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Sample records for polymer reinforced crc

  1. Process for preparing polymer reinforced silica aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Capadona, Lynn A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Process for preparing polymer-reinforced silica aerogels which comprises a one-pot reaction of at least one alkoxy silane in the presence of effective amounts of a polymer precursor to obtain a silica reaction product, the reaction product is gelled and subsequently subjected to conditions that promotes polymerization of the precursor and then supercritically dried to obtain the polymer-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels.

  2. Slender reinforced concrete columns strengthened with fibre reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdošová, K.; Bilčík, J.

    2011-06-01

    The requirement for a long life with relatively low maintenance costs relates to the use of building structures. Even though the structure is correctly designed, constructed and maintained, the need for extensions of its lifetime can appear. The preservation of the original structure with a higher level of resistance or reliability is enabled by strengthening. Conventional materials are replaced by progressive composites - mainly carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP). They are used for strengthening reinforced concrete columns in two ways: added reinforcement in the form of CFRP strips in grooves or CFRP sheet confinement and eventually their combination. This paper presents the effect of the mentioned strengthening methods on slender reinforced concrete columns.

  3. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers. PMID:25647481

  4. Nanotube reinforced thermoplastic polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shofner, Meisha Lei

    The inherent high strength, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity make nanotubes attractive reinforcements for polymer matrix composites. However, the structure that makes them desirable also causes highly anisotropic properties and limited reactivity with other materials. This thesis isolates these problems in two separate studies aimed at improving mechanical properties with single wall nanotube (SWNT) reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites. The two studies demonstrate the effect of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and chemical functionalization on anisotropy and limited reactivity, respectively. Both studies showed mechanical property improvements. The alignment study demonstrates a maximum increase of 93% in tensile modulus with single wall nanotubes (SWNTs). The chemical functionalization study shows a larger increase in storage modulus for functionalized SWNTs as compared to purified SVWNTs with respective increases of 9% and 44% in storage modulus. Improved interfacial properties are also observed as a decrease in mechanical damping. Maximum property increases in composites are obtained when nanotubes are aligned, requiring additional processing consideration to the anisotropic structure. Melt spinning and extrusion processing effectively align nanotubes, but the end product of these techniques, composite fibers, requires further processing to be incorporated into finished parts. Extrusion-based SFF is a novel technique for processing nanotube reinforced composites because it allows for the direct fabrication of finished parts containing aligned nanotubes. SFF processing produces parts containing preferentially oriented nanotubes with improved mechanical properties when compared to isotropic composites. Functionalization of the nanotube surface disrupts the rope structure to obtain smaller ropes and promote further interfacial bonding. The chemically inert nature of nanotubes resulting from a structure containing few defects and the

  5. Reinforcement and rupture behavior of carbon nanotubes-polymer nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haihui; Lam, Hoa; Titchenal, Nick; Gogotsi, Yury; Ko, Frank

    2004-09-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy examination of carbon nanotube-polyacrylonitrile composite fibers synthesized by electrospinning was conducted. Both single-wall carbon nanotubes and multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been used to reinforce the polymer fibers. A two-stage rupture behavior of the composite fibers under tension, including crazing of polymer matrix and pull-out of carbon nanotubes, has been observed. Carbon nanotubes reinforce the polymer fibers by hindering crazing extension, reducing stress concentration, and dissipating energy by pullout. Distribution of nanotubes in the polymer matrix and interfacial adhesion between nanotubes and polymers are two major factors to determine the reinforcement effect of carbon nanotubes in polymer fibers.

  6. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  7. Investigation of nanoscale reinforcement into textile polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mujibur Rahman

    A dual inclusion strategy for textile polymers has been investigated to increase elastic energy storage capacity of fibers used in high velocity impact applications. Commercial fibers such as Spectra and Dyneema are made from ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Dynamic elastic energy of these fibers is still low therefore limiting their wholesale application without a secondary metallic or ceramic component. The idea in this investigation is to develop methodologies so that the elastic energy of polyethylene based fibers can be increased by several folds. This would allow manufacturing of an all-fabric system for high impact applications. The dual inclusion consists of a polymer phase and a nanoscale inorganic phase to polyethylene. The polymer phase was nylon-6 and the inorganic phase was carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nylon-6 was blended as a minor phase into UHMWPE and was chosen because of its large fracture strain -- almost one order higher than that of UHMWPE. On the other hand, CNTs with their very high strength, modulus, and aspect ratio, contributed to sharing of load and sliding of polymer interfaces as they aligned during extrusion and strain hardening processes. A solution spinning process was developed to produce UHMWPE filaments reinforced with CNTs and nylon-6. The procedure involved dispersing of CNTs into paraffin oil through sonication followed by dissolving polymers into paraffin-CNT solution using a homogenizer. The admixture was fed into a single screw extruder for melt mixing and extrusion through an orifice. The extrudate was rinsed via a hexane bath, stabilized through a heater, and then drawn into a filament winder with controlled stretching. In the next step, the as produced filaments were strain-hardened through repeated loading unloading cycles under tension. Neat and reinforced filaments were characterized through DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), XRD (X-ray Diffraction), Raman Spectroscopy, SEM (Scanning Electron

  8. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  9. Reinforcement effect of soy protein and carbohydrates in polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The modulus of soft polymer material can be increased by filler reinforcement. A review of using soy protein and carbohydrates as alternative renewable reinforcement material is presented here. Dry soy protein and carbohydrates are rigid and can form strong filler networks through hydrogen-bonding...

  10. Effects of the Reinforcement Morphology on the Fatigue Properties of Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Robert J.; Converse, Gabriel L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforcement morphology and content on the fatigue behavior of HA reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE). To this end, HDPE was reinforced with 20 and 40 vol% of either HA whiskers or an equiaxed HA powder, and tested in four-point bending fatigue under simulated physiological conditions. The fatigue life, mechanical property degradation and failure surfaces were compared between experimental groups. HDPE reinforced with HA whiskers exhibited a four- to five-fold increase (p < 0.001, T-test) in fatigue life compared to an equiaxed powder for either the 20 and 40 vol% reinforcement level. Composites containing 40 vol% HA exhibited decreased fatigue life compared to those with 20 vol% HA for either reinforcement morphology (p < 0.0001, ANOVA). HA whisker reinforced HDPE exhibited less stiffness loss, permanent deformation (creep) and energy dissipation at a given number of cycles compared to HA powder. Thus, HA whisker reinforced HDPE was more tolerant of fatigue damage due to either microcracking or polymer plasticity. Scanning electron microscopy of failure surfaces and surface microcracks showed evidence of toughening by uncracked ligaments, crack tip plasticity, polymer fibril bridging and HA whisker pullout. The results of this study suggest that the use of HA whiskers, in place of HA powder, is a straightforward means to improve the fatigue life and damage tolerance of HA reinforced polymers for synthetic bone substitutes. PMID:19578474

  11. Technology and Development of Self-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, Ben; Peijs, Ton

    In recent years there has been an increasing amount of interest, both commercially and scientifically, in the emerging field of "self-reinforced polymer composites". These materials, which are sometimes also referred to as "single polymer composites", or "all-polymer composites", were first conceived in the 1970s, and are now beginning to appear in a range of commercial products. While high mechanical performance polymer fibres or tapes are an obvious precursor for composite development, various different technologies have been developed to consolidate these into two- or three-dimensional structures. This paper presents a review of the various processing techniques that have been reported in the literature for the manufacture of self-reinforced polymer composites from fibres or tapes of different polymers, and so exploit the fibre or tape performance in a commercial material or product.

  12. Quantitative radiographic analysis of fiber reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Baidya, K P; Ramakrishna, S; Rahman, M; Ritchie, A

    2001-01-01

    X-ray radiographic examination of the bone fracture healing process is a widely used method in the treatment and management of patients. Medical devices made of metallic alloys reportedly produce considerable artifacts that make the interpretation of radiographs difficult. Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials have been proposed to replace metallic alloys in certain medical devices because of their radiolucency, light weight, and tailorable mechanical properties. The primary objective of this paper is to provide a comparable radiographic analysis of different fiber reinforced polymer composites that are considered suitable for biomedical applications. Composite materials investigated consist of glass, aramid (Kevlar-29), and carbon reinforcement fibers, and epoxy and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) matrices. The total mass attenuation coefficient of each material was measured using clinical X-rays (50 kev). The carbon fiber reinforced composites were found to be more radiolucent than the glass and kevlar fiber reinforced composites. PMID:11261603

  13. Polymer concrete reinforced with recycled-tire fibers: Mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Cruz, E.; Martínez-Barrera, G.; Martínez-López, M.

    2013-06-01

    Polymer Concrete was reinforced with recycled-tire fibers in order to improve the compressive and flexural strength. Polymer concrete specimens were prepared with 70% of silicious sand, 30% of polyester resin and various fiber concentrations (0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 vol%). The results show increment of 50% in average of the compressive and flexural strength as well as on the deformation when adding 1.2 vol% of recycled-fibers.

  14. Electron beam surface modifications in reinforcing and recycling of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czvikovszky, T.; Hargitai, H.

    1997-08-01

    Thermoplastic polymers can be fiber-reinforced in the recycling step through a reactive modification of the interface between the polymer matrix and fiber. Recollected automobile bumpers made of polypropylene copolymers have been reinforced during the reprocessing with eight different types of high-strength fibers, with waste cord-yarns of the tire industry. A thin layer reactive interface of acrylic oligomers has been applied and activated through low energy (175 keV) electron beam (EB). The upcycling (upgrading recycling) resulted in a series of extrudable and injection-mouldable, fiber-reinforced thermoplastic of enhanced bending strength, increased modulus of elasticity and acceptable impact strength. EB treatment has been compared with conventional methods.

  15. CO2-Laser Cutting Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Nuss, Rudolf; Geiger, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    Guided by experimental investigations laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced reactive injection moulded (RRIM)-polyurethanes which are used e.g. in car industry for bumpers, spoilers, and further components is described. A Comparison with other cutting techniques as there are water jet cutting, milling, punching, sawing, cutting with conventional knife and with ultrasonic excited knife is given. Parameters which mainly influence cutting results e.g. laser power, cutting speed, gas nature and pressure will be discussed. The problematic nature in characterising micro and macro geometry of laser cut edges of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) is explained. The topography of cut edges is described and several characteristic values are introduced to specify the obtained working quality. The surface roughness of laser cut edges is measured by both, an optical and a mechanical sensor and their reliabilities are compared.

  16. Flexural retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures using Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Ignacio

    An experimental study will be carried out to determine the suitability of Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates (GNFRP) manufactured with hemp fibers, with the purpose of using them as structural materials for the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) beams. Four identical RC beams, 96 inches long, are tested for the investigation, three control beams and one test beam. The first three beams are used as references; one unreinforced, one with one layer of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP), one with two layers of CFRP, and one with n layers of the proposed, environmental-friendly, GNFRP plates. The goal is to determine the number of GNFRP layers needed to match the strength reached with one layer of CFRP and once matched, assess if the system is less expensive than CFRP strengthening, if this is the case, this strengthening system could be an alternative to the currently used, expensive CFRP systems.

  17. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  18. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  19. Development of ductile hybrid fiber reinforced polymer (D-H-FRP) reinforcement for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somboonsong, Win

    The corrosion of steel rebars has been the major cause of the reinforced concrete deterioration in transportation structures and port facilities. Currently, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) spends annually $31 billion for maintaining and repairing highways and highway bridges. The study reported herein represents the work done in developing a new type of reinforcement called Ductile Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Polymer or D-H-FRP using non-corrosive fiber materials. Unlike the previous FRP reinforcements that fail in a brittle manner, the D-H-FRP bars exhibit the stress-strain curves that are suitable for concrete reinforcement. The D-H-FRP stress-strain curves are linearly elastic with a definite yield point followed by plastic deformation and strain hardening resembling that of mild steel. In addition, the D-H-FRP reinforcement has integrated ribs required for concrete bond. The desirable mechanical properties of D-H-FRP reinforcement are obtained from the integrated design based on the material hybrid and geometric hybrid concepts. Using these concepts, the properties can be tailored to meet the specific design requirements. An analytical model was developed to predict the D-H-FRP stress-strain curves with different combination of fiber materials and geometric configuration. This model was used to optimize the design of D-H-FRP bars. An in-line braiding-pultrusion manufacturing process was developed at Drexel University to produce high quality D-H-FRP reinforcement in diameters that can be used in concrete structures. A series of experiments were carried out to test D-H-FRP reinforcement as well as their individual components in monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. Using the results from the tensile tests and fracture analysis, the stress-strain behavior of the D-H-FRP reinforcement was fully characterized and explained. Two series of concrete beams reinforced with D-H-FRP bars were studied. The D-H-FRP beam test results were then compared with companion

  20. Investigation of rectangular concrete columns reinforced or prestressed with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars or tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Ching Chiaw

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been increasingly used in concrete construction. This research focused on the behavior of concrete columns reinforced with FRP bars, or prestressed with FRP tendons. The methodology was based the ultimate strength approach where stress and strain compatibility conditions and material constitutive laws were applied. Axial strength-moment (P-M) interaction relations of reinforced or prestressed concrete columns with FRP, a linearly-elastic material, were examined. The analytical results identified the possibility of premature compression and/or brittle-tension failure occurring in FRP reinforced and prestressed concrete columns where sudden and explosive type failures were expected. These failures were related to the rupture of FRP rebars or tendons in compression and/or in tension prior to concrete reaching its ultimate strain and strength. The study also concluded that brittle-tension failure was more likely to occur due to the low ultimate tensile strain of FRP bars or tendons as compared to steel. In addition, the failures were more prevalent when long term effects such as creep and shrinkage of concrete, and creep rupture of FRP were considered. Barring FRP failure, concrete columns reinforced with FRP, in some instances, gained significant moment resistance. As expected the strength interaction of slender steel or FRP reinforced concrete columns were dependent more on column length rather than material differences between steel and FRP. Current ACI minimum reinforcement ratio for steel (rhomin) reinforced concrete columns may not be adequate for use in FRP reinforced concrete columns. Design aids were developed in this study to determine the minimum reinforcement ratio (rhof,min) required for rectangular reinforced concrete columns by averting brittle-tension failure to a failure controlled by concrete crushing which in nature was a less catastrophic and more gradual type failure. The proposed method using rhof

  1. Rate dependent constitutive models for fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to assess the state-of-the-art in rate dependent constitutive models for continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials. Several recent models which include formulations for describing plasticity, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, and rate-dependent phenomenon such as creep and stress relaxation are outlined and compared. When appropriate, these comparisons include brief descriptions of the mathematical formulations, the test procedures required for generating material constants, and details of available data comparing test results to analytical predictions.

  2. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube shapes, sizes, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite systems, one with aligned SWNTs and the other with three-dimensionally randomly oriented SWNTs. The Young's modulus and shear modulus have been calculated for the two systems for various nanotube lengths and volume fractions.

  3. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.; Park, C.; Siochi, E. J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube lengths, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyimide composite systems.

  4. Polymer Chain Reinforcement across Narrow Interfaces: Entanglements Versus Chain Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason J.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Kramer, Edward J.

    2002-03-01

    It is widely believed that entangled chains that bridge a glassy polymer/polymer interface solely determine its fracture energy (G_c). However, experiments show that while Gc increases with interfacial width (w), Gc vs. w/d_t, where dt is the tube diameter of the melt, is not universal. For some polymer pairs Gc increases dramatically even when w << d_t, while for others Gc does not increase until w >= d_t. We demonstrate that the friction stress for polymer loop pull-out from the interface is given by f_monoρ_merw/2 where f_mono is the static friction coefficient per mer and ρ_mer is the mer number density. Unlike interfaces with short block copolymers, where the friction stress for block pull-out is limited by a maximum areal density of block copolymer, the polymer/polymer friction stress grows linearly with w. For interfaces as narrow as 3 nm, it can be large enough to induce crazing. A model that includes both loop pull-out and chain entanglement shows that modest changes in f_mono can account for the fact that Gc versus w/dt is non-universal. A high areal density of bridging, entangled chains is therefore sufficient, but not necessary, to reinforce polymer interfaces.

  5. Microscopic mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity in polymer nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae-Eun

    Modification of polymers by adding various nano-particles is an important method to obtain effective enhancement of materials properties. Within this class of materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are among the most studied materials for polymer reinforcement due to their extraordinary mechanical properties, superior thermal and electronic properties, and high aspect ratio. However, to unlock the potential of CNTs for applications, CNTs must be well dispersed in a polymer matrix and the microscopic mechanism of polymer reinforcement by CNTs must be understood. In this study, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composites with polypropylene (PP)-SWNT and polystyrene (PS)-SWNT were prepared and analyzed. Microscopic study of the mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity by SWNT included Raman spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and dielectric measurement. For PP-SWNT composites, tensile tests show a three times increase in the Young's modulus with addition of only 1 wt% SWNT, and much diminished increase of modulus with further increase in SWNT concentration. For PS-SWNT composites, well-dispersed SWNT/PS composite has been produced, using initial annealing of SWNT and optimum sonication conditions. The studies on the tangential mode in the Raman spectra and TEM indicated well-dispersed SWNTs in a PS matrix. We show that conductivity appears in composites already at very low concentrations, hinting at the formation of a 'percolative' network even below 0.5% of SWNT. The Raman studies for both composites show good transfer of the applied stress from the polymer matrices to SWNTs. However, no significant improvement of mechanical property is observed for PS-SWNT composites. The reason for only a slight increase of mechanical property remains unknown.

  6. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  7. Fracture behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, A.; Arikan, H.; Akdemir, A

    2004-03-01

    Chopped strand glass fiber reinforced particle-filled polymer composite beams with varying notch-to-depth ratios and different volume fractions of glass fibers were investigated in Mode I fracture using three-point bending tests. Effects of polyester resin content and glass fiber content on fracture behavior was also studied. Polyester resin contents were used 13.00%%, 14.75%, 16.50%, 18.00% and 19.50%, and glass fiber contents were 1% and 1.5% of the total weight of the polymer composite system. Flexural strength of the polymer composite increases with increase in polyester and fiber content. The critical stress intensity factor was determined by using several methods such as initial notch depth method, compliance method and J-integral method. The values of K{sub IC} obtained from these methods were compared.

  8. Basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites: Processing and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang

    A high efficiency rig was designed and built for in-plane permeability measurement of fabric materials. A new data derivation procedure to acquire the flow fluid pattern in the experiment was developed. The measurement results of the in-plane permeability for basalt twill 31 fabric material showed that a high correlation exists between the two principal permeability values for this fabric at 35% fiber volume fraction. This may be the most important scientific contribution made in this thesis. The results from radial measurements corresponded quite well with those from Unidirectional (UD) measurements, which is a well-established technique. No significant differences in mechanical properties were found between basalt fabric reinforced polymer composites and glass composites reinforced by a fabric of similar weave pattern. Aging results indicate that the interfacial region in basalt composites may be more vulnerable to environmental damage than that in glass composites. However, the basalt/epoxy interface may have been more durable than the glass/epoxy interface in tension-tension fatigue because the basalt composites have significantly longer fatigue life. In this thesis, chapter I reviews the literature on fiber reinforced polymer composites, with concentration on permeability measurement, mechanical properties and durability. Chapter II discusses the design of the new rig for in-plane permeability measurement, the new derivation procedure for monitoring of the fluid flow pattern, and the permeability measurement results. Chapter III compares the mechanical properties and durability between basalt fiber and glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. Lastly, chapter IV gives some suggestions and recommendations for future work.

  9. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  10. Tungsten disulfide nanotubes reinforced biodegradable polymers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M; Farshid, Behzad; Parmar, Priyanka; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the efficacy of inorganic nanotubes as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites as a function of nanomaterial loading concentration (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Tungsten disulfide nanotubes (WSNTs) were used as reinforcing agents in the experimental group. Single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) were used as positive controls, and crosslinked PPF composites were used as the baseline control. Mechanical testing (compression and three-point bending) shows a significant enhancement (up to 28-190%) in the mechanical properties (compressive modulus, compressive yield strength, flexural modulus and flexural yield strength) of WSNT-reinforced PPF nanocomposites compared to the baseline control. In comparison to the positive controls, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of WSNT nanocomposites were also observed at various concentrations. In general, the inorganic nanotubes (WSNTs) showed mechanical reinforcement better than (up to 127%) or equivalent to that of carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Sol fraction analysis showed significant increases in the crosslinking density of PPF in the presence of WSNTs (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis on thin sections of crosslinked nanocomposites showed the presence of WSNTs as individual nanotubes in the PPF matrix, whereas SWCNTs and MWCNTs existed as micron-sized aggregates. The trend in the surface area of nanostructures obtained by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis was SWCNTs>MWCNTs>WSNTs. The BET surface area analysis, TEM analysis and sol fraction analysis results taken together suggest that chemical composition (inorganic vs. carbon nanomaterials), the presence of functional groups (such as sulfide and oxysulfide) and individual dispersion of the nanomaterials in the polymer matrix (absence of aggregation of the reinforcing agent) are the key parameters

  11. Tungsten Disulfide Nanotubes Reinforced Biodegradable Polymers for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M.; Farshid, Behzad; Parmar, Priyanka; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the efficacy of inorganic nanotubes as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites as a function of nanomaterial loading concentration (0.01-0.2 wt%). Tungsten disulfide nanotubes (WSNTs) were used as reinforcing agents in the experimental groups. Single- and multi- walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) were used as positive controls, and crosslinked PPF composites were used as baseline control. Mechanical testing (compression and three-point bending) shows a significant enhancement (up to 28-190%) in the mechanical properties (compressive modulus, compressive yield strength, flexural modulus, and flexural yield strength) of WSNT reinforced PPF nanocomposites compared to the baseline control. In comparison to positive controls, at various concentrations, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of WSNT nanocomposites were also observed. In general, the inorganic nanotubes (WSNTs) showed a better (up to 127%) or equivalent mechanical reinforcement compared to carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Sol fraction analysis showed significant increases in the crosslinking density of PPF in the presence of WSNTs (0.01-0.2 wt%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis on thin sections of crosslinked nanocomposites showed the presence of WSNTs as individual nanotubes in the PPF matrix, whereas SWCNTs and MWCNTs existed as micron sized aggregates. The trend in the surface area of nanostructures obtained by BET surface area analysis was SWCNTs > MWCNTs > WSNTs. The BET surface area analysis, TEM analysis, and sol fraction analysis results taken together suggest that chemical composition (inorganic vs. carbon nanomaterials), presence of functional groups (such as sulfide and oxysulfide), and individual dispersion of the nanomaterials in the polymer matrix (absence of aggregation of the reinforcing agent) are the key parameters affecting the mechanical

  12. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  13. Self Healing Fibre-reinforced Polymer Composites: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Ian P.; Trask, Richard S.; Williams, Hugo R.; Williams, Gareth J.

    Lightweight, high-strength, high-stiffness fibre-reinforced polymer composite materials are leading contenders as component materials to improve the efficiency and sustainability of many forms of transport. For example, their widespread use is critical to the success of advanced engineering applications, such as the Boeing 787 and Airbus A380. Such materials typically comprise complex architectures of fine fibrous reinforcement e.g. carbon or glass, dispersed within a bulk polymer matrix, e.g. epoxy. This can provide exceptionally strong, stiff, and lightweight materials which are inherently anisotropic, as the fibres are usually arranged at a multitude of predetermined angles within discrete stacked 2D layers. The direction orthogonal to the 2D layers is usually without reinforcement to avoid compromising in-plane performance, which results in a vulnerability to damage in the polymer matrix caused by out-of-plane loading, i.e. impact. Their inability to plastically deform leaves only energy absorption via damage creation. This damage often manifests itself internally within the material as intra-ply matrix cracks and inter-ply delaminations, and can thus be difficult to detect visually. Since relatively minor damage can lead to a significant reduction in strength, stiffness and stability, there has been some reticence by designers for their use in safety critical applications, and the adoption of a `no growth' approach (i.e. damage propagation from a defect constitutes failure) is now the mindset of the composites industry. This has led to excessively heavy components, shackling of innovative design, and a need for frequent inspection during service (Richardson 1996; Abrate 1998).

