATRP of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate. In addition, butyl acrylate, oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate 300 and 475, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, styrene, and methyl methacrylate were polymerized using bis(2-hydroxyethyl) disulfide bis(2-bromo-2-methylpropionate) as the initiator, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine as the ligand, and tin(II) 2-ethylhexanoate as the reducing agent. The catalyst and reducing agent concentration was optimized specifically for each monomer, and then a library of polymers was synthesized systematically using the optimized conditions. The disulfide-functionalized chains could be cleaved to two thiol-terminated chains upon exposure to dithiothreitol, which may have utility for the synthesis of polymer bioconjugates. Finally, we demonstrated that these new conditions translated perfectly to conventional batch polymerization. We believe the methods developed here may prove generally useful to accelerate the systematic optimization of a variety of chemical reactions and polymerizations. PMID:23599541

  11. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose. PMID:26491321

  12. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose. PMID:26491321

  13. Iron-based cathode catalyst with enhanced power density in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Eric; Jaouen, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Michel; Larouche, Nicholas; Tian, Juan; Herranz, Juan; Dodelet, Jean-Pol

    2011-01-01

    H(2)-air polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells are electrochemical power generators with potential vehicle propulsion applications. To help reduce their cost and encourage widespread use, research has focused on replacing the expensive Pt-based electrocatalysts in polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells with a lower-cost alternative. Fe-based cathode catalysts are promising contenders, but their power density has been low compared with Pt-based cathodes, largely due to poor mass-transport properties. Here we report an iron-acetate/phenanthroline/zeolitic-imidazolate-framework-derived electrocatalyst with increased volumetric activity and enhanced mass-transport properties. The zeolitic-imidazolate-framework serves as a microporous host for phenanthroline and ferrous acetate to form a catalyst precursor that is subsequently heat treated. A cathode made with the best electrocatalyst from this work, tested in H(2)-O(2,) has a power density of 0.75 W cm(-2) at 0.6 V, a meaningful voltage for polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells operation, comparable with that of a commercial Pt-based cathode tested under identical conditions. PMID:21811245

  14. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  15. Effects of operating conditions on durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell Pt cathode catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyagi, Shinsuke; Matsuda, Toshihiko; Iseki, Yohei; Sasaki, Tatsuyoshi; Kaito, Chihiro

    In this study, we investigated the effects of humidity and oxygen reduction on the degradation of the catalyst of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) in a voltage cycling test. To elucidate the effect of humidity on the voltage cycling corrosion of a carbon-supported Pt catalyst with 3 nm Pt particles, voltage cycling tests based on 10,000 cycles were conducted using 100% relative humidity (RH) hydrogen as anode gas and nitrogen of varying humidities as cathode gas. The degradation rate of an electrochemical surface area (ECSA) was almost 50% under 189% RH nitrogen atmosphere and the Pt average particle diameter after 10,000 cycles under these conditions was about 2.3 times that of a particle of fresh catalyst because of the agglomeration of Pt particles. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) that facilitated Pt catalyst agglomeration when oxygen was employed as the cathode gas also demonstrated that Pt agglomeration was prominent in higher concentrations of oxygen. The ECSA degradation figure in 100% RH oxygen was similar to that in 189% RH nitrogen. It was concluded that liquid water, which was dropped under a supersaturated condition or generated by ORR, accelerated Pt agglomeration. In this paper, we suggest that the Pt agglomeration degradation occurs in a flooding area in a cell plane.

  16. Hydrogenase-based nanomaterials as anode electrode catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Muneyuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    We consider hydrogenase-based nanomaterials for possible use as anode electrode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). We choose Fe-only hydrogenase component of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (DdHase) as a hydrogenase complex, and investigate its catalytic activity for H 2 dissociation using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We found two possible H-H bond cleavage pathways, which are heterolytic and possess low activation barriers. Moreover, the H 2 dissociation can be promoted by inducing spin polarization of the H 2 adduct. We report that hydrogenase or hydrogenase-based nanomaterials can manipulate to exhibit the catalytic activity equivalent to the well-known platinum catalyst.

  17. Hydrogen evolution from water by use of viologen polymers as electron transfer catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ageishi, K.; Endo, T.; Okawara, M.

    1981-05-01

    The behavior of viologen polymer (P-V/sup 2 +/) as an electron transfer catalyst in the reaction of hydrogen generation was studied. In the photoirradiation system, which contains triethanolamine (TEA), Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 3 +/, and P-V/sup 2 +/, the amount of hydrogen evolution was less than methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/); P-V/sup 2 +/, however, was more effective in sodium dithionite as the electron donor and showed higher initial rates than MV/sup 2 +/. 3 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Conducting polymer-doped polyprrrole as an effective cathode catalyst for Li-O{sub 2} batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Doped polypyrrole as cathode catalysts for Li-O{sub 2} batteries. • Polypyrrole has an excellent redox capability to activate oxygen reduction. • Chloride doped polypyrrole demonstrated an improved catalytic performance in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. - Abstract: Polypyrrole conducting polymers with different dopants have been synthesized and applied as the cathode catalyst in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. Polypyrrole polymers exhibited an effective catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction in lithium oxygen batteries. It was discovered that dopant significantly influenced the electrochemical performance of polypyrrole. The polypyrrole doped with Cl{sup −} demonstrated higher capacity and more stable cyclability than that doped with ClO{sub 4}{sup −}. Polypyrrole conducting polymers also exhibited higher capacity and better cycling performance than that of carbon black catalysts.

  19. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br(-) afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity. PMID:27365001

  20. Cytostatic and immunomobilizing activities of polymer-bound drugs: experimental and first clinical data.

    PubMed

    Ríhová, Blanka; Strohalm, Jirí; Prausová, Jana; Kubácková, Katerina; Jelínková, Markéta; Rozprimová, Lad'ka; Sírová, Milada; Plocová, Dana; Etrych, Tomás; Subr, Vladimír; Mrkvan, Tomás; Kovár, Marek; Ulbrich, Karel

    2003-08-28

    An N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer carrier containing doxorubicin and human immunoglobulin as an actively/passively targeting moiety was used in four patients with generalized breast cancer resistant to standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. The dose and time schedule were deduced from a Phase I clinical trial in which doxorubicin bound to HPMA copolymer carrier (PK1) was tested. It was confirmed that the Dox-HPMA-HuIg conjugate is stable and doxorubicin remains in the peripheral blood with a small amount also in the urine, mostly in its polymer-bound form. More than 116 biochemical, immunological and hematological parameters were determined for blood samples taken from patients 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 1 to 11 weeks after treatment. Depending on the patient, some parameters decreased permanently or temporarily to the normal level (CRP, C3, CA 72-4, beta(2)-microglobulin, ferritin, CEA, CA 125, CD4, CD8, CE19, CD16(+)56(+), leu, ery) and some moved markedly towards physiological values (AST, ALT, ALP, GMT, CA 15-3, NSE, AFP). While the number of peripheral blood reticulocytes was significantly decreased after treatment with the classical free drug, their number was not affected or was even elevated after treatment with Dox-HPMA-HuIg. Increased absolute numbers of CD16(+)56(+) and CD4(+) cells in the peripheral blood and activation of NK and LAK cells in all patients support data obtained in experimental animals, pointing to a dual, i.e. cytostatic and immunomobilizing character of Dox-HPMA conjugates containing a targeting immunoglobulin moiety. PMID:12932633

  1. Nanocasting Design and Spatially Selective Sulfonation of Polystyrene-Based Polymer Networks as Solid Acid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Richter, Felix H; Sahraoui, Laila; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-09-12

    Nanocasting is a general and widely applied method in the generation of porous materials during which a sacrificial solid template is used as a mold on the nanoscale. Ideally, the resulting structure is the inverse of the template. However, replication is not always as direct as anticipated, so the influences of the degree of pore filling and of potential restructuring processes after removal of the template need to be considered. These apparent limitations give rise to opportunities in the synthesis of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PSD) polymer networks of widely varying porosities (BET surface area=63-562 m(2)  g(-1) ; Vtot =0.18-1.05 cm(3)  g(-1) ) by applying a single synthesis methodology. In addition, spatially selective sulfonation on the nanoscale seems possible. Together, nanocasting and sulfonation enable rational catalyst design. The highly porous nanocast and predominantly surface-sulfonated PSD networks approach the activity of the corresponding molecular catalyst, para-toluenesulfonic acid, and exceed those of commercial ion-exchange polymers in the depolymerization of macromolecular inulin. PMID:27561365

  2. Preferential positioning of a nanoparticle bound to a polymer: Exact enumeration of a self-avoiding walk chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Andy; Iwaki, Takafumi; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2009-09-01

    A lattice chain model is extended to investigate the preferential position of a sticky sphere bound to a polymer chain, motivated by wrapping one nanosize core-histone with DNA to form a nucleosome structure. It was shown that the single bound histone is populated in DNA chain ends from the experiment by T. Sakaue et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 078105 (2001)]. Here, the possible mechanisms are examined to elucidate such behavior. For neutral chains or ionic chains in high salt concentrations, spheres bound on the middle of chain may trigger conformational constraints to reduce conformational entropy. For ionic chains, the bound sphere can be driven to chain ends if its effective charge and the charge of chain monomers are of like charge. The two-dimensional chain is further studied to mimic the chromosome strongly adsorbed onto surfaces, of which behavior is similar to the three-dimensional case with minor difference due to surface confinement.

  3. A ruthenium-grafted triazine functionalized mesoporous polymer: a highly efficient and multifunctional catalyst for transfer hydrogenation and the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Salam, Noor; Kundu, Sudipta K; Roy, Anupam Singha; Mondal, Paramita; Ghosh, Kajari; Bhaumik, Asim; Islam, S M

    2014-05-21

    A new ruthenium-grafted mesoporous organic polymer Ru-MPTAT-1 has been synthesized via simple and facile in situ radical polymerization of 2,4,6-triallyloxy-1,3,5-triazine (TAT) in aqueous medium in the presence of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) as a template, followed by grafting of Ru(II) onto its surface. Ru-MPTAT-1 has been characterized by elemental analysis, powder XRD, HRTEM, FT-IR, UV-vis DRS, TG-DTA, FESEM and XPS characterization tools. The Ru-MPTAT-1 material showed very good catalytic activity in the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction for aryl halides and transfer hydrogenation reaction for a series of carbonyl compounds. The catalyst is easily recoverable from the reaction mixture and can be reused several times without appreciable loss of catalytic activity in the above reactions. Highly dispersed and strongly bound Ru(II) sites at the mesoporous polymer surface could be responsible for the observed high activity of the Ru-MPTAT-1 catalyst in these reactions. PMID:24667768

  4. Insulating polymer concrete. [Perlite or glass nodule aggregates bound together with a polyester resin

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.

    1984-04-01

    An insulating polymer concrete (IPC) composite has been developed under contract to the Gas Research Institute for possible use as a dike insulation material at Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) storage facilities. In the advent of an LNG spill into the impounding dike area, the boiloff rate of the LNG can be substantially reduced if the surfaces of the dike are insulated. This increased safety at the LNG facility will tend to reduce the hazardous explosive mixture with atmospheric air in the surrounding region. The dike insulation material must have a low thermal conductivity and be unaffected by environmental conditions. The IPC composites developed consist of perlite or glass nodule aggregates bound together as a closed cell structure with a polyester resin. In addition to low thermal conductivity and porosity, these composites have correspondingly high strengths and, therefore, can carry transient loads of workmen and maintenance equipment. Prefabricated IPC panels have been installed experimentally and at least one utility is currently considering a complete installation at its LNG facility. 4 references, 8 tables.

  5. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  6. Performance enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by catalyst and support layer modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy David

    Possible enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) was investigated by modifying catalyst and support layers. Platinum (Pt) and platinum cobalt (Pt xCo1-x) alloys were prepared by pulsed electrodeposition onto Toray carbon paper. Composite supports composed of either commercial multi-walled nanofiber (MWNF) mats or MWNF layers on a commercial backing were also investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the surface structure, composition, and catalyst loading. Various electrochemical techniques with a wet electrochemical cell, a Nuvant multi-array system, and a Scribner fuel cell system were used to study and rank the effectiveness of the catalysts and supports toward both the methanol oxidation reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The activity toward methanol oxidation of the electrodeposited Pt catalyst was found to be dependent on the deposited mass. Further comparisons between commercial electrodes in the Nuvant system showed these deposits can yield activities comparable to those of commercially available electrodes. The structure of the Pt electrodeposits was highly non-uniform due to the H2 evolution during the deposition process blocking the cathodes surface. The activities of the planar structured PtxCo1-x deposits were insignificant for both oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation. The composition of the deposits ranged from 5 to 15 at% Pt. It was found by both the Nuvant and Scribner systems that the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode would enhance the performance of a DMFC anode. In the Nuvant system, the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode also enhanced the PEM cathode activity. This however was not corroborated by Scribner analysis, showing a

  7. Conjugated Polymers with Repeated Sequences of Group 16 Heterocycles Synthesized through Catalyst-Transfer Polycondensation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Hua; Fortney, Andria; Qiu, Yunyan; Gil, Roberto R; Yaron, David; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Noonan, Kevin J T

    2016-06-01

    Periodic π-conjugated polymers of the group 16 heterocycles (furan, thiophene, and selenophene) were synthesized with controlled chain lengths and relatively low dispersities using catalyst-transfer polycondensation. The optical gap and redox potentials of these copolymers were fine-tuned by altering the heterocycle sequence, and atomic force microscopy revealed nanofibrillar morphologies for all the materials. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering of the thiophene-selenophene copolymers indicated that the π-stacking distance increased with incorporation of the larger heteroatom (from ∼3.7-4.0 Å), while the lamellar spacing decreased (from ∼15.8-15.2 Å). The study also revealed that periodic sequences allow electronic properties to be tuned while retaining nanofibrillar morphologies similar to those observed for poly(3-hexylthiophene). PMID:27104362

  8. Enhanced stability of multilayer graphene-supported catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkas, A.; Hempelmann, R.; Heinzel, A.; Peinecke, V.; Radev, I.; Natter, H.

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the field of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is to enhance the lifetime and the long-term stability of PEMFC electrodes, especially of cathodes, furthermore, to reduce their platinum loading, which could lead to a cost reduction for efficient PEMFCs. These demands could be achieved with a new catalyst support architecture consisting of a composite of carbon structures with significant different morphologies. A highly porous cathode catalyst support layer is prepared by addition of various carbon types (carbon black particles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)) to multilayer graphene (MLG). The reported optimized cathodes shows extremely high durability and similar performance to commercial standard cathodes but with 89% lower Pt loading. The accelerated aging protocol (AAP) on the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) shows that the presence of MLG increases drastically the durability and the Pt-extended electrochemical surface area (ECSA). In fact, after the AAP slightly enhanced performance can be observed for the MLG-containing cathodes instead of a performance loss, which is typical for the commercial carbon-based cathodes. Furthermore, the presence of MLG drastically decreases the ECSA loss rate. The MLG-containing cathodes show up to 6.8 times higher mass-normalized Pt-extended ECSA compared to the commercial standard systems.

  9. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  10. Polypyrrole-palladium nanocomposite coating of micrometer-sized polymer particles toward a recyclable catalyst.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Syuji; Matsuzawa, Soichiro; Hamasaki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Bouleghlimat, Azzedine; Buurma, Niklaas J

    2012-02-01

    A range of near-monodisperse, multimicrometer-sized polymer particles has been coated with ultrathin overlayers of polypyrrole-palladium (PPy-Pd) nanocomposite by chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using PdCl(2) as an oxidant in aqueous media. Good control over the targeted PPy-Pd nanocomposite loading is achieved for 5.2 μm diameter polystyrene (PS) particles, and PS particles of up to 84 μm diameter can also be efficiently coated with the PPy-Pd nanocomposite. The seed polymer particles and resulting composite particles were extensively characterized with respect to particle size and size distribution, morphology, surface/bulk chemical compositions, and conductivity. Laser diffraction studies of dilute aqueous suspensions indicate that the polymer particles disperse stably before and after nanocoating with the PPy-Pd nanocomposite. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of the PS particles coated with the PPy-Pd nanocomposite overlayer is dominated by the underlying particle, since this is the major component (>96% by mass). Thermogravimetric and elemental analysis indicated that PPy-Pd nanocomposite loadings were below 6 wt %. The conductivity of pressed pellets prepared with the nanocomposite-coated particles increased with a decrease of particle diameter because of higher PPy-Pd nanocomposite loading. "Flattened ball" morphologies were observed by scanning/transmission electron microscopy after extraction of the PS component from the composite particles, which confirmed a PS core and a PPy-Pd nanocomposite shell morphology. X-ray diffraction confirmed the production of elemental Pd and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicated the existence of elemental Pd on the surface of the composite particles. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that nanometer-sized Pd particles were distributed in the shell. Near-monodisperse poly(methyl methacrylate) particles with diameters ranging between 10 and 19 μm have been also successfully

  11. A novel (ex situ) method to quantify oxygen diffusion coefficient of polymer fuel cells backing and catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricci, Andrea; Casalegno, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Limiting current density of oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is determined by several mass transport resistances that lower the concentration of oxygen on the catalyst active site. Among them, diffusion across porous media plays a significant role. Despite the extensive experimental activity documented in PEMFC literature, only few efforts have been dedicated to the measurement of the effective transport properties in porous layers. In the present work, a methodology for ex situ measurement of the effective diffusion coefficient and Knudsen radius of porous layers for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (gas diffusion layer, micro porous layer and catalyst layer) is described and applied to high temperature polymer fuel cells State of Art materials. Regression of the measured quantities by means of a quasi 2D physical model is performed to quantify the Knudsen effect, which is reported to account, respectively, for 30% and 50% of the mass transport resistance in micro porous layer and catalyst layer. On the other side, the model reveals that pressure gradient consequent to permeation in porous layers of high temperature polymer fuel cells has a negligible effect on oxygen concentration in relevant operating conditions.

