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Sample records for polymer-based autologous chondrocyte

  1. Treatment of focal degenerative cartilage defects with polymer-based autologous chondrocyte grafts: four-year clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Kreuz, Peter C; Müller, Sebastian; Ossendorf, Christian; Kaps, Christian; Erggelet, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Second-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation with scaffolds stabilizing the grafts is a clinically effective procedure for cartilage repair. In this ongoing prospective observational case report study, we evaluated the effectiveness of BioSeed®-C, a cell-based cartilage graft based on autologous chondrocytes embedded in fibrin and a stable resorbable polymer scaffold, for the treatment of clinical symptomatic focal degenerative defects of the knee. Methods Clinical outcome after 4-year clinical follow-up was assessed in 19 patients with preoperatively radiologically confirmed osteoarthritis and a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2 or more. Clinical scoring was performed before implantation of the graft and 6, 12, and 48 months after implantation using the Lysholm score, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, and the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score. Cartilage regeneration and articular resurfacing were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 4 years after implantation of the autologous cartilage graft. Results Significant improvement (P < 0.05) of the Lysholm and ICRS scores was observed as early as 6 months after implantation of BioSeed®-C and remained stable during follow-up. The IKDC score showed significant improvement compared with the preoperative situation at 12 and 48 months (P < 0.05). The KOOS showed significant improvement in the subclasses pain, activities of daily living, and knee-related quality of life 6 months as well as 1 and 4 years after implantation of BioSeed®-C in osteoarthritic defects (P < 0.05). MRI analysis showed moderate to complete defect filling with a normal to incidentally hyperintense signal in 16 out of 19 patients treated with BioSeed®-C. Two patients without improvement in the clinical and MRI scores received a total knee endoprosthesis after 4 years. Conclusions The results show that the good clinical

  2. Autologous chondrocytes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: more data needed.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    There is no standard surgical treatment for young adults with persistent, incapacitating symptoms of knee cartilage damage. ChondroCelect is the first cell therapy product to be authorised in the European Union. It contains a dense suspension of chondrocytes cultured from a biopsy of the patient's knee cartilage for 4 weeks before being reimplanted. Clinical evaluation of Chondro-Celect only includes one trial, versus subchondral microfracture, in 118 patients. After 3 years of follow-up, there was no difference in the symptom score between the groups. Histological outcome was better after autologous chondrocyte implantation, but methodological problems make it difficult to interpret the observed difference. Long-term functional outcomes remain to be determined. More joint complications occurred after autologous chondrocyte implantation than after subchondral bone microfracture: more frequently symptomatic cartilage hypertrophy (27% versus 13%, possibly related to the implantation technique), joint swelling (22% versus 6.6%), joint effusion (24% versus 9.8%), and joint crepitations (18% versus 6.6%). Autologous chondrocyte implantation was sometimes associated with flu-like syndrome (in 7.8% of patients), which did not occur with the microfracture technique. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is more complex than microfracture. During routine use, there is a risk that one patient will inadvertently receive chondrocytes collected from another patient, leading to a risk of rejection. In practice, this autologous chondrocyte product should only be used by highly specialised teams, and its assessment must continue. PMID:21648176

  3. Treatment of posttraumatic and focal osteoarthritic cartilage defects of the knee with autologous polymer-based three-dimensional chondrocyte grafts: 2-year clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Ossendorf, Christian; Kaps, Christian; Kreuz, Peter C; Burmester, Gerd R; Sittinger, Michael; Erggelet, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an effective clinical procedure for the regeneration of articular cartilage defects. BioSeed®-C is a second-generation ACI tissue engineering cartilage graft that is based on autologous chondrocytes embedded in a three-dimensional bioresorbable two-component gel-polymer scaffold. In the present prospective study, we evaluated the short-term to mid-term efficacy of BioSeed-C for the arthrotomic and arthroscopic treatment of posttraumatic and degenerative cartilage defects in a group of patients suffering from chronic posttraumatic and/or degenerative cartilage lesions of the knee. Clinical outcome was assessed in 40 patients with a 2-year clinical follow-up before implantation and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after implantation by using the modified Cincinnati Knee Rating System, the Lysholm score, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and the current health assessment form (SF-36) of the International Knee Documentation Committee, as well as histological analysis of second-look biopsies. Significant improvement (p < 0.05) in the evaluated scores was observed at 1 and/or 2 years after implantation of BioSeed-C, and histological staining of the biopsies showed good integration of the graft and formation of a cartilaginous repair tissue. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score showed significant improvement in the subclasses pain, other symptoms, and knee-related quality of life 2 years after implantation of BioSeed-C in focal osteoarthritic defects. The results suggest that implanting BioSeed-C is an effective treatment option for the regeneration of posttraumatic and/or osteoarthritic defects of the knee. PMID:17451597

  4. Incomplete defect filling after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Matthias F.; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F.; Hammerschmid, Florian; Müller, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a suitable method for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint. However, knowledge about the development of graft thickness and the clinical relevance of incomplete defect filling in the postoperative course is low. This prospective study analyses the graft integration into the surrounding cartilage, with special consideration of the graft thickness. Material and methods A total of 71 consecutive patients with 79 cartilage defects were treated with third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (NOVOCART 3D) in the knee. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 years. Graft thickness was measured compared to the surrounding healthy cartilage. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for clinical evaluation. Cartilage defect filling was classified as the percentage of the surrounding cartilage. Results The average graft thickness showed a significant increase between 3 and 6 months after autologous chondrocyte implantation. Incomplete defect filling occurred in 44 (55.7%) cases. Of these, 33 cases showed incomplete defect filling grade I (> 75%), 10 cases were grade II (> 50%) and one case grade III (> 25%). Incomplete defect filling grade IV (< 25%) was not observed. Incomplete defect filling occurred significantly more often in women (p = 0.021), without worse clinical results. Conclusions Graft thickness after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation shows increasing graft thickness over the period of 2 years postoperatively. A high rate of incomplete defect filling in the surrounding cartilage was observed, without worse clinical results. PMID:27478460

  5. AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTE TRANSPLANTATION-SERIES OF 3 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Pécora, José Ricardo; Rezende, Múrcia Uchõa de; Filho, Tarcisio E.P Barros; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini

    2015-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage covers joint surfaces and plays an important role in reducing friction and mechanical loading on synovial joints such as the knee. This tissue is not supplied with blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic circulation, which may be one of the reasons why joint cartilage has such poor capacity for healing. Chondral lesions that reach the subchondral bone (osteochondral lesions) do not heal and may progress to arthrosis with the passage of time. In young patients, treatment of chondral defects of the knee is still a challenge, especially in lesions larger than 4 cm. One option for treating these patients is autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation. Because this treatment does not violate the subchondral bone and repairs the defect with tissue similar to hyaline cartilage, it has the theoretical advantage of being more biological, and mechanically superior, compared with other techniques. In this paper, we describe our experience with autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital das Clínicas, University of Sâo Paulo, through a report on three cases. PMID:27022579

  6. MR imaging of osteochondral grafts and autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Millington, S. A.; Szomolanyi, P.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Surgical articular cartilage repair therapies for cartilage defects such as osteochondral autograft transfer, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are becoming more common. MRI has become the method of choice for non-invasive follow-up of patients after cartilage repair surgery. It should be performed with cartilage sensitive sequences, including fat-suppressed proton density-weighted T2 fast spin-echo (PD/T2-FSE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D GRE) sequences, which provide good signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios. A thorough magnetic resonance (MR)-based assessment of cartilage repair tissue includes evaluations of defect filling, the surface and structure of repair tissue, the signal intensity of repair tissue and the subchondral bone status. Furthermore, in osteochondral autografts surface congruity, osseous incorporation and the donor site should be assessed. High spatial resolution is mandatory and can be achieved either by using a surface coil with a 1.5-T scanner or with a knee coil at 3 T; it is particularly important for assessing graft morphology and integration. Moreover, MR imaging facilitates assessment of complications including periosteal hypertrophy, delamination, adhesions, surface incongruence and reactive changes such as effusions and synovitis. Ongoing developments include isotropic 3D sequences, for improved morphological analysis, and in vivo biochemical imaging such as dGEMRIC, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging, which make functional analysis of cartilage possible. PMID:16802126

  7. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  8. Effective implantation of autologous chondrocytes in a patient suffering from a painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sgherzi, Stefano; Sillani, Alessandro; Magris, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    A 45-year-old patient, caucasian, affected by severe, painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis has been treated by implanting autologous chondrocytes, normally used for degenerative joint diseases of the knee and ankle. PMID:19918494

  9. Effective implantation of autologous chondrocytes in a patient suffering from a painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Francesco; Sgherzi, Stefano; Sillani, Alessandro; Magris, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    A 45-year-old patient, caucasian, affected by severe, painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis has been treated by implanting autologous chondrocytes, normally used for degenerative joint diseases of the knee and ankle. PMID:19918494

  10. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix.

  11. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair: monitoring its success by magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sally; McCall, Iain W; Darby, Alan J; Menage, Janis; Evans, Helena; Harrison, Paul E; Richardson, James B

    2003-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is being used increasingly for the treatment of cartilage defects. In spite of this, there has been a paucity of objective, standardised assessment of the outcome and quality of repair tissue formed. We have investigated patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), some in conjunction with mosaicplasty, and developed objective, semiquantitative scoring schemes to monitor the repair tissue using MRI and histology. Results indicate repair tissue to be on average 2.5 mm thick. It was of varying morphology ranging from predominantly hyaline in 22% of biopsy specimens, mixed in 48%, through to predominantly fibrocartilage, in 30%, apparently improving with increasing time postgraft. Repair tissue was well integrated with the host tissue in all aspects viewed. MRI scans provide a useful assessment of properties of the whole graft area and adjacent tissue and is a noninvasive technique for long-term follow-up. It correlated with histology (P = 0.02) in patients treated with ACI alone. PMID:12716454

  12. Increased Production of Clusterin in Biopsies of Repair Tissue following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Malda, Jos; Richardson, James B.; Roberts, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the immunolocalization of clusterin in the repair cartilage of patients having undergone autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and evaluate correlation to clinical outcome. Design. Full-depth core biopsies of repair tissue were obtained from 38 patients who had undergone ACI at an average of 18 ± 13 months previously (range 8-67 months). The biopsies were snap frozen, cryosectioned, and clusterin production immunolocalized using a specific monoclonal clusterin antibody and compared with normal and osteoarthritic cartilage. Clinical outcome was assessed from patients preoperatively, at the time of biopsy, and annually postoperatively. Results. Intensity of immunostaining for clusterin decreased with age in healthy cartilage tissue. Clusterin was detected to a variable degree in 37 of the 38 ACI cartilage biopsies, in single and clustered chondrocytes, in the pericellular capsule and the cartilage extracellular matrix, as well as the osteocytes and osteoid within the bone. Chondrocytes in hyaline repair tissue were significantly more immunopositive than those in fibrocartilage repair tissue. Clinical outcome improved significantly post-ACI, but did not correlate with the presence of clusterin in the repair tissue. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the presence of clusterin in actively repairing human cartilage and indicate a different distribution of clusterin in this tissue compared to normal cartilage. Variability in clusterin staining in the repair tissue could indicate different states of chondrogenic differentiation. The clinical significance of clusterin within repair tissue is difficult to assess, although the ideal functioning repair tissue morphology should resemble that of healthy adult cartilage. PMID:26069669

  13. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, G; López-Ruiz, E; Kwiatkowski, W; Montañez, E; Arrebola, F; Carrillo, E; Gray, P C; Izpisua Belmonte, J C; Choe, S; Perán, M; Marchal, J A

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  14. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, G.; López-Ruiz, E.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Montañez, E.; Arrebola, F.; Carrillo, E.; Gray, P. C.; Belmonte, J. C. Izpisua; Choe, S.; Perán, M.; Marchal, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  15. Editorial Commentary: Focal Cartilage Defects in Young Patients Indicate Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Sooner Rather Than Later.

    PubMed

    Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2016-09-01

    Articular cartilage lesions, whether acute or chronic, are among the most common and difficult-to-treat conditions of the knee in the adolescent and athletic population. The results from a study in this issue as well as some in the previous literature suggest that autologous chondrocyte implantation yields long-term improvement in function and symptoms and may be a viable treatment for young to adult athletes or patients with high physical demands and a long active lifespan. No intervention in the young symptomatic patient will yield inferior results because it appears that no treatment over time has deleterious effects. Treatment in young athletes should include (1) early stabilization of ligament injuries, (2) resurfacing chondral defects, (3) correction of malalignment, (4) restoration of meniscal integrity, and (5) utilization of a chondroprotective strategy with orthobiological interventions. PMID:27594334

  16. In Vivo Evaluation of Different Surgical Procedures for Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Marina; Van Hauwermeiren, Hadewych; Neys, Johan; Vanderlinden, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) involves the application of a chondrocyte suspension into a membrane-sealed cartilage defect. Recently, “cell-seeded collagen matrix-supported” ACI has been developed wherein chondrocytes are seeded on a biomembrane. This study aimed at preclinically comparing 4 variant ACI techniques in a refined goat model: 2 traditional procedures, whereby the defect is sealed by a periosteal flap or collagen membrane, and 2 cell-seeding methods, with the collagen membrane either sutured or glued into the defect. Design: The efficacy of the surgical techniques was evaluated in an acute critical size chondral defect in the medial condyle of 32 skeletally mature goats, randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 aforementioned treatment groups. After 10 weeks in vivo, the quality of the repair was graded histologically by 2 independent, blinded readers using the “modified O’Driscoll” score. Results: The cell-seeding procedure whereby the membrane is sutured into the defect has a similar structural repair capacity than traditional ACI techniques. However, when the cell-seeded membrane was glued into the defect, the outcome appeared inferior. Conclusion: These findings indicate that optimizing the goat model and the postoperative recovery does allow preclinical evaluation of ACI-based cartilage implants in a load-bearing setting. This preclinical observation provides support to the clinical utilization of the sutured membrane-seeded (ACI-CS) technique, provided sutures, but not fibrin sealants, are used to fix the cell-seeded membrane in the defect bed. PMID:26069652

  17. Outcomes of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee following Failed Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Riff, Andrew Joseph; Yanke, Adam Blair; Tilton, Annemarie K.; Cole, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Marrow stimulation techniques such as drilling or microfracture are first-line treatment options for symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. For young patients who have failed microfracture, cartilage restoration techniques such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), OATS, and osteochondral allograft and are frequently employed. Nevertheless, there a few reports in the literature evaluating the results of ACI following failed microfracture and those available suggest inferior outcomes compared to primary ACI. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) following failed microfracture in the knee and compare these outcomes to those of primary ACI. Methods: Patients were identified who underwent autologous chondrocyte implantation for symptomatic chondral lesions of the knee refractory to previous microfracture. Postoperative data were collected using several subjective scoring systems (Noyes, Tegner, Lysholm, IKDC, KOOS, SF12). An age-matched cohort of 103 patients who underwent primary ACI of the knee was used as a control group. Statistics were performed in a paired manner using a Student’s t-test for ordinal data and chi-square test for categorical data. Results: Ninety-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The average patient age was 30.1 years (range, 14-49 years) at the time of ACI. The average duration from microfracture to ACI was 21.2 months (range, 1-88 months). ACI was performed in the tibiofemoral compartment in 42 patients, the patellofemoral compartments in 38 patients, and in both in 12 patients. The primary lesion treated with ACI involved the MFC in 38 patients, the trochlea in 25 patients, the patella in 19 patients, and the LFC in 10 patients. The lesions averaged 467mm3 in the trochlea, 445mm3 in the LFC, 265mm3 in the patella, and 295mm3 in the patella. Nineteen patients underwent concurrent ACI to multiple lesions. Thirty-one patients underwent concomitant

  18. Age-Independent Cartilage Generation for Synovium-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Ernst B; Lippuner, Kurt; Keel, Marius J B; Shintani, Nahoko

    2015-07-01

    The articular cartilage layer of synovial joints is commonly lesioned by trauma or by a degenerative joint disease. Attempts to repair the damage frequently involve the performance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Healthy cartilage must be first removed from the joint, and then, on a separate occasion, following the isolation of the chondrocytes and their expansion in vitro, implanted within the lesion. The disadvantages of this therapeutic approach include the destruction of healthy cartilage-which may predispose the joint to osteoarthritic degeneration-the necessarily restricted availability of healthy tissue, the limited proliferative capacity of the donor cells-which declines with age-and the need for two surgical interventions. We postulated that it should be possible to induce synovial stem cells, which are characterized by high, age-independent, proliferative and chondrogenic differentiation capacities, to lay down cartilage within the outer juxtasynovial space after the transcutaneous implantation of a carrier bearing BMP-2 in a slow-release system. The chondrocytes could be isolated on-site and immediately used for ACI. To test this hypothesis, Chinchilla rabbits were used as an experimental model. A collagenous patch bearing BMP-2 in a slow-delivery vehicle was sutured to the inner face of the synovial membrane. The neoformed tissue was excised 5, 8, 11 and 14 days postimplantation for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Neoformed tissue was observed within the outer juxtasynovial space already on the 5th postimplantation day. It contained connective and adipose tissues, and a central nugget of growing cartilage. Between days 5 and 14, the absolute volume of cartilage increased, attaining a value of 12 mm(3) at the latter juncture. Bone was deposited in measurable quantities from the 11th day onwards, but owing to resorption, the net volume did not exceed 1.5 mm(3) (14th day). The findings confirm our hypothesis. The quantity of

  19. Outcome of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Nawaz, Syed Z; Gallagher, Kieran R; Skinner, John; Briggs, Tim; Bentley, George

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instability of the knee joint, after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is contraindication to osteochondral defect repair. This prospective study is to investigate the role of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Three independent groups of patients with previous ACL injuries undergoing ACI were identified and prospectively followed up. The first group had ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction (combined group); the 2nd group consisted of individuals who had an ACI procedure having had a previously successful ACL reconstruction (ACL first group); and the third group included patients who had an ACI procedure to a clinically stable knee with documented nonreconstructed ACL disruption (No ACL group). Their outcomes were assessed using the modified cincinnati rating system, the Bentley functional (BF) rating system (BF) and a visual analog scale (VAS). Results: At a mean followup of 64.24 months for the ACL first group, 63 months for combined group and 78.33 months for the No ACL group; 60% of ACL first patients, 72.73% of combined group and 83.33% of the No ACL group felt their outcome was better following surgery. There was no significant difference demonstrated in BF and VAS between the combined and ACL first groups. Results revealed a significant affect of osteochondral defect size on outcome measures. Conclusion: The study confirms that ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction is a viable option with similar outcomes as those patients who have had the procedures staged. PMID:26015603

  20. Implantation of rAAV5-IGF-I transduced autologous chondrocytes improves cartilage repair in full-thickness defects in the equine model.

    PubMed

    Ortved, Kyla F; Begum, Laila; Mohammed, Hussni O; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-02-01

    Cartilage injury often precipitates osteoarthritis which has driven research to bolster repair in cartilage impact damage. Autologous chondrocytes transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I were evaluated in chondral defects in a well-established large animal model. Cartilage was harvested from the talus of 24 horses; chondrocytes were isolated and stored frozen. Twenty million cells were cultured and transduced with 10(5) AAV vg/cell prior to implantation. Chondrocytes from eight horses were transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I, chondrocytes from eight horses with rAAV5-GFP, and chondrocytes from eight horses were not transduced. A 15 mm full-thickness chondral defect was created arthroscopically in the lateral trochlear ridge of the femur in both femoropatellar joints. Treated defects were filled with naive or gene-enhanced chondrocytes, in fibrin vehicle. Control defects in the opposite limb received fibrin alone. rAAV5-IGF-I transduced chondrocytes resulted in significantly better healing at 8 week arthroscopy and 8 month necropsy examination when compared to controls. At 8 months, defects implanted with cells expressing IGF-I had better histological scores compared to control defects and defects repaired with naive chondrocytes. This included increased chondrocyte predominance and collagen type II, both features of hyaline-like repair tissue. The equine model closely approximates human cartilage healing, indicating AAV-mediated genetic modification of chondrocytes may be clinically beneficial to humans. PMID:25311491

  1. Articular cartilage restoration in load-bearing osteochondral defects by implantation of autologous chondrocyte-fibrin constructs: an experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Munirah, S; Samsudin, O C; Chen, H C; Salmah, S H Sharifah; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I

    2007-08-01

    Ovine articular chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage biopsy and culture expanded in vitro. Approximately 30 million cells per ml of cultured chondrocytes were incorporated with autologous plasma-derived fibrin to form a three-dimensional construct. Full-thickness punch hole defects were created in the lateral and medial femoral condyles. The defects were implanted with either an autologous 'chondrocyte-fibrin' construct (ACFC), autologous chondrocytes (ACI) or fibrin blanks (AF) as controls. Animals were killed after 12 weeks. The gross appearance of the treated defects was inspected and photographed. The repaired tissues were studied histologically and by scanning electron microscopy analysis. All defects were assessed using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification. Those treated with ACFC, ACI and AF exhibited median scores which correspond to a nearly-normal appearance. On the basis of the modified O'Driscoll histological scoring scale, ACFC implantation significantly enhanced cartilage repair compared to ACI and AF. Using scanning electron microscopy, ACFC and ACI showed characteristic organisation of chondrocytes and matrices, which were relatively similar to the surrounding adjacent cartilage. Implantation of ACFC resulted in superior hyaline-like cartilage regeneration when compared with ACI. If this result is applicable to humans, a better outcome would be obtained than by using conventional ACI. PMID:17785753

  2. Clinical Outcome 3 Years After Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Does Not Correlate With the Expression of a Predefined Gene Marker Set in Chondrocytes Prior to Implantation but Is Associated With Critical Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Johan; de Windt, Tommy S.; Synnergren, Jane; Hynsjö, Lars; van der Lee, Josefine; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Brittberg, Mats; Peterson, Lars; Lindahl, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a need for tools to predict the chondrogenic potency of autologous cells for cartilage repair. Purpose: To evaluate previously proposed chondrogenic biomarkers and to identify new biomarkers in the chondrocyte transcriptome capable of predicting clinical success or failure after autologous chondrocyte implantation. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with clinical improvement after autologous chondrocyte implantation and 5 patients with graft failures 3 years after implantation were included. Surplus chondrocytes from the transplantation were frozen for each patient. Each chondrocyte sample was subsequently thawed at the same time point and cultured for 1 cell doubling, prior to RNA purification and global microarray analysis. The expression profiles of a set of predefined marker genes (ie, collagen type II α1 [COL2A1], bone morphogenic protein 2 [BMP2], fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 [FGFR3], aggrecan [ACAN], CD44, and activin receptor–like kinase receptor 1 [ACVRL1]) were also evaluated. Results: No significant difference in expression of the predefined marker set was observed between the success and failure groups. Thirty-nine genes were found to be induced, and 38 genes were found to be repressed between the 2 groups prior to autologous chondrocyte implantation, which have implications for cell-regulating pathways (eg, apoptosis, interleukin signaling, and β-catenin regulation). Conclusion: No expressional differences that predict clinical outcome could be found in the present study, which may have implications for quality control assessments of autologous chondrocyte implantation. The subtle difference in gene expression regulation found between the 2 groups may strengthen the basis for further research, aiming at reliable biomarkers and quality control for tissue engineering in cartilage repair. Clinical Relevance: The present study shows the possible

  3. Mechanical characterization of matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI®) grafts in an equine model at 53 weeks.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Darvin J; Bonnevie, Edward D; Lachowsky, Devin J; Hart, James C A; Sparks, Holly D; Moran, Nance; Matthews, Gloria; Nixon, Alan J; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-07-16

    There has been much interest in using autologous chondrocytes in combination with scaffold materials to aid in cartilage repair. In the present study, a total of 27 animals were used to compare the performance of matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation (MACI®) using a collagen sponge as a chondrocyte delivery vehicle, the sponge membrane alone, and empty controls. A total of three distinct types of mechanical analyses were performed on repaired cartilage harvested from horses after 53 weeks of implantation: (1) compressive behavior of samples to measure aggregate modulus (HA) and hydraulic permeability (k) in confined compression; (2) local and global shear modulus using confocal strain mapping; and (3) boundary friction coefficient using a custom-built tribometer. Cartilage defects receiving MACI® implants had equilibrium modulus values that were 70% of normal cartilage, and were not statistically different than normal tissue. Defects filled with Maix™ membrane alone or left empty were only 46% and 51-63% of control, respectively. The shear modulus of tissue from all groups of cartilage defects were between 4 and 10 times lower than control tissue, and range from 0.2 to 0.4 MPa. The average values of boundary mode friction coefficients of control tissue from all groups ranged from 0.42 to 0.52. This study represents an extensive characterization of the mechanical performance of the MACI® grafts implant in a large animal model at 53 weeks. Collectively, these data demonstrate a range of implant performance, revealing similar compressive and frictional properties to native tissue, with inferior shear properties. PMID:25920896

  4. Comparative repair capacity of knee osteochondral defects using regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and fibrin glue with/without autologous chondrocytes during 36 weeks in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Mobini, Sahba; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Khanjani, Sayeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Torkaman, Giti; Ravanbod, Roya; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Moshiri, Ali; Tahmasebi, Mohammad-Naghi; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    The reconstruction capability of osteochondral (OCD) defects using silk-based scaffolds has been demonstrated in a few studies. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of natural scaffolds is still challengeable. Here, we investigate the in vivo repair capacity of OCD defects using a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite scaffold with great mechanical properties and porosity during 36 weeks. After evaluation of the in vivo biocompatibility and degradation rate of these scaffolds, we examined the effectiveness of these fabricated scaffolds accompanied with/without autologous chondrocytes in the repair of OCD lesions of rabbit knees after 12 and 36 weeks. Moreover, the efficiency of these scaffolds was compared with fibrin glue (FG) as a natural carrier of chondrocytes using parallel clinical, histopathological and mechanical examinations. The data on subcutaneous implantation in mice showed that the designed scaffolds have a suitable in vivo degradation rate and regenerative capacity. The repair ability of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds was typically higher than the scaffolds alone. After 36 weeks of implantation, most parts of the defects reconstructed by chondrocytes-seeded silk scaffolds (SFC) were hyaline-like cartilage. However, spontaneous healing and filling with a scaffold alone did not eventuate in typical repair. We could not find significant differences between quantitative histopathological and mechanical data of SFC and FGC. The fabricated constructs consisting of regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and chondrocytes are safe and suitable for in vivo repair of OCD defects and promising for future clinical trial studies. PMID:26822846

  5. Three-Dimensional Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocytes Implantation for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus: Midterm Results

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, B.; Samaila, E.; Bondi, M.; Vecchini, E.; Micheloni, G. M.; Bartolozzi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We evaluate the midterm results of thirty patients who underwent autologous chondrocytes implantation for talus osteochondral lesions treatment. Materials and Methods. From 2002 to 2009, 30 ankles with a mean lesion size of 2,36 cm2 were treated. We evaluated patients using American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery and Coughlin score, Van Dijk scale, recovering time, and Musculoskeletal Outcomes Data Evaluation and Management System. Results. The mean AOFAS score varied from 36.9 to 83.9 at follow-up. Average of Van Dijk scale was 141.1. Coughlin score was excellent/good in 24 patients. MOCART score varied from 6.3 to 3.8. Discussion. This matrix is easy to handle conformable to the lesion and apply by arthroscopy. No correlation between MRI imaging and clinical results is found. Conclusions. Our results, compared with those reported in literature with other surgical procedures, show no superiority evidence for our technique compared to the others regarding the size of the lesions. PMID:22570793

  6. Osteochondral autograft transplantation or autologous chondrocyte implantation for large cartilage defects of the knee: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeng; Zhu, Tianyi; Fan, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT or mosaicplasty) are two effective surgeries for the treatment of large cartilage defects for more than two decades. But there are always some controversies about which one has the better outcomes for the patients. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare the outcomes of these two surgeries and give an advice to the clinical practices. The literature search was performed on multiple electronic databases with specific included criteria. After the assessments, five Randomized controlled trials (level II) were included and two of them were in the same cohort. The continuous data of outcomes were categorized into ranked ones (excellent, good, fair and poor) for comparisons. In the six comparisons of excellent or good results and poor results, the outcomes of ACI were significantly better than OAT in only one comparison (RR 2.57, 95 % CI 1.09-6.07, P = 0.03) while others had no significant differences. We may reach a primary conclusion that there is no significant different outcome between ACI and OAT in a short-term follow-up but it may indicate that the patients with OAT may be more likely to have worse condition than that with ACI for a long-term period. PMID:26068598

  7. [INFLUENCE OF AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTES TRANSPLANTATION ON THE INTERVERTEBRAL DISC STATE IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF OSTEOCHONDROSIS].

