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Sample records for polymerase accessory subunit

  1. Accessory subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase from Drosophila embryos. Cloning, molecular analysis, and association in the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Farr, C L; Kaguni, L S

    1997-05-23

    A full-length cDNA of the accessory (beta) subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase from Drosophila embryos has been obtained, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The cDNA clone encodes a polypeptide with a deduced amino acid sequence of 361 residues and a predicted molecular mass of 41 kDa. The gene encoding the beta subunit lies within 4 kilobase pairs of that for the catalytic subunit in the Drosophila genome, on the left arm of chromosome 2. The two genes have similar structural features and share several common DNA sequence elements in their upstream regions, suggesting the possibility of coordinate regulation. A human cDNA homolog of the accessory subunit was identified, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The human sequence encodes a polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 43 kDa that shows a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the Drosophila beta subunit. Subunit-specific rabbit antisera, directed against the recombinant catalytic and accessory subunit polypeptides overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli, recognize specifically and immunoprecipitate the native enzyme from Drosophila embryos. Demonstration of the physical association of the two subunits in the Drosophila enzyme and identification of a human accessory subunit homolog provide evidence for a common heterodimeric structure for animal mitochondrial DNA polymerases. PMID:9153213

  2. The Pseudorabies Virus DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit UL42 Directs Nuclear Transport of the Holoenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Du, Wen-Juan; Huang, Li-Ping; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Feng, Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA replication occurs in the nuclei of infected cells and requires the viral DNA polymerase. The PRV DNA polymerase comprises a catalytic subunit, UL30, and an accessory subunit, UL42, that confers processivity to the enzyme. Its nuclear localization is a prerequisite for its enzymatic function in the initiation of viral DNA replication. However, the mechanisms by which the PRV DNA polymerase holoenzyme enters the nucleus have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the nuclear import pathways of the PRV DNA polymerase catalytic and accessory subunits. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that UL42 localizes independently in the nucleus, whereas UL30 alone predominantly localizes in the cytoplasm. Intriguingly, the localization of UL30 was completely shifted to the nucleus when it was coexpressed with UL42, demonstrating that nuclear transport of UL30 occurs in an UL42-dependent manner. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the two proteins showed that UL42 contains a functional and transferable bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at amino acids 354–370 and that K354, R355, and K367 are important for the NLS function, whereas UL30 has no NLS. Coimmunoprecipitation assays verified that UL42 interacts with importins α3 and α4 through its NLS. In vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that nuclear accumulation of UL42 is a temperature- and energy-dependent process and requires both importins α and β, confirming that UL42 utilizes the importin α/β-mediated pathway for nuclear entry. In an UL42 NLS-null mutant, the UL42/UL30 heterodimer was completely confined to the cytoplasm when UL42 was coexpressed with UL30, indicating that UL30 utilizes the NLS function of UL42 for its translocation into the nucleus. Collectively, these findings suggest that UL42 contains an importin α/β-mediated bipartite NLS that transports the viral DNA polymerase holoenzyme into the nucleus in an in vitro expression system

  3. The Crystal Structure of PF-8, the DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit from Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Jennifer L.; Filman, David J.; Ciustea, Mihai; Silverman, Janice Elaine Y.; Lautenschlager, Catherine L.; Coen, Donald M.; Ricciardi, Robert P.; Hogle, James M.

    2009-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is an emerging pathogen whose mechanism of replication is poorly understood. PF-8, the presumed processivity factor of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus DNA polymerase, acts in combination with the catalytic subunit, Pol-8, to synthesize viral DNA. We have solved the crystal structure of residues 1 to 304 of PF-8 at a resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. This structure reveals that each monomer of PF-8 shares a fold common to processivity factors. Like human cytomegalovirus UL44, PF-8 forms a head-to-head dimer in the form of a C clamp, with its concave face containing a number of basic residues that are predicted to be important for DNA binding. However, there are several differences with related proteins, especially in loops that extend from each monomer into the center of the C clamp and in the loops that connect the two subdomains of each protein, which may be important for determining PF-8's mode of binding to DNA and to Pol-8. Using the crystal structures of PF-8, the herpes simplex virus catalytic subunit, and RB69 bacteriophage DNA polymerase in complex with DNA and initial experiments testing the effects of inhibition of PF-8-stimulated DNA synthesis by peptides derived from Pol-8, we suggest a model for how PF-8 might form a ternary complex with Pol-8 and DNA. The structure and the model suggest interesting similarities and differences in how PF-8 functions relative to structurally similar proteins.

  4. Nucleolin associates with the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase accessory subunit UL44 and is necessary for efficient viral replication.

    PubMed

    Strang, Blair L; Boulant, Steeve; Coen, Donald M

    2010-02-01

    In the eukaryotic cell, DNA replication entails the interaction of multiple proteins with the DNA polymerase processivity factor PCNA. As the structure of the presumptive human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase processivity factor UL44 is highly homologous to that of PCNA, we hypothesized that UL44 also interacts with numerous proteins. To investigate this possibility, recombinant HCMV expressing FLAG-tagged UL44 was generated and used to immunoprecipitate UL44 and associated proteins from infected cell lysates. Unexpectedly, nucleolin, a major protein component of the nucleolus, was identified among these proteins by mass spectrometry and Western blotting. The association of nucleolin and UL44 in infected cell lysate was confirmed by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation in the presence and absence of nuclease. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that the level of nucleolin increases during infection and that nucleolin becomes distributed throughout the nucleus. Furthermore, the colocalization of nucleolin and UL44 in infected cell nuclei was observed by immunofluorescence assays. Assays of HCMV-infected cells treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting nucleolin mRNA indicated that nucleolin was required for efficient virus production, viral DNA synthesis, and the expression of a late viral protein, with a correlation between the efficacy of knockdown and the effect on virus replication. In contrast, the level of neither global protein synthesis nor the replication of an unrelated virus (reovirus) was reduced in siRNA-treated cells. Taken together, our results indicate an association of nucleolin and UL44 in HCMV-infected cells and a role for nucleolin in viral DNA synthesis. PMID:20007282

  5. Optimal Replication Activity of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase Requires Phosphorylation of a Residue(s) at Carboxy-Terminal Domain II of Its Accessory Subunit, Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Leroy N.; Englund, Nathan; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Amiya K.; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    1999-01-01

    The phosphoprotein, P, of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a key subunit of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. The protein is phosphorylated at multiple sites in two different domains. We recently showed that specific serine and threonine residues within the amino-terminal acidic domain I of P protein must be phosphorylated for in vivo transcription activity, but not for replication activity, of the polymerase complex. To examine the role of phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of the P protein in transcription and replication, we have used a panel of mutant P proteins in which the phosphate acceptor sites (Ser-226, Ser-227, and Ser-233) were altered to alanines either individually or in various combinations. Analyses of the mutant proteins for their ability to support replication of a VSV minigenomic RNA suggest that phosphorylation of either Ser-226 or Ser-227 is necessary for optimal replication activity of the protein. The mutant protein (P226/227) in which both of these residues were altered to alanines was only about 8% active in replication compared to the wild-type (wt) protein. Substitution of alanine for Ser-233 did not have any adverse effect on replication activity of the protein. In contrast, all the mutant proteins showed activities similar to that of the wt protein in transcription. These results indicate that phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of P protein are required for optimal replication activity but not for transcription activity. Furthermore, substitution of glutamic acid residues for Ser-226 and Ser-227 resulted in a protein that was only 14% active in replication but almost fully active in transcription. Taken together, these results, along with our earlier studies, suggest that phosphorylation of residues at two different domains in the P protein regulates its activity in transcription and replication of the VSV genome. PMID:10364310

  6. Modulation of Kv4.3 current by accessory subunits.

    PubMed

    Deschênes, Isabelle; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2002-09-25

    Kv4.3 encodes the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac transient outward potassium current (I(to)). hKv4.3-encoded current does not fully replicate cardiac I(to), suggesting a functionally significant role for accessory subunits. KChIP2 associates with Kv4.3 and modifies hKv4.3-encoded currents but does not replicate native I(to). We examined the effect of several ancillary subunits expressed in the heart on hKv4.3-encoded currents. Remarkably, the ancillary subunits Kvbeta(3), minK, MiRP-1, the Na channel beta(1) and KChIP2 increased the density and modified the gating of hKv4.3 current. hKv4.3 promiscuously assembles with ancillary subunits in vitro, functionally modifying the encoded currents; however, the physiological significance is uncertain. PMID:12297301

  7. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  8. Characterization of Human RNA Polymerase III Identifies Orthologues for Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA Polymerase III Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Wu, Si; Sun, Yuling; Yuan, Chih-Chi; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Myers, Michael P.; Hernandez, Nouria

    2002-01-01

    Unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase III, human RNA polymerase III has not been entirely characterized. Orthologues of the yeast RNA polymerase III subunits C128 and C37 remain unidentified, and for many of the other subunits, the available information is limited to database sequences with various degrees of similarity to the yeast subunits. We have purified an RNA polymerase III complex and identified its components. We found that two RNA polymerase III subunits, referred to as RPC8 and RPC9, displayed sequence similarity to the RNA polymerase II RPB7 and RPB4 subunits, respectively. RPC8 and RPC9 associated with each other, paralleling the association of the RNA polymerase II subunits, and were thus paralogues of RPB7 and RPB4. Furthermore, the complex contained a prominent 80-kDa polypeptide, which we called RPC5 and which corresponded to the human orthologue of the yeast C37 subunit despite limited sequence similarity. RPC5 associated with RPC53, the human orthologue of S. cerevisiae C53, paralleling the association of the S. cerevisiae C37 and C53 subunits, and was required for transcription from the type 2 VAI and type 3 human U6 promoters. Our results provide a characterization of human RNA polymerase III and show that the RPC5 subunit is essential for transcription. PMID:12391170

  9. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  10. RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Woychik, N; Liao, S M; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation were investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by attaching an epitope coding sequence to a well-characterized RNA polymerase II subunit gene (RPB3) and by immunoprecipitating the product of this gene with its associated polypeptides. The immunopurified enzyme catalyzed alpha-amanitin-sensitive RNA synthesis in vitro. The 10 polypeptides that immunoprecipitated were identical in size and number to those previously described for RNA polymerase II purified by conventional column chromatography. The relative stoichiometry of the subunits was deduced from knowledge of the sequence of the subunits and from the extent of labeling with [35S]methionine. Immunoprecipitation from 32P-labeled cell extracts revealed that three of the subunits, RPB1, RPB2, and RPB6, are phosphorylated in vivo. Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of RPB1 could be distinguished; approximately half of the RNA polymerase II molecules contained a phosphorylated RPB1 subunit. These results more precisely define the subunit composition and phosphorylation of a eucaryotic RNA polymerase II enzyme. Images PMID:2183013

  11. Functional analysis of Drosophila DNA polymerase ε p58 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sahashi, Ritsuko; Matsuda, Risa; Suyari, Osamu; Kawai, Mieko; Yoshida, Hideki; Cotterill, Sue; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerase ε (polε) plays a central role in DNA replication in eukaryotic cells, and has been suggested to the main synthetic polymerase on the leading strand. It is a hetero-tetrameric enzyme, comprising a large catalytic subunit (the A subunit ~250 kDa), a B subunit of ~60 kDa in most species (~80 kDa in budding yeast) and two smaller subunits (each ~20 kDa). In Drosophila, two subunits of polε (dpolε) have been identified. One is the 255 kDa catalytic subunit (dpolεp255), and the other is the 58 kDa subunit (dpolεp58). The functions of the B subunit have been mainly studied in budding yeast and mammalian cell culture, few studies have been performed in the context of an intact multicellular organism and therefore its functions in this context remain poorly understood. To address this we examined the in vivo role of dpolεp58 in Drosophila. A homozygous dpolεp58 mutant is pupal lethal, and the imaginal discs are less developed in the third instar larvae. In the eye discs of this mutant S phases, as measured by BrdU incorporation assays, were significantly reduced. In addition staining with an anti-phospho histone H3 (PH3) antibody, (a marker of M phase), was increased in the posterior region of eye discs, where usually cells stop replicating and start differentiation. These results indicate that dpolεp58 is essential for Drosophila development and plays an important role in progression of S phase in mitotic cell cycles. We also observed that the size of nuclei in salivary gland cells were decreased in dpolεp58 mutant, indicating that dpolεp58 also plays a role in endoreplication. Furthermore we detect a putative functional interaction between dpolε and ORC2 in discs suggesting that polε plays a role in the initiation of DNA replication in Drosophila. PMID:24224125

  12. Genetic exploration of interactive domains in RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Okamura, S; Young, R

    1990-01-01

    The two large subunits of RNA polymerase II, RPB1 and RPB2, contain regions of extensive homology to the two large subunits of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These homologous regions may represent separate protein domains with unique functions. We investigated whether suppressor genetics could provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of RPB1 and RPB2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A plasmid shuffle method was used to screen thoroughly for mutations in RPB2 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, which is located in region H of RPB1. All six RPB2 mutations that suppress rpb1-1 were clustered in region I of RPB2. The location of these mutations and the observation that they were allele specific for suppression of rpb1-1 suggests an interaction between region H of RPB1 and region I of RPB2. A similar experiment was done to isolate and map mutations in RPB1 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb2-2, which occurs in region I of RPB2. These suppressor mutations were not clustered in a particular region. Thus, fine structure suppressor genetics can provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of two proteins, but the results of this type of analysis can depend on the conditional mutation to be suppressed. Images PMID:2183012

  13. Comparison of Large Subunits of Type II DNA-dependent RNA Polymerases from Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Kidd, G H; Link, G; Bogorad, L

    1979-10-01

    Two-dimensional tryptic mapping of (125)I-labeled polypeptides has been employed to compare the large subunits of type II DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from maize, parsley (Petroselinum sativum), and wheat. Maps of the 220 kilodalton (kd) and 140 kd subunits from wheat RNA polymerase II differ from those of the corresponding subunits from parsley enzyme II. The 180 kd subunits from maize and parsley type II enzymes also yield dissimilar tryptic maps. Thus, despite similarities in molecular mass, the large subunits of wheat, parsley, and maize type II RNA polymerases are unique to each individual plant species. PMID:16661032

  14. Human CLC-K Channels Require Palmitoylation of Their Accessory Subunit Barttin to Be Functional*

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Kim Vanessa; Gorinski, Nataliya; Wojciechowski, Daniel; Todorov, Vladimir; Guseva, Daria; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Fahlke, Christoph; Fischer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    CLC-K/barttin chloride channels are essential for NaCl re-absorption in Henle's loop and for potassium secretion by the stria vascularis in the inner ear. Here, we studied the posttranslational modification of such channels by palmitoylation of their accessory subunit barttin. We found that barttin is palmitoylated in vivo and in vitro and identified two conserved cysteine residues at positions 54 and 56 as palmitoylation sites. Point mutations at these two residues reduce the macroscopic current amplitudes in cells expressing CLC-K/barttin channels proportionally to the relative reduction in palmitoylated barttin. CLC-K/barttin expression, plasma membrane insertion, and single channel properties remain unaffected, indicating that these mutations decrease the number of active channels. R8W and G47R, two naturally occurring barttin mutations identified in patients with Bartter syndrome type IV, reduce barttin palmitoylation and CLC-K/barttin channel activity. Palmitoylation of the accessory subunit barttin might thus play a role in chloride channel dysfunction in certain variants of Bartter syndrome. We did not observe pronounced alteration of barttin palmitoylation upon increased salt and water intake or water deprivation, indicating that this posttranslational modification does not contribute to long term adaptation to variable water intake. Our results identify barttin palmitoylation as a novel posttranslational modification of CLC-K/barttin chloride channels. PMID:26013830

  15. A DNA polymerase alpha accessory protein, Mcl1, is required for propagation of centromere structures in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Sutani, Takashi; Dunleavy, Elaine M; Pidoux, Alison L; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Allshire, Robin C; Yamao, Fumiaki

    2008-01-01

    Specialized chromatin exists at centromeres and must be precisely transmitted during DNA replication. The mechanisms involved in the propagation of these structures remain elusive. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two chromatin domains: the central CENP-A(Cnp1) kinetochore domain and flanking heterochromatin domains. Here we show that fission yeast Mcl1, a DNA polymerase alpha (Pol alpha) accessory protein, is critical for maintenance of centromeric chromatin. In a screen for mutants that alleviate both central domain and outer repeat silencing, we isolated several cos mutants, of which cos1 is allelic to mcl1. The mcl1-101 mutation causes reduced CENP-A(Cnp1) in the central domain and an aberrant increase in histone acetylation in both domains. These phenotypes are also observed in a mutant of swi7(+), which encodes a catalytic subunit of Pol alpha. Mcl1 forms S-phase-specific nuclear foci, which colocalize with those of PCNA and Pol alpha. These results suggest that Mcl1 and Pol alpha are required for propagation of centromere chromatin structures during DNA replication. PMID:18493607

  16. A p.R369G POLG2 mutation associated with adPEO and multiple mtDNA deletions causes decreased affinity between polymerase γ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Kate; Young, Matthew J.; Blakely, Emma L.; Longley, Matthew J.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Copeland, William C.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (pol γ) is the sole enzyme required to replicate and maintain the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. It comprises two subunits, a catalytic p140 subunit and a smaller p55 accessory subunit encoded by the POLG2 gene. We describe the molecular characterization of a potential dominant POLG2 mutation (p.R369G) in a patient with adPEO and multiple mtDNA deletions. Biochemical studies of the recombinant mutant p55 protein showed a reduced affinity to the pol γ p140 subunit, leading to impaired processivity of the holoenzyme complex but did not show sensitivity to N-ethylmalaimide (NEM) inhibition, inferring a novel disease mechanism. PMID:22155748

  17. Functional diversification of maize RNA polymerase IV and V subtypes via alternative catalytic subunits.

    PubMed

    Haag, Jeremy R; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D; Norbeck, Angela D; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; McGinnis, Karen; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L; Pikaard, Craig S

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two subtypes of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:25284785

  18. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  19. Structure and sequence of the gene for the largest subunit of trypanosomal RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Köck, J; Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1988-01-01

    As the first step in the analysis of the transcription process in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, we have started to characterise the trypanosomal RNA polymerases. We have previously described the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and found that two almost identical RNA polymerase II genes are encoded within the genome of T. brucei. Here we present the identification, cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III. This gene contains a single open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight highly conserved regions with significant homology to those previously reported in other eukaryotic RNA polymerase largest subunits were identified. Some of these domains contain functional sites, which are conserved among all eukaryotic largest subunit genes analysed thus far. Since these domains make up a large part of each polypeptide, independent of the RNA polymerase class, these data strongly support the hypothesis that these domains provide a major part of the transcription machinery of the RNA polymerase complex. The additional domains which are uniquely present in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I and II, respectively, two large hydrophylic insertions and a C-terminal extension, might be a determining factor in specific transcription of the gene classes. Images PMID:3174432

  20. Subunits of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe RNA polymerase II: enzyme purification and structure of the subunit 3 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Y; Yamagishi, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the structure and function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, we purified the enzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The highly purified RNA polymerase II contained more than eleven polypeptides. The sizes of the largest the second-, and the third-largest polypeptides as measured by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were about 210, 150, and 40 kilodaltons (kDa), respectively, and are similar to those of RPB1, 2, and 3 subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II. Using the degenerated primers designed after amino acid micro-sequencing of the 40 kDa third-largest polypeptide (subunit 3), we cloned the subunit 3 gene (rpb3) and determined its DNA sequence. Taken together with the sequence of parts of PCR-amplified cDNA, the predicted coding sequence of rpb3, interrupted by two introns, was found to encode a polypeptide of 297 amino acid residues in length with a molecular weight of 34 kDa. The S. pombe subunit 3 contains four structural domains conserved for the alpha-subunit family of RNA polymerase from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A putative leucine zipper motif was found to exist in the C-terminal proximal conserved region (domain D). Possible functions of the conserved domains are discussed. Images PMID:8367291

  1. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  2. An enlarged largest subunit of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II defines conserved and variable RNA polymerase domains.