  12. Co-Pt core-shell nanostructured catalyst prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition of Pt on Co as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sang-Joon; Chung, Ho-Kyoon; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Seung-Woo; Min Cho, Sung

    2014-01-15

    A new type of PtCo/C catalyst for use as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells was prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition (CVPD) of Pt on the surface of Co. The activity of the prepared catalyst for oxygen reduction was higher than that of a catalyst prepared by sequential impregnation (IMP) with the two metallic components. This catalytic activity difference occurs because the former catalyst has smaller Pt crystallites that produce stronger Pt-Co interactions and have a larger Pt surface area. Consequently, the CVPD catalyst has a great number of Co particles that are in close contact with the added Pt. The Pt surface was also electronically modified by interactions with Co, which were stronger in the CVPD catalyst than in the IMP catalyst, as indicated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry measurements of the catalysts.

  13. Stannic chloride-para toluene sulfonic acid as a novel catalyst-co-catalyst system for the designing of hydroxyl terminated polyepichlorohydrin polymer: Synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Akther, Zareen; Ahmad, Waqar

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxy terminated polyepichlorohydrin (PECH) was synthesized in good yield (85-88%) with improved functionality (2.01-2.53) and desired number average molecular weight (∼3000), using a novel catalyst-co-catalyst combination. The effect of various molar ratios (4-12) of p-toluenesulphonic acid and SnCl4 on molecular weight of PECH was investigated. Different polymerization conditions like temperature, time and monomer addition rates were found to have pronounced effect on molecular weight, polydispersity and functionality of the products. The molecular weight distribution and polydispersity of the synthesized polymers were determined by Gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Absolute value of Number average molecular weight (Mn) was established with vapor pressure osmometry and structural elucidations were carried out by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopic techniques. Terminal Hydroxyl groups were quantified by acetylation method and functionality was derived from hydroxyl value and Mn. PMID:26135537

  14. Generalized flooded agglomerate model for the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarajugadda, Sai; Mazumder, Sandip

    2012-06-01

    The flooded agglomerate model has found prolific usage in modeling the oxygen reduction reaction within the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The assumption made in this model is that the ionomer-coated carbon-platinum agglomerate is spherical in shape and that the spheres are non-overlapping. This assumption is convenient because the governing equations lend themselves to closed-form analytical solution when a spherical shape is assumed. In reality, micrographs of the catalyst layer show that the agglomerates are best represented by sets of overlapping spheres of unequal radii. In this article, the flooded agglomerate is generalized by considering overlapping spheres of unequal radii. As a first cut, only two overlapping spheres are considered. The governing reaction-diffusion equations are solved numerically using the unstructured finite-volume method. The volumetric current density is extracted for various parametric variations, and tabulated. This sub-grid-scale generalized flooded agglomerate model is first validated and finally coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for predicting the performance of the PEMFC. Results show that when the agglomerates are small (<200 nm equivalent radius), the effect of agglomerate shape on the overall PEMFC performance is insignificant. For large agglomerates, on the other hand, the effect of agglomerate shape was found to be critical, especially for high current densities for which the mass transport resistance within the agglomerate is strongly dependent on the shape of the agglomerate, and was found to correlate well with the surface-to-volume ratio of the agglomerate.

  15. Supramolecular organization in organic-inorganic heterogeneous hybrid catalysts formed from polyoxometalate and poly(ampholyte) polymer.

    PubMed

    Raj, Gijo; Swalus, Colas; Guillet, Alain; Devillers, Michel; Nysten, Bernard; Gaigneaux, Eric M

    2013-04-01

    Hybridization of polyoxometalates (POMs) via the formation of an organic-inorganic association constitutes a new route to develop a heterogeneous POM catalyst with tunable functionality imparted through supramolecular assembly. Herein, we report on strategies to obtain tunable well-defined supramolecular architectures of an organic-inorganic heterogeneous hybrid catalyst formed by the association of a hydrophobically substituted polyampholyte copolymer (poly N, N-diallyl-N-hexylamine-alt-maleic acid) and phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40) POMs. The self-assembling property of the initial polyampholyte copolymer matrix is modulated by controlling the pH of the hybridization solution. When deposited on a mica surface, isolated, long and extended polymer chains are formed under basic conditions (pH 7.9), while globular or coiled structures are formed under acidic conditions (pH 2). The supramolecular assembly of the POM-polymer hybrid is found to be directed by the type and quantities of charges present on the polyampholyte copolymer, which themselves depend on the pH conditions. The hypothesis is that the Keggin type [PW12O40](3-) anions, which have a size of ~1 nm, electrostatically bind to the positive charge sites of the polymer backbone. The hybrid material stabilized at pH 5.3 consists of POM-decorated polymer chains. Statistical analysis of distances between pairs of POM entities show narrow density distributions, suggesting that POM entities are attached to the polymer chains with a high level of order. Conversely, under acidic conditions (pH 2), the hybrid shows the formation of a core-shell type of structure. The strategies reported here, to tune the supramolecular assembly of organic-inorganic hybrid materials, are highly valuable for the design and a more rational utilization of POM heterogeneous catalysts in several chemical transformations. PMID:23480273

  16. Theoretical studies on membranes and non-platinum catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-12-31

    Mechanism of proton transfer among high-density acid groups in the interface between organic and inorganic materials for polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been theoretically examined. It has been clearly shown that the interactions between the phosphate groups at the surface of the inorganic material, zirconium phosphate (ZrP), and the adsorbed water molecules are relatively large and a strong hydrogen-bond network is generated locally. Because of the strong interactions, water molecules can be attached to ZrP and the O–O distance becomes shorter than that in bulk water systems. Because of the short O–O distances and the delocalized charge of each atom, the activation energy of proton transfer at the ZrP surface decreases and causes high proton conductivity even under conditions of high temperature and low humidity. Based on the above studies, the origin of the high proton conductivity of hybrid electrolytes is also discussed. We will also discuss the mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on non-platinum catalysts such as Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}.

  17. Theoretical studies on membranes and non-platinum catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Mechanism of proton transfer among high-density acid groups in the interface between organic and inorganic materials for polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been theoretically examined. It has been clearly shown that the interactions between the phosphate groups at the surface of the inorganic material, zirconium phosphate (ZrP), and the adsorbed water molecules are relatively large and a strong hydrogen-bond network is generated locally. Because of the strong interactions, water molecules can be attached to ZrP and the O-O distance becomes shorter than that in bulk water systems. Because of the short O-O distances and the delocalized charge of each atom, the activation energy of proton transfer at the ZrP surface decreases and causes high proton conductivity even under conditions of high temperature and low humidity. Based on the above studies, the origin of the high proton conductivity of hybrid electrolytes is also discussed. We will also discuss the mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on non-platinum catalysts such as Ta3N5.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and cytocompatibility of a degradable polymer using ferric catalyst for esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu-Na; Zhu, Ya-Bin; Gong, Chang-Feng; Lv, Jing-Jing; Kang, Chen; Hou, Lin-Xi

    2014-02-01

    This study focused on the synthesis, characterization and cytocompatibility of a biodegradable polymer by the cross-linking from poly(ethylene glycol-co-lactide) dimethacrylate (PLEGDMA), polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and N-isopropylacrylamide, where PLEGDMA was synthesized by ring-opening oligomerization of poly(ethylene glycol) with different molecular weights (Mn = 400, 600, 1000, 2000 Da) and L-lactide using low toxic iron(III) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3) as the catalyst and subsequently being terminated with dimethacrylate. The product, PLEGDMA, was analyzed to confirm its chemistry using FTIR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectra and gel permeation chromatography etc. The thermodynamic properties, mechanical behaviors, surface hydrophilicity, degradability and cytotoxicity of the cross-linked product were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry, tensile tests, contact angle measurements and cell cultures. The effects of reaction variables such as PEGDA content and reactants ratio were optimized to achieve a material with low glass transition temperature (Tg), high wettability and preferable mechanical characteristics. Using a tubular mould which has been patented in our group, a tubular scaffold with predetermined dimension and pattern was fabricated, which aims at guiding the growth and phenotype regulation of esophageal primary cells like fibroblast and smooth muscle cell towards fabricating tissue engineered esophagus in future. PMID:24150983

  19. Polymer-supported CuPd nanoalloy as a synergistic catalyst for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to methane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Kang, Peng; Bakir, Mohammed; Lapides, Alexander M; Dares, Christopher J; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-12-29

    Developing sustainable energy strategies based on CO2 reduction is an increasingly important issue given the world's continued reliance on hydrocarbon fuels and the rise in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. An important option is electrochemical or photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction to carbon fuels. We describe here an electrodeposition strategy for preparing highly dispersed, ultrafine metal nanoparticle catalysts on an electroactive polymeric film including nanoalloys of Cu and Pd. Compared with nanoCu catalysts, which are state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, the bimetallic CuPd nanoalloy catalyst exhibits a greater than twofold enhancement in Faradaic efficiency for CO2 reduction to methane. The origin of the enhancement is suggested to arise from a synergistic reactivity interplay between Pd-H sites and Cu-CO sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction. The polymer substrate also appears to provide a basis for the local concentration of CO2 resulting in the enhancement of catalytic current densities by threefold. The procedure for preparation of the nanoalloy catalyst is straightforward and appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of catalytic electrodes for incorporation into electrolysis devices. PMID:26668386

  20. Polymer-supported CuPd nanoalloy as a synergistic catalyst for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to methane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Kang, Peng; Bakir, Mohammed; Lapides, Alexander M.; Dares, Christopher J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Developing sustainable energy strategies based on CO2 reduction is an increasingly important issue given the world’s continued reliance on hydrocarbon fuels and the rise in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. An important option is electrochemical or photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction to carbon fuels. We describe here an electrodeposition strategy for preparing highly dispersed, ultrafine metal nanoparticle catalysts on an electroactive polymeric film including nanoalloys of Cu and Pd. Compared with nanoCu catalysts, which are state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, the bimetallic CuPd nanoalloy catalyst exhibits a greater than twofold enhancement in Faradaic efficiency for CO2 reduction to methane. The origin of the enhancement is suggested to arise from a synergistic reactivity interplay between Pd–H sites and Cu–CO sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction. The polymer substrate also appears to provide a basis for the local concentration of CO2 resulting in the enhancement of catalytic current densities by threefold. The procedure for preparation of the nanoalloy catalyst is straightforward and appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of catalytic electrodes for incorporation into electrolysis devices. PMID:26668386

  1. Partitioning of dissolved organic matter-bound mercury between a hydrophobic surface and polysulfide-rubber polymer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Ah

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the role of dissolved organic matter on mercury partitioning between a hydrophobic surface (polyethylene, PE) and a reduced sulfur-rich surface (polysulfide rubber, PSR). Comparative sorption studies employed polyethylene and polyethylene coated with PSR for reactions with DOM-bound mercuric ions. These studies revealed that PSR enhanced the Hg-DOM removal from water when DOM was Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM), fulvic acid (FA), or humic acid (HA), while the same amount of 1,3-propanedithiol-bound mercuric ion was removed by both PE and PSR-PE. The differences for Hg-DOM removal efficiencies between PE and PSR-PE varied depending on which DOM was bound to mercuric ion as suggested by the PE/water and PSR-PE/water partition coefficients for mercury. The surface concentrations of mercury on PE and PSR-PE with the same DOM measured by x-ray – photoelectron spectroscopy were similar, which indicated the comparable amounts of immobilized mercury on PE and PSR-PE being exposed to the aqueous phase. With these observations, two major pathways for the immobilization reactions between PSR-PE and Hg- DOM were examined: 1) adsorption of Hg-DOM on PE by hydrophobic interactions between DOM and PE, and 2) addition reaction of Hg-DOM onto PSR by a complexation reaction between Hg and PSR. The percent contribution of each pathway was derived from a mass balance and the ratios among aqueous mercury, PE-bound Hg-DOM, and PSR-bound Hg-DOM concentrations. The results indicate strong binding of mercuric ion with both dissolved organic matter and PSR polymer. The FT-IR examination of Hg-preloaded-PSR-PEs after the reaction with DOM corroborated a strong interaction between mercuric ion and 1,3-propanedithiol compared to Hg-HA, Hg-FA, or Hg-NOM interactions. PMID:21872900

  2. Electronically conducting proton exchange polymers as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, M.C.; Qi, Z.; Pickup, P.G.

    1999-06-01

    A variety of supported catalysts were prepared by the chemical deposition of Pt and Pt-Ru particles on chemically prepared poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) and PEDOT/polyvinylsulfate (PVS) composites. The polymer particles were designed to provide a porous, proton-conducting and electron-conducting catalyst support for use in fuel cells. These polymer-supported catalysts were characterized by electron microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and conductivity measurements. Their catalytic activities toward hydrogen and methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction were evaluated in proton exchange membrane fuel-cell-type gas diffusion electrodes. Activities for oxygen reduction comparable to that obtained with a commercial carbon-supported catalyst were observed, whereas those for hydrogen and methanol oxidation were significantly inferior, although still high for prototype catalysts.

  3. Nanostructured catalyst materials for next generation polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudhayer, Wisam J.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are electrochemical energy conversion devices which have demonstrated great promise as future energy sources for electric vehicles, as they convert chemical energy to electrical energy with a significantly higher efficiency and lower environmental impact than in standard combustion processes. However, the commercialization of PEM fuel cells for transportation applications has been hindered by several factors such as high cost of Pt, low Pt utilization, poor long-term durability of the conventional PEM fuel cell catalyst (Pt nanoparticels supported on carbon black; Pt/C), and poor thermal and chemical stability of the electrocatalyst supports (carbon black). The goal of this research was to fabricate high performance, durable, carbon-free, controllable porosity, and low cost (low Pt loading) sputtered-nanostructured electrocatalysts and investigate their morphologies, crystal properties, and electrocatalytic activities. First, the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of vertically-aligned solid Pt nanorods was evaluated. A glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique was used to fabricate Pt nanorod arrays directly on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. It was found that Pt-nanorod electrocatalysts exhibit higher area-specific activity, greater electrochemical stability, higher electron-transfer rate constant, and comparable activation energy for ORR than those of Pt/C due to their larger crystallite size, single-crystal property, and dominance of the preferred crystal orientations (Pt[110]) for ORR. However, Pt nanorods show lower mass specific activity than that of Pt/C electrocatalyst due to the large diameter of nanorods. Second, to further enhance the mass-specific activity of solid GLAD Pt nanorods, the GLAD chromium (Cr) nanorods were used as low-cost catalyst supports for conformal Pt thin film coating achieved by a small angle deposition (SAD) technique as a potential catalyst electrode for oxygen

  4. Polymerization of olefins in the presence of polymer supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, S.A.; Coleman, W.M. III; Howell, W.R. Jr.

    1986-11-18

    A process is described for polymerizing one or more ..cap alpha..-olefins or one or more ..cap alpha..-olefins and one or more polymerizable ethylenically unsaturated monomers. The process comprises conducting the polymerization under Ziegler polymerization conditions in the presence of an organoaluminum cocatalyst and a polymer supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst resulting from contacting for a time sufficient to form a compound or a complex, (A) (1) at least one organic polymeric material to which has been covalently bonded (2) one or more dihydric phenolic compounds; which has been prepared by reacting a halogenated organic polymeric material with the dihydric phenolic compound; with (B) at least one compound of an element from the transition metal, lanthanide or actinide series represented by the formula Tm(OR)/sub x/X/sub y-x/. Each R is independently a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to about 20 carbon atoms; Tm is an element from the transition metal, lanthanide or actinide series; X is a halogen; x has a value from zero to a value equal to the valence of the element Tm and y has a value equal to the valence of the element Tm; and wherein components (A-1) and (A-2) are employed in amounts which provides a ratio of moles of (A-2) per halogen atom contained in a halogenated component (A-1) of from about 1:1 to about 30:1. Components (A) and (B) are employed in an amount which provides a ratio of moles of polyhydric aromatic compound per atom of Tm of from about 1:1 to about 10:1.

  5. Performance and durability of electrodes with platinum catalysts in polymer electrolyte cells prepared by ultrasonic spray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigdon, William A.

    The development of stable platinum electrocatalysts for durable electrode performance has been a goal of this research. Cost of these materials is a major barrier to commercialization of technology such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Catalysts need to be supported on inexpensive materials that use a minimal amount of platinum while maintaining a high activity over the life of the device. Carbon support corrosion is the origin of many problems plaguing electrocatalyst longevity. Instead of replacing carbon with a ceramic or another single phase material, this dissertation has explored a composite consisting of both carbon nanotubes and titania to support platinum catalysts. Graphitized carbons and stable metal oxides have become a popular material selection for catalyst supports in many recent publications, but their design lacks a fundamental understanding. High performance and durability have been reported, although successful application in working electrodes is necessary to validate these advantages. Titania and carbon nanotube supports for platinum were able to better preserve catalyst performance than a control without titania in the cathode. Choice of a niobium donor dopant in titania was used in an approach to modify the structure and electronic properties of the metal oxide phase when integrated into the anode. When included into electrocatalysts, semiconductor oxides promote bifunctional mechanisms through junctions formed with the catalyst. Strong metal-support interactions enhanced catalyst bonding characteristics extended from the support. An ultrasonic spray deposition process was used to prepare membrane electrode assemblies from the synthesized electrocatalysts. A synergy between both performance and durability of electrodes can be realized by design of better composite supports used in fuel cells and potentially other related electrochemical devices.