    PubMed

    Khyzhnyak, M V

    2015-07-01

    The degenerative changes in the nucleus pulposus and fibrous ring of the intervertebral discs are the basis of spinal osteochondrosis. A large number of models, including biological, where some mechanisms of their development were worked out and studied, was used to study the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of degenerative spinal changes. The deserved place in the comparative experiments and especially the different methods of therapeutic effects on the tissues of the intervertebral discs in degenerative spinal changes is taken by the experimental methods. The biochemical changes of the intervertebral disc structures were analyzed under the administration of cultured autologous cell of nucleus pulposus suspension against a background of experimental model of rat osteochondrosis. PMID:26591226

  8. Use of a Smooth, Resorbable Template for Delivery of Cultured Pellets of Autologous Chondrocytes to Articular Cartilage Defects—Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pomahac, Bohdan; Zuhaili, Baraa; Kudsi, Yusef; Aflaki, Pejman; Eriksson, Elof

    2009-01-01

    Background: Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is the most commonly used cell-based surgical procedure for repair of articular cartilage defects. The challenges of this technique include dedifferentiation of chondrocytes following several in vitro passages, invasive means of transplantation, and inadequate cell retention leading to washout of transplanted cells. To overcome these obstacles, we developed a novel technique of transplanting high-density chondrocyte pellets seeded on a prefabricated, resorbable, rigid, 2-dimensional template amenable to minimally invasive implantation. Methods: Chondrocytes were obtained from the costal cartilage of New Zealand white rabbits and expanded in vitro in monolayer culture. After 2 passages, chondrocyte suspension was centrifuged and a total of 1 × 106 cells condensed on the surface of a prefabricated, resorbable template of LactoSorb plate (0.5-mm thick, 4-mm diameter). The construct was incubated for 24 hours in a culture medium before transplantation into circular 4-mm diameter, 0.5-mm deep defects in a non–weight-bearing part of the femoral condyle. Control defects were left empty or implanted with LactoSorb alone. Macroscopic and histological evaluation was performed 4 weeks posttransplantation. Results: Macroscopically, boundaries of all defects were demarcated and distinguishable from adjacent intact cartilage. Regenerative tissue in experimental group appeared white, smooth, and uniform showing more resemblance to hyaline cartilage. Control groups revealed absent cartilaginous tissue and defects were filled with soft, fibrous tissue with an irregular surface. Histologically, the repair tissue in the control groups was fibroinflammatory with irregular surface and no evidence of continuous chondrocytic regeneration. Cartilage regeneration in the experimental defects revealed a continuous, high-density layer of chondrocytes surrounding the LactoSorb plates. Consistently with chondrocyte pellets grown for 4

  9. [Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for cartilage defects of the knee: a guideline by the working group "Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology (DGOU)].

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, P; Andereya, S; Angele, P; Ateschrang, A; Aurich, M; Baumann, M; Behrens, P; Bosch, U; Erggelet, C; Fickert, S; Fritz, J; Gebhard, H; Gelse, K; Günther, D; Hoburg, A; Kasten, P; Kolombe, T; Madry, H; Marlovits, S; Meenen, N M; Müller, P E; Nöth, U; Petersen, J P; Pietschmann, M; Richter, W; Rolauffs, B; Rhunau, K; Schewe, B; Steinert, A; Steinwachs, M R; Welsch, G H; Zinser, W; Albrecht, D

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation (ACT/ACI) is an established and recognised procedure for the treatment of localised full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. The present review of the working group "Clinical Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (DGOU) describes the biology and function of healthy articular cartilage, the present state of knowledge concerning potential consequences of primary cartilage lesions and the suitable indication for ACI. Based on current evidence, an indication for ACI is given for symptomatic cartilage defects starting from defect sizes of more than 3-4 cm2; in the case of young and active sports patients at 2.5 cm2. Advanced degenerative joint disease is the single most important contraindication. The review gives a concise overview on important scientific background, the results of clinical studies and discusses advantages and disadvantages of ACI. PMID:23423589

  10. Matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation combined with iliac crest bone graft for reconstruction of talus necrosis due to villonodular synovitis.

    PubMed

    Dickschas, Jörg; Welsch, Götz; Strecker, Wolf; Schöffl, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old driving instructor with osteonecrosis of the talus and a large articular cartilage and osseous defect. The cystic lesion was caused by villonodular synovitis. After magnetic resonance imaging detection and arthoscopic analysis, the defect was filled with a bone graft, followed by matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) combined with a total synovectomy. In general, lesions similar to the one described in this case are treated using osteochondral autografts, but in our case the osseous defect was too large to perform an osteochondral autograft. Our choice of treatment with an iliac crest bone graft combined with a MACT simultaneously has not yet been published, as far as we know. The patient returned to his former activities of daily living and sport activities, without restrictions or complaints, and with only a slight deficit in range of motion. Morphological and biochemical magnetic resonance imaging 12 months after surgery showed excellent bone healing with no intraosseous edema. The MACT resulted in a good clinical outcome, with 100% defect filling and excellent integration and surface and signal intensity of the cartilage repair tissue, and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot score increased from 47 to 79 points. PMID:22104171

  11. Debridement of cartilage lesions before autologous chondrocyte implantation by open or transarthroscopic techniques: a comparative study using post-mortem materials.

    PubMed

    Drobnic, M; Radosavljevic, D; Cör, A; Brittberg, M; Strazar, K

    2010-04-01

    We compared the quality of debridement of chondral lesions performed by four arthroscopic (SH, shaver; CU, curette; SHCU, shaver and curette; BP, bipolar electrodes) and one open technique (OPEN, scalpel and curette) which are used prior to autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The ex vivo simulation of all five techniques was carried out on six juvenile equine stifle joints. The OPEN, SH and SHCU techniques were tested on knees harvested from six adult human cadavers. The most vertical walls with the least adjacent damage to cartilage were obtained with the OPEN technique. The CU and SHCU methods gave inferior, but still acceptable results whereas the SH technique alone resulted in a crater-like defect and the BP method undermined the cartilage wall. The subchondral bone was severely violated in all the equine samples which might have been peculiar to this model. The predominant depth of the debridement in the adult human samples was at the level of the calcified cartilage. Some minor penetrations of the subchondral end-plate were induced regardless of the instrumentation used. Our study suggests that not all routine arthroscopic instruments are suitable for the preparation of a defect for ACI. We have shown that the preferred debridement technique is either open or arthroscopically-assisted manual curettage. The use of juvenile equine stifles was not appropriate for the study of the cartilage-subchondral bone interface. PMID:20357342

  12. Cell-seeded Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (cs-ACI) - A Simplified Implantation Technique with Maintained Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ambra, Luiz Felipe Morlin; Phan, Amy; Mastrocola, Marissa; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate whether outcomes and failure rate of a simplified ACI technique (cs-ACI) were comparable to those of the more complicated traditional technique of a chondrocyte suspension injected under membrane cover (cACI). Methods: Patients were treated with cACI prior to February 2010. After this date the senior author switched to the cs-ACI technique for all patients. For the cs-ACI technique, cultured chondrocytes were seeded in the OR onto a collagen membrane, which was subsequently placed into the cartilage defect and secured with a running suture and/or fibrin glue. Thirty-nine patients treated with the cs-ACI technique fulfilled the inclusion requirements of minimum 2 year follow-up and complete data set. A comparison group was composed of 45 patients treated prior to the switch date with standard ACI (cACI) in which a suspension of cultured chondrocytes was injected into a debrided chondral defect underneath a sutured collagen cover. Prospectively collected data were retrieved from our IRB-approved database. Both groups followed an identical post-operative protocol. The outcomes were measured with the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm knee scale, and Tegner activity scale. We defined failure as any graft removal of more than 25% of the original defect size, for example through revision with allograft or arthroplasty. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare mean scores between groups preoperatively and at the latest follow-up; chi-square test was used to detect differences between groups. Graft survivorship was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and distributions were compared using the log rank test. Results: Group demographics were not significantly different, except for defect size (Table 1) and average follow-up: 4 years in the cACI group and 2.5 years in the cs-ACI group

  13. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology. PMID:27094849

  14. Monolayer expansion induces an oxidative metabolism and ROS in chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heywood, H.K. Lee, D.A.

    2008-08-22

    This study tests the hypothesis that articular chondrocytes shift from a characteristically glycolytic to an oxidative energy metabolism during population expansion in monolayer. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer under standard incubator conditions for up to 14 days. Cellular proliferation, oxygen consumption, lactate production, protein content, ROS generation and mitochondrial morphology were examined. Lactate release increased {approx}5-fold within 1 week, but this was limited to {approx}2-fold increase when normalized to cellular protein content. By contrast, per cell oxidative phosphorylation increased 98-fold in 1 week. The increase in oxidative phosphorylation was evident within 24 h, preceding cell proliferation and was associated with augmented reactive oxygen species generation. The autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure requires 14-21 days for population expansion. The alterations in metabolic phenotype we report within 7 days in vitro are thus pertinent to autologous chondrocyte implantation with significant implications for the chondrocyte functionality.

  15. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  16. Proliferation and differentiation potential of chondrocytes from osteoarthritic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tallheden, Tommi; Bengtsson, Catherine; Brantsing, Camilla; Sjögren-Jansson, Eva; Carlsson, Lars; Peterson, Lars; Brittberg, Mats; Lindahl, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has been shown, in long-term follow-up studies, to be a promising treatment for the repair of isolated cartilage lesions. The method is based on an implantation of in vitro expanded chondrocytes originating from a small cartilage biopsy harvested from a non-weight-bearing area within the joint. In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), there is a need for the resurfacing of large areas, which could potentially be made by using a scaffold in combination with culture-expanded cells. As a first step towards a cell-based therapy for OA, we therefore investigated the expansion and redifferentiation potential in vitro of chondrocytes isolated from patients undergoing total knee replacement. The results demonstrate that OA chondrocytes have a good proliferation potential and are able to redifferentiate in a three-dimensional pellet model. During the redifferentiation, the OA cells expressed increasing amounts of DNA and proteoglycans, and at day 14 the cells from all donors contained type II collagen-rich matrix. The accumulation of proteoglycans was in comparable amounts to those from ACT donors, whereas total collagen was significantly lower in all of the redifferentiated OA chondrocytes. When the OA chondrocytes were loaded into a scaffold based on hyaluronic acid, they bound to the scaffold and produced cartilage-specific matrix proteins. Thus, autologous chondrocytes are a potential source for the biological treatment of OA patients but the limited collagen synthesis of the OA chondrocytes needs to be further explained. PMID:15899043

  17. Polymer based tunneling sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Tianhong (Inventor); Wang, Jing (Inventor); Zhao, Yongjun (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a polymer based circuit by the following steps. A mold of a design is formed through a lithography process. The design is transferred to a polymer substrate through a hot embossing process. A metal layer is then deposited over at least part of said design and at least one electrical lead is connected to said metal layer.

  18. Chondrocyte Moves: clever strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Teresa I.

    2007-01-01

    Goals To review the literature on chondrocyte movements and to develop plausible hypothesis for further work. Design Chondrocyte movements are herein defined as translocations of the cell body. To set the stage for a discussion of chondrocyte moves, a brief overview of cell migration in other cell types is presented, including a discussion of the challenges that cells find when moving within tissues. Reports of isolated chondrocyte migration in vitro (isolated cell systems) and ex vivo (cartilage organ cultures) are then summarized, followed by a discussion of recent studies that infer chondrocyte movements in vivo. Results Investigators from different laboratories have observed chondrocyte motility in vitro. I became interested in the question of whether articular chondrocytes retained their phenotype during their migratory excursions. We devised a simple method to separate migratory and stationary chondrocytes and then showed that migratory chondrocytes synthesized collagen II but not I—consistent with a differentiated phenotype. Our time-lapse video microscopy studies showed that the cells displayed appropriate movement kinetics, albeit with low speed and directionality. Similarly, others have presented data consistent with slow movement of chondrocytes out of cartilage explants. It is important to decipher whether these in vitro movements reflect physiological states and if so, which events are simulated. Examples of in vivo studies that have inferred chondrocyte movements include those describing rotational or gliding movements of chondrocytes in the proliferative zone of the growth plate and its importance in the growth process; and the notion that chondrocytes move from the cartilage endplates to the nucleus pulposus in the spine of rabbits and rats during development. Such studies are consistent with the hypothesis that chondrocytes exhibit highly controlled and specialized movements during tissue growth and remodeling in vivo. On the other hand, the

  19. Microfluidics-based optimization of neuroleukin-mediated regulation of articular chondrocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, KANG; ZHONG, WEILIANG; ZHANG, YINGQIU; YIN, BAOSHENG; ZHANG, WEIGUO; LIU, HAN

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low proliferative and migratory capacities of chondrocytes, cartilage repair remains a challenging clinical problem. Current therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair result in unsatisfactory outcomes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a cell based therapy that relies on the in vitro expansion of healthy chondrocytes from the patient, during which proliferation-promoting factors are frequently used. Neuroleukin (NLK) is a multifunctional protein that possesses growth factor functions, and its expression has been associated with cartilage development and bone regeneration, however its direct role in chondrocyte proliferation remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, the role of NLK in chondrocyte proliferation in vitro in addition to its potential to act as an exogenous factor during ACI was investigated. Furthermore, the concentration of NLK for in vitro chondrocyte culture was optimized using a microfluidic device. An NLK concentration of 12.85 ng/ml was observed to provide optimal conditions for the promotion of chondrocyte proliferation. Additionally, NLK stimulation resulted in an increase in type II collagen synthesis by chondrocytes, which is a cartilaginous secretion marker and associated with the phenotype of chondrocytes. Together these data suggest that NLK is able to promote cell proliferation and type II collagen synthesis during in vitro chondrocyte propagation, and thus may serve as an exogenous factor for ACI. PMID:26573126

  20. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Genya; Sato, Masato; Lee, Jeong IK; Kaneshiro, Nagatoshi; Ishihara, Miya; Ota, Naoshi; Kokubo, Mami; Sakai, Hideaki; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Mochida, Joji

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. PMID:19267909

  1. Linking cell shape, elasticity and fate: in vitro re-differentiation of chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Chim, Yahua; Yin, Huabing

    2014-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has become a promising method for repairing large articular defects. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during cell expansion remains a major limitation for ACT procedures. In this study, we explore the potential of confining cell shape for re-differentiation of dedifferentiated bovine chondrocytes. A novel culture system, combining 2D micropatterning with 3D matrix formation, was developed to control and maintain individual chondrocyte's shape. Both collagen II synthesis and the mechanical properties of cells were monitored during re-differentiation. We show that a spherical morphology without cell spreading plays a limited role in induction of re-differentiation. Instead, isolated, dedifferentiated chondrocytes partially regain chondrogenic properties if they have an appropriate cell shape and limited spreading.

  2. Hyaluronan production and chondrogenic properties of primary human chondrocyte on gelatin based hematostatic spongostan scaffold

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autologous chondrocyte transplantation is a promising technique for treatment of cartilage defects. Three dimensional chondrocyte cultures on a scaffold are widely used to retain the chondrogenic phenotype. Using a biodegradable gelatin scaffold is one option for the cell delivery system, but molecular and histological studies of the method have not yet been done. Methods We evaluated the chondrogenic property of the primary human chondrocyte on a gelatin scaffold as compared to a collagen scaffold over a period of 21 days. We examined the production of glycosaminoglycan by quantitative and histological analysis. Gene expression of cartilage-associated molecules was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The gelatin scaffold showed the ability to promote chondrocyte expansion, chondrogenic phenotype retention at molecular and mRNA levels. Conclusions This scaffold is thus suitable for use as an in vitro model for chondrocyte 3D culture. PMID:23253362

  3. The Emerging Chondrocyte Channelome

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Jolley, Richard; Lewis, Rebecca; Fallman, Rebecca; Mobasheri, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the resident cells of articular cartilage and are responsible for synthesizing a range of collagenous and non-collagenous extracellular matrix macromolecules. Whilst chondrocytes exist at low densities in the tissue (1–10% of the total tissue volume in mature cartilage) they are extremely active cells and are capable of responding to a range of mechanical and biochemical stimuli. These responses are necessary for the maintenance of viable cartilage and may be compromised in inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. Although chondrocytes are non-excitable cells their plasma membrane contains a rich complement of ion channels. This diverse channelome appears to be as complex as one might expect to find in excitable cells although, in the case of chondrocytes, their functions are far less well understood. The ion channels so far identified in chondrocytes include potassium channels (KATP, BK, Kv, and SK), sodium channels (epithelial sodium channels, voltage activated sodium channels), transient receptor potential calcium or non-selective cation channels and chloride channels. In this review we describe this emerging channelome and discuss the possible functions of a range of chondrocyte ion channels. PMID:21423376

  4. Focal Adhesion Assembly Induces Phenotypic Changes and Dedifferentiation in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunjun; Lee, Mi Nam; Choung, Jin Seung; Kim, Sanghee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Noh, Minsoo; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate sufficient populations for cell-based therapies. However, during monolayer culture, chondrocytes lose inherent characteristics and shift to fibroblast-like cells as passage number increase. Here, we investigated passage-dependent changes in cellular physiology, including cellular morphology, motility, and gene and protein expression, as well as the role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal regulation in the dedifferentiation process. We found that the gene and protein expression levels of both the focal adhesion complex and small Rho GTPases are upregulated with increasing passage number and are closely linked to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. The inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but not small Rho GTPases induced the loss of fibroblastic traits and the recovery of collagen type II, aggrecan, and SOX9 expression levels in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Based on these findings, we propose a strategy to suppress chondrogenic dedifferentiation by inhibiting the identified FAK or Src pathways while maintaining the expansion capability of chondrocytes in a 2D environment. These results highlight a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of skeletal diseases and the generation of cartilage in tissue-engineering approaches. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1822-1831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661891

  5. The Interplay between Chondrocyte Redifferentiation Pellet Size and Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Betul Kul; Ghanavi, Parisa; Levett, Peter; Lott, William B.; Klein, Travis; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Crawford, Ross; Doran, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes dedifferentiate during ex vivo expansion on 2-dimensional surfaces. Aggregation of the expanded cells into 3-dimensional pellets, in the presence of induction factors, facilitates their redifferentiation and restoration of the chondrogenic phenotype. Typically 1×105–5×105 chondrocytes are aggregated, resulting in “macro” pellets having diameters ranging from 1–2 mm. These macropellets are commonly used to study redifferentiation, and recently macropellets of autologous chondrocytes have been implanted directly into articular cartilage defects to facilitate their repair. However, diffusion of metabolites over the 1–2 mm pellet length-scales is inefficient, resulting in radial tissue heterogeneity. Herein we demonstrate that the aggregation of 2×105 human chondrocytes into micropellets of 166 cells each, rather than into larger single macropellets, enhances chondrogenic redifferentiation. In this study, we describe the development of a cost effective fabrication strategy to manufacture a microwell surface for the large-scale production of micropellets. The thousands of micropellets were manufactured using the microwell platform, which is an array of 360×360 µm microwells cast into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), that has been surface modified with an electrostatic multilayer of hyaluronic acid and chitosan to enhance micropellet formation. Such surface modification was essential to prevent chondrocyte spreading on the PDMS. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production and collagen II gene expression in chondrocyte micropellets increased significantly relative to macropellet controls, and redifferentiation was enhanced in both macro and micropellets with the provision of a hypoxic atmosphere (2% O2). Once micropellet formation had been optimized, we demonstrated that micropellets could be assembled into larger cartilage tissues. Our results indicate that micropellet amalgamation efficiency is inversely related to the time cultured as discreet

  6. Modelling and Simulating the Adhesion and Detachment of Chondrocytes in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jian; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Rosenstrauch, Doreen

    Chondrocytes are typically studied in the environment where they normally reside such as the joints in hips, intervertebral disks or the ear. For example, in [SKE+99], the effect of seeding duration on the strength of chondrocyte adhesion to articulate cartilage has been studied in shear flow chamber since such adhesion may play an important role in the repair of articular defects by maintaining cells in positions where their biosynthetic products can contribute to the repair process. However, in this investigation, we focus mainly on the use of auricular chondrocytes in cardiovascular implants. They are abundant, easily and efficiently harvested by a minimally invasive technique. Auricular chondrocytes have ability to produce collagen type-II and other important extracellular matrix constituents; this allows them to adhere strongly to the artificial surfaces. They can be genetically engineered to act like endothelial cells so that the biocompatibility of cardiovascular prothesis can be improved. Actually in [SBBR+02], genetically engineered auricular chondrocytes can be used to line blood-contacting luminal surfaces of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and a chondrocyte-lined LVAD has been planted into the tissue-donor calf and the results in vivo have proved the feasibility of using autologous auricular chondrocytes to improve the biocompatibility of the blood-biomaterial interface in LVADs and cardiovascular prothesis. Therefore, cultured chondrocytes may offer a more efficient and less invasive means of covering artificial surface with a viable and adherent cell layer.

  7. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  8. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC).

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung Woo; Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Ahmed, Saif; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Seok Jung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic articular cartilage defects are common, difficult to treat, and progressive lesions that cause significant morbidity in the general population. There have been multiple approaches to treat such lesions, including arthroscopic debridement, microfracture, multiple drilling, osteochondral transplantation and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) that are currently being used in clinical practice. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC) is a single-staged arthroscopic procedure. This method combines a modified microfracture technique with the application of a bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), hyaluronic acid and fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We reviewed the current literatures and surgical techniques for mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis. PMID:27489409

  9. Effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on proliferation and phenotype maintenance in rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HAOJIA; LIU, QIN; LIU, LEI; WU, HUAYU; ZHENG, LI

    2015-01-01

    In autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to restore defective cartilage, limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes are the major difficulties. An alternative is the use of growth factors, but their high cost and potential for tumorigenesis are major obstacles. To ensure successful ACI therapy, it is important to find an effective substitute pro-chondrogenic agent. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the green tea catechins, has been widely investigated in studies of interleukin-1β-induced chondrocytes. In the present study, the effects of EGCG on rabbit articular chondrocytes were investigated through the examination of cell proliferation, morphology, glycosaminoglycan synthesis and cartilage-specific gene expression. The results showed that EGCG could effectively promote chondrocyte growth and enhance the secretion and synthesis of the cartilage extracellular matrix by upregulating expression levels of aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9 genes. Expression of the collagen I gene was downregulated, which showed that EGCG effectively inhibited the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. Hypertrophy, which may lead to chondrocyte ossification, was also undetectable in the EGCG groups. In conclusion, the recommended dose of EGCG was found to be in the range of 5 to 20 μM, with the most marked response observed with 10 μM. The present study may provide a basis for the development of a novel agent as a substitute for growth factors in the treatment of articular cartilage defects. PMID:25452805

  10. Polymer-Based Organic Batteries.

    PubMed

    Muench, Simon; Wild, Andreas; Friebe, Christian; Häupler, Bernhard; Janoschka, Tobias; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-08-24

    The storage of electric energy is of ever growing importance for our modern, technology-based society, and novel battery systems are in the focus of research. The substitution of conventional metals as redox-active material by organic materials offers a promising alternative for the next generation of rechargeable batteries since these organic batteries are excelling in charging speed and cycling stability. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these systems and discusses the numerous classes of organic, polymer-based active materials as well as auxiliary components of the battery, like additives or electrolytes. Moreover, a definition of important cell characteristics and an introduction to selected characterization techniques is provided, completed by the discussion of potential socio-economic impacts. PMID:27479607

  11. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.; Dourado, Sunil K.; Dulebohn, Joel I.; Hanchar, Robert J.

    2007-04-17

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  12. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  13. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies. PMID:27566509

  14. Clinical experience in cell-based therapeutics: disc chondrocyte transplantation A treatment for degenerated or damaged intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans Jörg; Siodla, Vilma; Ganey, Timothy; Minkus, Yvonne; Hutton, William C; Alasevic, Olivera J

    2007-02-01

    Disc herniation treated by discectomy results in a significant loss of nucleus material and disc height. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. Chondrocytes that have been removed from damaged cartilaginous tissues maintain a capacity to proliferate, produce and secrete matrix components and respond to physical stimuli such as dynamic loading. Nucleus regeneration using autologous cultured disc-derived chondrocytes (ADCT) has been demonstrated in a canine model and in clinical pilot studies. In 2002 a prospective, controlled, randomised, multi-center study, EuroDISC, comparing safety and efficacy of autologous disc chondrocyte transplant, chondrotransplant DISC, plus discectomy (ADCT), with discectomy alone was initiated. A dog model was used to investigate the hypothesis that autologous disc chondrocytes can be used to repair damaged intervertebral disc. Disc chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in culture under controlled and defined conditions, returned to the same animals from which they had been sampled (autologous transplantation) via percutaneous delivery. The animals were analyzed at specific times after transplantation by several methods to examine whether disc chondrocytes integrated with the surrounding tissue, produced the appropriate intervertebral disc extracellular matrix, and might provide a formative solution to disc repair. The clinical goals of the EuroDISC study, were to provide long-term pain relief, maintain disc height and prevent adjacent segment disease. Interim analysis was performed after 2 years; Oswestry (low back pain/disability), Quebec Back-Pain Disability Scale, as well as Prolo and VAS score were used for the evaluation. Disc height was assessed by MRI. In the context of degenerative changes in an injury model: () autologous disc chondrocytes were expended in culture and returned to the disc by a

  15. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice; Maloney, William J.; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient; an abundant autologous source, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), is therefore attractive for engineering cartilage. We report a growth factor-based protocol for differentiating hiPSCs into articular-like chondrocytes (hiChondrocytes) within 2 weeks, with an overall efficiency >90%. The hiChondrocytes are stable and comparable to adult articular chondrocytes in global gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and ability to generate cartilage tissue in vitro and in immune-deficient mice. Molecular characterization identified an early SRY (sex-determining region Y) box (Sox)9low cluster of differentiation (CD)44lowCD140low prechondrogenic population during hiPSC differentiation. In addition, 2 distinct Sox9-regulated gene networks were identified in the Sox9low and Sox9high populations providing novel molecular insights into chondrogenic fate commitment and differentiation. Our findings present a favorable method for generating hiPSC-derived articular-like chondrocytes. The hiChondrocytes are an attractive cell source for cartilage engineering because of their abundance, autologous nature, and potential to generate articular-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage. In addition, hiChondrocytes can be excellent tools for modeling human musculoskeletal diseases in a dish and for rapid drug screening.—Lee, J., Taylor, S. E. B., Smeriglio, P., Lai, J., Maloney, W. J., Yang, F., Bhutani, N. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25911615

  16. Polymer-Based Carbon Monoxide Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, M. L.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Kisor, A. K.; Lara, L. M.; Yen, S.-P. S.; Ryan, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-based sensors have been used primarily to detect volatile organics and inorganics; they are not usually used for smaller, gas phase molecules. We report the development and use of two types of polymer-based sensors for the detection of carbon monoxide. Further understanding of the experimental results is also obtained by performing molecular modeling studies to investigate the polymer-carbon monoxide interactions. The first type is a carbon-black-polymer composite that is comprised of a non-conducting polymer base that has been impregnated with carbon black to make it conducting. These chemiresistor sensors show good response to carbon monoxide but do not have a long lifetime. The second type of sensor has a non-conducting polymer base but includes both a porphyrin-functionalized polypyrrole and carbon black. These sensors show good, repeatable and reversible response to carbon monoxide at room temperature.