  14. Calcium phosphate cement reinforcement by polymer infiltration and in situ curing: a method for 3D scaffold reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2010-08-01

    This study describes a novel method of calcium phosphate cement reinforcement based on infiltrating a pre-set cement with a reactive polymer and then cross-linking the polymer in situ. This method can be used to reinforce 3D calcium phosphate cement scaffolds, which we demonstrate using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as a model reinforcing polymer. The compressive strength of a 3D scaffold comprised of orthogonally intersecting beams was increased from 0.31 +/- 0.06 MPa to 1.65 +/- 0.13 MPa using PEGDA 600. In addition, the mechanical properties of reinforced cement were characterized using three PEGDA molecular weights (200, 400, and 600 Da) and three cement powder to liquid (P/L) ratios (0.8, 1.0, and 1.43). Higher molecular weight increased reinforcement efficacy, and P/L controlled cement porosity and determined the extent of polymer incorporation. Although increasing polymer incorporation resulted in a transition from brittle, cement-like behavior to ductile, polymer-like behavior, maximizing polymer incorporation was not advantageous. Polymerization shrinkage produced microcracks in the cement, which reduced the mechanical properties. The most effective reinforcement was achieved with P/L of 1.43 and PEGDA 600. In this group, flexural strength increased from 0.44 +/- 0.12 MPa to 7.04 +/- 0.51 MPa, maximum displacement from 0.05 +/- 0.01 mm to 1.44 +/- 0.17 mm, and work of fracture from 0.64 +/- 0.10 J/m(2) to 677.96 +/- 70.88 J/m(2) compared to non-reinforced controls. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our novel reinforcement method, as well as its potential for fabricating reinforced 3D calcium phosphate cement scaffolds useful for bone tissue engineering. PMID:20186776

  15. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers.

    PubMed

    Pircher, N; Veigel, S; Aigner, N; Nedelec, J M; Rosenau, T; Liebner, F

    2014-10-13

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating the secondary polymer into the BC matrix and to convert the formed composite organogels into aerogels. Uniaxial compression tests revealed a considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties as compared to BC aerogels. Nitrogen sorption experiments at 77K and scanning electron micrographs confirmed the preservation (or even enhancement) of the surface-area-to-volume ratio for most of the samples. The formation of an open-porous, interpenetrating network of the second polymer has been demonstrated by treatment of BC/PMMA hybrid aerogels with EMIM acetate, which exclusively extracted cellulose, leaving behind self-supporting organogels. PMID:25037381

  16. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, N.; Veigel, S.; Aigner, N.; Nedelec, J.M.; Rosenau, T.; Liebner, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating the secondary polymer into the BC matrix and to convert the formed composite organogels into aerogels. Uniaxial compression tests revealed a considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties as compared to BC aerogels. Nitrogen sorption experiments at 77 K and scanning electron micrographs confirmed the preservation (or even enhancement) of the surface-area-to-volume ratio for most of the samples. The formation of an open-porous, interpenetrating network of the second polymer has been demonstrated by treatment of BC/PMMA hybrid aerogels with EMIM acetate, which exclusively extracted cellulose, leaving behind self-supporting organogels. PMID:25037381

  17. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  18. Behaviour of fibre reinforced polymer confined reinforced concrete columns under fire condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ershad Ullah

    In recent years, fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) materials have demonstrated enormous potential as materials for repairing and retrofitting concrete bridges that have deteriorated from factors such as electro-chemical corrosion and increased load requirements. However, concerns associated with fire remain an obstacle to applications of FRP materials in buildings and parking garages due to FRP's sensitivity to high temperatures as compared with other structural materials and to limited knowledge on their thermal and mechanical behaviour in fire. This thesis presents results from an ongoing study on the fire performance of FRP materials, fire insulation materials and systems, and FRP wrapped reinforced concrete columns. The overall goal of the study is to understand the fire behaviour of FRP materials and FRP strengthened concrete columns and ultimately, provide rational fire safety design recommendations and guidelines for FRP strengthened concrete columns. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was conducted to achieve the goals of this research study. The experimental work consisted of both small-scale FRP material testing at elevated temperatures and full-scale fire tests on FRP strengthened columns. A numerical model was developed to simulate the behaviour of unwrapped reinforced concrete and FRP strengthened reinforced concrete square or rectangular columns in fire. After validating the numerical model against test data available in literature, it was determined that the numerical model can be used to analyze the behaviour of concrete axial compressive members in fire. Results from this study also demonstrated that although FRP materials experience considerable loss of their mechanical and bond properties at temperatures somewhat below the glass transition temperature of the resin matrix, externally-bonded FRP can be used in strengthening concrete structural members in buildings, if appropriate supplemental fire protection system is provided over

  19. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  20. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  1. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  2. Polymer microcapsules with a fiber-reinforced nanocomposite shell.

    PubMed

    Sagis, Leonard M C; Ruiter, Riëlle de; Miranda, Francisco J Rossier; Ruiter, Jolet de; Schroën, Karin; Aelst, Adriaan C van; Kieft, Henk; Boom, Remko; Linden, Erik van der

    2008-03-01

    Polymer microcapsules can be used as controlled release systems in drugs or in foods. Using layer-by-layer adsorption of common food proteins and polysaccharides, we produced a new type of microcapsule with tunable strength and permeability. The shell consists of alternating layers of pectin and whey protein fibrils, yielding a fiber-reinforced nanocomposite shell. The strength can be tightly controlled by varying the number of layers or the density and length of the fibrils in the protein layers. The mechanical stability of these microcapsules appears to be superior to that of currently available multilayer capsules. The method involves only standard unit operations and has the potential for scaling up to industrial production volumes. PMID:18237217

  3. Durability Studies on Confined Concrete using Fiber Reinforced Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponmalar, V.; Gettu, R.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, 24 concrete cylinders with a notch at the centre were prepared. Among them six cylinders were wrapped using single and double layers of fiber reinforced polymer; six cylinders were coated with epoxy resin; the remaining cylinders were used as a control. The cylinders were exposed to wet and dry cycling and acid (3 % H2SO4) solution for the period of 120 days. Two different concrete strengths M30 and M50 were considered for the study. It is found that the strength, ductility and failure mode of wrapped cylinders depend on number of layers and the nature of exposure conditions. It was noticed that the damage due to wet and dry cycling and acid attack was severe in control specimen than the epoxy coated and wrapped cylinders.

  4. Objective Surface Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of advanced composites are essential for their structural performance, but the surface finish on exterior composite panels is of critical importance for customer satisfaction. This paper describes the application of wavelet texture analysis (WTA) to the task of automatically classifying the surface finish properties of two fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite construction types (clear resin and gel-coat) into three quality grades. Samples were imaged and wavelet multi-scale decomposition was used to create a visual texture representation of the sample, capturing image features at different scales and orientations. Principal components analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the texture feature vector, permitting successful classification of the samples using only the first principal component. This work extends and further validates the feasibility of this approach as the basis for automated non-contact classification of composite surface finish using image analysis.

  5. On Healable Polymers and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christian Eric

    Polymeric materials capable of healing damage would be valuable in structural applications where access for repair is limited. Approaches to creating such materials are reviewed, with the present work focusing on polymers with thermally reversible covalent cross-links. These special cross-links are Diels-Alder (DA) adducts, which can be separated and re-formed, enabling healing of mechanical damage at the molecular level. Several DA-based polymers, including 2MEP4FS, are mechanically and thermally characterized. The polymerization reaction of 2MEP4FS is modeled and the number of established DA adducts is associated with the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The models are applied to concentric cylinder rotational measurements of 2MEP4FS prepolymer at room and elevated temperatures to describe the viscosity as a function of time, temperature, and conversion. Mechanical damage including cracks and scratches are imparted in cured polymer samples and subsequently healed. Damage due to high temperature thermal degradation is observed to not be reversible. The ability to repair damage without flowing polymer chains makes DA-based healable polymers particularly well-suited for crack healing. The double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) fracture test is investigated as a useful method of creating and incrementally growing cracks in a sample. The effect of sample geometry on the fracture behavior is experimentally and computationally studied. Computational and empirical models are developed to estimate critical stress intensity factors from DCDC results. Glass and carbon fiber-reinforced composites are fabricated with 2MEP4FS as the matrix material. A prepreg process is developed that uses temperature to control the polymerization rate of the monomers and produce homogeneous prepolymer for integration with a layer of unidirectional fiber. Multiple prepreg layers are laminated to form multi-layered cross-ply healable composites, which are characterized in

  6. A self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer composite using mechanophore-based smart polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jin; Liu, Yingtao; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Dai, Lenore

    2015-04-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are ubiquitous in engineering applications due to their superior mechanical properties at low weight. However, they are susceptible to damage due to their low interlaminar mechanical properties and poor heat and charge transport in the transverse direction to the laminate. Moreover, methods to inspect and ensure the reliability of composites are expensive and labor intensive. Recently, mechanophore-based smart polymer has attracted significant attention, especially for self-sensing of matrix damage in PMCs. A cyclobutane-based self-sensing approach using 1,1,1-tris (cinnamoyloxymethyl) ethane (TCE) and poly (vinyl cinnamate) (PVCi) has been studied in this paper. The self-sensing function was investigated at both the polymer level and composite laminate level. Fluorescence emissions were observed on PMC specimens subjected to low cycle fatigue load, indicating the presence of matrix cracks. Results are presented for graphite fiber reinforced composites.

  7. Polymer-Reinforced, Non-Brittle, Lightweight Cryogenic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary application for cryogenic insulating foams will be fuel tank applications for fueling systems. It is crucial for this insulation to be incorporated into systems that survive vacuum and terrestrial environments. It is hypothesized that by forming an open-cell silica-reinforced polymer structure, the foam structures will exhibit the necessary strength to maintain shape. This will, in turn, maintain the insulating capabilities of the foam insulation. Besides mechanical stability in the form of crush resistance, it is important for these insulating materials to exhibit water penetration resistance. Hydrocarbon-terminated foam surfaces were implemented to impart hydrophobic functionality that apparently limits moisture penetration through the foam. During the freezing process, water accumulates on the surfaces of the foams. However, when hydrocarbon-terminated surfaces are present, water apparently beads and forms crystals, leading to less apparent accumulation. The object of this work is to develop inexpensive structural cryogenic insulation foam that has increased impact resistance for launch and ground-based cryogenic systems. Two parallel approaches will be pursued: a silica-polymer co-foaming technique and a post foam coating technique. Insulation characteristics, flexibility, and water uptake can be fine-tuned through the manipulation of the polyurethane foam scaffold. Silicate coatings for polyurethane foams and aerogel-impregnated polyurethane foams have been developed and tested. A highly porous aerogel-like material may be fabricated using a co-foam and coated foam techniques, and can insulate at liquid temperatures using the composite foam

  8. Tensile properties of glass/natural jute fibre-reinforced polymer bars for concrete reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. W.; Lee, S. K.; Kim, K. W.; Park, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    The tensile performance of glass/natural jute fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bar, intended for concrete reinforcement was evaluated as a function of volume fraction of natural jute fibre. Natural jute fibre, mixed at a ratio of 7:3 with vinyl ester, was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent and used to replaced glass fibre in the composite in volume fractions of 0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 100%. The tensile load-displacement curve showed nearly linear elastic behaviour up to 50% natural jute fibre, but was partially nonlinear at a proportion of 70%. However, the glass/natural jute FRP bars prepared using 100% natural jute fibre showed linear elastic behaviour. Tensile strength decreased as the natural jute fibre volume fraction increased because the tensile strength of natural jute fibre is much lower than that of glass fibre (about 1:8.65). The degree of reduction was not proportional to the natural jute fibre volume fraction due to the low density of natural jute fibre (1/2 that of glass fibre). Thus, as the mix proportion of natural jute fibre increased, the amount (wt%) and number of fibres used also increased.

  9. A review on the cords & plies reinforcement of elastomeric polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S. S.; Husin, H.; Mat-Shayuti, M. S.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Steel, polyester, nylon and rayon are the main materials of cords & plies that have been reinforced in the natural rubber to produce quality tyres but there is few research reported on cord and plies reinforcement in silicone rubber. Taking the innovation of tyres as inspiration, this review's first objective is to compile the comprehensive studies about the cords & plies reinforcement in elastomeric polymer matrix. The second objective is to gather information about silicone rubber that has a high potential as a matrix phase for cords and plies reinforcement. All the tests and findings are gathered and compiled in sections namely processing preparation, curing, physical and mechanical properties, and adhesion between cords-polymer.

  10. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene nanosheets for polymer reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-10-01

    Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non-covalent functionalization through π-π stacking interactions. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene sheets (ANFGS) were successfully obtained by adding the graphene oxide (GO)/DMSO dispersion into the ANFs/DMSO solution followed by reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The ANFGS, with ANFs absorbed on the surface of the graphene nanosheets, can be easily exfoliated and dispersed in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Through a combination of these two ultra-strong materials, ANFs and graphene nanosheets (GS), the resultant ANFGS can act as novel nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. We used the ANFGS as an additive for reinforcing the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). With a loading of 0.7 wt% of the ANFGS, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the ANFGS/PMMA composite film approached 63.2 MPa and 3.42 GPa, which are increases of ~84.5% and ~70.6%, respectively. The thermal stabilities of ANFGS/PMMA composite films were improved by the addition of ANFGS. Additionally, the transparencies of the ANFGS/PMMA composite films have a degree of UV-shielding due to the ultraviolet light absorption of the ANFs in the ANFGS.Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non

  11. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene nanosheets for polymer reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-11-21

    Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non-covalent functionalization through π-π stacking interactions. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene sheets (ANFGS) were successfully obtained by adding the graphene oxide (GO)/DMSO dispersion into the ANFs/DMSO solution followed by reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The ANFGS, with ANFs absorbed on the surface of the graphene nanosheets, can be easily exfoliated and dispersed in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Through a combination of these two ultra-strong materials, ANFs and graphene nanosheets (GS), the resultant ANFGS can act as novel nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. We used the ANFGS as an additive for reinforcing the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). With a loading of 0.7 wt% of the ANFGS, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the ANFGS/PMMA composite film approached 63.2 MPa and 3.42 GPa, which are increases of ∼84.5% and ∼70.6%, respectively. The thermal stabilities of ANFGS/PMMA composite films were improved by the addition of ANFGS. Additionally, the transparencies of the ANFGS/PMMA composite films have a degree of UV-shielding due to the ultraviolet light absorption of the ANFs in the ANFGS. PMID:23047662

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  13. Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites is gaining momentum with the pressure to lightweight vehicles, however energy-intensity and cost remain some of the major barriers before this material could be used in large-scale automotive applications. A representative automotive part, i.e., a 30.8 kg steel floor pan having a 17% weight reduction potential with stringent cash performance requirements has been considered for the life cycle energy and emissions analysis based on the latest developments occurring in the precursor type (conventional textile-based PAN vs. renewable-based lignin), part manufacturing (conventional SMC vs. P4) and fiber recycling technologies. Carbon fiber production is estimated to be about 14 times more energy-intensive than conventional steel production, however life cycle primary energy use is estimated to be quite similar to the conventional part, i.e., 18,500 MJ/part, especially when considering the uncertainty in LCI data that exists from using numerous sources in the literature. Lignin P4 technology offers the most life cycle energy and CO2 emissions benefits compared to a conventional stamped steel technology. With a 20% reduction in energy use in the lignin conversion to carbon fiber and free availability of lignin as a by-product of ethanol and wood production, a 30% reduction in life cycle energy use could be obtained. A similar level of life cycle energy savings could also be obtained with a higher part weight reduction potential of 43%.

  14. Unraveling the Mechanism of Nanoscale Mechanical Reinforcement in Glassy Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shiwang; Bocharova, Vera; Belianinov, Alex; Xiong, Shaomin; Kisliuk, Alexander; Somnath, Suhas; Holt, Adam P; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Jesse, Stephen; Martin, Halie; Etampawala, Thusitha; Dadmun, Mark; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) above the glass transition temperature, Tg, has been extensively studied. However, not much is known about the origin of this effect below Tg. In this Letter, we unravel the mechanism of PNC reinforcement within the glassy state by directly probing nanoscale mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy and macroscopic properties with Brillouin light scattering. Our results unambiguously show that the "glassy" Young's modulus in the interfacial polymer layer of PNCs is two-times higher than in the bulk polymer, which results in significant reinforcement below Tg. We ascribe this phenomenon to a high stretching of the chains within the interfacial layer. Since the interfacial chain packing is essentially temperature independent, these findings provide a new insight into the mechanical reinforcement of PNCs also above Tg. PMID:27203453

  15. Unraveling the Mechanism of Nanoscale Mechanical Reinforcement in Glassy Polymer Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Shiwang; Bocharova, Vera; Belianinov, Alex; Xiong, Shaomin; Kisliuk, Alexander; Somnath, Suhas; Holt, Adam P.; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Jesse, Stephen; Martin, Halie J.; et al

    2016-05-20

    The mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) above the glass transition temperature, Tg, has been extensively researched. However, not much is known about the origin of this effect below Tg. In this paper, we unravel the mechanism of PNC reinforcement within the glassy state by directly probing nanoscale mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy and macroscopic properties with Brillouin light scattering. Our results unambiguously show that the "glassy" Young's modulus in the interfacial polymer layer of PNCs is two-times higher than in the bulk polymer, which results in significant reinforcement below Tg. We ascribe this phenomenon to a high stretchingmore » of the chains within the interfacial layer. Since the interfacial chain packing is essentially temperature independent, these findings provide a new insight into the mechanical reinforcement of PNCs also above Tg.« less

  16. Unraveling the Mechanism of Nanoscale Mechanical Reinforcement in Glassy Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shiwang; Bocharova, Vera; Belianinov, Alex; Xiong, Shaomin; Kisliuk, Alexander; Somnath, Suhas; Holt, Adam P; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Jesse, Stephen; Martin, Halie J; Etampawala, Thusitha N; Dadmun, Mark D; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) above the glass transition temperature, Tg, has been extensively studied. However, not much is known about the origin of this effect below Tg. In this Letter, we unravel the mechanism of PNC reinforcement within the glassy state by directly probing nanoscale mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy and macroscopic properties with Brillouin light scattering. Our results unambiguously show that the glassy Young s modulus in the interfacial polymer layer of PNCs is two-times higher than in the bulk polymer, which results in significant reinforcement below Tg. We ascribe this phenomenon to a high stretching of the chains within the interfacial layer. Since the interfacial chain packing is essentially temperature independent, these findings provide a new insight into the mechanical reinforcement of PNCs also above Tg.

  17. Health monitoring of precast bridge deck panels reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, James Mcdaniel

    The Beaver Creek Bridge on US highway 6 is the pilot project for Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bridge decks and posttensioned bridge decks in the state of Utah. The bridge was built in 2009, using accelerated bridge construction practices, including the use of precast prestressed girders, as well as precast decking. The westbound bridge decking was composed of 12 precast panels each measuring 41'-5" long, 6'-10" wide, and 9¼" thick, and weighing approximately 33 kips. At the time, these panels were the longest GFRP panels in the United States. The Utah Department of Transportation has decided to evaluate GFRP reinforcing bars as an alternative to steel rebar in this bridge deck. The hope is to increase the lifespan of bridge decks to match the service life of the entire bridge. Due to the nature of the GFRP bars, the panels were lifted at four points using straps instead of imbedded anchors. During the four-point lifting, the panels exhibited small deflections and strains; furthermore, no cracks larger than hairline cracks were found in the panels after lifting. The Beaver Creek Bridge deck is the first precast deck in the state of Utah to be posttensioned in the direction of traffic. Posttensioning bridge decks is expected to become the norm in the state of Utah. The posttensioning resulted in increased continuity between panels. In order to quantify the expected performance of the bridge during its service life, a truck load test was performed. The truck load test was comprised of a static and dynamic test. During the truck load test, the bridge experienced deflections in the panels which were 93% below design values. Girder deflections were also small. The use of GFRP bars has the potential to extend the life of bridge decks exposed to deicing salts from 45 years to 100 years, while only requiring an increased capital cost in the bridge of 8%. Furthermore, the use of GFRP bars in conjunction with accelerated building practices has the potential to

  18. Evaluation of post-fire strength of concrete flexural members reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Devon S.

    Owing to their corrosion resistance and superior strength to weight ratio, there has been, over the past two decades, increased interest in the use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete structural members. The mechanical behavior of FRP reinforcement differs from that of steel reinforcement. For example, FRP reinforcement exhibit a linear stress-strain behavior until the bar ruptures and the strength, stiffness and bond properties of FRP reinforcement are affected more adversely by elevated temperatures. All structures are subject to the risk of damage by fire and fires continue to be a significant cause of damage to structures. Many structures do not collapse after being exposed to fire. The safety of the structure for any future use is dependent on the ability to accurately estimate the post-fire load capacity of the structure. Assuming that the changes, due to fire exposure, in the mechanical behavior of the GFRP reinforcing bar and concrete, and the bond between the reinforcing bar and the concrete are understood, an analytical procedure for estimating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete flexural elements can be developed. This thesis investigates the changes in: a) tensile properties and bond of GFRP bars; and b) the flexural behavior of GFRP reinforced concrete beams flexural after being exposed to elevated temperatures up to 400°C and cooled to ambient temperature. To this end, twelve tensile tests, twelve pullout bond tests and ten four-point beam tests were performed. The data from the tests were used to formulate analytical procedures for evaluating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete beams. The procedure produced conservative results when compared with the experimental data. In general, the residual tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of GFRP bars decrease as the exposure temperature increases. The loss in properties is however, smaller than that observed by other researchers when

  19. Development of wind turbine towers using fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungkurapinan, Nibong

    With an ongoing trend in the wind turbine market, the size of wind turbines has been increasing continuously. Larger wind turbines imply an increase in size, weight, and loads acting on the wind turbine tower. This requires towers to be stronger and stiffer, and consequently leads to bigger tower diameters. Because of their size and weight, transportation and erection require heavy equipment that makes the use of such towers prohibitive in remote communities. To tackle this problem, a research program was initiated at the University of Manitoba to develop the technology required for the fabrication of wind turbine towers constructed of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) for use in remote communities in Canada. The research program was carried out in stages. During the first stage, a feasibility study and an analytical investigation on various shapes of FRP towers were conducted. The concept of a multi-cellular composite tower was examined in great detail and the finite element results showed that such a tower could result in almost 45 percent reduction in weight. In the second stage of this research program, a robotic filament winding machine was designed and constructed in the Composites Laboratory of the University of Manitoba. It was used to fabricate the multi-cell tower specimens for testing. The third stage of the research program involved the experimental investigation, which was carried out in three phases. In the first phase, two single cell specimens were tested to failure under lateral loading. The specimens were 8 ft (2.44 m) long. The second phase involved the testing of two single cells loaded in compression. The third phase of the experimental investigation involved the testing of two eight-cell jointed tower specimens. The specimens were octagonal and tapered, with a diameter of 21.4 in (543 mm) at the base and 17.4 in (441 mm) at the top. They were 16 ft (4.88 m) in height and tested as cantilever under static loading. Local buckling was the dominant

  20. Design criteria for pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer composite columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeol

    This dissertation investigated the behavior of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite columns under extensive time-independent short-term and time-dependent long-term experiments. Based on the experimental results, analytical studies were performed to propose a design approach for pultruded FRP composite columns. In the time-independent short-term tests, a total of 100 tests on wide flange, I-shape and box section columns were selected to develop the empirical column strength equation. All column tests were performed with pinned-pinned end conditions using either a 30 feet reaction frame or a MTS machine depending on the column length. The experimental results from short-term column tests provided valuable realistic information, such as the ultimate column capacity, failure mode, and column strength equation for pultruded FRP composite columns subjected to axial compression. To develop empirical column strength equation, ultimate column capacity at failure may be examined by plotting of the ultimate compressive stress versus effective slenderness ratio, and then nondimensionalize the ultimate compressive stress and slenderness ratio to compare columns having different cross sections. Finally, a set of empirical column strength equations of FRP composite column was developed from the column strength curves using curve-fitting technique. In the time-dependent long-term creep tests, a total of 4 box and 4 wide flange section columns were tested to investigate time-dependent deformation of pultruded FRP composite columns. The cross-section used in the investigation is 4 in. x 4 in. x 1/4 in. (100 mm x 100 mm x 6.4 mm) and length is 4 feet (1.2 m) with box and wide flange sections. Creep tests were carried out at four different loading levels; 20, 30, 40 and 50 percents of the ultimate column strength from the short-term column tests. The axial time-dependent deformation under sustained loading was monitored for time duration up to 2,500 hours. The

  1. Characterization of the polymer-filler interface in (gamma)-irradiated silica-reinforced polysiloxane composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, A T; Balazs, B; LeMay, J

    2000-04-03

    The changes in hydrogen bonding at the interface of silica-reinforced polysiloxane composites due to aging in gamma radiation environments were examined in this study. Solvent swelling was utilized to determine the individual contributions of the matrix polymer and polymer-filler interactions to the overall crosslink density. The results show how the polymer-filler hydrogen bonding dominates the overall crosslink density of the material. Air irradiated samples displayed decreased hydrogen bonding at the polymer-filler interface, while vacuum irradiation revealed the opposite effect.