  6. Solar Hydrogen Production Using Molecular Catalysts Immobilized on Gallium Phosphide (111)A and (111)B Polymer-Modified Photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Beiler, Anna M; Khusnutdinova, Diana; Jacob, Samuel I; Moore, Gary F

    2016-04-20

    We report the immobilization of hydrogen-producing cobaloxime catalysts onto p-type gallium phosphide (111)A and (111)B substrates via coordination to a surface-grafted polyvinylimidazole brush. Successful grafting of the polymeric interface and subsequent assembly of cobalt-containing catalysts are confirmed using grazing angle attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectrochemical testing in aqueous conditions at neutral pH shows that cobaloxime modification of either crystal face yields a similar enhancement of photoperformance, achieving a greater than 4-fold increase in current density and associated rates of hydrogen production as compared to results obtained using unfunctionalized electrodes tested under otherwise identical conditions. Under simulated solar illumination (100 mW cm(-2)), the catalyst-modified photocathodes achieve a current density ≈ 1 mA cm(-2) when polarized at 0 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode reference and show near-unity Faradaic efficiency for hydrogen production as determined by gas chromatography analysis of the headspace. This work illustrates the modularity and versatility of the catalyst-polymer-semiconductor approach for directly coupling light harvesting to fuel production and the ability to export this chemistry across distinct crystal face orientations. PMID:26998554

  7. Investigation of the microstructure in the catalyst layer and effects of both perfluorosulfonate ionomer and PTFE-loaded carbon on the catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Makoto; Aoyama, Yuko; Eda, Nobuo; Ohta, Akira

    1995-12-01

    Effects of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer (PFSI) and of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loaded carbon (PTFE-C) on the catalyst layer in the electrode of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) prepared by a new method based on the process of PFSI-colloid formation were investigated by electrochemical techniques and a mercury pore sizer. The microstructure of the catalyst layer and its effect on the PEFC performance were affected by the contents of both PFSI and PTFE-C. The catalyst layer has two distinctive pore distributions with a boundary of ca. 0.04 {micro}m. The volume of larger pore (secondary pore) decreased with an increase of the PFSI content and increased with an increase of the PTFE-C content. The volume of the smaller pore (primary pore) was independent of the content of both PFSI and PTFE-C. The PFSI as well as the PTFE existed only in the secondary pore. The content of PFSI affected the performance of PEFC in the whole current density range. On the other hand, the content of PTFE-C influenced it greatly at high current density due to its gas feeding faculty. In the PEFC, reaction sites were found to exist in the secondary pore coated with the macromolecule PFSI. The hydrophobic PTFE-C works to supply the reaction gas to the reaction sites covered with the PFSI in the secondary pore, and to exhaust the product water from there. The high performance of PEFC at high current density was achieved with the best mixture of the PFSI and the PTFE-C.

  8. Effects of microstructure on carbon support in the catalyst layer on the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Makoto; Fukuoka, Yuko; Sugawara, Yasushi

    1996-12-31

    In the case of the Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), the reaction sites exist on the platinum (Pt) surface covered with PFSI. Though PFSI membrane is used as an electrolyte of the PEFC, the membrane does not soak deeply into the electrodes as a liquid electrolyte does. Therefore, PFSI solution was impregnated into the catalyst layers to increase the contact areas between Pt and PFSI. In our previous work we proposed a new preparation method of the M&E assembly which emphasized the colloid formation of the PFSI to optimize the network of PFSIs in the catalyst layer and also to simplify the fabrication process of the M&E assembly. Following this work, we focused on the microstructure of the catalyst layer. The importance of the morphological properties of the gas-diffusion electrodes on performance has been reported in several papers. The catalyst layer was claimed to have had two distinctive pore distributions with a boundary of ca. 0.1 {mu}m. The smaller pore (primary pore) was identified with the space in and between the primary particles in the agglomerate of the carbon support and the larger one (secondary pore) was that between the agglomerates. In our recent work, we reported that the PFSI was distributed only in the secondary pores, and the reaction sites were therefore limited to that location. The results indicated that the PEFC system required a particular design rather than a conventional one for the fuel cells with liquid electrolytes. We proposed that novel structure and/or preparation methods of the catalyst layer were keys to higher utilization of Pt.

  9. Modulated ionomer distribution in the catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells for high temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Choo, Min-Ju; Oh, Keun-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Tak; Park, Jung-Ki

    2014-08-01

    Ionomer distribution is an important design parameter for high performance polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs); however, the nano-scale modulation of the ionomer morphology has not been intensively explored. Here, we propose a new route to modulate the ionomer distribution that features the introduction of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to the cathode catalyst layer and the leaching the PEG phase from the catalyst layer using a water effluent during operation. The key concept in the approach is the expansion of the ionomer thin film through the PEG addition. We demonstrate that the modulated ionomer distribution increases the electrochemical active area and proton transport property, without loss in oxygen transport, at a fixed ionomer content. At a high temperature of 120 °C, the power performance at 0.6 V is increased by 1.73-fold with the modulated ionomer distribution as a result of 1.25-fold increase in the electrochemical active area and two-fold increase in the proton transport rate in the catalyst layer. PMID:24777945

  10. Metalloporphyrin-Based Hypercrosslinked Polymers Catalyze Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Dienes: A Fascinating Strategy for the Construction of Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhiyu; Xu, Li; Zhi, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yuwei; Xia, Hong; Mu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-07-11

    We describe a novel and intriguing strategy for the construction of efficient heterogeneous catalysts by hypercrosslinking catalyst molecules in a one-pot Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. The new hypercrosslinked polymers (HCPs) as porous solid catalysts exhibit the combined advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, owing to their high surface area, good stability, and tailoring of catalytic centers on the frameworks. Indeed, a new class of metalloporphyrin-based HCPs were successfully synthesized using modified iron(III) porphyrin complexes as building blocks, and the resulting networks were found to be excellent recyclable heterogeneous catalysts for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of unactivated aldehydes with 1,3-dienes. Moreover, this new strategy showed wide adaptability, and many kinds of homogeneous-like solid-based catalysts with high catalytic performance and excellent recyclability were also constructed. PMID:27147500

  11. Hydrogenation of unsaturated, aromatic, and heterocyclic compounds with polymer-supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Karakhanov, E.A.; Pshezhetskii, V.S.; Dedov, A.G.; Loktev, A.S.; Lebedeva, T.S.

    1984-04-01

    The authors synthesized and studied catalysts based upon complexes of platinum, palladium, rhodium, and nickel with the following polymeric microligands: copolymers of styrene with maleic acid (S-MA), copolymers of maleic acid with methyl methacrylate (MA-MMA), and polyacrylic acid (PAA). The catalysts showed high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of furan and its derivatives, benzofuran, benzodioxane, benzene, nitrobenzene, phenol, olefins and cyclic olefins, and cyclic dienes. 2 tables.

  12. Electronic materials high-T(sub c) superconductivity polymers and composites structural materials surface science and catalysts industry participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fifth year of the Center for Advanced Materials was marked primarily by the significant scientific accomplishments of the research programs. The Electronics Materials program continued its work on the growth and characterization of gallium arsenide crystals, and the development of theories to understand the nature and distribution of defects in the crystals. The High Tc Superconductivity Program continued to make significant contributions to the field in theoretical and experimental work on both bulk materials and thin films and devices. The Ceramic Processing group developed a new technique for cladding YBCO superconductors for high current applications in work with the Electric Power Research Institute. The Polymers and Composites program published a number of important studies involving atomistic simulations of polymer surfaces with excellent correlations to experimental results. The new Enzymatic Synthesis of Materials project produced its first fluorinated polymers and successfully began engineering enzymes designed for materials synthesis. The structural Materials Program continued work on novel alloys, development of processing methods for advanced ceramics, and characterization of mechanical properties of these materials, including the newly documented characterization of cyclic fatigue crack propagation behavior in toughened ceramics. Finally, the Surface Science and Catalysis program made significant contributions to the understanding of microporous catalysts and the nature of surface structures and interface compounds.

  13. Oxygen reduction reaction on palladium-cobalt alloy catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Kentaro

    The Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) activity in acid medium on Pd-Co was studied in this work. The catalysts were synthesized by two techniques; physical vapor deposition technique and ultrasonic spray reaction technique. The last technique was developed for the first time in our laboratory for the supported electro catalyst preparation and direct deposition onto the carbon paper or gas diffusion electrode the for PEMFC applications. The electrochemical properties such as the amount of hydrogen adsorption/desorption, the oxide formation/reduction of Pd-Co alloy catalyst have not been sufficiently studied before. Therefore these electrochemical properties were investigated by using the Pd-Co thin films prepared by sputtering method. A thin film catalyst cannot be directly used as an electrode of working PEMFCs, however the sputtering method is very useful since the chemical composition of alloy and surface area of the electrode can be controlled easily. Thus the fundamental electrochemical properties such as the amount of hydrogen adsorption/desorption, oxide formation/reduction and oxide reduction peak position on thin films of Pd-Co alloy, Pd and Pt catalysts were determined and their correlations to ORR catalytic activities in acid medium were studied. Enhancements of the catalytic activities for ORR by Pd-Co binary alloys were found to be in agreement with results obtained in previous studies. Ultrasonic spray reaction method was developed for the first time in our laboratory for carbon supported nano-scale catalyst for PEMFC application. Fine catalyst particles supported on high surface area carbon powder are required to apply the catalyst as the PEMFC cathode materials for the commercialization, but none of the studies done before were able to successfully obtain the Pd-Co fine particles which are comparable with the existing carbon supported platinum catalyst (ϕ2-4nm). Therefore the establishment of the catalyst synthesis method for Pd-Co fine particles are

  14. A highly stable TiB2-supported Pt catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shibin; Mu, Shichun; Pan, Mu; Fu, Zhengyi

    2011-10-01

    Pt nanoparticles supported on TiB2 conductive ceramics (Pt/TiB2) have been prepared through a liquid reduction method, where the TiB2 surfaces are stabilized with perfluorosulfonic acid. The prepared Pt/TiB2 catalyst is characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TEM techniques, and a rotating disk electrode (RDE) apparatus. The Pt nanoparticles are found to uniformly disperse on the surface of the TiB2 particles with narrow size distribution. The electrochemical stability of Pt/TiB2 is evaluated and found highly electrochemically stable compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst. Meanwhile, the catalyst also shows comparable performance for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to the Pt/C. The mechanism of the remarkable stability and comparable activity for ORR on Pt/TiB2 is also proposed and discussed.

  15. One pot aqueous synthesis of nanoporous Au85Pt15 material with surface bound Pt islands: an efficient methanol tolerant ORR catalyst.

    PubMed

    Anandha Ganesh, P; Jeyakumar, D

    2014-11-01

    For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the 'Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg cm(-2)) as the cathode material and Pt-Ru/C (loading: 0.5 mg cm(-2)) as the anode material performed better (38 mW cm(-2)) than the HiSPEC Pt/C cathode material (16 mW cm(-2)). PMID:25241856

  16. Polymer nanocomposite membranes with hierarchically structured catalysts for high throughput dehalogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crock, Christopher A.

    Halogenated organics are categorized as primary pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency. Trichloroethylene (TCE), which had broad industrial use in the past, shows persistence in the environment because of its chemical stability. The large scale use and poor control of TCE resulted in its prolonged release into the environment before the carcinogenic risk associated with TCE was fully understood. TCE pollution stemmed from industrial effluents and improper disposal of solvent waste. Membrane reactors are promising technology for treating TCE polluted groundwater because of the high throughput, relatively low cost of membrane fabrication and facile retrofitting of existing membrane based water treatment facilities with catalytic membrane reactors. Compared to catalytic fluidized or fixed bed reactors, catalytic membrane reactors feature minimal diffusional limitation. Additionally, embedding catalyst within the membrane avoids the need for catalyst recovery and can prevent aggregation of catalytic nanoparticles. In this work, Pd/xGnP, Pd-Au/xGnP, and commercial Pd/Al2O3 nanoparticles were employed in batch and flow-through membrane reactors to catalyze the dehalogenation of TCE in the presence of dissolved H2. Bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts were shown to be more active than monometallic Pd/xGnP or commercial Pd/Al 2O3 catalysts. In addition to synthesizing nanocomposite membranes for high-throughput TCE dehalogenation, the membrane based dehalogenation process was designed to minimize the detrimental impact of common catalyst poisons (S2-, HS-, and H2S -) by concurrent oxidation of sulfide species to gypsum in the presence of Ca2+ and removal of gypsum through membrane filtration. The engineered membrane dehalogenation process demonstrated that bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts resisted deactivation by residual sulfide species after oxidation, and showed complete removal of gypsum during membrane filtration.

  17. Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformitiesin Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, results from mathematical, pseudo 2-D simulations are shown for four different along-the-channel thickness distributions of both the membrane and cathode catalyst layer. The results and subsequent analysis clearly demonstrate that for the membrane thickness distributions, cell performance is affected a few percent under low relative-humidity conditions and that the position along the gas channel is more important than the local thickness variations. However, for the catalyst-layer thickness distributions, global performance is not impacted, although for saturated conditions there is a large variability in the local temperature and performance depending on the thickness.

  18. Stable and catalytically active iron porphyrin-based porous organic polymer: Activity as both a redox and Lewis acid catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Oveisi, Ali R.; Zhang, Kainan; Khorramabadi-zad, Ahmad; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    A new porphyrin-based porous organic polymer (POP) with BET surface area ranging from 780 to 880 m2/g was synthesized in free-base form via the reaction of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and a rigid trigonal building block, hexahydroxytriphenylene. The material was then metallated with Fe(III) imparting activity for Lewis acid catalysis (regioselective methanolysis ring-opening of styrene oxide), oxidative cyclization catalysis (conversion of bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methanes to the corresponding spirodienone), and a tandem catalytic processes: an in situ oxidation-cyclic aminal formation-oxidation sequence, which selectively converts benzyl alcohol to 2-phenyl-quinazolin-4(3H)-one. Notably, the catalyst is readily recoverable and reusable, with little loss in catalytic activity. PMID:26177563

  19. Synthesis of polymer-supported dendritic palladium nanoparticle catalysts for Suzuki coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Eagambaram; Jebaranjitham, J. Nimita; Usha, A.

    2012-09-01

    New bead-shaped heterogeneous nanoparticle catalysts viz., amino-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) grafted on poly(styrene)-co-Poly(vinylbenzylchloride) (PS-Poly(VBC)) matrices immobilized/stabilized with palladium nanoparticle were prepared by simplified procedure. The first step is the preparation of PS-Poly(VBC) beads by suspension polymerization method. Second, the PAMAM G(0) G(1) and G(2) dendrimers were grafted individually onto the PS-Poly(VBC) matrices via divergent method by repeating two reactions, i.e., Michael addition of methyl acrylate to surface amino groups of aminomethylated PS-Poly(VBC) matrixes followed by amidation of the resulting esters with ethylene diamine. The resulting three types of PAMAM G(0), G(1) and G(2) grafted on PS-Poly(VBC) matrices were complexed individually with PdCl2 and thus yielded the corresponding new bead-shaped heterogeneous nanoparticle catalyst immobilized with PdNPs. The appearance of surface plasmon resonance band noticed at 547 nm in UV confirms the formation of PdNPs. The SEM result shows that the intensity of white patches due to immobilization of PdNPs increases with generation number and XRD reveals that the crystalline nature was decreased against generation number of the PAMAM. The catalytic efficiency of PS-Poly(VBC)-NH2-PdNPs-G(0), G(1) and G(2) catalysts were examined by Suzuki coupling reaction performed in mixture of water/ethanol. The observed reaction yield reveals that the activity was proportional to the generation number of PAMAM grafted onto the PS-Poly(VBC) matrices. The percentage of reaction yield (biphenyl) is sustained to ≈70 % even up to five cycles and this in turn confirms the stability of the catalysts. These catalysts can be used to conduct the Suzuki-coupling reaction in continuous mode operation in industrial scale.

  20. One pot aqueous synthesis of nanoporous Au85Pt15 material with surface bound Pt islands: an efficient methanol tolerant ORR catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandha Ganesh, P.; Jeyakumar, D.

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the `Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg cm-2) as the cathode material and Pt-Ru/C (loading: 0.5 mg cm-2) as the anode material performed better (38 mW cm-2) than the HiSPEC Pt/C cathode material (16 mW cm-2).For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the `Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg

  1. Porous coordination polymers of diverse topologies based on a twisted tetrapyridylbiaryl: application as nucleophilic catalysts for acetylation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Seth, Saona; Venugopalan, Paloth; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2015-01-26

    Porous coordination polymers (CPs) with partially uncoordinated pyridyl rings based on rationally designed polypyridyl linkers are appealing from the point of view of their application as nucleophilic catalysts. A D2d -symmetric tetradentate organic linker L, that is, 2,2',6,6'-tetramethoxy-3,3',5,5'-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)biphenyl, was designed and synthesized for metal-assisted self-assembly aimed at porous CPs. Depending on the nature of the metal ion and the counter anion, the ligand L is found to function as a 3- or 4-connecting building block leading to porous CPs of diverse topologies. The reaction of L with Zn(NO3 )2 and Cd(NO3 )2 yields porous 2 D CPs of "fes" topology, in which the tetrapyridyl linker L serves as a 3-connecting unit with its free pyridyl rings well exposed into the pores. The functional utility of these porous CPs containing uncoordinated pyridyl rings is demonstrated by employing them as efficient heterogeneous nucleophilic catalysts for acetylation of a number of phenols with varying electronic properties and reactivities. PMID:25430673

  2. Rheological Properties of PET/PC Immiscible Polymer Blends: Effect of Catalysts and Stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souad, Mbarek; Christian, Carrot; Mohamed, Jaziri; Yvan, Chalamet; Boubaker, Elleuch

    2008-07-01

    The rheology of PET/PC blends obtained by melt reactive blending using various transesterification catalysts has been measured in the melt at 260 °C in dynamic oscillatory shear flow. The thermal stability in the melt of PET/PC blends is a key limitation of the measurement time especially in presence of transesterification catalysts. For long residence time, a noticeable decrease of the viscosity is observed. This decrease is attributed to thermal degradation promoted by exchange reactions. The efficiency of phosphite and phenolic stabilizers, alone or in combination, has been assessed from the rheological measurements. The results show that the effectiveness of phenolic species is more important than that of phosphites. The addition of 0.3 wt-% of Irganox 1010 delays the decrease of the rheological characteristics for 10 minutes.

  3. Water balance model for polymer electrolyte fuel cells with ultrathin catalyst layers.

    PubMed

    Chan, Karen; Eikerling, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present a water balance model of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultrathin catalyst layers (UTCLs). The model treats the catalyst layers in an interface approximation and the gas diffusion layers as linear transmission lines of water fluxes. It relates current density, pressure distribution, and water fluxes in the different functional layers of the assembly. The optimal mode of operation of UTCLs is in a fully flooded state. The main challenge for MEAs with UTCLs is efficient liquid water removal, to avoid flooding of the gas diffusion layers. The model provides strategies for increasing the critical current density for the onset of flooding, via liquid permeabilities, vaporization areas, and gas pressure differentials. Finally, we discuss methods to identify regimes of transport via water flux measurements. PMID:24343559

  4. Nb doped TiO2 as a Cathode Catalyst Support Material for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, Alexander W.