  17. Chondrocytes expressing intracellular collagen type II enter the cell cycle and co-express collagen type I in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J

    2014-11-01

    For autologous chondrocyte transplantation, articular chondrocytes are harvested from cartilage tissue and expanded in vitro in monolayer culture. We aimed to characterize with a cellular resolution the synthesis of collagen type II (COL2) and collagen type I (COL1) during expansion in order to further understand why these cells lose the potential to form cartilage tissue when re-introduced into a microenvironment that supports chondrogenesis. During expansion for six passages, levels of transcripts encoding COL2 decreased to <0.1%, whereas transcript levels encoding COL1 increased 370-fold as compared to primary chondrocytes. Flow cytometry for intracellular proteins revealed that chondrocytes acquired a COL2/COL1-double positive phenotype during expansion, and the COL2 positive cells were able to enter the cell cycle. While the fraction of COL2 positive cells decreased from 70% to <2% in primary chondrocytes to passage six cells, the fraction of COL1 positive cells increased from <1% to >95%. In parallel to the decrease of the fraction of COL2 positive cells, the cells' potential to form cartilage-like tissue in pellet cultures steadily decreased. Intracellular staining for COL2 enables for characterization of chondrocyte lineage cells in more detail with a cellular resolution, and it may allow predicting the effectiveness of expanded chondrocytes to form cartilage-like tissue. PMID:25043137

  18. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies. PMID:26987846

  19. Porcine Intervertebral Disc Repair Using Allogeneic Juvenile Articular Chondrocytes or Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank L.; Metz, Lionel; Adkisson, Huston Davis; Liu, Jane; Carruthers-Liebenberg, Ellen; Milliman, Curt; Maloney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for intervertebral disc repair have focused on the use of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes. Difficulties with graft procurement, harvest site morbidity, and functionality, however, may limit the utility of this cell source. We used an in vivo porcine model to investigate allogeneic non-disc-derived chondrocytes and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for disc repair. After denucleation, lumbar discs were injected with either fibrin carrier alone, allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes (JCs), or allogeneic MSCs. Discs were harvested at 3, 6, and 12 months, and cell viability and functionality were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. JC-treated discs demonstrated abundant cartilage formation at 3 months, and to a lesser extent at 6 and 12 months. For the carrier and MSC-treated groups, however, there was little evidence of proteoglycan matrix or residual notochordal/chondrocyte cells, but rather a type I/II collagen-enriched scar tissue. By contrast, JCs produced a type II collagen-rich matrix that was largely absent of type I collagen. Viable JCs were observed at all time points, whereas no evidence of viable MSCs was found. These data support the premise that committed chondrocytes are more appropriate for use in disc repair, as they are uniquely suited for survival in the ischemic disc microenvironment. PMID:21910592

  20. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  1. Extracellular Matrix Domain Formation as an Indicator of Chondrocyte Dedifferentiation and Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Kyupelyan, Levon; Petrigliano, Frank A.; McAllister, David R.; Adams, John S; Karperien, Marcel; Tuan, Tai-Lan; Benya, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage injury represents one of the most significant clinical conditions. Implantation of expanded autologous chondrocytes from noninjured compartments of the joint is a typical strategy for repairing cartilage. However, two-dimensional culture causes dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, making them functionally inferior for cartilage repair. We hypothesized that functional exclusion of dedifferentiated chondrocytes can be achieved by the selective mapping of collagen molecules deposited by chondrogenic cells in a three-dimensional environment. Freshly isolated and in vitro expanded human fetal or adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in a thermoreversible hydrogel at density of 1×107 cells/mL for 24 h. Chondrocytes were released from the gel, stained with antibodies against collagen type 2 (COL II) or COL I or COL X and sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Imaging flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assays were performed to evaluate the differences between COL II domain forming and COL II domain-negative cells. Freshly dissected periarticular chondrocytes robustly formed domains that consisted of the extracellular matrix surrounding cells in the hydrogel as a capsule clearly detectable by imaging flow cytometry (ImageStream) and confocal microscopy. These domains were almost exclusively formed by COL II. In contrast to that, a significant percentage of freshly isolated growth plate pre-hypertrophic and hyperdrophic chondrocytes deposited matrix domains positive for COL II, COL I, and COL X. The proportion of the cells producing COL II domains decreased with the increased passage of in vitro expanded periarticular fetal or adult articular chondrocytes. Sorted COL II domain forming cells deposited much higher levels of COL II and GAGs in pellet assays than COL II domain-negative cells. COL II domain forming cells expressed chondrogenic genes at higher levels than negative cells

  2. Effect of Longan polysaccharides on proliferation and phenotype maintenance in rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuyu; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Qin; Wu, Huayu; Zheng, Li

    2016-04-01

    For autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to restore cartilage defect, limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes are the major difficulties. An alternative is the use of growth factors, but the high cost and potential tumorigenesis are the major obstacles. To ensure successful ACI therapy, it is of significance to find effective substituted pro-chondrogenic agent. Polysaccharides from plant extract have low toxicity and few undesirable side effects, which were reported to facilitate cartilage regeneration. In this study, we investigated the effect of Longan polysaccharides (LP) on rabbit articular chondrocytes through examination of the cell proliferation, morphology, viability, glycosaminoglycan synthesis and cartilage-specific gene expression. Results showed that close to the positive group which used the growth factor of TGF-β, LP could effectively promote chondrocytes growth and enhance secretion and synthesis of cartilage extracellular matrix by up-regulating expression levels of aggrecan, collagen II and sox9 compared to the negative control. Expression of collagen I gene was effectively down-regulated, demonstrating the inhibition of chondrocytes dedifferentiation by LP. Hypertrophy that might lead to chondrocyte ossification was also undetectable in LP groups. Range of 4.69-18.76 µg/ml was recommended dose of LP, among which the most profound response was observed with 9.38 μg/ml. All the evidences revealed that LP may replace the growth factors to be applied in ACI therapy. This study might provide a basis for development of a novel agent in the treatment of articular cartilage defect. PMID:26231088

  3. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements. PMID:21916014

  4. Autologous Therapies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Autologous therapy is a therapeutic intervention that uses an individual’s cells or tissues, which are processed outside the body, and reintroduced into the donor. This emerging field presently represents a mere tip of the iceberg with much knowledge and applications yet to be discovered. It, being free from risks of hypersensitivity reactions and transmission of infectious agents, has been explored in various fields, such as plastic surgery, orthopedics, and dermatology. This review article focuses on various forms of autologous therapies used in dermatology along with their applications and mechanisms of action. PMID:25584137

  5. Autologous Microvascular Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    Autologous microvascular breast reconstruction is widely accepted as a key component of breast cancer treatment. There are two basic donor sites; the anterior abdominal wall and the thigh/buttock region. Each of these regions provides for a number of flaps that are successfully utilised in breast reconstruction. Refinement of surgical technique and the drive towards minimising donor site morbidity whilst maximising flap vascularity in breast reconstruction has seen an evolution towards perforator based flap reconstructions, however myocutaneous flaps are still commonly practiced. We review herein the current methods of autologous microvascular breast reconstruction. PMID:23362474

  6. Differential effects of tyrosine-rich amelogenin peptide on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of adult chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Amin, H D; Ethier, C R

    2016-04-01

    Current approaches to treat osteoarthritis (OA) are insufficient. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been used for the past decade to treat patients with OA or focal cartilage defects. However, a number of complications have been reported post-ACI, including athrofibrosis and symptomatic hypertrophy. Thus, a long-term ACI strategy should ideally incorporate methods to 'prime' autologous chondrocytes to form a cartilage-specific matrix and suppress hypertrophic mineralization. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of tyrosine-rich amelogenin peptide (TRAP; an isoform of the developmental protein amelogenin) on human articular cartilage cell (HAC) chondrogenic differentiation and hypertrophic mineralization in vitro. Effects of chemically synthesized TRAP on HAC chondrogenic differentiation were determined by assessing: (1) sGAG production; (2) Alcian blue staining for proteoglycans; (3) collagen type II immunostaining; and (4) expression of the chondrogenic genes SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Hypertrophic mineralization was assayed by: (1) ALP expression; (2) Alizarin red staining for Ca(+2)-rich bone nodules; (3) OC immunostaining; and (4) expression of the osteogenic/hypertrophic genes Ihh and BSP. Chemically synthesized TRAP was found to suppress terminal osteogenic differentiation of HACs cultured in hypertrophic mineralization-like conditions, an effect mediated via down-regulation of the Ihh gene. Moreover, TRAP was found to augment chondrogenic differentiation of HACs via induction of SOX9 gene expression when cells were cultured in pro-chondrogenic media. The results obtained from this proof-of-concept study motivate further studies on the use of TRAP as part of a preconditioning regimen in autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures for OA patients and patients suffering from focal cartilage defects. PMID:26404401

  7. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Suzer, Ferzan; Thermann, Hajo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a 1-step cartilage restoration technique that combines microfracture with the use of an exogenous scaffold. This matrix covers and mechanically stabilizes the clot. There have been an increasing number of studies performed related to the AMIC technique and an update of its use and results is warranted. Design and methods: Using the PubMed database, a literature search was performed using the terms “AMIC” or “Autologous Matrix Induced Chondrogenesis.” A total of 19 basic science and clinical articles were identified. Results: Ten studies that were published on the use of AMIC for knee chondral defects were identified and the results of 219 patients were analyzed. The improvements in Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective, Lysholm and Tegner scores at 2 years were comparable to the published results from autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and matrix ACI techniques for cartilage repair. Conclusions: Our systematic review of the current state of the AMIC technique suggests that it is a promising 1-stage cartilage repair technique. The short-term clinical outcomes and magnetic resonance imaging results are comparable to other cell-based methods. Further studies with AMIC in randomized studies versus other repair techniques such as ACI are needed in the future. PMID:26069694

  8. Polymer-based platform for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Krulevitch, Peter; Maghribi, Mariam; Hamilton, Julie; Rose, Klint; Wang, Amy W.

    2009-10-13

    A method of forming a polymer-based microfluidic system platform using network building blocks selected from a set of interconnectable network building blocks, such as wire, pins, blocks, and interconnects. The selected building blocks are interconnectably assembled and fixedly positioned in precise positions in a mold cavity of a mold frame to construct a three-dimensional model construction of a microfluidic flow path network preferably having meso-scale dimensions. A hardenable liquid, such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) is then introduced into the mold cavity and hardened to form a platform structure as well as to mold the microfluidic flow path network having channels, reservoirs and ports. Pre-fabricated elbows, T's and other joints are used to interconnect various building block elements together. After hardening the liquid the building blocks are removed from the platform structure to make available the channels, cavities and ports within the platform structure. Microdevices may be embedded within the cast polymer-based platform, or bonded to the platform structure subsequent to molding, to create an integrated microfluidic system. In this manner, the new microfluidic platform is versatile and capable of quickly generating prototype systems, and could easily be adapted to a manufacturing setting.

  9. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. PMID:27242325

  10. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Characterized Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huylebroek, José; Van Der Bauwhede, Jan; Saris, Daniël; Veeckman, Geert; Bobic, Vladimir; Victor, Jan; Almqvist, Karl Fredrik; Verdonk, Peter; Fortems, Yves; Van Lommel, Nel; Haazen, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical outcome of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation using ChondroCelect in daily practice. Methods: The study is a cross-sectional analysis of an open-label, noninterventional cohort. The setting was a compassionate use program, involving 43 orthopaedic centers in 7 European countries. The participants were patients treated with ChondroCelect between October 13, 2004 and July 2, 2008. The measurements used were Clinical Global Impression–Improvement and –Efficacy and solicited adverse event reports. Results: Safety data were collected from 334 patients (90.3%), and effectiveness data were from 282 (76.2%) of the 370 patients treated. Mean age at baseline was 33.6 years (range, 12-57 years), 57% were male, and mean body mass index was 25 kg/m2. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range, 0.4-4.1 years). A femoral condyle lesion was reported in 66% (288/379) and a patellar lesion in 19% (84/379). Mean lesion size was 3.5 cm2; a collagen membrane was used in 92.4% (328/355). A therapeutic effect was reported in 89% (234/264) of patients overall and in 87% (40/46) of patellar lesion patients. Rates of much or very much improved patients were similar in patients with short- (<18 months: 71% [115/163]) and long-term follow-up (>18 months: 68% [70/103]) (P = 0.68) and were independent of lesion size (>4 cm2: 75.5% [37/49]; ≤4 cm2: 67.7% [111/164]) (P = 0.38). Adverse events were similar to those reported in the randomized trial with the same product, with more arthrofibrosis, more reduced joint mobility, and more crepitations reported in patellar lesions. Overall, less cartilage hypertrophy was noted, probably due to the use of a biological membrane cover. Conclusions: Implantation of ChondroCelect appeared to result in a positive benefit/risk ratio when used in an unselected heterogenous population, irrespective of the follow-up period, lesion size, and type of lesion treated. PMID:26069630

  12. Stretchable polymer-based electronic device

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Wilson, Thomas S.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Benett, William J.; Tovar, Armando R.

    2008-02-26

    A stretchable electronic circuit or electronic device and a polymer-based process to produce a circuit or electronic device containing a stretchable conducting circuit. The stretchable electronic apparatus has a central longitudinal axis and the apparatus is stretchable in a longitudinal direction generally aligned with the central longitudinal axis. The apparatus comprises a stretchable polymer body and at least one circuit line operatively connected to the stretchable polymer body. The circuit line extends in the longitudinal direction and has a longitudinal component that extends in the longitudinal direction and has an offset component that is at an angle to the longitudinal direction. The longitudinal component and the offset component allow the apparatus to stretch in the longitudinal direction while maintaining the integrity of the circuit line.

  13. Chopping off the chondrocyte proteome

    PubMed Central

    Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona; Reich, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The progressive nature of osteoarthritis is manifested by the dynamic increase of degenerated articular cartilage, which is one of the major characteristics of this debilitating disease. As articular chondrocytes become exposed to inflammatory stress they enter a pro-catabolic state, which leads to the secretion and activation of a plethora of proteases. In aim to detect the disease before massive areas of cartilage are destroyed, various protein and non-protein biomarkers have been examined in bodily fluids and correlated with disease severity. This review will discuss the widely research extracellular degraded products as well as products generated by affected cellular pathways upon increased protease activity. While extracellular components could be more abundant, cleaved cellular proteins are less abundant and are suggested to possess a significant effect on cell metabolism and cartilage secretome. Subtle changes in cell secretome could potentially act as indicators of the chondrocyte metabolic and biological state. Therefore, it is envisioned that combined biomarkers composed of both cell and extracellular-degraded secretome could provide a valuable platform for testing drug efficacy to halt disease progression at its early stages. PMID:25179281

  14. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  15. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  16. Phenotypic analysis of bovine chondrocytes cultured in 3D collagen sponges: effect of serum substitutes.

    PubMed

    Yates, Karen E; Allemann, Florin; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Repair of damaged cartilage usually requires replacement tissue or substitute material. Tissue engineering is a promising means to produce replacement cartilage from autologous or allogeneic cell sources. Scaffolds provide a three-dimensional (3D) structure that is essential for chondrocyte function and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins (collagen type II, aggrecan) and sulfated proteoglycans. In this study, we assessed porous, 3D collagen sponges for in vitro engineering of cartilage in both standard and serum-free culture conditions. Bovine articular chondrocytes (bACs) cultured in 3D sponges accumulated and maintained cartilage matrix over 4 weeks, as assessed by quantitative measures of matrix content, synthesis, and gene expression. Chondrogenesis by bACs cultured with Nutridoma as a serum replacement was equivalent or better than control cultures in serum. In contrast, chondrogenesis in insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS(+3)) serum replacement cultures was poor, apparently due to decreased cell survival. These data indicate that porous 3D collagen sponges maintain chondrocyte viability, shape, and synthetic activity by providing an environment favorable for high-density chondrogenesis. With quantitative assays for cartilage-specific gene expression and biochemical measures of chondrogenesis in these studies, we conclude that the collagen sponges have potential as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:15735900

  17. Biomimetic, polymer-based microcantilever infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael Thomas

    This dissertation describes the initial development of a polymer-based, microcantilever infrared sensor. The development of the sensor is bio-inspired and based upon the long-range infrared sensor found in the pyrophilous jewel beetle Melanophila acuminata, which is able to seek out forest fires from more than 50 km away. Based on several proposed models of the infrared detector found in Melanophila acuminata, as well as published in vivo experiments, the feasibility of polymer-based infrared thermal sensors was explored and developed. Polymer materials were chosen due to their high absorptivity in the infrared range due to vibrational resonance modes characteristic of their organic bonds. Polymeric materials investigated in the course of this work include the polysaccharide and biomaterial chitin, its deacetylated derivative, chitosan, and the work-horse polymer of the semiconductor industry, novolak-resin-based photoresist. Chitin and chitosan are particularly noteworthy polymers for exploration in infrared detection due to their natural absorbance of infrared radiation near the 3 mum and 10 mum bands, which are important for the detection of the temperatures of warm engines and human body temperature, respectively. Because only limited work (primarily focused on electrodeposition) has been focused on the microscale patterning of chitosan, a photolithography process for chitosan and chitin was developed to allow the integration of the material into a variety of microelectromechanical systems processes. In addition to optical/infrared sensing, this process has a variety of potential applications in tissue engineering, protein engineering, and lab-on-a-chip devices. To demonstrate these areas of use, surface functionalization was demonstrated using bioconjugation to attach a protein to a patterned chitosan surface. Thin films of chitosan and chitin were characterized using laser profilometry to identify the effect of temperature on the film stress, and contact

  18. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  19. Native Chondrocyte Viability during Cartilage Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.; Augé, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Early surgical intervention for articular cartilage disease is desirable before full-thickness lesions develop. As early intervention treatments are designed, native chondrocyte viability at the treatment site before intervention becomes an important parameter to consider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate native chondrocyte viability in a series of specimens demonstrating the progression of articular cartilage lesions to determine if the chondrocyte viability profile changes during the evolution of articular cartilage disease to the level of surface fibrillation. Design: Osteochondral specimens demonstrating various degrees of articular cartilage damage were obtained from patients undergoing knee total joint replacement. Three groups were created within a patient harvest based on visual and tactile cues commonly encountered during surgical intervention: group 1, visually and tactilely intact surfaces; group 2, visually intact, tactilely soft surfaces; and group 3, surface fibrillation. Confocal laser microscopy was performed following live/dead cell viability staining. Results: Groups 1 to 3 demonstrated viable chondrocytes in all specimens, even within the fibrillated portions of articular cartilage, with little to no evidence of dead chondrocytes. Chondrocyte viability profile in articular cartilage does not appear to change as disease lesion progresses from normal to surface fibrillation. Conclusions: Fibrillated partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions are a good therapeutic target for early intervention. These lesions retain a high profile of viable chondrocytes and are readily diagnosed by visual and tactile cues during surgery. Early intervention should be based on matrix failure rather than on more aggressive procedures that further corrupt the matrix and contribute to chondrocyte necrosis of contiguous untargeted cartilage. PMID:26069561

  20. Biochemical and proteomic characterization of alkaptonuric chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as "black" AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as "white" AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both "white" and "black" AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in "black" AKU chondrocytes. PMID:22213341

  1. Biochemical and Proteomic Characterization of Alkaptonuric Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as “black” AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as “white” AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both “white” and “black” AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in “black” AKU chondrocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3333–3343, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22213341

  2. Interfacial Aspects of Polymer Based Photovoltaic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Controlling thin film morphology is key in optimizing the efficiency of polymer-based photovoltaic (PV) devices. Poly(3- hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-penyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) based solar cell performance is dictated by nanostructure of the active layer, the interfaces between the active layer and the electrodes, and the P3HT chain orientation in the thin film. The above parameters were systematically studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning force microscopy, optical microscopy, grazing incident angle x- ray diffraction., dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The influence of thermal annealing on the morphology, interfaces and crystal structure was investigated in films that were either initially confined by two electrodes or confined by only one electrode. While the bulk morphology in these films were identical, significant differences in the concentration of components at the electrode interfaces were found, giving rise to a marked difference in performance. In addition, a model was established, based on the crystallization of the P3HTand the diffusion of the PCBM to describe the origins of the nanoscale morphology found in the active layer. The device performance parameters were quantitatively studied. In collaboration with D. Chen, H. Liu, Y. Gu and F. Lu at UMass Amherst, A. Nakahara at Kuraray Co., D. Wei at Carl Zeiss NTS LLC, D. Nordlund at SSRL and supported by the DOE-supported EFRC at the UMass Amherst (DE-PS02-08ER15944).

  3. Autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A

    1995-02-01

    The patient with short bowel syndrome is essentially unable to absorb sufficient nutrients. This is caused by either short mucosal contact time, insufficient mucosal surface area (enterocyte mass), or a combination of the two. Management consists primarily in sustaining health and growth by intravenous nutrition and in enhancing the natural intestinal adaptation response. Surgery in the form of autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction (AGIR) is designed to redistribute the patient's own residual absorptive bowel to enhance adaptation and, possibly, to increase the absorptive mucosal surface by neomucosal growth. The alternative and ultimate fallback procedure in the management of intestinal failure is bowel transplantation, with its associated serious immunosuppression-related complications. Imaginative AGIR techniques provide new hope for the future. PMID:7728509

  4. Cultured chondrocyte and porcine cartilage-derived substance (PCS) construct as a possible dorsal augmentation material in rhinoplasty: A preliminary animal study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo Suk; Park, Do-Yang; Cho, Yong Hyun; Chang, Jae Won; Choi, Jae Won; Park, Joo Kyung; Min, Byung Hyun; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Chul Ho

    2015-05-01

    As there is no single ideal material for dorsal augmentation in rhinoplasty, there has been a continuing need for the development of improved materials. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the outcome of using a novel tissue-engineered construct composed of autologous chondrocytes cultured with a porcine cartilage-derived substance (PCS) scaffold as an augmentation material in rhinoplasty. A scaffold derived from decellularized and powdered porcine articular cartilage was prepared. The rabbit articular cartilage was used as the source of homologous chondrocytes, which were expanded and cultured with the PCS scaffold for 7 weeks. The chondrocyte-PCS constructs were then surgically implanted on the nasal dorsum of six rabbits. Four and eight weeks after implantation, the gross morphology, radiologic images, and histologic features of the site of implant were analyzed. The rabbits showed no signs of postoperative inflammation and infection. The degree of dorsal augmentation was maintained during the 8-week postoperative observation period. Postoperative histologic examinations showed chondrocyte proliferation without an inflammatory response. However, neo-cartilage formation from the constructs was not confirmed. The biocompatibility and structural features of tissue-engineered chondrocyte-PCS constructs indicate their potential as candidate dorsal augmentation material for use in rhinoplasty. PMID:25735721

  5. Autologous blood storage in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Herbert, W N; Owen, H G; Collins, M L

    1988-08-01

    Autologous transfusion, storage of one's own blood for subsequent infusion if needed, is safe and effective in a variety of scheduled operative procedures. Obstetric involvement in such programs is very limited, however. Thirty pregnant women with placenta previa or other potential complications underwent 55 phlebotomies in an autologous transfusion program. Phlebotomies were performed at an average gestational age of 32.4 weeks (range 13-40). Changes in mean diastolic blood pressure and pulse were minimal. Electronic fetal monitoring tracings were normal during the 34 procedures in which it was used. The frequency of mild donor reactions (4%) was consistent with that in nonpregnant donors. After entry into this program, 15 patients received a total of 29 U of packed red blood cells (23 autologous; six homologous). Homologous transfusion was avoided in 86.7% of patients receiving blood. Selected pregnant women can participate safely in autologous blood collection programs, minimizing the need, and therefore the risks, of homologous transfusion. PMID:3292974

  6. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  7. Autologous gluteal lipograft.

    PubMed

    Nicareta, Beatriz; Pereira, Luiz Haroldo; Sterodimas, Aris; Illouz, Yves Gérard

    2011-04-01

    In the past 25 years, several different techniques of lipoinjection have been developed. The authors performed a prospective study to evaluate the patient satisfaction and the rate of complications after an autologous gluteal lipograft among 351 patients during January 2002 and January 2008. All the patients included in the study requested gluteal augmentation and were candidates for the procedure. Overall satisfaction with body appearance after gluteal fat augmentation was rated on a scale of 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4 (very good), and 5 (excellent). The evaluation was made at follow-up times of 12 and 24 months. The total amount of clean adipose tissue transplanted to the buttocks varied from 100 to 900 ml. In nine cases, liponecrosis was treated by aspiration with a large-bore needle connected to a 20-ml syringe, performed as an outpatient procedure. Infection of the grafted area also occurred for four patients and was treated by incision drainage and use of antibiotics. Of the 21 patients who expressed the desire of further gluteal augmentation, 16 had one more session of gluteal fat grafting. The remaining five patients did not have enough donor area and instead received gluteal silicone implants. At 12 months, 70% reported that their appearance after gluteal fat augmentation was "very good" to "excellent," and 23% responded that their appearance was "good." Only 7% of the patients thought their appearance was less than good. At 24 months, 66% reported that their appearance after gluteal fat augmentation was "very good" (36%) to "excellent" (30%), and 27% responded that their appearance was "good." However, 7% of the patients continued to think that their appearance was less than good. At this writing, the average follow-up time for this group of patients has been 4.9 years. The key to successful gluteal fat grafting is familiarity with the technique, knowledge of the gluteal topography, and understanding of the patient's goals. With experience, the

  8. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology. PMID:24712343

  9. Adipose stem cells differentiated chondrocytes regenerate damaged cartilage in rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Latief, Noreen; Raza, Fahad Ali; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Tarar, Moazzam Nazir; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2016-05-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or autologous chondrocytes has been shown to repair damages to articular cartilage due to osteoarthritis (OA). However, survival of transplanted cells is considerably reduced in the osteoarthritic environment and it affects successful outcome of the transplantation of the cells. Differentiated chrondroytes derived from adipose stem cells have been proposed as an alternative source and our study investigated this possibility in rats. We investigated the regenerative potential of ADSCs and DCs in osteoarthritic environment in the repair of cartilage in rats. We found that ADSCs maintained fibroblast morphology in vitro and also expressed CD90 and CD29. Furthermore, ADSCs differentiated into chondrocytes, accompanied by increased level of proteoglycans and expression of chondrocytes specific genes, such as, Acan, and Col2a1. Histological examination of transplanted knee joints showed regeneration of cartilage tissue compared to control OA knee joints. Increase in gene expression for Acan, Col2a1 with concomitant decrease in the expression of Col1a1 suggested formation of hyaline like cartilage. A significant increase in differentiation index was observed in DCs and ADSCs transplanted knee joints (P = 0.0110 vs. P = 0.0429) when compared to that in OA control knee joints. Furthermore, transplanted DCs showed increased proliferation along with reduction in apoptosis as compared to untreated control. In conclusion, DCs showed better survival and regeneration potential as compared with ADSCs in rat model of OA and thus may serve a better option for regeneration of osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:26888708

  10. Xenotransplantation of pig chondrocytes: therapeutic potential and barriers for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Sommaggio, R; Uribe-Herranz, M; Marquina, M; Costa, C

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation may be the best option for the repair of many cartilage lesions including early osteoarthritis. Currently, autologous and allogeneic chondrocytes are grafted into cartilage defects to treat selected patients with moderate clinical success. However, their limited use justifies exploring novel therapies for cartilage repair. Xenotransplantation could become a solution by offering high cell availability, quality and genetic engineering capabilities. The rejection process of xenogeneic cartilage is thus being elucidated in order to develop counteractive strategies. Initial studies determined that pig cartilage xenografts are rejected by a slow process comprising humoral and cellular responses in which the galactose α1,3-galactose antigen participates. Since then, our group has identified key mechanisms of the human response to pig chondrocytes (PCs). In particular, human antibody and complement contribute to PC rejection by inducing a pro-inflammatory milieu. Furthermore, PCs express and up-regulate molecules which are functionally relevant for a variety of cellular immune responses (SLA-I, the potent co-stimulatory molecule CD86, and adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1). These participate by triggering a T cell response, as well as supporting a prominent role of the innate immune responses led by natural killer (NK) cells and monocytes/macrophages. Human NK cells lyse PCs by using selected NK activating receptors, whereas human monocytes are activated by PCs to secrete cytokines and chemokines. All this knowledge sets the bases for the development of genetic engineering approaches designed to avert rejection of xenogeneic chondrocytes and leads the way to developing new clinical applications for cartilage repair. PMID:27377665

  11. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension. PMID:26616052

  12. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    PubMed

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT. PMID:26744435

  13. High Density Polymer-Based Integrated Electgrode Array

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Hamilton, Julie K.

    2006-04-25

    A high density polymer-based integrated electrode apparatus that comprises a central electrode body and a multiplicity of arms extending from the electrode body. The central electrode body and the multiplicity of arms are comprised of a silicone material with metal features in said silicone material that comprise electronic circuits.