    PubMed Central

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Gu, H M; Tanaka, M; Fox, B A; Inselburg, J

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II from Plasmodium falciparum. The RPII gene is expressed in the asexual erythrocytic stages of the parasite as a 9 kb mRNA, and is present as a single copy gene located on chromosome 3. The P. falciparum RPII subunit is the largest (2452 amino acids) eukaryotic RPII subunit, and it contains enlarged variable regions that clearly separate and define five conserved regions of the eukaryotic RPII largest subunits. A distinctive carboxyl-terminal domain contains a short highly conserved heptapeptide repeat domain which is bounded on its 5' side by a highly diverged heptapeptide repeat domain, and is bounded on its 3' side by a long carboxyl-terminal extension. Images PMID:2690004

  3. An enlarged largest subunit of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II defines conserved and variable RNA polymerase domains.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Gu, H M; Tanaka, M; Fox, B A; Inselburg, J

    1989-12-11

    We have isolated the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II from Plasmodium falciparum. The RPII gene is expressed in the asexual erythrocytic stages of the parasite as a 9 kb mRNA, and is present as a single copy gene located on chromosome 3. The P. falciparum RPII subunit is the largest (2452 amino acids) eukaryotic RPII subunit, and it contains enlarged variable regions that clearly separate and define five conserved regions of the eukaryotic RPII largest subunits. A distinctive carboxyl-terminal domain contains a short highly conserved heptapeptide repeat domain which is bounded on its 5' side by a highly diverged heptapeptide repeat domain, and is bounded on its 3' side by a long carboxyl-terminal extension. PMID:2690004

  4. DNA replication defect in Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking the editing (epsilon) subunit of DNA polymerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Lifsics, M R; Lancy, E D; Maurer, R

    1992-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, dnaQ null mutants (encoding the epsilon editing subunit of DNA polymerase III [Pol III]) exhibit a severe growth defect when the genetic background is otherwise wild type. Suppression of the growth defect requires both a mutation affecting the alpha (polymerase) subunit of DNA polymerase III and adequate levels of DNA polymerase I. In the present paper, we report on studies that clarify the nature of the physiological defect imposed by the loss of epsilon and the mechanism of its suppression. Unsuppressed dnaQ mutants exhibited chronic SOS induction, indicating exposure of single-stranded DNA in vivo, most likely as gaps in double-stranded DNA. Suppression of the growth defect was associated with suppression of SOS induction. Thus, Pol I and the mutant Pol III combined to reduce the formation of single-stranded DNA or accelerate its maturation to double-stranded DNA. Studies with mutants in major DNA repair pathways supported the view that the defect in DNA metabolism in dnaQ mutants was at the level of DNA replication rather than of repair. The requirement for Pol I was satisfied by alleles of the gene for Pol I encoding polymerase activity or by rat DNA polymerase beta (which exhibits polymerase activity only). Consequently, normal growth is restored to dnaQ mutants when sufficient polymerase activity is provided and this compensatory polymerase activity can function independently of Pol III. The high level of Pol I polymerase activity may be required to satisfy the increased demand for residual DNA synthesis at regions of single-stranded DNA generated by epsilon-minus pol III. The emphasis on adequate polymerase activity in dnaQ mutants is also observed in the purified alpha subunit containing the suppressor mutation, which exhibits a modestly elevated intrinsic polymerase activity relative to that of wild-type alpha. Images PMID:1400246

  5. Versatile Roles of V-ATPases Accessory Subunit Ac45 in Osteoclast Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Jiake; Dai, Ke R.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuolar-type H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are macromolecular proton pumps that acidify intracellular cargos and deliver protons across the plasma membrane of a variety of specialized cells, including bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Extracellular acidification is crucial for osteoclastic bone resorption, a process that initiates the dissolution of mineralized bone matrix. While the importance of V-ATPases in osteoclastic resorptive function is well-defined, whether V-ATPases facilitate additional aspects of osteoclast function and/or formation remains largely obscure. Here we report that the V-ATPase accessory subunit Ac45 participates in both osteoclast formation and function. Using a siRNA-based approach, we show that targeted suppression of Ac45 impairs intracellular acidification and endocytosis, both are prerequisite for osteoclastic bone resorptive function in vitro. Interestingly, we find that knockdown of Ac45 also attenuates osteoclastogenesis owing to a reduced fusion capacity of osteoclastic precursor cells. Finally, in an effort to gain more detailed insights into the functional role of Ac45 in osteoclasts, we attempted to generate osteoclast-specific Ac45 conditional knockout mice using a Cathepsin K-Cre-LoxP system. Surprisingly, however, insertion of the neomycin cassette in the Ac45-FloxNeo mice resulted in marked disturbances in CNS development and ensuing embryonic lethality thus precluding functional assessment of Ac45 in osteoclasts and peripheral bone tissues. Based on these unexpected findings we propose that, in addition to its canonical function in V-ATPase-mediated acidification, Ac45 plays versatile roles during osteoclast formation and function. PMID:22087256

  6. The POLD3 subunit of DNA polymerase δ can promote translesion synthesis independently of DNA polymerase ζ.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kouji; Yoshikiyo, Kazunori; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Murai, Junko; Tsuda, Masataka; Phillips, Lara G; Narita, Takeo; Nishihara, Kana; Kobayashi, Kaori; Yamada, Kouich; Nakamura, Jun; Pommier, Yves; Lehmann, Alan; Sale, Julian E; Takeda, Shunichi

    2015-02-18

    The replicative DNA polymerase Polδ consists of a catalytic subunit POLD1/p125 and three regulatory subunits POLD2/p50, POLD3/p66 and POLD4/p12. The ortholog of POLD3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pol32, is required for a significant proportion of spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis through its additional role in translesion synthesis (TLS) as a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ. Remarkably, chicken DT40 B lymphocytes deficient in POLD3 are viable and able to replicate undamaged genomic DNA with normal kinetics. Like its counterpart in yeast, POLD3 is required for fully effective TLS, its loss resulting in hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents, a diminished ability to maintain replication fork progression after UV irradiation and a significant decrease in abasic site-induced mutagenesis in the immunoglobulin loci. However, these defects appear to be largely independent of Polζ, suggesting that POLD3 makes a significant contribution to TLS independently of Polζ in DT40 cells. Indeed, combining polη, polζ and pold3 mutations results in synthetic lethality. Additionally, we show in vitro that POLD3 promotes extension beyond an abasic by the Polδ holoenzyme suggesting that while POLD3 is not required for normal replication, it may help Polδ to complete abasic site bypass independently of canonical TLS polymerases. PMID:25628356

  7. Properties, expression and potential roles of cardiac K+ channel accessory subunits: MinK, MiRPs, KChIP, and KChAP.

    PubMed

    Pourrier, M; Schram, G; Nattel, S

    2003-08-01

    Over the past 10 years, cDNAs encoding a wide range of pore-forming K(+)-channel alpha-subunits have been cloned and found to result in currents with many properties of endogenous cardiac K(+) channels upon homomeric expression in heterologous systems. However, a variety of remaining discrepancies have led to a search for other subunits that might be involved in the formation of native channels. Over the past few years, a series of accessory subunits has been discovered that modify current properties upon coexpression with alpha-subunits. One of these, the minimal K(+)-channel subunit minK, is essential for formation of the cardiac slow delayed-rectifier K(+) current, I(Ks), and may also interact in functionally important ways with other alpha-subunits. Another, the K(+)-channel interacting protein KChIP appears critical in formation of native transient outward current (I(to)) channels. The roles of 2 other accessory subunits, the minK-related peptide MiRP and the K(+)-channel accessory protein, KChAP, remain unclear. This article reviews the available knowledge regarding the accessory subunits minK, MiRP, KChIP and KChAP, dealing with their structure, effects on currents carried by coexpressed alpha-subunits, expression in cardiac tissues and potential physiological function. On the basis of the available information, we attempt to assess the potential involvement of these accessory K(+)-channel subunits in cardiac pathophysiology and in developing new therapeutic approaches. PMID:14502427

  8. Evolutionary connection between the catalytic subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases and eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and the origin of RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) is involved in the amplification of regulatory microRNAs during post-transcriptional gene silencing. This enzyme is highly conserved in most eukaryotes but is missing in archaea and bacteria. No evolutionary relationship between RDRP and other polymerases has been reported so far, hence the origin of this eukaryote-specific polymerase remains a mystery. Results Using extensive sequence profile searches, we identified bacteriophage homologs of the eukaryotic RDRP. The comparison of the eukaryotic RDRP and their homologs from bacteriophages led to the delineation of the conserved portion of these enzymes, which is predicted to harbor the catalytic site. Further, detailed sequence comparison, aided by examination of the crystal structure of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (DDRP), showed that the RDRP and the β' subunit of DDRP (and its orthologs in archaea and eukaryotes) contain a conserved double-psi β-barrel (DPBB) domain. This DPBB domain contains the signature motif DbDGD (b is a bulky residue), which is conserved in all RDRPs and DDRPs and contributes to catalysis via a coordinated divalent cation. Apart from the DPBB domain, no similarity was detected between RDRP and DDRP, which leaves open two scenarios for the origin of RDRP: i) RDRP evolved at the onset of the evolution of eukaryotes via a duplication of the DDRP β' subunit followed by dramatic divergence that obliterated the sequence similarity outside the core catalytic domain and ii) the primordial RDRP, which consisted primarily of the DPBB domain, evolved from a common ancestor with the DDRP at a very early stage of evolution, during the RNA world era. The latter hypothesis implies that RDRP had been subsequently eliminated from cellular life forms and might have been reintroduced into the eukaryotic genomes through a bacteriophage. Sequence and structure analysis of the DDRP led to further insights into the evolution of RNA polymerases

  9. A mutation in the C31 subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase III affects transcription initiation.

    PubMed Central

    Thuillier, V; Stettler, S; Sentenac, A; Thuriaux, P; Werner, M

    1995-01-01

    The C31 subunit belongs to a complex of three subunits (C31, C34 and C82) specific to RNA polymerase (pol) III that have no counterparts in other RNA polymerases. This complex is thought to play a role in transcription initiation since it interacts with the general initiation factor TFIIIB via subunit C34. We have obtained a conditional mutation of pol III by partially deleting the acidic C-terminus of the C31 subunit. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying this truncated C31 subunit is impaired in in vivo transcription of tRNAs and failed to grow at 37 degrees C. This conditional growth phenotype was suppressed by overexpression of the gene coding for the largest subunit of pol III (C160), suggesting an interaction between C160 and C31. The mutant pol III enzyme transcribed non-specific templates at wild-type rates in vitro, but was impaired in its capacity to transcribe tRNA genes in the presence of general initiation factors. Transcription initiation, but not termination or recycling of the enzyme, was affected in the mutant, suggesting that it could be altered on interaction with initiation factors or on the formation of the open complex. Interestingly, the C-terminal deletion was also suppressed by a high gene dosage of the DED1 gene encoding a putative helicase. Images PMID:7835345

  10. Active RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei Harbors a Novel Subunit Essential for Transcription▿

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tu N.; Schimanski, Bernd; Günzl, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    A unique characteristic of the protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is a multifunctional RNA polymerase I which, in addition to synthesizing rRNA as in other eukaryotes, transcribes gene units encoding the major cell surface antigens variant surface glycoprotein and procyclin. Thus far, purification of this enzyme has revealed nine orthologues of known subunits but no active enzyme. Here, we have epitope tagged the specific subunit RPB6z and tandem affinity purified RNA polymerase I from crude extract. The purified enzyme was active in both a nonspecific and a promoter-dependent transcription assay and exhibited enriched protein bands with apparent sizes of 31, 29, and 27 kDa. p31 and its trypanosomatid orthologues were identified, but their amino acid sequences have no similarity to proteins of other eukaryotes, nor do they contain a conserved sequence motif. Nevertheless, p31 cosedimented with purified RNA polymerase I, and RNA interferance-mediated silencing of p31 was lethal, affecting the abundance of rRNA. Moreover, extract of p31-silenced cells exhibited a specific defect in transcription of class I templates, which was remedied by the addition of purified RNA polymerase I, and an anti-p31 serum completely blocked RNA polymerase I-mediated transcription. We therefore dubbed this novel functional component of T. brucei RNA polymerase I TbRPA31. PMID:17606628

  11. Identification of subunits of gonococcal RNA polymerase by immunoblot analysis: evidence for multiple sigma factors.

    PubMed Central

    Klimpel, K W; Lesley, S A; Clark, V L

    1989-01-01

    Heparin-agarose and single-stranded DNA-cellulose chromatography were used to purify RNA polymerase 25-fold from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and the activity of the polymerase was characterized in altered assay systems. The core subunits (beta, beta', and alpha) were tentatively identified as major proteins copurifying with polymerase activity. The identification of the core subunits was confirmed by Western (immunoblot) analysis with polyclonal antisera to Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase. Gonococcal sigma factor heterogeneity was examined by Western blot analysis with polyclonal antiserum to the major E. coli sigma factor, sigma 70, to the E. coli heat shock sigma factor, sigma 32, and with a monoclonal antiserum to Salmonella typhimurium NtrA (sigma 54). Purified RNA polymerase and whole-cell extracts from type 1, type 4, heat-shocked, and anaerobically grown gonococci were examined. Four putative gonococcal sigma factors were detected in purified RNA polymerase preparations and in whole-cell extracts from all cell types. Two of these bands appeared as a doublet, which had an estimated Mr of 80,000. A single lower-Mr band, estimated to be 40,000, was also present. All three of these bands reacted with antisera to E. coli sigma 70 and to E. coli sigma 32. A fourth gonococcal protein reacted solely with a highly specific monoclonal antibody to sigma 54 and had an Mr of 90,000. We conclude that N. gonorrhoeae may contain multiple sigma factors, which it may use to regulate gene expression. Images PMID:2472377

  12. RNA polymerase mutations that facilitate replication progression in the rep uvrD recF mutant lacking two accessory replicative helicases.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Lestini, Roxane; Duigou, Stéphane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2010-07-01

    We observed that cells lacking Rep and UvrD, two replication accessory helicases, and the recombination protein RecF are cryo-sensitive on rich medium. We isolated five mutations that suppress this Luria-Bertani (LB)-cryo-sensitivity and show that they map in the genes encoding the RNA polymerase subunits RpoB and RpoC. These rpoB (D444G, H447R and N518D) and rpoC mutants (H113R and P451L) were characterized. rpoB(H447R) and rpoB(D444G) prevent activation of the Prrn core promoter in rich medium, but only rpoB(H447R) also suppresses the auxotrophy of a relA spoT mutant (stringent-like phenotype). rpoC(H113R) suppresses the thermo-sensitivity of a greA greB mutant, suggesting that it destabilizes stalled elongation complexes. All mutations but rpoC(P451L) prevent R-loop formation. We propose that these rpo mutations allow replication in the absence of Rep and UvrD by destabilizing RNA Pol upon replication-transcription collisions. In a RecF(+) context, they improve growth of rep uvrD cells only if DinG is present, supporting the hypothesis that Rep, UvrD and DinG facilitate progression of the replication fork across transcribed sequences. They rescue rep uvrD dinG recF cells, indicating that in a recF mutant replication forks arrested by unstable transcription complexes can restart without any of the three known replication accessory helicases Rep, UvrD and DinG. PMID:20497334

  13. Individual IKs channels at the surface of mammalian cells contain two KCNE1 accessory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Xiong, Dazhi; Dai, Hui; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2014-01-01

    KCNE1 (E1) β-subunits assemble with KCNQ1 (Q1) voltage-gated K+ channel α-subunits to form IKslow (IKs) channels in the heart and ear. The number of E1 subunits in IKs channels has been an issue of ongoing debate. Here, we use single-molecule spectroscopy to demonstrate that surface IKs channels with human subunits contain two E1 and four Q1 subunits. This stoichiometry does not vary. Thus, IKs channels in cells with elevated levels of E1 carry no more than two E1 subunits. Cells with low levels of E1 produce IKs channels with two E1 subunits and Q1 channels with no E1 subunits—channels with one E1 do not appear to form or are restricted from surface expression. The plethora of models of cardiac function, transgenic animals, and drug screens based on variable E1 stoichiometry do not reflect physiology. PMID:24591645

  14. The influenza A virus PB2 polymerase subunit is required for the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Perales, B; Ortín, J

    1997-01-01

    The transcription and replication of influenza virus RNA (vRNA) were reconstituted in vivo. The experimental approach involved the transfection of plasmids encoding the viral subunits of the polymerase and the nucleoprotein into cells infected with a vaccinia virus recombinant virus expressing the T7 RNA polymerase. As templates, one of two model RNAs was transfected: vNSZ or cNSZ RNA. The RNAs were 240 nucleotides in length, contained the terminal sequences of the NS viral segment, and were of negative or positive polarity, respectively. The accumulation of cRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with vNSZ RNA and the accumulation of vRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with cNSZ RNA were determined by RNase protection assays with labeled vNSZ-L or cNSZ-L probes. The patterns of protected bands obtained indicated that both cRNA replication intermediate and mRNA accumulated when the system was reconstituted with vNSZ RNA. Likewise, both vRNA and mRNA accumulated after reconstitution with cNSZ RNA. The reconstitution of incomplete systems in which any of the subunits of the polymerase or the model RNA were omitted was completely negative for the accumulation of cRNA or vRNA, indicating that the presence of the PB2 subunit in the polymerase is required for replication of vRNA. PMID:8995663