    In order to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases and reduce dependence on the use of fossil fuels, it is necessary to pursue alternative sources of energy. Transportation is a major contributor to the emission of greenhouse gases due to the use of fossil fuels in the internal combustion engine. To reduce emission of these pollutants into the atmosphere, research is needed to produce alternative solutions for vehicle transportation. Low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are energy conversion devices that provide an alternative to the internal combustion engine, however, they still have obstacles to overcome to achieve large scale implementation. T he following work presents original research with regards to the development of Nb doped TiO2 as a cathode catalyst support material for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The development of a new process to synthesize nanoparticles of Nb doped TiO2 with controlled compositions is presented as well as methods to scale up the process and optimize the synthesis for the aforementioned application. In addition to this, comparison of both electrochemical activity and durability with current state of the art Pt on high surface area carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) is investigated. Effects of the strong metal-support interaction on the electrochemical behavior of these materials is also observed and discussed.

  5. Influence of Belousov-Zhabotinsky substrate concentrations on autonomous oscillation of polymer chains with Fe(bpy)3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Kenji

    2014-06-19

    We studied the effect of initial substrate concentrations in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction on the optical transmittance self-oscillation behavior of a polymer chain consisting of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and a Fe catalyst ([Fe(bpy)3]). The driving force of this transmittance self-oscillation was the solubility difference between the reduced and oxidized states of the [Fe(bpy)3] moiety in the polymer chain. The amplitude of the soluble-insoluble self-oscillation of poly(NIPAAm-co-[Fe(bpy)3]) was significantly smaller than that of poly(NIPAAm-co-[Ru(bpy)3]). Theoretical simulation results attributed this behavior to the small difference in the solvent qualities, C*, of the reduced and oxidized states. Furthermore, we clarified that poly(NIPAAm-co-[Fe(bpy)3]) required a narrower concentration range of HNO3 to exhibit self-oscillation than poly(NIPAAm-co-[Ru(bpy)3]), since transmittance self-oscillation occurred only for [HNO3] = 0.3 M. The period of self-oscillation of poly(NIPAAm-co-[Fe(bpy)3]) in solution was controlled mainly by NaBrO3 concentration and was hardly influenced by the initial concentration of malonic acid. PMID:24853126

  6. B-N polymer embedded iron(0) nanoparticles as highly active and long lived catalyst in the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Duman, Sibel; Metin, Onder; Ozkar, Saim

    2013-07-01

    B-N polymer embedded iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) were in-situ generated from the reduction of iron(III) acetylacetonate during the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) in THF solution at 40.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The iron(0) NPs could be isolated as powder from the reaction solution by centrifugation and characterized by UV-Vis, TEM, and XRD. They are redispersible in polar solvent such as THF and yet highly active catalysts in the dehydrogenation of AB providing a TOF value of 202 h(-1) at 40.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The catalytic activity of iron(0) NPs compare well with those of the known homogenous and heterogeneous precious metal catalysts reported so far. They are also long-life catalysts in the dehydrogenation of AB providing 1410 turnovers over 18 h at 40.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The poisoning experiments using carbon disulfide show that the dehydrogenation of AB catalyzed by iron(0) NPs is a heterogeneous catalysis. The catalytic dehydrogenation of AB in the presence of iron(0) NPs was followed by measuring the volume of hydrogen generated and by 11B-NMR spectroscopy. Our report also includes the results of a detailed kinetic study on the catalytic dehydrogenation of AB depending on the catalyst concentration, substrate concentration, and temperature. The dehydrogenation of AB produces sparingly soluble B-N polymers which provide just enough stability to the iron(0) NPs. The co-precipitation of some iron(0) NPs with the sparingly soluble polymers causes a slight decrease in the catalytic activity toward the end of dehydrogenation. However, iron(0) NPs embedded in B-N polymers appear to be an efficient catalyst in hydrogen generation from ammonia borane at moderate temperature. PMID:23901516

  7. Possible role of bacterial siderophores in inflammation. Iron bound to the Pseudomonas siderophore pyochelin can function as a hydroxyl radical catalyst.

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, T J; Cox, C D; Edeker, B L; Britigan, B E

    1990-01-01

    Tissue injury has been linked to neutrophil associated hydroxyl radical (.OH) generation, a process that requires an exogenous transition metal catalyst such as iron. In vivo most iron is bound in a noncatalytic form. To obtain iron required for growth, many bacteria secrete iron chelators (siderophores). Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are associated with considerable tissue destruction, we examined whether iron bound to the Pseudomonas siderophores pyochelin (PCH) and pyoverdin (PVD) could act as .OH catalysts. Purified PCH and PVD were iron loaded (Fe-PCH, Fe-PVD) and added to a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase superoxide- (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-generating system. Evidence for .OH generation was then sought using two different spin-trapping agents (5.5 dimethyl-pyrroline-1-oxide or N-t-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone), as well as the deoxyribose oxidation assay. Regardless of methodology, .OH generation was detected in the presence of Fe-PCH but not Fe-PVD. Inhibition of the process by catalase and/or SOD suggested .OH formation with Fe-PCH occurred via the Haber-Weiss reaction. Similar results were obtained when stimulated neutrophils were used as the source of .O2- and H2O2. Addition of Fe-PCH but not Fe-PVD to stimulated neutrophils yielded .OH as detected by the above assay systems. Since PCH and PVD bind ferric (Fe3+) but not ferrous (Fe2+) iron, .OH catalysis with Fe-PCH would likely involve .O2(-)-mediated reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ with subsequent release of "free" Fe2+. This was confirmed by measuring formation of the Fe2(+)-ferrozine complex after exposure of Fe-PCH, but not Fe-PVD, to enzymatically generated .O2-. These data show that Fe-PCH, but not Fe-PVD, is capable of catalyzing generation of .OH. Such a process could represent as yet another mechanism of tissue injury at sites of infection with P. aeruginosa. PMID:2170442

  8. Analysis of multi-phase transport phenomena with catalyst reactions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Munir Ahmed; Sundén, Bengt; Yuan, Jinliang

    2011-10-01

    A review is presented for two-phase modeling approaches to study various transport processes and reactions in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells along with some experimental work. It has been noted that water management is still one of the least accurate modeled phenomena. The lackness in complete descriptive models for water management inside PEM fuel cells can be attributed to the complexity of the phenomena, lack of empirical or measured data and non-availability of apt governing equations. Another discrepancy found in present models is the proper validation of the numerical work as it has been observed that mere comparison with V-I curve can sometimes lead to misguided conclusions. Additionally, keeping in mind the multi-scale nature of a PEM fuel cell, application of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has also been reviewed in this work and it was noticed that LB methods offer bright perspective at meso-scale by incorporating details of local structure. Furthermore, a brief description of the catalyst layer models is also presented with some technological developments at nano-scale to improve the physio- and electro-chemical properties. A test case for a 2D PEM cathode is also simulated for different operating voltages to predict the water saturation effects.

  9. Effect of adherent bacteria and bacterial extracellular polymers upon assimilation by Macoma balthica of sediment-bound Cd, Zn and Ag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of adherent bacteria and bacterial extracellular polymer (exopolymer) upon uptake of particle-bound Cd, Zn and Ag by the deposit-feeding clam Macoma balthica were studied in the laboratory. Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and unaltered and alkaline-extracted sediments were used as model particulates in separate, controlled deposit-feeding experiments. In general, amounts of metal taken up from ingested particles varied dramatically with the nature of the particle surface. Ingestion of contaminated iron oxide particles did not contribute to overall uptake of Cd and Ag in feeding clams, but accounted for 89 to 99% of total Zn uptake. Exopolymer adsorbed on iron oxide particles caused an increase in the biological availability of particle-bound metals in the order Ag>Cd>Zn, whereas adherent bacteria up to 3.2 X 1011 g-1 had no effect upon amounts of metal taken up from ingested particulates. At the higher Cd and Ag concentrations employed (3.6 X 10-7M), feeding rates declined with increasing amounts of iron oxide-bound exopolymer, suggesting behavioral avoidance due to increased metal availability. Much of the Cd (57 %) taken up by clams feeding on unaltered estuarine sediments originated from particulates, even though particle/solute distribution of Cd (86%) was similar to that in experiments with iron oxide particles. Uptake of Cd from alkalineextracted sediments was insignificant, as it was from unamended iron oxide. However, addition of exopolymer (10 mgg-1 sediment) caused a restoration nn bioavailability of sediment-bound Cd.

  10. Polyaniline-derived non-precious catalyst for the polymer electrolyte fuel cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhongwei; Garzon, Fernando; Zelenay, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    A novel polyaniline (PANI)-derived non-precious cathode catalyst was developed in this work, exhibiting remarkable activity (onset potential: 0.9 V, half-wave potential: 0.77 V) and selectivity (0.4 % H20 2 at 0.4 V). As a result, the generated current densities at high voltages associated with electrochemically kinetic activity can be achieved to 0.04 Acm-2 for 0.80V and 0.21 Acm-2 for 0.6 V, when air was used in fuel cell tests. MEA life test at a constant voltage of 0.4 V demonstrated a promising stability up to 450 hours, without obvious degradation. The current density during the test was measured around 0.32 A cm-2, a respectable performance for a cell with non-precious cathode, operated on air rather than oxygen. The possible active sites, related to pyridine- and pyrrole-like metal species were discussed according to presented XPS and XRD analysis.

  11. Ionic Polymer Microspheres Bearing a Co(III) -Salen Moiety as a Bifunctional Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Efficient Cycloaddition of CO2 and Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yan; Lu, Dan; Zhang, Chenjun; Jiang, Pingping; Zhang, Weijie; Wang, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We report a unique strategy to obtain the bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co (TBB=1,2,4,5-tetrakis(bromomethyl)benzene, Bpy=4,4'-bipyridine, Salen-Co=N,N'-bis({4-dimethylamino}salicylidene)ethylenediamino cobalt(III) acetate) by combining a cross-linked ionic polymer with a Co(III) -salen Schiff base. The catalyst showed extra high activity for CO2 fixation under mild, solvent-free reaction conditions with no requirement for a co-catalyst. The synthesized catalyst possessed distinctive spherical structural features, abundant halogen Br(-) anions with good leaving group ability, and accessible Lewis acidic Co metal centers. These unique features, together with the synergistic role of the Co and Br(-) functional sites, allowed TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co to exhibit enhanced catalytic conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates relative to the corresponding monofunctional analogues. This catalyst can be easily recovered and recycled five times without significant leaching of Co or loss of activity. Moreover, based on our experimental results and previous work, a synergistic cycloaddition reaction mechanism was proposed. PMID:27116117

  12. Deoxyribonucleic acid directed metallization of platinum nanoparticles on graphite nanofibers as a durable oxygen reduction catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peera, S. Gouse; Sahu, A. K.; Arunchander, A.; Nath, Krishna; Bhat, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    Effective surface functionalization to the hydrophobic graphite nanofibers (GNF) is performed with the biomolecule, namely deoxy-ribo-nucleic-acid (DNA) via π-π interactions. Pt nanoparticles are impregnated on GNF-DNA composite by ethylene glycol reduction method (Pt/GNF-DNA) and its effect on electro catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is systemically studied. Excellent dispersion of Pt nanoparticles over GNF-DNA surfaces with no evidence on particle aggregation is a remarkable achievement in this study. This result in higher electro chemical surface area of the catalyst, enhanced ORR behavior with significant enhancement in mass activity. The catalyst is validated in H2-O2 polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) and a peak power density of 675 mW cm-2 is achieved at a load current density of 1320 mA cm-2 with a minimal catalyst loading of 0.1 mg cm-2 at a cell temperature of 70 °C and 2 bar absolute pressure. Repeated potential cycling up to 10000 cycles in acidic media is also performed for this catalyst and found excellent stability with only 60 mV drop in the ORR half wave potential. The superior behavior of Pt/GNF-DNA catalyst is credited to the robust fibrous structure of GNF and its effective surface functionalization process via π-π interaction.

  13. In-Situ Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Studies of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, James Andrew

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are a promising high efficiency energy conversion technology, but their cost effective implementation, especially for automotive power, has been hindered by degradation of the electrochemically-active surface area (ECA) of the Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts. While numerous studies using ex-situ post-mortem techniques have provided insight into the effect of operating conditions on ECA loss, the governing mechanisms and underlying processes are not fully understood. Toward the goal of elucidating the electrocatalyst degradation mechanisms, we have followed particle size distribution (PSD) growth evolutions of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticle catalysts during potential cycling in an aqueous acidic environment (with and without flow of electrolyte) and in a fuel cell environment using in-situ anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The results of this thesis show a surface area loss mechanism of Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon to be predominantly controlled by Pt dissolution, the particle size dependence of Pt dissolution, the loss of dissolved Pt into the membrane and electrolyte, and, to a lesser extent, the re-deposition of dissolved Pt onto larger particles. The relative extent of these loss mechanisms are shown to be dependent on the environment, the temperature, and the potential cycling conditions. Correlation of ASAXS-determined particle growth with both calculated and voltammetrically-determined oxide coverages demonstrates that the oxide coverage is playing a key role in the dissolution process and in the corresponding growth of the mean Pt nanoparticle size and loss of ECA. This understanding potentially reduces the complex changes in PSDs and ECA resulting from various voltage profiles to the response to a single variable, oxide coverage. A better understanding of the degradation mechanisms of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticle distributions could lead to more stable electrocatalysts while

  14. Nitrogen-doped graphene-rich catalysts derived from heteroatom polymers for oxygen reduction in nonaqueous lithium-O2 battery cathodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Mack, Nathan H; Gao, Wei; Ma, Shuguo; Zhong, Ruiqin; Han, Jiantao; Baldwin, Jon K; Zelenay, Piotr

    2012-11-27

    In this work, we present a synthesis approach for nitrogen-doped graphene-sheet-like nanostructures via the graphitization of a heteroatom polymer, in particular, polyaniline, under the catalysis of a cobalt species using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as a supporting template. The graphene-rich composite catalysts (Co-N-MWNTs) exhibit substantially improved activity for oxygen reduction in nonaqueous lithium-ion electrolyte as compared to those of currently used carbon blacks and Pt/carbon catalysts, evidenced by both rotating disk electrode and Li-O(2) battery experiments. The synthesis-structure-activity correlations for the graphene nanostructures were explored by tuning their synthetic chemistry (support, nitrogen precursor, heating temperature, and transition metal type and content) to investigate how the resulting morphology and nitrogen-doping functionalities (e.g., pyridinic, pyrrolic, and quaternary) influence the catalyst activity. In particular, an optimal temperature for heat treatment during synthesis is critical to creating a high-surface-area catalyst with favorable nitrogen doping. The sole Co phase, Co(9)S(8), was present in the catalyst but plays a negligible role in ORR. Nevertheless, the addition of Co species in the synthesis is indispensable for achieving high activity, due to its effects on the final catalyst morphology and structure, including surface area, nitrogen doping, and graphene formation. This new route for the preparation of a nitrogen-doped graphene nanocomposite with carbon nanotube offers synthetic control of morphology and nitrogen functionality and shows promise for applications in nonaqueous oxygen reduction electrocatalysis for Li-O(2) battery cathodes. PMID:23036092

  15. Development of Hierarchical Polymer@Pd Nanowire‐Network: Synthesis and Application as Highly Active Recyclable Catalyst and Printable Conductive Ink

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Sajjad Husain

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A facile one‐pot approach for preparing hierarchical nanowire‐networks of hollow polymer@Pd nanospheres is reported. First, polymer@Pd hollow nanospheres were produced through metal‐complexation‐induced phase separation with functionalized graft copolymers and subsequent self‐assembly of PdNPs. The nanospheres hierarchically assembled into the nanowire‐network upon drying. The Pd nanowire‐network served as an active catalyst for Mizoroki–Heck and Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reactions. As low as 500 μmol % Pd was sufficient for quantitative reactions, and the origin of the high activity is ascribed to the highly active sites originating from high‐index facets, kinks, and coalesced structures. The catalyst can be recycled via simple filtration and washing, maintaining its high activity owing to the micrometer‐sized hierarchical structure of the nanomaterial. The polymer@Pd nanosphere also served as a printable conductive ink for a translucent grid pattern with excellent horizontal conductivity (7.5×105 S m−1). PMID:27551657

  16. Development of Hierarchical Polymer@Pd Nanowire-Network: Synthesis and Application as Highly Active Recyclable Catalyst and Printable Conductive Ink.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sajjad Husain; Ochiai, Bungo

    2016-06-01

    A facile one-pot approach for preparing hierarchical nanowire-networks of hollow polymer@Pd nanospheres is reported. First, polymer@Pd hollow nanospheres were produced through metal-complexation-induced phase separation with functionalized graft copolymers and subsequent self-assembly of PdNPs. The nanospheres hierarchically assembled into the nanowire-network upon drying. The Pd nanowire-network served as an active catalyst for Mizoroki-Heck and Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions. As low as 500 μmol % Pd was sufficient for quantitative reactions, and the origin of the high activity is ascribed to the highly active sites originating from high-index facets, kinks, and coalesced structures. The catalyst can be recycled via simple filtration and washing, maintaining its high activity owing to the micrometer-sized hierarchical structure of the nanomaterial. The polymer@Pd nanosphere also served as a printable conductive ink for a translucent grid pattern with excellent horizontal conductivity (7.5×10(5) S m(-1)). PMID:27551657

  17. Carbon monoxide poisoning of platinum-graphite catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: comparison between platinum-supported on graphite and intercalated in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilquin, J. Y.; Côté, R.; Guay, D.; Dodelet, J. P.; Denès, G.

    Platinum intercalated in graphite and Pt supported on graphite have been synthesized as catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells in order to test the effect of carbon monoxide adsorption on their electrochemical properties. These materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, neutron activation analysis and cyclic voltammetry in Nafion-based films in contact with H 2SO 4 solution at pH 0.5 Pt intercalates are indeed tridimensional Pt cluster inclusions in a perturbed graphite matrix. Hydrogen electrosorption measurements demonstrate that Pt supported on graphite has three times more active sites than Pt intercalated in graphite even if Pt loadings (16 ± 4 Pt wt.%) and the size of Pt clusters (3.4 ± 0.4 nm) are similar for both catalysts. Pt supported on graphite and intercalated in graphite are equally poisoned by carbon monoxide.