  14. Bovine achondrogenesis: evidence for defective chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Jayo, M J; Leipold, H W; Machado, M A; Campbell, D; Ahmed, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey study of growth cartilage abnormalities in bovine bone dysplasias revealed that a disorder in Holstein cattle called bulldog calf closely resembles human achondrogenesis Type II. Substantial amounts of Type I collagen and other non Type II collagens were detected in the bulldog cartilage which was comprised primarily of extensive vascular canals and cells having the characteristics of hypertrophic and degenerative chondrocytes normally found in the growth plate. It is proposed that chondrocytes throughout the bulldog growth cartilage prematurely differentiate into hypertrophic cells that degenerate and predispose the cartilage to vascular invasion and the formation of cartilage canals. The presence of these canals probably accounts for most of the observed collagen abnormalities. PMID:3606909

  15. [Growth behavior of chondrocytes on various biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Rudert, M; Hirschmann, F; Wirth, C J

    1999-01-01

    Chondrocytes can be cultured on different three-dimensional culture systems suitable for transplantation to enhance the repair of localized cartilage defects. Articular cartilage chondrocytes from adult rabbit knees and from bovine calf metacarpophalangeal joints were isolated by enzymatic digestion and cultured in a monolayer system to amplify cell count. After amplification the cells were seeded on different biocompatible materials. We investigated two types of bioresorbable polymer fleece matrices (a composite fleece of polydioxanon and polyglactin and a resorbable poly-L-lactic acid fleece) and lyophilized dura as a biological carrier. On all three types of transport media the phenotypic and morphological appearance of cultured chondrocytes could be observed. The production of glycosaminoglycans was revealed by Alcian blue staining and immunohistochemical detection of Chondroitin-4 and 6-sulfate in the created constructs. The material properties of the carriers allow for transplantation of the artificial cartilage-like products into full thickness articular cartilage defects and could therefore improve the minor intrinsic healing capacity of cartilage tissue. Bioartificial cartilage may become a future perspective in the treatment options of orthopaedic and plastic surgery. PMID:10081046

  16. Genome-wide mapping of DNA hydroxymethylation in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Li, Ye Henry; Wong, Wing H.; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine genome-wide 5hmC distribution in osteoarthritic (OA) and normal chondrocytes to investigate the effect on OA-specific gene expression. Methods Cartilage was obtained from OA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty or control patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Genome-wide sequencing of 5hmC-enriched DNA (5hmC-seq) was performed for a small cohort of normal and OA chondrocytes to identify differentially hydroxymethylated regions (DhMRs) in OA chondrocytes. 5hmC-seq data was intersected with global OA gene expression data to define subsets of genes and pathways potentially affected by increased 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Results 70591 DhMRs were identified in OA chondrocytes compared to normal chondrocytes, 44288 (63%) of which were increased in OA chondrocytes. The majority of DhMRs (66%) were gained in gene bodies. Increased DhMRs were observed in ~50% of genes previously implicated in OA pathology including MMP3, LRP5, GDF5 and COL11A1. Furthermore, analyses of gene expression data revealed gene body gain of 5hmC appears to be preferentially associated with activated but not repressed genes in OA chondrocytes. Conclusion This study provides the first genome-wide profiling of 5hmC distribution in OA chondrocytes. We had previously reported a global increase in 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Gain of 5hmC in the gene body is found to be characteristic of activated genes in OA chondrocytes, highlighting the influence of 5hmC as an epigenetic mark in OA. In addition, this study identifies multiple OA-associated genes that are potentially regulated either singularly by gain of DNA hydroxymethylation or in combination with loss of DNA methylation. PMID:25940674

  17. Bridging Microstructure, Properties and Processing of Polymer Based Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a guest editorial for a special issue in Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. The papers collected in this special issue emphasize significant challenges, current approaches and future strategies necessary to advance the development of polymer-based materials. They were partly presented at the symposium of 'Bridging microstructure, properties and processing of polymer based advanced materials' in the TMS 2011 annual conference meeting, which was held in San Diego, US, on Feb 28 to March 3, 2011. This symposium was organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (USA) and the Institute of Mechanics of Fluids and Solids of the University of Strasbourg (France). The organizers were D.S. Li, S. Ahzi, and M. Khaleel.

  18. Chondrocyte-specific ablation of Osterix leads to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Crombrugghe, Benoit de; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional ablation of Osterix (Osx) in chondrocytes leads to skeletal defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx has an autonomous function in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. -- Abstract: Osterix (Osx) is an essential transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation during both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Endochondral ossification, a process in which bone formation initiates from a cartilage intermediate, is crucial for skeletal development and growth. Osx is expressed in differentiating chondrocytes as well as osteoblasts during mouse development, but its role in chondrocytes has not been well studied. Here, the in vivo function of Osx in chondrocytes was examined in a chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout model using Col2a1-Cre. Chondrocyte-specific Osx deficiency resulted in a weak and bent skeleton which was evident in newborn by radiographic analysis and skeletal preparation. To further understand the skeletal deformity of the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout, histological analysis was performed on developing long bones during embryogenesis. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were expanded, the formation of bone trabeculae and marrow cavities was remarkably delayed, and subsequent skeletal growth was reduced. The expression of several chondrocyte differentiation markers was reduced, indicating the impairment of chondrocyte differentiation and endochondral ossification in the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout. Taken together, Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Osx in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification.

  19. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  4. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  5. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Haq, Samina Hyder

    2016-06-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  6. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  7. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  8. [Autologous Fat Grafting in Scar Revision].

    PubMed

    Yu, Pan-xi; Cai, Jing-long

    2016-04-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging discipline. Adipose tissue is a rich source of fat cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and autologous fat grafting has increasingly been applied in plastic surgeries and dermatological treatments. This paper reviews the latest advances in autologous fat grafting in scar revision. PMID:27181904

  9. Effect of hyaluronic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Sadigursky, David; de Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the percentage of apoptotic cells in a contusion model of osteoarthritis (OA) and to assess whether intra-articular injection of high doses of hyaluronic acid (HA) immediately after trauma reduces chondrocyte apoptosis. METHODS: Forty knees from adult rabbits were impacted thrice with a 1 kg block released through a 1 meter tall cylinder (29.4 Joules). Subsequently, 2 mL of HA was injected in one knee and 2 mL saline in the contra-lateral knee. Medication were administered twice a week for 30 days, when animals were sacrificed. Specimens were prepared for optical microscopy exam and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase end labeling assay (TUNEL). RESULTS: The apoptosis rate in the contusion model was 68.01% (± 19.73%), a higher rate than previously described. HA significantly reduced the rate of apoptosis to 53.52% (± 18.09) (p <0.001). CONCLUSION: Intra-articular HA administration started immediately after trauma reduces impact-induced chondrocyte apoptosis rates in rabbits. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:27069407

  10. New polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Nishi, Taiji; Tanikawa, Yukari; Nitta, Naotaka

    2014-03-01

    We will report newly developed polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic (PA) imaging systems. Phantoms are important for performance evaluation and calibration of new modalities; however, there is no established method for making phantoms with no long-term change. We have developed skin mimicking phantoms simulating both optical and acoustic properties (i.e. optical scattering and absorption coefficients, and sound velocity). Furthermore, the phantoms are able to give accurate simulation of blood vessels by Inkjet-printing. Newly developed phantoms are consisted of castor oil included acrylic block copolymer and we can fabricate 0.8mm or less thick sheets and pile them using their self-adhesiveness.

  11. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  12. Fibroblast growth factor is an inhibitor of chondrocyte terminal differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Iwamoto, M. )

    1990-04-05

    The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and cartilage-matrix calcification were investigated. Rabbit growth-plate chondrocytes maintained as a pelleted mass in a centrifuge tube produced an abundant proteoglycan matrix during the matrix-maturation stage, yielding a cartilage-like tissue. Thereafter, they terminally differentiated to hypertrophic chondrocytes which produced high levels of alkaline phosphatase. These cells induced extensive calcification of the matrix in the absence of additional phosphate. Addition of bFGF to the chondrocyte cultures abolished the increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, {sup 45}Ca deposition, and the calcium content. These effects were dose-dependent, reversible, and observed in the presence of cytosine arabinoside, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. The inhibitory effects could be observed only when chondrocytes were exposed to bFGF in a transition period between the matrix-maturation and hypertrophic stages. As chondrocytes differentiated to hypertrophic cells, bFGF became less effective in inhibiting the expression of the mineralization-related phenotypes. The present study also shows that although the rate of ({sup 35}S)sulfate incorporation into large, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the cell-matrix fraction is very high during the matrix-maturation stage, it abruptly decreases by 90% after terminal differentiation. Furthermore, the terminal differentiation-associated decrease in proteoglycan synthesis was delayed by bFGF. These results provide evidence that bFGF inhibits terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and calcification.

  13. Synthesis of classical pathway complement components by chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K; North, J; Saunders, D; Schwaeble, W; Jeziorska, M; Woolley, D E; Whaley, K

    1996-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical studies, C1q, C1s, C4 and C2 were detected in chondrocytes in normal human articular cartilage and macroscopically normal articular cartilage from the inferior surfaces of hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis. Using reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNA for C1q, C1s, C4 and C2 was also detected in RNA extracted from articular cartilage. C1r, C3, C1-inhibitor, C4-binding protein and factor I were not detected by either technique. Articular chondrocytes cultured in vitro synthesized C1r, C1s, C4, C2, C3 and C1-inhibitor but not C1q, C4-binding protein or factor I, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Northern blot analysis. Thus cultured articular chondrocytes have a complement profile that is similar to that of cultured human fibroblasts rather than that of articular chondrocytes in vivo. Complement synthesis in cultured chondrocytes was modulated by the cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), showing that cytokines can probably regulate complement synthesis in intact cartilage. The possible roles of local synthesis of complement components by chondrocytes in matrix turnover and the regulation chondrocyte function are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8881771

  14. Primary Human Chondrocyte Extracellular Matrix Formation and Phenotype Maintenance using RGD-derivatized PEGDM Hydrogels Possessing a Continuous Gradient in Modulus

    PubMed Central

    Smith Callahan, Laura A.; Ganios, Anna M.; Childers, Erin P.; Weiner, Scott D.; Becker, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient ex vivo methods for expanding primary human chondrocytes while maintaining phenotype is critical to advancing autologous cell sourcing efforts for tissue engineering applications. While there is significant activity in the literature, systematic approaches are necessary to determine and optimize the chemical and mechanical scaffold properties for hyaline cartilage generation using limited cell numbers. Functionalized hydrogels possessing continuous variations in physico-chemical properties are therefore an efficient three-dimensional platform for studying several properties simultaneously. Herein, we describe a polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEGDM) hydrogel system possessing a gradient in modulus (~27,000 Pa to 3,800 Pa) containing a uniform concentration of arginine–glycine–aspartic acid peptide (RGD) to enhance cellular adhesion for the correlation of primary human osteoarthritic chondrocyte proliferation, phenotype maintenance, and ECM production to the hydrogel properties. Cell number and chondrogenic phenotype (CD14:CD90 ratios) were found to decline in regions with higher storage modulus (>13,100 Pa), while regions with lower storage modulus maintained cell number and phenotype. Over three weeks of culture, hydrogel regions possessing lower storage modulus experience an increase in ECM content (~200%) compared to regions with higher storage modulus. Variations in the amount and organization of cytoskeletal markers actin and vinculin were observed within the modulus gradient which are indicative of the differences in chondrogenic phenotype maintenance and ECM expression. Thus scaffold mechanical properties significantly impact on modulating human osteoarthritic chondrocyte behavior and tissue formation. PMID:23291491

  15. Surfaces and interfaces in polymer-based electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, M.; Salaneck, W. R.

    2002-03-01

    Research on electronics applications such as light-emitting devices for flat-panel displays, transistors, sensors and even solid state lasers based on conducting polymers is presently under way and in some cases has reached the stage of prototype production. The mechanisms for charge injection and conduction in these materials are being studied, as are the physics of luminescence and its quenching. Lately, research into controlling film morphology through self-organizing techniques also has gained interest. Though the present interest in conducting polymers mainly concerns the pristine semiconducting state, doped conducting polymers are also studied for potential use in many applications. In this paper, we present an overview of some of the central issues in surface and interface science in the field, as well as provide our view on what may lie ahead in the future. Specifically, the importance of metal/polymer, polymer/metal and polymer/polymer interfaces is addressed. We illustrate these using polymer-based light-emitting devices, though the same type of issues appear in other polymer-based applications such as transistors and solar cells.

  16. Polymer-based tubular microbots: role of composition and preparation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Uygun, Aysegul; Pei, Allen; Ponedal, Adam; Wang, Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The influence of the composition and electropolymerization conditions upon the propulsion of new template-prepared polymer-based bilayer microtubular microbots is described. The effects of different electropolymerized outer layers, including polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polyaniline (PANI), and of various inner catalytic metal surfaces (Ag, Pt, Au, Ni-Pt alloy), upon the movement of such bilayer microtubes are evaluated and compared. Electropolymerization conditions, such as the monomer concentration and medium (e.g. surfactant, electrolyte), have a profound effect upon the morphology and locomotion of the resulting microtubes. The most efficient propulsion is observed using PEDOT/Pt microbots that offer a record-breaking speed of over 1400 body lengths s(-1) at physiological temperature, which is the fastest relative speed reported to date for all artificial micro/nanomotors. An inner Pt-Ni alloy surface is shown useful for combining magnetic control and catalytic fuel decomposition within one layer, thus greatly simplifying the preparation of magnetically-guided microbots. Polymer-based microbots with an inner gold layer offer efficient biocatalytic propulsion in low peroxide level in connection to an immobilized catalase enzyme. Metallic Au/Pt bilayer microbots can also be prepared electrochemically to offer high speed propulsion towards potential biomedical applications through functionalization of the outer gold surface. Such rational template preparation and systematic optimization of highly efficient microbots hold considerable promise for diverse practical applications. PMID:22374514

  17. Platelet-rich plasma increases transforming growth factor-beta1 expression at graft-host interface following autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Boakye, Lorraine A; Ross, Keir A; Pinski, John M; Smyth, Niall A; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Fortier, Lisa A; Kennedy, John G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of platelet-rich plasma on protein expression patterns of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in cartilage following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in a rabbit knee cartilage defect model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits received bilateral AOT. In each rabbit, one knee was randomized to receive an autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection and the contralateral knee received saline injection. Rabbits were euthanized at 3, 6 and 12 wk post-operatively. Articular cartilage sections were stained with TGF-β1 antibody. Histological regions of interest (ROI) (left, right and center of the autologous grafts interfaces) were evaluated using MetaMorph. Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was then assessed. RESULTS: Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was higher in PRP treated knees for selected ROIs (left; P = 0.03, center; P = 0.05) compared to control and was also higher in the PRP group at each post-operative time point (P = 6.6 × 10-4, 3.1 × 10-4 and 7.3 × 10-3 for 3, 6 and 12 wk, respectively). TGF-β1 expression was higher in chondrocytes of PRP-treated knees (36% ± 29% vs 15% ± 18%) (P = 1.8 × 10-6) overall for each post-operative time point and ROI. CONCLUSION: Articular cartilage of rabbits treated with AOT and PRP exhibit increased TGF-β1 expression compared to those treated with AOT and saline. Our findings suggest that adjunctive PRP may increase TGF-β1 expression, which may play a role in the chondrogenic effect of PRP in vivo. PMID:26716092

  18. Runx1 Activities in Superficial Zone Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Clones and Response to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Walcott, Marie E.; Gaur, Tripti; O’Connell, Shannon L.; Basil, Kirti; Tadiri, Christina P.; Mason-Savas, April; Silva, Jason A.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C.; Lian, Jane B.; Fanning, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Runx1, the hematopoietic lineage determining transcription factor, is present in perichondrium and chondrocytes. Here we addressed Runx1 functions, by examining expression in cartilage during mouse and human osteoarthritis (OA) progression and in response to mechanical loading. Methods Spared and diseased compartments in knees of OA patients and in mice with surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus were examined for changes in expression of Runx1 mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (immunoblot, immunohistochemistry). Runx1 levels were quantified in response to static mechanical compression of bovine articular cartilage. Runx1 function was assessed by cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA) and cell type phenotypic markers. Results Runx1 is enriched in superficial zone (SZ) chondrocytes of normal bovine, mouse, and human tissues. Increasing loading conditions in bovine cartilage revealed a positive correlation with a significant elevation of Runx1. Runx1 becomes highly expressed at the periphery of mouse OA lesions and in human OA chondrocyte ‘clones’ where Runx1 co-localizes with Vcam1, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker and lubricin (Prg4), a cartilage chondroprotective protein. These OA induced cells represent a proliferative cell population, Runx1 depletion in MPCs decreases cell growth, supporting Runx1 contribution to cell expansion. Conclusion The highest Runx1 levels in SZC of normal cartilage suggest a function that supports the unique phenotype of articular chondrocytes, reflected by upregulation under conditions of compression. We propose Runx1 co-expression with Vcam1 and lubricin in murine cell clusters and human ‘clones’ of OA cartilage, participate in a cooperative mechanism for a compensatory anabolic function. PMID:25078095

  19. A Qualitative Model of the Differentiation Network in Chondrocyte Maturation: A Holistic View of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Leijten, Jeroen; Bolander, Johanna; Luyten, Frank P; Post, Janine N; Geris, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of chondrocytes towards hypertrophy is a natural process whose control is essential in endochondral bone formation. It is additionally thought to play a role in several pathophysiological processes, with osteoarthritis being a prominent example. We perform a dynamic analysis of a qualitative mathematical model of the regulatory network that directs this phenotypic switch to investigate the influence of the individual factors holistically. To estimate the stability of a SOX9 positive state (associated with resting/proliferation chondrocytes) versus a RUNX2 positive one (associated with hypertrophy) we employ two measures. The robustness of the state in canalisation (size of the attractor basin) is assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis and the sensitivity to perturbations is assessed by a perturbational analysis of the attractor. Through qualitative predictions, these measures allow for an in silico screening of the effect of the modelled factors on chondrocyte maintenance and hypertrophy. We show how discrepancies between experimental data and the model's results can be resolved by evaluating the dynamic plausibility of alternative network topologies. The findings are further supported by a literature study of proposed therapeutic targets in the case of osteoarthritis. PMID:27579819

  20. Sepsis after autologous fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Simon G; Parrett, Brian M; Yaremchuk, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Autologous fat grafting is an increasingly popular technique, with numerous examples of excellent results. Adherence to key principles, including sterile technique and low-volume injection throughout layers of tissue, appears to be critical to obtaining good results. Reports of adverse outcomes are infrequent, but several case reports document both infectious and aesthetic complications. This case report represents an extreme complication, including abscess formation, life-threatening sepsis, and residual deformity. It serves as yet another reminder that early adoption of surgical procedures by those without a sound understanding of the underlying principles and techniques can have disastrous consequences. Furthermore, physicians operating on any patient must understand the potential for complications and be able to manage these appropriately when they occur. PMID:20885205

  1. Catabolic effects of muramyl dipeptide on rabbit chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ikebe, T.; Iribe, H.; Hirata, M.; Yanaga, F.; Koga, T. )

    1990-12-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, an essential structure for the diverse biologic activities of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, inhibited the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Muramyl dipeptide, as well as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 alpha, also enhanced the release of 35S-sulfate-prelabeled glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan from the cell layer, which seems to reflect, at least partially, the increasing degradation of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan. Five synthetic analogs of muramyl dipeptide known to be adjuvant active or adjuvant inactive were tested for their potential to inhibit synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan and to enhance the release of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in chondrocytes. The structural dependence of these synthetic analogs on chondrocytes was found to parallel that of immunoadjuvant activity. These results suggest that muramyl dipeptide is a potent mediator of catabolism in chondrocytes.

  2. The effect of piroxicam on the metabolism of isolated human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulstra, S K; Kuijer, R; Buurman, W A; Terwindt-Rouwenhorst, E; Guelen, P J; van der Linden, A J

    1992-04-01

    The effect of piroxicam on the metabolism of healthy and osteoarthrotic (OA) chondrocytes was studied in vitro. The chondrocytes were obtained from five healthy, five moderately OA, and four severely OA hips or knees. The chondrocytes were cultured in a high-density, short-term in vitro model. In this culture, the healthy chondrocytes as well as the OA chondrocytes retain their metabolic properties. Piroxicam was used in concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 micrograms/ml, which is comparable to the concentrations reached in vivo after oral administration. In cultures of healthy chondrocytes, piroxicam inhibited proliferation and synthesis of proteoglycans. The metabolism of moderately damaged chondrocytes was not influenced by piroxicam. In severely damaged chondrocytes, the proliferation was significantly inhibited by piroxicam. In order to avoid the possible negative side effects of piroxicam on the metabolism of healthy and severely OA chondrocytes, piroxicam treatment of an OA joint with synovitis should be restricted to the period of the effusion. PMID:1555353

  3. Extensively Expanded Auricular Chondrocytes Form Neocartilage In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Alan; Pomerantseva, Irina; Cronce, Michael J.; Kimura, Anya M.; Neville, Craig M.; Randolph, Mark A.; Sundback, Cathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to engineer cartilage in vivo using auricular chondrocytes that underwent clinically relevant expansion and using methodologies that could be easily translated into health care practice. Design Sheep and human chondrocytes were isolated from auricular cartilage biopsies and expanded in vitro. To reverse dedifferentiation, expanded cells were either mixed with cryopreserved P0 chondrocytes at the time of seeding onto porous collagen scaffolds or proliferated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). After 2-week in vitro incubation, seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 6 weeks. The neocartilage quality was evaluated histologically; DNA and glycosaminoglycans were quantified. Cell proliferation rates and collagen gene expression profiles were assessed. Results Clinically sufficient over 500-fold chondrocyte expansion was achieved at passage 3 (P3); cell dedifferentiation was confirmed by the simultaneous COL1A1/3A1 gene upregulation and COL2A1 downregulation. The chondrogenic phenotype of sheep but not human P3 cells was rescued by addition of cryopreserved P0 chondrocytes. With bFGF supplementation, chondrocytes achieved clinically sufficient expansion at P2; COL2A1 expression was not rescued but COL1A1/3A1genes were downregulated. Although bFGF failed to rescue COL2A1 expression during chondrocyte expansion in vitro, elastic neocartilage with obvious collagen II expression was observed on porous collagen scaffolds after implantation in mice for 6 weeks. Conclusions Both animal and human auricular chondrocytes expanded with low-concentration bFGF supplementation formed high-quality elastic neocartilage on porous collagen scaffolds in vivo. PMID:26069703

  4. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates rat primary chondrocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, Ha Young; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Rat primary chondrocytes express the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor, S1P{sub 2}, S1P{sub 3}, S1P{sub 4}, but not S1P{sub 1}. When chondrocytes were stimulated with S1P or phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P, an S1P{sub 1}- and S1P{sub 4}-selective agonist), phospholipase C-mediated cytosolic calcium increase was dramatically induced. S1P and PhS1P also stimulated two kinds of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase in chondrocytes. In terms of the two phospholipids-mediated functional modulation of chondrocytes, S1P and PhS1P stimulated cellular proliferation. The two phospholipids-induced chondrocyte proliferations were almost completely blocked by PD98059 but not by SB203580, suggesting that ERK but not p38 kinase is essentially required for the proliferation. Pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited the two phospholipids-induced cellular proliferation and ERK activation, indicating the crucial role of G{sub i} protein. This study demonstrates the physiological role of two important phospholipids (S1P and PhS1P) on the modulation of rat primary chondrocyte proliferation, and the crucial role played by ERK in the process.

  6. Equine articular chondrocytes on MACT scaffolds for cartilage defect treatment.

    PubMed

    Nürnberger, S; Meyer, C; Ponomarev, I; Barnewitz, D; Resinger, C; Klepal, W; Albrecht, C; Marlovits, S

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of cartilage defects poses challenging problems in human and veterinary medicine, especially in horses. This study examines the suitability of applying scaffold materials similar to those used for human cartilage regeneration on equine chondrocytes. Chondrocytes gained from biopsies of the talocrural joint of three horses were propagated in 2D culture and grown on two different scaffold materials, hyaluronan (HYAFF®) and collagen (BioGide®), and evaluated by light and electron microscopy. The equine chondrocytes developed well in both types of materials. They were vital and physiologically highly active. On the surface of the scaffolds, they formed cell multilayers. Inside the hyaluronan web, the chondrocytes were regularly distributed and spanned the large scaffold fibre distances by producing their own matrix sheath. Half-circle-like depressions occasionally found in the cell membrane were probably related to movement on the flexible matrix sheath. Inside the dense collagen scaffold, only single cells were found. They passed through the scaffold strands by cell shape adaptation. This study showed that the examined scaffold materials can be used for equine chondrocyte cultivation. Chondrocytes tend to form multilayers on the surface of both, very dense and very porous scaffolds, and have strategies to span between and move in large gaps. PMID:23323689

  7. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J. . E-mail: immuno@ua.ac.be; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-09-22

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY{sup 581/591} was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Chondrocyte Death via Autophagic Process

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Yang, Chung Mi; Park, Su Jin; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, which are highly precipitated in the joint cartilage, increase the production of cartilage-degrading enzymes and pro-inflammatory mediators in cartilage, thereby leading to gouty inflammation and joint damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of MSU crystals on the viability of human articular chondrocytes and the mechanism of MSU crystal-induced chondrocyte death. MSU crystals significantly decreased the viability of primary chondrocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation was observed in a culture medium of MSU crystal-treated chondrocytes, but not in cell lysates. MSU crystals did not activate caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, compared with actinomycin D and TNF-α-treated cells. MSU crystals did not directly affect the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers at the mRNA and protein levels. However, MSU crystals significantly increased the LC3-II level in a time-dependent manner, indicating autophagy activation. Moreover, MSU crystal-induced autophagy and subsequent chondrocyte death were significantly inhibited by 3-methyladenine, a blocker of autophagosomes formation. MSU crystals activated autophagy via inhibition of phosporylation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that MSU crystals may cause the death of chondrocytes through the activation of the autophagic process rather than apoptosis or ER stress. PMID:26670233

  9. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  10. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26363286

  11. Lipid- and Polymer-Based Nanostructures for Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Brian T.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2012-01-01

    The relatively new field of nanotheranostics combines the advantages of in vivo diagnosis with the ability to administer treatment through a single nano-sized carrier, offering new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Nanotheranostics has facilitated the development of nanomedicine through direct visualization of drug blood circulation and biodistribution. From a clinical perspective, nanotheranostics allows therapies to be administered and monitored in real time, thus decreasing the potential of under- or over-dosing and allowing for more personalized treatment regimens. Herein, we review recent development of nanotheranostics using lipid- and polymer-based formulations, with a particular focus on their applications in cancer research. Recent advances in nanotechnology aimed to combine therapeutic molecules with imaging agents for magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, or fluorescence imaging are discussed. PMID:23382770

  12. Polymer-based tubular microbots: role of composition and preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Uygun, Aysegul; Pei, Allen; Ponedal, Adam; Wang, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    The influence of the composition and electropolymerization conditions upon the propulsion of new template-prepared polymer-based bilayer microtubular microbots is described. The effects of different electropolymerized outer layers, including polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polyaniline (PANI), and of various inner catalytic metal surfaces (Ag, Pt, Au, Ni-Pt alloy), upon the movement of such bilayer microtubes are evaluated and compared. Electropolymerization conditions, such as the monomer concentration and medium (e.g. surfactant, electrolyte), have a profound effect upon the morphology and locomotion of the resulting microtubes. The most efficient propulsion is observed using PEDOT/Pt microbots that offer a record-breaking speed of over 1400 body lengths s-1 at physiological temperature, which is the fastest relative speed reported to date for all artificial micro/nanomotors. An inner Pt-Ni alloy surface is shown useful for combining magnetic control and catalytic fuel decomposition within one layer, thus greatly simplifying the preparation of magnetically-guided microbots. Polymer-based microbots with an inner gold layer offer efficient biocatalytic propulsion in low peroxide level in connection to an immobilized catalase enzyme. Metallic Au/Pt bilayer microbots can also be prepared electrochemically to offer high speed propulsion towards potential biomedical applications through functionalization of the outer gold surface. Such rational template preparation and systematic optimization of highly efficient microbots hold considerable promise for diverse practical applications.The influence of the composition and electropolymerization conditions upon the propulsion of new template-prepared polymer-based bilayer microtubular microbots is described. The effects of different electropolymerized outer layers, including polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polyaniline (PANI), and of various inner catalytic metal

  13. Polymer-based nanocarriers for vaginal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    das Neves, José; Nunes, Rute; Machado, Alexandra; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-09-15

    The vaginal delivery of various drugs is well described and its relevance established in current medical practice. Alongside recent advances and achievements in the fields of pharmaceutical nanotechnology and nanomedicine, there is an increasing interest in the potential use of different nanocarriers for the delivery of old and new pharmacologically active molecules with either therapeutic or prophylactic purposes. Nanosystems of polymeric nature in particular have been investigated over the last years and their interactions with mucosal fluids and tissues, as well as genital tract biodistribution upon vaginal administration, are now better understood. While different applications have been envisioned, most of the current research is focusing in the development of nano-formulations with the potential to inhibit the vaginal transmission of HIV upon sexual intercourse. The present work focuses its discussion on the potential and perils of polymer-based nanocarriers for the vaginal administration of different pharmacologically active molecules. PMID:25550217

  14. Polymer-based optical interconnects using nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, Arjen; Wiegersma, Sjoukje; Offrein, Bert J.; Duis, Jeroen; Delis, Jos; Ortsiefer, Markus; van Steenberge, Geert; Karpinen, Mikko; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Corbett, Brian

    2013-02-01

    The increasing request for higher data speeds in the information and communication technology leads to continuously increasing performance of microprocessors. This has led to the introduction of optical data transmission as a replacement of electronic data transmission in most transmission applications longer than 10 meters. However, a need remains for optical data transmission for shorter distances inside the computer. This paper gives an overview of the Joint European project FIREFLY, in which new polymer based single mode waveguides are developed for integration with VCSELs, splitters and fibers that will be manufactured using multi-layer nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Innovative polymers, new applications of nano-technology, new methods for optical coupling between components, and the integration of all these new components are the technical ingredients of this ambitious project.