  15. Phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit during Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Bellier, S; Dubois, M F; Nishida, E; Almouzni, G; Bensaude, O

    1997-01-01

    Xenopus laevis oogenesis is characterized by an active transcription which ceases abruptly upon maturation. To survey changes in the characteristics of the transcriptional machinery which might contribute to this transcriptional arrest, the phosphorylation status of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPB1 subunit) was analyzed during oocyte maturation. We found that the RPB1 subunit accumulates in large quantities from previtellogenic early diplotene oocytes up to fully grown oocytes. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RPB1 subunit was essentially hypophosphorylated in growing oocytes from Dumont stage IV to stage VI. Upon maturation, the proportion of hyperphosphorylated RPB1 subunits increased dramatically and abruptly. The hyperphosphorylated RPB1 subunits were dephosphorylated within 1 h after fertilization or heat shock of the matured oocytes. Extracts from metaphase II-arrested oocytes showed a much stronger CTD kinase activity than extracts from prophase stage VI oocytes. Most of this kinase activity was attributed to the activated Xp42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, a MAP kinase of the ERK type. Making use of artificial maturation of the stage VI oocyte through microinjection of a recombinant stable cyclin B1, we observed a parallel activation of Xp42 MAP kinase and phosphorylation of RPB1. Both events required protein synthesis, which demonstrated that activation of p34(cdc2)off kinase was insufficient to phosphorylate RPB1 ex vivo and was consistent with a contribution of the Xp42 MAP kinase to RPB1 subunit phosphorylation. These results further support the possibility that the largest RNA polymerase II subunit is a substrate of the ERK-type MAP kinases during oocyte maturation, as previously proposed during stress or growth factor stimulation of mammalian cells. PMID:9032270

  16. Functional Consequences of Subunit Diversity in RNA Polymerases II and V

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Ek Han; Blevins, Todd; Ream, Thomas S.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-03-01

    Multisubunit RNA polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and Pol V) evolved as specialized forms of Pol II that mediate RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and transcriptional silencing of transposons, viruses, and endogenous repeats in plants. Among the subunits common to Arabidopsis thaliana Pols II, IV, and V are 93% identical alternative ninth subunits, NRP(B/D/E)9a and NRP(B/D/E)9b. The 9a and 9b subunit variants are incompletely redundant with respect to Pol II; whereas double mutants are embryo lethal, single mutants are viable, yet phenotypically distinct. Likewise, 9a or 9b can associate with Pols IV or V but RNA-directed DNA methylation is impaired only in 9b mutants. Based on genetic and molecular tests, we attribute the defect in RdDM to impaired Pol V function. Collectively, our results reveal a role for the ninth subunit in RNA silencing and demonstrate that subunit diversity generates functionally distinct subtypes of RNA polymerases II and V.

  17. ε, a New Subunit of RNA Polymerase Found in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andrew N.; Yang, Xiao; Wiedermannová, Jana; Delumeau, Olivier; Krásný, Libor

    2014-01-01

    RNA polymerase in bacteria is a multisubunit protein complex that is essential for gene expression. We have identified a new subunit of RNA polymerase present in the high-A+T Firmicutes phylum of Gram-positive bacteria and have named it ε. Previously ε had been identified as a small protein (ω1) that copurified with RNA polymerase. We have solved the structure of ε by X-ray crystallography and show that it is not an ω subunit. Rather, ε bears remarkable similarity to the Gp2 family of phage proteins involved in the inhibition of host cell transcription following infection. Deletion of ε shows no phenotype and has no effect on the transcriptional profile of the cell. Determination of the location of ε within the assembly of RNA polymerase core by single-particle analysis suggests that it binds toward the downstream side of the DNA binding cleft. Due to the structural similarity of ε with Gp2 and the fact they bind similar regions of RNA polymerase, we hypothesize that ε may serve a role in protection from phage infection. PMID:25092033

  18. Roles of POLD4, smallest subunit of DNA polymerase {delta}, in nuclear structures and genomic stability of human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qin Miao; Akashi, Tomohiro; Masuda, Yuji; Kamiya, Kenji; Takahashi, Takashi; Suzuki, Motoshi

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian DNA polymerase {delta} (pol {delta}) is essential for DNA replication, though the functions of this smallest subunit of POLD4 have been elusive. We investigated pol {delta} activities in vitro and found that it was less active in the absence of POLD4, irrespective of the presence of the accessory protein PCNA. shRNA-mediated reduction of POLD4 resulted in a marked decrease in colony formation activity by Calu6, ACC-LC-319, and PC-10 cells. We also found that POLD4 reduction was associated with an increased population of karyomere-like cells, which may be an indication of DNA replication stress and/or DNA damage. The karyomere-like cells retained an ability to progress through the cell cycle, suggesting that POLD4 reduction induces modest genomic instability, while allowing cells to grow until DNA damage reaches an intolerant level. Our results indicate that POLD4 is required for the in vitro pol {delta} activity, and that it functions in cell proliferation and maintenance of genomic stability of human cells.

  19. In vivo degradation of RNA polymerase II largest subunit triggered by alpha-amanitin.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, V T; Giannoni, F; Dubois, M F; Seo, S J; Vigneron, M; Kédinger, C; Bensaude, O

    1996-01-01

    Alpha-Amanitin is a well-known specific inhibitor of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in vitro and in vivo. It is a cyclic octapeptide which binds with high affinity to the largest subunit of RNAPII, RPB1. We have found that in murine fibroblasts exposure to alpha-amanitin triggered degradation of the RPB1 subunit, while other RNAPII subunits, RPB5 and RPB8, remained almost unaffected. Transcriptional inhibition in alpha-amanitin-treated cells was slow and closely followed the disappearance of RPB1. The degradation rate of RPB1 was alpha-amanitin dose dependent and was not a consequence of transcriptional arrest. Alpha-Amanitin-promoted degradation of RPB1 was prevented in cells exposed to actinomycin D, another transcriptional inhibitor. Epitope-tagged recombinant human RPB1 subunits were expressed in mouse fibroblasts. In cells exposed to alpha-amanitin the wild-type recombinant subunit was degraded like the endogenous protein, but a mutated alpha-amanitin-resistant subunit remained unaffected. Hence, alpha-amanitin did not activate a proteolytic system, but instead its binding to mRPB1 likely represented a signal for degradation. Thus, in contrast to other inhibitors, such as actinomycin D or 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole, which reversibly act on transcription, inhibition by alpha-amanitin cannot be but an irreversible process because of the destruction of RNAPII. PMID:8760875

  20. Cloning DPB3, the gene encoding the third subunit of DNA polymerase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Araki, H; Hamatake, R K; Morrison, A; Johnson, A L; Johnston, L H; Sugino, A

    1991-01-01

    DNA polymerase II purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of greater than 200, 80, 34, 30 and 29 kDa, the two largest of which (subunits A and B) are encoded by the essential genes POL2 and DPB2. By probing a lambda gt11 expression library of yeast DNA with antiserum against DNA polymerase II, we isolated a single gene, DPB3, that encodes both the 34- and 30-kDa polypeptides (subunit C and C'). The nucleotide sequence of DPB3 contained an open reading frame encoding a 23-kDa protein, significantly smaller than the observed molecular masses, 34- or 30-kDa, which might represent post-translationally modified forms of the DPB3 product. The predicted amino acid sequence contained a possible NTP-binding motif and a glutamate-rich region. NTP-binding motif and a glutamate-rich region. A dpb3 deletion mutant (dpb3 delta) was viable and yielded a DNA polymerase II lacking the 34- and 30-kDa polypeptides. dpb3 delta strains exhibited an increased spontaneous mutation rate, suggesting that the DPB3 product is required to maintain fidelity of chromosomal replication. Since a fifth, 29-kDa polypeptide was present in DNA polymerase II preparations from wild-type cell extracts throughout purification, the subunit composition appears to be A, B, C (or C and C') and D. The 5' nontranscribed region of DPB3 contained the MulI-related sequence ACGCGA, while the 0.9-kb DPB3 transcript accumulated periodically during the cell cycle and peaked at the G1/S boundary. The level of DPB3 transcript thus appears to be under the same cell cycle control as those of POL2, DPB2 and other DNA replication genes. DPB3 was mapped to chromosome II, 30 cM distal to his7. Images PMID:1923754

  1. Characterization of the gene encoding the largest subunit of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Tanaka, M; Gu, H M; Fox, B A; Inselburg, J

    1991-06-01

    We report here the isolation, sequence analysis, structure, and expression of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III (RPIII) from Plasmodium falciparum. The P. falciparum RPIII gene consists of 5 exons and 4 introns, is expressed in all of the asexual erythrocytic stages of the parasite as a 8.5-kb mRNA, and is present in a single copy on chromosome 13. The predicted 2339 amino acid residue RPIII subunit contained 5 regions that were conserved between different eukaryotic RPIII subunits, and 4 variable regions that separated the conserved regions. Three of the variable regions were greatly enlarged in comparison to the corresponding variable regions in other RPIII subunits. Variable region C' represented nearly one-third of the P. falciparum RPIII subunit (750 amino acid residues), included a unique repeated decapeptide sequence, and had some homology with yeast DNA topoisomerase II. Noteworthy amino acid sequences and structures were identified in both the conserved regions and in the enlarged variable regions, and their possible role(s) as domains that regulate RPIII enzyme activity is discussed. PMID:1656254

  2. Mitochondrial DNA polymerase from embryos of Drosophila melanogaster: purification, subunit structure, and partial characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wernette, C.M.; Kaguni, L.S.

    1986-11-05

    The mitochondrial DNA polymerase has been purified to near-homogeneity from early embryos of Drosophila melanogaster. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the highly purified enzyme reveals two polypeptides with molecular masses of 125,000 and 35,000 daltons, in a ratio of 1:1. The enzyme has a sedimentation coefficient of 7.6 S and a stokes radius of 51 A. Taken together, the data suggest that the D. melanogaster DNA polymerase ..gamma.. is a heterodimer. DNA polymerase activity gel analysis has allowed the assignment of the DNA polymerization function to the large subunit. The DNA polymerase exhibits a remarkable ability to utilize efficiently a variety of template-primers including gapped DNA, poly(rA).oligo(dT) and singly primed phiX174 DNA. Both the crude and the highly purified enzymes are stimulated by KCl, and inhibited by dideoxythymidine triphosphate and by N-ethylmaleimide. Thus, the catalytic properties of the near-homogeneous Drosophila enzyme are consistent with those of DNA polymerase ..gamma.. as partially purified from several vertebrates.

  3. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-González, Samuel; Birktoft, Jens J.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2010-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dimethyllysine derivative of the E. coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The α subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli αCTD (α subunit residues 245–329) determined to 2.0 Å resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R{sub free} = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the αCTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995 ▶), Science, 270, 1495–1497; Benoff et al. (2002 ▶), Science, 297, 1562–1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of αCTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallography and electron-microscopy reconstruction.

  4. Cloning, soluble expression, and purification of the RNA polymerase II subunit RPB5 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Gaurav; Ghosh, Arabinda; Chinta, Ramesh; Akhtar, Sohail; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning, expression, and single-step homogeneous purification of RNA polymerase II subunit RPB5 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. RPB5 is a 210 amino acid nuclear protein that functions as the fifth largest subunit of polymerase II and plays a central role in transcription. The gene that codes for RPB5 was generated by amplification by polymerase chain reaction. It was then inserted in the expression vector pET28a(+) under the transcriptional control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter and lac operator. BL21(DE3) Escherichia coli strain transformed with the rpb5 expression vector pET28a(+)-rpb5 accumulates large amounts of a soluble protein of about 30 kDa (25 kDa plus 5 kDa double His6-Tag at N and C-terminal). The protein was purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. RPB5 recombinant protein was further confirmed by immunoblotting with anti-His antibody. In this study, the expression and purification procedures have provided a simple and efficient method to obtain pure RPB5 in large quantities. This will provide an opportunity to study the role of S. cerevisiae RPB5 in gene expression and transcription regulation. Furthermore, it can provide additional knowledge of the interaction partners of RPB5 during various steps of transcription and gene expression. PMID:25551420

  5. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  6. CBR antimicrobials alter coupling between the bridge helix and the β subunit in RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Malinen, Anssi M.; NandyMazumdar, Monali; Turtola, Matti; Malmi, Henri; Grocholski, Thadee; Artsimovitch, Irina; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a validated target for antibacterial drugs. CBR703 series antimicrobials allosterically inhibit transcription by binding to a conserved α helix (β′ bridge helix, BH) that interconnects the two largest RNAP subunits. Here we show that disruption of the BH-β subunit contacts by amino-acid substitutions invariably results in accelerated catalysis, slowed-down forward translocation and insensitivity to regulatory pauses. CBR703 partially reverses these effects in CBR-resistant RNAPs while inhibiting catalysis and promoting pausing in CBR-sensitive RNAPs. The differential response of variant RNAPs to CBR703 suggests that the inhibitor binds in a cavity walled by the BH, the β′ F-loop and the β fork loop. Collectively, our data are consistent with a model in which the β subunit fine tunes RNAP elongation activities by altering the BH conformation, whereas CBRs deregulate transcription by increasing coupling between the BH and the β subunit. PMID:24598909

  7. The δ Subunit of RNA Polymerase Guides Promoter Selectivity and Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Andy; Ibarra, J. Antonio; Paoletti, Jessica; Carroll, Ronan K.

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, and particularly the Firmicutes, the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) complex contains an additional subunit, termed the δ factor, or RpoE. This enigmatic protein has been studied for more than 30 years for various organisms, but its function is still not well understood. In this study, we investigated its role in the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. We showed conservation of important structural regions of RpoE in S. aureus and other species and demonstrated binding to core RNAP that is mediated by the β and/or β′ subunits. To identify the impact of the δ subunit on transcription, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis and observed 191 differentially expressed genes in the rpoE mutant. Ontological analysis revealed, quite strikingly, that many of the downregulated genes were known virulence factors, while several mobile genetic elements (SaPI5 and prophage ϕSA3usa) were strongly upregulated. Phenotypically, the rpoE mutant had decreased accumulation and/or activity of a number of key virulence factors, including alpha toxin, secreted proteases, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). We further observed significantly decreased survival of the mutant in whole human blood, increased phagocytosis by human leukocytes, and impaired virulence in a murine model of infection. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the δ subunit of RNAP is a critical component of the S. aureus transcription machinery and plays an important role during infection. PMID:24491578

  8. Stable interactions between DNA polymerase δ catalytic and structural subunits are essential for efficient DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Brocas, Clémentine; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Dhérin, Claudine; Gangloff, Serge; Maloisel, Laurent

    2010-10-01

    Eukaryotic DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) activity is crucial for chromosome replication and DNA repair and thus, plays an essential role in genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pol δ is a heterotrimeric complex composed of the catalytic subunit Pol3, the structural B subunit Pol31, and Pol32, an additional auxiliary subunit. Pol3 interacts with Pol31 thanks to its C-terminal domain (CTD) and this interaction is of functional importance both in DNA replication and DNA repair. Interestingly, deletion of the last four C-terminal Pol3 residues, LSKW, in the pol3-ct mutant does not affect DNA replication but leads to defects in homologous recombination and in break-induced replication (BIR) repair pathways. The defect associated with pol3-ct could result from a defective interaction between Pol δ and a protein involved in recombination. However, we show that the LSKW motif is required for the interaction between Pol3 C-terminal end and Pol31. This loss of interaction is relevant in vivo since we found that pol3-ct confers HU sensitivity on its own and synthetic lethality with a POL32 deletion. Moreover, pol3-ct shows genetic interactions, both suppression and synthetic lethality, with POL31 mutant alleles. Structural analyses indicate that the B subunit of Pol δ displays a major conserved region at its surface and that pol31 alleles interacting with pol3-ct, correspond to substitutions of Pol31 amino acids that are situated in this particular region. Superimposition of our Pol31 model on the 3D architecture of the phylogenetically related DNA polymerase α (Pol α) suggests that Pol3 CTD interacts with the conserved region of Pol31, thus providing a molecular basis to understand the defects associated with pol3-ct. Taken together, our data highlight a stringent dependence on Pol δ complex stability in DNA repair. PMID:20813592

  9. MiRP3 acts as an accessory subunit with the BK potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Daniel I.; Wanderling, Sherry; Biemesderfer, Daniel; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2008-01-01

    MinK-related peptides (MiRPs) are single-span membrane proteins that assemble with specific voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel α-subunits to establish gating kinetics, unitary conductance, expression level, and pharmacology of the mixed complex. MiRP3 (encoded by the KCNE4 gene) has been shown to alter the behavior of some Kv α-subunits in vitro but its natural partners and physiologic functions are unknown. Seeking in vivo partners for MiRP3, immunohistochemistry was used to localize its expression to a unique subcellular site, the apical membrane of renal intercalated cells, where one potassium channel type has been recorded, the calcium- and voltage-gated channel BK. Overlapping staining of these two proteins was found in rabbit intercalated cells, and MiRP3 and BK subunits expressed in tissue culture cells were found to form detergent-stable complexes. Electrophysiologic and biochemical evaluation showed MiRP3 to act on BK to reduce current density in two fashions: shifting the current-voltage relationship to more depolarized voltages in a calcium-dependent fashion (∼10 mV at normal intracellular calcium levels) and accelerating degradation of MiRP3-BK complexes. The findings suggest a role for MiRP3 modulation of BK-dependent urinary potassium excretion. PMID:18463315

  10. The RNA polymerase II 15-kilodalton subunit is essential for viability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, D A; Mortin, M A; Corces, V G

    1992-01-01

    A small, divergently transcribed gene is located 500 bp upstream of the suppressor of Hairy-wing locus of Drosophila melanogaster. Sequencing of a full-length cDNA clone of the predominant 850-nucleotide transcript reveals that this gene encodes a 15,100-Da protein with high homology to a subunit of RNA polymerase II. The RpII15 protein is 46% identical to the RPB9 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the smallest subunits of RNA polymerase II from that species. Among those identical residues are four pairs of cysteines whose spacing is suggestive of two metal-binding "finger" domains. The gene is expressed at all developmental stages and in all tissues. Two deletions within the RpII15 gene are multiphasic lethal deletions, with accumulation of dead animals commencing at the second larval instar. Ovary transplantation experiments indicate that survival of mutant animals to this stage is due to the persistence of maternal gene product throughout embryogenesis and early larval development. The RpII15 gene product is thus necessary for viability of D. melanogaster. Images PMID:1545824

  11. Identification of a nucleic acid-binding region within the largest subunit of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kontermann, R. E.; Kobor, M.; Bautz, E. K.