  18. Enhanced hole injection in a polymer light emitting diode using a small molecule monolayer bound to the anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Koch, Norbert; Bernasek, Steven L.; Schwartz, Jeffrey

    2006-08-01

    A monolayer of quarterthiophene-2-phosphonate (4TP) was chemically bound to the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) and was then p-doped with the strong acceptor, tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F 4-TCNQ). This interface modification strongly reduced the barrier for hole injection compared to unmodified ITO. This doped monolayer surface treatment was also superior to the commonly used anode coating poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PPS) at driving voltages above 5.2 V.

  19. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  20. Soluble porous coordination polymers by mechanochemistry: from metal-containing films/membranes to active catalysts for aerobic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Haiying; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-14

    Soluble porous coordination polymers from mechanochemical synthesis are presented through a coordination polymerization between highly contorted, rigid tetraphenol and a broad variety of transition metal ions. These polymers can be easily cast as metal-containing films or freestanding membranes. Importantly, as-made coordination polymers are highly active and stable in the aerobic oxidation of allylic C-H bonds. PMID:25389070

  1. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-05-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m(2) g(-1), respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2(-) content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm(-2) were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method. PMID:25833146

  2. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  3. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization. PMID:27113681

  4. Comparison of Pt-based binary and ternary alloy anode catalysts for polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.; Ley, K.L.; Pu, C.

    1996-12-31

    As an anode catalyst, Pt is highly active for the adsorption and dehydrogenation of methanol, however, the surface is poisoned by CO. To oxidize CO to CO{sub 2}, a second oxygen atom is required from an adjacent adsorbed water molecule. Bifunctional alloys composed of Pt and a second metal M, able to activate H{sub 2}O (forming -OH{sub ads}) at low potentials, are candidate materials for methanol electro-oxidation catalysts A proposed mechanism is: Figure 2 shows that metals which enhance methanol oxidation activity when alloyed with Pt have similar M-O bond strengths (see bold print), suggesting that the best binary alloy catalysts have second metals that are optimized with respect to the ability to oxidatively adsorb water. and the ability to dissociate M-O bonds to yield CO{sub 2}.

  5. Catalyzed oxidative degradation of methyl orange over Au catalyst prepared by ionic liquid-polymer modified silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Guo, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    A new type of hybrid material was prepared by grafting an ionic liquid monomer, 1-(p-vinylbenzyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride, on the surface of the porous silica which was synthesized via sodium silicate hydrolysis. The as-synthesized products were characterized by scanning electron microscope, nitrogen physisorption experiment, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectra. A catalyst with Au was prepared using the hybrid material as carrier. The experimental results show that the catalyst exhibits a better catalytic effect of hydrogen peroxide on the degradation of methyl orange. The reason may be that the metal component of the catalyst facilitated the dissociation of hydrogen peroxide to produce abundant highly active free radicals which can rapidly ruin the structure of methyl orange molecules in water. Finally, a probable catalytic degradation mechanism based on diffusion was discussed.

  6. Stability and Biodistribution of Thiol-Functionalized and (177)Lu-Labeled Metal Chelating Polymers Bound to Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yook, Simmyung; Lu, Yijie; Jeong, Jenny Jooyoung; Cai, Zhongli; Tong, Lemuel; Alwarda, Ramina; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Winnik, Mitchell A; Reilly, Raymond M

    2016-04-11

    We are studying a novel radiation nanomedicine approach to treatment of breast cancer using 30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) metal-chelating polymers (MCP) that incorporate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelators for complexing the β-particle emitter, (177)Lu. Our objective was to compare the stability of AuNP conjugated to MCP via a single thiol [DOTA-PEG-ortho-pyridyl disulfide (OPSS)], a dithiol [DOTA-PEG-lipoic acid (LA)] or multithiol end-group [PEG-pGlu(DOTA)8-LA4] and determine the elimination and biodistribution of these (177)Lu-labeled MCP-AuNP in mice. Stability to aggregation in the presence of thiol-containing dithiothreitol (DTT), L-cysteine or glutathione was assessed and dissociation of (177)Lu-MCP from AuNP in human plasma measured. Elimination of radioactivity from the body of athymic mice and excretion into the urine and feces was measured up to 168 h post-intravenous (i.v.) injection of (177)Lu-MCP-AuNP and normal tissue uptake was determined. ICP-AES was used to quantify Au in the liver and spleen and these were compared to (177)Lu. Our results showed that PEG-pGlu(DOTA)8-LA4-AuNP were more stable to aggregation in vitro than DOTA-PEG-LA-AuNP and both forms of AuNP were more stable to thiol challenge than DOTA-PEG-OPSS-AuNP. PEG-pGlu((177)Lu-DOTA)8-LA4 was the most stable in plasma. Whole body elimination of (177)Lu was most rapid for mice injected with (177)Lu-DOTA-PEG-OPSS-AuNP. Urinary excretion accounted for >90% of eliminated (177)Lu. All (177)Lu-MCP-AuNP accumulated in the liver and spleen. Liver uptake was lowest for PEG-pGlu((177)Lu-DOTA)8-LA4-AuNP but these AuNP exhibited the greatest spleen uptake. There were differences in Au and (177)Lu in the liver for PEG-pGlu((177)Lu-DOTA)8-LA4-AuNP. These differences were not correlated with in vitro stability of the (177)Lu-MCP-AuNP. We conclude that conjugation of AuNP with PEG-pGlu((177)Lu-DOTA)8-LA4 via a multithiol

  7. Rate determination of azide click reactions onto alkyne polymer brush scaffolds: a comparison of conventional and catalyst-free cycloadditions for tunable surface modification.

    PubMed

    Orski, Sara V; Sheppard, Gareth R; Arumugam, Selvanathan; Arnold, Rachelle M; Popik, Vladimir V; Locklin, Jason

    2012-10-16

    The postpolymerization functionalization of poly(N-hydroxysuccinimide 4-vinylbenzoate) brushes with reactive alkynes that differ in relative rates of activity of alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions is described. The alkyne-derived polymer brushes undergo "click"-type cycloadditions with azido-containing compounds by two mechanisms: a strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) with dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) and azadibenzocyclooctyne (ADIBO) or a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) to a propargyl group (PPG). Using a pseudo-first-order limited rate equation, rate constants for DIBO, ADIBO, and PPG-derivatized polymer brushes functionalized with an azide-functionalized dye were calculated as 7.7 × 10(-4), 4.4 × 10(-3), and 2.0 × 10(-2) s(-1), respectively. The SPAAC click reactions of the surface bound layers were determined to be slower than the equivalent reactions in solution, but the relative ratio of the reaction rates for the DIBO and ADIBO SPAAC reactions was consistent between solution and the polymer layer. The rate of functionalization was not influenced by the diffusion of azide into the polymer scaffold as long as the concentration of azide in solution was sufficiently high. The PPG functionalization by CuAAC had an extremely fast rate, which was comparable to other surface click reaction rates. Preliminary studies of dilute solution azide functionalization indicate that the diffusion-limited regime of brush functionalization impacts a 50 nm polymer brush layer and decreases the pseudo-first-order rate by a constant diffusion-limited factor of 0.233. PMID:23009188

  8. Preparation of Carbon-Platinum-Ceria and Carbon-Platinum-Cerium catalysts and its application in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell: Hydrogen, Methanol, and Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Blas, Rolando Pedro

    This thesis is focused on fuel cells using hydrogen, methanol and ethanol as fuel. Also, in the method of preparation of catalytic material for the anode: Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD) and impregnation method using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a chelating agent. The first part of the thesis describes the general knowledge about Hydrogen Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HPEMFC),Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) and Direct Ethanol Fuel Cell (DEFC), as well as the properties of Cerium and CeO2 (Ceria). The second part of the thesis describes the preparation of catalytic material by Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD). SFD was utilized to deposit Pt and ceria simultaneously onto gas diffusion layers. The Pt-ceria catalyst deposited by SFD exhibited higher methanol oxidation activity compared to the platinum catalyst alone. The linear sweep traces of the cathode made for the methanol cross over study indicate that Pt-Ceria/C as the anode catalyst, due to its better activity for methanol, improves the fuel utilization, minimizing the methanol permeation from anode to cathode compartment. The third and fourth parts of the thesis describe the preparation of material catalytic material Carbon-Platinum-Cerium by a simple and cheap impregnation method using EDTA as a chelating agent to form a complex with cerium (III). This preparation method allows the mass production of the material catalysts without additional significant cost. Fuel cell polarization and power curves experiments showed that the Carbon-Platinum-Cerium anode materials exhibited better catalytic activity than the only Vulcan-Pt catalysts for DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. In the case of Vulcan-20%Pt-5%w Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-20%Pt in DMFC. In the case of Vulcan-40% Pt-doped Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-40% Pt in DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. Finally, I propose a theory that explains the reason why the

  9. Microcrystalline Zinc Coordination Polymers as Single-site Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Selective Synthesis of Mono-oxazolines from Amino Alcohol and Dinitriles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junning; Huang, Chao; Gao, Kuan; Wang, Xiaolu; Liu, Mengjia; Ma, Haoran; Wu, Jie; Hou, Hongwei

    2016-06-21

    In our effort to develop coordination polymers (CPs)-based single-site catalysts for the selective synthesis of mono-oxazolines, two Zn-based CPs, [{Zn6 (idbt)4 (phen)4 } ⋅3 H2 O]n  (1) and [{Zn3 (idbt)2 (H2 O)4 }⋅2 H2 O]n  (2) (H3 idbt= 5,5'-(1H-imidazole-4,5-diyl)-bis-(2H-tetrazole), phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized. They exhibit two-dimensional structure and contain isolated and accessible catalytically active sites, mimicking the site isolation of many catalytic enzymes. Micro CPs 1 and 2 are obtained by using surfactant-mediated hydrothermal methods, and an investigation is conducted to explore how different surfactants affect their morphologies and particle sizes. Furthermore, micro 1 and 2 have shown to be effective heterogeneous catalysts for the reaction of amino alcohols and aromatic dinitriles, and exerted a significant influence on the selectivity of the catalytic reactions, yielding mono-oxazolines as the major reaction product. PMID:27136746

  10. Impact of micro-porous layer on liquid water distribution at the catalyst layer interface and cell performance in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabe, Yutaka; Aoyama, Yusuke; Kadowaki, Kazumasa; Suzuki, Kengo; Chikahisa, Takemi

    2015-08-01

    In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, a gas diffusion layer (GDL) with a micro-porous layer (MPL) gives better anti-flooding performance than GDLs without an MPL. To investigate the function and mechanism of the MPL to suppress water flooding, the liquid water distribution at the cathode catalyst layer (CL) surface are observed by a freezing method; in the method liquid water is immobilized in ice form by rapid freezing, followed by disassembling the cell for observations. The ice covered area is quantified by image processing and cells with and without an MPL are compared. The results show that the MPL suppresses water accumulation at the interface due to smaller pore size and finer contact with the CL, and this results in less water flooding. Investigation of ice formed after -10 °C cold start shutdowns and the temporary performance deterioration at ordinary temperatures also indicates a significant influence of the liquid water accumulating at the interface. The importance of the fine contact between CL and MPL, the relative absence of gaps, is demonstrated by a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) which is directly coated with catalyst ink on the surface of the MPL achieving finer contact of the layers.

  11. Surface-Regulated Nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C Cathode Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Fabricated by a Selective Electrochemical Sn Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kensaku; Takao, Shinobu; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Samjeské, Gabor; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-14

    We have achieved significant improvements for the oxygen reduction reaction activity and durability with new SnO2-nanoislands/Pt3Co/C catalysts in 0.1 M HClO4, which were regulated by a strategic fabrication using a new selective electrochemical Sn deposition method. The nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C catalysts with Pt/Sn = 4/1, 9/1, 11/1, and 15/1 were characterized by STEM-EDS, XRD, XRF, XPS, in situ XAFS, and electrochemical measurements to have a Pt3Co core/Pt skeleton-skin structure decorated with SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt surface with the defects and dislocations. The high performances of nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C originate from efficient electronic modification of the Pt skin surface (site 1) by both the Co of the Pt3Co core and surface nano-SnO2 and more from the unique property of the periphery sites of the SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt skeleton-skin surface (more active site 2), which were much more active than expected from the d-band center values. The white line peak intensity of the nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C revealed no hysteresis in the potential up-down operations between 0.4 and 1.0 V versus RHE, unlike the cases of Pt/C and Pt3Co/C, resulting in the high ORR performance. Here we report development of a new class of cathode catalysts with two different active sites for next-generation polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PMID:26412503

  12. High-performance, low Pt content catalysts for the electroreduction of oxygen in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, J.; Faubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.; Cote, R.; Guay, D.; Dodelet, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts have been synthesized using graphite and carbon black supports of various specific areas. The graphites are KS6 (20 m{sup 2}/g), HS100 (110 m{sup 2}/g), and HS300 (305 m{sup 2}/g) from Lonza, and the carbon blacks are Vulcan (254 m{sup 2}/g) and Black Pearls (1475 m{sup 2}/g) from Cabot. The Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts were used at the cathode of a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell, and their polarization curves were compared to each other and to those of various Pt-supported catalysts from E-TEK. In the high current region of interest to fuel cell developers, it is shown that Pt-supported catalysts perform better than Pt-included ones when the specific area of the support is small. The contrary is true when the specific area of the support is large. The best catalysts are HS300-Pti [8.3 weight percent (w/o) Pt included in HS300 graphite] and Vu-Pti (6.1 w/o Pt included in Vulcan XC-72R). These catalysts display very high mass and specific activities for O{sub 2} reduction. Furthermore, the iR-corrected polarization curves of both HS300-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.110 mg/cm{sup 2}) and Vu-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.070 mg/cm{sup 2}) cross at high current the polarization curve of the electrode prepared with E-TEK20 (20 w/o of supported Pt, with a Pt loading of 0.287 mg/cm{sup 2}). Pt inclusion in graphite or carbon black is therefore an interesting way of reducing the Pt loading of fuel cell cathodes without lowering electrochemical performance. HS300-Pti have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These analyses indicate that they both contain metallic Pt and Pt(II and IV) oxides and/or hydroxides.

  13. Preparation of uniform magnetic recoverable catalyst microspheres with hierarchically mesoporous structure by using porous polymer microsphere template

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Merging nanoparticles with different functions into a single microsphere can exhibit profound impact on various applications. However, retaining the unique properties of each component after integration has proven to be a significant challenge. Our previous research demonstrated a facile method to incorporate magnetic nanoparticles into porous silica microspheres. Here, we report the fabrication of porous silica microspheres embedded with magnetic and gold nanoparticles as magnetic recoverable catalysts. The as-prepared multifunctional composite microspheres exhibit excellent magnetic and catalytic properties and a well-defined structure such as uniform size, high surface area, and large pore volume. As a result, the very little composite microspheres show high performance in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol, special convenient magnetic separability, long life, and good reusability. The unique nanostructure makes the microspheres a novel stable and highly efficient catalyst system for various catalytic industry processes. PMID:24708885

  14. Cross-sectional observation of nanostructured catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte fuel cell using FIB/SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayanagi, Yuta; Shimizu, Takahiro; Hashimasa, Yoshiyuki; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yohtaro; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2015-04-01

    The catalyst layer structure of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) affects fuel cell performance. Cross-sectional observation is the most simple and effective way to evaluate the catalyst layer structure. Although focused ion beam (FIB) is a common tool for cross-sectional observation, sputtering of the ion beam causes heat damage to the MEA sample, which in previous studies was mitigated by sample cooling using liquid nitrogen. In this study, the sample holder and FIB stage were newly developed for cross-sectional observation of MEA catalyst layers, which suppressed heat damage by thermoelectric cooling using Peltier elements. Two types of degradation mode tests, load cycle and startup-shutdown cycle, were conducted on the MEA sample and their cross-sectional observations were performed using newly developed scanning electron microscope stages, which can mount the sample holder directly. The growth of platinum nanoparticles corresponding to the degradation of the active surface area was clearly observed for the sample subjected to the load cycle test. On the other hand, the corrosion of carbon particles was observed for the startup-shutdown sample. Since the cross-sectional samples were fabricated without heat damage by FIB with the newly developed stage, the difference in microstructure for these modes could be clearly distinguished.

  15. Electrochemical stability and postmortem studies of Pt/SiC catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Stamatin, Serban N; Speder, Jozsef; Dhiman, Rajnish; Arenz, Matthias; Skou, Eivind M

    2015-03-25

    In the presented work, the electrochemical stability of platinized silicon carbide is studied. Postmortem transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to document the change in the morphology and structure upon potential cycling of Pt/SiC catalysts. Two different potential cycle aging tests were used in order to accelerate the support corrosion, simulating start-up/shutdown and load cycling. On the basis of the results, we draw two main conclusions. First, platinized silicon carbide exhibits improved electrochemical stability over platinized active carbons. Second, silicon carbide undergoes at least mild oxidation if not even silicon leaching. PMID:25719513

  16. Load cycle durability of a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Chikara; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Tashiro, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We focus on Pt degradation occurring during fuel cell vehicle (FCV) combined drive cycles involving load and open circuit voltage (OCV) just after startup and during idling. Load cycle durability is evaluated as a function of OCV/load holding time, load rate and relative humidity (RH) with a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/GCB) in the cathode. The degradation of Pt/GCB is suppressed for shorter OCV holding times, lower load rates and lower RH. Scanning ion microscopy (SIM) images of membrane cross-sections indicate that the amount of Pt deposited in the membrane decreases during drive cycles involving load with short OCV holding times. Investigations of the Pt distribution in the cathode catalyst layer (CL) by using scanning TEM-EDX show that the dissolution of Pt is suppressed on the membrane side in the CL. The Pt dissolution is accelerated by the high Pt oxidation due to the long OCV holding time. A load cycle with both long OCV holding time and low load inhibits the Pt2+ migration into the membrane but accelerates the Pt particle growth due to electrochemical Ostwald ripening; meanwhile, a load cycle with long OCV holding time at lower RH prevents both the Pt dissolution and particle growth.