  15. Locoregional cancer therapy using polymer-based drug depots.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Farshad; van Nostrum, Cornelis F; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E; Kok, Robbert J

    2016-04-01

    Locoregional delivery of anticancer drugs is an attractive approach to minimize adverse effects associated with intravenous chemotherapy. Polymer-based drug depots injected or implanted intratumorally or adjacent to the tumor can provide long-term local drug exposure. This review highlights studies in which drug-eluting depots have been applied locally in the treatment of cancer. In many cases such drug depots are used for prevention of tumor recurrence after surgery to eradicate remaining tumor cells. Clinical success has been reported for the treatment of brain cancer and liver cancer, and preclinical studies showed proof-of-concept for inhaled drug depots in lung cancer and intraperitoneally injected depots for the treatment of abdominal cancer. PMID:26969576

  16. Traveling wave ultrasonic motor using polymer-based vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tabaru, Marie; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    With the characteristics of low density, low elastic modulus, and low mechanical loss, poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) is a promising material for fabricating lightweight ultrasonic motors (USMs). For the first time, we used PPS to fabricate an annular elastomer with teeth and glued a piece of piezoelectric-ceramic annular disk to the bottom of the elastomer to form a vibrator. To explore for a material suitable for the rotor surface coming in contact with the PPS-based vibrator, several disk-shaped rotors made of different materials were fabricated to form traveling wave USMs. The polymer-based USM rotates successfully as the conventional metal-based USMs. The experimental results show that the USM with the aluminum rotor has the largest torque, which indicates that aluminum is the most suitable for the rotor surface among the tested materials.

  17. Polymer-based lab-on-a-chip lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, A.; Balslev, S.; Bilenberg, B.; Gersborg-Hansen, M.; Nilsson, D.

    2004-12-01

    The integration of optical transducers is generally considered a key issue in the further development of lab-on-a-chip Microsystems. We present a technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks. The lasers rely on the commercial laser dye Rhodamine 6G as active medium, and the laser resonator is defined in a thin film of polymer on a low refractive index substrate. Two types of devices are demonstrated: solid and microfluidic polymer based dye lasers. In the microfluidic dye lasers, the laser dye is dissolved in a suitable solvent and flushed though a microfluidic channel, which has the laser resonator embedded. For solid state dye lasers, the laser dye is dissolved in the polymer forming the laser resonator. The miniaturized dye lasers are optically pumped by a frequency doubled, pulsed Nd:YAG laser (at 532 nm), and emit at wavelengths between 560 nm and 590 nm. The lasers emit in the plane of the chip, and the emitted light is coupled into planar polymer waveguides on the chip. The feasibility of three types of polymers is demonstrated: SU-8, PMMA and a cyclo-olefin co-polymer (COC) - Topas. SU-8 is a negative tone photoresist, allowing patterning with conventional UV lithography. PMMA and Topas are thermoplasts, which are patterned by nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The lasing wavelength of the microfluidic dye lasers can be coarse tuned over 30 nm by varying the concentration of laser dye, and fine tuned by varying the refractive index of the solvent. This is utilized to realize a tunable laser, by on-chip mixing of dye, and two solvents of different index of refraction. The lasers were also integrated with waveguides and microfluidic networks.

  18. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold-conjugated bone morphogenetic protein-2 promotes cartilage regeneration from primary chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo without accelerated endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Zhang, Huina; Hollister, Scott J

    2012-08-01

    As articular cartilage is avascular, and mature chondrocytes do not proliferate, cartilage lesions have a limited capacity for regeneration after severe damage. The treatment of such damage has been challenging due to the limited availability of autologous healthy cartilage and lengthy and expensive cell isolation and expansion procedures. Hence, the use of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), a potent regulator of chondrogenic expression, has received considerable attention in cartilage and osteochondral tissue engineering. However, the exact role of BMP-2 in cartilage repair has been postulated to promote both cartilage formation and subsequent cartilage degradation through hypertrophy and endochondral ossification. Furthermore, it is likely that the manner in which BMP-2 is presented to chondrocytes will influence the physiologic pathway (repair vs. degeneration). This study investigates the relative influence of BMP-2 on cartilage matrix and potential subsequent bone matrix production using primary chondrocytes seeded on designed 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with chemically conjugated BMP-2. The results show that chemically conjugated BMP-2 PCL scaffolds can promote significantly greater cartilage regeneration from seeded chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo compared with untreated scaffolds. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the conjugated BMP-2 does not particularly accelerate endochondral ossification even in a readily permissible and highly vascular in vivo environment compared with untreated PCL scaffolds. This study not only reveals the potential use of the BMP-2 conjugation delivery method for enhanced cartilage tissue formation but also gives new insights for the effects of conjugated BMP-2 on cartilage regeneration and osteochondral ossification. PMID:22615065

  19. Verification system for postoperative autologous blood retransfusion.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeki; Kimura, Eizen; Kobayashi, Shinji; Ishihara, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Medical staff members should match blood products with patients using a barcode authentication system for blood transfusion to prevent medical accidents. However, our hospital only verifies the blood products of the Japanese Red Cross Society and the preserved autologous blood, not the autologous blood salvaged during the operation or from the oxygenator. In this study, we developed the barcode medication administration system and mobile device for verification. This system will prevent blood transfusion errors in the ward setting. PMID:23920751

  20. Epigenetic regulation in chondrocyte phenotype maintenance for cell-based cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Ma, Bin; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Loss of hyaline chondrocyte phenotype during the monolayer culture in vitro is a major obstacle for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Increasing evidence implicates an important role of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs have all been shown to contribute to chondrocyte dedifferentiation and hypertrophy. Moreover, the interplay among epigenetic regulators forms a complicated epigenetic network in regulating chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This review provides a detailed overview of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. PMID:26807163

  1. [Autologous transfusion in obstetrics and fetal safety].

    PubMed

    Rech, F; Patella, A; Cecchi, A; Ippolito, M; Indraccolo, S R

    1994-06-01

    It is common knowledge that for modern medicine transfusion therapy represents a precious resource and an often mandatory option. It is equally known that autohemotransfusion (or autologous transfusion) provides further advantages: certainty of blood availability when necessary, absence of transfusion reactions, elimination of the risk of infections that is still associated with the traditional homologous transfusions. In its most widespread application, autotransfusion provides for the donation of one or more units of autologous blood, mostly before elective surgery. Even in obstetrics the practice of autologous blood donation with the aim of autotransfusion is finding increasing employment. However, there are still controversial aspects and the need is pointed out for more authoritative verifications as refers to the alleged innocuity to the fetus of acute maternal blood loss. The present study was performed to contribute personal experience to a better definition of the possible interactions between autologous blood donation during pregnancy and unborn child welfare. To this end, 80 term pregnant women underwent fetal heart rate electronic monitoring before, during and after the donation of one unit of autologous blood. Both during and after the phlebotomy there were no cardiotocographic signs of fetal hypo-oxygenation. Even the non stress tests performed at a distance of 24 hours and those that were periodically repeated afterwards were normal, confirming the safety of autologous predonation during pregnancy. However, the authors think that in obstetrics it is still premature to consider the experimental phase of autotransfusion as definitively exhausted. PMID:7936387

  2. A 5-Year Follow-Up After Cartilage Repair in the Knee Using a Platelet-Rich Plasma-Immersed Polymer-Based Implant

    PubMed Central

    Siclari, Alberto; Mascaro, Gennaro; Kaps, Christian; Boux, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the clinical outcome after repair of cartilage defects of the knee with subchondral drilling and resorbable polymer-based implants immersed with autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Fifty-two patients with focal chondral defects were treated with subchondral drilling, followed by covering with a polyglycolic acid - hyaluronan (PGA-HA) implant (chondrotissue®) immersed with autologous PRP. At 5-year follow-up, patients’ situation was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and compared to the pre-operative situation. The KOOS showed clinically meaningful and significant (p < 0.05) improvement in all subcategories compared to baseline. Subgroup analysis showed that there were no differences in the clinical outcome regarding defect size and localization as well as degenerative condition of the knee. Cartilage repair was complete in 20 out of 21 patients at 4-year follow-up as shown by magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring. Covering of focal cartilage defects with the PGA-HA implant and PRP after bone marrow stimulation leads to a lasting improvement of the patients’ situation. PMID:25352927

  3. Choosing the right chondrocyte cell line: Focus on nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been considered a catabolic factor that contributes to OA pathology by inducing chondrocytes apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinases synthesis, and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression. Thus, the research on NO regulation in chondrocytes represents a relevant field which needs to be explored in depth. However, to date, only the murine ATDC-5 cell line and primary chondrocytes are well-established cells to study NO production in cartilage tissues. The goal of this study is to determine whether two commonly used human chondrocytic cell lines: SW-1353 and T/C-28a2 cell lines are good models to examine lipopolysaccharide and/or pro-inflammatory cytokine-driven NO release and iNOS expression. To this aim, we carefully examined NO production and iNOS protein expression in human T/C-28a2 and SW-1353 chondrocytes stimulated with LPS and interleukin (IL)-1 alone or in combination. We also use ATDC-5 cells as a positive control for NO production. NO accumulation has been determined by colorimetric Griess reaction, whereas NOS type II expression was determined by Western Blot analysis. Our results clearly demonstrated that neither human T/C-28a2 nor SW-1353 chondrocytes showed a detectable increase in NO production or iNOS expression after bacterial endotoxin or cytokines challenge with IL-1. Our study demonstrated that T/C-28a2 and SW-1353 human cell lines are not suitable for studying NO release and iNOS expression confirming that ATDC5 and human primary cultured chondrocytes are the best in vitro cell system to study the actions derived from this mediator. PMID:26016689

  4. Modeling chondrocyte patterns by elliptical cluster processes.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Martin; Lück, Sebastian; Martin, Pascal; Felka, Tino; Aicher, Wilhelm; Rolauffs, Bernd; Schmidt, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Superficial zone chondrocytes (CHs) of human joints are spatially organized in distinct horizontal patterns. Among other factors, the type of spatial CH organization within a given articular surface depends on whether the cartilage has been derived from an intact joint or the joint is affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Furthermore, specific variations of the type of spatial organization are associated with particular states of OA. This association may prove relevant for early disease recognition based on a quantitative structural characterization of CH patterns. Therefore, we present a point process model describing the distinct morphology of CH patterns within the articular surface of intact human cartilage. This reference model for intact CH organization can be seen as a first step towards a model-based statistical diagnostic tool. Model parameters are fitted to fluorescence microscopy data by a novel statistical methodology utilizing tools from cluster and principal component analysis. This way, the complex morphology of surface CH patters is represented by a relatively small number of model parameters. We validate the point process model by comparing biologically relevant structural characteristics between the fitted model and data derived from photomicrographs of the human articular surface using techniques from spatial statistics. PMID:22155191

  5. The influence of scaffold material on chondrocytes in inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Heenam; Sun, Lin; Cairns, Dana M.; Rainbow, Roshni S.; Preda, Rucsanda Carmen; Kaplan, David L.; Zeng, Li

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering aims to repair damaged cartilage tissue in arthritic joints. As arthritic joints have significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1β and TNFα that cause cartilage destruction, it is critical to engineer stable cartilage in an inflammatory environment. Biomaterial scaffolds constitute an important component of the microenvironment for chondrocytes in engineered cartilage. However, it remains unclear how scaffold material influences the response of chondrocytes seeded in these scaffolds under inflammatory stimuli. Here, we compared the response of articular chondrocytes seeded within three different polymeric scaffolding materials (silk, collagen and polylactic acid (PLA)) to IL-1β and TNFα. These scaffolds have different physical characteristics and yielded significant differences in the expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix production and degradation, cell adhesion and cell death. Silk and collagen scaffolds released pro-inflammatory cytokines faster and had higher uptake water abilities than PLA scaffolds. Correspondingly, chondrocytes cultured in silk and collagen scaffolds maintained higher levels of cartilage matrix than those in PLA, suggesting that these biophysical properties of scaffolds may regulate gene expression and response to inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes. Based on this study, we concluded that selecting the proper scaffolding material will aid in the engineering of more stable cartilage tissues for cartilage repair; and that silk and collagen are the more optimal scaffolds in supporting the stability of 3D cartilage under inflammatory conditions. PMID:23333441

  6. Repair Mechanism of Osteochondral Defect Promoted by Bioengineered Chondrocyte Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Naosuke; Adachi, Nobuo; Hamanishi, Michio; Kamei, Goki; Mahmoud, Elhussein Elbadry; Nakano, Tomohiro; Iwata, Takanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has developed as a remarkable method for cell transplantation. In the field of cartilage regeneration, several studies previously reported that cartilage defects could be regenerated by transplantation of a chondrocyte sheet using cell sheet engineering. However, it remains unclear how such a thin cell sheet could repair a deep cartilage defect. We, therefore, focused on the mechanism of cartilage repair using cell sheet engineering in this study. Chondrocyte sheets and synovial cell sheets were fabricated using cell sheet engineering, and these allogenic cell sheets were transplanted to cover an osteochondral defect in a rat model. Macroscopic and histological evaluation was performed at 4 and 12 weeks after transplantation. Analysis of the gene expression of each cell sheet and of the regenerated tissue at 1 week after transplantation was performed. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were used as donors (transplanted chondrocyte sheets) or recipients (osteochondral defect models) to identify the cell origin of regenerated cartilage. Cartilage repair was significantly better in the group implanted with a chondrocyte sheet than in that with a synovial cell sheet. The results of gene expression analysis suggest that the possible factor contributing to cartilage repair might be TGFβ1. Cell tracking experiments using GFP transgenic rats showed that the regenerated cartilage was largely composed of cells derived from the transplanted chondrocyte sheets. PMID:25396711

  7. Studies of the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets.

    PubMed

    Hamahashi, K; Sato, M; Yamato, M; Kokubo, M; Mitani, G; Ito, S; Nagai, T; Ebihara, G; Kutsuna, T; Okano, T; Mochida, J

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to repair and regenerate articular cartilage with layered chondrocyte sheets, produced using temperature-responsive culture dishes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets. Articular chondrocytes and synovial cells were harvested during total knee arthroplasty. After co-culture, the samples were divided into three groups: a monolayer, 7 day culture sheet group (group M); a triple-layered, 7 day culture sheet group (group L); and a monolayer culture group with a cell count identical to that of group L (group C). The secretion of collagen type 1 (COL1), collagen type 2 (COL2), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13), transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Layered chondrocyte sheets produced the most humoral factors. PGE2 expression declined over time in group C but was significantly higher in groups M and L. TGFβ expression was low in group C but was significantly higher in groups M and L (p<0.05). Our results suggest that the humoral factors produced by layered chondrocyte sheets may contribute to cartilaginous tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:23165985

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production by Immortalized Human Chondrocyte Lines

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, Charles J.; Meszaros, Evan C.; Wylie, Meredith A.; Dahoud, Wissam; Skomorovska-Prokvolit, Yelenna; Mesiano, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We reported at the Keynote Forum of Immunology Summit-2015 that recombinant human (rh) TNF-α or rhIL-6 stimulated production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the T/C28a2 and C-28/I2 human immortalized chondrocyte cell lines. Furthermore, we reported that tocilizumab (TCZ), a fully humanized monoclonal antibody which neutralizes IL-6-mediated signaling, inhibited the rhIL-6-mediated increase in the production of MMP-9. IL-6 is also a known activator of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. In that regard, we evaluated the effect of rhIL-6 on total and phosphorylated Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription by these chondrocyte lines which showed that whereas STAT3 was constitutively phosphorylated in T/C28a2 chondrocytes, rhIL-6 activated STAT3 in C-28/I2 chondrocytes. The finding that rhIL-6 increased the production of MMP-9 by human immortalized chondrocyte cell lines may have important implications with respect to the destruction of articular cartilage in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Thus, the markedly elevated level of IL-6 in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis sera and synovial fluid would be expected to generate significant MMP-9 to cause the degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix proteins. The finding that TCZ suppressed rhIL-6-mediated MMP-9 production suggests that TCZ, currently employed in the medical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, could be considered as a drug for osteoarthritis.

  9. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  10. Postoperative Autologous Reinfusion in Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Crescibene, A.; Martire, F.; Gigliotti, P.; Rende, A.; Candela, M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgeries for total knee replacement (TKR) are increasing and in this context there is a need to develop new protocols for management and use of blood transfusion therapy. Autologous blood reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion and the aim of the present study was to verify the safety and the clinical efficacy. An observational retrospective study has been conducted on 124 patients, undergoing cemented total knee prosthesis replacement. Observed population was stratified into two groups: the first group received reinfusion of autologous blood collected in the postoperative surgery and the second group did not receive autologous blood reinfusion. Analysis of data shows that patients undergoing autologous blood reinfusion received less homologous blood bags (10.6% versus 30%; p = 0.08) and reduced days of hospitalization (7.88 ± 0.7 days versus 8.96 ± 2.47 days for the control group; p = 0.03). Microbiological tests were negative in all postoperatively salvaged and reinfused units. Our results emphasize the effectiveness of this procedure and have the characteristics of simplicity, low cost (€97.53 versus €103.79; p < 0.01), and easy reproducibility. Use of autologous drainage system postoperatively is a procedure that allows reducing transfusion of homologous blood bags in patients undergoing TKR. PMID:26442168

  11. Planar integrated polymer-based optical strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelb, Christian; Reithmeier, Eduard; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    In this work we present a new type of optical strain sensor that can be manufactured by MEMS typical processes such as photolithography or by hot embossing. Such sensors can be of interest for a range of new applications in structural health monitoring for buildings and aircraft, process control and life science. The approach aims at high sensitivity and dynamic range for 1D and 2D sensing of mechanical strain and can also be extended to quantities such as pressure, force, and humidity. The sensor consists of an array of planar polymer-based multimode waveguides whose output light is guided through a measurement area and focused onto a second array of smaller detection waveguides by using micro-optical elements. Strain induced in the measurement area varies the distance between the two waveguide arrays, thus, changing the coupling efficiency. This, in turn, leads to a variation in output intensity or wavelength which is monitored. We performed extensive optical simulations in order to identify the optimal sensor layout with regard to either resolution or measurement range or both. Since the initial approach relies on manufacturing polymer waveguides with cross sections between 20×20 μm2 and 100×100 μm2 the simulations were carried out using raytracing models. For the readout of the sensor a simple fitting algorithm is proposed.

  12. Multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingsheng; Hu, Mei; Wang, Dali; Wang, Guojian; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue; Sun, Jian

    2012-06-20

    Multifunctional gene vectors with high transfection, low cytotoxicity, and good antitumor and antibacterial activities were prepared from natural aminoglycosides. Through the Michael-addition polymerization of gentamycin and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, cationic hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers were synthesized, and their physical and chemical properties were analyzed by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, GPC, ζ-potential, and acid-base titration techniques. The cytotoxicity of these hyperbranched glycoconjugated polycations was low because of the hydrolysis of degradable glycosidic and amide linkages in acid conditions. Owing to the presence of various primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the polymers, hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers showed high buffering capacity and strong DNA condensation ability, resulting in the high transfection efficiency. In the meantime, due to the introduction of natural aminoglycosides into the polymeric backbone, the resultant hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers inhibited the growth of cancer cells and bacteria efficiently. Combining the gene transfection, antitumor, and antibacterial abilities together, the multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides may play an important role in protecting cancer patients from bacterial infections. PMID:22591322

  13. Electroencephalogram measurement using polymer-based dry microneedle electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Miyako; Nishinaka, Yuya; Miki, Norihisa

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report a successful electroencephalogram (EEG) measurement using polymer-based dry microneedle electrodes. The electrodes consist of needle-shaped substrates of SU-8, a silver film, and a nanoporous parylene protective film. Differently from conventional wet electrodes, microneedle electrodes do not require skin preparation and a conductive gel. SU-8 is superior as a structural material to poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS; Dow Corning Toray Sylgard 184) in terms of hardness, which was used in our previous work, and facilitates the penetration of needles through the stratum corneum. SU-8 microneedles can be successfully inserted into the skin without breaking and could maintain a sufficiently low skin-electrode contact impedance for EEG measurement. The electrodes successfully measured EEG from the frontal pole, and the quality of acquired signals was verified to be as high as those obtained using commercially available wet electrodes without any skin preparation or a conductive gel. The electrodes are readily applicable to record brain activities for a long period with little stress involved in skin preparation to the users.

  14. Molecularly imprinted polymer based enantioselective sensing devices: a review.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Mahavir Prasad; Prasad, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Chiral recognition is the fundamental property of many biological molecules and is a quite important field in pharmaceutical analysis because of the pharmacologically different activities of enantiomers in living systems. Enantio-differentiating signal of the sensor requires specific interaction between the chiral compounds (one or a mixture of enantiomers) in question and the selector. This type of interaction is controlled normally by at least three binding centers, whose mutual arrangement and interacting characteristics with one of the enantiomers effectively control the selectivity of recognition. Molecular imprinting technology provides a unique opportunity for the creation of three-dimensional cavities with tailored recognition properties. Over the past decade, this field has expanded considerably across the variety of disciplines, leading to novel transduction approaches and many potential applications. The state-of-art of molecularly imprinted polymer-based chiral recognition might set an exotic trend toward the development of chiral sensors. The objective of this review is to provide comprehensive knowledge and information to all researchers who are interested in exploiting molecular imprinting technology toward the rational design of chiral sensors operating on different transduction principles, ranging from electrochemical to piezoelectric, being used for the detection of chiral compounds as they pose significant impact on the understanding of the origin of life and all processes that occur in living organisms. PMID:25467446

  15. Magnetic field sensor using a polymer-based vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Hasebe, Kazuhiko; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tabaru, Marie; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    In this technical note, a polymer-based magnetic sensor with a high resolution was devised for sensing the high magnetic field. It consisted of a bimorph (vibrator) made of poly (phenylene sulfide) (PPS) and a phosphor-bronze foil glued on the free end of the bimorph. According to Faraday’s law of induction, when a magnetic field in the direction perpendicular to the bimorph was applied, the foil cut the magnetic flux, and generated an alternating voltage across the leads at the natural frequency of the bimorph. Because PPS has low mechanical loss, low elastic modulus, and low density, high vibration velocity can be achieved if it is employed as the elastomer of the bimorph. The devised sensor was tested in the magnetic field range of 0.1–570 mT and exhibited a minimum detectable magnetic field of 0.1 mT. At a zero-to-peak driving voltage of 60 V, the sensitivity of the PPS-based magnetic sensor reached 10.5 V T‑1, which was 1.36 times the value of the aluminum-based magnetic sensor with the same principle and dimensions.

  16. Polymer-based micro deformable mirror for adaptive optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frederic; Conedera, Veronique; Liotard, Arnaud; Schroeder, Andreas; Fabre, Norbert; Camon, Henri; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Next generation giant telescopes as well as next generation instrumentation for 10m-class telescopes relies on the availability of highly performing adaptive optical systems, for studying new fields like circumstellar disks and extrasolar planets. These systems require deformable mirrors with very challenging parameters, including number of actuators up to 250 000 and inter-actuator spacing around 500μm. MOEMS-based devices are promising for future deformable mirrors. However, only limited strokes for large driving voltages have been demonstrated. In order to overcome these limitations, we are currently developing a micro-deformable mirror based on an array of electrostatic actuators with attachment posts to a continuous mirror on top. The originality of our approach lies in the elaboration of a sacrificial layer and of a structural layer made of polymer materials, using low-temperature process. This process allows the realization of high optical quality mirrors on top of an actuator array made with various techniques. We have developed the first polymer piston-motion actuator in order to reach high strokes for low driving voltages: a 10μm thick mobile plate with four springs attached to the substrate, and with an air gap of 10μm exhibits a piston motion of 2μm for 30V. Preliminary comparison with FEM models show very good agreement and design of a complete polymer-based MDM looks possible.

  17. In vitro phenotypic modulation of chondrocytes from knees of patients with osteochondritis dissecans: implications for chondrocyte implantation procedures.

    PubMed

    Aurich, M; Hofmann, G O; Mückley, T; Mollenhauer, J; Rolauffs, B

    2012-01-01

    We attempted to characterise the biological quality and regenerative potential of chondrocytes in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Dissected fragments from ten patients with OCD of the knee (mean age 27.8 years (16 to 49)) were harvested at arthroscopy. A sample of cartilage from the intercondylar notch was taken from the same joint and from the notch of ten patients with a traumatic cartilage defect (mean age 31.6 years (19 to 52)). Chondrocytes were extracted and subsequently cultured. Collagen types 1, 2, and 10 mRNA were quantified by polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the notch chondrocytes, cells from the dissecate expressed similar levels of collagen types 1 and 2 mRNA. The level of collagen type 10 message was 50 times lower after cell culture, indicating a loss of hypertrophic cells or genes. The high viability, retained capacity to differentiate and metabolic activity of the extracted cells suggests preservation of the intrinsic repair capability of these dissecates. Molecular analysis indicated a phenotypic modulation of the expanded dissecate chondrocytes towards a normal phenotype. Our findings suggest that cartilage taken from the dissecate can be reasonably used as a cell source for chondrocyte implantation procedures. PMID:22219249

  18. Effects of radiation therapy on chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Margulies, B S; Horton, J A; Wang, Y; Damron, T A; Allen, M J

    2006-05-01

    The negative irradiation complications of growth loss leading to limb length asymmetry and pathological fracture incurred following radiation therapy in pediatric patients has led to a renewed interest in understanding the specific effects of irradiation on the growth plate and the surrounding bone. In the present report, we examined the radiation therapy effects on primary rat growth cartilage chondrocytes in order to determine the chondrocyte radiosensitivity relative to other bone cell constituents and tumor cells, the postirradiation temporal progression of radiation-induced alterations in chondrocyte function, and the time course for the functional restoration of chondrocyte pathways that drive the eventual recovery in growth function. We employed an in vitro primary rat costochondral growth cartilage cell culture model system to evaluate the radiation therapy effects on proliferative chondrocytes using serial radiation doses (0-20 Gy) that are well within the clinically relevant range. Following irradiation, all of the following occurred in a dose-dependent manner: proliferation decreased, cytotoxicity increased, several markers of apoptosis increased, markers of radiation-induced cellular differentiation increased, and cell synthetic activity was disturbed. Alterations in proliferation, cell death, and induction of apoptosis are likely due to a transient radiation-induced derangement of the parathyroid hormone-related protein-Indian hedgehog proliferation-maturation pathway. Alterations in cellular differentiation and cell synthetic activity are novel observations for chondrocytes. Further, these results correspond very well to our previous work in an in vivo Sprague-Dawley rat model, making this model particularly relevant to researching the radiation therapy effects on longitudinal growth. PMID:16691495

  19. Regulation of osteogenic proteins by chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chubinskaya, Susan; Kuettner, Klaus E

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the current scientific knowledge of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in adult articular cartilage. We specifically focus on adult cartilage, since one of the major potential applications of the members of the BMP family may be a repair of adult tissue after trauma and/or disease. After reviewing cartilage physiology and BMPs, we analyze the data on the role of recombinant BMPs as anabolic agents in tissue formation and restoration in different in vitro and in vivo models following with the endogenous expression of BMPs and factors that regulate their expression. We also discuss recent transgenic modifications of BMP genes and subsequent effect on cartilage matrix synthesis. We found that the most studied BMPs in adult articular cartilage are BMP-7 and BMP-2 as well as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). There are a number of contradicting reports for some of these growth factors, since different models, animals, doses, time points, culture conditions and devices were used. However, regardless of the experimental conditions, only BMP-7 or osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1) exhibits the most convincing effects. It is the only BMP studied thus far in adult cartilage that demonstrates strong anabolic activity in vitro and in vivo with and without serum. OP-1 stimulates the synthesis of the majority of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in adult articular chondrocytes derived from different species and of different age. OP-1 counteracts the degenerative effect of numerous catabolic mediators; it is also expressed in adult human, bovine, rabbit and goat articular cartilage. This review reveals the importance of the exploration of the BMPs in the cartilage field and highlights their significance for clinical applications in the treatment of cartilage-related diseases. PMID:12798347

  20. Chondrocytes transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in endochondral bone during development, postnatal growth and fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  1. Chondrocytes Transdifferentiate into Osteoblasts in Endochondral Bone during Development, Postnatal Growth and Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  2. The effect of resveratrol on normal and osteoarthritic chondrocyte metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. J.; Braun, H. J.; Dragoo, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound commonly found in the skins of red grapes. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a human gene that is activated by resveratrol and has been shown to promote longevity and boost mitochondrial metabolism. We examined the effect of resveratrol on normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes. Methods Normal and OA chondrocytes were incubated with various concentrations of resveratrol (1 µM, 10 µM, 25 µM and 50 µM) and cultured for 24, 48 or 72 hours or for six weeks. Cell proliferation, gene expression, and senescence were evaluated. Results SIRT1 was significantly upregulated in normal chondrocytes with resveratrol concentrations of 25 µM and 50 µM on both two- (2D) (both p = 0.001) and three-dimensional (3D) cultures (p = 0.008 and 0.001, respectively). It was significantly upregulated in OA chondrocytes treated with 10 µM, 25 µM and 50 µM resveratrol on 2D cultures (p = 0.036, 0.002 and 0.001, respectively) and at 50 µM concentration on 3D cultures (p = 0.001). At 72 hours, the expression of collagen (COL)-10, aggrecan (AGG), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) was significantly greater in both 25 µM (p = 0.011, 0.006 and 0.015, respectively) and 50 µM (p = 0.019, 0.004 and 0.002, respectively) resveratrol-treated normal chondrocyte cultures. In OA chondrocytes, expression of COL10 and RUNX2 was significantly greater in 25 µM (p = 0.004 and 0.024) and 50 µM (p = 0.004 and 0.019) cultures at 72 hours on 3D cultures. Conclusions At concentrations of 25 µM and/or 50 µM, resveratrol treatment significantly upregulates SIRT1 gene expression in normal and osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Resveratrol induces chondrocytes into a hypertrophic state through upregulation of COL1, COL10, and RUNX2. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:51–9. PMID:24615710

  3. Polymer-based micro-deformable mirror for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotard, Arnaud; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Conedera, Veronique; Fabre, Norbert; Lanzoni, Patrick; Camon, Henri; Chazallet, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Highly performing adaptive optical (AO) systems are mandatory for next generation giant telescopes as well as next generation instrumentation for 10m-class telescopes, for studying new fields like circumstellar disks and extra-solar planets. These systems require deformable mirrors with very challenging parameters, including number of actuators up to 250 000 and inter-actuator spacing around 500μm. MOEMS-based devices are promising for future deformable mirrors. We are currently developing a micro-deformable mirror (MDM) based on an array of electrostatic actuators with attachment posts to a continuous mirror on top. In order to reach large stroke for low driving voltage, the originality of our approach lies in the elaboration of a sacrificial layer and of a structural layer made of polymer materials. We have developed the first polymer piston-motion actuator: a 10μm thick mobile plate with four springs attached to the substrate, and with an air gap of 10μm exhibits a piston motion of 2μm for 30V, and measured resonance frequency of 6.5kHz is well suited for AO systems. The electrostatic force provides a non-linear actuation, while AO systems are based on linear matrices operations. We have successfully developed a dedicated 14-bit electronics in order to "linearize" the actuation. Actual location of the actuator versus expected location of the actuator is obtained with a standard deviation of 21 nm. Comparison with FEM models shows very good agreement, and design of a complete polymer-based MDM has been done.