    1993-01-01

    The largest and the second-largest subunit of the multisubunit eukaryotic RNA polymerases are involved in interaction with the DNA template and the nascent RNA chain. Using Southwestern DNA-binding techniques and nitrocellulose filter binding assays of bacterially expressed fusion proteins, we have identified a region of the largest, 215-kDa, subunit of Drosophila RNA polymerase II that has the potential to bind nucleic acids nonspecifically. This nucleic acid-binding region is located between amino acid residues 309-384 and is highly conserved within the largest subunits of eukaryotic and bacterial RNA polymerases. A homology to a region of the DNA-binding cleft of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I involved in binding of the newly synthesized DNA duplex provides indirect evidence that the nucleic acid-binding region of the largest subunit participates in interaction with double-stranded nucleic acids during transcription. The nonspecific DNA-binding behavior of the region is similar to that observed for the native enzyme in nitrocellulose filter binding assays and that of the separated largest subunit in Southwestern assays. A high content of basic amino acid residues is consistent with the electrostatic nature of nonspecific DNA binding by RNA polymerases. PMID:8443600

  12. Diverse gene-silencing mechanisms with distinct requirements for RNA polymerase subunits in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Amy E; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; McGinnis, Karen M

    2014-11-01

    In Zea mays, transcriptional regulation of the b1 (booster1) gene requires a distal enhancer and MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1), MOP2, and MOP3 proteins orthologous to Arabidopsis components of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway. We compared the genetic requirements for MOP1, MOP2, and MOP3 for endogenous gene silencing by two hairpin transgenes with inverted repeats of the a1 (anthocyaninless1) gene promoter (a1pIR) and the b1 gene enhancer (b1IR), respectively. The a1pIR transgene induced silencing of endogenous A1 in mop1-1 and mop3-1, but not in Mop2-1 homozygous plants. This finding suggests that transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) circumvented the requirement for MOP1, a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and MOP3, the predicted largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV). Because the Arabidopsis protein orthologous to MOP2 is the second largest subunit of Pol IV and V, our results may indicate that hairpin-induced siRNAs cannot bypass the requirement for the predicted scaffolding activity of Pol V. In contrast to a1pIR, the b1IR transgene silenced endogenous B1 in all three homozygous mutant genotypes--mop1-1, Mop2-1, and mop3-1--suggesting that transgene mediated b1 silencing did not involve MOP2-containing Pol V complexes. Based on the combined results for a1, b1, and three previously described loci, we propose a speculative hypothesis of locus-specific deployment of Pol II, MOP2-containing Pol V, or alternative versions of Pol V with second largest subunits other than MOP2 to explain the mechanistic differences in silencing at specific loci, including one example associated with paramutation. PMID:25164883

  13. Structural requirements for the interdomain linker of alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Fujita, N; Endo, S; Ishihama, A

    2000-05-23

    The carboxy-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, which is connected with the core part of RNA polymerase through a long flexible linker, plays decisive roles in transcription activation by directly interacting with a large number of transcription factors and upstream (UP) element DNA. Here we constructed a set of mutant RNA polymerases, each containing a mutant alpha subunit with an altered interdomain linker. Deletion of three amino acids from the linker exhibited 50% inhibition of cAMP receptor protein- (CRP-) dependent lac P1 transcription. Deletion of six amino acids completely knocked out the activity. Insertion of three amino acids did not affect the activity, whereas 40-60% inhibition was observed after insertion of one, two, or four amino acids. Substitution of 10 consecutive glycine residues resulted in nearly 90% reduction of the CRP-dependent activity, whereas 50% activity was retained after substitution of 10 proline residues or a sequence expected to form a strong alpha-helix. Essentially the same results were obtained with UP element-dependent rrnB P1 transcription. These observations altogether suggest that (i) sufficient length of the interdomain linker is required for transcription activation mediated by the alpha carboxy-terminal domain, (ii) the linker is not totally unstructured but has structural and torsional preferences to facilitate positioning of the carboxy-terminal domain to a proper location for the interaction with CRP and UP element, and (iii) CRP-dependent activation and UP element-dependent activation share a common intermediary state in which the positioning of the alpha carboxy-terminal domain is of primary importance. PMID:10821700

  14. Antimutator Mutations in the α Subunit of Escherichia Coli DNA Polymerase III: Identification of the Responsible Mutations and Alignment with Other DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Fijalkowska, I. J.; Schaaper, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The dnaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the DNA polymerasesubunit) of the main replicative enzyme, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. We have previously identified this gene as the site of a series of seven antimutator mutations that specifically decrease the level of DNA replication errors. Here we report the nucleotide sequence changes in each of the different antimutator dnaE alleles. For each a single, but different, amino acid substitution was found among the 1,160 amino acids of the protein. The observed substitutions are generally nonconservative. All affected residues are located in the central one-third of the protein. Some insight into the function of the regions of polymerase III containing the affected residues was obtained by amino acid alignment with other DNA polymerases. We followed the principles developed in 1990 by M. Delarue et al. who have identified in DNA polymerases from a large number of prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources three highly conserved sequence motifs, which are suggested to contain components of the polymerase active site. We succeeded in finding these three conserved motifs in polymerase III as well. However, none of the amino acid substitutions responsible for the antimutator phenotype occurred at these sites. This and other observations suggest that the effect of these mutations may be exerted indirectly through effects on polymerase conformation and/or DNA/polymerase interactions. PMID:8375647

  15. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jixiang; Xie, Shaojun; Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  16. Suppressor analysis of temperature-sensitive mutations of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a suppressor gene encodes the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, R; Nomura, M

    1991-01-01

    The SRP3-1 mutation is an allele-specific suppressor of temperature-sensitive mutations in the largest subunit (A190) of RNA polymerase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two mutations known to be suppressed by SRP3-1 are in the putative zinc-binding domain of A190. We have cloned the SRP3 gene by using its suppressor activity and determined its complete nucleotide sequence. We conclude from the following evidence that the SRP3 gene encodes the second-largest subunit (A135) of RNA polymerase I. First, the deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product contains several regions with high homology to the corresponding regions of the second-largest subunits of RNA polymerases of various origins, including those of RNA polymerase II and III from S. cerevisiae. Second, the deduced amino acid sequence contains known amino acid sequences of two tryptic peptides from the A135 subunit of RNA polymerase I purified from S. cerevisiae. Finally, a strain was constructed in which transcription of the SRP3 gene was controlled by the inducible GAL7 promoter. When this strain, which can grow on galactose but not on glucose, was shifted from galactose medium to glucose medium, a large decrease in the cellular concentration of A135 was observed by Western blot analysis. We have also identified the specific amino acid alteration responsible for suppression by SRP3-1 and found that it is located within the putative zinc-binding domain conserved among the second-largest subunits of eucaryotic RNA polymerases. From these results, it is suggested that this putative zinc-binding domain is in physical proximity to and interacts with the putative zinc-binding domain of the A190 subunit. Images PMID:1990281

  17. NMR solution structure of the theta subunit of DNA polymerase III from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Keniry, M. A.; Berthon, H. A.; Yang, J. Y.; Miles, C. S.; Dixon, N. E.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic core of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III contains three tightly associated subunits (alpha, epsilon, and theta). The theta subunit is the smallest, but the least understood of the three. As a first step in a program aimed at understanding its function, the structure of the theta subunit has been determined by triple-resonance multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Although only a small protein, theta was difficult to assign fully because approximately one-third of the protein is unstructured, and some sections of the remaining structured parts undergo intermediate intramolecular exchange. The secondary structure was deduced from the characteristic nuclear Overhauser effect patterns, the 3J(HN alpha) coupling constants and the consensus chemical shift index. The C-terminal third of the protein, which has many charged and hydrophilic amino acid residues, has no well-defined secondary structure and exists in a highly dynamic state. The N-terminal two-thirds has three helical segments (Gln10-Asp19, Glu38-Glu43, and His47-Glu54), one short extended segment (Pro34-Ala37), and a long loop (Ala20-Glu29), of which part may undergo intermediate conformational exchange. Solution of the three-dimensional structure by NMR techniques revealed that the helices fold in such a way that the surface of theta is bipolar, with one face of the protein containing most of the acidic residues and the other face containing most of the long chain basic residues. Preliminary chemical shift mapping experiments with a domain of the epsilon subunit have identified a loop region (Ala20-Glu29) in theta as the site of association with epsilon. PMID:10794414

  18. Molecular characterization of the largest subunit of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Fox, B A; Li, W B; Tanaka, M; Inselburg, J; Bzik, D J

    1993-09-01

    Plasmodium species possess developmentally regulated ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. This report describes the expression and gene structure of the largest subunit of P. falciparum RNA polymerase I (RNAPI), which is responsible for the synthesis of rRNA. The RNAPI largest subunit gene was present as a single copy gene on chromosome 9. Three exons encode the 2910-amino acid RNAPI polypeptide (340 140 Da). A comparison of Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear RNAP largest subunits identified conserved amino acid positions and class-specific amino acid positions. Novel amino acid insertions were found between RNAPI conserved regions A and B (region A'), D and DE1 (region D'), DE2 and E (region DE2'), and F and G (region F'). Leucine zipper domains were found within regions D', DE2, and DE2'. A novel serine-rich repeat domain, a domain with homology to the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic upstream binding factor (UBF), and 4 highly conserved casein kinase II (CKII) Ser/Thr phosphorylation motifs were found within a 127-amino acid sub-region of enlarged region F'. The novel RNAPI serine-rich repeat contained a conserved motif, Ser-X3-Ser, which was also identified in the serine-rich repeat domains of the P. falciparum RNAPII and RNAPIII largest subunits, as well as within a highly homologous serine-rich repeat from trophozoite antigen R45. The results of this molecular analysis indicate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanisms regulate the activity of P. falciparum RNAPI. PMID:8259131

  19. Role of N-Terminal Domain and Accessory Subunits in Controlling Deactivation-Inactivation Coupling of Kv4.2 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Barghaan, Jan; Tozakidou, Magdalini; Ehmke, Heimo; Bähring, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between deactivation and inactivation in Kv4.2 channels. In particular, we were interested in the role of a Kv4.2 N-terminal domain and accessory subunits in controlling macroscopic gating kinetics and asked if the effects of N-terminal deletion and accessory subunit coexpression conform to a kinetic coupling of deactivation and inactivation. We expressed Kv4.2 wild-type channels and N-terminal deletion mutants in the absence and presence of Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) and dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like proteins (DPPs) in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kv4.2-mediated A-type currents at positive and deactivation tail currents at negative membrane potentials were recorded under whole-cell voltage-clamp and analyzed by multi-exponential fitting. The observed changes in Kv4.2 macroscopic inactivation kinetics caused by N-terminal deletion, accessory subunit coexpression, or a combination of the two maneuvers were compared with respective changes in deactivation kinetics. Extensive correlation analyses indicated that modulatory effects on deactivation closely parallel respective effects on inactivation, including both onset and recovery kinetics. Searching for the structural determinants, which control deactivation and inactivation, we found that in a Kv4.2Δ2–10 N-terminal deletion mutant both the initial rapid phase of macroscopic inactivation and tail current deactivation were slowed. On the other hand, the intermediate and slow phase of A-type current decay, recovery from inactivation, and tail current decay kinetics were accelerated in Kv4.2Δ2–10 by KChIP2 and DPPX. Thus, a Kv4.2 N-terminal domain, which may control both inactivation and deactivation, is not necessary for active modulation of current kinetics by accessory subunits. Our results further suggest distinct mechanisms for Kv4.2 gating modulation by KChIPs and DPPs. PMID:17981906

  20. RNA polymerase II subunit RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    To improve our understanding of RNA polymerase II, the gene that encodes its third-largest subunit, RPB3, was isolated from a lambda gt11 DNA library by using antibody probes. The RPB3 DNA sequence predicts a 318-amino-acid protein whose sequence was confirmed, in part, by microsequence analysis of the gel-purified RNA polymerase II subunit. RPB3 was found to be an essential single-copy gene that is tightly linked to HIS6 on chromosome IX. An RPB3 temperature-sensitive mutant that arrested growth after three to four generations at the restrictive temperature was isolated. When the mutant was shifted to the restrictive temperature, RNA polymerase II could no longer assemble, previously assembled functional enzyme was depleted, and mRNA levels were consequently reduced. These results demonstrate that RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus. Finally, the RPB3 protein is similar in sequence and length to RPC5, a subunit common to RNA polymerases I and III, suggesting that these subunits may play similar roles in RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Images PMID:2685562

  1. Promoter Structure of the RNA Polymerase II Large Subunit Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae

    PubMed Central

    Bird, D. McK.; Kaloshian, I.; Molinari, S.

    1997-01-01

    The 5'-end of the Caenorhabditis elegans ama-1 gene transcript, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, was cloned. Sequencing revealed that the message is trans-spliced. To characterize the Ce-ama-1 promoter, DNA sequence spanning 3 kb upstream from the initiation codon was determined. Typical elements, such as TATA and Spl sites, were absent. The homologue of ama-1 in C. briggsae, Cb-ama-1, was isolated and its 5' flanking sequence compared with that of Ce-ama-1, revealing only limited similarity, although both sequences included a potential initiator-class transcriptional regulator and phased repeats of an AT₃C motif. The latter elements are postulated to facilitate DNA bending and may play a role in transcription regulation. PMID:19274143

  2. Retrotransposons. An RNA polymerase III subunit determines sites of retrotransposon integration.

    PubMed

    Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Baller, Joshua A; Menouni, Rachid; Fayol, Hélène; Flores, Amando; Saïb, Ali; Werner, Michel; Voytas, Daniel F; Lesage, Pascale

    2015-05-01

    Mobile genetic elements are ubiquitous. Their integration site influences genome stability and gene expression. The Ty1 retrotransposon of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrates upstream of RNA polymerase III (Pol III)-transcribed genes, yet the primary determinant of target specificity has remained elusive. Here we describe an interaction between Ty1 integrase and the AC40 subunit of Pol III and demonstrate that AC40 is the predominant determinant targeting Ty1 integration upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. Lack of an integrase-AC40 interaction dramatically alters target site choice, leading to a redistribution of Ty1 insertions in the genome, mainly to chromosome ends. The mechanism of target specificity allows Ty1 to proliferate and yet minimizes genetic damage to its host. PMID:25931562

  3. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta (i.e., in alpha 2 beta, alpha 2 beta beta', and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma), and amino acids 175-210 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta' (i.e., in alpha 2 beta beta' and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma). The protected regions are conserved in the alpha homologs of prokaryotic, eukaryotic, archaeal, and chloroplast RNAPs and contain sites of substitutions that affect RNAP assembly. We conclude that the protected regions define determinants of alpha for direct functional interaction with beta and beta'. The observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta and the observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta' both correspond to the expected value for complete protection of one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP (i.e., 50% protection). We propose that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta and that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta'. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8816769

  4. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase a Subunit C-terminal Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Gonzalez, S.; Birktoft, J; Lawson, C

    2010-01-01

    The {alpha} subunit C-terminal domain ({alpha}CTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli {alpha}CTD ({alpha} subunit residues 245-329) determined to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R{sub free} = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the {alpha}CTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995), Science, 270, 1495-1497; Benoff et al. (2002), Science, 297, 1562-1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of {alpha}CTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallography and electron-microscopy reconstruction.

  5. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Lara-González, Samuel; Birktoft, Jens J.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    The α subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli αCTD (α subunit residues 245–329) determined to 2.0 Å resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P21 and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R free = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the αCTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995 ▶), Science, 270, 1495–1497; Benoff et al. (2002 ▶), Science, 297, 1562–1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of αCTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallo­graphy and electron-microscopy reconstruction. PMID:20606261

  6. Identification of Leptospira serovars by RFLP of the RNA polymerase beta subunit gene (rpoB)

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Lenice Roteia Cardoso; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Nunes, Álvaro Cantini

    2015-01-01

    Leptospires are usually classified by methods based on DNA-DNA hybridization and the conventional cross-agglutination absorption test, which uses polyclonal antibodies against lipopolysaccharides. In this study, the amplification of the rpoB gene, which encodes the beta-subunit of RNA polymerase, was used as an alternative tool to identify Leptospira. DNA extracts from sixty-eight serovars were obtained, and the hypervariable region located between 1990 and 2500-bp in the rpoB gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The 600-bp amplicons of the rpoB gene were digested with the restriction endonucleases TaqI, Tru1I, Sau3AI and MslI, and the restriction fragments were separated by 6% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Thirty-five fragment patters were obtained from the combined data of restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and used to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the Leptospira species and serovars. The species assignments obtained were in full agreement with the established taxonomic classifications. Twenty-two serovars were effectively identified based on differences in their molecular profiles. However, the other 46 serovars remained clustered in groups that included more than one serovar of different species. This study demonstrates the value of RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified rpoB as an initial method for identifying Leptospira species and serovars. PMID:26273261

  7. Structure and stoichiometry of an accessory subunit TRIP8b interaction with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels

    PubMed Central

    Bankston, John R.; Camp, Stacey S.; DiMaio, Frank; Lewis, Alan S.; Chetkovich, Dane M.; Zagotta, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels operate in intact tissues as part of large macromolecular complexes that can include cytoskeletal proteins, scaffolding proteins, signaling molecules, and a litany of other molecules. The proteins that make up these complexes can influence the trafficking, localization, and biophysical properties of the channel. TRIP8b (tetratricopetide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein) is a recently discovered accessory subunit of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that contributes to the substantial dendritic localization of HCN channels in many types of neurons. TRIP8b interacts with the carboxyl-terminal region of HCN channels and regulates their cell-surface expression level and cyclic nucleotide dependence. Here we examine the molecular determinants of TRIP8b binding to HCN2 channels. Using a single-molecule fluorescence bleaching method, we found that TRIP8b and HCN2 form an obligate 4:4 complex in intact channels. Fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence anisotropy allowed us to confirm that two different domains in the carboxyl-terminal portion of TRIP8b—the tetratricopepide repeat region and the TRIP8b conserved region—interact with two different regions of the HCN carboxyl-terminal region: the carboxyl-terminal three amino acids (SNL) and the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, respectively. And finally, using X-ray crystallography, we determined the atomic structure of the tetratricopepide region of TRIP8b in complex with a peptide of the carboxy-terminus of HCN2. Together, these experiments begin to uncover the mechanism for TRIP8b binding and regulation of HCN channels. PMID:22550182

  8. Functional Interplay of Two Paralogs Encoding SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Accessory Subunits During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Iris; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Cornes, Eric; Fontrodona, Laura; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter; Cabello, Juan; Cerón, Julián

    2016-03-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes have been related to several cellular processes such as transcription, regulation of chromosomal stability, and DNA repair. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene ham-3 (also known as swsn-2.1) and its paralog swsn-2.2 encode accessory subunits of SWI/SNF complexes. Using RNA interference (RNAi) assays and diverse alleles we investigated whether ham-3 and swsn-2.2 have different functions during C. elegans development since they encode proteins that are probably mutually exclusive in a given SWI/SNF complex. We found that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 display similar functions in vulva specification, germline development, and intestinal cell proliferation, but have distinct roles in embryonic development. Accordingly, we detected functional redundancy in some developmental processes and demonstrated by RNA sequencing of RNAi-treated L4 animals that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 regulate the expression of a common subset of genes but also have specific targets. Cell lineage analyses in the embryo revealed hyper-proliferation of intestinal cells in ham-3 null mutants whereas swsn-2.2 is required for proper cell divisions. Using a proteomic approach, we identified SWSN-2.2-interacting proteins needed for early cell divisions, such as SAO-1 and ATX-2, and also nuclear envelope proteins such as MEL-28. swsn-2.2 mutants phenocopy mel-28 loss-of-function, and we observed that SWSN-2.2 and MEL-28 colocalize in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SWSN-2.2 is required for correct chromosome segregation and nuclear reassembly after mitosis including recruitment of MEL-28 to the nuclear periphery. PMID:26739451

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing of RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved, contains 17 subunits and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 50S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. Functional roles of the RPC5 are poorly characterized in the literature. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silenci...