  17. A Tungsten Complex with a Bidentate, Hemilabile N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand, Facile Displacement of the Weakly Bound W-(C=C) Bond, and the Vulnerability of the NHC Ligand Toward Catalyst Deactivation During Ketone Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Fan; Dioumaev, Vladimir K; Szalda, David J; Hanson, Jonathan; Bullock, R Morris

    2007-09-24

    The initial reaction observed between N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene) and molybdenum and tungsten hydride complexes CpM(CO)2(PPh3)H (M = Mo, W) is deprotonation of the metal hydride by IMes, giving [(IMes)H]+[CpM(CO)2(PPh3)] . At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the reaction of IMes with CpM(CO)2(PR3)H (M = Mo, W; R = Me, Ph) produces CpM(CO)2(IMes)H. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph3C+B(C6F5)4- gives CpW(CO)2(IMes)+B(C6F5)4- which was crystallographically characterized using x-ray radiation from a synchrotron. The IMes is bonded as a bidentate ligand, through the carbon of the carbene as well as forming a weak bond from the metal to a C=C bond of one mesityl ring. The weakly bound C=C ligand is hemilabile, being readily displaced by H2, THF, ketones or alcohols. Reaction of CpW(CO)2(IMes)+ with H2 gives the dihydride complex [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(H)2]+. Addition of Et2CH–OH to CpW(CO)2(IMes)+B(C6F5)4- gives the alcohol complex [CpM(CO)2(IMes)(Et2CH–OH)]+[B(C6F5)4] which was characterized by crystallography and exhibits no evidence for hydrogen bonding of the bound OH group. Addition of H2 to the ketone complex [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(Et2C=O)]+[B(C6F5)4] produces an equilibrium with the dihydride [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(H)2]+ (Keq = 1.1 x 103 at 25 °C). The tungsten

  18. A Tungsten Complex with a Bidentate, Hemilabile N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand, Facile Displacement of the Weakly Bound W-(C=C) Bond, and the Vulnerability of the NHC Ligand Towards Catalyst Deactivation During Ketone Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,F.; Dioumaev, V.; Szalda, D.; Hanson, J.; Bullock, R.

    2007-01-01

    The initial reaction observed between the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) and molybdenum and tungsten hydride complexes CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W) is deprotonation of the metal hydride by IMes, giving [(IMes)H]{sup +}[CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})]{sup -}. At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the reaction of IMes with CpM(CO){sub 2}(PR{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W; R = Me, Ph) produces CpM(CO){sub 2}(IMes)H. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph{sub 3}C{sub +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, which was crystallographically characterized using X-ray radiation from a synchrotron. The IMes is bonded as a bidentate ligand, through the carbon of the carbene as well as forming a weak bond from the metal to a C=C bond of one mesityl ring. The weakly bound C=C ligand is hemilabile, being readily displaced by H{sub 2}, THF, ketones, or alcohols. Reaction of CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +} with H{sub 2} gives the dihydride complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +}. Addition of Et{sub 2}CH-OH to CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives the alcohol complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}CH-OH)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}, which was characterized by crystallography and exhibits no evidence for hydrogen bonding of the bound OH group. Addition of H{sub 2} to the ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -} produces an equilibrium with the dihydride [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +} (K{sub eq} = 1.1 x 10{sup 3} at 25 {sup o}C). The tungsten ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}- serves as a modest catalyst for hydrogenation of Et{sub 2}C=O to Et{sub 2}CH-OH in neat ketone solvent. Decomposition of the catalyst produces [H(IMes)]{sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, indicating that these

  19. H2O2 detection analysis of oxygen reduction reaction on cathode and anode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Akira; Shironita, Sayoko; Umeda, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    The generation percentage of H2O2 during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at practical powder electrocatalysts was evaluated using a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). We employed a porous microelectrode that contains electrocatalysts, namely, Pt/C, Pt-Co/C, and Pt-Ru/C as the oxygen reduction electrode of the SECM, and the Pt microelectrode was used as the H2O2 detector. First, the H2O2 generation amount at Pt/Cs was measured by changing the Pt loading amount. A Pt/C with a higher Pt loading has a higher ORR activity and generates a larger amount of H2O2. However, the percentage of H2O2 generated with respect to the ORR is the same regardless of the Pt loading amount. Next, H2O2 generation is markedly suppressed at the Pt-Co/C and Pt-Ru/C in the potential ranges of practical fuel cell cathode and anode, respectively. This explains that the Pt-Co/C is effective when used as a cathode, and the anode Pt-Ru/C enables the reduction of the H2O2 generation even if O2 crossleak occurs in the practical polymer electrolyte fuel cell.

  20. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  1. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  2. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  3. Ex situ testing method to characterize cathode catalysts degradation under simulated start-up/shut-down conditions - A contribution to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Toth, G.; Kundu, S.; Colmenares, L. C.; Behm, R. J.

    2012-10-01

    The paper introduces a novel ex situ test procedure that was developed to quantify the ageing of catalyst layers under critical automotive fuel cell conditions during start-up/shut-down phases. It is based on liquid electrolyte measurements, using a thin film catalyst electrode. The overall degradation under start-up/shut-down conditions is assessed by the decay in electrochemically active surface area. Furthermore, contributions from different processes leading to catalyst degradation such as Pt dissolution and Pt particle growth/agglomeration can be separated. Finally, using a differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) set-up, also the extent and role of carbon corrosion under these conditions is accessible. The potential of this, compared to in situ fuel cell stack tests, rather fast and less costly ex situ test procedure is demonstrated in measurements using a commercial, graphitized carbon-supported Pt catalyst. The results of the degradation test and in particular the contributions from different degradation processes such as Pt dissolution, Pt particle growth/agglomeration and carbon corrosion during different stages of catalyst ageing are discussed.

  4. A Facile Strategy for Catalyst Separation and Recycling Suitable for ATRP of Hydrophilic Monomers Using a Macroligand.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaowu; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2016-01-01

    How to simply and efficiently separate and recycle catalyst has still been a constraint for the wide application of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), especially for the polymerization systems with hydrophilic monomers because the polar functional groups may coordinate with transition metal salts, resulting in abundant catalyst residual in the resultant water-soluble polymers. In order to overcome this problem, a latent-biphasic system is developed, which can be successfully used for ATRP catalyst separation and recycling in situ for various kinds of hydrophilic monomers for the first time, such as poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMA), and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM). Herein, random copolymer of octadecyl acrylate (OA), MA-Ln (2-(bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)ethyl acrylate), and POA-ran-P(MA-Ln) is designed as the macroligand, and heptane/ethanol is selected as the biphasic solvent. Copper(II) bromide (CuBr2 ) is employed as the catalyst, PEG-bound 2-bromo-2-methylpropanoate (PEG350 -Br) as the water-soluble ATRP initiator and 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) as the azo-initiator to establish an ICAR (initiators for continuous activator regeneration) ATRP system. Importantly, well-defined water-soluble polymers are obtained even though the recyclable catalyst is used for sixth times. PMID:26506506

  5. Carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazenes and polymers thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allcock, H. R.; Scopelianos, A. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Carboranylmethylene-substituted cyclophosphazenes are described which can be thermally polymerized into carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazene polymers. The polymers are useful as thermally stable coatings. Also, due to the characteristics of these polymers in acting as a ligand for transition metals, metalocarboranylmethylene phosphazene polymers are described which can act as immobilized catalyst systems, and are electrically conductive and superconductive.

  6. bis-Nitrile and bis-Dialkylcyanamide Platinum(II) Complexes as Efficient Catalysts for Hydrosilylation Cross-Linking of Siloxane Polymers.

    PubMed

    Islamova, Regina M; Dobrynin, Mikhail V; Ivanov, Daniil M; Vlasov, Andrey V; Kaganova, Elena V; Grigoryan, Galina V; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2016-01-01

    cis- and trans-Isomers of the platinum(II) nitrile complexes [PtCl2(NCR)2] (R = NMe2, N(C₅H10), Ph, CH2Ph) were examined as catalysts for hydrosilylation cross-linking of vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane and trimethylsilyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-ethylhydrosiloxane) producing high quality silicone rubbers. Among the tested platinum species the cis-complexes are much more active catalysts than their trans-congeners and for all studied platinum complexes cis-[PtCl2(NCCH2Ph)2] exhibits the best catalytic activity (room temperature, c = 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L, τpot-life 60 min, τcuring 6 h). Although cis-[PtCl₂(NCCH2Ph)2] is less active than the widely used Karstedt's catalyst, its application for the cross-linking can be performed not only at room temperature (c = 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L), but also, more efficiently, at 80 °C (c = 1.0 × 10(-4)-1.0 × 10(-5) mol/L) and it prevents adherence of the formed silicone rubbers to equipment. The usage of the cis- and trans-[PtCl2(NCR)2] complexes as the hydrosilylation catalysts do not require any inhibitors and, moreover, the complexes and their mixtures with vinyl- and trimethylsilyl terminated polysiloxanes are shelf-stable in air. Tested catalysts do not form colloid platinum particles after the cross-linking. PMID:26959003

  7. Structural analysis of polymer-protected Pd/Pt bimetallic clusters as dispersed catalysts by using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Toshima, Naoki; Harada, Masafumi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Kushihashi, Kakuta; Asakura, Kiyotaka )

    1991-09-19

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) was applied to the determination of the structure of colloidal dispersions of the poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected palladium/platinum bimetallic clusters, which work as the catalysts for selective partial hydrogenation of 1,3-cyclooctadiene to cyclooctene. The catalytic activity was found to depend on the structure of the bimetallic clusters. The EXAFS data on the Pd/Pt (4/1) bimetallic clusters, which are the most active catalysts, indicate a Pt core structure, in which the 42 Pd atoms are on the surface of the cluster particle and 13 Pt atoms are at the center of the particle, forming a core. In contrast, the Pd/Pt (1/1) bimetallic clusters are suggested to have a modified Pt core structure, in which 28 Pt atoms connect directly with each other, being located both in the core and on the surface, and 27 Pd atoms form three islands on the surface of the cluster particle. These bimetallic clusters work as active catalysts for selective hydrogenation of olefins, selective partial hydrogenation of diene to monoene, and visible light-induced hydrogen generation from water.

  8. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Inclusion of Polymer Topics into Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Suggests polymer topics for study in inorganic chemistry courses. Commercial materials (including list of inorganic compounds utilized in polymer industry), anchored metal catalysis, polymers modified or formed by coordination, polysiloxanes, phosphazene or phosphonitrilic halide polymers, and hetergeneous polymerization catalysts are considered.…

  9. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  10. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  11. Metal-Organic Polymers Containing Discrete Single-Walled Nanotube as a Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Cycloaddition of Carbon Dioxide to Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; He, Cheng; Xiu, Jinghai; Yang, Lu; Duan, Chunying

    2015-12-01

    The cycloaddition of carbon dioxide to epoxides to produce cyclic carbonates is quite promising and does not result in any side products. A discrete single-walled metal-organic nanotube was synthesized by incorporating a tetraphenyl-ethylene moiety as the four-point connected node. The assembled complex has a large cross-section, with an exterior wall diameter of 3.6 nm and an interior channel diameter of 2.1 nm. It features excellent activity toward the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide, with a turnover number of 17,500 per mole of catalyst and an initial turnover frequency as high as 1000 per mole of catalyst per hour. Only minimal decreases in the catalytic activity were observed after 70 h under identical reaction conditions, and a total turnover number as high as 35,000 was achieved. A simple comparison of relative porous MOFs suggested that the cross-section of the channels is an important factor influencing the transport of the substrates and products through the channel. PMID:26584402

  12. Applications of functionalized polymers in catalysis. Progress report 3, July 15, 1979-July 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bergbreiter, D.E.

    1980-07-01

    Research on applications of polymers in catalysis has encompassed three areas: the use of functionalized polymers to detect soluble intermediates in heterogeneous Group VIII metal catalyzed arene hydrogenations; a study of olefin isomerization and hydrogenations catalyzed by polystyrene supported bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride and an alkylmagnesium halide; and the acceleration in rate of an olefin hydrogenation catalyzed by homogeneous rhodium and ruthenium complexes as a result of absorption of triphenylphosphine by silver (I) polystyrenesulfonate. The first project found that polymer bound trapping agents were unable to detect soluble intermediates such as dienes, free radicals, or reducing agents in platinum-catalyzed benzene hydrogenation at 60 psi H/sub 2/ and 30/sup 0/C. The inability to detect diene intermediates was shown to be the result of the lower reactivity of the polymeric reagent versus an active catalyst. The polymer-supported titanium catalysts studied were unusual in that immobilization of a catalyst in this case altered the catalyst's specificity relative to its homogeneous counterpart. Preliminary results from the third project demonstrate the potential of simple functionalized polymers to improve existing homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Rate increases for olefin hydrogenations using C1Rh(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 3/, HRh(CO)(Ph/sub 3/)/sub 3/, HRu(OAc)(Ph/sub 3/P), H/sub 2/Ru(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 4/, Cl/sub 2/Ru(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 3/, and Cl/sub 2/Ru(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 4/ ranged from 25 to 3000%.

  13. Polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1987-05-12

    A process is described for polymerizing at least one alpha olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization wherein the polymerization is conducted in the presence of a catalyst system which comprises: a supported catalyst prepared under anhydrous conditions by the sequential steps of: preparing a slurry of inert particulate support material; adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of a zirconium halide compound, hafnium compound or mixtures thereof; adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium halide compound; and recovering solid catalyst.

  14. Polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1986-10-21

    A process is described for polymerizing at least one alpha-olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization wherein the polymerization is conducted in the presence of a catalyst comprising: a supported catalyst prepared under anhydrous conditions by the steps of: (1) sequentially; (a) preparing a slurry of inert particulate support material; (b) adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; (c) adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of zirconium compound; and (2) thereafter; (d) adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; (e) adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium compound; (f) recovering solid catalyst; and an organoaluminum compound.

  15. Syntheses and reactions of polymer-bound molybdenum complexes and hydrogenolyses of an alkynyl cobalt carbonyl cluster. [Co/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/CCH/sub 2/CCH/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/; cyclopentadienyl-(tricarbonyl) hydridomolybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Frommer, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    Co/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/CCH/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/ reacted with hydrogen in aromatic solvents to yield 3,3-dimethylbutene, 2,2-dimethylbutane, and 4,4-dimethylpentanal. First order decomposition of starting material and a hydrogen pressure dependence for the rate of appearance of total products were indicated. The hydrogenation was inhibited in the presence of carbon monoxide (CO:H/sub 2/, 3.7:3.7 atm, 60/sup 0/C), but at 85/sup 0/ under the same CO/H/sub 2/ atmosphere, aldehyde production became the predominant reaction pathway at the expense of earlier-formed olefin. Incorporation of independently added olefins in the hydrogenation suggested the intermediacy of olefin aldehyde ad alkane production. A polystyrene-attached n/sup 5/-cyclopentadienyl(tricarbonyl)-hydridomolybdenum complex was prepared and its reactions with several THF-soluble bases were investigated. Enolates of ..beta..-dicarbonyl compounds quantitatively deprotonated this complex, giving polymer-bound salts of the corresponding anion. Little change in pKa in THF was induced by binding the molybdenum hydride to the polymer. Even though the polymer-supported partners rendered the reactions heterogeneous, the systems adhered reasonably well to conventional equilibrium behavior. A polymer-bound carboxylic acid and its conjugate base also displayed essentially conventional equilibrium dynamics.

  16. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  17. Two coordination polymers constructed from a multidentate carboxylic acid ligand with a tertiary amine serve as acid-base catalysts for the synthesis of chloropropene carbonate from CO2 under atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Li, Guanghua; Shen, Pan; Jin, Haichao; Zhang, Ning

    2014-10-01

    Two new coordination polymers, [Ni(H2O)(Hpdcd)(H2O)2]·DMF (1) and [Co(H2O)(Hpdcd)(H2O)2]·DMF (2) (H3pdcd = 1-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,5-dimethyl, 1H-pyrrole-3,4-dicarboxylic acid), which were designed based on a tertiary amine ligand, were synthesized and characterized using multiple spectroscopy techniques, including single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These two 1D linear chains possess the properties of both a Lewis acid and organic base, which was confirmed by temperature programmed desorption of ammonia and on-line mass spectrometry (NH3-TPD-MS), and selective sorption for carbon dioxide. Due to their acid-base properties, the compounds exhibited high catalytic activity, in the absence of co-catalysts, for solvent-free synthesis of chloropropene carbonate from CO2 and epichlorohydrin under atmospheric CO2 pressure. The yields of chloropropene carbonate were 88% and 87% for 1 and 2, respectively, under the optimized conditions. PMID:25113602

  18. Electronic structures of Pt-Co and Pt-Ru alloys for CO-tolerant anode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells studied by EC-XPS.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Mitsuru; Mitsui, Satoshi; Hirose, Yoshikazu; Kawashima, Katsura; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2006-11-23

    CO tolerance at pure Pt, Pt-Co, and Pt-Ru alloys was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an electrochemical cell (EC-XPS) in order to discover a hint for designing higher performance anode catalysts. After the electrochemical stabilization and/or CO adsorption, these electrodes were immediately transferred to the XPS chamber without exposure to air to avoid contamination of the surfaces. It was revealed that alloying with Co or Ru modified the electronic structures of Pt atoms, resulting in a positive core level (CL) shift of Pt 4f(7/2) which could weaken the Pt-CO interaction. For the Pt-Co alloy electrode, the Pt 4f(7/2) CL shift remained after the electrochemical stabilization despite Co dissolution and formation of a Pt skin layer. Changes in surface core level shifts (DeltaSCLSs) induced by CO adsorption were evaluated and related to the CO adsorption energy. The values of DeltaSCLS at these alloys were smaller than that of pure Pt, indicating that Ru and Co are effective elements to weaken the bond strength of Pt-CO. PMID:17107203

  19. Immobilized catalysts for iridium-catalyzed allylic amination: rate enhancement by immobilization.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Chandi C; Helmchen, Günter

    2015-05-01

    The first immobilized catalyst for Ir-catalyzed asymmetric allylic aminations is described. The catalyst is a cationic (π-allyl)Ir complex bound by cation exchange to an anionic silica gel support. Preparation of the catalyst is facile, and the supported catalyst displayed considerably enhanced activity compared with the parent homogeneous catalyst. Up to 43 consecutive amination runs were possible in recycling experiments. PMID:25787122

  20. A Mechanochemically Triggered "Click" Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Michael, Philipp; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-16

    "Click" chemistry represents one of the most powerful approaches for linking molecules in chemistry and materials science. Triggering this reaction by mechanical force would enable site- and stress-specific "click" reactions--a hitherto unreported observation. We introduce the design and realization of a homogeneous Cu catalyst able to activate through mechanical force when attached to suitable polymer chains, acting as a lever to transmit the force to the central catalytic system. Activation of the subsequent copper-catalyzed "click" reaction (CuAAC) is achieved either by ultrasonication or mechanical pressing of a polymeric material, using a fluorogenic dye to detect the activation of the catalyst. Based on an N-heterocyclic copper(I) carbene with attached polymeric chains of different flexibility, the force is transmitted to the central catalyst, thereby activating a CuAAC in solution and in the solid state. PMID:26420664

  1. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Even, Jr., William R.