  4. Runx2 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy through its expression in the perichondrium

    PubMed Central

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Bialek, Peter; Chen, You-Tzung; Rached, Marie-Therese; Groner, Yoram; Behringer, Richard R.; Ornitz, David M.; Karsenty, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The perichondrium, a structure made of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells surrounding growth plate cartilage, regulates chondrocyte maturation through poorly understood mechanisms. Analyses of loss- and gain-of-function models show that Twist-1, whose expression in cartilage is restricted to perichondrium, favors chondrocyte maturation in a Runx2-dependent manner. Runx2, in turn, enhances perichondrial expression of Fgf18, a regulator of chondrocyte maturation. Accordingly, compound heterozygous embryos for Runx2 and Fgf18 deletion display the same chondrocyte maturation phenotype as Fgf18-null embryos. This study identifies a transcriptional basis for the inhibition of chondrocyte maturation by perichondrium and reveals that Runx2 fulfills antagonistic functions during chondrogenesis. PMID:17050674

  5. In vitro chondrocyte behavior on porous biodegradable poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid scaffolds for articular chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, John B; Rivero, Iris V; Dertien, Janet S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid (PCL/PGA) scaffolds for repairing articular cartilage were fabricated via solid-state cryomilling along with compression molding and porogen leaching. Four distinct scaffolds were fabricated using this approach by four independent cryomilling times. These scaffolds were assessed for their suitability to promote articular cartilage regeneration with in vitro chondrocyte cell culture studies. The scaffolds were characterized for pore size, porosity, swelling ratio, compressive, and thermal properties. Cryomilling time proved to significantly affect the physical, mechanical, and morphological properties of the scaffolds. In vitro bovine chondrocyte culture was performed dynamically for 1, 7, 14, 28, and 35 days. Chondrocyte viability and adhesion were tested using MTT assay and scanning electron microscopy micrographs. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays were performed to investigate the extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and cell proliferation, respectively. PCL/PGA scaffolds demonstrated high porosity for all scaffold types. Morphological analysis and poly(ethylene oxide) continuity demonstrated the existence of a co-continuous network of interconnected pores with pore sizes appropriate for tissue engineering and chondrocyte ingrowth. While mean pore size decreased, water uptake and compressive properties increased with increasing cryomilling times. Compressive modulus of 12, 30, and 60 min scaffolds matched the compressive modulus of human articular cartilage. Viable cells increased besides increase in cell proliferation and ECM formation with progress in culture period. Chondrocytes exhibited spherical morphology on all scaffold types. The pore size of the scaffold affected chondrocyte adhesion, proliferation, and GAG secretion. The results indicated that the 12 min scaffolds delivered promising results for applications in articular cartilage repair. PMID:25671317

  6. Repopulation of laser-perforated chondroepiphyseal matrix with xenogeneic chondrocytes: An experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, E.M.; Lewandrowski, K.U.; Ohlendorf, C.; Tomford, W.W.; Zaleske, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Growth of chondrocytes into a xenogeneic chondroepiphyseal matrix was investigated in an in vitro experimental model by combining viable calf chondrocytes with chick epiphyseal matrix devoid of viable chondrocytes. The chondrocytes were harvested from the wrist joints of newborn calves and cultured for 2 days. The epiphyses were harvested from the distal femurs and the proximal tibias of fetal chicks after development was arrested at 17 days by freezing. The epiphyseal specimens were prepared in four ways. These included femoral and tibial epiphyses without holes and femoral and tibial epiphyses with holes made by a laser. These epiphyseal specimens were co-cultured with calf chondrocytes for various periods. After digestion of the epiphyseal matrix, viable chondrocytes were counted in suspension. Chondrocyte division in the matrix was assessed by [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation. The growth of calf chondrocytes into the xenogeneic chick matrix was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy on fresh thick epiphyseal sections. The percentage of viable chondrocytes in the xenogeneic epiphyseal matrix increased with culture time to a maximum at day 21. The addition of laser-drilled holes was found to extend a plateau of chondrocyte viability until day 29. A decrease in cell viability was detected at later observation points. This study demonstrates that xenogeneic matrix may serve as a morphogenetic scaffold for chondrocytic growth. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Sweet Syndrome After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Ali; İdemen, Celal; Okçu Heper, Aylin; Utkan, Güngör

    2016-02-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a rare clinical entity characterized by skin lesions, neutrophilia, fever, and neutrophilic infiltration of the dermis. It may be a consequence of malignant disease, comorbidities, or drugs. We present a case of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in a patient after autologous stem cell transplant. PMID:25748978

  8. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  9. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as “biological insurance” should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  10. Responsive polymer-based colloids for drug delivery and bioconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudina, Olena

    Responsive polymer-based colloids (RPBC) are the colloidal structures containing responsive polymeric component which is able to adapt its physico-chemical properties to the environment by undergoing chemical and/or conformational changes. The goal of the dissertation is to develop and characterize several groups of RPBC with different morphological complexity and explore their potential in drug delivery and bioconversion. The role of RPBC morphology for these specific applications is discussed in details. Three groups of RPBC were fabricated: i. polymeric micelles; ii. mixed polymeric micelles; iii. hybrid polymer-inorganic particles. All fabricated RPBCs contain polymeric component in their structure. The dissertation investigates how the changes of the responsive polymeric component properties are reflected in morphologies of RPBC. The first group of RPBC, polymeric micelles, was formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic invertible polymers (AIPs) synthesized in our group. AIPs self-assemble into invertible micellar assemblies (IMAs) in solvents of different polarity. In this work, IMAs ability to invert the structure as a response to the change in solvent polarity was demonstrated using 1H NMR spectroscopy and SANS. It was shown that the IMAs incorporate hydrophobic cargo either in the core or in the shell, depending on the chemical structure of cargo molecules. Following in vitro study demonstrates that loaded with drug (curcumin) IMAs are cytotoxic to osteosarcoma cells. Mixed polymeric micelles represent another, more complex, RPBC morphologies studied in the dissertation. Mixed micelles were fabricated from AIPs and amphiphilic oligomers synthesized from pyromellitic dianhydride, polyethylene glycol methyl ethers, and alkanols/cholesterol. The combination of selected AIP and oligomers based on cholesterol results in mixed micelles with an increased drug-loading capacity (from 10% w/w loaded curcumin in single component IMAs to 26%w/w in mixed micelles

  11. Interaction of electromagnetic fields with chondrocytes in gel culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Gluzband, Yehezkiel A.

    1992-01-01

    The specific objectives of this research period were: (1) to quantify the effect of applied electric fields on chondrocyte metabolism, using a range of stimulation frequencies and amplitudes; (2) to compare the chondrocyte biosynthetic response to applied fields at early times in agarose gel culture before an extracellular matrix has accumulated and at later times after significant deposition of matrix around and between the cells; and (3) to begin to interpret the biosynthetic response to applied fields in terms of models of physical mechanisms. The results of these studies suggest that electric fields applied to chondrocytes in agarose can modulate the synthesis of proteoglycans and protein constituents. Biosynthesis may be inhibited or stimulated depending on the amplitude of the applied current density. In addition, the presence of extracellular matrix may enhance the ability of normal chondrocytes and cells in intact cartilage to respond to electric fields, although the presence of matrix was not required for the stimulatory response to be observed with Swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells.

  12. Effect of thiram on avian growth plate chondrocytes in culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiram (tetramethyl thiuram disulfide) is a general use pesticide. It causes tibial dyschondroplasia, a cartilage defect in poultry leading to growth plate deformation and lameness. The mechanism of its action on chondrocytes is not understood. Since proteins play significant role in development an...

  13. [Molecular mechanisms of cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation].

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2004-07-01

    Cartilage plays multiple roles in vertebrate animals. In an embryonic stage and early postnatal life, cartilage is important not only as a structural support of early embryo but also as a template of endochondral bone. In a later postnatal life, cartilage provides smooth joint movement and tissue elasticity. A number of critical signaling molecules that regulate cartilage formation and chondrocytes maturation in endochondral bone formation have been identified to date. The interplay of those important molecules is also actively studied. However, several fundamental questions still remain unsolved. What signal initiates mesenchymal cell condensation? Does condensation enough to make cells competent for BMP-induced chondrogenesis? Is there chondrocyte stem cell in cartilage? Likewise, it is not known which factor triggers chondrocytes maturation. In this review article, we summarized the action of several key factors including BMP, hedgehog, PTHrP, and Wnt in condensation, chondrogenenic differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes. Towards further understanding of above fundamental questions, this review article also tried to propose future direction of cartilage biology research. PMID:15577071

  14. Telomere erosion and senescence in human articular cartilage chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, J A; Buckwalter, J A

    2001-04-01

    Aging and the degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis are distinct processes, but a strong association exists between age and the incidence and prevalence of osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that this association is due to in vivo replicative senescence, which causes age-related declines in the ability of chondrocytes to maintain articular cartilage. For this hypothesis to be tested, senescence-associated markers were measured in human articular chondrocytes from donors ranging in age from 1 to 87 years. These measures included in situ staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, (3)H-thymidine incorporation assays for mitotic activity, and Southern blots for telomere length determinations. We found that senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity increased with age, whereas both mitotic activity and mean telomere length declined. These findings indicate that chondrocyte replicative senescence occurs in vivo and support the hypothesis that the association between osteoarthritis and aging is due in part to replicative senescence. The data also imply that transplantation procedures performed to restore damaged articular surfaces could be limited by the inability of older chondrocytes to form new cartilage after transplantation. PMID:11283188

  15. Packaging consideration of two-dimensional polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Wang, Alan Xiaolong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Ray T.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report the theoretical study of polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering which is based on the superprism effect as well as the experiment fabrication of the two dimensional photonic crystals for the laser beam steering. Superprism effect, the principle for beam steering, was separately studied in details through EFC (Equifrequency Contour) analysis. Polymer based photonic crystals were fabricated through double exposure holographic interference method using SU8-2007. The experiment results were also reported.

  16. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Methods: Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×106/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Results: Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may

  17. Inverse correlation between tyrosine phosphorylation and collagenase production in chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, T F; Mills, G; Pritzker, K P; Kandel, R A

    1990-01-01

    Collagenase production by chondrocytes appears to play a major role in the development of osteoarthritis. Although the mechanisms regulating collagenase production by chondrocytes are not known, incubation of bovine chondrocytes in serum markedly decreases collagenase production. Since serum has been demonstrated to increase levels of phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) in several cell types, we determined the effect of altering intracellular levels of P-Tyr on collagenase production. Both orthovanadate, a potent inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, and serum caused a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. The increase in P-Tyr was associated with a decrease in the production of collagenase, suggesting that two processes may be linked. Orthovanadate caused an increase in P-Tyr in the absence of serum, suggesting that P-Tyr levels in resting chondrocytes are regulated through activity of both tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Orthovanadate and serum induced a synergistic increase in P-Tyr levels, suggesting that serum functions through increasing kinase activity rather than decreasing phosphatase activity. In the absence of serum, concentrations of orthovanadate which maximally inhibited collagenase production primarily increased phosphorylation of a 36 kDa protein, suggesting that the phosphorylation of this protein may play a major role in regulating collagenase production. Orthovanadate had limited effects on chondrocyte proteoglycan synthesis, morphology or viability in the presence or absence of serum, suggesting that the decrease in collagenase production was not due to non-specific inhibition of protein synthesis or cellular toxicity. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases by orthovanadate or activation of tyrosine kinases by addition of serum correlated with the inhibition of collagenase production. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1697163

  18. Neutral amino acid transport in bovine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Barker, G A; Wilkins, R J; Golding, S; Ellory, J C

    1999-02-01

    1. The sodium-dependent amino acid transport systems responsible for proline, glycine and glutamine transport, together with the sodium-independent systems for leucine and tryptophan, have been investigated in isolated bovine chondrocytes by inhibition studies and ion replacement. Each system was characterized kinetically. 2. Transport via system A was identified using the system-specific analogue alpha-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB) as an inhibitor of proline, glycine and glutamine transport. 3. Uptake of proline, glycine and glutamine via system ASC was identified by inhibition with alanine or serine. 4. System Gly was identified by the inhibition of glycine transport with excess sarcosine (a substrate for system Gly) whilst systems A and ASC were inhibited. This system, having a very limited substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was also shown to be Na+ and Cl- dependent. Evidence for expression of the system Gly component GLYT-1 was obtained using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). 5. System N, also of narrow substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was shown to be present in chondrocytes. Na+-dependent glutamine uptake was inhibited by high concentrations of histidine (a substrate of system N) in the presence of excess MeAIB and serine. 6. System L was identified using the system specific analogue 2-aminobicyclo(2,2, 1)heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) and D-leucine as inhibitors of leucine and tryptophan transport. 7. The presence of system T was tested by using leucine, tryptophan and tyrosine inhibition. It was concluded that this system was absent in the chondrocyte. 8. Kinetic analysis showed the Na+-independent chondrocyte L system to have apparent affinities for leucine and tryptophan of 125 +/- 27 and 36 +/- 11 microM, respectively. 9. Transport of the essential amino acids leucine and tryptophan into bovine chondrocytes occurs only by the Na+-independent system L, but with a higher affinity than the

  19. Efficient, Low-Cost Nucleofection of Passaged Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Delve, Elizabeth; Andrejevic, Katarina; Paez-Parent, Sabrina; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Nucleofection of chondrocytes has been shown to be an adequate method of transfection. Using Amaxa's nucleofection system, transfection efficiencies up to 89% were achievable for vector (pmaxGFP) and 98% for siRNA (siGLO) into passaged chondrocytes. However, such methods rely on costly commercial kits with proprietary reagents limiting its use in basic science labs and in clinical translation. Bovine-passaged chondrocytes were plated in serum reduced media conditionsand then nucleofected using various in laboratory-produced buffers. Cell attachment, confluency, viability, and transfection efficiency was assessed following nucleofection. For each parameter the buffers were scored and a final rank for each buffer was determined. Buffer denoted as 1M resulted in no significant difference for cell attachment, confluency, and viability as compared to non-nucleofected controls. Nucleofection in 1M buffer, in the absence of DNA vectors, resulted in increased col2, ki67, ccnd1 mRNA levels, and decreased col1 mRNA levels at 4 days of culture. Flow cytometry revealed that the transfection efficiency of 1M buffer was comparable to that obtained using the Amaxa commercial kit. siRNA designed against lamin A/C resulted in an average reduction of lamin A and C proteins to 19% and 8% of control levels, respectively. This study identifies a cost-effective, efficient method of nonviral nucleofection of bovine-passaged chondrocytes using known buffer formulations. Human-passaged chondrocytes could also be successfully nucleofected in 1M buffer. Thus this method should facilitate cost-efficient gene targeting of cells used for articular cartilage repair in a research setting. PMID:26958320

  20. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  1. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  2. Modification of polylactide bioplastic using hyperbranched polymer based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Rahul

    Polylactide (PLA) is the most well known renewable resource based biodegradable polymer. The inherent brittleness and poor processability of PLA pose considerable technical challenges and limit its range of commercial applications. The broad objective of this research was to investigate novel pathways for polylactide modification to enhance its mechanical and rheological properties. The focus of this work was to tailor the architecture of a dendritic hyperbranched polymer (HBP) and study its influence on the mechanical and rheological properties of PLA bioplastic. The hyperbranched polymers under consideration are biodegradable aliphatic hydroxyl-functional hyperbranched polyesters having nanoscale dimensions, unique physical properties and high peripheral functionalities. This work relates to identifying a new and industrially relevant research methodology to develop PLA based nanoblends having outstanding stiffness-toughness balance. In this approach, a hydroxyl functional hyperbranched polymer was crosslinked in-situ with a polyanhydride (PA) in the PLA matrix during melt processing, leading to the generation of new nanoscale hyperbranched polymer based domains in the PLA matrix. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the "sea-island" morphology of PLA-crosslinked HBP blends. The domain size of a large portion of the crosslinked HBP particles in PLA matrix was less than 100 nm. The presence of crosslinked hyperbranched polymers exhibited more than 500% and 800% improvement in the tensile toughness and elongation at break values of PLA, respectively, with a minimal sacrifice of tensile strength and modulus as compared to unmodified PLA. The toughening mechanism of PLA in the presence of crosslinked HBP particles was comprised of shear yielding and crazing. The volume fraction of crosslinked HBP particles and matrix ligament thickness (inter-particle distance) were found to be the critical parameters for the toughening of PLA. The

  3. R-spondin 2 facilitates differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Yasuhiko; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-04-22

    Endochondral ossification is a crucial process for longitudinal growth of bones. Differentiating chondrocytes in growth cartilage form four sequential zones of proliferation, alignment into column, hypertrophy, and substitution of chondrocytes with osteoblasts. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of R-spondin family, is an agonist for Wnt signaling, but its role in chondrocyte differentiation remains unknown. Here we report that growth cartilage of Rspo2-knockout mice shows a decreased amount of β-catenin and increased amounts collagen type II (CII) and Sox9 in the abnormally extended proliferating zone. In contrast, expression of collagen type X (CX) in the hypertrophic zone remains unchanged. Differentiating chondrogenic ATDC5 cells, mimicking proliferating chondrocytes, upregulate Rspo2 and its putative receptor, Lgr5, in parallel. Addition of recombinant human Rspo2 to differentiating ATDC5 cells decreases expressions of Col2a1, Sox9, and Acan, as well as production of proteoglycans. In contrast, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of Rspo2 has the opposite effect. The effect of Rspo2 on chondrogenic differentiation is mediated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and not by Wnt/PCP or Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling. We propose that Rspo2 activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling to reduce Col2a1 and Sox9 and to facilitate differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. PMID:27012200

  4. Achieving ideal breast aesthetics with autologous reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Achieving ideal breast aesthetic has become a top priority for women considering breast reconstruction following mastectomy. The use of autologous tissue is generally regarded as providing the most natural results because donor tissues quality and consistency is similar to that of the native breast. There are several donor sites that are particularly useful for autologous reconstruction that include the abdomen, gluteal region, posterior thorax, and the thigh. Traditional and microsurgical techniques can be used. Shaping is a critical component and involves a basic understanding of the footprint, conus, and skin envelope. This manuscript will review many aspects of breast shaping in-order to achieve aesthetically pleasing results in a predictable manner. PMID:26005645

  5. Autologous Fat Grafting Improves Facial Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Marco; Lisa, Andrea; Caviggioli, Fabio; Maione, Luca; Murolo, Matteo; Vinci, Valeriano; Klinger, Francesco Maria

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old male patient who presented a retractile and painful scar in the nasolabial fold due to trauma which determined partial motor impairment of the mouth movements. We subsequently treated him with autologous fat grafting according to Coleman's technique. Clinical assessments were performed at 5 and 14 days and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgical procedure and we observed a progressive release of scar retraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms. A second procedure was performed 6 months after the previous one. We observed total restoration of mimic movements within one-year follow-up. The case described confirms autologous fat grafting regenerative effect on scar tissue enlightening a possible therapeutic effect on peripheral nerve activity, hypothesizing that its entrapment into scar tissue can determine a partial loss of function. PMID:26167327

  6. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving. PMID:24750320

  7. [Nutritional pathway for autologous stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Takashi; Imataki, Osamu; Inoue, Naomi; Katsumata, Mina; Katsuta, Tomoko; Kataoka, Tomomi; Yoshida, Takashi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Motokawa, Satoshi; Tamai, Yotaro; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Kawakami, Kimihiro

    2007-08-01

    We developed a nutritional pathway for autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) to be applied in our transplantation unit. We performed autologous SCT for 37 patients with malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma during from April 2003 to July 2005. For 10 of them who underwent SCT since 2005,we intervened with nutritional support using our original nutritional pathway,to monitor the clinical course of SCT from the aspect of dietetics with a dietician making assessments of the individual nutrition status. From comparing the 2 groups with (n=27) or without (n=10) the nutritional pathway, oral intake at day 14 was significantly increased from 1,038 kcal to 1,440 kcal,and at discharge developed from 1,167 kcal to 1,446 kcal without statistical significance. Patients whose body weight decreased more than 5% were reduced from 52%(14/27) to 10%(1/10),and 3 days reduction of the CVC insertion period was observed after the intervention. Although the long-term clinical outcome was not fully evaluated, the efficacy of nutritional pathway for autologous SCT was suggested. PMID:17687206

  8. Yap1 Regulates Multiple Steps of Chondrocyte Differentiation during Skeletal Development and Bone Repair.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yujie; Wu, Ailing; Li, Pikshan; Li, Gang; Qin, Ling; Song, Hai; Mak, Kinglun Kingston

    2016-03-01

    Hippo signaling controls organ size and tissue regeneration in many organs, but its roles in chondrocyte differentiation and bone repair remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Yap1, an effector of Hippo pathway inhibits skeletal development, postnatal growth, and bone repair. We show that Yap1 regulates chondrocyte differentiation at multiple steps in which it promotes early chondrocyte proliferation but inhibits subsequent chondrocyte maturation both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we find that Yap1 requires Teads binding for direct regulation of Sox6 expression to promote chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast, Yap1 inhibits chondrocyte maturation by suppression of Col10a1 expression through interaction with Runx2. In addition, Yap1 also governs the initiation of fracture repair by inhibition of cartilaginous callus tissue formation. Taken together, our work provides insights into the mechanism by which Yap1 regulates endochondral ossification, which may help the development of therapeutic treatment for bone regeneration. PMID:26923596

  9. Peritoneal transport characteristics with glucose polymer based dialysate.

    PubMed

    Ho-dac-Pannekeet, M M; Schouten, N; Langendijk, M J; Hiralall, J K; de Waart, D R; Struijk, D G; Krediet, R T

    1996-09-01

    Dialysate fluids containing glucose polymers as osmotic agent are different from the conventional solutions, because they are iso-osmotic to plasma and produce transcapillary ultrafiltration (TCUF) by colloid osmosis. To investigate the effects on fluid and solute kinetics, a comparison was made between a 7.5% glucose polymer based dialysate (icodextrin) and 1.36% and 3.86% glucose based dialysate in 10 stable CAPD patients. In each patient three standard peritoneal permeability analyses (SPA) were done with the osmotic agents and concentrations mentioned above. Dextran 70 was added to the glucose solutions to calculate fluid kinetics. In the glucose polymer SPAs fluid kinetics were calculated from the dilution and disappearance of dextrin. The TCUF rate with icodextrin was closer to that obtained with 3.86% glucose than to 1.36% glucose. Extrapolation of the fluid profiles revealed sustained ultrafiltration with icodextrin. TCUF increased linearly in time in the icodextrin tests, whereas a hyperbola best described the glucose profiles. The effective lymphatic absorption rate with icodextrin was similar to the glucose based solutions. Mass transfer area coefficients of low molecular weight solutes with icodextrin were also similar to the values obtained with glucose, as was D/P creatinine. A positive correlation was present between the MTAC creatinine and the TCUF rate with icodextrin (r = 0.66, P = 0.05), which was absent in the glucose SPAs. This suggests that in patients with a larger effective peritoneal surface area, more ultrafiltration can be achieved by glucose polymer solutions. Clearances of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) were higher with icodextrin than with 3.86% glucose and 1.36% glucose dialysate (P < 0.05). No differences were found for the larger serum proteins albumin, IgG and alpha 2-macroglobulin. Initial D/PNa-->was higher (0.96) with icodextrin than with the glucose based solutions (0.92), due to the higher Na+ concentration of icodextrin, and

  10. A Review of Thermal Spray Metallization of Polymer-Based Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Ashrafizadeh, H.; Lopera, A.; Mertiny, P.; McDonald, A.

    2016-06-01

    A literature review on the thermal spray deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures is presented. The deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures has been developed to enhance the thermal and electrical properties of the resulting metal-polymer material system. First, the description of the thermal spray metallization processes and technologies for polymer-based materials are outlined. Then, polymer surface preparation methods and the deposition of metal bond-coats are explored. Moreover, the thermal spray process parameters that affect the properties of metal deposits on polymers are described, followed by studies on the temperature distribution within the polymer substrate during the thermal spray process. The objective of this review is devoted to testing and potential applications of thermal-sprayed metal coatings deposited onto polymer-based substrates. This review aims to summarize the state-of-the-art contributions to research on the thermal spray metallization of polymer-based materials, which has gained recent attention for potential and novel applications.

  11. A Review of Thermal Spray Metallization of Polymer-Based Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Ashrafizadeh, H.; Lopera, A.; Mertiny, P.; McDonald, A.

    2016-05-01

    A literature review on the thermal spray deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures is presented. The deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures has been developed to enhance the thermal and electrical properties of the resulting metal-polymer material system. First, the description of the thermal spray metallization processes and technologies for polymer-based materials are outlined. Then, polymer surface preparation methods and the deposition of metal bond-coats are explored. Moreover, the thermal spray process parameters that affect the properties of metal deposits on polymers are described, followed by studies on the temperature distribution within the polymer substrate during the thermal spray process. The objective of this review is devoted to testing and potential applications of thermal-sprayed metal coatings deposited onto polymer-based substrates. This review aims to summarize the state-of-the-art contributions to research on the thermal spray metallization of polymer-based materials, which has gained recent attention for potential and novel applications.