  10. Structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of human RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Acker, J; Wintzerith, M; Vigneron, M; Kedinger, C

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of the human RNA polymerase II (or B) has been elucidated. The gene consists of six exons, ranging from 52 to over 101 bp, interspaced with five introns ranging from 84 to 246 bp. It is transcribed into three major RNA species, present at low abundance in exponentially growing HeLa cells. The corresponding messenger RNAs contain the same open reading frame encoding a 125 amino acid residue protein, with a calculated molecular weight of 14,523 Da. This protein (named hRPB14.5) shares strong homologies with the homologous polymerase subunits encoded by the Drosophila (RpII15) and yeast (RPB9) genes. Cysteines characteristic of two zinc fingers are conserved in all three corresponding sequences and, like the yeast protein, the hRPB14.5 subunit exhibits zinc-binding activity. Images PMID:8265347

  11. A role for interaction of the RNA polymerase flap domain with the sigma subunit in promoter recognition.

    PubMed

    Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Dove, Simon L; Rogulja, Dragana; Nickels, Bryce E; Hochschild, Ann; Heyduk, Tomasz; Severinov, Konstantin

    2002-02-01

    In bacteria, promoter recognition depends on the RNA polymerase sigma subunit, which combines with the catalytically proficient RNA polymerase core to form the holoenzyme. The major class of bacterial promoters is defined by two conserved elements (the -10 and -35 elements, which are 10 and 35 nucleotides upstream of the initiation point, respectively) that are contacted by sigma in the holoenzyme. We show that recognition of promoters of this class depends on the "flexible flap" domain of the RNA polymerase beta subunit. The flap interacts with conserved region 4 of sigma and triggers a conformational change that moves region 4 into the correct position for interaction with the -35 element. Because the flexible flap is evolutionarily conserved, this domain may facilitate promoter recognition by specificity factors in eukaryotes as well. PMID:11823642

  12. Molecular Basis of mRNA Cap Recognition by Influenza B Polymerase PB2 Subunit.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lili; Wartchow, Charles; Shia, Steven; Uehara, Kyoko; Steffek, Micah; Warne, Robert; Sutton, James; Muiru, Gladys T; Leonard, Vincent H J; Bussiere, Dirksen E; Ma, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus polymerase catalyzes the transcription of viral mRNAs by a process known as "cap-snatching," where the 5'-cap of cellular pre-mRNA is recognized by the PB2 subunit and cleaved 10-13 nucleotides downstream of the cap by the endonuclease PA subunit. Although this mechanism is common to both influenza A (FluA) and influenza B (FluB) viruses, FluB PB2 recognizes a wider range of cap structures including m(7)GpppGm-, m(7)GpppG-, and GpppG-RNA, whereas FluA PB2 utilizes methylated G-capped RNA specifically. Biophysical studies with isolated PB2 cap-binding domain (PB2(cap)) confirm that FluB PB2 has expanded mRNA cap recognition capability, although the affinities toward m(7)GTP are significantly reduced when compared with FluA PB2. The x-ray co-structures of the FluB PB2(cap) with bound cap analogs m(7)GTP and GTP reveal an inverted GTP binding mode that is distinct from the cognate m(7)GTP binding mode shared between FluA and FluB PB2. These results delineate the commonalities and differences in the cap-binding site between FluA and FluB PB2 and will aid structure-guided drug design efforts to identify dual inhibitors of both FluA and FluB PB2. PMID:26559973

  13. Termination-altering mutations in the second-largest subunit of yeast RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Shaaban, S A; Krupp, B M; Hall, B D

    1995-01-01

    In order to identify catalytically important amino acid changes within the second-largest subunit of yeast RNA polymerase III, we mutagenized selected regions of its gene (RET1) and devised in vivo assays for both increased and decreased transcription termination by this enzyme. Using as the reporter gene a mutant SUP4-o tRNA gene that in one case terminates prematurely and in the other case fails to terminate, we screened mutagenized RET1 libraries for reduced and increased transcription termination, respectively. The gain in suppression phenotype was in both cases scored as a reduction in the accumulation of red pigment in yeast strains harboring the ade2-1 ochre mutation. Termination-altering mutations were obtained in regions of the RET1 gene encoding amino acids 300 to 325, 455 to 486, 487 to 521, and 1061 to 1082 of the protein. In degree of amino acid sequence conservation, these range from highly variable in the first to highly conserved in the last two regions. Residues 300 to 325 yielded mainly reduced-termination mutants, while in region 1061 to 1082, increased-termination mutants were obtained exclusively. All mutants recovered, while causing gain of suppression with one SUP4 allele, brought about a reduction in suppression with the other allele, thus confirming that the phenotype is due to altered termination rather than an elevated level of transcription initiation. In vitro transcription reactions performed with extracts from several strong mutants demonstrated that the mutant polymerases respond to RNA terminator sequences in a manner that matches their in vivo termination phenotypes. PMID:7862140

  14. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, J. K.; Hagen, G.; Guilfoyle, T. J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II and III, which are multi-subunit RNA polymerases found in all eukaryotes, plants have catalytic subunits for two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V (formerly Pol IVa and Pol IVb, respectively). Pol IV and Pol V play non-redundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing pathways.

  15. Structural basis for promoter –10 element recognition by the bacterial RNA polymerase σ subunit

    PubMed Central

    Feklistov, Andrey; Darst, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The key step in bacterial promoter opening is recognition of the -10 promoter element (T-12A-11T-10A-9A-8T-7 consensus sequence) by the RNA polymerase σ subunit. We determined crystal structures of σ domain 2 bound to single-stranded DNA bearing -10 element sequences. Extensive interactions occur between the protein and the DNA backbone of every -10 element nucleotide. Base-specific interactions occur primarily with A-11, and T-7, which are flipped out of the single-stranded DNA base-stack and buried deep in protein pockets. The structures, along with biochemical data, support a model where the recognition of the -10 element sequence drives initial promoter opening as the bases of the non-template strand are extruded from the DNA double-helix and captured by σ. These results provide a detailed structural basis for the critical roles of A-11 and T-7 in promoter melting, and reveal important insights into the initiation of transcription bubble formation. PMID:22136875

  16. Sites and roles of phosphorylation of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase subunit UL44

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Laurie A.; Strang, Blair L.; Lin, Eric W.; Kamil, Jeremy P.; Coen, Donald M.

    2011-09-01

    The human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase subunit UL44 is a phosphoprotein, but its sites and roles of phosphorylation have not been investigated. We compared sites of phosphorylation of UL44 in vitro by the viral protein kinase UL97 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 with those in infected cells. Transient treatment of infected cells with a UL97 inhibitor greatly reduced labeling of two minor UL44 phosphopeptides. Viruses containing alanine substitutions of most UL44 residues that are phosphorylated in infected cells exhibited at most modest effects on viral DNA synthesis and yield. However, substitution of highly phosphorylated sites adjacent to the nuclear localization signal abolished viral replication. The results taken together are consistent with UL44 being phosphorylated directly by UL97 during infection, and a crucial role for phosphorylation-mediated nuclear localization of UL44 for viral replication, but lend little support to the widely held hypothesis that UL97-mediated phosphorylation of UL44 is crucial for viral DNA synthesis.

  17. Structural Basis for Promoter ;#8722;10 Element Recognition by the Bacterial RNA Polymerase [sigma] Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Feklistov, Andrey; Darst, Seth A.

    2011-12-15

    The key step in bacterial promoter opening is recognition of the -10 promoter element (T-{sub 12}A-{sub 11}T-{sub 10}A-{sub 9}A-{sub 8}T{sub -7} consensus sequence) by the RNA polymerase {alpha} subunit. We determined crystal structures of {alpha} domain 2 bound to single-stranded DNA bearing -10 element sequences. Extensive interactions occur between the protein and the DNA backbone of every -10 element nucleotide. Base-specific interactions occur primarily with A{sub -11} and T{sub -7}, which are flipped out of the single-stranded DNA base stack and buried deep in protein pockets. The structures, along with biochemical data, support a model where the recognition of the -10 element sequence drives initial promoter opening as the bases of the nontemplate strand are extruded from the DNA double-helix and captured by {alpha}. These results provide a detailed structural basis for the critical roles of A{sub -11} and T{sub -7} in promoter melting and reveal important insights into the initiation of transcription bubble formation.

  18. Divergence of RNA polymerase α subunits in angiosperm plastid genomes is mediated by genomic rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Blazier, J Chris; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Weng, Mao-Lun; Rehman, Sumaiyah K; Sabir, Jamal S M; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) persist in the plastid genomes of all photosynthetic angiosperms. However, three unrelated lineages (Annonaceae, Passifloraceae and Geraniaceae) have been identified with unusually divergent open reading frames (ORFs) in the conserved region of rpoA, the gene encoding the PEP α subunit. We used sequence-based approaches to evaluate whether these genes retain function. Both gene sequences and complete plastid genome sequences were assembled and analyzed from each of the three angiosperm families. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that the rpoA sequences are likely functional despite retaining as low as 30% nucleotide sequence identity with rpoA genes from outgroups in the same angiosperm order. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions indicated that these genes are under purifying selection, and bioinformatic prediction of conserved domains indicated that functional domains are preserved. One of the lineages (Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) contains species with multiple rpoA-like ORFs that show evidence of ongoing inter-paralog gene conversion. The plastid genomes containing these divergent rpoA genes have experienced extensive structural rearrangement, including large expansions of the inverted repeat. We propose that illegitimate recombination, not positive selection, has driven the divergence of rpoA. PMID:27087667

  19. Divergence of RNA polymerase α subunits in angiosperm plastid genomes is mediated by genomic rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Blazier, J. Chris; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Weng, Mao-Lun; Rehman, Sumaiyah K.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) persist in the plastid genomes of all photosynthetic angiosperms. However, three unrelated lineages (Annonaceae, Passifloraceae and Geraniaceae) have been identified with unusually divergent open reading frames (ORFs) in the conserved region of rpoA, the gene encoding the PEP α subunit. We used sequence-based approaches to evaluate whether these genes retain function. Both gene sequences and complete plastid genome sequences were assembled and analyzed from each of the three angiosperm families. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that the rpoA sequences are likely functional despite retaining as low as 30% nucleotide sequence identity with rpoA genes from outgroups in the same angiosperm order. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions indicated that these genes are under purifying selection, and bioinformatic prediction of conserved domains indicated that functional domains are preserved. One of the lineages (Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) contains species with multiple rpoA-like ORFs that show evidence of ongoing inter-paralog gene conversion. The plastid genomes containing these divergent rpoA genes have experienced extensive structural rearrangement, including large expansions of the inverted repeat. We propose that illegitimate recombination, not positive selection, has driven the divergence of rpoA. PMID:27087667

  20. Specific Residues of PB2 and PA Influenza Virus Polymerase Subunits Confer the Ability for RNA Polymerase II Degradation and Virus Pathogenicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Llompart, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus transcription requires functional coupling with cellular transcription for the cap-snatching process. Despite this fact, RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is degraded during infection in a process triggered by the viral polymerase. Reassortant viruses from the A/PR/8/34 (PR8) strain that induce (hvPR8) or do not induce (lvPR8) RNAP II degradation led to the identification of PA and PB2 subunits as responsible for the degradation process. Three changes in the PB2 sequence (I105M, N456D, and I504V) and two in PA (Q193H and I550L) differentiate PA and PB2 of lvPR8 from those of hvPR8. Using recombinant viruses, we observed that changes at position 504 of PB2, together with 550 of PA, confer the ability on lvPR8 for RNAP II degradation and, conversely, abolish hvPR8 degradation capacity. Since hvPR8 is more pathogenic than lvPR8 in mice, we tested the potential contribution of RNAP II degradation in a distant viral strain, the 2009 pandemic A/California/04/09 (CAL) virus, whose PA and PB2 subunits are of avian origin. As in the hvPR8 virus, mutations at positions 504 of PB2 and 550 of PA in CAL virus abolished its RNAP II degradation capacity. Moreover, in an in vivo model, the CAL-infected mice lost more body weight, and 75% lethality was observed in this situation compared with 100% survival in mutant-CAL- or mock-infected animals. These results confirm the involvement of specific PB2 and PA residues in RNAP II degradation, which correlates with pathogenicity in mice of viruses containing human or avian polymerase PB2 and PA subunits. IMPORTANCE The influenza virus polymerase induces the degradation of RNAP II, which probably cooperates to avoid the antiviral response. Here, we have characterized two specific residues located in the PA and PB2 polymerase subunits that mediate this degradation in different influenza viruses. Moreover, a clear correlation between RNAP II degradation and in vivo pathogenicity in mice was observed, indicating that the

  1. Cloning of the cDNAs for the small subunits of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} and chromosomal location of the human gene (POLD2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Tan, Cheng-Keat; Downey, K.M.

    1995-09-01

    cDNAs encoding the small subunit of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} have been cloned and sequenced. The predicted polypeptides, 50,885 and 51,289 Daltons, respectively, are 94% identical, similar to the catalytic subunits. The high degree of conservation of the polypeptides suggests an essential function for the small subunit in the heterodimeric core enzyme. Although the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase 5 shares significant homology with those of the herpes virus family of DNA polymerases, the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase 6 is not homologous to the small subunit of either herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA polymerase (UL42 protein) or the Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase (BMRF1 protein). Searches of the protein databases failed to detect significant homology with any protein sequenced thus far. PCR analysis of DNA from a panel of human-hamster hybrid cell lines localized the gene (POLD2) for the small subunit of DNA polymerase 5 to human chromosome 7. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Thomas J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the essential RNA polymerases present in all eukaryotes, plants have two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V, that play nonredundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing. We show that Arabidopsis Pol IV and Pol V are composed of subunits that are paralogous or identical to the 12 subunits of Pol II. Four subunits of Pol IV are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, six subunits of Pol V are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, and four subunits differ between Pol IV and Pol V. Importantly, the subunit differences occur in key positions relative to the template entry and RNA exit paths. Our findings support the hypothesis that Pol IV and Pol V are Pol II-like enzymes that evolved specialized roles in the production of noncoding transcripts for RNA silencing and genome defense.