    2000-01-01

    A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

  2. The organotin coordination polymer [(n-Bu3Sn)4Fe(CN)6H2O] as effective catalyst towards the oxidative degradation of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etaiw, S. E. H.; Saleh, Dalia I.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the supramolecular coordination polymer SCP 1; [(n-Bu3Sn)4Fe(CN)6H2O] consists of octahedral [Fe(CN)6]4- building blocks which are connected by the TBPY-5 configured n-Bu3Sn(CN..)2 fragments creating 3D-network structure. Fenton and photo-Fenton oxidative discoloration of Methylene Blue (MB) has been investigated by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with the SCP 1. The reaction exhibited pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to each of MB and H2O2. The irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of MB mineralization, Kobs = 0.76 h-1. Mineralization of MB was investigated by FT-IR spectra. Disodium salt of terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technology was carried out to identify the reactive oxygen species. The different parameters that affect MB degradation rate were evaluated. Moreover, the efficiency of recycled the SCP 1 and the mechanism of degradation of MB dye were investigated.

  3. Catalyst layer-free carbon-coated steel-An easy route to bipolar plates of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells: Characterization on structure and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chih-Yeh; Chen, Shi-Kun; Chin, Tsung-Shune; Ko, Tse-Hao; Lin, Shiuan-Wen; Chang, Wei-Min; Hsiao, Shih-Nan

    Stainless steel coated with carbon by CVD process has been evaluated as a low-cost and small-volume substitute for graphite bipolar plate in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Carbon film was grown at 690-930 °C under gas-mixture of C 2H 2-H 2. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize surface morphology and crystal structure of resultant carbon films, which were found to depend much on reaction temperature. Interfacial contact resistance (ICR), hydrophobicity and chemical stability of obtained specimens were measured to compare with commercial highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). All carbon films investigated in this study show improved ICR and hydrophobicity of SUS304 substrate to the level of HOPG. Amorphous carbon layer with continuous film structure prepared at 810 °C shows the best protection of SUS304 substrate against the attack of H (aq) + (anodic side) and the best resistance of the coated carbon from gasification (cathodic side) in the simulated PEMFC environment.

  4. Neutral bimetallic transition metal phenoxyiminato catalysts and related polymerization methods

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Rodriguez, Brandon A.; Delferro, Massimiliano

    2012-08-07

    A catalyst composition comprising a neutral bimetallic diphenoxydiiminate complex of group 10 metals or Ni, Pd or Pt is disclosed. The compositions can be used for the preparation of homo- and co-polymers of olefinic monomer compounds.

  5. Iron complex-catalyzed ammonia-borane dehydrogenation. A potential route toward B-N-containing polymer motifs using earth-abundant metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Baker, R Tom; Gordon, John C; Hamilton, Charles W; Henson, Neil J; Lin, Po-Heng; Maguire, Steven; Murugesu, Muralee; Scott, Brian L; Smythe, Nathan C

    2012-03-28

    Ammonia-borane (NH(3)BH(3), AB) has garnered interest as a hydrogen storage material due to its high weight percent hydrogen content and ease of H(2) release relative to metal hydrides. As a consequence of dehydrogenation, B-N-containing oligomeric/polymeric materials are formed. The ability to control this process and dictate the identity of the generated polymer opens up the possibility of the targeted synthesis of new materials. While precious metals have been used in this regard, the ability to construct such materials using earth-abundant metals such as Fe presents a more economical approach. Four Fe complexes containing amido and phosphine supporting ligands were synthesized, and their reactivity with AB was examined. Three-coordinate Fe(PCy(3))[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (1) and four-coordinate Fe(DEPE)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (2) yield a mixture of (NH(2)BH(2))(n) and (NHBH)(n) products with up to 1.7 equiv of H(2) released per AB but cannot be recycled (DEPE = 1,2-bis(diethylphosphino)ethane). In contrast, Fe supported by a bidentate P-N ligand (4) can be used in a second cycle to afford a similar product mixture. Intriguingly, the symmetric analogue of 4 (Fe(N-N)(P-P), 3), only generates (NH(2)BH(2))(n) and does so in minutes at room temperature. This marked difference in reactivity may be the result of the chemistry of Fe(II) vs Fe(0). PMID:22428955

  6. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  7. Platinum nanoparticles on carbon-nanotube support prepared by room-temperature reduction with H2 in ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent as catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuying; Dou, Zhengjie; Fang, Yanxiong; Li, Muwu; Wu, Xin; Zeng, Jianhuang; Hou, Zhaohui; Liao, Shijun

    2016-02-01

    Polyol approach is commonly used in synthesizing Pt nanoparticles in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. However, the application of this process consumes a great deal of time and energy, as the reduction of precursors requires elevated temperatures and several hours. Moreover, the ethylene glycol and its oxidizing products bound to Pt are difficult to remove. In this work, we utilize the advantages of ethylene glycol and prepare Pt nanoparticles through a room-temperature hydrogen gas reduction in an ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent, which is followed by subsequent harvesting by carbon nanotubes as electrocatalysts. This method is simple, facile, and time-efficient, as the entire room-temperature reduction process is completed in a few minutes. As the solvent changes from water to an ethylene glycol/water mix, the size of Pt nanoparticles varies from 10 to 3 nm and their shape transitions from polyhedral to spherical. Pt nanoparticles prepared in a 1:1 volume ratio mixture of ethylene glycol/water are uniformly dispersed with an average size of ∼3 nm. The optimized carbon nanotube-supported Pt electrocatalyst exhibits excellent methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction activities. This work demonstrates the potential use of mixed solvents as an approach in materials synthesis.

  8. Photochemical preparation of olefin addition catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Harry B. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Gupta, Amitava (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Novel polymer supported catalysts are prepared by photo-irradiation of low valent transition metal compounds such as Co.sub.2 (CO).sub.8, Rh.sub.4 (CO).sub.12 or Ru.sub.3 (CO).sub.12 in the presence of solid polymers containing amine ligands such as polyvinyl pyridine. Hydroformylation of olefins to aldehydes at ambient conditions has been demonstrated.

  9. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  10. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  11. Green polymer chemistry: enzyme catalysis for polymer functionalization.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sanghamitra; Puskas, Judit E

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme catalyzed reactions are green alternative approaches to functionalize polymers compared to conventional methods. This technique is especially advantageous due to the high selectivity, high efficiency, milder reaction conditions, and recyclability of enzymes. Selected reactions can be conducted under solventless conditions without the application of metal catalysts. Hence this process is becoming more recognized in the arena of biomedical applications, as the toxicity created by solvents and metal catalyst residues can be completely avoided. In this review we will discuss fundamental aspects of chemical reactions biocatalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B, and their application to create new functionalized polymers, including the regio- and chemoselectivity of the reactions. PMID:26007188

  12. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  13. Hydrocracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hilfman, L.; O'Hara, M.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a process for the conversion of heavy hydrocarbon oil boiling above about 650/sup 0/F into lower boiling hydrocarbons, which comprises hydrocracking the heavy oil in admixture with hydrogen and in contact with a catalyst with comprising a ra re earth exchange metal component and a platinum group metal component supported on a mixture of ziegler alumina and a zeolite.

  14. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  15. Polymers for metal extractions in carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Tumas, William; Powell, Kimberly R.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Romack, Timothy J.; McClain, James B.; Birnbaum, Eva R.

    2001-01-01

    A composition useful for the extraction of metals and metalloids comprises (a) carbon dioxide fluid (preferably liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide); and (b) a polymer in the carbon dioxide, the polymer having bound thereto a ligand that binds the metal or metalloid; with the ligand bound to the polymer at a plurality of locations along the chain length thereof (i.e., a plurality of ligands are bound at a plurality of locations along the chain length of the polymer). The polymer is preferably a copolymer, and the polymer is preferably a fluoropolymer such as a fluoroacrylate polymer. The extraction method comprises the steps of contacting a first composition containing a metal or metalloid to be extracted with a second composition, the second composition being as described above; and then extracting the metal or metalloid from the first composition into the second composition.

  16. Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

  17. Application of a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Wisner, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for applying a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate for the creation of a robust, high temperature catalyst system for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in propulsion systems. The method begins by forming a prepared substrate material consisting of a metallic inner substrate and a bound layer of a noble metal intermediate. Alternatively, a bound ceramic coating, or frit, may be introduced between the metallic inner substrate and noble metal intermediate when the metallic substrate is oxidation resistant. A high-activity catalyst slurry is applied to the surface of the prepared substrate and dried to remove the organic solvent. The catalyst layer is then heat treated to bind the catalyst layer to the surface. The bound catalyst layer is then activated using an activation treatment and calcinations to form the high-activity catalyst system.

  18. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity. PMID:26755755

  19. The Development and Study of Surface Bound Ruthenium Organometallic Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Geoffrey Reuben

    The focus of this project has been on the use of mono-diimine ruthenium organometallic complexes, of the general structure [H(Ru)(CO)(L)2(L') 2][PF6] (L=PPh3, DPPENE and L'=Bpy, DcBpy, MBpyC, Phen, AminoPhen) bound to surfaces as luminescent probes. Both biological and inorganic/organic hybrid surfaces have been studied. The complexes were characterized both bound and unbound using standard analytical techniques such as NMR, IR and X-ray crystallography, as well as through several photophysical methods as well. Initially the study focused on how the photophyscial properties of the complexes were affected by incorporation into biological membranes. It was found that by conjugating the probes to a more rigid cholesterol moiety that luminescence was conserved, compared to conjugation with a far more flexible lipid moiety, where luminescence was either lost or reduced. Both the cholesterol and lipid conjugates were able to insert into a lipid membrane, and in the more rigid environment some of the lipid conjugates regained some of their luminescence, but often blue shifted and reduced, depending on the conjugation site. Silica Polyamine Composites (SPCs) were a hybrid material developed in the Rosenberg Lab as useful metal separation materials, that could be easily modified, and had several benefits over current commercially available polymers, or inorganic materials. These SPCs also provided an opportunity for the development of a heterogeneous platform for luminescent complexes as either catalysts or sensors. Upon binding of the luminescent Ru complexes to the surface no loss, or major change in luminescence was seen, however, when bound to the rigid surface a significant increase in excited state lifetime was measured. It is likely that through binding and interacting with the surface that the complexes lost non-radiative decay pathways, resulting in the increase in lifetime, however, these interactions do not seem to affect the energy level of the MLCT band in a

  20. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  1. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  2. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  3. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  4. An Overview of Recent Development in Composite Catalysts from Porous Materials for Various Reactions and Processes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zaiku; Liu, Zhicheng; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Qihua; Xu, Longya; Ding, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet the practical catalytic performance requirements in the chemical industry of high activity, high selectivity and good stability. In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on development of composite catalysts, mainly focusing on the composite catalysts obtained from porous materials such as zeolites, mesoporous materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT), etc. Six types of porous composite catalysts are discussed, including amorphous oxide modified zeolite composite catalysts, zeolite composites prepared by co-crystallization or overgrowth, hierarchical porous catalysts, host-guest porous composites, inorganic and organic mesoporous composite catalysts, and polymer/CNT composite catalysts. PMID:20559508

  5. [Catalyst research]. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ian P Rothwell; David R McMillin

    2005-03-14

    Research results are the areas of catalyst precursor synthesis, catalyst fluxionality, catalyst stability, polymerization of {alpha}-olefins as well as the chemistry of Group IV and Group V metal centers with aryloxide and arylsulfide ligands.

  6. Metal phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Metal 4, 4', 4", 4"'=tetracarboxylic phthalocyanines (MPTC) are prepared by reaction of trimellitic anhydride, a salt or hydroxide of the desired metal (or the metal in powdered form), urea and a catalyst. A purer form of MPTC is prepared than heretofore. These tetracarboxylic acids are then polymerized by heat to sheet polymers which have superior heat and oxidation resistance. The metal is preferably a divalent metal having an atomic radius close to 1.35A.

  7. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Pd-poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 nanocomposite as a polymer-inorganic hybrid catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbasi, Roozbeh Javad; Mosaddegh, Neda

    2011-11-15

    Composite poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 (PVP/KIT-5) was prepared by in situ polymerization method and used as a support for palladium nanoparticles obtained through the reduction of Pd(OAc){sub 2} by hydrazine hydrate. The physical and chemical properties of the catalyst were investigated by XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis, TG, BET, SEM, and TEM techniques. The catalytic performance of this novel heterogeneous catalyst was determined for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction between aryl halides and phenylboronic acid in the presence of water at room temperature. The stability of the nanocomposite catalyst was excellent and could be reused 8 times without much loss of activity in the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. - Graphical Abstract: Pd-poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 was prepared as an organic-inorganic hybrid catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction. The stability of the catalyst was excellent and could be reused 8 times in the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction. Highlights: > Pd-poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 was prepared as a novel nanocomposite. > Nanocomposite was prepared based on a cage-type mesoporous system. > Catalyst showed excellent activity for Suzuki-Miyaura reaction in water. > Stability of the catalyst was excellent and could be reused 8 times.

  9. Asymptotic entropy bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    We show that known entropy bounds constrain the information carried off by radiation to null infinity. We consider distant, planar null hypersurfaces in asymptotically flat spacetime. Their focusing and area loss can be computed perturbatively on a Minkowski background, yielding entropy bounds in terms of the energy flux of the outgoing radiation. In the asymptotic limit, we obtain boundary versions of the quantum null energy condition, of the generalized Second Law, and of the quantum Bousso bound.

  10. Combinatorial synthesis and screening of fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Shrisudersan

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are compact power sources that can operate with high efficiencies and low emission of environmentally harmful gases. One of the major barriers impeding the development of PEMFCs as a competitive energy source is the inability of existing anode catalysts to oxidize fuels other than hydrogen at sufficient levels due to catalyst deactivation by carbon monoxide (CO) and other partial oxidation products. The focus of this research is the development and application of combinatorial strategies to construct and interrogate electrooxidation (anode) catalysts pertaining to PEMFCs to discover catalysts with enhanced performance in catalyst deactivating environments. A novel method (known as the "gel-transfer" method) for synthesizing catalyst composition gradient libraries for combinatorial catalyst discovery was developed. This method involved transferring a spatial concentration gradient of precursor metal salts created within a polymer gel on to a solid conducting substrate by electrochemical reduction. Chemically sensitive surface-imaging techniques, namely, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and optical screening with a pH-dependent fluorescence probe were used to characterize the combinatorial catalyst samples. The utility of SECM as a screening tool to measure the activity of multicomponent catalyst libraries towards fuel cell electrooxidation reactions was established with simple catalyst libraries including a platinum coverage gradient and platinum-ruthenium and platinum-ruthenium-molybdenum arrays. A platinum-ruthenium surface composition gradient was constructed through the gel-transfer method and its reactivity towards hydrogen oxidation in the presence of a catalyst poison (CO) was mapped using the SECM. Ruthenium composition between 20 and 30% exhibited superior performance than the rest of the binary. The gel-transfer method was extended to construct a ternary platinum-ruthenium-rhodium catalyst library

  11. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  12. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer. PMID:27442285

  13. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  14. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2000-01-01

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  15. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  16. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. 1 fig.

  17. Immobilisation of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts. Factors influencing activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Severn, John R; Chadwick, John C

    2013-07-01

    The activity and stability of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts, when immobilised on a support, are dependent on both chemical and physical effects. Chemical factors affecting catalyst activity include the ease of formation of the active species, which is strongly dependent on the transition metal. Catalyst productivity is dependent on the balance between activity and stability. Immobilisation can lead to a lower proportion of active species and therefore lower initial polymerisation activity, but nevertheless give higher polymer yields in cases where increased catalyst stability is obtained. Important physical factors are support porosity and the ability of a support to undergo progressive fragmentation during polymerisation, facilitating monomer diffusion through the growing catalyst/polymer particle. This article illustrates the importance of these factors in olefin polymerisation with both early- and late-transition metal catalysts, with particular reference to the use of silica and magnesium chloride supports as well as to effects of immobilisation on polymer structure and properties. PMID:23467461

  18. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  19. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  20. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  1. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  2. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  3. A clamp-like biohybrid catalyst for DNA oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongen, Stijn F. M.; Clerx, Joost; Nørgaard, Kasper; Bloemberg, Tom G.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Trakselis, Michael A.; Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.

    2013-11-01

    In processive catalysis, a catalyst binds to a substrate and remains bound as it performs several consecutive reactions, as exemplified by DNA polymerases. Processivity is essential in nature and is often mediated by a clamp-like structure that physically tethers the catalyst to its (polymeric) template. In the case of the bacteriophage T4 replisome, a dedicated clamp protein acts as a processivity mediator by encircling DNA and subsequently recruiting its polymerase. Here we use this DNA-binding protein to construct a biohybrid catalyst. Conjugation of the clamp protein to a chemical catalyst with sequence-specific oxidation behaviour formed a catalytic clamp that can be loaded onto a DNA plasmid. The catalytic activity of the biohybrid catalyst was visualized using a procedure based on an atomic force microscopy method that detects and spatially locates oxidized sites in DNA. Varying the experimental conditions enabled switching between processive and distributive catalysis and influencing the sliding direction of this rotaxane-like catalyst.

  4. Long-Life Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STC Catalysts, Inc. (SCi) manufactures a noble metal reducible oxide catalyst consisting primarily of platinum and tin dioxide deposited on a ceramic substrate. It is an ambient temperature oxidation catalyst that was developed primarily for Carbon Dioxide Lasers.The catalyst was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder Program (LAWS) which was intended to measure wind velocity on a global basis. There are a number of NASA owned patents covering various aspects of the catalyst.