  12. Regulators of chondrocyte differentiation in tibial dyschondroplasia: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Berry, J L; Mawer, E B; Seawright, E; Whitehead, C C

    1995-09-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a disorder of endochondral bone growth and results in the retention of a mass of unmineralized, avascular cartilage extending into the metaphysis. We have studied various parameters of chondrocyte differentiation, both in isolated chick chondrocytes and growth plate sections, in an attempt to determine whether the inhibition in chondrocyte differentiation seen in TD is a consequence of an inherent incapability of chondrocytes to differentiate terminally and mineralize. Results from in vitro experiments indicated that both normal and lesion chondrocytes synthesized a matrix that stained with antibodies to types II and X collagen and displayed foci of mineralization. Alkaline phosphatase activity in lesion chondrocytes was significantly increased in comparison to that in normal hypertrophic chondrocytes. In addition, normal and lesion chondrocytes in culture synthesized transforming growth factor-beta and 24,25(OH)2D3 but not 1,25(OH)2D3. There was no significant difference in the production rate of these growth regulators between normal and lesion chondrocytes. In contrast, in growth plate sections, alkaline phosphatase activity was markedly reduced in the lesion chondrocytes and sites of mineralization were not evident. Type II collagen was located throughout the growth plate and lesion, but type X collagen was not present within the lesion except at sites of vascularization. These results indicate that, in culture, lesion chondrocytes have the ability to differentiate terminally and mineralize, and suggest that the primary abnormality in TD is related to a developmental fault which is only operative in vivo. This may include a defect in cartilage vascularization and/or impairment of chondrocyte differentiation by mechanisms that have not yet been elucidated but may involve the abnormal production of regulatory factors. PMID:8541142

  13. Lectin binding patterns reflect the phenotypic status of in vitro chondrocyte models.

    PubMed

    Toegel, S; Plattner, V E; Wu, S Q; Goldring, M B; Chiari, C; Kolb, A; Unger, F M; Nehrer, S; Gabor, F; Viernstein, H; Wirth, M

    2009-01-01

    In vitro studies using chondrocyte cell cultures have increased our understanding of cartilage physiology and the altered chondrocytic cell phenotype in joint diseases. Beside the use of primary cells isolated from cartilage specimens of donors, immortalized chondrocyte cell lines such as C-28/I2 and T/C-28a2 have facilitated reproducible and standardized experiments. Although carbohydrate structures appear of significance for cartilage function, the contribution of the chondrocyte glycocalyx to matrix assembly and alterations of the chondrocyte phenotype is poorly understood. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the glycoprofile of primary human chondrocytes as well as of C-28/I2 and T/C-28a2 cells in culture. First, the chondrocytic phenotype of primary and immortalized cells was assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, and glycosaminoglycans staining. Then, a panel of lectins was selected to probe for a range of oligosaccharide sequences determining specific products of the O-glycosylation and N-glycosylation pathways. We found that differences in the molecular phenotype between primary chondrocytes and the immortalized chondrocyte cell models C-28/I2 and T/C-28a2 are reflected in the glycoprofile of the cells. In this regard, the glycocalyx of immortalized chondrocytes was characterized by reduced levels of high-mannose type and sialic acid-capped N-glycans as well as increased fucosylated O-glycosylation products. In summary, the present report emphasizes the glycophenotype as an integral part of the chondrocyte phenotype and points at a significant role of the glycophenotype in chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:19263178

  14. Dystrophic calcifications after autologous fat injection on face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dai Hyun; Jang, Hee Won; Kim, Hee Joo; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-06-01

    Autologous fat injection is widely used procedure for various functional and aesthetic purposes. However, it could result in many immediate or delayed complications including dystrophic calcifications. Almost all of the case reports about dystrophic calcification after autologous fat injection were result from the iatrogenic tissue trauma of breast augmentation. This is a report of a 30-year-old patient who developed pathologically proven multiple dystrophic calcifications on the face after autologous fat injection. PMID:24131074

  15. MicroRNA-33 suppresses CCL2 expression in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Meng; Xie, Qingyun; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Dongyang; Wang, Ying; Mo, Liweng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    CCL2-mediated macrophage infiltration in articular tissues plays a pivotal role in the development of the osteoarthritis (OA). miRNAs regulate the onset and progression of diseases via controlling the expression of a series of genes. How the CCL2 gene was regulated by miRNAs was still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the binding sites of miR-33 in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene were conserved in human, mouse and rat species. By performing gain- or loss-of-function studies, we verified that miR-33 suppressed CCL2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that miR-33 suppressed the CCL2 levels in the supernatant of cultured primary mouse chondrocytes. With reporter gene assay, we demonstrated that miR-33 targeted at AAUGCA in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene. In transwell migration assays, we demonstrated that the conditional medium (CM) from miR-33 deficient chondrocytes potentiated the monocyte chemotaxis in a CCL2 dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of miR-33 was decreased, whereas the CCL2 level was increased in the articular cartilage from the OA patients compared with the control group. In summary, we identified miR-33 as a novel suppressor of CCL2 in chondrocytes. The miR-33/CCL2 axis in chondrocytes regulates monocyte chemotaxis, providing a potential mechanism of macrophage infiltration in OA. PMID:27129293

  16. A practical way to prepare primer human chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Isyar, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Yasar Sirin, Duygu; Yalcin, Sercan; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2016-09-01

    Biological cartilage repair is one of the most important targets for orthopedic surgeons currently. For this purpose, it is mandatory to know how to prepare a chondrocyte culture. In this study, our purpose was to introduce a method enabling orthopedic surgeons to practice their knowledge and skills on molecular experimental setup at cellular level, based on our experiences from previous pilot studies. Thus, we believe it will encourage orthopedic surgeons. PMID:27408489

  17. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  18. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    LIN, PINGDONG; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; MA, YUHUAN; CHEN, HOUHUANG; SHAO, XIANG; ZHENG, WENWEI; LIU, XIANXIANG; YE, HONGZHI; LI, XIHAI

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type II collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)-stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA). We found that 4-PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP-homologous protein (Chop), caspase-9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase-9, caspase-3

  19. Bioreactor-Induced Chondrocyte Maturation Is Dependent on Cell Passage and Onset of Loading

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J.; Niemeyer, Philipp; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Pestka, Jan; Alini, Mauro; Chen, Jiying

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of shifting in vitro culture conditions regarding cellular passage and onset of loading within matrix-associated bovine articular chondrocytes cultured under free-swelling and/or dynamical loading conditions on general chondrocyte maturation. Methods: Primary or passage 3 bovine chondrocytes were seeded in fibrin-polyurethane scaffolds. Constructs were cultured either free-swelling for 2 or 4 weeks, under direct mechanical loading for 2 or 4 weeks, or free swelling for 2 weeks followed by 2 weeks of loading. Samples were collected for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, mRNA expression of chondrogenic genes, immunohistochemistry, and histology. Results: Mechanical loading generally stimulated GAG synthesis, up-regulated chondrogenic genes, and improved the accumulation of matrix in cell-laden constructs when compared with free-swelling controls. Primary chondrocytes underwent more effective cartilage maturation when compared with passaged chondrocytes. Constructs of primary chondrocytes that were initially free-swelling followed by 2 weeks of mechanical load (delayed) had overall highest GAG with strongest responsiveness to load regarding matrix synthesis. Constructs that experienced the delayed loading regime also demonstrated most favorable chondrogenic gene expression profiles in both primary and third passage cells. Furthermore, most intense matrix staining and immunostaining of collagen type II and aggrecan were visualized in these constructs. Conclusions: Primary chondrocytes were more effective than passage 3 chondrocytes when chondrogenesis was concerned. The most efficient chondrogenesis resulted from primary articular chondrocytes, which were initially free-swelling followed by a standardized loading protocol. PMID:26069659

  20. Optimal 3-D culture of primary articular chondrocytes for use in the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Baker, Travis L.; Brown, Raquel J.; Catlin, Lindsey W.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reliable culturing methods for primary articular chondrocytes are essential to study the effects of loading and unloading on joint tissue at the cellular level. Due to the limited proliferation capacity of primary chondrocytes and their tendency to dedifferentiate in conventional culture conditions, long-term culturing conditions of primary chondrocytes can be challenging. The goal of this study was to develop a suspension culturing technique that not only would retain the cellular morphology but also maintain gene expression characteristics of primary articular chondrocytes. METHODS Three-dimensional culturing methods were compared and optimized for primary articular chondrocytes in the rotating wall vessel bioreactor, which changes the mechanical culture conditions to provide a form of suspension culture optimized for low shear and turbulence. We performed gene expression analysis and morphological characterization of cells cultured in alginate beads, Cytopore-2 microcarriers, primary monolayer culture, and passaged monolayer cultures using reverse transcription-PCR and laser scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS Primary chondrocytes grown on Cytopore-2 microcarriers maintained the phenotypical morphology and gene expression pattern observed in primary bovine articular chondrocytes, and retained these characteristics for up to 9 days. DISCUSSION Our results provide a novel and alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes suitable for studies that require suspension such as those using the rotating wall vessel bioreactor. In addition, we provide an alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes that can impact future mechanistic studies of osteoarthritis progression, treatments for cartilage damage and repair, and cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25199120

  1. In situ chondrocyte deformation with physiological compression of the feline patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Clark, A L; Barclay, L D; Matyas, J R; Herzog, W

    2003-04-01

    The mechanical environment is an important factor affecting the maintenance and adaptation of articular cartilage, and thus the function of the joint and the progression of joint degeneration. Recent evidence suggests that cartilage deformation caused by mechanical loading is directly associated with deformation and volume changes of chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro experiments have shown that these changes in the mechanical states of chondrocytes correlate with a change in the biosynthetic activity of cartilage cells. The purpose of this study was to apply our knowledge of contact forces within the feline patellofemoral joint to quantify chondrocyte deformation in situ under loads of physiological magnitude. A uniform, static load of physiological magnitude was applied to healthy articular cartilage still fully intact and attached to its native bone. The compressed cartilage was then chemically fixed to enable the evaluation of cartilage strain, chondrocyte deformation and chondrocyte volumetric fraction. Patella and femoral groove articular cartilages differ in thickness, chondrocyte aspect ratio, and chondrocyte volumetric fraction in both magnitude and depth distribution. Furthermore, when subjected to the same compressive loads, changes to all of these parameters differ in magnitude and depth distribution between patellar and femoral groove articular cartilage. This evidence suggests that significant chondrocyte deformation likely occurs during in vivo joint loading, and may influence chondrocyte biosynthetic activity. Furthermore, we hypothesise that the contrasts between patella and femoral groove cartilages may explain, in part, the site-specific progression of osteoarthritis in the patellofemoral joint of the feline anterior cruciate ligament transected knee. PMID:12600346

  2. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  3. Notch signaling indirectly promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy via regulation of BMP signaling and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xifu; Wang, Jinwu; Luo, Zhengliang; Wang, Yongjun; Morandi, Massimo M.; Marymont, John V.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Dong, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is critical for chondrocyte differentiation and hypertrophy. Recently we identified the Notch signaling pathway as an important regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during mouse cartilage development. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we assessed the role for Notch signaling regulation of the cell cycle during chondrocyte differentiation. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that over-expression of the Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) significantly induced the expression of p57, a cell cycle inhibitor, in chondrocytes. Flow cytometric analyses further confirmed that over-expression of NICD in chondrocytes enhances the G0/G1 cell cycle transition and cell cycle arrest. In contrast, treatment of chondrocytes with the Notch inhibitor, DAPT, decreased both endogenous and BMP2-induced SMAD 1/5/8 phosphorylation and knockdown of SMAD 1/5/8 impaired NICD-induced chondrocyte differentiation and p57 expression. Co-immunoprecipitation using p-SMAD 1/5/8 and NICD antibodies further showed a strong interaction of these proteins during chondrocyte maturation. Finally, RT-PCR and Western blot results revealed a significant reduction in the expression of the SMAD-related phosphatase, PPM1A, following NICD over-expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Notch signaling induces cell cycle arrest and thereby initiates chondrocyte hypertrophy via BMP/SMAD-mediated up-regulation of p57. PMID:27146698

  4. Thermally reversible colloidal gels for three-dimensional chondrocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Lapworth, James W.; Hatton, Paul V.; Goodchild, Rebecca L.; Rimmer, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Healthy cells are required in large numbers to form a tissue-engineered construct and primary cells must therefore be increased in number in a process termed ‘expansion’. There are significant problems with existing procedures, including cell injury and an associated loss of phenotype, but three-dimensional culture has been reported to offer a solution. Reversible gels, which allow for the recovery of cells after expansion would therefore have great value in the expansion of chondrocytes for tissue engineering applications, but they have received relatively little attention to date. In this study, we examined the synthesis and use of thermoresponsive polymers that form reversible three-dimensional gels for chondrocyte cell culture. A series of polymers comprising N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and styrene was synthesized before studying their thermoresponsive solution behaviour and gelation. A poly(NIPAM-co-styrene-graft-N-vinylpyrrolidone) variant was also synthesized in order to provide increased water content. Both random- and graft-copolymers formed particulate gels above the lower critical solution temperature and, on cooling, re-dissolved to allow enzyme-free cell recovery. Chondrocytes remained viable in all of these materials for 24 days, increased in number and produced collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans. PMID:21775322

  5. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi; Xu, Qingli; Zhang, Jian; Niu, Jialing; Yuan, Guangyin; Jiang, Yao; He, Yaohua; Wang, Xinling

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C‑JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen Ⅱ (Col Ⅱ) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  6. The effects of simulated microgravity on cultured chicken embryonic chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Li, X. B.; Yang, S. Z.; Li, S. G.; Jiang, P. D.; Lin, Z. H.

    2003-10-01

    Using the cultured chicken embryonic chondrocytes as a model, the effects of simulated microgravity on the microtubular system of the cellular skeleton, extracellular matrix, alkaline phosphatase activity, intracellular free calcium concentration and mitochondrial ATP synthase activity with its oligomycin inhibition rate were studied with a clinostat. The microtubular content was measured by a flow cytometer. The decrease of microtubular content showed the impairment of the cellular skeleton system. Observation on the extracellualr matrix by the scanning electron microscopy showed that it decreased significantly after rotating, and the fibers in the extracellular matrix were more tiny and disorderly than that of the control group. It can be concluded that the simulated microgravity can affect the secreting and assembly of the extracellular matrix. In contrast to the control, there was a time course decrease in alkaline phosphatase activity of chondrocytes, a marker of matrix mineralization. Meanwhile a significant drop in the intracellular calcium concentration happened at the beginning of rotation. These results indicate that simulated microgravity can suppress matrix calcification of cultured chondrocytes, and intracellular free calcium may be involved in the regulation of matrix calcification as the second signal transmitter. No significant changes happened in the mitochondrial ATP synthase activity and its oligomycin inhibition rate. Perhaps the energy metabolism wasn't affected by the simulated microgravity. The possible mechanisms about them were discussed.

  7. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  8. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  9. Adaptive cellular response to osmotic stress in pig articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, P; Della Salda, L; De Angelis, E; Maltarello, M C; Petronini, P G; Cabassi, E; Marcato, P S; Maraldi, N M; Borghetti, A F

    1995-04-01

    The authors studied the effects of a wide range of medium osmolarities (from 0.28 osM (physiological osmolarity of plasma and synovial fluid) to 0.58 osM) by altering Na+ concentration in high density cultures of pig articular chondrocytes in order to analyze the behaviour of some functional and structural parameters during cell adaptation to these imposed changes in the ionic environment. Biochemical and morphological results indicated that, even if isolated from the tissue matrix and cultured in vitro, chondrocytes maintained active osmoregulation systems which are present in living conditions. They showed a similar biochemical and morphological behavior when cultured at 0.28 osM and 0.38 osM but they were able, with regard to protein synthesis, aminoacid transport and proliferation rates, to respond quickly and to adapt to 0.48 osM medium as well. On the contrary, the treatment at the highest osmolarity (0.58 osM) early altered these biochemical parameters and was detrimental or even gave rise to lethal damage during long-term treatment. Furthermore, while chondrocytes cultured in 0.28-0.38 osM medium maintained phenotypic characteristics in culture, the higher osmolarities (0.48-0.58 osM) caused morphological changes in cell populations resulting in loss of phenotypic cell stability as demonstrated by their taking on a fibroblast-like shape as well as a lack of ability to assembly matrix proteoglycans. PMID:7778094

  10. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  11. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; Zhang, Qing-Song; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Reiser, Brendan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Braun, Stephen E.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX) in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype. PMID:24758934

  12. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, YI; XU, QINGLI; ZHANG, JIAN; NIU, JIALING; YUAN, GUANGYIN; JIANG, YAO; HE, YAOHUA; WANG, XINLING

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C-JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen II (Col II) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  13. Multifunctional Polymer-Based Graphene Foams with Buckled Structure and Negative Poisson’s Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhaohe; Weng, Chuanxin; Liu, Luqi; Hou, Yuan; Zhao, Xuanliang; Kuang, Jun; Shi, Jidong; Wei, Yueguang; Lou, Jun; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the polymer-based graphene foams through combination of bottom-up assembly and simple triaxially buckled structure design. The resulting polymer-based graphene foams not only effectively transfer the functional properties of graphene, but also exhibit novel negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR) behaviors due to the presence of buckled structure. Our results show that after the introduction of buckled structure, improvement in stretchability, toughness, flexibility, energy absorbing ability, hydrophobicity, conductivity, piezoresistive sensitivity and crack resistance could be achieved simultaneously. The combination of mechanical properties, multifunctional performance and unusual deformation behavior would lead to the use of our polymer-based graphene foams for a variety of novel applications in future such as stretchable capacitors or conductors, sensors and oil/water separators and so on. PMID:27608928

  14. Multifunctional Polymer-Based Graphene Foams with Buckled Structure and Negative Poisson's Ratio.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhaohe; Weng, Chuanxin; Liu, Luqi; Hou, Yuan; Zhao, Xuanliang; Kuang, Jun; Shi, Jidong; Wei, Yueguang; Lou, Jun; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the polymer-based graphene foams through combination of bottom-up assembly and simple triaxially buckled structure design. The resulting polymer-based graphene foams not only effectively transfer the functional properties of graphene, but also exhibit novel negative Poisson's ratio (NPR) behaviors due to the presence of buckled structure. Our results show that after the introduction of buckled structure, improvement in stretchability, toughness, flexibility, energy absorbing ability, hydrophobicity, conductivity, piezoresistive sensitivity and crack resistance could be achieved simultaneously. The combination of mechanical properties, multifunctional performance and unusual deformation behavior would lead to the use of our polymer-based graphene foams for a variety of novel applications in future such as stretchable capacitors or conductors, sensors and oil/water separators and so on. PMID:27608928

  15. Matrix molecule influence on chondrocyte phenotype and proteoglycan 4 expression by alginate-embedded zonal chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Coates, Emily E; Riggin, Corinne N; Fisher, John P

    2012-12-01

    Articular cartilage resists load and provides frictionless movement at joint surfaces. The tissue is organized into the superficial, middle, deep, and calcified zones throughout its depth, each which serve distinct functions. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), found in the superficial zone, is a critical component of the joint's lubricating mechanisms. Maintenance of both the chondrocyte and zonal chondrocyte phenotype remain challenges for in vitro culture and tissue engineering. Here we investigate the expression of PRG4 mRNA and protein by primary bovine superficial zone chondrocytes, middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogels with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) additives. Chondrogenic phenotype and differentiation markers are evaluated by mRNA expression, histochemical, and immunohistochemical staining. Results show middle/deep cells express no measurable PRG4 mRNA by day 7. In contrast, superficial zone cells express elevated PRG4 mRNA throughout culture time. This expression can be significantly enhanced up to 15-fold by addition of both HA and CS to scaffolds. Conversely, PRG4 mRNA expression is downregulated (up to 5-fold) by CS and HA in differentiating MSCs, possibly due to build up of entrapped protein. HA and CS demonstrate favorable effects on chondrogenesis by upregulating transcription factor Sox9 mRNA (up to 4.6-fold) and downregulating type I collagen mRNA (up to 18-fold). Results highlight the important relationship between matrix components and expression of critical lubricating proteins in an engineered cartilage scaffold. PMID:22674584

  16. Intercellular Ca2+ waves in mechanically stimulated articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, P; Calabrese, A; Capozzi, I; Grandolfo, M; Tonon, R; Vittur, F

    2000-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a tissue designed to withstand compression during joint movement and, in vivo, is subjected to a wide range of mechanical loading forces. Mechanosensitivity has been demonstrated to influence chondrocyte metabolism and cartilage homeostasis, but the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction in these cells are poorly understood. In many cell types mechanical stimulation induces increases of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration that propagates from cell to cell as an intercellular Ca2+ wave. Cell-to-cell communication through gap junctions underlies tissue co-ordination of metabolism and sensitivity to extracellular stimuli: gap junctional permeability to intracellular second messengers allows signal transduction pathways to be shared among several cells, ultimately resulting in co-ordinated tissue responses. Mechanically-induced Ca2+ signalling was investigated with digital fluorescence video imaging in primary cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes. Mechanical stimulation of a single cell, obtained by briefly distorting the plasmamembrane with a micropipette, induced a wave of increased Ca2+ that was communicated to surrounding cells. Intercellular Ca2+ spreading was inhibited by 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid, suggesting the involvement of gap junctions in signal propagation. The functional expression of gap junctions was assessed, in confluent chondrocyte cultures, by the intercellular transfer of Lucifer yellow dye in microinjection experiments while the expression of connexin 43 could be detected in Western blots. A series of pharmacological tools known to interfere with the cell calcium handling capacity were employed to investigate the mechanism of mechanically-induced Ca2+ signalling. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ mechanical stimulation induced communicated Ca2+ waves similar to controls. Mechanical stress induced Ca2+ influx both in the stimulated chondrocyte but not in the adjacent cells, as assessed by the Mn2+ quenching

  17. Autologous bone marrow transplantation by photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.

    1992-06-01

    Simultaneous exposure of Merocyanine 540 dye containing cultured tumor cells to 514-nm laser light (93.6 J/cm2) results in virtually complete cell destruction. Under identical conditions, 40% of the normal progenitor (CFU-GM) cells survive the treatment. Laser- photoradiation treated, cultured breast cancer cells also were killed, and living tumor cells could not be detected by clonogenic assays or by anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody method. Thus, laser photoradiation therapy could be useful for purging of contaminating tumor cells from autologous bone marrow.

  18. Detection of accessory spleens with indium 111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.H., II; Varki, A.; Heaton, W.A.; Siegel, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    In two patients with recurrent immune thrombocytopenia, accessory splenic tissue was demonstrated by radionuclide imaging following administration of indium 111-labeled autologous platelets. In one of these patients, no accessory splenic tissue was seen on images obtained with technetium 99m sulfur colloid. This new technique provides a simple means for demonstrating accessory spleens and simultaneously evaluating the life-span of autologous platelets.

  19. Autologous Graft-versus-Tumor Effect: Reality or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the current dogma is not an evidence of graft-versus-tumor effect in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; thus, it is assumed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation only relies on the high-dose chemotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. However, recent studies argue in favor of the existence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor without the detrimental complications of graft-versus-host disease due to the nonspecific immune response from the infused donor alloreactive immune effector cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, this paper reviews the clinical evidence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor effect based on the autograft collected and infused host immune effector cells and host immunity recovery after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation affecting clinical outcomes in cancer patients.

  20. RECK Is Up-Regulated and Involved in Chondrocyte Cloning in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tokuhiro; Okada, Aiko; Yatabe, Taku; Okubo, Masashi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Noda, Makoto; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) is a membrane-anchored matrix metalloproteinase regulator, but its functions in cartilage are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the expression and functions of RECK in human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that the expression level of RECK is significantly higher in OA cartilage than in normal cartilage. By immunohistochemical analysis, RECK was localized to chondrocytes in OA cartilage, and the immunoreactivity directly correlated with the Mankin score and degree of chondrocyte cloning and proliferation. In cultured OA chondrocytes, RECK was expressed on the cell surface by glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchoring. The expression was stimulated by insulin-like growth factor-1 and suppressed by interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Down-regulation of RECK by small interfering RNA showed reduced spreading and smaller focal adhesions in the chondrocytes. Chondrocyte migration in a monolayer wounding assay was increased by down-regulation of RECK and inhibited by RECK overexpression in an matrix metalloproteinase activity-dependent manner. On the other hand, chondrocyte proliferation was suppressed by RECK silencing, and this was associated with reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, whereas the proliferation was enhanced by RECK overexpression. These data are the first to demonstrate that RECK is up-regulated in human OA cartilage and suggest that RECK plays a role in chondrocyte cloning probably through suppression and promotion of chondrocyte migration and proliferation, respectively. PMID:20395433

  1. Chondrocyte number and proteoglycan synthesis in the aging and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Bobacz, K; Erlacher, L; Smolen, J; Soleiman, A; Graninger, W

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To correlate the number of chondrocytes in healthy and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage with age, and to evaluate the influence of donor age on total proteoglycan synthesis. Methods: Chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage derived from hip joints with and without osteoarthritic lesions. The cell number was normalised to cartilage sample wet weight. In addition, the influence of age on chondrocyte numbers was assessed histomorphometrically. Chondrocytes were grown as monolayer cultures for seven days in a chemically defined serum-free basal medium. Total proteoglycan synthesis was measured by [35S]sulphate incorporation into newly synthesised macromolecules. Results: Chondrocyte numbers in healthy cartilage decreased significantly with advancing age (r = –0.69, p<0.0001). In contrast to healthy specimens, chondrocyte numbers were decreased in osteoarthritic cartilage irrespective of and unrelated to age, and differed markedly, by an average of 38%, from the cell numbers found in healthy individuals (p<0.0001). Regarding synthesis of matrix macromolecules, no dependence on patients' age, either in healthy or in osteoarthritic specimens, could be observed. Conclusions: Under the experimental conditions employed, chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic joints synthesised comparable amounts of cartilage macromolecules, independent of age or underlying osteoarthritic disease. Thus the decrease in chondrocyte number in aging and osteoarthritic joints could be a crucial factor in limiting tissue replenishment. PMID:15547085

  2. Notch signaling controls chondrocyte hypertrophy via indirect regulation of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Anat; Rutkowski, Timothy P; Liu, Zhaoyang; Mirando, Anthony J; Zuscik, Michael J; O’Keefe, Regis J; Hilton, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling regulates both the onset of chondrocyte hypertrophy and the progression to terminal chondrocyte maturation during endochondral ossification. It has been suggested that Notch signaling can regulate Sox9 transcription, although how this occurs at the molecular level in chondrocytes and whether this transcriptional regulation mediates Notch control of chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage development is unknown or controversial. Here we have provided conclusive genetic evidence linking RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling to the regulation of Sox9 expression and chondrocyte hypertrophy by examining tissue-specific Rbpjk mutant (Prx1Cre;Rbpjkf/f), Rbpjk mutant/Sox9 haploinsufficient (Prx1Cre;Rbpjkf/f;Sox9f/+), and control embryos for alterations in SOX9 expression and chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development. These studies demonstrate that Notch signaling regulates the onset of chondrocyte maturation in a SOX9-dependent manner, while Notch-mediated regulation of terminal chondrocyte maturation likely functions independently of SOX9. Furthermore, our in vitro molecular analyses of the Sox9 promoter and Notch-mediated regulation of Sox9 gene expression in chondrogenic cells identified the ability of Notch to induce Sox9 expression directly in the acute setting, but suppresses Sox9 transcription with prolonged Notch signaling that requires protein synthesis of secondary effectors. PMID:26558140

  3. AP-1 family members act with Sox9 to promote chondrocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Xinjun; Ohba, Shinsuke; Hojo, Hironori; McMahon, Andrew P

    2016-08-15

    An analysis of Sox9 binding profiles in developing chondrocytes identified marked enrichment of an AP-1-like motif. Here, we have explored the functional interplay between Sox9 and AP-1 in mammalian chondrocyte development. Among AP-1 family members, Jun and Fosl2 were highly expressed within prehypertrophic and early hypertrophic chondrocytes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) showed a striking overlap in Jun- and Sox9-bound regions throughout the chondrocyte genome, reflecting direct binding of each factor to the same enhancers and a potential for protein-protein interactions within AP-1- and Sox9-containing complexes. In vitro reporter analysis indicated that direct co-binding of Sox9 and AP-1 at target motifs promoted gene activity. By contrast, where only one factor can engage its DNA target, the presence of the other factor suppresses target activation consistent with protein-protein interactions attenuating transcription. Analysis of prehypertrophic chondrocyte removal of Sox9 confirmed the requirement of Sox9 for hypertrophic chondrocyte development, and in vitro and ex vivo analyses showed that AP-1 promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy. Sox9 and Jun co-bound and co-activated a Col10a1 enhancer in Sox9 and AP-1 motif-dependent manners consistent with their combined action promoting hypertrophic gene expression. Together, the data support a model in which AP-1 family members contribute to Sox9 action in the transition of chondrocytes to the hypertrophic program. PMID:27471255