  3. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes PoI IV and PoI V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Thomas J.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In addition to RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the essential RNA polymerases present in all eukaryotes, plants have two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V, that play nonredundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing. We show that Arabidopsis Pol IV and Pol V are composed of subunits that are paralogous or identical to the 12 subunits of Pol II. Four subunits of Pol IV are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, six subunits of Pol V are distinct from their Pol II paralogs, and four subunits differ between Pol IV and Pol V. Importantly, the subunit differences occur in key positions relative to the template entry and RNA exit paths. Our findings support the hypothesis that Pol IV and Pol V are Pol II-like enzymes that evolved specialized roles in the production of noncoding transcripts for RNA silencing and genome defense. PMID:19110459

  4. Transcription initiation complexes and upstream activation with RNA polymerase II lacking the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Buratowski, S; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II assembles with other factors on the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter to generate pairs of transcription initiation complexes resolvable by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. The pairing of the complexes is caused by the presence or absence of the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit. This domain is not required for transcription stimulation by the major late transcription factor in vitro. Images PMID:2398901

  5. Lack of the Delta Subunit of RNA Polymerase Increases Virulence Related Traits of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoli; Sztajer, Helena; Buddruhs, Nora; Petersen, Jörn; Rohde, Manfred; Talay, Susanne R.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    The delta subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoE, maintains the transcriptional specificity in Gram-positive bacteria. Lack of RpoE results in massive changes in the transcriptome of the human dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we analyzed traits of the ΔrpoE mutant which are important for biofilm formation and interaction with oral microorganisms and human cells and performed a global phenotypic analysis of its physiological functions. The ΔrpoE mutant showed higher self-aggregation compared to the wild type and coaggregated with other oral bacteria and Candida albicans. It formed a biofilm with a different matrix structure and an altered surface attachment. The amount of the cell surface antigens I/II SpaP and the glucosyltransferase GtfB was reduced. The ΔrpoE mutant displayed significantly stronger adhesion to human extracellular matrix components, especially to fibronectin, than the wild type. Its adhesion to human epithelial cells HEp-2 was reduced, probably due to the highly aggregated cell mass. The analysis of 1248 physiological traits using phenotype microarrays showed that the ΔrpoE mutant metabolized a wider spectrum of carbon sources than the wild type and had acquired resistance to antibiotics and inhibitory compounds with various modes of action. The reduced antigenicity, increased aggregation, adherence to fibronection, broader substrate spectrum and increased resistance to antibiotics of the ΔrpoE mutant reveal the physiological potential of S. mutans and show that some of its virulence related traits are increased. PMID:21625504

  6. CMG helicase and DNA polymerase ε form a functional 15-subunit holoenzyme for eukaryotic leading-strand DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Langston, Lance D; Zhang, Dan; Yurieva, Olga; Georgescu, Roxana E; Finkelstein, Jeff; Yao, Nina Y; Indiani, Chiara; O'Donnell, Mike E

    2014-10-28

    DNA replication in eukaryotes is asymmetric, with separate DNA polymerases (Pol) dedicated to bulk synthesis of the leading and lagging strands. Pol α/primase initiates primers on both strands that are extended by Pol ε on the leading strand and by Pol δ on the lagging strand. The CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicase surrounds the leading strand and is proposed to recruit Pol ε for leading-strand synthesis, but to date a direct interaction between CMG and Pol ε has not been demonstrated. While purifying CMG helicase overexpressed in yeast, we detected a functional complex between CMG and native Pol ε. Using pure CMG and Pol ε, we reconstituted a stable 15-subunit CMG-Pol ε complex and showed that it is a functional polymerase-helicase on a model replication fork in vitro. On its own, the Pol2 catalytic subunit of Pol ε is inefficient in CMG-dependent replication, but addition of the Dpb2 protein subunit of Pol ε, known to bind the Psf1 protein subunit of CMG, allows stable synthesis with CMG. Dpb2 does not affect Pol δ function with CMG, and thus we propose that the connection between Dpb2 and CMG helps to stabilize Pol ε on the leading strand as part of a 15-subunit leading-strand holoenzyme we refer to as CMGE. Direct binding between Pol ε and CMG provides an explanation for specific targeting of Pol ε to the leading strand and provides clear mechanistic evidence for how strand asymmetry is maintained in eukaryotes. PMID:25313033

  7. Modeling RNA polymerase competition: the effect of σ-subunit knockout and heat shock on gene transcription level

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modeling of a complex biological process can explain the results of experimental studies and help predict its characteristics. Among such processes is transcription in the presence of competing RNA polymerases. This process involves RNA polymerases collision followed by transcription termination. Results A mathematical and computer simulation model is developed to describe the competition of RNA polymerases during genes transcription on complementary DNA strands. E.g., in the barley Hordeum vulgare the polymerase competition occurs in the locus containing plastome genes psbA, rpl23, rpl2 and four bacterial type promoters. In heat shock experiments on isolated chloroplasts, a twofold decrease of psbA transcripts and even larger increase of rpl23-rpl2 transcripts were observed, which is well reproduced in the model. The model predictions are in good agreement with virtually all relevant experimental data (knockout, heat shock, chromatogram data, etc.). The model allows to hypothesize a mechanism of cell response to knockout and heat shock, as well as a mechanism of gene expression regulation in presence of RNA polymerase competition. The model is implemented for multiprocessor platforms with MPI and supported on Linux and MS Windows. The source code written in C++ is available under the GNU General Public License from the laboratory website. A user-friendly GUI version is also provided at http://lab6.iitp.ru/en/rivals. Conclusions The developed model is in good agreement with virtually all relevant experimental data. The model can be applied to estimate intensities of binding of the holoenzyme and phage type RNA polymerase to their promoters using data on gene transcription levels, as well as to predict characteristics of RNA polymerases and the transcription process that are difficult to measure directly, e.g., the intensity (frequency) of holoenzyme binding to the promoter in correlation to its nucleotide composition and the type of σ-subunit, the

  8. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  9. Pin1 Interacts with the Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Polymerase Catalytic Subunit and Regulates Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Yohei; Ryo, Akihide; Kawashima, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Kanda, Teru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) protein is known as a regulator which recognizes phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and increases the rate of cis and trans amide isomer interconversion, thereby altering the conformation of its substrates. We found that Pin1 knockdown using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology resulted in strong suppression of productive Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA replication. We further identified the EBV DNA polymerase catalytic subunit, BALF5, as a Pin1 substrate in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays. Lambda protein phosphatase treatment abolished the binding of BALF5 to Pin1, and mutation analysis of BALF5 revealed that replacement of the Thr178 residue by Ala (BALF5 T178A) disrupted the interaction with Pin1. To further test the effects of Pin1 in the context of virus infection, we constructed a BALF5-deficient recombinant virus. Exogenous supply of wild-type BALF5 in HEK293 cells with knockout recombinant EBV allowed efficient synthesis of viral genome DNA, but BALF5 T178A could not provide support as efficiently as wild-type BALF5. In conclusion, we found that EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 subunit interacts with Pin1 through BALF5 Thr178 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Pin1 might modulate EBV DNA polymerase conformation for efficient, productive viral DNA replication. PMID:23221557

  10. Crystal Structure in the Vivo-Assembled Bacillus subtilis Spx/RNA Polymerase alpha Subunit C-Terminal Domain Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, V.; Westblade, L; Campbell, E; Darst, S

    2009-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis Spx protein is a global transcription factor that interacts with the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase {alpha} subunit ({alpha}CTD) and regulates transcription of genes involved in thiol-oxidative stress, sporulation, competence, and organosulfur metabolism. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Spx/{alpha}CTD complex from an entirely new crystal form than previously reported [Newberry, K.J., Nakano, S., Zuber, P., Brennan, R.G., 2005. Crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis anti-alpha, global transcriptional regulator, Spx, in complex with the alpha C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 15839-15844]. Comparison of the previously reported sulfate-bound complex and our sulfate-free complex reveals subtle conformational changes that may be important for the role of Spx in regulating organosulfur metabolism.

  11. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-05-02

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA Polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), providing the first description of their physical compositions in plants. AC40 and AC19 subunits are typically common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes whose mutation, in humans, is a cause of the craniofacial disorder, Treacher-Collins Syndrome. Surprisingly, A. thaliana, and related species, express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Pol III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with this functional divergence of Pol I and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit, and either variant can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the twelve subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers.

  12. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-05-02

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA Polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), providing the first description of their physical compositions in plants. AC40 and AC19 subunits are typically common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes whose mutation, in humans, is a cause of the craniofacial disorder, Treacher-Collins Syndrome. Surprisingly, A. thaliana, and related species, express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Polmore » III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with this functional divergence of Pol I and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit, and either variant can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the twelve subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers.« less

  13. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), the first analysis of their physical compositions in plants. In all eukaryotes examined to date, AC40 and AC19 subunits are common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes. Surprisingly, A. thaliana and related species express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Pol III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with the functional divergence of Pol I- and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit and either protein can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the 12 subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers. PMID:25813043

  14. Identification of Essential Subunits in the Plastid-Encoded RNA Polymerase Complex Reveals Building Blocks for Proper Plastid Development1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Sebastian; Schröter, Yvonne; Pfalz, Jeannette; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The major RNA polymerase activity in mature chloroplasts is a multisubunit, Escherichia coli-like protein complex called PEP (for plastid-encoded RNA polymerase). Its subunit structure has been extensively investigated by biochemical means. Beside the “prokaryotic” subunits encoded by the plastome-located RNA polymerase genes, a number of additional nucleus-encoded subunits of eukaryotic origin have been identified in the PEP complex. These subunits appear to provide additional functions and regulation modes necessary to adapt transcription to the varying functional situations in chloroplasts. However, despite the enormous progress in genomic data and mass spectrometry techniques, it is still under debate which of these subunits belong to the core complex of PEP and which ones represent rather transient or peripheral components. Here, we present a catalog of true PEP subunits that is based on comparative analyses from biochemical purifications, protein mass spectrometry, and phenotypic analyses. We regard reproducibly identified protein subunits of the basic PEP complex as essential when the corresponding knockout mutants reveal an albino or pale-green phenotype. Our study provides a clearly defined subunit catalog of the basic PEP complex, generating the basis for a better understanding of chloroplast transcription regulation. In addition, the data support a model that links PEP complex assembly and chloroplast buildup during early seedling development in vascular plants. PMID:21949211

  15. CMG helicase and DNA polymerase ε form a functional 15-subunit holoenzyme for eukaryotic leading-strand DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Langston, Lance D.; Zhang, Dan; Yurieva, Olga; Georgescu, Roxana E.; Finkelstein, Jeff; Yao, Nina Y.; Indiani, Chiara; O’Donnell, Mike E.

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes is asymmetric, with separate DNA polymerases (Pol) dedicated to bulk synthesis of the leading and lagging strands. Pol α/primase initiates primers on both strands that are extended by Pol ε on the leading strand and by Pol δ on the lagging strand. The CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicase surrounds the leading strand and is proposed to recruit Pol ε for leading-strand synthesis, but to date a direct interaction between CMG and Pol ε has not been demonstrated. While purifying CMG helicase overexpressed in yeast, we detected a functional complex between CMG and native Pol ε. Using pure CMG and Pol ε, we reconstituted a stable 15-subunit CMG–Pol ε complex and showed that it is a functional polymerase–helicase on a model replication fork in vitro. On its own, the Pol2 catalytic subunit of Pol ε is inefficient in CMG-dependent replication, but addition of the Dpb2 protein subunit of Pol ε, known to bind the Psf1 protein subunit of CMG, allows stable synthesis with CMG. Dpb2 does not affect Pol δ function with CMG, and thus we propose that the connection between Dpb2 and CMG helps to stabilize Pol ε on the leading strand as part of a 15-subunit leading-strand holoenzyme we refer to as CMGE. Direct binding between Pol ε and CMG provides an explanation for specific targeting of Pol ε to the leading strand and provides clear mechanistic evidence for how strand asymmetry is maintained in eukaryotes. PMID:25313033

  16. Virus-induced gene silencing of the RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Nemchinov, Lev G.; Boutanaev, Alexander M.; Postnikova, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 5S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. The RPC5-like subunit is one of the 17 subunits forming RNAPIII and its exact functional roles in the transcription are poorly understood. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silencing of transcripts encoding a putative RPC5-like subunit of the RNA Polymerase III in a model species Nicotiana benthamiana had pleiotropic effects, including but not limited to severe dwarfing appearance, chlorosis, nearly complete reduction of internodes and abnormal leaf shape. Using transcriptomic analysis, we identified genes and pathways affected by RPC5 silencing and thus presumably related to the cellular roles of the subunit as well as to the downstream cascade of reactions in response to partial loss of RNA Polymerase III function. Our results suggest that silencing of the RPC5L in N. benthamiana disrupted not only functions commonly associated with the core RNA Polymerase III transcripts, but also more diverse cellular processes, including responses to stress. We believe this is the first demonstration that activity of the RPC5 subunit is critical for proper functionality of RNA Polymerase III and normal plant development. PMID:27282827

  17. Virus-induced gene silencing of the RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Nemchinov, Lev G; Boutanaev, Alexander M; Postnikova, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 5S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. The RPC5-like subunit is one of the 17 subunits forming RNAPIII and its exact functional roles in the transcription are poorly understood. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silencing of transcripts encoding a putative RPC5-like subunit of the RNA Polymerase III in a model species Nicotiana benthamiana had pleiotropic effects, including but not limited to severe dwarfing appearance, chlorosis, nearly complete reduction of internodes and abnormal leaf shape. Using transcriptomic analysis, we identified genes and pathways affected by RPC5 silencing and thus presumably related to the cellular roles of the subunit as well as to the downstream cascade of reactions in response to partial loss of RNA Polymerase III function. Our results suggest that silencing of the RPC5L in N. benthamiana disrupted not only functions commonly associated with the core RNA Polymerase III transcripts, but also more diverse cellular processes, including responses to stress. We believe this is the first demonstration that activity of the RPC5 subunit is critical for proper functionality of RNA Polymerase III and normal plant development. PMID:27282827

  18. Functional interaction between TFIIB and the Rpb9 (Ssu73) subunit of RNA polymerase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z W; Tessmer, A; Hampsey, M

    1996-01-01

    Recessive mutations in the SSU71, SSU72 and SSU73 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified as either suppressors or enhancers of a TFIIB defect (sua7-1) that confers both a cold-sensitive growth phenotype and a downstream shift in transcription start site selection. The SSU71 (TFG1) gene encodes the largest subunit of TFIIF and SSU72 encodes a novel protein that is essential for cell viability. Here we report that SSU73 is identical to RPB9, the gene encoding the 14.2 kDa subunit of RNA polymerase II. The ssu73-1 suppressor compensates for both the growth defect and the downstream shift in start site selection associated with sua7-1. These effects are similar to those of the ssu71-1 suppressor and distinct from the ssu72-1 enhancer. The ssu73-1 allele was retrieved and sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation at codon 107. Consequently, ssu73-1 encodes a truncated form of Rpb9 lacking the C-terminal 16 amino acids. This Rpb9 derivative retains at least partial function since the ssu73-1 mutant exhibits none of the growth defects associated with rpb9 null mutants. However, in a SUA7+ background, ssu73-1 confers the same upstream shift at ADH1 as an rpb9 null allele. This suggests that the C-terminus of Rpb9 functions in start site selection and demonstrates that the previously observed effects of rpb9 mutations on start site selection are not necessarily due to complete loss of function. These results establish a functional interaction between TFIIB and the Rpb9 subunit of RNA polymerase II and suggest that these two components of the preinitiation complex interact during transcription start site selection. PMID:8692696

  19. Localization of an alpha-amanitin resistance mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of mouse RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomei, M S; Corden, J L

    1987-01-01

    RNA polymerase II is inhibited by the mushroom toxin alpha-amanitin. A mouse BALB/c 3T3 cell line was selected for resistance to alpha-amanitin and characterized in detail. This cell line, designated A21, was heterozygous, possessing both amanitin-sensitive and -resistant forms of RNA polymerase II; the mutant form was 500 times more resistant to alpha-amanitin than the sensitive form. By using the wild-type mouse RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPII215) gene (J.A. Ahearn, M.S. Bartolomei, M. L. West, and J. L. Corden, submitted for publication) as the probe, RPII215 genes were isolated from an A21 genomic DNA library. The mutant allele was identified by its ability to transfer amanitin resistance in a transfection assay. Genomic reconstructions between mutant and wild-type alleles localized the mutation to a 450-base-pair fragment that included parts of exons 14 and 15. This fragment was sequenced and compared with the wild-type sequence; a single AT-to-GC transition was detected at nucleotide 6819, corresponding to an asparagine-to-aspartate substitution at amino acid 793 of the predicted protein sequence. Knowledge of the position of the A21 mutation should facilitate the study of the mechanism of alpha-amanitin resistance. Furthermore, the A21 gene will be useful for studying the phenotype of site-directed mutations in the RPII215 gene. Images PMID:3821724

  20. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α. The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  1. The nuclear matrix protein p255 is a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit which associates with spliceosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M; Lauriault, P; Dubois, M F; Lavoie, S; Bensaude, O; Chabot, B

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody CC-3 recognizes a phosphodependent epitope on a 255 kDa nuclear matrix protein (p255) recently shown to associate with splicing complexes as part of the [U4/U6.U5] tri-snRNP particle [Chabot et al. (1995) Nucleic Acids Res. 23, 3206-3213]. In mouse and Drosophila cultured cells the electrophoretic mobility of p255, faster in the latter species, was identical to that of the hyperphosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit (IIo). The CC-3 immunoreactivity of p255 was abolished by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, which is known to cause the dephosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of subunit IIo by inhibiting the TFIIH-associated kinase. The identity of p255 was confirmed by showing that CC-3-immunoprecipitated p255 was recognized by POL3/3 and 8WG16, two antibodies specific to RNA polymerase II largest subunit. Lastly, the recovery of RNA polymerase II largest subunit from HeLa splicing mixtures was compromised by EDTA, which prevents the interaction of p255 with splicing complexes and inhibits splicing. Our results indicate that p255 represents a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit physically associated with spliceosomes and possibly involved in coupling transcription to RNA processing. PMID:8972849

  2. A partial loss-of-function mutation in an Arabidopsis RNA polymerase III subunit leads to pleiotropic defects

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kaeli C. M.; Yu, Yu; Gao, Lei; Eng, Ryan C.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.; Chen, Xuemei; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Plants employ five DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (Pols) in transcription. One of these polymerases, Pol III, has previously been reported to transcribe 5S rRNA, tRNAs, and a number of small RNAs. However, in-depth functional analysis is complicated by the fact that knockout mutations in Pol subunits are typically lethal. Here, we report the characterization of the first known viable Pol III subunit mutant, nrpc7-1. This mutant was originally isolated from a forward genetic screen designed to identify enhancers of the autoimmune mutant snc1, which contains a gain-of-function mutation in a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptor-encoding gene. The nrpc7-1 mutation occurs in an intron–exon splice site and results in intron retention in some NRPC7 transcripts. There is a global disruption in RNA equilibrium in nrpc7-1, exemplified by the altered expression of a number of RNA molecules, some of which are not reported to be transcribed by Pol III. There are developmental defects associated with the mutation, as homozygous mutant plants are dwarf, have stunted roots and siliques, and possess serrated leaves. These defects are possibly due to altered small RNA stability or activity. Additionally, the nrpc7-1 mutation confers an NLR-specific alternative splicing defect that correlates with enhanced disease resistance, highlighting the importance of alternative splicing in regulating NLR activity. Altogether, these results reveal novel roles for Pol III in maintaining RNA homeostasis, adjusting the expression of a diverse suite of genes, and indirectly modulating gene splicing. Future analyses using the nrpc7-1 mutant will be instrumental in examining other unknown Pol III functions. PMID:26865731

  3. A partial loss-of-function mutation in an Arabidopsis RNA polymerase III subunit leads to pleiotropic defects.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kaeli C M; Yu, Yu; Gao, Lei; Eng, Ryan C; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O; Chen, Xuemei; Li, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Plants employ five DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (Pols) in transcription. One of these polymerases, Pol III, has previously been reported to transcribe 5S rRNA, tRNAs, and a number of small RNAs. However, in-depth functional analysis is complicated by the fact that knockout mutations in Pol subunits are typically lethal. Here, we report the characterization of the first known viable Pol III subunit mutant,nrpc7-1 This mutant was originally isolated from a forward genetic screen designed to identify enhancers of the autoimmune mutantsnc1, which contains a gain-of-function mutation in a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptor-encoding gene. Thenrpc7-1mutation occurs in an intron-exon splice site and results in intron retention in someNRPC7transcripts. There is a global disruption in RNA equilibrium innrpc7-1, exemplified by the altered expression of a number of RNA molecules, some of which are not reported to be transcribed by Pol III. There are developmental defects associated with the mutation, as homozygous mutant plants are dwarf, have stunted roots and siliques, and possess serrated leaves. These defects are possibly due to altered small RNA stability or activity. Additionally, thenrpc7-1mutation confers anNLR-specific alternative splicing defect that correlates with enhanced disease resistance, highlighting the importance of alternative splicing in regulating NLR activity. Altogether, these results reveal novel roles for Pol III in maintaining RNA homeostasis, adjusting the expression of a diverse suite of genes, and indirectly modulating gene splicing. Future analyses using thenrpc7-1mutant will be instrumental in examining other unknown Pol III functions. PMID:26865731