  2. Surface damage behavior during scratch deformation of mineral reinforced polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, R.D.K.; Hadal, R.; Duncan, S.J

    2004-08-16

    The surface damage behavior during scratch deformation of neat and wollastonite reinforced ethylene-propylene and polypropylene polymeric materials with significant differences in ductility was studied using electron microscopy in association with scratch deformation parameters and local crystallinity characteristics obtained from atomic force microscopy. Under identical conditions of scratch tests, the decrease in resistance to scratch damage and stress whitening of polymeric materials followed the sequence: wollastonite-reinforced polypropylene (PP-W) congruent with wollastonite-reinforced ethylene-propylene (EP-W) > neat polypropylene (PP) > neat ethylene-propylene copolymer (EP). The improved resistance to scratch damage of mineral reinforced polymeric materials is attributed to the effective reinforcement by micrometer-sized wollastonite particles that increase the tensile modulus of the polymeric materials and restrict plastic deformation of the polymer matrix. Scratching of neat and wollastonite-containing EP copolymers involved periodic parabolic scratch tracks containing voids, which transformed to distinct zig-zag scratch tracks on reinforcement with micrometric wollastonite particles. The enhanced plastic flow in neat EP is facilitated by high ductility of the material and ability to nucleate voids, while in EP-W the plastic flow is suppressed because of reinforcement effect of wollastonite. On the other hand, zig-zag periodic scratch tracks were observed in both neat PP and PP-W, but the scratch tracks were not clearly discernible on reinforcement of PP with wollastonite. The resistance to scratch deformation is discussed in terms of tensile modulus, elastic recovery, scratch hardness, and reinforcement-matrix interaction.

  3. Microwave Heating of Functionalized Graphene Nanoribbons in Thermoset Polymers for Wellbore Reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Dong; Metzger, Andrew; Hejazi, Vahid; Li, Yilun; Kovalchuk, Anton; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Ye, Ruquan; Mann, Jason A; Kittrell, Carter; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Tour, James M

    2016-05-25

    Here, we introduce a systematic strategy to prepare composite materials for wellbore reinforcement using graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in a thermoset polymer irradiated by microwaves. We show that microwave absorption by GNRs functionalized with poly(propylene oxide) (PPO-GNRs) cured the composite by reaching 200 °C under 30 W of microwave power. Nanoscale PPO-GNRs diffuse deep inside porous sandstone and dramatically enhance the mechanics of the entire structure via effective reinforcement. The bulk and the local mechanical properties measured by compression and nanoindentation mechanical tests, respectively, reveal that microwave heating of PPO-GNRs and direct polymeric curing are major reasons for this significant reinforcement effect. PMID:27140722

  4. Influence of cyclic freeze-thaw on the parameters of the electric response to the pulse mechanical excitation of concrete reinforced by glass fibre reinforced polymer bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursa, T. V.; Petrov, M. V.; Korzenok, I. N.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of the influence of cyclic freeze-thaw on the parameters of electric response from samples of concrete reinforced by glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars were conducted. It is found that an increase in the number of freeze-thaw cycles increases the attenuation coefficient of energy of electric responses and moves the centre of gravity of spectrum to the low-frequency area. The results can be used to develop a method of nondestructive testing of reinforced concrete.

  5. Preparation and characterization of glass fibers - polymers (epoxy) bars (GFRP) reinforced concrete for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkjk, Saeed; Jabra, Rafee; Alkhater, Salem

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents some of the results from a large experimental program undertaken at the Department of Civil Engineering of Damascus University. The project aims to study the ability to reinforce and strengthen the concrete by bars from Epoxy polymer reinforced with glass fibers (GFRP) and compared with reinforce concrete by steel bars in terms of mechanical properties. Five diameters of GFRP bars, and steel bars (4mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm) tested on tensile strength tests. The test shown that GFRP bars need tensile strength more than steel bars. The concrete beams measuring (15cm wide × 15cm deep × and 70cm long) reinforced by GFRP with 0.5 vol.% ratio, then the concrete beams reinforced by steel with 0.89 vol.% ratio. The concrete beams tested on deflection test. The test shown that beams which reinforced by GFRP has higher deflection resistance, than beams which reinforced by steel. Which give more advantage to reinforced concrete by GFRP.

  6. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  7. Further weight reduction of applications in long glass reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanev, A.; Schijve, W.; Martin, C.; Brands, D.

    2014-05-01

    Long glass reinforced materials are broadly used in the automotive industry due to their good mechanical performance, competitive price and options for functional integration in order to reduce weight. With rapidly changing environmental requirements, a demand for further weight reduction is growing constantly. Designs in LGF-PP can bring light weight solutions in combination with system cost improvement. There are quite some possibilities for applying weight reduction technologies nowadays. These technologies have to be evaluated based on weight reduction potential, but also on mechanical performance of the end application, where the latter is often the key to success. Different weight reduction technologies are applied to SABIC®STAMAX{trade mark, serif} material, a long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (LGF-PP), in order to investigate and define best application performance. These techniques include: chemical foaming, physical foaming and thin wall applications. Results from this research will be presented, giving a guideline for your development.

  8. Electron beam irradiation in natural fibres reinforced polymers (NFRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechaou, B.; Salvia, M.; Fakhfakh, Z.; Juvé, D.; Boufi, S.; Kallel, A.; Tréheux, D.

    2008-11-01

    This study focuses on the electric charge motion in unsatured polyester and epoxy composites reinforced by natural fibres of Alfa type, treated by different coupling agents. The electric charging phenomenon is studied by scanning electron microscopy mirror effect (SEMME) coupled with the induced current method (ICM). Previously, using the same approach, glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE) was studied to correlate mechanical [B. Kchaou, C. Turki, M. Salvia, Z. Fakhfakh, D. Tréheux, Composites Science and Technology 64 (2004) 1467], or tribological [B. Kchaou, C. Turki, M. Salvia, Z. Fakhfakh, D. Tréheux, Dielectric and friction behaviour of unidirectionalglass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE), Wear, 265 (2008) 763.] properties and dielectric properties. It was shown that the dielectric properties of the fibre-matrix interfaces play a significant role in the optimization of the composite. This result seems to be the same for natural fibre composites: the fibre-matrix interfaces allow a diffusion of the electric charges which can delocalize the polarization energy and consequently delay the damage of the composite. However, a non-suited sizing can lead to a new trapping of electric charges along these same interfaces with, as a consequence, a localization of the polarisation energy. The optimum composite is obtained for one sizing which helps, at the same time, to have a strong fibre-matrix adhesion and an easy flow of the electric charges along the interface.

  9. Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP) as Reinforcement for Concrete According to German Approvals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, R.

    2015-11-01

    This article demonstrates the possibility of the application of joint principles to develop test programs for national approval or European Technical Assessments of FRP reinforcement for concrete. The limits of different systems are shown, which until now have been approved in Germany.

  10. Polymer reinforcement using liquid-exfoliated boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Umar; May, Peter; O'Neill, Arlene; Bell, Alan P.; Boussac, Elodie; Martin, Arnaud; Semple, James; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2012-12-01

    We have exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride by ultrasonication in solutions of polyvinylalcohol in water. The resultant nanosheets are sterically stabilised by adsorbed polymer chains. Centrifugation-based size-selection was used to give dispersions of nanosheets with aspect ratio (length/thickness) of ~1400. Such dispersions can be used to produce polyvinylalcohol-BN composite films. Helium ion microscopy of fracture surfaces shows the nanosheets to be well dispersed and the composites to fail by pull-out. We find both modulus, Y, and strength, σB, of these composites to increase linearly with volume fraction, Vf, up to Vf ~ 0.1 vol% BN before falling off. The rates of increase are extremely high; dY/dVf = 670 GPa and dσB/dVf = 47 GPa. The former value matches theory based on continuum mechanics while the latter value is consistent with remarkably high polymer-filler interfacial strength. However, because the mechanical properties increase over such a narrow volume fraction range, the maximum values of both modulus and strength are only ~40% higher than the pure polymer. This phenomenon has also been observed for graphene-filled composites and represents a serious hurdle to the production of high performance polymer-nanosheet composites.We have exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride by ultrasonication in solutions of polyvinylalcohol in water. The resultant nanosheets are sterically stabilised by adsorbed polymer chains. Centrifugation-based size-selection was used to give dispersions of nanosheets with aspect ratio (length/thickness) of ~1400. Such dispersions can be used to produce polyvinylalcohol-BN composite films. Helium ion microscopy of fracture surfaces shows the nanosheets to be well dispersed and the composites to fail by pull-out. We find both modulus, Y, and strength, σB, of these composites to increase linearly with volume fraction, Vf, up to Vf ~ 0.1 vol% BN before falling off. The rates of increase are extremely high; dY/dVf = 670 GPa and d

  11. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  12. Shape memory composites based on glass-fibre-reinforced poly(ethylene)-like polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, J. M.; Rubio, R.; Laza, J. M.; Vilas, J. L.; Rodriguez, M.; León, L. M.

    2012-03-01

    The mechanical response of a series of semicrystalline shape memory polymers was considerably enhanced by incorporating short glass fibres without modifying the thermo-responsive actuation based on balanced crystallinity and elasticity. The effect of different fractions of inorganic reinforcement on thermo-mechanical properties was evaluated using different instrument techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TGA), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and three-point flexural tests. Moreover, we studied the inorganic reinforcement influence on the shape memory actuation capabilities by thermo-mechanical bending cycle experiments. As demonstrated, the manufactured polymer composites showed excellent shape memory capacities, similar to neat active polymer matrices, but with outstanding improvements in static and recovering mechanical performance.

  13. EB treatment of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebényi, G.; Romhány, G.; Vajna, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2012-09-01

    A small amount — less than 0.5% — carbon nanotube reinforcement may improve the mechanical properties of epoxy based composite materials significantly. The basic technical problem on one side is the dispersion of the nanotubes into the viscous matrix resin, namely, the fine powder-like — less than 100 nanometer diameter — nanotubes are prone to form aggregates. On the other side, the good connection between the nanofiber and matrix, which is determining the success of the reinforcement, requires some efficient adhesion promoting treatment. The goal of our research was to give one such treatment capable of industrial size application. A two step curing epoxy/vinylester resin process technology has been developed where the epoxy component has been cured conventionally, while the vinylester has been cured by electron treatment afterwards. The sufficient irradiation dose has been selected according to Raman spectroscopy characterization. Using the developed hybrid resin system hybrid composites containing carbon fibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The effect of the electron beam induced curing of the vinylester resin on the mechanical properties of the composites has been characterized by three point bending and interlaminar shear tests, which showed clearly the superiority of the developed resin system. The results of the mechanical tests have been supported by AFM studies of the samples, which showed that the difference in the viscoelastic properties of the matrix constituents decreased significantly by the electron beam treatment.

  14. Resorbable continuous-fibre reinforced polymers for osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dauner, M; Planck, H; Caramaro, L; Missirlis, Y; Panagiotopoulos, E

    1998-03-01

    Four institutes from three countries in the European Union have collaborated under the BRITE-EURAM framework programme for the development of processing technologies for resorbable osteosynthesis devices. The devices should be continuous-fibre reinforced, and the technology should offer the possibility of orienting the fibres in the main trajectories. Poly-L-lactide and poly-L-DL-lactides have been synthesized for reinforcement fibres and matrix material, respectively. Melt-spun P-L-LA fibres of a strength of 800 MPa have been embedded in an amorphous P-L-DL-LA 70 : 30 matrix by compression moulding. Ethyleneoxide sterilized samples have been tested in vitro and in vivo. A satisfying bending modulus has been reached (6 GPa). Yet with 50% strength retention after ten weeks, fast degradation occurred that could be related to residual monomers. By this fast degradation 70% resorption after one year could be observed in the non-functional animal studies in rabbits. There was only a mild inflammatory reaction, which confirmed the good biocompatibility of the materials even during the resorption period. Further effort has to concentrate on the reduction of initial monomer content. The great advantage of the processing method to orient fibres in the device will be utilized in prototype samples, e.g. an osteosynthesis plate with fixation holes. PMID:15348907

  15. Development of a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for cranial bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alge, Daniel L.

    The repair of critical-sized cranial bone defects represents an important clinical challenge. The limitations of autografts and alloplastic materials make a bone tissue engineering strategy desirable, but success depends on the development of an appropriate scaffold. Key scaffold properties include biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, sufficient strength to maintain its structure, and resorbability. Furthermore, amenability to rapid prototyping fabrication methods is desirable, as these approaches offer precise control over scaffold architecture and have the potential for customization. While calcium phosphate cements meet many of these criteria due to their composition and their injectability, which can be leveraged for scaffold fabrication via indirect casting, their mechanical properties are a major limitation. Thus, the overall goal of this work was to develop a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for use in cranial bone tissue engineering. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) setting cements are of particular interest because of their excellent resorbability. We demonstrated for the first time that DCPD cement can be prepared from monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/hydroxyapatite (HA) mixtures. However, subsequent characterization revealed that MCPM/HA cements rapidly convert to HA during degradation, which is undesirable and led us to choose a more conventional formulation for scaffold fabrication. In addition, we developed a novel method for calcium phosphate cement reinforcement that is based on infiltrating a pre-set cement structure with a polymer, and then crosslinking the polymer in situ. Unlike prior methods of cement reinforcement, this method can be applied to the reinforcement of 3D scaffolds fabricated by indirect casting. Using our novel method, composites of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) reinforced DCPD were prepared and demonstrated as excellent candidate scaffold materials, as they had increased strength and ductility

  16. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers that were studied included graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber-sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  17. Crystallization processes in poly(ethylene terephthalate) as modified by polymer additives and fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsch, V.E.; Rebenfeld, L.

    1993-12-31

    The effect of fiber reinforcement on the crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The objective of the study was to determine how the effects of fiber reinforcement on PET crystallization are modified by the presence of polymer additives. The interaction of fiber effects and nucleating and plasticizing agents was studied. Unidirectional fiber composites were prepared using aramid and glass fibers in PET. The rate of crystallization of PET, as reflected by crystallization half-time, it seem to depend on reinforcing fiber type, crystallization temperature, and presence of nucleant or plasticizer. However, degree of crytallinity of PET is largely unaffected by the presence of additives and reinforcing fibers. Crystallization kinetics are analyzed using a series Avrami model for PET volume crystallized as a function of time. The using a series Arami model for PET volume crystallized as a function of time. The crystalline morphology of fiber reinforced PET was studied using polarized light microscopy. Results concerning nucleation density, chain mobility, and growth morphology are used in explaining differences seen in crystallization kinetics in fiber reinforced systems.

  18. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential. PMID:25553057

  19. Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers as new sizing agents for fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers (polydopamine and polynorepinephrine) were coated on the surface of carbon and glass fibers in order to increase the interfacial shear strength between fibers and polymer matrix, and consequently the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. By utilizing adhesive characteristic of the catecholamine polymer, fiber-reinforced composites can become mechanically stronger than conventional composites. Since the catecholamine polymer is easily constructed on the surface by the simultaneous polymerization of its monomer under a weak basic circumstance, it can be readily coated on micro-fibers by a simple dipping process without any complex chemical treatments. Also, catecholamines can increase the surface free energy of micro-fibers and therefore, can give better wettability to epoxy resin. Therefore, catecholamine polymers can be used as versatile and effective surface modifiers for both carbon and glass fibers. Here, catecholamine-coated carbon and glass fibers exhibited higher interfacial shear strength (37 and 27% increases, respectively) and their plain woven composites showed improved interlaminar shear strength (13 and 9% increases, respectively) compared to non-coated fibers and composites.

  20. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  1. Mechanical characterization and structural analysis of recycled fiber-reinforced-polymer resin-transfer-molded beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Eugene Wie Loon

    1999-09-01

    The present investigation was focussed on the mechanical characterization and structural analysis of resin-transfer-molded beams containing recycled fiber-reinforced polymers. The beams were structurally reinforced with continuous unidirectional glass fibers. The reinforcing filler materials consisted entirely of recycled fiber-reinforced polymer wastes (trim and overspray). The principal resin was a 100-percent dicyclo-pentadiene unsaturated polyester specially formulated with very low viscosity for resin transfer molding. Variations of the resin transfer molding technique were employed to produce specimens for material characterization. The basic materials that constituted the structural beams, continuous-glass-fiber-reinforced, recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled unsaturated polyesters, were fully characterized in axial and transverse compression and tension, and inplane and interlaminar shear, to ascertain their strengths, ultimate strains, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios. Experimentally determined mechanical properties of the recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled materials from the present investigation were superior to those of unsaturated polyester polymer concretes and Portland cement concretes. Mechanical testing and finite element analyses of flexure (1 x 1 x 20 in) and beam (2 x 4 x 40 in) specimens were conducted. These structurally-reinforced specimens were tested and analyzed in four-point, third-point flexure to determine their ultimate loads, maximum fiber stresses and mid-span deflections. The experimentally determined load capacities of these specimens were compared to those of equivalent steel-reinforced Portland cement concrete beams computed using reinforced concrete theory. Mechanics of materials beam theory was utilized to predict the ultimate loads and mid-span deflections of the flexure and beam specimens. However, these predictions proved to be severely inadequate. Finite element (fracture propagation

  2. Thermal Expansion of Carbon Nanofiber-Reinforced Multiscale Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Ronald L.; Achar, Sriniket; Gupta, Nikhil

    2012-10-01

    Improved dimensional stability of composites is desired in applications where they are exposed to varying temperature conditions. The current study aims at analyzing the effect of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the thermal expansion behavior of epoxy matrix composites and hollow particle-filled composites (syntactic foams). CNFs have a lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) than epoxy resin, which results in composites with increased dimensional stability as the CNF content is increased. The experimental measurements show that with 10 wt.% CNF, the composite has about 11.6% lower CTE than the matrix resin. In CNF-reinforced syntactic foams, the CTE of the composite decreases with increasing wall thickness and volume fraction of hollow particle inclusions. With respect to neat epoxy resin, a maximum decrease of 38.4% is also observed in the CNF/syntactic foams with microballoon inclusions that range from 15 vol.% to 50 vol.% in all composite mixtures. The experimental results for CNF/syntactic foam are in agreement with a modified version of Kerner's model. A combination of hollow microparticles and nanofibers has resulted in the ability to tailor the thermal expansion of the composite over a wide range.

  3. The reflectivity of carbon fiber reinforced polymer short circuit illuminated by guided microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojovschi, A.; Scott, J.; Ghorbani, K.

    2013-09-01

    An investigation of the interaction between guided electromagnetic waves and carbon fibre reinforced polymer waveguide short circuits is presented. To determine the electromagnetic response of the composite waveguide short circuit, its anisotropic characteristics are considered. The reflection coefficients of the short circuit, at the reference plane, are about 0.98 over the whole 8 GHz to 12 GHz band. The results indicate the viability of carbon fiber based short circuits for lightweight waveguides.

  4. A modified fractional Zener model to describe the behaviour of a carbon fibre reinforced polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M. Fernanda P.; Ribeiro, C.

    2013-10-01

    In this work a modified conventional Fractional Zener Model is deduced and applied to estimate the viscoelastic constitutive parameters of a Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer. The accuracy of this modified model was studied against conventional Fractional Zener model and Fractional Maxwell model, considering experimental data in the frequency domain. The set of parameters was found by solving a nonlinear constrained least square problem based on the variation of the storage and loss moduli with frequency.

  5. Unzipped multiwalled carbon nanotube oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids for polymer reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Tian, Ming; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been widely used as nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. However, it has been restricted by the limited available interface area of MWNTs in the polymer matrices. Oxidation unzipping of MWNTs is an effective way to solve this problem. The unzipped multiwalled carbon nanotube oxides (UMCNOs) exhibit excellent enhancement effect with low weight fractions, but agglomeration of UMCNOs at a relatively higher loading still hampered the mechanical reinforcement of polymer composites. In this paper, we interestingly found that the dispersion of UMCNOs in polymer matrices can be significantly improved with the combination of pristine MWNTs. The hybrids of MWNTs and UMCNOs (U/Ms) can be easily obtained by adding the pristine MWNTs into the UMCNOs aqueous dispersion, followed by sonication. With a π-stacking interaction, the UMCNOs were attached onto the outwalls of MWNTs. The morphologies and structure of the U/Ms were characterized by several measurements. The mechanical testing of the resultant poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-based composites demonstrated that the U/Ms can be used as ideal reinforcing fillers. Compared to PVA, the yield strength and Young's modulus of U/M-PVA composites with a loading of 0.7 wt % of the U/Ms approached ∼145.8 MPa and 6.9 GPa, respectively, which are increases of ∼107.4% and ∼122.5%, respectively. The results of tensile tests demonstrated that the reinforcement effect of U/Ms is superior to the individual UMCNOs and MWNTs, because of the synergistic interaction of UMCNOs and MWNTs. PMID:23121120

  6. Effect of fiber reinforcements on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermo-oxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. A compilation of some results from these studies is presented, and this information shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various polymer matrix composites. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material that was used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-40R graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. The Celion 6000/PMR-15 bond is very tight but the T-40/PMR-15 bond is less tight. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  7. A new type of smart basalt fiber-reinforced polymer bars as both reinforcements and sensors for civil engineering application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Wu, Gang; Shen, Sheng

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, a new type of smart basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) bar is developed and their sensing performance is investigated by using the Brillouin scattering-based distributed fiber optic sensing technique. The industrial manufacturing process is first addressed, followed by an experimental study on the strain, temperature and fundamental mechanical properties of the BFRP bars. The results confirm the superior sensing properties, in particular the measuring accuracy, repeatability and linearity through comparing with bare optical fibers. Results on the mechanical properties show stable elastic modulus and high ultimate strength. Therefore, the smart BFRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as strengthening and upgrading structures. Moreover the coefficient of thermal expansion for smart BFRP bars is similar to the value for concrete.

  8. Sensing uniaxial tensile damage in fiber-reinforced polymer composites using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Wahyu; Pinto, Brian; La Saponara, Valeria; Yasui, Jennifer; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2016-08-01

    This work describes the application of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) in sensing damage in fiber-reinforced polymer composites under uniaxial quasi-static tension. Damage is manifested as numerous matrix cracks which are distributed across the composite volume and which eventually coalesce into intralayer cracks. Hence, tensile damage is distributed throughout the volume, and could be more significant outside the sensor area. In this work, tensile damage of unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites (GFRP) and plain weave carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) is sensed by utilizing a spray-on nanocomposite sensor, which is then instrumented by boundary electrodes. The resistance change distribution within the sensor area is reconstructed from a series of boundary voltage measurements, and ERT is implemented using a maximum a posteriori approach and assumptions on the type of noise in the reconstruction. Results show that this technique has promise in tracking uniaxial damage in composites. The different fiber architectures (unidirectional GFRP, plain weave CFRP) give distinct features in the ERT, which are consistent with the physical behavior of the tested samples.