  4. Modulation of Hyaluronan Synthesis by the Interaction between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Eliane; Piccinato, Carla A.; Nader, Helena B.; Cohen, Moisés; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Ferretti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are considered a good source for cellular therapy in cartilage repair. But, their potential to repair the extracellular matrix, in an osteoarthritic environment, is still controversial. In osteoarthritis (OA), anti-inflammatory action and extracellular matrix production are important steps for cartilage healing. This study examined the interaction of BM-MSC and OA-chondrocyte on the production of hyaluronan and inflammatory cytokines in a Transwell system. We compared cocultured BM-MSCs and OA-chondrocytes with the individually cultured controls (monocultures). There was a decrease in BM-MSCs cell count in coculture with OA-chondrocytes when compared to BM-MSCs alone. In monoculture, BM-MSCs produced higher amounts of hyaluronan than OA-chondrocytes and coculture of BM-MSCs with OA-chondrocytes increased hyaluronan production per cell. Hyaluronan synthase-1 mRNA expression was upregulated in BM-MSCs after coculture with OA-chondrocytes, whereas hyaluronidase-1 was downregulated. After coculture, lower IL-6 levels were detected in BM-MSCs compared with OA-chondrocytes. These results indicate that, in response to coculture with OA-chondrocytes, BM-MSCs change their behavior by increasing production of hyaluronan and decreasing inflammatory cytokines. Our results indicate that BM-MSCs per se could be a potential tool for OA regenerative therapy, exerting short-term effects on the local microenvironment even when cell:cell contact is not occurring. PMID:26273306

  5. Xanthan gum protects rabbit articular chondrocytes against sodium nitroprusside-induced apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qixin; Mei, Xifan; Han, Guanying; Ling, Peixue; Guo, Bin; Guo, Yuewei; Shao, Huarong; Wang, Guan; Cui, Zan; Bai, Yuxin; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-20

    We have previously reported that intra-articular injection of xanthan gum (XG) could significantly ameliorate the degree of joint cartilage degradation and pain in experimental osteoarthritis (OA) model in vivo. In this present study, we evaluated the protective effect of XG against Sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced rabbit articular chondrocytes apoptosis in vitro. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were incubated with various concentrations of XG for 24h prior to 0.5mmol/L SNP co-treatment for 24h. The proliferation of chondrocytes was analyzed using MTT assay. The chondrocytes early apoptosis rates were evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry. The morphology of apoptosis chondrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The loss/disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using rhodamin 123 by confocal microscope. The concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in cell culture supernatants was evaluated using ELISA assay. The results showed that XG could significantly reverse SNP-reduced cell proliferation and inhibited cell early apoptosis rate in a dose-dependent manner. XG alleviated loss/disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased the PGE2 level of chondrocytes cell culture supernatants in SNP-induced chondrocytes. These results of the present research strongly suggest that XG can protect rabbit articular chondrocytes against SNP-induced apoptosis in vitro. PMID:26256195

  6. Annexin V/beta5 integrin interactions regulate apoptosis of growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2006-10-13

    Apoptosis of terminally differentiated chondrocytes allows the replacement of growth plate cartilage by bone. Despite its importance, little is known about the regulation of chondrocyte apoptosis. We show that overexpression of annexin V, which binds to the cytoplasmic domain of beta5 integrin and protein kinase C alpha (PKCalpha), stimulates apoptotic events in hypertrophic growth plate chondrocytes. To determine whether the balance between the interactions of annexin V/beta5 integrin and annexin V/active PKCalpha play a role in the regulation of terminally differentiated growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis, a peptide mimic of annexin V (Penetratin (Pen)-VVISYSMPD) that binds to beta5 integrin but not to PKCalpha was used. This peptide stimulated apoptotic events in growth plate chondrocytes. Suppression of annexin V expression using small interfering ribonucleic acid decreased caspase-3 activity and increased cell viability in Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated growth plate chondrocytes. An activator of PKC resulted in a further decrease of cell viability and further increase of caspase-3 activity in Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated growth plate chondrocytes, whereas inhibitors of PKCalpha led to an increase of cell viability and decrease of caspase-3 activity of Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated cells. These findings suggest that binding of annexin V to active PKCalpha stimulates apoptotic events in growth plate chondrocytes and that binding of annexin Vto beta5 integrin controls these interactions and ultimately apoptosis. PMID:16914549

  7. Effects of telomerase and viral oncogene expression on the in vitro growth of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; Mitchell, Calista J; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2002-02-01

    Senescent chondrocytes accumulate with aging in articular cartilage, a process that interferes with cartilage homeostasis and increases the risk of cartilage degeneration. We showed previously that chondrocyte telomere length declines with donor age, which suggests that the aging process is telomere dependent. From these results we hypothesized that telomerase should delay the onset of senescence in cultured chondrocytes. Population doubling limits (PDL) were determined for chondrocytes expressing telomerase. We found that telomerase alone did not extend PDL beyond controls that senesced after 25 population doublings. The human papillomavirus 16 oncogenes E6 and E7 were transduced into the same cell population to investigate this telomere-independent form of senescence further. Chondrocytes expressing E6 and E7 grew longer than the telomerase cDNA (hTERT) cells but still senesced at 55 population doublings. In contrast, chondrocytes expressing telomerase with E6 and E7 grew vigorously past 100 population doublings. We conclude that although telomerase is necessary for the indefinite extension of chondrocyte life span, telomere-independent senescence limits PDL in vitro and may play a role in the age-related accumulation of senescent chondrocytes in vivo. PMID:11818423

  8. ADAM17 Controls Endochondral Ossification by Regulating Terminal Differentiation of Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Katherine C.; Hill, Daniel; Otero, Miguel; Plumb, Darren A.; Froemel, Dara; Dragomir, Cecilia L.; Maretzky, Thorsten; Boskey, Adele; Crawford, Howard C.; Selleri, Licia; Goldring, Mary B.

    2013-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is a highly regulated process that relies on properly orchestrated cell-cell interactions in the developing growth plate. This study is focused on understanding the role of a crucial regulator of cell-cell interactions, the membrane-anchored metalloproteinase ADAM17, in endochondral ossification. ADAM17 releases growth factors, cytokines, and other membrane proteins from cells and is essential for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and for processing tumor necrosis factor alpha. Here, we report that mice lacking ADAM17 in chondrocytes (A17ΔCh) have a significantly expanded zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and retarded growth of long bones. This abnormality is caused by an accumulation of the most terminally differentiated type of chondrocytes that produces a calcified matrix. Inactivation of ADAM17 in osteoclasts or endothelial cells does not affect the zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes, suggesting that the main role of ADAM17 in the growth plate is in chondrocytes. This notion is further supported by in vitro experiments showing enhanced hypertrophic differentiation of primary chondrocytes lacking Adam17. The enlarged zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes in A17ΔCh mice resembles that described in mice with mutant EGFR signaling or lack of its ligand transforming growth factor α (TGFα), suggesting that ADAM17 regulates terminal differentiation of chondrocytes during endochondral ossification by activating the TGFα/EGFR signaling axis. PMID:23732913

  9. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of a Polymer-Based Gas Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the temperature and humidity dependence of a polymer-based gas sensor. The measurement and analysis of three polymers indicates that resistance changes in the polymer films, due to temperature and humidity, can be positive or negative. The temperature sensitivity ranged from +1600 to -320 ppm/nd the relative sensitivity ranged from +1100 to -260 ppm/%.

  10. A photochromic supramolecular polymer based on bis-p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene recognition in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuyang; Li, Teng; Wang, Sheng; Ma, Xiang; Tian, He

    2014-07-11

    A photochromic supramolecular polymer based on bis-p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene recognition with a dithienylethene derivative in aqueous solution was fabricated. The resultant polymer showed good photochromic behaviour with obvious colour switching and a morphology change under alternative UV/Vis light stimuli. PMID:24853232

  11. All-polymer based fabrication process for an all-polymer flexible and parallel optical interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jilin; Ge, Tao; Summitt, Chris; Wang, Sunglin; Milster, Tom; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2015-08-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a new all-polymer based fabrication process for an all-polymer flexible and parallel optical interconnect cable in which a vertical light coupler is integrated. The approach potentially cut down the cost by eliminating a metallization process for alignment of multiple masks. Throughout the process we used a polyimide as the substrate, coated by Epoclad as claddings, then AP2210B and WPR 5100 were used to fabricate waveguides and 45 degree mirror couplers, respectively. In addition, precisely aligned mirror couplers to waveguides are achieved by using polymer-based, non-metallic, and transparent phase-based alignment marks. We tested a feature specific phase-based alignment system. In addition, the shape and depth of the phase-based alignment marks are optimized for phase contrast and Schlieren imaging. Our results shows that a contrast of the image is enhanced compared to that of observed by a conventional imaging system. Such process enables to integrate polymer based waveguides by only using the polymer based alignment marks on the WPR 5100 layer.

  12. Autologous stem cells for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasongchean, Weerapong; Ferretti, Patrizia

    2012-09-15

    Increasing understanding of stem cell biology, the ability to reprogramme differentiated cells to a pluripotent state and evidence of multipotency in certain adult somatic stem cells has opened the door to exciting therapeutic advances as well as a great deal of regulatory and ethical issues. Benefits will come from the possibility of modelling human diseases and develop individualised therapies, and from their use in transplantation and bioengineering. The use of autologous stem cells is highly desirable, as it avoids the problem of tissue rejection, and also reduces ethical and regulatory issues. Identification of the most appropriate cell sources for different potential applications, development of appropriate clinical grade methodologies and large scale well controlled clinical trials will be essential to assess safety and value of cell based therapies, which have been generating much hope, but are by and large not yet close to becoming standard clinical practice. We briefly discuss stem cells in the context of tissue repair and regenerative medicine, with a focus on individualised clinical approaches, and give examples of sources of autologous cells with potential for clinical intervention. PMID:22561284

  13. Breast Augmentation With Autologous Fat Injection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fa-Cheng; Chen, Bing; Cheng, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Autologous fat transplantation has attracted great interest in breast augmentation for cosmetic purpose. In the present study, we reported our experience in fat grafting in breast in 105 cases, and some detailed procedure concerning efficacy and safety of grafting was evaluated. Methods Fat was harvested using 20-mL syringe attached to a 3-hole blunt cannula in a diameter not beyond 3 mm. After washing with cool normal saline to remove blood, the fat was managed with open method using cotton towel as a platform for concentration fat tissue and separating them from fluids, oil, and debris. A 14-gauge, 1-hole blunt cannula was used to place the fat through 3-mm incision on inframammary fold. The fat was infiltrated into the breast from deep to superficial subcutaneous plane. Results Between July 2002 and August 2010, 105 patients have undergone this procedure. The age distribution of the patients ranged from 18 to 45 years, with a mean of 31.3 years. Grafted fat volume has ranged from 120 to 250 mL (average, 205 mL) per breast per session. All women had a significant improvement in their breast size and shape postoperatively, and the breasts were soft and natural in appearance. Conclusions Liposuction and autologous fat transplantation is a suitable approach for augmentation mammaplasty. PMID:25003461

  14. Identification and cloning of a novel phosphatase expressed at high levels in differentiating growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Houston, B; Seawright, E; Jefferies, D; Hoogland, E; Lester, D; Whitehead, C; Farquharson, C

    1999-01-11

    Growth plate chondrocytes progress through a proliferative phase before acquiring a terminally-differentiated phenotype. In this study we used Percoll density gradients to separate chick growth plate chondrocytes into populations of different maturational phenotype. By applying agarose gel differential display to these populations we cloned a cDNA encoding a novel 268 amino acid protein (3X11A). 3X11A contains two peptide motifs that are conserved in a recently identified superfamily of phosphotransferases. It is likely that 3X11A is a phosphatase, but its substrate specificity remains uncertain. 3X11A expression is upregulated 5-fold during chondrocyte terminal differentiation and its expression is approximately 100-fold higher in hypertrophic chondrocytes than in non-chondrogenic tissues. This suggests that 3X11A participates in a biochemical pathway that is particularly active in differentiating chondrocytes. PMID:9990301

  15. Chemokine expression is upregulated in chondrocytes in diabetic fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alblowi, Jazia; Tian, Chen; Siqueira, Michelle F; Kayal, Rayyan A; McKenzie, Erin; Behl, Yugal; Gerstenfeld, Louis; Einhorn, Thomas A; Graves, Dana T

    2013-03-01

    Chemokines are thought to play an important role in several aspects of bone metabolism including the recruitment of leukocytes and the formation of osteoclasts. We investigated the impact of diabetes on chemokine expression in normal and diabetic fracture healing. Fracture of the femur was performed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and matched normoglycemic control mice. Microarray analysis was carried out and chemokine mRNA levels in vivo were assessed. CCL4 were examined in fracture calluses by immunohistochemistry and the role of TNF in diabetes-enhanced expression was investigated by treatment of animals with the TNF-specific inhibitor, pegsunercept. In vitro studies were conducted with ATDC5 chondrocytes. Diabetes significantly upregulated mRNA levels of several chemokines in vivo including CCL4, CCL8, CCL6, CCL11, CCL20, CCL24, CXCL2, CXCL5 and chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4. Chondrocytes were identified as a significant source of CCL4 and its expression in diabetic fractures was dependent on TNF (P<0.05). TNF-α significantly increased mRNA levels of several chemokines in vitro which were knocked down with FOXO1 siRNA (P<0.05). CCL4 expression at the mRNA and proteins levels was induced by FOXO1 over-expression and reduced by FOXO1 knockdown. The current studies point to the importance of TNF-α as a mechanism for diabetes enhanced chemokine expression by chondrocytes, which may contribute to the accelerated loss of cartilage observed in diabetic fracture healing. Moreover, in vitro results point to FOXO1 as a potentially important transcription factor in mediating this effect. PMID:23262028

  16. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Wann, A.K.T.; Thompson, C.L.; Hassen, A.; Wang, W.; Knight, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. Methods The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88orpk). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. Results IFT88orpk cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88orpk cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88orpk cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88orpk cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88orpk cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. PMID:26493329

  17. Modulation of Apoptosis and Differentiation by the Treatment of Sulfasalazine in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Kil; Kang, Jin Seok

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to examine the cellular regulatory mechanisms of sulfasalazine (SSZ) in rabbit articular chondrocytes treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Cell phenotype was determined, and the MTT assay, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of type II collagen was performed in control, SNP-treated and SNP plus SSZ (50~200 μg/mL) rabbit articular chondrocytes. Cellular proliferation was decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with that in the control (p < 0.01). SSZ treatment clearly increased the SNP-reduced proliferation levels in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.01). SNP treatment induced significant dedifferentiation and inflammation compared with control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Type II collagen expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). Cylooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but was unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed that SSZ treatment increased type II collagen expression compared with that in SNP-treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase (pERK) expression levels were decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with those in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Expression levels of pERK increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes. pp38 kinase expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). In summary, SSZ significantly inhibited nitric oxide-induced cell death and dedifferentiation, and regulated extracellular regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p38 kinase in rabbit articular chondrocytes. PMID:27123162

  18. Leptin Receptor Metabolism Disorder in Primary Chondrocytes from Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Girls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Jia; Yu, Hong-Gui; Zhou, Zhen-Hai; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Long-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying mechanisms of low metabolic activity of primary chondrocytes obtained from girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS); AIS is a spine-deforming disease that often occurs in girls. AIS is associated with a lower bone mass than that of healthy individuals and osteopenia. Leptin was shown to play an important role in bone growth. It can also regulate the function of chondrocytes. Changes in leptin and Ob-R levels in AIS patients have been reported in several studies. The underlying mechanisms between the dysfunction of peripheral leptin signaling and abnormal chondrocytes remain unclear; The following parameters were evaluated in AIS patients and the control groups: total serum leptin levels; Ob-R expression in the plasma membrane of primary chondrocytes; JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation status. Then, we inhibited the lysosome and proteasome and knocked down clathrin heavy chain (CHC) expression in primary chondrocytes isolated from girls with AIS and evaluated Ob-R expression. We investigated the effects of leptin combined with a lysosome inhibitor or CHC knockdown in primary chondrocytes obtained from AIS patients; Compared with the controls, AIS patients showed similar total serum leptin levels, reduced JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreased cartilage matrix synthesis in the facet joint. Lower metabolic activity and lower membrane expression of Ob-R were observed in primary chondrocytes from the AIS group than in the controls. Lysosome inhibition increased the total Ob-R content but had no effect on the membrane expression of Ob-R or leptin’s effects on AIS primary chondrocytes. CHC knockdown upregulated the membrane Ob-R levels and enhanced leptin’s effects on AIS primary chondrocytes; The underlying mechanism of chondrocytes that are hyposensitive to leptin in some girls with AIS is low plasma membrane Ob-R expression that results from an imbalance between the rate of receptor endocytosis and the insertion of newly

  19. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Lv, Zhi; Sun, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shaowei; Zhang, Yang; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Materials and Methods Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz) by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation. Results 87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS. Conclusions CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced

  20. Modulation of Apoptosis and Differentiation by the Treatment of Sulfasalazine in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kil; Kang, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the cellular regulatory mechanisms of sulfasalazine (SSZ) in rabbit articular chondrocytes treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Cell phenotype was determined, and the MTT assay, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of type II collagen was performed in control, SNP-treated and SNP plus SSZ (50~200 μg/mL) rabbit articular chondrocytes. Cellular proliferation was decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with that in the control (p < 0.01). SSZ treatment clearly increased the SNP-reduced proliferation levels in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.01). SNP treatment induced significant dedifferentiation and inflammation compared with control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Type II collagen expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). Cylooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to SSZ treatment but was unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed that SSZ treatment increased type II collagen expression compared with that in SNP-treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase (pERK) expression levels were decreased significantly in the SNP-treated group compared with those in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). Expression levels of pERK increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in SNP-treated chondrocytes. pp38 kinase expression levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner by SSZ but were unaltered in control chondrocytes (p < 0.01). In summary, SSZ significantly inhibited nitric oxide-induced cell death and dedifferentiation, and regulated extracellular regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p38 kinase in rabbit articular chondrocytes. PMID:27123162

  1. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Karolak, Matthew R.; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  2. FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes is attenuated by the Ras-GAP neurofibromin during endochondral bone formation.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Matthew R; Yang, Xiangli; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling disrupts chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate size and architecture, leading to various chondrodysplasias or bone overgrowth. These observations suggest that the duration, intensity and cellular context of FGFR signaling during growth plate chondrocyte maturation require tight, regulated control for proper bone elongation. However, the machinery fine-tuning FGFR signaling in chondrocytes is incompletely defined. We report here that neurofibromin, a Ras-GAP encoded by Nf1, has an overlapping expression pattern with FGFR1 and FGFR3 in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, and with FGFR1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Based on previous evidence that neurofibromin inhibits Ras-ERK signaling in chondrocytes and phenotypic analogies between mice with constitutive FGFR1 activation and Nf1 deficiency in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes, we asked whether neurofibromin is required to control FGFR1-Ras-ERK signaling in maturing chondrocytes in vivo. Genetic Nf1 ablation in Fgfr1-deficient chondrocytes reactivated Ras-ERK1/2 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes and reversed the expansion of the hypertrophic zone observed in mice lacking Fgfr1 in Col2a1-positive chondrocytes. Histomorphometric and gene expression analyses suggested that neurofibromin, by inhibiting Rankl expression, attenuates pro-osteoclastogenic FGFR1 signaling in hypertrophic chondrocytes. We also provide evidence suggesting that neurofibromin in prehypertrophic chondrocytes, downstream of FGFRs and via an indirect mechanism, is required for normal extension and organization of proliferative columns. Collectively, this study indicates that FGFR signaling provides an important input into the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling axis in chondrocytes, and that this input is differentially regulated during chondrocyte maturation by a complex intracellular machinery, of which neurofibromin is a critical component. PMID:25616962

  3. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair. PMID:25054343

  4. An analysis of a preoperative pediatric autologous blood donation program

    PubMed Central

    Letts, Merv; Perng, Richard; Luke, Brian; Jarvis, James; Lawton, Louis; Hoey, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a pediatric autologous blood donation program. Design A retrospective study of patient charts and blood-bank records. Setting The Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, a tertiary care, pediatric centre. Patients One hundred and seventy-three children who received blood transfusions for a total of 182 procedures between June 1987 and June 1997. Interventions Autologous and homologous blood transfusion required for major surgical intervention, primarily spinal fusion. Main outcome measures Surgeons’ accuracy in predicting the number of autologous blood units required for a given procedure, compliance rate (children’s ability to donate the requested volume of blood), utilization rate of autologous units and rate of allogeneic transfusion. Results The surgeons’ accuracy in predicting the number of autologous units required for a given procedure was 53.8%. The compliance rate of children to donate the requested amount of blood was 80.3%. In children below the standard age and weight criteria for blood donation the compliance rate was 75.5%. The utilization rate of autologous units obtained was 84.4% and the incidence of allogeneic transfusion was 26.6%. Conclusions There was a high rate of compliance and utilization of predonated autologous blood in the children in the study. Preoperative blood donation programs are safe and effective in children, even in those below the standard age and weight criteria of 10 years and 40 kg. PMID:10812347

  5. Role of autologous bladder-neck slings: a urogynecology perspective.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Dani; Karram, Mickey

    2012-08-01

    The concept of the autologous pubovaginal sling involves supporting the proximal urethra and bladder neck with a piece of graft material, achieving continence either by providing a direct compressive force on the urethra/bladder outlet or by reestablishing a reinforcing platform or hammock against which the urethra is compressed during transmission of increased abdominal pressure. Pubovaginal slings using a biological sling material (whether autologous, allograft, or xenograft) can be used successfully to manage primary or recurrent stress incontinence. This article addresses the indications for the use of an autologous bladder-neck sling, describes the surgical techniques, and discusses outcomes and technical considerations. PMID:22877713

  6. Loss of the mammalian DREAM complex deregulates chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Forristal, Chantal; Henley, Shauna A; MacDonald, James I; Bush, Jason R; Ort, Carley; Passos, Daniel T; Talluri, Srikanth; Ishak, Charles A; Thwaites, Michael J; Norley, Chris J; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; DiMattia, Gabriel; Holdsworth, David W; Beier, Frank; Dick, Frederick A

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian DREAM is a conserved protein complex that functions in cellular quiescence. DREAM contains an E2F, a retinoblastoma (RB)-family protein, and the MuvB core (LIN9, LIN37, LIN52, LIN54, and RBBP4). In mammals, MuvB can alternatively bind to BMYB to form a complex that promotes mitotic gene expression. Because BMYB-MuvB is essential for proliferation, loss-of-function approaches to study MuvB have generated limited insight into DREAM function. Here, we report a gene-targeted mouse model that is uniquely deficient for DREAM complex assembly. We have targeted p107 (Rbl1) to prevent MuvB binding and combined it with deficiency for p130 (Rbl2). Our data demonstrate that cells from these mice preferentially assemble BMYB-MuvB complexes and fail to repress transcription. DREAM-deficient mice show defects in endochondral bone formation and die shortly after birth. Micro-computed tomography and histology demonstrate that in the absence of DREAM, chondrocytes fail to arrest proliferation. Since DREAM requires DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase 1A) phosphorylation of LIN52 for assembly, we utilized an embryonic bone culture system and pharmacologic inhibition of (DYRK) kinase to demonstrate a similar defect in endochondral bone growth. This reveals that assembly of mammalian DREAM is required to induce cell cycle exit in chondrocytes. PMID:24710275

  7. Loss of the Mammalian DREAM Complex Deregulates Chondrocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Forristal, Chantal; Henley, Shauna A.; MacDonald, James I.; Bush, Jason R.; Ort, Carley; Passos, Daniel T.; Talluri, Srikanth; Ishak, Charles A.; Thwaites, Michael J.; Norley, Chris J.; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; DiMattia, Gabriel; Holdsworth, David W.; Beier, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian DREAM is a conserved protein complex that functions in cellular quiescence. DREAM contains an E2F, a retinoblastoma (RB)-family protein, and the MuvB core (LIN9, LIN37, LIN52, LIN54, and RBBP4). In mammals, MuvB can alternatively bind to BMYB to form a complex that promotes mitotic gene expression. Because BMYB-MuvB is essential for proliferation, loss-of-function approaches to study MuvB have generated limited insight into DREAM function. Here, we report a gene-targeted mouse model that is uniquely deficient for DREAM complex assembly. We have targeted p107 (Rbl1) to prevent MuvB binding and combined it with deficiency for p130 (Rbl2). Our data demonstrate that cells from these mice preferentially assemble BMYB-MuvB complexes and fail to repress transcription. DREAM-deficient mice show defects in endochondral bone formation and die shortly after birth. Micro-computed tomography and histology demonstrate that in the absence of DREAM, chondrocytes fail to arrest proliferation. Since DREAM requires DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase 1A) phosphorylation of LIN52 for assembly, we utilized an embryonic bone culture system and pharmacologic inhibition of (DYRK) kinase to demonstrate a similar defect in endochondral bone growth. This reveals that assembly of mammalian DREAM is required to induce cell cycle exit in chondrocytes. PMID:24710275

  8. Indium-111 autologous leukocyte imaging in pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Spence, R.A.; Laird, J.D.; Ferguson, W.R.; Kennedy, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thirty-nine patients with acute pancreatitis have been assessed using a prognostic factor grading system, abdominal ultrasound, and autologous leukocyte imaging. Both prognostic factor grading and leukocyte imaging can accurately assess the severity of the disease early in its course. All patients with a negative indium-labeled leukocyte image recovered without sequelae, whereas five of the 12 patients with a positive image developed complications, including two deaths. Abdominal ultrasound is of no value in assessing severity, but is a useful method of detecting those patients with gallstone-associated disease. In patients with suspected abscess formation following acute pancreatitis, indium leukocyte imaging does not differentiate between fat necrosis and abscess formation. In this situation, computerized tomography should be carried out before laparotomy is undertaken.

  9. Characterization of human adipose-derived stem cells cultured in autologous serum after subsequent passaging and long term cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Ance; Berzins, Uldis; Nikulshin, Sergey; Skrastina, Dace; Ezerta, Agnese; Legzdina, Diana; Kozlovska, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) from passage 2 (P2) to P8 cultured in medium containing 5% autologous serum (AS) after a long-term cryopreservation with regards to their surface marker expression, differentiation potential, and immunosuppressive effect in vitro. 8-color flow cytometry and real time PCR were used to determine mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) surface marker expression on ASCs from various passages. In vitro differentiation ability and immunomodulatory properties of ASCs were also tested. Flow cytometry showed that all ASCs express typical MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105 simultaneously, but do not express such markers as HLA-DR, CD34, CD14, CD19, and CD45. Furthermore, median fluorescence intensity of positive cell surface markers increased with each subsequent passage indicating the accumulation of protein expression. The multilineage differentiation demonstrated the ability of ASCs from P6 to efficiently differentiate into adipocytes and chondrocytes, but their potential of osteogenic differentiation was diminished. Data from co-culture of ASCs and autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) indicated that ASCs from P3, P6, and P9 significantly reduce the proliferation of PBMNCs at ASCs:PBMNCs ratio 1:1 and this suppression is dose dependent. This study demonstrated that ASCs from P2 to P8, cultured in the presence of AS, represent a highly homogeneous cell population with a peak accumulation of MSC surface proteins at P5 possessing multilineage differentiation ability and significant immunosuppressive properties after double freezing and more than 4 years of cryopreservation. PMID:25157448

  10. Engineered cartilage using primary chondrocytes cultured in a porous cartilage-derived matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Estes, Bradley T; Young, Tai-Horng; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-01-01

    Aim To investigate the cell growth, matrix accumulation and mechanical properties of neocartilage formed by human or porcine articular chondrocytes on a porous, porcine cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) for use in cartilage tissue engineering. Materials & methods We examined the physical properties, cell infiltration and matrix accumulation in different formulations of CDM and selected a CDM made of homogenized cartilage slurry as an appropriate scaffold for long-term culture of human and porcine articular chondrocytes. Results The CDM scaffold supported growth and proliferation of both human and porcine chondrocytes. Histology and immunohistochemistry showed abundant cartilage-specific macromolecule deposition at day 28. Human chondrocytes migrated throughout the CDM, showing a relatively homogeneous distribution of new tissue accumulation, whereas porcine chondrocytes tended to form a proteoglycan-rich layer primarily on the surfaces of the scaffold. Human chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds had a significantly lower aggregate modulus and hydraulic permeability at day 28. Conclusions These data show that a scaffold derived from native porcine articular cartilage can support neocartilage formation in the absence of exogenous growth factors. The overall characteristics and properties of the constructs depend on factors such as the concentration of CDM used, the porosity of the scaffold, and the species of chondrocytes. PMID:21175289