  4. Multi-target parallel processing approach for gene-to-structure determination of the influenza polymerase PB2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Armour, Brianna L; Barnes, Steve R; Moen, Spencer O; Smith, Eric; Raymond, Amy C; Fairman, James W; Stewart, Lance J; Staker, Bart L; Begley, Darren W; Edwards, Thomas E; Lorimer, Donald D

    2013-01-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of highly virulent influenza strains can cause widespread morbidity and mortality in human populations worldwide. In the United States alone, an average of 41,400 deaths and 1.86 million hospitalizations are caused by influenza virus infection each year (1). Point mutations in the polymerase basic protein 2 subunit (PB2) have been linked to the adaptation of the viral infection in humans (2). Findings from such studies have revealed the biological significance of PB2 as a virulence factor, thus highlighting its potential as an antiviral drug target. The structural genomics program put forth by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) provides funding to Emerald Bio and three other Pacific Northwest institutions that together make up the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The SSGCID is dedicated to providing the scientific community with three-dimensional protein structures of NIAID category A-C pathogens. Making such structural information available to the scientific community serves to accelerate structure-based drug design. Structure-based drug design plays an important role in drug development. Pursuing multiple targets in parallel greatly increases the chance of success for new lead discovery by targeting a pathway or an entire protein family. Emerald Bio has developed a high-throughput, multi-target parallel processing pipeline (MTPP) for gene-to-structure determination to support the consortium. Here we describe the protocols used to determine the structure of the PB2 subunit from four different influenza A strains. PMID:23851357

  5. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. PMID:26989174

  6. Underproduction of the Largest Subunit of RNA Polymerase II Causes Temperature Sensitivity, Slow Growth, and Inositol Auxotrophy in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, J.; Jansma, D. B.; Friesen, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in genes encoding subunits of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) often give rise to a set of pleiotropic phenotypes that includes temperature sensitivity, slow growth and inositol auxotrophy. In this study, we show that these phenotypes can be brought about by a reduction in the intracellular concentration of RNAPII. Underproduction of RNAPII was achieved by expressing the gene (RPO21), encoding the largest subunit of the enzyme, from the LEU2 promoter or a weaker derivative of it, two promoters that can be repressed by the addition of leucine to the growth medium. We found that cells that underproduced RPO21 were unable to derepress fully the expression of a reporter gene under the control of the INO1 UAS. Our results indicate that temperature sensitivity, slow growth and inositol auxotrophy is a set of phenotypes that can be caused by lowering the steadystate amount of RNAPII; these results also lead to the prediction that some of the previously identified RNAPII mutations that confer this same set of phenotypes affect the assembly/stability of the enzyme. We propose a model to explain the hypersensitivity of INO1 transcription to mutations that affect components of the RNAPII transcriptional machinery. PMID:8849884

  7. Distinct functions of the RNA polymerase σ subunit region 3.2 in RNA priming and promoter escape

    PubMed Central

    Pupov, Danil; Kuzin, Ivan; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    The σ subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) has been implicated in all steps of transcription initiation, including promoter recognition and opening, priming of RNA synthesis, abortive initiation and promoter escape. The post-promoter-recognition σ functions were proposed to depend on its conserved region σ3.2 that directly contacts promoter DNA immediately upstream of the RNAP active centre and occupies the RNA exit path. Analysis of the transcription effects of substitutions and deletions in this region in Escherichia coli σ70 subunit, performed in this work, suggests that (i) individual residues in the σ3.2 finger collectively contribute to RNA priming by RNAP, likely by the positioning of the template DNA strand in the active centre, but are not critical to promoter escape; (ii) the physical presence of σ3.2 in the RNA exit channel is important for promoter escape; (iii) σ3.2 promotes σ dissociation during initiation and suppresses σ-dependent promoter-proximal pausing; (iv) σ3.2 contributes to allosteric inhibition of the initiating NTP binding by rifamycins. Thus, region σ3.2 performs distinct functions in transcription initiation and its inhibition by antibiotics. The B-reader element of eukaryotic factor TFIIB likely plays similar roles in RNAPII transcription, revealing common principles in transcription initiation in various domains of life. PMID:24452800

  8. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. PMID:26989174

  9. Plasmid replication initiator interactions with origin 13-mers and polymerase subunits contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Gross, Marta; Wasaznik, Anna; Konieczny, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular basis for replisome activity has been extensively investigated, it is not clear what the exact mechanism for de novo assembly of the replication complex at the replication origin is, or how the directionality of replication is determined. Here, using the plasmid RK2 replicon, we analyze the protein interactions required for Escherichia coli polymerase III (Pol III) holoenzyme association at the replication origin. Our investigations revealed that in E. coli, replisome formation at the plasmid origin involves interactions of the RK2 plasmid replication initiation protein (TrfA) with both the polymerase β- and α-subunits. In the presence of other replication proteins, including DnaA, helicase, primase and the clamp loader, TrfA interaction with the β-clamp contributes to the formation of the β-clamp nucleoprotein complex on origin DNA. By reconstituting in vitro the replication reaction on ssDNA templates, we demonstrate that TrfA interaction with the β-clamp and sequence-specific TrfA interaction with one strand of the plasmid origin DNA unwinding element (DUE) contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly. Wild-type TrfA, but not the TrfA QLSLF mutant (which does not interact with the β-clamp), in the presence of primase, helicase, Pol III core, clamp loader, and β-clamp initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA template containing 13-mers of the bottom strand, but not the top strand, of DUE. Results presented in this work uncovered requirements for anchoring polymerase at the plasmid replication origin and bring insights of how the directionality of DNA replication is determined. PMID:26195759

  10. Interactions between the cyclic AMP receptor protein and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase at the Escherichia coli galactose operon P1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Attey, A; Belyaeva, T; Savery, N; Hoggett, J; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Busby, S

    1994-10-25

    DNAase I footprinting has been used to study open complexes between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the galactose operon P1 promoter, both in the absence and the presence of CRP (the cyclic AMP receptor protein, a transcription activator). From the effects of deletion of the C-terminal part of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit, we deduce that alpha binds at the upstream end of both the binary RNA polymerase-galP1 and ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes. Disruption of the alpha-upstream contact suppresses open complex formation at galP1 at lower temperatures. In ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes, alpha appears to make direct contact with Activating Region 1 in CRP. DNAase I footprinting has been used to detect and quantify interactions between purified alpha and CRP bound at galP1. PMID:7971267

  11. Interactions between the cyclic AMP receptor protein and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase at the Escherichia coli galactose operon P1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Attey, A; Belyaeva, T; Savery, N; Hoggett, J; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Busby, S

    1994-01-01

    DNAase I footprinting has been used to study open complexes between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the galactose operon P1 promoter, both in the absence and the presence of CRP (the cyclic AMP receptor protein, a transcription activator). From the effects of deletion of the C-terminal part of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit, we deduce that alpha binds at the upstream end of both the binary RNA polymerase-galP1 and ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes. Disruption of the alpha-upstream contact suppresses open complex formation at galP1 at lower temperatures. In ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes, alpha appears to make direct contact with Activating Region 1 in CRP. DNAase I footprinting has been used to detect and quantify interactions between purified alpha and CRP bound at galP1. Images PMID:7971267

  12. Amino Acid Substitutions in the Caenorhabditis elegans RNA Polymerase II Large Subunit AMA-1/RPB-1 that Result in α-Amanitin Resistance and/or Reduced Function.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Elizabeth Anne; Riddle, Donald L; Kelly, William

    2011-11-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans RNA polymerase II AMA-1/RPB-1 subunit that cause α-amanitin resistance and/or developmental defects were isolated previously. We identified 12 of these mutations and mapped them onto the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB1 structure to provide insight into AMA-1 regions that are essential for development in a multicellular organism. PMID:22384351

  13. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III from the fungus Podospora comata. Purification, subunit structure and comparison with the homologous enzyme of a related species.

    PubMed

    Barreau, C; Begueret, J

    1982-12-15

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III has been purified to homogeneity from the filamentous fungus Podospora comata. The enzyme was extracted at low ionic strength, separated from the polymerases I and II by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography and purified by heparin-Sepharose and phosphocellulose chromatography; 0.1-0.2 mg highly purified homogeneous enzyme with a specific activity of 220 units/mg could be obtained from 2 kg wet mycelium. The subunit composition of the enzyme was determined after sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; thirteen putative subunits of molecular weight 174000 (a), 129000 b), 87000 (c), 50000 (d), 39000 (e), 23500 (f), 21000 (g), 19000 (h), 17000 (i), 16500 (j), 13500 (k), 11000 (l) and 10000 (m) were identified. All of the polypeptide components of the enzyme are present in about integral stoichiometric amounts as judged by dye binding. The presence of subunit Mr = 87000 in a molar ratio 1:1 is necessary to obtain very active enzyme. Thirteen homologous subunits were observed in a preparation of RNA polymerase III from Podospora anserina, which is a related species. Only subunit i is different in the two species. PMID:7151805

  14. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same ‘double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs. PMID:27548043

  15. Structure-Based Drug Design Targeting a Subunit Interaction of Influenza Virus RNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Kanako; Obayashi, Eiji; Yoshida, Hisashi; Park, Sam-Yong

    Influenza A virus is a major human and animal pathogen with the potential to cause catastrophic loss of life. Influenza virus reproduces rapidly, mutates frequently, and occasionally crosses species barriers. The recent emergence of swine-origin influenza H1N1 and avian influenza related to highly pathogenic forms of the human virus has highlighted the urgent need for new effective treatments. Here, we describe two crystal structures of complexes made by fragments of PA and PB1, and PB1 and PB2. These novel interfaces are surprisingly small, yet they play a crucial role in regulating the 250 kDa polymerase complex, and are completely conserved among swine, avian and human influenza viruses. Given their importance to viral replication and strict conservation, the PA/PB1 and PB1/PB2 interfaces appear to be promising targets for novel anti-influenza drugs of use against all strains of influenza A virus. It is hoped that the structures presented here will assist the search for such compounds.

  16. Critical Function of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Putative Polyphosphate Polymerase Subunit during Nutrient Deprivation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Munevver; Pootakham, Wirulda; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetics was used to isolate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered abilities to acclimate to sulfur (S) deficiency. The ars76 mutant has a deletion that eliminates several genes, including VACUOLAR TRANSPORTER CHAPERONE1 (VTC1), which encodes a component of a polyphosphate polymerase complex. The ars76 mutant cannot accumulate arylsulfatase protein or mRNA and shows marked alterations in levels of many transcripts encoded by genes induced during S deprivation. The mutant also shows little acidocalcisome formation compared with wild-type, S-deprived cells and dies more rapidly than wild-type cells following exposure to S-, phosphorus-, or nitrogen (N)-deficient conditions. Furthermore, the mutant does not accumulate periplasmic l-amino acid oxidase during N deprivation. Introduction of the VTC1 gene specifically complements the ars76 phenotypes, suggesting that normal acidocalcisome formation in cells deprived of S requires VTC1. Our data also indicate that a deficiency in acidocalcisome function impacts trafficking of periplasmic proteins, which can then feed back on the transcription of the genes encoding these proteins. These results and the reported function of vacuoles in degradation processes suggest a major role of the acidocalcisome in reshaping the cell during acclimation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:25281687

  17. Step-wise and lineage-specific diversification of plant RNA polymerase genes and origin of the largest plant-specific subunits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiong; Ma, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Proteins often function as complexes, yet little is known about the evolution of dissimilar subunits of complexes. DNA-directed RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are multisubunit complexes, with distinct eukaryotic types for different classes of transcripts. In addition to Pol I-III, common in eukaryotes, plants have Pol IV and V for epigenetic regulation. Some RNAP subunits are specific to one type, whereas other subunits are shared by multiple types. We have conducted extensive phylogenetic and sequence analyses, and have placed RNAP gene duplication events in land plant history, thereby reconstructing the subunit compositions of the novel RNAPs during land plant evolution. We found that Pol IV/V have experienced step-wise duplication and diversification of various subunits, with increasingly distinctive subunit compositions. Also, lineage-specific duplications have further increased RNAP complexity with distinct copies in different plant families and varying divergence for subunits of different RNAPs. Further, the largest subunits of Pol IV/V probably originated from a gene fusion in the ancestral land plants. We propose a framework of plant RNAP evolution, providing an excellent model for protein complex evolution. PMID:25921392

  18. Sequence diversity in the large subunit of RNA polymerase I contributes to Mefenoxam insensitivity in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Randall, Eva; Young, Vanessa; Sierotzki, Helge; Scalliet, Gabriel; Birch, Paul R J; Cooke, David E L; Csukai, Michael; Whisson, Stephen C

    2014-09-01

    Phenylamide fungicides have been widely used for the control of oomycete-incited plant diseases for over 30 years. Insensitivity to this chemical class of fungicide was recorded early in its usage history, but the precise protein(s) conditioning insensitivity has proven difficult to determine. To determine the genetic basis of insensitivity and to inform strategies for the cloning of the gene(s) responsible, genetic crosses were established between Mefenoxam sensitive and intermediate insensitive isolates of Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen. F1 progeny showed the expected semi-dominant phenotypes for Mefenoxam insensitivity and suggested the involvement of multiple loci, complicating the positional cloning of the gene(s) conditioning insensitivity to Mefenoxam. Instead, a candidate gene strategy was used, based on previous observations that the primary effect of phenylamide compounds is to inhibit ribosomal RNA synthesis. The subunits of RNA polymerase I (RNApolI) were sequenced from sensitive and insensitive isolates and F1 progeny. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specific to insensitive field isolates were identified in the gene encoding the large subunit of RNApolI. In a survey of field isolates, SNP T1145A (Y382F) showed an 86% association with Mefenoxam insensitivity. Isolates not showing this association belonged predominantly to one P. infestans genotype. The transfer of the 'insensitive' allele of RPA190 to a sensitive isolate yielded transgenic lines that were insensitive to Mefenoxam. These results demonstrate that sequence variation in RPA190 contributes to insensitivity to Mefenoxam in P. infestans. PMID:24521429

  19. The JNKs differentially regulate RNA polymerase III transcription by coordinately modulating the expression of all TFIIIB subunits.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shuping; Johnson, Deborah L

    2009-08-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III-dependent transcription is subject to stringent regulation by tumor suppressors and oncogenic proteins and enhanced RNA pol III transcription is essential for cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Since the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) display both oncogenic and tumor suppressor properties, the roles of these proteins in regulating RNA pol III transcription were examined. In both mouse and human cells, loss or reduction in JNK1 expression represses RNA pol III transcription. In contrast, loss or reduction in JNK2 expression induces transcription. The JNKs coordinately regulate expression of all 3 TFIIIB subunits. While JNK1 positively regulates TBP expression, the RNA pol III-specific factors, Brf1 and Bdp1, JNK2 negatively regulates their expression. Brf1 is coregulated with TBP through the JNK target, Elk-1. Reducing Elk-1 expression decreases Brf1 expression. Decreasing JNK1 expression reduces Elk-1 occupancy at the Brf1 promoter, while decreasing JNK2 expression enhances recruitment of Elk-1 to the Brf1 promoter. In contrast, regulation of Bdp1 occurs through JNK-mediated alterations in TBP expression. Altered TBP expression mimics the effect of reduced JNK1 or JNK2 levels on Bdp1 expression. Decreasing JNK1 expression reduces the occupancy of TBP at the Bdp1 promoter, while decreasing JNK2 expression enhances recruitment of TBP to the Bdp1 promoter. Together, these results provide a molecular mechanism for regulating RNA pol III transcription through the coordinate control of TFIIIB subunit expression and elucidate opposing functions for the JNKs in regulating a large class of genes that dictate the biosynthetic capacity of cells. PMID:19620725

  20. Identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of influenza virus via disrupting the subunits interaction of the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Singh, Kailash; Chow, Billy K C; Kao, Richard Y T; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase complex from the individual subunits PB1, PA, and PB2 is a prerequisite for viral replication, in which the interaction between the C terminal of PA (PAC) and the N-terminal of PB1 (PB1N) may be a desired target for antiviral development. In this study, we compared the feasibility of high throughput screening by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescence polarization assay. Among the two, ELISA was demonstrated to own broader dynamic range so that it was used for screening inhibitors that blocked PAC and PB1N interaction. Several binding inhibitors of PAC-PB1N were identified and subsequently tested for the antiviral efficacy. Apparently, 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-6-ethyl-7-methyl[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidin-5-ol, designated ANA-1, was found to be a strong inhibitor of viral polymerase activity and act as a potent antiviral agent against the infections of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes, in cell cultures. Intranasal administration of ANA-1 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. Docking analyses predicted that ANA-1 bound to an allosteric site of PAC, which might cause conformational changes thereby disrupting the PAC-PB1N interaction. Overall, our study has identified a novel compound with potential to be developed as an anti-influenza drug. PMID:26593979

  1. Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 19 promotes osteosarcoma growth and metastasis and associates with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenxi; Zhang, Zhichang; Min, Daliu; Yang, Qingcheng; Du, Xuefei; Tang, Lina; Lin, Feng; Sun, Yuanjue; Zhao, Hui; Zheng, Shuier; He, Aina; Li, Hongtao; Yao, Yang; Shen, Zan

    2014-04-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumour of bone. Nearly 30-40% of OS patients have a poor prognosis despite multimodal treatments. Because the carcinogenesis of OS remains unclear, the identification of new oncogenes that control the tumourigenesis and progression of OS is crucial for developing new therapies. Here, we found that the expression of Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 19 (Med19) was increased in OS samples from patients compared to normal bone tissues. Cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 are upregulated in Med19 positive OS tissues. Importantly, among 97 OS patients of Enneking stage IIB or IIIB, Med19 expression was correlated with metastasis (P<0.05) and poor prognosis (P<0.01). Med19 knockdown significantly induced growth inhibition, reduced colony-forming ability and suppressed migration in the OS cell lines Saos-2 and U2OS, along with the downregulated expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Med19 knockdown also induced apoptosis in Saos-2 cells via induction of caspase-3 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). In addition, Med19 knockdown significantly suppressed tumour growth in an OS xenograft nude mouse model via suppression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Simultaneously, Med19 downregulation decreased the expression of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in tumour samples from OS xenograft nude mice. Med19 depletion remarkably reduced tumour metastasis in a model of OS metastatic spreading. Taken together, our data suggest that Med19 acts as an oncogene in OS via a possible cyclin D1/cyclin B1 modulation pathway. PMID:24565852

  2. RNA Polymerase I-Specific Subunit CAST/hPAF49 Has a Role in the Activation of Transcription by Upstream Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Panov, Kostya I.; Panova, Tatiana B.; Gadal, Olivier; Nishiyama, Kaori; Saito, Takashi; Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are large complexes, 12 subunits of which are structurally or functionally homologous across the three polymerase classes. Each class has a set of specific subunits, likely targets of their cognate transcription factors. We have identified and characterized a human RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-specific subunit, previously identified as ASE-1 (antisense of ERCC1) and as CD3ɛ-associated signal transducer (CAST), and here termed CAST or human Pol I-associated factor of 49 kDa (hPAF49), after mouse orthologue PAF49. We provide evidence for growth-regulated Tyr phosphorylation of CAST/hPAF49, specifically in initiation-competent Pol Iβ complexes in HeLa cells, at a conserved residue also known to be important for signaling during T-cell activation. CAST/hPAF49 can interact with activator upstream binding factor (UBF) and, weakly, with selectivity factor 1 (SL1) at the rDNA (ribosomal DNA repeat sequence encoding the 18S, 5.8S, and 28S rRNA genes) promoter. CAST/hPAF49-specific antibodies and excess CAST/hPAF49 protein, which have no effect on basal Pol I transcription, inhibit UBF-activated transcription following functional SL1-Pol I-rDNA complex assembly and disrupt the interaction of UBF with CAST/hPAF49, suggesting that interaction of this Pol I-specific subunit with UBF is crucial for activation. Drawing on parallels between mammalian and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol I transcription machineries, we advance one model for CAST/hPAF49 function in which the network of interactions of Pol I-specific subunits with UBF facilitates conformational changes of the polymerase, leading to stabilization of the Pol I-template complex and, thereby, activation of transcription. PMID:16809778

  3. Polymerase chain reaction-based diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcomas: comparison of fetal type acetylcholine receptor subunits and myogenin.