  9. Study on reinforced concrete beams strengthened using shape memory alloy wires in combination with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Zhi-qiang; Ou, Jin-ping

    2007-12-01

    It has been proven that carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets or plates are capable of improving the strength of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. However, residual deformation of RC structures in service reduces the effect of CFRP strengthening. SMA can be applied to potentially decrease residual deformation and even close concrete cracks because of its recovery forces imposed on the concrete when heated. Therefore, a method of a RC structure strengthened by CFRP plates in combination with SMA wires is proposed in this paper. The strengthening effect of this method is investigated through experiments and numerical study based on the nonlinear finite element software ABAQUS in simple RC beams. Parametric analysis and assessment of damage by defining a damage index are carried out. The results indicate that recovery forces of SMA wires can decrease deflections and even close cracks in the concrete. The recovery rate of deflection of the beam increases with increasing the ratio of SMA wires. The specimen strengthened with CFRP plates has a relatively large stiffness and smaller damage index value when the residual deformation of the beam is first reduced by activation of the SMA wires. The effectiveness of this strengthening method for RC beams is verified by experimental and numerical results.

  10. Self-diagnosis of structures strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. S.; Yang, C. Q.; Harada, T.; Ye, L. P.

    2005-06-01

    The correlation of mechanical and electrical properties of concrete beams strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (HCFRP) sheets is studied in this paper. Two types of concrete beams, with and without reinforcing bars, are strengthened with externally bonded HCFRP sheets, which have a self-structural health monitoring function due to the electrical conduction and piezoresistivity of carbon fibers. Parameters investigated include the volume fractions and types of carbon fibers. According to the investigation, it is found that the hybridization of uniaxial HCFRP sheets with several different types of carbon fibers is a viable method for enhancing the mechanical properties and obtaining a built-in damage detection function for concrete structures. The changes in electrical resistance during low strain ranges before the rupture of carbon fibers are generally smaller than 1%. Nevertheless, after the gradual ruptures of carbon fibers, the electrical resistance increases remarkably with the strain in a step-wise manner. For the specimens without reinforcing bars, the electrical behaviors are not stable, especially during the low strain ranges. However, the electrical behaviors of the specimens with reinforcing bars are relatively stable, and the whole range of self-sensing function of the HCFRP-strengthened RC structures has realized the conceptual design of the HCFRP sensing models and is confirmed by the experimental investigations. The relationships between the strain/load and the change in electrical resistance show the potential self-monitoring capacity of HCFRP reinforcements used for strengthening concrete structures.

  11. Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh; Mather, Patrick; Rodriguez, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcing critical areas in carbon polymer matrix composites (PMCs), also known as fiber reinforced composites (FRCs), is advantageous for structural durability. Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have extremely high tensile strength, they can be used as a functional additive to enhance the mechanical properties of FRCs. However, CNTs are not readily dispersible in the polymer matrix, which leads to lower than theoretically predicted improvement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CNT composites. The inability to align CNTs in a polymer matrix is also a known issue. The feasibility of incorporating aligned CNTs into an FRC was demonstrated using a novel, yet commercially viable nanofiber approach, termed NRMs (nanofiber-reinforcing mats). The NRM concept of reinforcement allows for a convenient and safe means of incorporating CNTs into FRC structural components specifically where they are needed during the fabrication process. NRMs, fabricated through a novel and scalable process, were incorporated into FRC test panels using layup and vacuum bagging techniques, where alternating layers of the NRM and carbon prepreg were used to form the reinforced FRC structure. Control FRC test panel coupons were also fabricated in the same manner, but comprised of only carbon prepreg. The FRC coupons were machined to size and tested for flexural, tensile, and compression properties. This effort demonstrated that FRC structures can be fabricated using the NRM concept, with an increased average load at break during flexural testing versus that of the control. The NASA applications for the developed technologies are for lightweight structures for in-space and launch vehicles. In addition, the developed technologies would find use in NASA aerospace applications such as rockets, aircraft, aircraft/spacecraft propulsion systems, and supporting facilities. The reinforcing aspect of the technology will allow for more efficient joining of fiber composite parts, thus offering

  12. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  13. A testing platform for durability studies of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under concurrent hygrothermo-mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus. PMID:25548950

  14. Studies on Effective Elastic Properties of CNT/Nano-Clay Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a computational approach to predict elastic propertiesof hybrid nanocomposite material prepared by adding nano-clayplatelets to conventional CNT-reinforced epoxy system. In comparison to polymers alone/single-fiber reinforced polymers, if an additional fiber is added to the composite structure, it was found a drastic improvement in resultant properties. In this regard, effective elastic moduli of a hybrid nano composite are determined by using finite element (FE) model with square representative volume element (RVE). Continuum mechanics based homogenization of the nano-filler reinforced composite is considered for evaluating the volumetric average of the stresses and the strains under different periodic boundary conditions.A three phase Halpin-Tsai approach is selected to obtain the analytical result based on micromechanical modeling. The effect of the volume fractions of CNTs and nano-clay platelets on the mechanical behavior is studied. Two different RVEs of nano-clay platelets were used to investigate the influence of nano-filler geometry on composite properties. The combination of high aspect ratio of CNTs and larger surface area of clay platelets contribute to the stiffening effect of the hybrid samples. Results of analysis are validated with Halpin-Tsai empirical formulae.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring of concrete columns and beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Gao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wensong; Xian, Guijun

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an effective method in the nondestructive testing (NDT) field of civil engineering. During the last two decades, Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has been widely used in repairing and strengthening concrete structures. The damage state of FRP strengthened concrete structures has become an important issue during the service period of the structure and it is a meaningful work to use AE technique as a nondestructive method to assess its damage state. The present study reports AE monitoring results of axial compression tests carried on basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) confined concrete columns and three-point-bending tests carried on BFRP reinforced concrete beams. AE parameters analysis was firstly utilized to give preliminary results of the concrete fracture process of these specimens. It was found that cumulative AE events can reflect the fracture development trend of both BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams and AE events had an abrupt increase at the point of BFRP breakage. Then the fracture process of BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams was studied through RA value-average frequency analysis. The RA value-average frequency tendencies of BFRP confined concrete were found different from that of BFRP strengthened concrete beams. The variation tendency of concrete crack patterns during the loading process was revealed.

  16. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed, to be cured, and be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000degC. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200degC, -SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Testing for this included thermal and mechanical testing per ASTM standard tests.

  17. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  18. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  19. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  20. Alignment of carbon nanotubes and reinforcing effects in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Rangari, Vijaya K; Yousuf, Mohammed; Jeelani, Shaik; Pulikkathara, Merlyn X; Khabashesku, Valery N

    2008-06-18

    Alignment of pristine carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) and fluorinated carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs) in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers (PCFs) has been achieved using a single-screw extrusion method. CNTs have been used as filler reinforcements to enhance the mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 composite fibers. The composites were fabricated by dry mixing nylon-6 polymer powder with the CNTs as the first step, then followed by the melt extrusion process of fiber materials in a single-screw extruder. The extruded fibers were stretched to their maxima and stabilized using a godet set-up. Finally, fibers were wound on a Wayne filament winder machine and tested for their tensile and thermal properties. The tests have shown a remarkable change in mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 polymer fibers with the addition of 0.5 wt% F-CNTs and 1.0 wt% of P-CNTs. To draw a comparison between the improvements achieved, the same process has been repeated with neat nylon-6 polymer. As a result, tensile strength has been increased by 230% for PCFs made with 0.5% F-CNTs and 1% P-CNTs as additives. These fibers have been further characterized by DSC, Raman spectroscopy and SEM which confirm the alignment of CNTs and interfacial bonding to nylon-6 polymer matrix. PMID:21825828

  1. Smart fiber-reinforced polymer rods featuring improved ductility and health monitoring capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Corra, Josh; Konz, Bethany

    2001-06-01

    The strain-measuring capability of fiber optic strain gages in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars was investigated for failure-inducing loads. Fiber optic interferometric sensors were embedded in a pultruded carbon fiber core and then another layer of carbon fibers were filament wound around the core to form a shell. Pultrusion and filament winding techniques protect the fiber optic strain gages from the concrete environment while providing a secure bond to the core and additional ductility to the overall FRP rebar. Tests of coupon FRP rebar and of FRP-rebar-reinforced concrete beams show that the fiber optic strain gages can read internal strain through failure and can duplicate data from conventional linear variable differential transformers and electrical resistance strain gages. Also, the shell of the FRP rebar inside the concrete beams failed before the rebar core providing pseudo-ductility.

  2. Evaluation of RC Bridge Piers Retrofitted using Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP)

    SciTech Connect

    Shayanfar, M. A.; Zarrabian, M. S.

    2008-07-08

    For many long years, steel reinforcements have been considered as the only tool for concrete confinements and studied widely, but nowadays application of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) as an effective alternative is well appreciated. Many bridges have been constructed in the past that are necessary to be retrofitted for resisting against the earthquake motions. The objective of this research is evaluation of nonlinear behavior of RC bridge piers. Eight RC bridge piers have been modeled by ABAQUS software under micromechanical model for homogeneous anisotropic fibers. Also the Bilinear Confinement Model by Nonlinear Transition Zone of Mirmiran has been considered. Then types and angles of fibers and their effects on the final responses were evaluated. Finally, effects of retrofitting are evaluated and some suggestions presented.

  3. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  4. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. LDEF was retrieved on January 12, 1990 from this orbit. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens.

  5. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  6. A Lamb waves based statistical approach to structural health monitoring of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Michele; Gianneo, Andrea; Giglio, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This research investigates a Lamb-wave based structural health monitoring approach matching an out-of-phase actuation of a pair of piezoceramic transducers at low frequency. The target is a typical quasi-isotropic carbon fibre reinforced polymer aeronautical laminate subjected to artificial, via Teflon patches, and natural, via suitable low velocity drop weight impact tests, delaminations. The performance and main influencing factors of such an approach are studied through a Design of Experiment statistical method, considering both Pulse Echo and Pitch Catch configurations of PZT sensors. Results show that some factors and their interactions can effectively influence the detection of a delamination-like damage. PMID:25746761

  7. Determination of Material Parameters for Microbuckling Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, M.

    2015-05-01

    This research focuses on studying the effect of the constitutive law adopted for a matrix material on the compressive response of a unidirectional fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite. To investigate this effect, a periodic unit cell model of a unidirectional composite with an initial fiber waviness and inelastic behavior of the matrix was used. The sensitivity of the compressive strength to the hydrostatic pressure, the flow rule and the fiber misalignment angle were presented. The model was verified against an analytical solution and experimental data. Results of this study indicate that a micromechanical model with correctly identified material parameters provides a useful alternative to theoretical models and experimentation.

  8. Functionalization of Natural Graphite for Use as Reinforcement in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael; Marques, Maria F V; Jonas, Renato; Grafova, Iryna; Grafov, Andriy

    2015-08-01

    Graphite is a naturally abundant material that has been used as reinforcing filler to produce polymeric nanocomposites for various applications including automotive, aerospace and electric-electronic. The objective of this study was to develop methodologies of graphite nanosheets preparation and for incorporation into polymer matrices. By means of different chemical and physical treatments, natural graphite was modified and subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetry (TGA) and the particle size determination. The results obtained clearly show that after the treatments employed, polar chemical groups were inserted on the natural graphite surface. Nanosized graphite particles of high aspect ratio were obtained. PMID:26369221

  9. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, R.; Bavykin, D. V.; Zekonyte, J.; Walsh, F. C.; Wood, R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the ‘drop-cast’ method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM.

  10. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Porras, R; Bavykin, D V; Zekonyte, J; Walsh, F C; Wood, R J

    2016-05-13

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the 'drop-cast' method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young's modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM. PMID:27039947

  11. Characterizing the self-sensing performance of carbon nanotube-enhanced fiber-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola, Bryan R.; La Saponara, Valeria; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2010-04-01

    The increased usage of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) in recent decades has created a need to monitor the unique response of these materials to impact and fatigue damage. As most traditional nondestructive evaluation methods are illsuited to detecting damage in FRPs, new methods must be created without compromising the high strength-to-weight aspects of FRPs. This paper describes the characterization of carbon nanotube-polyelectrolyte thin films applied to glass fiber substrates as a means for in situ strain sensing in glass fiber-reinforced polymers (GFRP). The layer-by-layer deposition process employed is capable of depositing individual and small bundles of carbon nanotubes within a polyelectrolyte matrix and directly onto glass fiber matrices. Upon film fabrication, the nanocomposite-coated GFRP specimens are mounted in a load frame for characterizing their electromechanical performance. This preliminary results obtained from this study has shown that these thin films exhibit bilinear piezoresistivity. Time- and frequency-domain techniques are utilized to characterize the nanocomposite strain sensing response. An equivalent circuit is also derived from electrical impedance spectroscopic analysis of thin film specimens.

  12. Effect of fiber reinforcement on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermooxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-4OR graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Slab-Column Connections Strengthened with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheyroddin, A.; Hoseini Vaez, S. R.; Naderpour, H.

    This study presents nonlinear finite element analysis of slab-column connection in order to investigate the effect of using CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) sheets on their structural behavior. Verification of study needs to calibrate the un-strengthened analytical models by available experimental data. In this case two groups of models with three layers of Solid 65 elements throughout the depth of the slabs were analyzed. One of them was consisted of the smeared reinforcement throughout the entire slab which indicated a reasonably accurate simulation of the load-deflection curves with a steel volume ratio of 0.028 and also gives a good indication of the cracking behavior of the slabs. In the other group, smeared reinforcement located at bottom layer was used. In both groups the pre-cracking branch of the different curves follows the experimental results very closely. Beyond cracking, the models of last group defined appear stiffer. The punching truncated pyramid of control model is in a very close agreement with the experiment. Slab model by using CFRP plates introducing to program by Solid 46 elements, have been analyzed. Results indicated that final deflection of slab has been increased of 36% while strength of the slab has been increased slightly. Also, strengthening of slab with increasing steel volume ratio in the central zone affects on behavior of the slabs with an increase in both, the final load and deflection.

  14. On Complexities of Impact Simulation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Simplified Modeling Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alemi-Ardakani, M.; Milani, A. S.; Yannacopoulos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study. PMID:25431787

  15. On complexities of impact simulation of fiber reinforced polymer composites: a simplified modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Alemi-Ardakani, M; Milani, A S; Yannacopoulos, S

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study. PMID:25431787

  16. Correlation between Rheotens measurements and reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites in the injection molding compounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, Markus G.; Friesenbichler, Walter; Duretek, Ivica; Guttmann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The evaluation of the effectiveness of reinforcement of polymers and polymer nanocomposites(PNCs), in particular the improvement of Young's modulus, is made by performing standardized tensile tests. Structural and morphological characterizations typically are investigated using expensive techniques like transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X- ray scattering and sometimes also rheological analyses (rotational rheometry). The objective of this study is to generate faster and economically advantageous data to verify the quality of the produced PNC-compound in an on-line measurement system. Subsequently injection molded parts are processed by using the Injection Molding Compounder (PNC-IMC) “by only one plasticizing process”. In comparison to the conventional compounding process, where the compound has to be pelletized and fed into the injection molding machine for the second plasticizing process, injection molding compounding combines these two processing steps. This paper shows first results and problems with the implementation of the Rheotens equipment into the concept of the IMC. Different processing techniques and various processing conditions were compared and the occurring effects were detected both with tensile testing and extensional melt rheology. Both, the increase of the Young's modulus by using layered silicates as nanofillersis compared to the virgin polypropylene and the correlation of the level of melt strength with Rheotens measurements is shown. These results give a good overview on both the possibilities and the limitations of the material pre-tests by the use of extensional rheology in the concept of the IMC for producing PNCs. Further studies to enable a fast and efficient way of estimating the level of reinforcement in PNCs by means of Rheotens measurements will be carried out towards industrial usability. Furthermore the verification of exfoliation and intercalation of the layered silicates in the polymer matrix using small angle X- ray

  17. Corrosion of steel members strengthenened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumadian, Ibrahim

    Due to many years of service at several cases of exposure at various environments there are many of steel bridges which are in need of rehabilitation. The infrastructure needs upgrading, repair or maintenance, and also strengthening, but by using an alternative as retrofits methods. The alternative retrofit method, which used fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials which their strength materials comes largely from the fiber such as carbon, glass, and aramid fiber. Of the most important materials used in the rehabilitation of infrastructure is a composite material newly developed in bonded externally carbon fiber and polymer (CFRP) sheets, which has achieved remarkable success in the rehabilitation and upgrading of structural members. This technique has many disadvantages one of them is galvanic corrosion. This study presents the effect of galvanic corrosion on the interfacial strength between carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and a steel substrate. A total of 35 double-lap joint specimens and 19 beams specimens are prepared and exposed to an aggressive service environment in conjunction with an electrical potential method accelerating corrosion damage. Six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including five specimens per category for double-lap joint specimens. And six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including three specimens per category for Beam section specimens. In addition one beam section specimen is control. The degree of corrosion is measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been used to monitor and confirm the proposed corrosion mechanisms on the surface of CFRP. In this study we are using FTIR-spectroscopic measurement systems in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength region (4000 - 400) cm-1 to monitor characteristic spectral features. Upon completion of corrosion processes, all specimens are monotonically loaded until failure

  18. Novel hybrid columns made of ultra-high performance concrete and fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohrevand, Pedram

    The application of advanced materials in infrastructure has grown rapidly in recent years mainly because of their potential to ease the construction, extend the service life, and improve the performance of structures. Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is one such material considered as a novel alternative to conventional concrete. The material microstructure in UHPC is optimized to significantly improve its material properties including compressive and tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, durability, and damage tolerance. Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is another novel construction material with excellent properties such as high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios and good corrosion resistance. Considering the exceptional properties of UHPC and FRP, many advantages can result from the combined application of these two advanced materials, which is the subject of this research. The confinement behavior of UHPC was studied for the first time in this research. The stress-strain behavior of a series of UHPC-filled fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tubes with different fiber types and thicknesses were tested under uniaxial compression. The FRP confinement was shown to significantly enhance both the ultimate strength and strain of UHPC. It was also shown that existing confinement models are incapable of predicting the behavior of FRP-confined UHPC. Therefore, new stress-strain models for FRP-confined UHPC were developed through an analytical study. In the other part of this research, a novel steel-free UHPC-filled FRP tube (UHPCFFT) column system was developed and its cyclic behavior was studied. The proposed steel-free UHPCFFT column showed much higher strength and stiffness, with a reasonable ductility, as compared to its conventional reinforced concrete (RC) counterpart. Using the results of the first phase of column tests, a second series of UHPCFFT columns were made and studied under pseudo-static loading to study the effect of column

  19. High-power picosecond laser drilling/machining of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Sabli, A.

    2016-02-01

    The large differences in physical and thermal properties of the carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite constituents make laser machining of this material challenging. An extended heat-affected zone (HAZ) often occurs. The availability of ultrashort laser pulse sources such as picosecond lasers makes it possible to improve the laser machining quality of these materials. This paper reports an investigation on the drilling and machining of CFRP composites using a state-of-the-art 400 W picosecond laser system. Small HAZs (<25 µm) were obtained on the entry side of 6-mm-diameter hole drilled on sample of 6 mm thickness, whereas no HAZ was seen below the top surface on the cut surfaces. Multiple ring material removal strategy was used. Furthermore, the effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, scanning speed and repetition rate on HAZ sizes and ablation depth was investigated.

  20. First light with a carbon fiber reinforced polymer 0.4 meter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher C.; Santiago, Freddie; Jungwirth, Matthew E.; Martinez, Ty; Restaino, Sergio R.; Bagwell, Brett; Romeo, Robert

    2014-03-01

    For the passed several years, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been investigating the use of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material in the construction of a telescope assembly including the optical components. The NRL, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA) have jointly assembled a prototype telescope and achieved "first light" images with a CFRP 0.4 m aperture telescope. CFRP offers several advantages over traditional materials such as creating structures that are lightweight and low coefficient of thermal expansion and conductivity. The telescope's primary and secondary mirrors are not made from glass, but CFRP, as well. The entire telescope weighs approximately 10 kg while a typical telescope of this size would weigh quite a bit more. We present the achievement of "first light" with this telescope demonstrating the imaging capabilities of this prototype and the optical surface quality of the mirrors with images taken during a day's quiescent periods.

  1. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot,

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  3. Reinforcement of polyetheretherketone polymer with titanium for improved mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Do; Park, Hui-Sun; Kang, Min-Ho; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Estrin, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Blends of ductile Ti metal with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) polymer were studied with regard to their mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility. PEEK/Ti composites with various Ti contents, ranging from 0 vol % to 60 vol %, were produced by compression molding at 370°C. In all composites produced, regardless of the initial Ti content, Ti particles were well distributed in the PEEK matrix. Addition of Ti led to a significant increase in mechanical properties of PEEK. Specifically, an increase in Ti content enhanced compressive strength and stiffness, while preserving ductile fracture behavior. In addition, the use of Ti for reinforcement of PEEK provided the composites with improved in vitro biocompatibility in terms of the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. PMID:25677541

  4. Optimization of microwire/glass-fibre reinforced polymer composites for wind turbine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, F. X.; Peng, H. X.; Chen, Z.; Wang, H.; Zhang, J. W.; Hilton, G.

    2013-11-01

    We here report a comprehensive study of glass-fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) incorporating ferromagnetic microwires for microwave absorption applications. With wire addition, a remarkable dependence of microwave absorption performance appears on the local properties of wires such as wire geometry and the mesostructure such as inter-wire spacing, as well as the embedded depth of the wires layer. The impact testing further demonstrates that the metallic microwires can to some extent improve the impact performance. Based on both the absorption and impact behavior, we propose an optimized design of the microwire/GFRP composites to achieve simultaneous best possible absorption and impact performance for multifunctional applications in aeronautical structures and wind turbines.

  5. Laser Processing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite for Optical Fiber Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, M. S. F.; Sakamoto, J. M. S.; Simoes, J. G. A.; Riva, R.

    The replacement of copper wires by optical fibers for control and monitoring of aircraft systems are gaining more and more acceptance due to weight reductions and their intrinsic reliability. The present investigation proposes a new method for producing fiber optical guidelines in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites using laser texturing and machining. Laser texturing was used to improve the adhesion bonding between the CFRP parts and laser machining is used to create a channel where the optical fiber will be placed and protected. The results show that using only 20 W of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser it is possible to enhance the joint resistance of CFRP composites and also protecting the optical fiber embedded in between two CFRP pieces. Using the proposed technology, the maximum load of a lap joint increased by 85% and the optical fiber remained integral even under severe bending conditions.

  6. Finite element analysis of drilling in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) laminates are attractive for many applications in the aerospace industry especially as aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. Usually drilling is an important final machining process for components made of composite laminates. In drilling of CFRP, it is an imperative task to determine the maximum critical thrust forces that trigger inter-laminar and intra-laminar damage modes owing to highly anisotropic fibrous media; and negotiate integrity of composite structures. In this paper, a 3D finite element (FE) model of drilling in CFRP composite laminate is developed, which accurately takes into account the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. A user defined material model is developed to account for accurate though thickness response of composite laminates. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for a set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results from literature.

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  8. Reinforced poly(propylene oxide): a very soft and extensible dielectric electroactive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, K.; Galantini, F.; Mazurek, P.; Daugaard, A. E.; Gallone, G.; Skov, A. L.

    2013-11-01

    Poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), a novel soft elastomeric material, and its composites were investigated as a new dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP). The PPO networks were obtained from thiol-ene chemistry by photochemical crosslinking of α,ω-diallyl PPO with a tetra-functional thiol. The elastomer was reinforced with hexamethylenedisilazane treated fumed silica to improve the mechanical properties of PPO. The mechanical properties of PPO and composites thereof were investigated by shear rheology and stress-strain measurements. It was found that incorporation of silica particles improved the stability of the otherwise mechanically weak pure PPO network. Dielectric spectroscopy revealed high relative dielectric permittivity of PPO at 103 Hz of 5.6. The relative permittivity was decreased slightly upon addition of fillers, but remained higher than the commonly used acrylic EAP material VHB4910. The electromechanical actuation performance of both PPO and its composites showed properties as good as VHB4910 and a lower viscous loss.