  5. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  6. The S-layer proteins of two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains are bound via their N-terminal region to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Egelseer, E M; Leitner, K; Jarosch, M; Hotzy, C; Zayni, S; Sleytr, U B; Sára, M

    1998-03-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1gamma chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  7. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Kathrein, Hendrik

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  8. Irreversibility and Polymer Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Ben; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2003-02-01

    Physisorption or chemisorption from dilute polymer solutions often entails irreversible polymer-surface bonding. We present a theory of the resultant nonequilibrium layers. While the density profile and loop distribution are the same as for equilibrium layers, the final layer comprises a tightly bound inner part plus an outer part whose chains make only fN surface contacts where N is chain length. The contact fractions f follow a broad distribution, P(f)˜f-4/5, in rather close agreement with strong physisorption experiments [

    H. M. Schneider et al., LangmuirLANGD50743-7463 12, 994 (1996)
    ].

  9. Nanoscale Catalysts for NMR Signal Enhancement by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fan; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Two types of nanoscale catalysts were created to explore NMR signal enhancement via reversible exchange (SABRE) at the interface between heterogeneous and homogeneous conditions. Nanoparticle and polymer comb variants were synthesized by covalently tethering Ir-based organometallic catalysts to support materials comprised of TiO2/PMAA (poly methacrylic acid) and PVP (polyvinyl pyridine), respectively, and characterized by AAS, NMR, and DLS. Following parahydrogen (pH2) gas delivery to mixtures containing one type of “nano-SABRE” catalyst particles, a target substrate, and ethanol, up to ~(−)40-fold and ~(−)7-fold 1H NMR signal enhancements were observed for pyridine substrates using the nanoparticle and polymer comb catalysts, respectively, following transfer to high field (9.4 T). These enhancements appear to result from intact particles and not from any catalyst molecules leaching from their supports; unlike the case with homogeneous SABRE catalysts, high-field (in situ) SABRE effects were generally not observed with the nanoscale catalysts. The potential for separation and reuse of such catalyst particles is also demonstrated. Taken together, these results support the potential utility of rational design at molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic/engineering levels for improving SABRE and HET-SABRE (heterogeneous-SABRE) for applications varying from fundamental studies of catalysis to biomedical imaging. PMID:26185545

  10. ''KN'' series cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klapstov, V.F.; Khlebrikova, M.A.; Maslova, A.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    The basic directions in improving high-activity zeolitic cracking catalysts at the present stage are improvements in the resistance to attrition and increases in the bulk density of the catalysts, along with a changeover to relatively waste-free catalyst manufacturing technology. Catalysts of the ''KN'' series have been synthesized recently with improved quality characteristics. Low-waste technology is used in manufacturing them. Data are presented which show that the KN catalysts are better than the other Soviet catalysts. The starting materials and reagents in preparing the KN catalysts are technical alumina, rare-earth element nitrates, a natural component (such as clay conforming to specification TU-21-25-146-75), sodium hydroxide, and granulated sodium silicate. The preparation of the KN catalysts is described and no silica gel is used in manufacturing the KN series catalyst, in contrast to the RSG-6Ts catalyst. The use of KN series catalysts in place of KMTsR in catalytic cracking units will result in an increase in the naphtha yield by at least 20% by weight, as well as a reduction of the catalyst consumption by a factor of 2-3. A changeover to the commerical production of this catalyst will make it possible to reduce saline waste by a factor of 8-10 and reduce the catalyst cost by a factor of 1.5-2.

  11. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2004-02-17

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.W) in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  12. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.w)in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  13. The Improvement of Dry Strength by Synthetic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Stan

    In the 1950s a new family of papermaking additives was developed - polyacrylamides [1]. Polyacrylamides are made by polymerising acrylamide solution using free-radical catalysts, to form a linear, non-ionic polymer [2].

  14. Reactions of strained hydrocarbons with alkene and alkyne metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Matthew; Buccella, Daniela; Siegrist, Theo; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin

    2008-10-29

    Here we describe the metathesis reactions of a strained eight-membered ring that contains both alkene and alkyne functionality. We find that the alkyne metathesis catalyst produces polymer through a ring-opening alkyne metathesis reaction that is driven by the strain release from the monomer. The strained monomer provides unusual reactivity with ruthenium-based alkene metathesis catalysts. We isolate a discrete trimeric species a Dewar benzene derivative that is locked in this form through an unsaturated cyclophane strap. PMID:18826219

  15. Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2008-11-15

    While over the last century or more considerable effort has been put into the problem of finding approximate solutions for wave equations in general, and quantum mechanical problems in particular, it appears that as yet relatively little work seems to have been put into the complementary problem of establishing rigourous bounds on the exact solutions. We have in mind either bounds on parametric amplification and the related quantum phenomenon of particle production (as encoded in the Bogoliubov coefficients), or bounds on transmission and reflection coefficients. Modifying and streamlining an approach developed by one of the present authors [M. Visser, Phys. Rev. A 59 (1999) 427-438, (arXiv:quant-ph/9901030)], we investigate this question by developing a formal but exact solution for the appropriate second-order linear ODE in terms of a time-ordered exponential of 2x2 matrices, then relating the Bogoliubov coefficients to certain invariants of this matrix. By bounding the matrix in an appropriate manner, we can thereby bound the Bogoliubov coefficients.

  16. Microgravity Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A one-day, interactive workshop considering the effects of gravity on polymer materials science was held in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 9, 1985. Selected programmatic and technical issues were reviewed to introduce the field to workshop participants. Parallel discussions were conducted in three disciplinary working groups: polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer engineering. This proceedings presents summaries of the workshop discussions and conclusions.

  17. The use of azide-alkyne click chemistry in recent syntheses and applications of polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Cao, Xiaosong; Gao, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of efficient organic click coupling reactions has significantly facilitated the construction of synthetic polymers with sophisticated branched nanostructures. This Feature Article summarizes the recent progress in the application of efficient copper-catalyzed and copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and CuFAAC) reactions in the syntheses of dendrimers, hyperbranched polymers, star polymers, graft polymers, molecular brushes, and cyclic graft polymers. Literature reports on the interesting properties and functions of these polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers are also discussed to illustrate their potential applications as self-healing polymers, adhesives, polymer catalysts, opto-electronic polymer materials and polymer carriers for drug and imaging molecules.

  18. Scoping economics for the commercial manufacture of metallocene catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmeier, N.F.

    1994-05-26

    This study assumes that commercial-scale production of propylene-based isotactic polymers with metallocene catalyst systems will become a reality. The challenge that must be overcome for commercial success with these propylene polymers is to discover a metallocene system recipe that will give sufficient catalyst activity along with the requisite stereo-selectivity at reasonable cost. Anticipating such a discovery, it is assumed here that the economics are well-represented by a catalyst system that consists in part of a silylene-bridged cyclopentadienyl zirconocene made in a batchwise process having an annual capacity of 15,000 pounds. Activation will be achieved with a cocatalyst such as methylaluminoxane (MAO), coated in conjunction with the catalyst on a support such as silica. The MAO at an estimated $100/lb contributes $1800/lb cost to the finished catalyst with an assumed recipe of 18:1 mass ratio of MAO to zirconocene. Based on a 20% return on investment, the selling price for the supported zirconocene system is estimated to be $2915/lb. The required capital investment to make 735,000 lb/yr of the total supported system is 9 million dollars. These estimates have {plus_minus}50% range of uncertainty. Payback period for this plant in a sold-out condition is three years. The catalyst system cost in ethylene-propylene copolymer is 3.9 cents per pound with a productivity of 75,000 lb polymer/lb of zirconocene. An Appendix includes some economic details.

  19. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-02-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on the development of novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed liquefaction. The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular that can be used in low precursors concentrations (< 1 %) but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. The major technical approaches are, first, to prepare the desired heteronuclear organometallic molecules as catalyst precursors that contain covalently bound, two different metal atoms and sulfur in a single molecule. Such precursors will generate finely dispersed bimetallic catalysts such as Fe-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Mo binary sulfides upon thermal decomposition. The second major technical approach is to perform the liquefaction of coals unpregnated with the organometallic precursors under temperature-programmed conditions, where the programmed heat-up serves as a step for both catalyst activation and coal pretreatment or preconversion. Two to three different complexes for each of the Fe-Mo, Co-Mo, and Ni-Mo combinations will be prepared. Initial catalyst screening tests will be conducted using a subbituminous coal and a bituminous coal. Effects of coal rank and solvents will be examined with the selected bimetallic catalysts which showed much higher activity than the dispersed catalysts from conventional precursors.

  20. Lewis Base Catalysts 6: Carbene Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of N-heterocyclic carbenes as catalysts for organic transformations has received increased attention in the past 10 years. A discussion of catalyst development and nucleophilic characteristics precedes a description of recent advancements and new reactions using N-heterocyclic carbenes in catalysis. PMID:21494949

  1. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  2. Catalysts for CO2/epoxide ring-opening copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Trott, G; Saini, P K; Williams, C K

    2016-02-28

    This article summarizes and reviews recent progress in the development of catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides. The copolymerization is an interesting method to add value to carbon dioxide, including from waste sources, and to reduce pollution associated with commodity polymer manufacture. The selection of the catalyst is of critical importance to control the composition, properties and applications of the resultant polymers. This review highlights and exemplifies some key recent findings and hypotheses, in particular using examples drawn from our own research. PMID:26755758

  3. Catalysts for CO2/epoxide ring-opening copolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Trott, G.; Saini, P. K.; Williams, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes and reviews recent progress in the development of catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides. The copolymerization is an interesting method to add value to carbon dioxide, including from waste sources, and to reduce pollution associated with commodity polymer manufacture. The selection of the catalyst is of critical importance to control the composition, properties and applications of the resultant polymers. This review highlights and exemplifies some key recent findings and hypotheses, in particular using examples drawn from our own research. PMID:26755758

  4. Preparation of arrays of long carbon nanotubes using catalyst structure

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Arendt, Paul; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xiefie

    2016-03-22

    A structure for preparing an substantially aligned array of carbon nanotubes include a substrate having a first side and a second side, a buffer layer on the first side of the substrate, a catalyst on the buffer layer, and a plurality of channels through the structure for allowing a gaseous carbon source to enter the substrate at the second side and flow through the structure to the catalyst. After preparing the array, a fiber of carbon nanotubes may be spun from the array. Prior to spinning, the array can be immersed in a polymer solution. After spinning, the polymer can be cured.

  5. Nano-catalysts: Key to the Greener Pathways Leading to Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthetic processes using alternative energy input in combination with nano-catalysts shorten the reaction time that eliminate or minimize side product formation. This concept is already finding acceptance in the syntheses of pharmaceuticals, fine chemicals, and polymers and may ...

  6. Structural and Electronic Transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C Cathode Catalysts in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells during Potential-step Operating Processes Characterized by In-situ Time-resolved XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Takao, Shinobu; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Uruga, Tomoya; Gayen, Sirshendu; Velaga, Srihari; Saniyal, Milan K.; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic structural and electronic transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C, Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) during the potential-step operating processes between 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE (potential vs RHE) were characterized by in-situ (operando) time-resolved Pt LIII-edge quick-XAFS at 100 ms time-resolution. Potential-dependent surface structures and oxidation states of Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticles on carbon at 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE were also analyzed by in-situ Pt LIII-edge and Pd K-edge quick-XAFS. The Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticle surfaces were restructured and disordered at 1.4 VRHE, which were induced by strong Pt-O bonds as well as alloying effects. The rate constants for the changes of Pt valence, CN(Pt-Pt), CN(Pt-Pd) and CN(Pt-O) (CN: coordination number) in the potential-step operating processes were also determined and discussed in relation to the origin of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of the Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts.

  7. Platinum nanophase electro catalysts and composite electrodes for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, L. F.; Godongwana, Z. G.; Iwuoha, E. I.

    Nanophase Pt electro catalysts were prepared by impregnating a Pt salt containing solution upon a high surface area hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) matrix, which was then carbonized to varying degree by chemical vapour deposition of liquid petroleum gas (LPG). Thereafter the HMS Si matrix could be removed by chemical etching with NaOH to immediately form a Pt containing carbon analogue or ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) with a porous structure similar to the parent HMS. Nanoparticles of Pt electro catalysts were thus successfully stabilized without agglomeration on both HMS and upon the porous HMS carbon analogue or OMC, which was graphitic in nature. The catalysts were electro active for the hydrogen evolution reaction and their activity compared favourable with an industry standard. Such nanophase Pt electro catalysts could be incorporated successfully in a composite electrode by sequential deposition, upon a suitable substrate and the catalysts in electrodes so formed proved to be stable and active under high-applied potential in high electrolyte environment for hydrogen production by electrolysis of water. This route to preparing a nanophase Pt OMC catalyst may be applicable to prepare active electro catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells and solid polymer electrolyte electrolyzers.

  8. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E.; Eastwood, Eric A.

    2012-06-05

    Polymers comprising residues of borane and/or carborane cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Methods of making and applications for using such polymers are also disclosed.

  9. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  10. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  11. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Renee M; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K; Grubbs, Robert H

    2011-12-26

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  12. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  13. Ethynyl terminated ester oligomers and polymers therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); hesives and composite matrices. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A new class of ethynyl-terminated oligomers and the process for preparing same are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, with or without a catalyst, the ethynyl groups react to provide crosslinking and chain extension to increase the polymer use temperature and improve the polymer solvent resistance. These improved polyesters are potentially useful in packaging, magnetic tapes, capacitors, industrial belting, protective coatings, structural adhesives and composite matrices.

  14. Optimal size for emergence of self-replicating polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoshiya J.; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    A biological system consists of a variety of polymers that are synthesized from monomers by catalysis, which exists only for some long polymers. It is important to elucidate the emergence and sustenance of such autocatalytic polymerization. We analyze here the stochastic polymerization reaction dynamics to investigate the transition time from a state with almost no catalysts to a state with sufficient catalysts. We found an optimal volume that minimizes this transition time, which agrees with the inverse of the catalyst concentration at the unstable fixed point that separates the two states, as is theoretically explained. Relevance to the origin of life is also discussed.

  15. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  16. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  17. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  18. A New Approach to Prepare Vegetable Oil-Based Polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymers from vegetable oils, such as soybean oil, were prepared by cationic polymerization in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) medium. Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3.OEt2) was selected as catalyst. The resulting polymers have molecular weight ranging from 21,842 to 118,300 g/mol. Nu...

  19. Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Ounaies, Z.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to detail the current theoretical understanding of the origin of piezoelectric and ferroelectric phenomena in polymers; to present the state-of-the-art in piezoelectric polymers and emerging material systems that exhibit promising properties; and to discuss key characterization methods, fundamental modeling approaches, and applications of piezoelectric polymers. Piezoelectric polymers have been known to exist for more than forty years, but in recent years they have gained notoriety as a valuable class of smart materials.

  20. Gas-phase reactivity of novel Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alameddin, N.G.; Eyler, J.R.; Richardson, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The discovery of soluble group 4 metallocene-based catalysts for the Ziegler-Natta polymerization of olefins has generated considerable interest in the field. In particular, the versatility of the Cp (cyclopentadienyl) ligand has made practical the development of a host of novel catalysts which can produce extremely regiospecific and stereospecific polymers. With further improvements in activity and stability, these catalysts are expected to make a major impact on the polymerization industry. Presently, catalyst design is driven by using the steric and electronic properties of the ligands to guide the monomer addition. However, since these ligands have considerable steric bulk, the choice of solvent will significantly affect their catalytic properties. Therefore, an understanding of the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts independent of a solvent is one of the first steps to building a better catalyst. The work in progress is a study of the reactivity of zircononene-based catalysts in the gas phase. The authors are in the process of studying the rates of reaction of a series of these compounds with H{sub 2} as well as with a number of olefins. In the gas phase, the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts is revealed and their chemistry can be studied in detail.

  1. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  2. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  3. Reversible Thermal-Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-03-01

    Silica nanoparticles adsorbed with a high glass-transition temperature polymer, PMMA (Tg: 130 °C) are shown to uniformly disperse in a low-Tg polymer matrix, PEO (Tg: -60 °C). These nanocomposites exhibit an unusual reversible liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. Mechanical adaptivity of PEO nanocomposites to temperatures underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on particles, and more importantly their impact on mechanical behavior, which sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. Moreover, the growth rate of elastic moduli at temperatures above Tg of PMMA presents an Arrhenius-type relaxation with activation energy well-matching with the α- β merging region of PMMA. These results suggest that the mobility of the surface-bound polymer is essential for reinforcement contrary to commonly accepted glassy-layer hypothesis.

  4. Catalyst enhances Claus operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, T.; Voizin, R.

    1982-11-01

    An improved Claus catalyst offers superior activity that emphasizes hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/ in the first converter. The catalyst is insensitive to oxygen action at concentrations generally found in Claus gas feeds. It also has an excellent resistance to hydrothermal shocks that may occur during shutdown of the sulfur line. Collectively, these properties make this catalyst the most active formula now available for optimum Claus yields and COS/CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis conversion.

  5. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  6. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Sol W.

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  7. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  8. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    DOEpatents

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  9. Bound charges and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczyński, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Bound charges and currents are among the conceptually challenging topics in advanced courses on electricity and magnetism. It may be tempting for students to believe that they are merely computational tools for calculating electric and magnetic fields in matter, particularly because they are usually introduced through abstract manipulation of integral identities, with the physical interpretation provided a posteriori. Yet these charges and currents are no less real than free charges and currents and can be measured experimentally. A simpler and more direct approach to introducing this topic, suggested by the ideas in the classic book by Purcell and emphasizing the physical origin of these phenomena, is proposed.

  10. Thiazolothiazole-linked porous organic polymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Jin, Tian; Wang, Jitong; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mei, Wenwen; Xiong, Yan; Hu, Jun; Feng, Xinliang; Liu, Honglai; et al

    2014-10-07

    In this study, thiazolothiazole-linked porous organic polymers have been synthesized from a facile catalyst-free condensation reaction between aldehydes and dithiooxamide under solvothermal conditions. The resultant porous frameworks exhibit a highly selective uptake of CO2 over N2 under ambient conditions.