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Optics Quality Assessment for Lightweight Deployable Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, J.; Martinez, T.; Restaino, S.; Santiago, F.; Wilcox, C.; Teare, S.; Romeo, R.; Martin, R.

    2010-09-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory and Composite Mirror Applications (CMA) have been working together for several years on the development of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) optics and telescopes. We have documented the potential advantages of this technology in several other publications, including structural, thermal and weight advantages over traditional steel and glass optical systems. In this paper we present results of a battery of optical tests done on various CFRP replicated mirrors. Our goal is to demonstrate not only the optical quality of such mirrors but also their reproducibility and stability. We show test results on a sample of four mirrors. We performed extensive optical tests and also stability and repeatability tests. These tests are geared towards proving the use of this technology for a variety of optical applications including use in our CFRP telescopes.

  10. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20–450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load–displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  11. Recycling carbon fibre reinforced polymers for structural applications: technology review and market outlook.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Soraia; Pinho, Silvestre T

    2011-02-01

    Both environmental and economic factors have driven the development of recycling routes for the increasing amount of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) waste generated. This paper presents a review of the current status and outlook of CFRP recycling operations, focusing on state-of-the-art fibre reclamation and re-manufacturing processes, and on the commercialisation and potential applications of recycled products. It is shown that several recycling and re-manufacturing processes are reaching a mature stage, with implementations at commercial scales in operation, production of recycled CFRPs having competitive structural performances, and demonstrator components having been manufactured. The major challenges for the sound establishment of a CFRP recycling industry and the development of markets for the recyclates are summarised; the potential for introducing recycled CFRPs in structural components is discussed, and likely promising applications are investigated. PMID:20980138

  12. Segmenting delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite CT using convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammons, Daniel; Winfree, William P.; Burke, Eric; Ji, Shuiwang

    2016-02-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) utilizes a variety of techniques to inspect various materials for defects without causing changes to the material. X-ray computed tomography (CT) produces large volumes of three dimensional image data. Using the task of identifying delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite CT, this work shows that it is possible to automate the analysis of these large volumes of CT data using a machine learning model known as a convolutional neural network (CNN). Further, tests on simulated data sets show that with a robust set of experimental data, it may be possible to go beyond just identification and instead accurately characterize the size and shape of the delaminations with CNNs.

  13. Repeated self-healing of microvascular carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Wass, D. F.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-11-01

    A self-healing, high performance, carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite is demonstrated by embedding a Lewis-acid catalytic curing agent within a laminate, manufactured using out of autoclave (OOA) composite manufacturing methods. Two configurations of healing agent delivery, pre-mixed and autonomous mixing, are investigated via injection of a healing agent through bio-inspired microvascular channels exposed on Mode I fractured crack planes. Healing is effected when an epoxy resin-solvent healing agent mixture reaches the boundary of embedded solid-state scandium(III) triflate (Sc(OTf)3) catalyst, located on the crack plane, to initiate the ring-opening polymerisation (ROP) of epoxides. Tailored self-healing agents confer high healing efficiency values after multiple healing cycles (69-108%) to successfully mitigate against crack propagation within the composite microstructure.

  14. Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission signals in carbon fiber reinforced polymer panels.

    PubMed

    Asamene, Kassahun; Hudson, Larry; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2015-05-01

    Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission (AE) signals in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) crossply and quasi-isotropic panels is examined in this paper. Attenuation coefficients of the fundamental antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) wave modes were determined experimentally along different directions for the two types of CFRP panels. In the frequency range from 100 kHz to 500 kHz, the A0 mode undergoes significantly greater changes due to material related attenuation compared to the S0 mode. Moderate to strong changes in the attenuation levels were noted with propagation directions. Such mode and frequency dependent attenuation introduces major changes in the characteristics of AE signals depending on the position of the AE sensor relative to the source. Results from finite element simulations of a microscopic damage event in the composite laminates are used to illustrate attenuation related changes in modal and frequency components of AE signals. PMID:25682294

  15. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  16. Development of multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites through ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Patterson, Brendan A.; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Sodano, Henry A.

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectric nanowires, in particular zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, have been vastly used in the fabrication of electromechanical devices to convert wasted mechanical energy into useful electrical energy. Over recent years, the growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowires on various structural fibers has led to the development of fiber-based nanostructured energy harvesting devices. However, the development of more realistic energy harvesters that are capable of continuous power generation requires a sufficient mechanical strength to withstand typical structural loading conditions. Yet, a durable, multifunctional material system has not been developed thoroughly enough to generate electrical power without deteriorating the mechanical performance. Here, a hybrid composite energy harvester is fabricated in a hierarchical design that provides both efficient power generating capabilities while enhancing the structural properties of the fiber reinforced polymer composite. Through a simple and low-cost process, a modified aramid fabric with vertically aligned ZnO nanowires grown on the fiber surface is embedded between woven carbon fabrics, which serve as the structural reinforcement as well as the top and the bottom electrodes of the nanowire arrays. The performance of the developed multifunctional composite is characterized through direct vibration excitation and tensile strength examination.

  17. Fabrication Of Carbon-Boron Reinforced Dry Polymer Matrix Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Future generation aerospace vehicles will require specialized hybrid material forms for component structure fabrication. For this reason, high temperature composite prepregs in both dry and wet forms are being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In an attempt to improve compressive properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites, a hybrid carbon-boron tape was developed and used to fabricate composite laminates which were subsequently cut into flexural and compression specimens and tested. The hybrid material, given the designation HYCARB, was fabricated by modifying a previously developed process for the manufacture of dry polymer matrix composite (PMC) tape at LaRC. In this work, boron fibers were processed with IM7/LaRC(TradeMark)IAX poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg to form a dry hybrid tape for Automated Tow Placement (ATP). Boron fibers were encapsulated between two (2) layers of reduced volatile, low fiber areal weight poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg. The hybrid prepreg was then fully imidized and consolidated into a dry tape suitable for ATP. The fabrication of a hybrid boron material form for tow placement aids in the reduction of the overall manufacturing cost of boron reinforced composites, while realizing the improved compression strengths. Composite specimens were press-molded from the hybrid material and exhibited excellent mechanical properties.

  18. Performance of reinforced polymer ablators exposed to a solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, C.; Burgess, T.; Bowen, J.; Deloach, K.; Talmy, I.

    1992-10-01

    Summarized in this report is the effort by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) and FMC Corporation (a launcher manufacturer) to identify new high performance ablators suitable for use on Navy guided missile launchers (GML) and ships' structures. The goal is to reduce ablator erosion by 25 to 50 percent compared to that of the existing ablators such as MXBE350 (rubbermodified phenolic containing glass fiber reinforcement). This reduction in erosion would significantly increase the number of new missiles with higher-thrust, longer burn rocket motors that can be launched prior to ablator refurbishment. In fact, there are a number of new Navy missiles being considered for development and introduction into existing GML: e.g., the Antisatellite Missile (ASM) and the Theater High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Missile. The U.S. Navy experimentally evaluated the eight best fiber-reinforced, polymer composites from a possible field of 25 off-the-shelf ablators previously screened by FMC Corporation. They were tested by the Navy in highly aluminized solid rocket motor exhaust plumes to determine their ability to resist erosion and to insulate.... Ablator, Guided Missile Launchers, Erosion, Tactical missiles, Convective heating, Solid rocket motors, Aluminum oxide particles.

  19. Flexural properties of denture-base polymer reinforced with glass-fibre polysulphone composite.

    PubMed

    Kemp, P L; de Wet, F A; Botha, S J; Levin, J

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of glass-fibre composite reinforcement on the flexural strength and flexural modulus poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). Prefabricated electrical glass-fibre polysulphone composite rods (GF/PSu), 3mm in diameter, were incorporated in cylindrical, heat polymerizing PMMA specimens with diameters of 4, 5 and 6mm respectively (n = 10). These specimens were compared with PMMA control groups of similar dimension. A three point loading test was performed in air after storage of specimens in water at 37 degrees C for 8 weeks. The following variables were measured : Flexural Strength (FS) and Flexural Modulus (FM). The data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). After testing, the fracture zone was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The glass-fibre reinforcement used in this study significantly enhanced both the FM and FS values of PMMA. This enhancement was, however, progressively reduced in relation to an increase in cross-sectional dimension of the specimens. SEM evaluation revealed delamination and fracture of the glass-fibres in the polymer matrix. PMID:15449438

  20. Long-term water-aging of whisker-reinforced polymer-matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H K

    2003-01-01

    Long-term water exposure may degrade polymer-matrix composites. This study investigated the water-aging of whisker composites. It was hypothesized that whiskers would provide stable and substantial reinforcement, and that whisker type would affect water-aging resistance. Silica-fused Si(3)N(4) and SiC whiskers were incorporated into a resin. The specimens were tested by three-point flexure and nano-indentation vs. water-aging for 1 to 730 days. After 730 days, SiC composite had a strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 185 +/- 33 MPa, similar to 146 +/- 44 MPa for Si(3)N(4) composite (p = 0.064); both were significantly higher than 67 +/- 23 MPa for an inlay/onlay control (p < 0.001). Compared with 1 day, the strength of the SiC composite showed no decrease, while that of the Si(3)N(4) composite decreased. The decrease was due to whisker weakening rather than to resin degradation or interface breakdown. Whisker composites also had higher moduli than the controls. In conclusion, silica-fused whiskers bonded to polymer matrix and resisted long-term water attack, resulting in much stronger composites than the controls after water-aging. PMID:12508045

  1. Stabilizing Surfactant Templated Cylindrical Mesopores in Polymer and Carbon Films through Composite Formation with Silica Reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lingyan; Feng, Dan; Lee, Hae-Jeong; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Quanyan; Zhao, Dongyuan; Vogt, Bryan D.

    2010-10-22

    A facile approach to maintain the periodic mesostructure of cylindrical pores in polymer-resin and carbon films after thermal template removal is explored through the reactive coassembly of resol (carbon precursor) and tetraethylorthosilicate (silica precursor) with triblock copolymer Pluronic F127. Without silica, a low porosity, disordered film is formed after pyrolysis despite the presence of an ordered mesostructure prior to template removal. However for silica concentration greater than 25 wt %, pyrolysis at 350 C yields a mesoporous silica-polymer film with well-defined pore mesostructure. These films remain well ordered upon carbonization at 800 C. In addition to the mesostructural stability, the addition of silica to the matrix impacts other morphological characteristics. For example, the average pore size and porosity of the films increase from 3.2 to 7.5 nm and 12 to 45%, respectively, as the concentration of silica in the wall matrix increases from 0 to 32 wt %. The improved thermal stability of the ordered mesostructure with the addition of silica to the matrix is attributed to the reinforcement of the mechanical properties leading to resistance to stress induced collapse of the mesostructure during template removal.

  2. Light scattering characterization of carbon nanotube dispersions and reinforcement of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian

    Dispersion and morphology of carbon nanotubes as well as enhancement for rubber reinforcement are studied. Several approaches including surfactant aids, functionalization and plasma treatment are used to assist dispersion. Several characterization methods are used to assess both the degree of dispersion and the level of reinforcement. Small angle light scattering is carried out as a primary tool to assess structure and dispersion of nanotubes treated through these approaches Stress-strain measurement and dynamic mechanical analysis are performed on elastomeric composites to study polymer reinforcement. These results are divided into five sections. The first section focuses on dispersion of untreated and acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanofibers (MWNF) suspended in water. Light scattering data provide the first insights into the mechanism by which surface treatment promotes dispersion. Both acid-treated and untreated nanofibers exhibit hierarchical morphology consisting of small-scale aggregates (bundles) that agglomerate to form fractal clusters that eventually precipitate. Although the morphology of the aggregates and agglomerates is nearly independent of surface treatment, their time evolution is quite different. Acid oxidation has little effect on bundle morphology. Rather acid treatment inhibits agglomeration of the bundles. The second section focuses on dispersion of the solubilized nanofibers. Light scattering data indicate that PEG-functionalized sample is dispersed at small rod-like bundle (side-by-side aggregate) level. Solubilization is achieved not by disrupting small-scale size-by-side bundles, but mainly by completely inhibiting large-scale agglomeration. The third section focuses on dispersion of plasma-treated carbon nanofibers. Comparison of untreated and plasma-treated nanofibers indicates that plasma treatment facilitates dispersion of nanofibers. The fourth section focuses on dispersion and structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs

  3. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  4. Surface modification of fiber reinforced polymer composites and their attachment to bone simulating material.

    PubMed

    Hautamäki, M P; Puska, M; Aho, A J; Kopperud, H M; Vallittu, P K

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber orientation of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) made of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and E-glass to the surface fabrication process by solvent dissolution. Intention of the dissolution process was to expose the fibers and create a macroporous surface onto the FRC to enhance bone bonding of the material. The effect of dissolution and fiber direction to the bone bonding capability of the FRC material was also tested. Three groups of FRC specimens (n = 18/group) were made of PMMA and E-glass fiber reinforcement: (a) group with continuous fibers parallel to the surface of the specimen, (b) continuous fibers oriented perpendicularly to the surface, (c) randomly oriented short (discontinuous) fibers. Fourth specimen group (n = 18) made of plain PMMA served as controls. The specimens were subjected to a solvent treatment by tetrahydrofuran (THF) of either 5, 15 or 30 min of time (n = 6/time point), and the advancement of the dissolution (front) was measured. The solvent treatment also exposed the fibers and created a surface roughness on to the specimens. The solvent treated specimens were embedded into plaster of Paris to simulate bone bonding by mechanical locking and a pull-out test was undertaken to determine the strength of the attachment. All the FRC specimens dissolved as function of time, as the control group showed no marked dissolution during the study period. The specimens with fibers along the direction of long axis of specimen began to dissolve significantly faster than specimens in other groups, but the test specimens with randomly oriented short fibers showed the greatest depth of dissolution after 30 min. The pull-out test showed that the PMMA specimens with fibers were retained better by the plaster of Paris than specimens without fibers. However, direction of the fibers considerably influenced the force of attachment. The fiber reinforcement increases significantly the

  5. Strength analysis and design of adhesive joints between circular elements made of metal and reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelekh, B. L.; Marchuk, M. V.; Kogut, I. S.

    1992-06-01

    The stress-strain state of an adhesive joint between cylindrical components made of a metal (steel) and a cross-reinforced filament-wound composite (glass/polymer or basalt/polymer) was investigated under static axial loading using newly proposed experimental techniques and a refined mathematical model. Analytical expressions are obtained for contact stresses in the adhesive joint. The maximum permissible load and the ultimate shear strength of the joint are determined. The experimental results are found to be in satisfactory agreement with model predictions.

  6. Three-Dimensional Nanoporous Cellulose Gels as a Flexible Reinforcement Matrix for Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuqun; Huang, Junchao; Liu, Chuanjun; Ding, Beibei; Kuga, Shigenori; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Lina

    2015-10-21

    With the world's focus on utilization of sustainable natural resources, the conversion of wood and plant fibers into cellulose nanowhiskers/nanofibers is essential for application of cellulose in polymer nanocomposites. Here, we present a novel fabrication method of polymer nanocomposites by in-situ polymerization of monomers in three-dimensionally nanoporous cellulose gels (NCG) prepared from aqueous alkali hydroxide/urea solution. The NCG have interconnected nanofibrillar cellulose network structure, resulting in high mechanical strength and size stability. Polymerization of the monomer gave P(MMA/BMA)/NCG, P(MMA/BA)/NCG nanocomposites with a volume fraction of NCG ranging from 15% to 78%. SEM, TEM, and XRD analyses show that the NCG are finely distributed and preserved well in the nanocomposites after polymerization. DMA analysis demonstrates a significant improvement in tensile storage modulus E' above the glass transition temperature; for instance, at 95 °C, E' is increased by over 4 orders of magnitude from 0.03 MPa of the P(MMA/BMA) up to 350 MPa of nanocomposites containing 15% v/v NCG. This reinforcement effect can be explained by the percolation model. The nanocomposites also show remarkable improvement in solvent resistance (swelling ratio of 1.3-2.2 in chloroform, acetone, and toluene), thermal stability (do not melt or decompose up to 300 °C), and low coefficients of thermal expansion (in-plane CTE of 15 ppm·K(-1)). These nanocomposites will have great promising applications in flexible display, packing, biomedical implants, and many others. PMID:26397710

  7. The strong diamagnetic behaviour of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galehdar, A.; Nicholson, K. J.; Callus, P. J.; Rowe, W. S. T.; John, S.; Wang, C. H.; Ghorbani, K.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon fibers are finite conductors with a weak diamagnetic response in a static magnetic field. When illuminated with a high-frequency alternating electromagnetic wave such that the skin depth is greater than the fiber diameter, carbon-fiber composites are shown to exhibit a strong dynamic diamagnetic response. The magnetic susceptibility (χm) is controlled by the polarization angle (θ), which is the angle between the incident electric field and conductor direction. A closed form solution for this behaviour was derived using Maxwell's equations and an understanding of the induced conductor currents. The equation was verified using simulation and free space "wall" and waveguide measurements on unidirectional IM7/977-3 carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. The measured responses ranged from non-magnetic at θ = 90°, χm = 0, up to strongly diamagnetic at θ = 30°, χm = -0.75, over the 8-18 GHz bandwidth. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and computational simulations.

  8. Modeling continuous-fiber reinforced polymer composites for exploration of damage tolerant concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Peter J.

    This work aims to improve the predictive capability for fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite laminates using the finite element method. A new tool for modeling composite damage was developed which considers important modes of failure. Well-known micromechanical models were implemented to predict material values for material systems of interest to aerospace applications. These generated material values served as input to intralaminar and interlaminar damage models. A three-dimensional in-plane damage material model was implemented and behavior verified. Deficiencies in current state-of-the-art interlaminar capabilities were explored using the virtual crack closure technique and the cohesive zone model. A user-defined cohesive element was implemented to discover the importance of traction-separation material constitutive behavior. A novel method for correlation of traction-separation parameters was created. This new damage modeling tool was used for evaluation of novel material systems to improve damage tolerance. Classical laminate plate theory was used in a full-factorial study of layerwise-hybrid laminates. Filament-wound laminated composite cylindrical shells were subjected to quasi-static loading to validate the finite element computational composite damage model. The new tool for modeling provides sufficient accuracy and generality for use on a wide-range of problems.

  9. High Power Laser Cutting of Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Polymers with cw- and Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Wolf, N.; Petring, D.

    Glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers with thermoplastic matrix enable high volume production with short cycle times. Cutting and trimming operations in these production chains require the use of high average laser power for an efficient cutting speed, but employment of high laser power runs the risk to induce a wide heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with investigations with cw and ns-pulsed CO2-laser radiation in the kilowatt range in single-pass and multiple-pass processes. Using multi-pass processing at high processing speeds of 100 m/min and above a reduced heat affected zone in the range of 100 μm to 200 μm could be achieved by the ns-pulsed radiation. With cw radiation at the same average power of 1 kW however, the HAZ was 300-400 μm. Also employing ns-pulses in the kW-range average power leads to heat accumulation in the material. Small HAZ were obtained with sufficient break times between subsequent passes.

  10. Research on the mechanical properties of a glass fiber reinforced polymer-steel combined truss structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  11. Argon-oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on carbon fiber reinforced polymer for improved bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartosias, Marios

    Acceptance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structures requires a robust surface preparation method with improved process controls capable of ensuring high bond quality. Surface preparation in a production clean room environment prior to applying adhesive for bonding would minimize risk of contamination and reduce cost. Plasma treatment is a robust surface preparation process capable of being applied in a production clean room environment with process parameters that are easily controlled and documented. Repeatable and consistent processing is enabled through the development of a process parameter window utilizing techniques such as Design of Experiments (DOE) tailored to specific adhesive and substrate bonding applications. Insight from respective plasma treatment Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and screening tests determined critical process factors from non-factors and set the associated factor levels prior to execution of the DOE. Results from mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) testing per ASTM D 5528 [1] standard and DOE statistical analysis software are used to produce a regression model and determine appropriate optimum settings for each factor.

  12. Prediction of failure in notched carbon-fibre-reinforced-polymer laminates under multi-axial loading.

    PubMed

    Tan, J L Y; Deshpande, V S; Fleck, N A

    2016-07-13

    A damage-based finite-element model is used to predict the fracture behaviour of centre-notched quasi-isotropic carbon-fibre-reinforced-polymer laminates under multi-axial loading. Damage within each ply is associated with fibre tension, fibre compression, matrix tension and matrix compression. Inter-ply delamination is modelled by cohesive interfaces using a traction-separation law. Failure envelopes for a notch and a circular hole are predicted for in-plane multi-axial loading and are in good agreement with the observed failure envelopes from a parallel experimental study. The ply-by-ply (and inter-ply) damage evolution and the critical mechanisms of ultimate failure also agree with the observed damage evolution. It is demonstrated that accurate predictions of notched compressive strength are obtained upon employing the band broadening stress for microbuckling, highlighting the importance of this damage mode in compression. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242302

  13. Crystallization kinetics and thermal resistance of bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumsorn, S.; Srisawat, N.; On, J. Wong; Pivsa-Art, S.; Hamada, H.

    2014-05-01

    Bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites were prepared in this study. Biodegradable poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) was blended with bamboo fiber in a twin screw extruder with varied bamboo content from 20-0wt%. PBS/bamboo fiber composites were fabricated by compression molding process. The effect of bamboo fiber contents on properties of the composites was investigated. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetic study of the composites was investigated based on Avrami equation. The kinetic parameters indicated that bamboo fiber acted as heterogeneous nucleation and enhanced crystallinity of the composites. Bamboo fiber was well dispersed on PBS matrix and good adhered with the matrix. Tensile strength of the composites slightly deceased with adding bamboo fiber. However, tensile modulus and impact strength of the composites increased when increasing bamboo fiber contents. It can be noted that bamboo fiber promoted crystallization and crystallinity of PBS in the composites. Therefore, the composites were better in impact load transferring than neat PBS, which exhibited improving on impact performance of the composites.

  14. Demonstration of a robust curved carbon fiber reinforced polymer deformable mirror with low surface error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughenour, Blake; Ammons, S. Mark; Hart, Michael; Romeo, Robert; Martin, Robert; Rademacher, Matt; Bailey, Hop

    2010-07-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites provide several advantages as a substrate for thin-shell adaptive secondary mirrors, including high stiffness-to-weight ratio and low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). We have addressed some of these concerns using a prototype CFRP mirror under actuation. Using 4D and Newton interferometry, we present measurements of surface quality at a range of temperatures. Under actuator relaxation at room temperature, its surface error is low (92 nm RMS) and dominated by edge curvature. This error is reduced further under best actuator correction to 43 nm RMS, placing it into consideration for use in near-IR astronomy. The low surface error internal to the outer ring of actuators - 17 nm RMS at 60°F and 33 nm RMS at 20°F - suggests that larger mirrors will have a similar figure quality under actuator correction on ground-based AO systems. Furthermore, the actuator forces required to correct the figure are small compared to the dynamic range of voice coil actuators (~0.1 N). In addition, surface roughness is characterized to address the effects of high spatial frequency errors.

  15. Research on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Steel Combined Truss Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  16. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  17. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  18. Hidden defect identification in carbon fibre reinforced polymer plates using magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lu; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2014-05-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials pose new challenges to the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. This study addresses the issue of large defect identification in CFRP plates using electromagnetic measurements. A dual plane magnetic induction tomography (MIT) technique is proposed as a method for damage localization in composite parts, where two arrays of planar sensors are utilized to measure the changes in induced voltages due to the changes in electrical conductivity properties. This geometry meets the requirements of damage inspection in plate structures and thus makes the imaging process feasible. The electrical voltage measurements are used as input to inversely map the spatial resolution of the samples in the region of interest. The stability and detectability of the dual plane system is examined using small metallic cubes. Both individual and multiple instances of damage embedded in CFRP samples are created as a representation of the possible manufacturing defects. Experimental study shows that the presence of damage can be identified in both cases using the dual plane MIT system. With advanced sensing design, rapid data collection unit and improvement in resolution, MIT could become a rapid NDE technique for the integrity inspection of composite structures.

  19. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  20. Basic study of monitoring on fibre reinforced polymers: theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglioli, B.; Strauss, A.; Pascale, G.; Bergmeister, K.

    2005-06-01

    Recent research activities, technological utilization and commercialization activities in sensors and acquisition systems for monitoring have strongly supported the introduction of these innovations and new concepts in civil structural engineering. The impact of monitoring and assessing the health state of infrastructures, as well as new and old constructions, has become important and it seems to be one of the largest industries in the world. With the aim of monitoring new or repaired structures various monitoring systems have been extensively employed in recent years. In particular, in this paper attention is focused on the procedures usually adopted for monitoring the strengthening systems based on fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) applied to civil structures. Electrical strain gauges are often used to detect strain variations, but on composite materials the measures can be affected by various factors, such as the characteristics of the resin coating, the type of glue and the gauge length. In this paper the measurement errors on FRP elements are studied, from a theoretical approach developed in previous work on a deterministic basis. This approach is extended to the probabilistic field, with the aim of performing a sensitivity analysis of the basic variables which can cause errors in strain measurements. Additionally, the previous approach is extended to study the effect of the deviation of the direction of the gauges from the longitudinal axis of the FRP sheets. Finally, a comparison with experimental data is performed.

  1. Self-monitoring fiber reinforced polymer strengthening system for civil engineering infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoliang; Dawood, Mina; Peters, Kara; Rizkalla, Sami

    2008-03-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) materials are currently used for strengthening civil engineering infrastructures. The strengthening system is dependant on the bond characteristics of the FRP to the external surface of the structure to be effective in resisting the applied loads. This paper presents an innovative self-monitoring FRP strengthening system. The system consists of two components which can be embedded in FRP materials to monitor the global and local behavior of the strengthened structure respectively. The first component of the system is designed to evaluate the applied load acting on a structure based on elongation of the FRP layer along the entire span of the structure. Success of the global system has been demonstrated using a full-scale prestressed concrete bridge girder which was loaded up to failure. The test results indicate that this type of sensor can be used to accurately determine the load prior to failure within 15 percent of the measured value. The second sensor component consists of fiber Bragg grating sensors. The sensors were used to monitor the behavior of steel double-lap shear splices tested under tensile loading up to failure. The measurements were used to identify abnormal structural behavior such as epoxy cracking and FRP debonding. Test results were also compared to numerical values obtained from a three dimensional shear-lag model which was developed to predict the sensor response.

  2. Intrinsic signatures of polymer based fiber reinforced composite structures: An ultrasonic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Good, M.S.; Hansen, N.H.; Heasler, P.G.; Undem, H.A.; Fuller, J.L.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    Combination of ultrasound, image comparison, and statistical analysis provide a method for acquiring a subsurface, intrinsic signature from polymer based, fiber-reinforced composites. Although materials properties are carefully controlled, localized fluctuations in the macrostructure and microstructure permit a basis for ultrasound and other NDE methods to read intrinsic signatures from a material. Under ideal conditions where a material signature is stable and has sufficient spatial features as a signature, an error rate on the order of one-out-of-a-million is feasible. A conclusion of an independent functional test performed on the laboratory prototype as it existed in June 1991 is that the system proved effective as a proof-of-concept system. An issue raised by the independent evaluation is that system performance is still at risk of factors relating to signature stability, particularly moisture absorption and material creep. System improvements made to mitigate noise sources identified by the independent evaluation include (1) implementation of a 3.0 {minus} 4.5 {mu}S software gate, (2) use of a RMS amplitude instead of the gated peak amplitude, and (3) optional use of a suction cup holder to facilitate reader alignment and scan consistency.

  3. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutenaere, S.; Lauro, F.; Bennani, B.; Matsumoto, T.; Mottola, E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  4. Hierarchical analysis of the degradation of fibre-reinforced polymers under the presence of void imperfections.

    PubMed

    Liebig, Wilfried V; Schulte, Karl; Fiedler, Bodo

    2016-07-13

    The subject of this work is the investigation of the influence of voids on the mechanical properties of fibre-reinforced polymers (FRPs) under compression loading. To specify the damage accumulation of FRPs in the presence of voids, the complex three-dimensional structure of the composite including voids was analysed and a reduced mechanical model composite was derived. The hierarchical analysis of the model composite on a micro-scale level implies the description of the stress and strain behaviour of the matrix using the photoelasticity technique and digital image correlation technology. These studies are presented along with an analytical examination of the stability of a single fibre. As a result of the experimental and analytical studies, the stiffness of the matrix and fibre as well as their bonding, the initial fibre orientation and the fibre diameter have the highest impact on the failure initiation. All these facts lead to a premature fibre-matrix debonding with ongoing loss of stability of the fibre and followed by kink-band formation. Additional studies on the meso-scale of transparent glass FRPs including a unique void showed that the experiments carried out on the model composites could be transferred to real composites. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242296

  5. An improved method for testing tension properties of fiber-reinforced polymer rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guoqing; Ma, Jian; Dong, Guohua

    2010-03-01

    We have conducted a series of tests to measure tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebar. In these tests, the ends of each rebar specimen were embedded in steel tube filled with expansive cement, and the rebar was loaded by gripping the tubes with the conventional fixture during the tensile tests. However, most of specimens were failed at the ends where the section changed abruptly. Numerical simulations of the stress field at bar ends in such tests by ANSYS revealed that such unexpected failure modes were caused by the test setup. The changing abruptly of the section induced stress concentration. So the test results would be regarded as invalid. An improved testing method is developed in this paper to avoid this issue. A transition part was added between the free segment of the rebar and the tube, which could eliminate the stress concentration effectively and thus yield more accurate values for the properties of FRP rebar. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated by both experimental tests and numerical analysis.

  6. An improved method for testing tension properties of fiber-reinforced polymer rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guoqing; Ma, Jian; Dong, Guohua

    2009-12-01

    We have conducted a series of tests to measure tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebar. In these tests, the ends of each rebar specimen were embedded in steel tube filled with expansive cement, and the rebar was loaded by gripping the tubes with the conventional fixture during the tensile tests. However, most of specimens were failed at the ends where the section changed abruptly. Numerical simulations of the stress field at bar ends in such tests by ANSYS revealed that such unexpected failure modes were caused by the test setup. The changing abruptly of the section induced stress concentration. So the test results would be regarded as invalid. An improved testing method is developed in this paper to avoid this issue. A transition part was added between the free segment of the rebar and the tube, which could eliminate the stress concentration effectively and thus yield more accurate values for the properties of FRP rebar. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated by both experimental tests and numerical analysis.

  7. Fusobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae: Important players for CRC?

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an essential role in regulating intestinal homeostasis through its capacity to modulate various biological activities ranging from barrier, immunity and metabolic function. Not surprisingly, microbial dysbiosis is associated with numerous intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In this piece, we will review recent evidence that gut microbial dysbiosis can influence intestinal disease, including colitis and CRC. We will discuss the biological events implicated in the development of microbial dysbiosis and the emergence of CRC-associated microorganisms, focusing on E.coli and F. nucleatum. Finally, the mechanisms by which E.coli and F. nucleatum exert potentially carcinogenic effects on the host will be reviewed. PMID:24972311

  8. Stiffness and strength of fiber reinforced polymer composite bridge deck systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Aixi

    This research investigates two principal characteristics that are of primary importance in Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bridge deck applications: STIFFNESS and STRENGTH. The research was undertaken by investigating the stiffness and strength characteristics of the multi-cellular FRP bridge deck systems consisting of pultruded FRP shapes. A systematic analysis procedure was developed for the stiffness analysis of multi-cellular FRP deck systems. This procedure uses the Method of Elastic Equivalence to model the cellular deck as an equivalent orthotropic plate. The procedure provides a practical method to predict the equivalent orthotropic plate properties of cellular FRP decks. Analytical solutions for the bending analysis of single span decks were developed using classical laminated plate theory. The analysis procedures can be extended to analyze continuous FRP decks. It can also be further developed using higher order plate theories. Several failure modes of the cellular FRP deck systems were recorded and analyzed through laboratory and field tests and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Two schemes of loading patches were used in the laboratory test: a steel patch made according to the ASSHTO's bridge testing specifications; and a tire patch made from a real truck tire reinforced with silicon rubber. The tire patch was specially designed to simulate service loading conditions by modifying real contact loading from a tire. Our research shows that the effects of the stiffness and contact conditions of loading patches are significant in the stiffness and strength testing of FRP decks. Due to the localization of load, a simulated tire patch yields larger deflection than the steel patch under the same loading level. The tire patch produces significantly different failure compared to the steel patch: a local bending mode with less damage for the tire patch; and a local punching-shear mode for the steel patch. A deck failure function method is proposed for predicting the

  9. An experimental and theoretical study of the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of nanoclay reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Nuno R. O.

    The goals of this study are to investigate the tensile loading and low velocity impact response of nanoclay reinforced polymers at various temperatures. Three types of polypropylene (PP 3371, Borealis and TP 3868) and epoxy with various nanoclay reinforcement percentages were considered. Tensile tests were conducted on ASTM Type I specimens instrumented with strain gauges using an MTS testing machine equipped with an environmental chamber. Low velocity impact tests were also performed using an Instron-Dynatup 8250 impact test machine equipped with an environmental chamber. Tensile test results were used to determine the effect of nanoclay reinforcement and different resins on the mechanical properties at various temperatures. The tensile tests results indicate that the Young's modulus of the nanocomposite increases with increasing nanoclay reinforcement percentage. The temperature has even a more significant effect. It was observed that as the temperature decreases the material becomes brittle, has higher stiffness and fails at lower strains. High temperatures have the opposite effect, in that, as the temperature increases the material loses stiffness and becomes more ductile. Temperature and nanoclay reinforcement affect the Poisson's ratio also, but this effect is less significant. In general, as the temperature increases the Poisson's ratio also increases. However, an increase in nanoclay reinforcement generally reduces the Poisson's ratio. The mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites were also calculated using the Mori-Tanaka formulation and the finite element method. Furthermore, the Mori-Tanaka model was modified to include the effect of temperature and voids. In the Mori-Tanaka formulation three types of nanoclay particle distribution was assumed: oriented nanoclay particles parallel to the direction of tensile loading, 2-D randomly distributed particles and 3-D randomly distributed particles. The finite element calculations were performed on a

  10. Properties of glass/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sevkani, V. R.; Patel, B. R.; Patel, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    Composite Materials are well known for their tailor-made properties. For the fabrication of composites different types of reinforcements are used for different applications. Sometimes for a particular application, one type of reinforcement may not fulfill the requirements. Therefore, more than one type of reinforcements may be used. Thus, the idea of hybrid composites arises. Hybrid composites are made by joining two or more different reinforcements with suitable matrix system. It helps to improve the properties of composite materials. In the present work glass/carbon fiber reinforcement have been used with a matrix triglycidyl ether of tris(m-hydroxy phenyl) phosphate epoxy resin using amine curing agent. Different physical and mechanical properties of the glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber reinforced polymeric systems have been found out.

  11. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  12. Fabrication and static characterization of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers with embedded NiTi shape memory wire actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araújo, C. J.; Rodrigues, L. F. A.; Coutinho Neto, J. F.; Reis, R. P. B.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) with embedded NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators were manufactured using a universal testing machine equipped with a thermally controlled chamber. Beam specimens containing cold-worked, annealed and trained NiTi SMA wires distributed along their neutral plane were fabricated. Several tests in a three-point bending mode at different constant temperatures were performed. To verify thermal buckling effects, electrical activation of the specimens was realized in a cantilevered beam mode and the influence of the SMA wire actuators on the tip deflection of the composite is demonstrated.

  13. Inductive wireless sensor-actuator node for structural health monitoring of fiber reinforced polymers by means of Lamb-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, Oliver; Salas, Mariugenia; Herrmann, Axel S.; Lang, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Wireless excitation of Piezo-Wafer-Active-Sensors (PWAS) was achieved using Low-frequency coils produced via Tailored-Fiber-Placement. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer behaves as conductor and depending on the frequency it shields radio waves; this effect is rising at high-frequency. A high permeability material was placed under the highfrequency antenna and re-tuning was performed to improve the quality of transmission. In this manner sensor responses were successfully transmitted wirelessly by analog amplitude modulation. The signals were evaluated to verify the functionality in presence of defects like delamination or holes. Generated power was confirmed to be enough to excite the actuator.

  14. An experimental investigation into the behavior of glassfiber reinforced polymer elements at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kenny Zongxi

    This thesis presents a literature review and results of an experimental study about the effects of high temperatures and cyclic loading on the physical and mechanical properties of pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) square tubes used in civil engineering structural applications. Most laboratory researches have focused mainly on the effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of the GFRP square tubes. Limited research has focused on the tensile strength of GFRP coupons under elevated temperatures. Dynamic Mechanical Analyses (DMA) was performed to assess the viscoelastic behavior including the glass transition temperature of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP coupons were tested under elevated temperatures to investigate the tensile strength and the effect of elevated temperatures to the tensile strength of GFRP. The results of an experimental program performed on fifty GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.83m at normal temperatures were discussed to investigate compression performance. Another experimental program was performed on 20 GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.22m under elevated temperatures. The experiments results were discussed and showed that the compressive strength of GFRP material was influenced by several factors including the glass transition v temperature and the connection bolts. Failure modes under 25°C and 75°C were crushing and the failure modes with the temperatures above 75°C were not typical crushing due to the glass transition of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP square tubes with length of 0.61m were tested with the same experimental program under elevated temperatures as the control group. Twelve GFRP square tubes with the same size were subjected to cyclic loading under elevated temperatures to investigate the effect of the cyclic loading to the compression properties of GFRP material. According to the experimental results and the discussion, the stiffness was reduced by the cyclic loading. On the contrary, the

  15. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  16. Non-destructive evaluation of porosity and its effect on mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, M. R.; Binoy, M. P.; Surya, N. M.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Engelbart, R. W.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, an attempt is made to induce porosity of varied levels in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based polymer composite laminates fabricated using prepregs by varying the fabrication parameters such as applied vacuum, autoclave pressure and curing temperature. Different NDE tools have been utilized to evaluate the porosity content and correlate with measurable parameters of different NDE techniques. Primarily, ultrasonic imaging and real time digital X-ray imaging have been tried to obtain a measurable parameter which can represent or reflect the amount of porosity contained in the composite laminate. Also, effect of varied porosity content on mechanical properties of the CFRP composite materials is investigated through a series of experimental investigations. The outcome of the experimental approach has yielded interesting and encouraging trend as a first step towards developing an NDE tool for quantification of effect of varied porosity in the polymer composite materials.

  17. Characterization of nanocellulose reinforced semi-interpenetrating polymer network of poly(vinyl alcohol) & polyacrylamide composite films.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Arup; Chakrabarty, Debabrata

    2015-12-10

    Semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) of poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyacrylamide was reinforced with various doses of nanocellulose. The different composite films thus prepared were characterized with respect to their mechanical, thermal, morphological and barrier properties. The composite film containing 5 wt.% of nanocellulose showed the highest tensile strength. The semi-interpenetrating polymer network of poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyacrylamide; and its various composites with nanocellulose were almost identical in their thermal stability. Each of the composites however exhibited much superior stability with respect to the linear poly(vinyl alcohol) and crosslinked polyacrylamide. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies exhibited phase separated morphology where agglomerates of nanocellulose were found to be dispersed in the matrix of the semi-IPN. The moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR) was the lowest for the film containing 5 wt.% of nanocellulose. PMID:26428121

  18. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  19. Efficient Load Transfer to Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes as Reinforcement in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakoli, Ali Nabipour; Cai, Wei; Jiehe, Sui; Feng, Jiang Tao

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grafted with poly(L-lactide-e-caprolactone) (PCLA) were synthesized by in situ ring opening polymerization and used as a reinforcement for neat PCLA. The analyzed data revealed that the applied tensile load on the composite was transferred to the functionalized MWCNTs, leading to a strain failure of the MWCNTs rather than an adhesive failure between the MWCNTs and the matrix. In comparison between the functionalized and pristine MWCNTs, as reinforcement materials for PCLA random copolymers (80% L-lactide (LA), 20% e-caprolactone (CL)) (PCLAR80), the functionalized MWCNTs are more effective reinforcement materials than pristine MWCNTs. In comparison with the neat PCLAR80, the increasing in tensile strength (28.03%) and elongation at failure (49.6%) when functionalized MWCNT loading reaches 1.0 wt%, indicate that an effective reinforcement of the MWCNT-OH-g-PCLA.

  20. Microscopic study of surface degradation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer rods embedded in concrete castings subjected to environmental conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, L.C.; Puterman, M.

    1997-12-31

    The surface degradation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) pultruded rods when embedded in concrete castings and subjected to environmental conditioning is discussed in this paper. Investigation of the degradation of the GFRP rods were performed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Unidirectionally reinforced pultruded rods (6.3- and 12.7-mm diameters) containing E-glass fibers in polyester and vinylester matrices were conditioned at standard laboratory conditions (21 C, 65% relative humidity) or submerged in aqueous solutions (tap water) at 80 C for durations of 14 and 84 days. Observations of the surfaces and cross-sections of the rods by optical microscopy and SEM revealed a variety of degradation phenomena. Embedded hygrothermally conditioned rods were found to have developed surface blisters of different sizes and depths. SEM studies of the surface revealed degradation of the polymer matrix material and exposure and degradation of the fibers close to the surface of the rods. The rods with the vinylester resin matrix showed less extensive degradation than those with the polyester resin matrix; however, the degradation characteristics of the two types of rods appear to be similar.

  1. CrcZ and CrcX regulate carbon utilization in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are important components of many regulatory pathways in bacteria and play key roles in regulating factors important for virulence. Carbon catabolite repression control is modulated by small RNAs (crcZ or crcZ and crcY) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. ...

  2. The effect of shock wave impingement on thin, woven glass fiber reinforced, polymer composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Douglas M.

    High-performance fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been increasingly used in many applications over the last 30 years. Their high specific stiffness, specific strength, and energy absorption capacity have made them attractive as replacements for traditional materials. While the dynamic response of homogeneous or monolithic materials has been well documented, the response of FRP composites is still under investigation. Knowledge of the response of FRP composites under this type of loading is essential to evaluating its performance as a structural or protective material. While such information starts to be slowly available, the effects of dynamic thermomechanical extremes such as shock wave loading on the FRP composites is relatively unknown. The challenge then is to develop a consistent laboratory methodology that allows investigations of the interactions between a FRP composite and a shock wave and eventually testing of such materials for performance evaluations under shock loading. Measuring the deformation of test specimens caused by shock wave impingement of different intensities was basic to understanding the gross effects on the FRP composites. In early tests, displacement across the diameter of the test specimen was measured after the end of the test giving a static measurement of the permanent deformation. To allow meaningful comparisons between disparate materials subject to different shock wave intensities a method of weighting and normalizing the was developed. The complexity of setting up and running a shock wave test limited the number tests could be performed, so while the results aren't statically robust, the trends observed are useful in comparing or choosing among different materials. A Time-Resolved Catadioptric Stereo Digital Image Correlation (TRC-SDIC) technique was developed which provide a non-contact, full-field method of measuring deformation over the time span from the impingement of the shock wave including the maximum

  3. Mechanical analysis of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composite for self-deployable structure in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Jang, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Goo, Nam Seo; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Reinforcements as carbon fiber had been used for making shape memory polymer composite (CF-SMPC). This study investigated a possibility of designing self-deployable structures in harsh space condition using CF-SMPCs and analyzed their shape memory behaviors with constitutive equation model.CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset epoxy based SMP to obtain their basic mechanical properties including actuation in harsh environment. The mechanical and shape memory properties of SMP and CF-SMPCs were characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and universal tensile machine (UTM) with an environmental chamber. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength and tensile strength of SMP and CF-SMPC were measured with simple tensile/bending test and time dependent shape memory behavior was characterized with designed shape memory bending test. For mechanical analysis of CF-SMPCs, a 3D constitutive equation of SMP, which had been developed using multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient and shape memory strains, was used with material parameters determined from CF-SMPCs. Carbon fibers in composites reinforced tensile and flexural strength of SMP and acted as strong elastic springs in rheology based equation models. The actuation behavior of SMP matrix and CF-SMPCs was then simulated as 3D shape memory bending cases. Fiber bundle property was imbued with shell model for more precise analysis and it would be used for prediction of deploying behavior in self-deployable hinge structure.

  4. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case. PMID:12206221

  5. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  6. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various continuous fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermooxidative stability of PMR-15 composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers studied include graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight-loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  7. Scalable plasticized polymer electrolytes reinforced with surface-modified sepiolite fillers - A feasibility study in lithium metal polymer batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, Alberto; Devaraj, Shanmukaraj; Guzmán, Julio; Lopez del Amo, Juan Miguel; García, Nuria; Rojo, Teófilo; Armand, Michel; Tiemblo, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Electrochemical properties of (polyethylene oxide) (PEO)/lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiTf)/ethylene carbonate (EC)/sepiolite extruded composite electrolytes were studied. Appreciable electrochemical stability of 4.5 V at 70 °C was observed for polymer composite membranes with D-α-tocopherol-polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-coated sepiolite fillers. Lithium plating/stripping analysis indicated no evidence of dendrite formation with good interfacial properties which were further confirmed by postmortem analysis of the cells. Solid state NMR studies show the presence of two Li+ population in the membranes. The feasibility of these electrolytes has been shown with LiFePO4 cathode materials. Initial discharge capacity of 142 mAh/g was observed remaining at 110 mAh/g after 25 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of 96%. The upscaling of these polymers can be easily achieved by extrusion technique and the capacity can be improved by varying the cathode architecture.

  8. Reinforcement effect of soy protein/carbohydrate ratio in styrene-butadiene polymer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein and carbohydrate at different ratios were blended with latex to form composites. The variation of protein to carbohydrate ratio has a sifnificant effect on the composite properties and the results from dynamic mechanical method showed a substantial reinforcement effect. The composites ...

  9. Dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymer/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites on the nanofiller dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitaev, A. K.; Kozlov, G. V.

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymethylmethacrylate/carbon nanotubes on the nanofiller content at ultrasmall concentrations of the latter is investigated. It is shown that the extreme character of this dependence is determined by the structural features of the nanofiller. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes gives a positive effect only below their percolation threshold.

  10. Effect of monomer composition of polymer matrix on flexural properties of glass fibre-reinforced orthodontic archwire.

    PubMed

    Ohtonen, J; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J

    2013-02-01

    To compare force levels obtained from glass fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) archwires. Specifically, FRC wires were compared with polymer matrices having different dimethacrylate monomer compositions. FRC material (E-glass provided by Stick Tech Ltd, Turku, Finland) with continuous unidirectional glass fibres and four different types of dimethacrylate monomer compositions for the resin matrix were tested. Cross-sectionally round FRC archwires fitting into the 0.3 mm slot of a bracket were divided into 16 groups with six specimens in each group. Glass fibres were impregnated by the manufacturer, and they were initially light-cured by hand light-curing unit or additionally post-cured in light-curing oven. The FRC archwire specimens were tested at 37°C according to a three-point bending test in dry and wet conditions using a span length of 10 mm and a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The wires were loaded until final failure. The data were statistically analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The dry FRC archwire specimens revealed higher load values than water stored ones, regardless of the polymer matrix. A majority of the FRC archwires showed higher load values after being post-cured. ANOVA revealed that the polymer matrix, curing method, and water storage had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on the flexural behaviour of the FRC archwire. Polymer matrix composition, curing method, and water storage affected the flexural properties and thus, force level and working range which could be obtained from the FRC archwire. PMID:22058110

  11. A Comparison of the Elastic Properties of Graphene- and Fullerene-Reinforced Polymer Composites: The Role of Filler Morphology and Size

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chang-Tsan; Weerasinghe, Asanka; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale carbon-based fillers are known to significantly alter the mechanical and electrical properties of polymers even at relatively low loadings. We report results from extensive molecular-dynamics simulations of mechanical testing of model polymer (high-density polyethylene) nanocomposites reinforced by nanocarbon fillers consisting of graphene flakes and fullerenes. By systematically varying filler concentration, morphology, and size, we identify clear trends in composite stiffness with reinforcement. To within statistical error, spherical fullerenes provide a nearly size-independent level of reinforcement. In contrast, two-dimensional graphene flakes induce a strongly size-dependent response: we find that flakes with radii in the 2–4 nm range provide appreciable enhancement in stiffness, which scales linearly with flake radius. Thus, with flakes approaching typical experimental sizes (~0.1–1 μm), we expect graphene fillers to provide substantial reinforcement, which also is much greater than what could be achieved with fullerene fillers. We identify the atomic-scale features responsible for this size- and morphology-dependent response, notably, ordering and densification of polymer chains at the filler–matrix interface, thereby providing insights into avenues for further control and enhancement of the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites. PMID:27546738

  12. A Comparison of the Elastic Properties of Graphene- and Fullerene-Reinforced Polymer Composites: The Role of Filler Morphology and Size.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chang-Tsan; Weerasinghe, Asanka; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale carbon-based fillers are known to significantly alter the mechanical and electrical properties of polymers even at relatively low loadings. We report results from extensive molecular-dynamics simulations of mechanical testing of model polymer (high-density polyethylene) nanocomposites reinforced by nanocarbon fillers consisting of graphene flakes and fullerenes. By systematically varying filler concentration, morphology, and size, we identify clear trends in composite stiffness with reinforcement. To within statistical error, spherical fullerenes provide a nearly size-independent level of reinforcement. In contrast, two-dimensional graphene flakes induce a strongly size-dependent response: we find that flakes with radii in the 2-4 nm range provide appreciable enhancement in stiffness, which scales linearly with flake radius. Thus, with flakes approaching typical experimental sizes (~0.1-1 μm), we expect graphene fillers to provide substantial reinforcement, which also is much greater than what could be achieved with fullerene fillers. We identify the atomic-scale features responsible for this size- and morphology-dependent response, notably, ordering and densification of polymer chains at the filler-matrix interface, thereby providing insights into avenues for further control and enhancement of the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites. PMID:27546738

  13. Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer variable-curvature mirror used for optical zoom imaging: prototype design and experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Fan, Xuewu; Pang, Zhihai; Ren, Guorui; Wang, Wei; Xie, Yongjie; Ma, Zhen; Du, Yunfei; Su, Yu; Wei, Jingxuan

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical zoom imaging without moving elements has received much attention. The key to realizing this technique lies in the design of the variable-curvature mirror (VCM). To obtain enough optical magnification, the VCM should be able to change its radius of curvature over a wide range. In other words, the VCM must be able to provide a large sagittal variation, which requires the mirror material to be robust during curvature variation, require little force to deform, and have high ultimate strength. Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) satisfies all these requirements and is suitable for fabricating such a VCM. Therefore, in this research, a CFRP prototype VCM has been designed, fabricated, and tested. With a diameter of 100 mm, a thickness of 2 mm, and an initial radius of curvature of 1740 mm, this VCM can provide a maximum 23-μm sagittal variation and a minimum and maximum radius of curvature of 1705 and 1760 mm.

  14. Finite element analysis of the effect of an interphase on toughening of a particle reinforced polymer composite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenhai; Sadeghipour, Keya; Baran, George

    2008-01-01

    A numerical method was used to study the interaction between a crack and the filler phase in a particle-reinforced polymer composite. The simulation was achieved by implementing a progressive damage-and-failure material model and element-removal technique through finite element analysis, providing a framework for the quantitative prediction of the deformation and fracture response of the composite. The effect of an interphase on composite toughness was also studied. Results show that a thin and high strength interphase results in efficient stress transfer between particle and matrix and causes the crack to deflect and propagate within the matrix. Alternatively, a thick and low strength interphase results in crack propagation within the interphase layer, and crack blunting. Further analysis of the effect of volume fraction and particle-particle interactions on fracture toughness as well as prediction of the fracture toughness can also be achieved within this framework. PMID:19492012

  15. Gas-phase plume from laser-irradiated fiberglass-reinforced polymers via imaging fourier transform spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Roberto I; Gross, Kevin C; Perram, Glen P; Johnson, Shane M; Dao, Ly; Medina, David F; Roybal, Robert; Black, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Emissive plumes from laser-irradiated fiberglass-reinforced polymers (FRP) were investigated using a mid-infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, operating at fast framing rates (50 kHz imagery and 2.5 Hz hyperspectral imagery) with adequate spatial (0.81 mm(2) per pixel) and spectral resolution (2 cm(-1)). Fiberglass-reinforced polymer targets were irradiated with a 1064 nm continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for 60 s at 100 W in air. Strong emissions from H(2)O, CO, CO(2), and hydrocarbons were observed between 1800 and 5000 cm(-1). A single-layer radiative transfer model was developed for the spectral region from 2000 to 2400 cm(-1) to estimate spatial maps of temperature and column densities of CO and CO(2) from the hyperspectral imagery. The spectral model was used to compute the absorption cross sections of CO and CO(2) using spectral line parameters from the high-temperature extension of the HITRAN. The analysis of pre-combustion spectra yields effective temperatures rising from ambient to 1200 K and suddenly increasing to 1515 K upon combustion. The peak signal-to-noise ratio for a single spectrum exceeds 60:1, enabling temperature and column density determinations with low statistical error. For example, the spectral analysis for a single pixel within a single frame yields an effective temperature of 1019 ± 6 K, and CO and CO(2) column densities of 1.14 ± 0.05 and 1.11 ± 0.03 × 10(18) molec/cm(2), respectively. Systematic errors associated with the radiative transfer model dominate, yielding effective temperatures with uncertainties of >100 K and column densities to within a factor of 2-3. Hydrocarbon emission at 2800 to 3200 cm(-1) is well correlated with CO column density. PMID:25014838

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation of the dynamic response of highly compliant, polymer-enhanced, graphite-reinforced cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Teng Keong

    This dissertation demonstrates how composite materials, fabricated by placing a low modulus, lightweight polymer-enhanced, cementitious matrix over multiple layers of stiff reinforcement, can be used to create a composite material with relatively high tension and compression properties. This extraordinary combination allows a structure to be highly stressed and deformed to store large amounts of elastic strain energy, thus providing more design flexibility than traditional materials. When the structural response is modified as the service loads are decreased, the energy is released in a controlled fashion to do useful work. Prior research shows that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic modulus ratio exceeds 20. A modified transformed section is formulated by using the rule of mixture to determine the effective material properties for the composite. Finite element analysis is used to verify the experimental results and a good agreement is obtained. This dissertation investigates the experimental and numerical methods to determine the dynamic response of this new class of highly compliant, Polymer-Enhanced, Graphite Reinforced Cementitious Composite (PEGRCC) materials. Highly compliant, PEGRCC structures are designed based on the strength, stiffness, and the position of the component materials in the composite section. Their ability to store and release energy depends upon a complex interaction between the shape, modal response, and the forcing function initiated to the structure. This dissertation shows that the PEGRCC materials behave like a composite material and the classical mechanics of composite material theory is applicable to PEGRCC laminates. The good agreement between the experimental natural frequencies and mode shapes and the finite element predictions indicate that the standard mechanical impact testing can be adopted to test PEGRCC materials. The accuracy of the finite element dynamic analysis shows

  17. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  18. Mineralization of clay/polymer aerogels: a bioinspired approach to composite reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jack R; Spikowski, Jane; Schiraldi, David A

    2009-06-01

    Clay aerogels, ultra low density materials made via a simple freeze-drying technique, have shown much promise in broad applications because of their low densities, often in the same range as silica aerogels (0.03-0.3 g/cm(3),) but suffering from low mechanical strength. A bioinspired approach to mineralize an active polymer/clay aerogel composite is inspected, showing marked improvement of the mechanical properties with increasing modification. Further property improvement was achieved using a layer-by-layer approach to produce alternate layers of polymer and silica on the surface. PMID:20355926

  19. Modeling the strength and thickness of the interphase in polymer nanocomposite reinforced with spherical nanoparticles by a coupling methodology.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the strength (σi) and thickness (t) of interphase in polymer nanocomposites reinforced with spherical nanoparticles are modeled by the developed form of Leidner-Woodhams and Pukanszky models for tensile strength. The "σi" and "t" are expressed as functions of "B" parameter in Pukanszky model and the properties of matrix and nanofiller such as the strength of matrix and the nanoparticles radius and volume fraction. Additionally, the effects of the mentioned parameters on "σi" and "t" are discussed. The calculations show that "B" has dissimilar effects on "σi" and "t" levels. A high level of "B" in Pukanszky model suggests a high level of "σi", while a thin interphase is obtained in this condition. Also, the content of nanoparticles plays different roles in the levels of "σi" and "t" based on the extent of interfacial adhesion between polymer and nanoparticles (B value). The influences of "B" on "t" at different nanofiller contents are described by the possibility of nanoparticles aggregation at various values of "B". PMID:26704592

  20. A viscoelastic-viscoplastic model for short-fibre reinforced polymers with complex fibre orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nciri, M.; Notta-Cuvier, D.; Lauro, F.; Chaari, F.; Zouari, B.; Maalej, Y.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an innovative approach for the modelling of viscous behaviour of short-fibre reinforced composites (SFRC) with complex distributions of fibre orientations and for a wide range of strain rates. As an alternative to more complex homogenisation methods, the model is based on an additive decomposition of the state potential for the computation of composite's macroscopic behaviour. Thus, the composite material is seen as the assembly of a matrix medium and several linear elastic fibre media. The division of short fibres into several families means that complex distributions of orientation or random orientation can be easily modelled. The matrix behaviour is strain-rate sensitive, i.e. viscoelastic and/or viscoplastic. Viscoelastic constitutive laws are based on a generalised linear Maxwell model and the modelling of the viscoplasticity is based on an overstress approach. The model is tested for the case of a polypropylene reinforced with short-glass fibres with distributed orientations and subjected to uniaxial tensile tests, in different loading directions and under different strain rates. Results demonstrate the efficiency of the model over a wide range of strain rates.

  1. CRC octane number requirement rating workshop 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    An octane number requirement rating workshop was conducted. The objective of the workshop was to improve the application of the CRC E-15 Technique for Determination of Octane Number Requirement of Light-Duty Vehicles. The workshop was to improve the skills of those with minimal experience and provide experienced raters a forum for interacting with other raters of similar experience. Investigative procedures and techniques were encouraged to provide data regarding the latest electronic engine controls such as knock sensors and adaptive learning strategies. Eleven 1991 and 1992 model year vehicles were used for track practice and testing. Five of the vehicles were equipped with auxiliary fuel systems to allow operation on the octane number reference fuels. The other six vehicles were equipped with tachometers and vacuum gauges for determination of transmission shift characteristics. Several scan tools were available and were used on most of the GM vehicles to monitor knock sensor activity and spark timing. The test fuels used were full-boiling range unleaded fuels.

  2. Fundamental analysis of the failure of polymer-based fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; Rybicki, E. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Broek, D.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model predicting the strength of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites containing known flaws and with linear elastic-brittle material behavior was developed. The approach was to imbed a local heterogeneous region surrounding the crack tip into an anisotropic elastic continuum. This (1) permits an explicit analysis of the micromechanical processes involved in the fracture, and (2) remains simple enough to be useful in practical computations. Computations for arbitrary flaw size and orientation under arbitrary applied loads were performed. The mechanical properties were those of graphite epoxy. With the rupture properties arbitrarily varied to test the capabilities of the model to reflect real fracture modes, it was shown that fiber breakage, matrix crazing, crack bridging, matrix-fiber debonding, and axial splitting can all occur during a period of (gradually) increasing load prior to catastrophic failure. The calculations also reveal the sequential nature of the stable crack growth process proceding fracture.

  3. Pyrolysis of reinforced polymer composites: Parameterizing a model for multiple compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Geraldine E.

    A single set of material properties was developed to describe the pyrolysis of fiberglass reinforced polyester composites at multiple composition ratios. Milligram-scale testing was performed on the unsaturated polyester (UP) resin using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to establish and characterize an effective semi-global reaction mechanism, of three consecutive first-order reactions. Radiation-driven gasification experiments were conducted on UP resin and the fiberglass composites at compositions ranging from 41 to 54 wt% resin at external heat fluxes from 30 to 70 kW m -2. The back surface temperature was recorded with an infrared camera and used as the target for inverse analysis to determine the thermal conductivity of the systematically isolated constituent species. Manual iterations were performed in a comprehensive pyrolysis model, ThermaKin. The complete set of properties was validated for the ability to reproduce the mass loss rate during gasification testing.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymer Composites-Molecular Dynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Chandra, Rakesh; Kumar, Pramod; Kumar, Navin

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been used to study the effect of carbon nanofiber (CNF) volume fraction ( V f) and aspect ratio ( l/d) on mechanical properties of CNF-reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites. Materials Studio 5.5 has been used as a tool for finding the modulus and damping in composites. CNF composition in PP was varied by volume from 0% to 16%. The aspect ratio of CNF was varied from l/d = 5 to l/d = 100. Results show that, with only 2% addition by volume of CNF in PP, E 11 increases 748%. Increase in E 22 is much less in comparison to the increase in E 11. With the increase in the CNF aspect ratio ( l/d) up to l/d = 60, the longitudinal loss factor ( η 11) decreases rapidly. The results of this study have been compared with those available in the literature.

  5. Milling damage on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer using TiAlN coated End mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konneh, Mohamed; Izman, Sudin; Rahman Kassim, Abdullah Abdul

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the damage caused by milling Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composite (CFRP) with 2-flute 4 mm-diameter solid carbide end mills, coated with titanium aluminium nitride. The machining parameters considered in work are, rotation speed, feed rate and depth of cut. Experiments were designed based on Box-Behnken design and the experiments conducted on a Mikrotool DT-110 CNC micro machine. A laser tachometer was used to ascertain a rotational speed for conducting any machining trial. Optical microscopy examination reveals minimum delamination value of 4.05 mm at the spindle speed of 25,000 rpm, depth of cut of 50μm and feed rate of 3 mm/min and the maximum delamination value of 5.04 mm at the spindle speed of 35000 rpm, depth of cut of 150μm and feed rate of 9 mm/min A mathematical model relating the milling parameters and delamination has been established.

  6. Assessment of solvent capsule-based healing for woven E-glass fibre-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, Erica; Cohades, Amaël; Richard, Inès; Michaud, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Molding (VARIM) with low vacuum pressure difference was used to manufacture woven glass fibre-reinforced epoxy resin plates, with a fibre volume fraction of approx. 50 vol% and containing ethyl phenylacetate (EPA)-filled capsules for self-healing purposes. Capsules were introduced by functionalising the fabrics through manual dispersion. We investigated the capability of autonomously healing delaminations induced by static loading in Mode I and II. Healing did not take place for composite samples; this was attributed to the presence of bare fibres on the crack plane and to the reduction of EPA diffusion into the matrix in the presence of fibres both of which hinder the swelling mechanism responsible for healing the cracks.

  7. Smart-aggregate-based damage detection of fiber-reinforced-polymer-strengthened columns under reversed cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howser, Rachel; Moslehy, Yashar; Gu, Haichang; Dhonde, Hemant; Mo, Y. L.; Ayoub, Ashraf; Song, Gangbing

    2011-07-01

    Structural health monitoring is an important aspect of the maintenance of large civil infrastructures, especially for bridge columns in areas of high seismic activity. In this project, recently developed innovative piezoceramic-based sensors were utilized to perform the health monitoring of a shear-critical reinforced concrete (RC) bridge column subjected to reversed cyclic loading. After the column failed, it was wrapped with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) sheets, commonly used to retrofit seismically damaged structures. The FRP-strengthened column was retested under the same reversed cyclic loading pattern. Innovative piezoceramic-based sensors, called 'smart aggregates', were utilized as transducers for health monitoring purposes. On the basis of the smart aggregates developed, an active-sensing approach and an impact-hammer-based approach were used to evaluate the health status of the RC column during the loading procedure. Wave transmission energy is attenuated by the existence of cracks during the loading procedure, and this attenuation phenomenon alters the curve of the transfer function between the actuator and sensor. To detect the damage occurrence and evaluate the damage severity, transfer function curves were compared with those obtained during the period of healthy status. A transfer-function-based damage index matrix was developed to demonstrate the damage severity at different locations. Experimental results verified the effectiveness of the smart aggregates in health monitoring of the FRP-strengthened column as well as the unstrengthened column. The experimental results show that the proposed smart-aggregate-based approach can successfully detect damage occurrence and evaluate its severity.

  8. Effect of embedded printed circuit board (PCB) sensors on the mechanical behavior of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javdanitehran, M.; Hoffmann, R.; Groh, J.; Vossiek, M.; Ziegmann, G.

    2016-06-01

    The embedding of dielectric chipless sensors for cure monitoring into fiber-reinforced thermosets allows for monitoring and controlling the curing process and consequently higher quality in production. The embedded sensors remain after the processing in the structure. This affects the integrity of the composite structure locally. In order to investigate these effects on the mechanical behavior of the glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP), sensors made on special low loss substrates are integrated into laminates with different lay-ups and thicknesses using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) method. In a parametric study the size of the sensor is varied to observe its influence on the strength and the stiffness of the laminates according to its lay-up and thickness. The size and orientation of the resin rich areas near sensors as well as the distortion in load bearing area as the consequences of the introduction of the sensors are investigated in conjunction with the strength of the structure. An empirical model is proposed by the authors which involves the previously mentioned factors and is used as a rapid tool for the prediction of the changes in bending and tensile strength of simple structures with embedded sensors. The methodology for model’s calibration as well as the validation of the model against the experimental data of different laminates with distinct lay-ups and thicknesses are presented in this work. Mechanical tests under tensile and bending loading indicate that the reduction of the structure’s strength due to sensor integration can be attributed to the size and the orientation of rich resin zones and depends over and above on the size of distorted load bearing area. Depending on the sensor’s elastic modulus the stiffness of the structure may vary through the introduction of a sensor.

  9. Extrusion of polysaccharide nanocrystal reinforced polymer nanocomposites through compatibilization with poly(ethylene oxide).

    PubMed

    Pereda, Mariana; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2014-06-25

    Polysaccharide nanocrystals with a rodlike shape but with different dimensions and specific surface area were prepared from cotton and capim dourado cellulose, and with a plateletlike morphology from waxy maize starch granules. The rheological behavior of aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with different molecular weights when adding these nanoparticles was investigated evidencing specific interactions between PEO chains and nanocrystals. Because PEO also bears hydrophobic moieties, it was employed as a compatibilizing agent for the melt processing of polymer nanocomposites. The freeze-dried mixtures were used to prepare nanocomposite materials with a low density polyethylene matrix by extrusion. The thermal and mechanical behavior of ensuing nanocomposites was studied. PMID:24840363

  10. Recovery torque modeling of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, He; Xu, Yunjun; Liang, Fei; Gou, Jihua; Mabbott, Bob

    2013-11-01

    Carbon fiber and carbon nanofiber paper (CF&CNFP) can be incorporated into shape memory polymers (SMPs) to increase electrical conductivity and allow high speed electrical actuation with a low power. This paper studies the interactions among the recovery torques of CF&CNFP and SMP and the gravity torque during the shape recovery process. The proposed recovery torque model in a SMP CF&CNFP based structure is validated by experimental data obtained using a recently developed low cost, non-contact measurement testbed.

  11. Study on experimental characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer panel using digital image correlation: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashfuddoja, Mohammad; Prasath, R. G. R.; Ramji, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the experimental characterization of polymer-matrix and polymer based carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate by employing a whole field non-contact digital image correlation (DIC) technique is presented. The properties are evaluated based on full field data obtained from DIC measurements by performing a series of tests as per ASTM standards. The evaluated properties are compared with the results obtained from conventional testing and analytical models and they are found to closely match. Further, sensitivity of DIC parameters on material properties is investigated and their optimum value is identified. It is found that the subset size has more influence on material properties as compared to step size and their predicted optimum value for the case of both matrix and composite material is found consistent with each other. The aspect ratio of region of interest (ROI) chosen for correlation should be the same as that of camera resolution aspect ratio for better correlation. Also, an open cutout panel made of the same composite laminate is taken into consideration to demonstrate the sensitivity of DIC parameters on predicting complex strain field surrounding the hole. It is observed that the strain field surrounding the hole is much more sensitive to step size rather than subset size. Lower step size produced highly pixilated strain field, showing sensitivity of local strain at the expense of computational time in addition with random scattered noisy pattern whereas higher step size mitigates the noisy pattern at the expense of losing the details present in data and even alters the natural trend of strain field leading to erroneous maximum strain locations. The subset size variation mainly presents a smoothing effect, eliminating noise from strain field while maintaining the details in the data without altering their natural trend. However, the increase in subset size significantly reduces the strain data at hole edge due to discontinuity in

  12. Stiffness predictions of carbon nanotube reinforced two and three-phase polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neer, Eric

    Carbon nanotubes are a relatively new area of research which has gained significant attention in published literature. One reason for this interest is their use in multi-phase composites, specifically where they can enhance traditional polymer matrices. Many authors have attempted to adapt conventional micromechanical analyses reserved for microfibers to the nano scale. A review of these works is presented. In depth analysis is provided on one of these two phase (nanotube and matrix) models, the Anumandla-Gibson model, originally published in 2006. A discussion of its strengths and sensitivities is given, with numerical data to support the conclusions. It is extended to three-phase composites through the use of classical laminated plate theory. A literature survey is conducted to gather published two and three-phase experimental results for comparison. Two phase experimental results agree well with the present model, whereas three phase data was limited, but initial comparisons were promising.

  13. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  14. Fundamental analysis of the failure of polymer-based fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; Rybicki, E. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Broek, D.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model is described which will permit predictions of the strength of fiber reinforced composites containing known flaws to be made from the basic properties of their constituents. The approach was to embed a local heterogeneous region (LHR) surrounding the crack tip into an anisotropic elastic continuum. The model should (1) permit an explicit analysis of the micromechanical processes involved in the fracture process, and (2) remain simple enough to be useful in practical computations. Computations for arbitrary flaw size and orientation under arbitrary applied load combinations were performed from unidirectional composites with linear elastic-brittle constituent behavior. The mechanical properties were nominally those of graphite epoxy. With the rupture properties arbitrarily varied to test the capability of the model to reflect real fracture modes in fiber composites, it was shown that fiber breakage, matrix crazing, crack bridging, matrix-fiber debonding, and axial splitting can all occur during a period of (gradually) increasing load prior to catastrophic fracture. The computations reveal qualitatively the sequential nature of the stable crack process that precedes fracture.

  15. The meter-class carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror and segmented mirror telescope at the Naval Postgraduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher; Fernandez, Bautista; Bagnasco, John; Martinez, Ty; Romeo, Robert; Agrawal, Brij

    2015-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Center of Excellence for National Security at the Naval Postgraduate School has implemented a technology testing platform and array of facilities for next-generation space-based telescopes and imaging system development. The Segmented Mirror Telescope is a 3-meter, 6 segment telescope with actuators on its mirrors for system optical correction. Currently, investigation is being conducted in the use of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced polymer structures for large monolithic optics. Advantages of this material include lower manufacturing costs, very low weight, and high durability and survivability compared to its glass counterparts. Design and testing has begun on a 1-meter, optical quality CFRP parabolic mirror for the purpose of injecting collimated laser light through the SMT primary and secondary mirrors as well as the following aft optics that include wavefront sensors and deformable mirrors. This paper will present the design, testing, and usage of this CFRP parabolic mirror and the current path moving forward with this ever-evolving technology.

  16. Development of a self-stressing NiTiNb shape memory alloy (SMA)/fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tahan, M.; Dawood, M.; Song, G.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a self-stressing patch using a combination of shape memory alloys (SMAs) and fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Prestressed carbon FRP patches are emerging as a promising alternative to traditional methods to repair cracked steel structures and civil infrastructure. However, prestressing these patches typically requires heavy and complex fixtures, which is impractical in many applications. This paper presents a new approach in which the prestressing force is applied by restraining the shape memory effect of NiTiNb SMA wires. The wires are subsequently embedded in an FRP overlay patch. This method overcomes the practical challenges associated with conventional prestressing. This paper presents the conceptual development of the self-stressing patch with the support of experimental observations. The bond between the SMA wires and the FRP is evaluated using pull-out tests. The paper concludes with an experimental study that evaluates the patch response during activation subsequent monotonic tensile loading. The results demonstrate that the self-stressing patch with NiTiNb SMA is capable of generating a significant prestressing force with minimal tool and labor requirements.

  17. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer dimensional stability investigations for use on the laser interferometer space antenna mission telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjuán, J.; Preston, A.; Korytov, D.; Spector, A.; Freise, A.; Dixon, G.; Livas, J.; Mueller, G.

    2011-12-01

    The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is a mission designed to detect low frequency gravitational waves. In order for LISA to succeed in its goal of direct measurement of gravitational waves, many subsystems must work together to measure the distance between proof masses on adjacent spacecraft. One such subsystem, the telescope, plays a critical role as it is the laser transmission and reception link between spacecraft. Not only must the material that makes up the telescope support structure be strong, stiff, and light, but it must have a dimensional stability of better than 1 pm Hz-1/2 at 3 mHz and the distance between the primary and the secondary mirrors must change by less than 2.5 μm over the mission lifetime. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer is the current baseline material; however, it has not been tested to the pico meter level as required by the LISA mission. In this paper, we present dimensional stability results, outgassing effects occurring in the cavity and discuss its feasibility for use as the telescope spacer for the LISA spacecraft.

  18. Effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites for 49 meter (160 foot) recreational yachts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dave (dea-wook); Hennigan, Daniel John; Beavers, Kevin Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Polymer composite materialsoffer high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and total life cost reductions that appeal to the marine industry. The advantages of composite construction have led to their incorporation in U.S. yacht hull structures over 46 meters (150 feet) in length. In order to construct even larger hull structures, higher quality composites with a lower cost production techniques need to be developed. In this study, the effect of composite hull fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastic(GFRP) composites is presented. Fabrication techniques used in this study are hand lay-up (HL), vacuum infusion (VI), and hybrid (HL+VI) processes. Mechanical property testing includes: tensile, compressive, and ignition loss sample analysis. Results demonstrate that the vacuum pressure implemented during composite fabrication has an effect on mechanical properties. The VI processed GFRP yields improved mechanical properties in tension/compression strengths and tensile modulus. The hybrid GFRP composites, however, failed in a sequential manor, due to dissimilar failure modes in the HL and VI processed sides. Fractography analysis was conducted to validate the mechanical property testing results

  19. Computational modeling of the electromagnetic characteristics of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites with different weave structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. M.; Douglas, J. F.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRPC) are of great interest in the aerospace and automotive industries due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Carbon fibers are typically woven and inter-laced perpendicularly in warps and wefts to form a carbon fabric that can be embedded in a binding matrix. The warps and wefts can be interlaced in different patterns called weaving structures. The primary weaving structures are the plain, twill, and satin weaves, which give different mechanical composite properties. The goal of this work is to computationally investigate the dependence of CFRPC microwave and terahertz electromagnetic characteristics on weave structure. These bands are good candidates for the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of CFRPC since their wavelengths are comparable to the main weave features. 3D full wave electromagnetic simulations of several different weave models have been performed using a finite element (FEM) simulator, which is able to accurately model the complex weave structure. The computational experiments demonstrate that the reflection of electromagnetic waves from CFRPC depend sensitively on weave structure. The reflection spectra calculated in this work can be used to identify the optimal frequencies for the NDE of each weave structure.

  20. Impregnation molding of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic-ceramic composites using preceramic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdal, Merve

    A ceramic-ceramic composite processing method based on resin transfer molding of particle-filled preceramic polymers was proposed and a numerical investigation of the resin impregnation was performed. The study is intended to provide a better understanding of the particle filtration occurring during impregnation and the nonlinear relations between various processing parameters, so that by a proper process design, the particle filtration and hence microstructure heterogeneity can be minimized. The proposed process is based on the need to counteract the high porosity and cracks forming in the composite as a result of mass loss and densification in the polymer during conversion to ceramic. A formulation of the problem was accomplished through combining anisotropic porous flow theory with particle filtration. Physical models were incorporated for filtration coefficient and domain permeability, to include the effect of resulting nonhomogeneous particle distributions. Compression resin transfer molding was proposed as an alternative to conventional resin transfer molding for processing high fiber volume ceramic composites at lower process pressures. Computational analysis showed that compression resin transfer molding offers the opportunity for homogenization of particle distributions within the composite through manipulation of the flow path by proper design of the impregnation and compression stages. The flow length rather than the flow velocity was observed to be the dominating factor on amount of filtration when the filtration mechanism is governed by geometric effects. Due to the geometrical complexity of the flow configurations and the existence of a moving boundary, the computational technique of boundary-fitted coordinate systems encompassing numerical grid generation was employed for numerical solution. Stability analysis indicated that the filtration solution accuracy is very sensitive to a nondimensional parameter derived from the current formulation. Through

  1. Spatial Gradients in Particle Reinforced Polymers Characterized by X-Ray Attenuation and Laser Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LAGASSE,ROBERT R.; THOMPSON,KYLE R.

    2000-06-12

    The goal of this work is to develop techniques for measuring gradients in particle concentration within filled polymers, such as encapsulant. A high concentration of filler particles is added to such materials to tailor physical properties such as thermal expansion coefficient. Sedimentation and flow-induced migration of particles can produce concentration gradients that are most severe near material boundaries. Therefore, techniques for measuring local particle concentration should be accurate near boundaries. Particle gradients in an alumina-filled epoxy resin are measured with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm using an x-ray beam attenuation technique, but an artifact related to the finite diameter of the beam reduces accuracy near the specimen's edge. Local particle concentration near an edge can be measured more reliably using microscopy coupled with image analysis. This is illustrated by measuring concentration profiles of glass particles having 40 {micro}m median diameter using images acquired by a confocal laser fluorescence microscope. The mean of the measured profiles of volume fraction agrees to better than 3% with the expected value, and the shape of the profiles agrees qualitatively with simple theory for sedimentation of monodisperse particles. Extending this microscopy technique to smaller, micron-scale filler particles used in encapsulant for microelectronic devices is illustrated by measuring the local concentration of an epoxy resin containing 0.41 volume fraction of silica.

  2. LOW-COST COMPOSITES IN VEHICLE MANUFACTURE - Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Holbery, Jim; Houston, Dan

    2006-11-01

    In the last decade, natural fiber composites have experienced rapid growth in the European automotive market, and this trend appears to be global in scale, provided the cost and performance is justified against competing technologies. However, mass reduction, recyclability, and performance requirements can be met today by competing systems such as injection-molded unreinforced thermoplastics; natural fiber composites will continue to expand their role in automotive applications only if such technical challenges as moisture stability, fiber-polymer interface compatibility, and consistent, repeatable fiber sources are available to supply automotive manufacturers. Efforts underway by Tier I and II automotive suppliers to explore hybrid glass-natural fiber systems, as well as applications that exploit such capabilities as natural fiber sound dampening characteristics, could very well have far-reaching effects. In addition, the current development underway of bio-based resins such as Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biodegradable polyesters and bio-based polyols could provide fully bio-based composite options to future automotive designers. In short, the development of the natural fiber composite market would make a positive impact on farmers and small business owners on a global scale, reduce US reliance on foreign oil, improve environmental quality through the development of a sustainable resource supply chain, and achieve a better CO2 balance over the vehicle?s lifetime with near-zero net greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Self-Healing Nanofiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites. 1. Tensile Testing and Recovery of Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2015-09-01

    the composites reinforced by such mats. This is the first work, to the best of our knowledge, where self-healing nanofibers and composites based on them were developed, tested, and revealed restoration of mechanical properties (stiffness) in a 24 h rest period at room temperature. PMID:26284888

  4. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity. PMID:26485431

  5. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity. PMID:26485431

  6. Fault isolation through no-overhead link level CRC

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.

    2007-04-24

    A fault isolation technique for checking the accuracy of data packets transmitted between nodes of a parallel processor. An independent crc is kept of all data sent from one processor to another, and received from one processor to another. At the end of each checkpoint, the crcs are compared. If they do not match, there was an error. The crcs may be cleared and restarted at each checkpoint. In the preferred embodiment, the basic functionality is to calculate a CRC of all packet data that has been successfully transmitted across a given link. This CRC is done on both ends of the link, thereby allowing an independent check on all data believed to have been correctly transmitted. Preferably, all links have this CRC coverage, and the CRC used in this link level check is different from that used in the packet transfer protocol. This independent check, if successfully passed, virtually eliminates the possibility that any data errors were missed during the previous transfer period.

  7. A distant real-time radar NDE technique for the in-depth inspection of glass fiber reinforced polymer-retrofitted concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tzu-Yang; Buyukozturk, Oral

    2008-03-01

    A novel real-time radar NDE technique for the in-depth inspection of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP)-retrofitted concrete columns is proposed. In this technique, continuous wave radar signals are transmitted in the far-field region (distant inspection), and reflected signals are collected by the same signal transmitter. Collected radar signals are processed by tomographic reconstruction methods for real-time image reconstruction. In-depth condition in the near-surface region of GFRP-concrete systems is revealed and evaluated by reconstructed images.

  8. Joint Strength Control at the Fiber/Matrix Interface during the Production of Polymer Composite Materials Reinforced with High Performance Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Vladimir V.; Korneeva, Natalia V.

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the study of the joint strength between polymer matrix and high performance polyethylene fiber. The fiber/matrix joints simulate the unit cell of the fiber-reinforced composite materials. Effect of heat treatment on the composite properties at the interface was estimated by a multifilament wet-pull-out method. It was found that the joint strength may be increased with the help of extra heart treatment. Both the energy to peak load and the energy to failure for CM joints at various stages of loading were determined.

  9. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  10. crcTRP: A Translational Research Platform for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ning; Zheng, Ling; Liu, Fang; Wang, Li; Duan, Huilong

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in both developed and developing countries. Transforming basic research results into clinical practice is one of the key tasks of translational research, which will greatly improve the diagnosis and treatments of colorectal cancer. In this paper, a translational research platform for colorectal cancer, named crcTRP, is introduced. crcTRP serves the colorectal cancer translational research by providing various types of biomedical information related with colorectal cancer to the community. The information, including clinical data, epidemiology data, individual omics data, and public omics data, was collected through a multisource biomedical information collection solution and then integrated in a clinic-omics database, which was constructed with EAV-ER model for flexibility and efficiency. A preliminary exploration of conducting translational research on crcTRP was implemented and worked out a set of clinic-genomic relations, linking clinical data with genomic data. These relations have also been applied to crcTRP to make it more conductive for cancer translational research. PMID:23431356

  11. CRC Credential Attainment by State Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpster, Anna M.; Byers, Katherine L.; Harris, LaKeisha L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines 137 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors' perceptions of the value of having the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credential. While almost 53% of this sample included persons who were certified, the majority who were not indicated that the two major reasons for not currently having this designation were: (a)…

  12. Cheap, Gram-Scale Fabrication of BN Nanosheets via Substitution Reaction of Graphite Powders and Their Use for Mechanical Reinforcement of Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Mo, Xiaoshu; Gan, Haibo; Guo, Tongyi; Wang, Xuebin; Chen, Bin; Chen, Jun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important two-dimensional (2D) materials, BN nanosheets attracted intensive interest in the past decade. Although there are many methods suitable for the preparation of BN sheets, finding a cheap and nontoxic way for their mass and high-quality production is still a challenge. Here we provide a highly effective and cheap way to synthesize gram-scale-level well-structured BN nanosheets from many common graphite products as source materials. Single-crystalline multi-layered BN sheets have a mean lateral size of several hundred nanometers and a thickness ranging from 5 nm to 40 nm. Cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis shows that the structures exhibit a near band-edge emission and a broad emission band from 300 nm to 500 nm. Utilization of nanosheets for the reinforcement of polymers revealed that the Young's modulus of BN/PMMA composite had increased to 1.56 GPa when the BN's fraction was only 2 wt.%, thus demonstrating a 20% gain compared to a blank PMMA film. It suggests that the BN nanosheet is an ideal mechanical reinforcing material for polymers. In addition, this easy and nontoxic substitution method may provide a universal route towards high yields of other 2D materials. PMID:24572725

  13. Selection of polymer binders and fabrication of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, John S.; Lightfoot, A.; Sigalovsky, J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: effects of solvent and polymer exposures on nitriding kinetics of high purity Si powders and on resulting phase distributions; effects of solvent and polymer exposures on Si Surface Chemistry; effects of solvent and polymeric exposures on nitriding kinetics; and fabrication of flexural test samples.

  14. Bending and Shear Behavior of Pultruded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Beams With Closed and Open Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Daniel Douglas

    Several advantages, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness, superior corrosion resistance, and high fatigue and impact resistance, among others, make FRPs an attractive alternative to conventional construction materials for use in developing new structures as well as rehabilitating in-service infrastructure. As the number of infrastructure applications using FRPs grows, the need for the development of a uniform Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) approach, including design procedures and examples, has become paramount. Step-by-step design procedures and easy-to-use design formulas are necessary to assure the quality and safety of FRP structural systems by reducing the possibility of design and construction errors. Since 2008, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), in coordination with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), has overseen the development of the Pre-Standard for Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) of Pultruded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Structures using probability-based limit states design. The fifth chapter of the pre-standard focuses on the design of members in flexure and shear under different failure modes, where the current failure load prediction models proposed within have been shown to be highly inaccurate based on experimental data and evaluation performed by researchers at the West Virginia University Constructed Facilities Center. A new prediction model for determining the critical flexural load capacity of pultruded GFRP square and rectangular box beams is presented within. This model shows that the type of failure can be related to threshold values of the beam span-to-depth ratio (L/h) and total flange width-to-thickness ratio (bf /t), resulting in three governing modes of failure: local buckling failure in the compression flange (4 ≤ L/h < 6), combined strain failure at the web-flange junction (6 ≤ L/h ≤ 10), and bending failure in the tension flange (10 < L/h ≤ 42

  15. Effect of Cr/C Ratio on Microstructure and Corrosion Performance of Cr3C2-NiCr Composite Fabricated by Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Deyuan; Liu, Dun; He, Chunlin; Bennett, Peter; Chen, Lie; Yang, Qibiao; Fearon, Eamonn; Dearden, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of different Cr/C ratios on the microstructure, microhardness, and corrosion resistance of Ni-based laser clad hardfacings, reinforced by in situ synthesized chromium carbide particles. Cr3C2-NiCr composites have been laser processed with graphite/Cr/Ni powder blends with varying Cr/C ratios. Following phase analysis (x-ray diffraction) and microstructure investigation (scanning electron microscopy; energy dispersive x-ray analysis; transmission electron microscopy), the solidification of laser melt pool is discussed, and the corrosion resistances are examined. Several different zones (planar, dendritic, eutectic and re-melt zone) were formed in these samples, and the thicknesses and shapes of these zones vary with the change of Cr/C ratio. The sizes and types of carbides and the content of reserved graphite in the composites change as the Cr/C ratio varies. With the content of carbides (especially Cr3C2) grows, the microhardness is improved. The corrosive resistance of the composites to 0.2M H2SO4 aqueous solution decreases as the Cr/C ratio reduces owing to not only the decreasing Cr content in the NiCr matrix but also the galvanic corrosion formed within the carbide and graphite containing Ni matrix.

  16. First principles investigation of chromium carbide, CrC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemos, Apostolos; Dunning, Thom H.; Mavridis, Aristides

    2005-07-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of 14 states of the experimentally unknown diatomic molecule chromium carbide, CrC, using standard multireference configuration interaction methods and high quality basis sets. We report potential curves, binding energies, and a number of spectroscopic parameters. The ground state of CrC, XΣ-3, displays triple-bond character with a binding energy of De=89kcal /mol and an internuclear separation of re=1.63Å. The first excited state (1Σ-5) lies 9.2kcal/mol higher. All the states studied are fairly ionic, featuring an electron transfer of 0.3-0.5e- from the metal atom to the carbon atom.

  17. First principles investigation of chromium carbide, CrC.

    PubMed

    Kalemos, Apostolos; Dunning, Thom H; Mavridis, Aristides

    2005-07-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of 14 states of the experimentally unknown diatomic molecule chromium carbide, CrC, using standard multireference configuration interaction methods and high quality basis sets. We report potential curves, binding energies, and a number of spectroscopic parameters. The ground state of CrC, X 3Sigma-, displays triple-bond character with a binding energy of D(e)=89 kcal/mol and an internuclear separation of r(e)=1.63 A. The first excited state (1 5Sigma-) lies 9.2 kcal/mol higher. All the states studied are fairly ionic, featuring an electron transfer of 0.3-0.5e- from the metal atom to the carbon atom. PMID:16035830

  18. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... adverse credit decision being reviewed may not serve on the CRC when it reviews that loan....

  19. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... adverse credit decision being reviewed may not serve on the CRC when it reviews that loan....

  20. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... adverse credit decision being reviewed may not serve on the CRC when it reviews that loan....

  1. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... adverse credit decision being reviewed may not serve on the CRC when it reviews that loan....

  2. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  3. Time dependence of mesoscopic strain distribution for triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Nagayama, Hideo; Yoneyama, Satoru; Aoki, Takahira

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain of a triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured using digital image correlation (DIC). Two types of DIC techniques were employed for the measurement: conventional subset DIC and mesh DIC. Static tensile and creep tests were carried out, and the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain distribution was investigated by applying these techniques. The ultimate failure of this material is dominated by inter-bundle decohesion caused by relative rigid rotation and relating shear stress. Therefore, these were focused on in the present study. During the creep tests, the fiber directional strain, shear strain, and rotation were monitored using the DIC, and the mechanism for the increase in the specimen's macro-strain over time was investigated based on the results obtained by the DIC measurement.

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of ±45° flat-braided carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers with carbon nanofibers using HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Y.; Shinyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Takai, Y.; Aly-Hassan, M. S.; Nakai, A.; Hamada, H.; Adachi, S.; Tanabe, K.; Tanaka, S.

    2013-01-01

    Step-by-step tensile tests were applied to flat-braided carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers with and without added dispersions of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and with and without sample sides cut off to study their mechanical properties and destructive mechanisms by means of in situ observation and stress-strain measurements. An ex situ nondestructive evaluation technique, using a high-temperature superconductor superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer, was also applied to the samples to study their electrical properties; the relationships between the mechanical and electrical properties by visualizing current maps in the samples during ac current injection was also studied. Clear differences were observed in the mechanical and electrical properties and the destructive mechanisms between the samples with and without CNFs and with and without cut off sides. These differences were mainly attributed to the addition of CNFs, which enhanced the mechanical and electrical connections between the carbon fiber bundles.

  5. The glass transition temperature of polyurethane shape memory polymer reinforced with treated/non-treated attapulgite (playgorskite) clay in dry and wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, G. H.; Huang, W. M.; Ng, Z. C.; Liu, N.; Phee, S. J.

    2008-08-01

    Attapulgite (playgorskite), a kind of nanosized fibrous clay mineral, may provide a simple and cheap alternative to improve the stiffness and actuation stress of shape memory polymers (SMPs). As a first step, in this paper, we investigate the glass transition temperature of a polyurethane SMP reinforced with treated/non-treated attapulgite in wet and dry conditions. In addition to confirming the strong influence of moisture, the results reveal that non-treated clay significantly reduces the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the composites, while the influence of treated clay on Tg is limited. However, for composites mixed with non-treated clay, after drying, the well pre-wetted samples have a much higher Tg than that of the dry ones. A partial detachment mechanism is proposed to explain this interesting phenomenon.

  6. Time dependence of mesoscopic strain distribution for triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Nagayama, Hideo; Yoneyama, Satoru; Aoki, Takahira

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain of a triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured using digital image correlation (DIC). Two types of DIC techniques were employed for the measurement: conventional subset DIC and mesh DIC. Static tensile and creep tests were carried out, and the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain distribution was investigated by applying these techniques. The ultimate failure of this material is dominated by inter-bundle decohesion caused by relative rigid rotation and relating shear stress. Therefore, these were focused on in the present study. During the creep tests, the fiber directional strain, shear strain, and rotation were monitored using the DIC, and the mechanism for the increase in the specimen's macro-strain over time was investigated based on the results obtained by the DIC measurement.

  7. Electrical conductivity, dielectric response and space charge dynamics of an electroactive polymer with and without nanofiller reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, R.; Tsekmes, I. A.; Morshuis, P. H. F.

    2015-07-01

    Electroactive polymers have gained considerable attention over the last 20 years for exhibiting a large displacement in response to electrical stimulation. The promising fields of application include wave energy converters, muscle-like actuators, sensors, robotics, and biomimetics. For an electrical engineer, electroactive polymers can be seen as a dielectric elastomer film or a compliant capacitor with a highly deformable elastomeric medium. If the elastomer is pre-stretched and pre-charged, a reduction of the tensile force lets the elastomer revert to its original form and increases the electrical potential. The light weight of electroactive polymers, low cost, high intrinsic breakdown strength, cyclical way of operation, reliable performance, and high efficiency can be exploited to utilize the elastomeric material as a transducer. The energy storage for a linear dielectric polymer is determined by its relative permittivity and the applied electric field. The latter is limited by the dielectric breakdown strength of the material. Therefore, to generate a high energy density of a flexible capacitor, the film must be used at the voltage level close to the material’s breakdown or inorganic particles with high dielectric permittivity which can be introduced into the polymer matrix. In the present study, silicone-titania elastomer nanocomposites were produced and the influence of nanoparticles on the macroscopic dielectric properties of the neat elastomer including space charge dynamics, complex permittivity, and electrical conductivity, were investigated.

  8. Comparative study on submillimeter flaws in stitched T-joint carbon fiber reinforced polymer by infrared thermography, microcomputed tomography, ultrasonic c-scan and microscopic inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Fernandes, Henrique; Robitaille, Francois; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core (incomplete infusion of T-joint core) and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it may cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. Microscopic inspection, ultrasonic c-scan, pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and laser spot thermography are used to investigate the internal flaws in a stitched T-joint carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Then, a new microlaser line thermography is proposed. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) is used to validate the infrared results. A comparison between microlaser line thermography and microCT is performed. It was concluded that microlaser line thermography can detect the internal submillimeter defects. However, the depth and size of the defects can affect the detection results. The microporosities with a diameter of less than 54 μm are not detected in the microlaser line thermography results. Microlaser line thermography can detect the microporosity (a diameter of 0.162 mm) from a depth of 90 μm. However, it cannot detect the internal microporosity (a diameter of 0.216 mm) from a depth of 0.18 mm. The potential causes are given. Finally, a comparative study is conducted.

  9. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of a continuous strand, swirl mat reinforced polymer composite in automotive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-12-31

    Creep and creep-rupture behavior of an isocyanurate based polyurethane matrix with a continuous strand, swirl mat E-glass reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications. The material under stress was exposed to various automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on its creep and creep-rupture properties. Proposed design guide lines and stress reduction factors were developed for various automotive environments. These composites are considered candidate structural materials for light weight and fuel efficient automobiles of the future.

  10. Investigation of electrical and impact properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with carbon nanotube buckypaper layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Christopher Brandon

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite materials have become commonplace in many industries including aerospace, automotive, and sporting goods. Previous research has determined a coupling relationship between the mechanical and electrical properties of these materials where the application of electrical current has been shown to improve their mechanical strengths. The next generations of these composites have started to be produced with the addition of nanocarbon buckypaper layers which provide even greater strength and electrical conductivity potentials. The focus of this current research was to characterize these new composites and compare their electro-mechanical coupling capabilities to those composites which do not contain any nonocarbons.