    PubMed

    Gattenlöhner, S; Müller-Hermelink, H K; Marx, A

    1998-06-01

    The diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is usually straight-forward when light microscopy and immunohistochemistry are used. However, tumors that exhibit a low degree of differentiation and small biopsies can lead to confusion. In such patients and for the detection of minimal (residual) disease, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach would be a valuable diagnostic adjunct. This type of approach would be highly sensitive and should be free from the risk for contamination of the tumor sample with normal tissue. Because myogenin and the alpha and gamma subunit of the fetal type acetylcholine receptor (AChR) are specific immunohistochemical markers for RMS, their expression on the mRNA level in RMS, other childhood and adult tumors, and normal tissues was studied. Although the sensitivity of both approaches was 100% in embryonal and alveolar RMS, detection of myogenin mRNA was not specific for RMS but occurred in normal muscle and the majority of the other normal tissues and childhood tumors. Conversely, detection of fetal AChR mRNA as defined by an alpha/tau ratio of < 1 was encountered only in RMS and denervated muscle. The authors conclude that mRNA of the fetal type AChR but not myogenin is a highly specific and sensitive target for the PCR-based diagnosis of RMS. PMID:9836066

  4. BRF1, a subunit of RNA polymerase III transcription factor TFIIIB, is essential for cell growth of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Ramírez, D E; Florencio-Martínez, L E; Romero-Meza, G; Rojas-Sánchez, S; Moreno-Campos, R; Arroyo, R; Ortega-López, J; Manning-Cela, R; Martínez-Calvillo, S

    2015-11-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes small RNA molecules that are essential for cell viability. Accurate initiation of transcription by Pol III requires general transcription factor TFIIIB, which is composed of three subunits: TFIIB-related factor BRF1, TATA-binding protein and BDP1. Here we report the molecular characterization of BRF1 in Trypanosoma brucei (TbBRF1), a parasitic protozoa that shows distinctive transcription characteristics. In silico analysis allowed the detection in TbBRF1 of the three conserved domains located in the N-terminal region of all BRF1 orthologues, namely a zinc ribbon motif and two cyclin repeats. Homology modelling suggested that, similarly to other BRF1 and TFIIB proteins, the TbBRF1 cyclin repeats show the characteristic structure of five α-helices per repeat, connected by a short random-coiled linker. As expected for a transcription factor, TbBRF1 was localized in the nucleus. Knock-down of TbBRF1 by RNA interference (RNAi) showed that this protein is essential for the viability of procyclic forms of T. brucei, since ablation of TbBRF1 led to growth arrest of the parasites. Nuclear run-on and quantitative real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that transcription of all the Pol III-dependent genes analysed was reduced, at different levels, after RNAi induction. PMID:26337955

  5. The interaction of ω2 with the RNA polymerase β’ subunit functions as an activation to repression switch

    PubMed Central

    Volante, Andrea; Carrasco, Begoña; Tabone, Mariangela; Alonso, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The ω gene is encoded in broad-host range and low-copy plasmids. It is genetically linked to antibiotic resistance genes of the major human pathogens of phylum Firmicutes. The homodimeric forms of ω (ω2) coordinate the plasmid copy number control, faithful partition (ω2 and δ2) and better-than-random segregation (ζϵ2ζ) systems. The promoter (P) of the ωϵζ operon (Pω) transiently interacts with ω2. Adding δ2 facilitates the formation of stable ω2·Pω complexes. Here we show that limiting ω2 interacts with the N-terminal domain of the β’ subunit of the Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase (RNAP-σA) vegetative holoenzyme. In this way ω2 recruits RNAP-σA onto Pω DNA. Partial Pω occupancy by ω2 increases the rate at which RNAP-σA complex shifts from its closed (RPC) to open (RPO) form. This shift increases transcription activation. Adding δ2 further increases the rate of Pω transcription initiation, perhaps by stabilizing the ω2·Pω complex. In contrast, full operator occupancy by ω2 facilitates RPC formation, but it blocks RPO isomerization and represses Pω utilization. The stimulation and inhibition of RPO formation is the mechanism whereby ω2 mediates copy number fluctuation and stable plasmid segregation. By this mechanism, ω2 also indirectly influences the acquisition of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26243774

  6. Helicobacter pylori RNA polymerase α-subunit C-terminal domain shows features unique to ɛ-proteobacteria and binds NikR/DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Borin, Brendan N; Tang, Wei; Krezel, Andrzej M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase is a large, multi-subunit enzyme responsible for transcription of genomic information. The C-terminal domain of the α subunit of RNA polymerase (αCTD) functions as a DNA and protein recognition element localizing the polymerase on certain promoter sequences and is essential in all bacteria. Although αCTD is part of RNA polymerase, it is thought to have once been a separate transcription factor, and its primary role is the recruitment of RNA polymerase to various promoters. Despite the conservation of the subunits of RNA polymerase among bacteria, the mechanisms of regulation of transcription vary significantly. We have determined the tertiary structure of Helicobacter pylori αCTD. It is larger than other structurally determined αCTDs due to an extra, highly amphipathic helix near the C-terminal end. Residues within this helix are highly conserved among ɛ-proteobacteria. The surface of the domain that binds A/T rich DNA sequences is conserved and showed binding to DNA similar to αCTDs of other bacteria. Using several NikR dependent promoter sequences, we observed cooperative binding of H. pylori αCTD to NikR:DNA complexes. We also produced αCTD lacking the 19 C-terminal residues, which showed greatly decreased stability, but maintained the core domain structure and binding affinity to NikR:DNA at low temperatures. The modeling of H. pylori αCTD into the context of transcriptional complexes suggests that the additional amphipathic helix mediates interactions with transcriptional regulators. PMID:24442709

  7. von Hippel-Lindau protein binds hyperphosphorylated large subunit of RNA polymerase II through a proline hydroxylation motif and targets it for ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Anna V; Meller, Jaroslaw; Schnell, Phillip O; Nash, James A; Ignacak, Monika L; Sanchez, Yolanda; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria F

    2003-03-01

    The transition from transcription initiation to elongation involves phosphorylation of the large subunit (Rpb1) of RNA polymerase II on the repetitive carboxyl-terminal domain. The elongating hyperphosphorylated Rpb1 is subject to ubiquitination, particularly in response to UV radiation and DNA-damaging agents. By using computer modeling, we identified regions of Rpb1 and the adjacent subunit 6 of RNA polymerase II (Rpb6) that share sequence and structural similarity with the domain of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) that binds von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL). pVHL confers substrate specificity to the E3 ligase complex, which ubiquitinates HIF-alpha and targets it for proteasomal degradation. In agreement with the computational model, we show biochemical evidence that pVHL specifically binds the hyperphosphorylated Rpb1 in a proline-hydroxylation-dependent manner, targeting it for ubiquitination. This interaction is regulated by UV radiation. PMID:12604794

  8. von Hippel–Lindau protein binds hyperphosphorylated large subunit of RNA polymerase II through a proline hydroxylation motif and targets it for ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Anna V.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Schnell, Phillip O.; Nash, James A.; Ignacak, Monika L.; Sanchez, Yolanda; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria F.

    2003-01-01

    The transition from transcription initiation to elongation involves phosphorylation of the large subunit (Rpb1) of RNA polymerase II on the repetitive carboxyl-terminal domain. The elongating hyperphosphorylated Rpb1 is subject to ubiquitination, particularly in response to UV radiation and DNA-damaging agents. By using computer modeling, we identified regions of Rpb1 and the adjacent subunit 6 of RNA polymerase II (Rpb6) that share sequence and structural similarity with the domain of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) that binds von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL). pVHL confers substrate specificity to the E3 ligase complex, which ubiquitinates HIF-α and targets it for proteasomal degradation. In agreement with the computational model, we show biochemical evidence that pVHL specifically binds the hyperphosphorylated Rpb1 in a proline-hydroxylation-dependent manner, targeting it for ubiquitination. This interaction is regulated by UV radiation. PMID:12604794

  9. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  10. Aptamers to Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase that sense its interaction with rifampicin, sigma-subunit and GreB.

    PubMed

    Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Feklistov, Andrey; Krasheninnikov, Igor; Goldfarb, Alex; Nikiforov, Vadim

    2004-12-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the central enzyme of gene expression that is responsible for the synthesis of all types of cellular RNAs. The process of transcription is accompanied by complex structural rearrangements of RNAP. Despite the recent progress in structural studies of RNAP, detailed mechanisms of conformational changes of RNAP that occur at different stages of transcription remain unknown. The goal of this work was to obtain novel ligands to RNAP which would target different epitopes of the enzyme and serve as specific probes to study the mechanism of transcription and conformational flexibility of RNAP. Using in vitro selection methods, we obtained 13 classes of ssDNA aptamers against Escherichia coli core RNAP. The minimal nucleic acid scaffold (an oligonucleotide construct imitating DNA and RNA in elongation complex), rifampicin and the sigma70-subunit inhibited binding of the aptamers to RNAP core but did not affect the dissociation rate of preformed RNAP-aptamer complexes. We argue that these ligands sterically block access of the aptamers to their binding sites within the main RNAP channel. In contrast, transcript cleavage factor GreB increased the rate of dissociation of preformed RNAP-aptamer complexes. This suggested that GreB that binds RNAP outside the main channel actively disrupts RNAP-aptamer complexes by inducing conformational changes in the channel. We propose that the aptamers obtained in this work will be useful for studying the interactions of RNAP with various ligands and regulatory factors and for investigating the conformational flexibility of the enzyme. PMID:15606780

  11. A single RNA-dependent RNA polymerase assembles with mutually exclusive nucleotidyl transferase subunits to direct different pathways of small RNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suzanne Rebecca; Talsky, Kristin Benjamin; Collins, Kathleen

    2009-07-01

    Members of the conserved family of eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (Rdrs) synthesize double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) intermediates in diverse pathways of small RNA (sRNA) biogenesis and RNA-mediated silencing. Rdr-dependent pathways of sRNA production are poorly characterized relative to Rdr-independent pathways, and the Rdr enzymes themselves are poorly characterized relative to their viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase counterparts. We previously described a physical and functional coupling of the Tetrahymena thermophila Rdr, Rdr1, and a Dicer enzyme, Dcr2, in the production of approximately 24-nucleotide (nt) sRNA in vitro. Here we characterize the endogenous complexes that harbor Rdr1, termed RDRCs. Distinct RDRCs assemble to contain Rdr1 and subsets of the total of four tightly Rdr1-associated proteins. Of particular interest are two RDRC subunits, Rdn1 and Rdn2, which possess noncanonical ribonucleotidyl transferase motifs. We show that the two Rdn proteins are uridine-specific polymerases of separate RDRCs. Two additional RDRC subunits, Rdf1 and Rdf2, are present only in RDRCs containing Rdn1. Rdr1 catalytic activity is retained in RDRCs purified from cell extracts lacking any of the nonessential RDRC subunits (Rdn2, Rdf1, Rdf2) or if the RDRC harbors a catalytically inactive Rdn. However, specific disruption of each RDRC imposes distinct loss-of-function consequences at the cellular level and has a differential impact on the accumulation of specific 23-24-nt sRNA sequences in vivo. The biochemical and biological phenotypes of RDRC subunit disruption reveal a previously unanticipated complexity of Rdr-dependent sRNA biogenesis in vivo. PMID:19451546

  12. Isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive mutations in RPA190, the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wittekind, M; Dodd, J; Vu, L; Kolb, J M; Buhler, J M; Sentenac, A; Nomura, M

    1988-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive mutations in RNA polymerase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae are described. A plasmid carrying RPA190, the gene encoding the largest subunit of the enzyme, was subjected to in vitro mutagenesis with hydroxylamine. Using a plasmid shuffle screening system, five different plasmids were isolated which conferred a temperature-sensitive phenotype in haploid yeast strains carrying the disrupted chromosomal RPA190 gene. These temperature-sensitive alleles were transferred to the chromosomal RPA190 locus for mapping and physiology experiments. Accumulation of RNA was found to be defective in all mutant strains at the nonpermissive temperature. In addition, analysis of pulse-labeled RNA from two mutant strains at 37 degrees C showed that the transcription of rRNA genes was decreased, while that of 5S RNA was relatively unaffected. RNA polymerase I was partially purified from several of the mutant strains grown at the nonpermissive temperature and was shown to be deficient when assayed in vitro. Fine-structure mapping and sequencing of the mutant alleles demonstrated that all five mutations were unique. The rpa190-1 and rpa190-5 mutations are tightly clustered in region I (S.S. Broyles and B. Moss, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:3141-3145, 1986), the putative zinc-binding region that is common to all eucaryotic RNA polymerase large subunits. The rpa190-3 mutation is located between regions III and IV, and a strain carrying it behaves as a mutant that is defective in the synthesis of the enzyme. This mutation lies within a previously unidentified segment of highly conserved amino acid sequence homology that is shared among the largest subunits of eucaryotic nuclear RNA polymerases. Another temperature-sensitive mutation, rpa190-2, creates a UGA nonsense codon. Images PMID:3054507

  13. Transcription activation at Escherichia coli promoters dependent on the cyclic AMP receptor protein: effects of binding sequences for the RNA polymerase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Savery, N J; Rhodius, V A; Wing, H J; Busby, S J

    1995-01-01

    Transcription activation at two semi-synthetic Escherichia coli promoters, CC(-41.5) and CC(-72.5), is dependent on the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) that binds to sites centred 41.5 and 72.5 bp upstream from the respective transcription startpoints. An UP-element that can bind the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha-subunit was cloned upstream of the DNA site for CRP at CC(-41.5) and downstream of the DNA site for CRP at CC(-72.5). In both cases CRP-dependent promoter activity was increased by the UP-element, but CRP-independent activity was not increased. DNase I footprinting was exploited to investigate the juxtaposition of bound CRP and RNAP alpha-subunits. In both cases, CRP and RNAP alpha-subunits occupy their cognate binding sites in ternary CRP-RNAP promoter complexes. RNAP alpha-subunits can occupy the UP-element in the absence of CRP, but this is not sufficient for open complex formation. The positive effects of binding RNAP alpha-subunits upstream of the DNA site for CRP at -41.5 are suppressed if the UP-element is incorrectly positioned. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7619086

  14. UmuDAb: An Error-Prone Polymerase Accessory Homolog Whose N-Terminal Domain Is Required for Repression of DNA Damage Inducible Gene Expression in Acinetobacter baylyi

    PubMed Central

    Stinnett, DeAnna B.; Wells, Whitney K.; Peterson, Megan A.; Hare, Janelle M.

    2016-01-01

    In many bacteria, the DNA damage response induces genes (SOS genes) that were repressed by LexA. LexA represses transcription by binding to SOS promoters via a helix-turn-helix motif in its N-terminal domain (NTD). Upon DNA damage, LexA cleaves itself and allows induction of transcription. In Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi, multiple genes are induced by DNA damage, and although the Acinetobacter genus lacks LexA, a homolog of the error-prone polymerase subunit UmuD, called UmuDAb, regulates some DNA damage-induced genes. The mechanism of UmuDAb regulation has not been determined. We constructed UmuDAb mutant strains of A. baylyi to test whether UmuDAb mediates gene regulation through LexA-like repressor actions consisting of relief of repression through self-cleavage after DNA damage. Real-time quantitative PCR experiments in both a null umuDAb mutant and an NTD mutant showed that the DNA damage-inducible, UmuDAb-regulated gene ddrR was highly expressed even in the absence of DNA damage. Protein modeling identified a potential LexA-like helix-turn-helix structure in the UmuDAb NTD, which when disrupted, also relieved ddrR and umuDAb repression under non-inducing conditions. Mutations in a putative SOS box in the shared umuDAb-ddrR promoter region similarly relieved these genes’ repression under non-inducing conditions. Conversely, cells possessing a cleavage-deficient UmuDAb were unable to induce gene expression after MMC-mediated DNA damage. This evidence of a UmuDAb repressor mechanism was contrasted with the failure of umuDAb to complement an Escherichia coli umuD mutant for UmuD error-prone DNA replication activity. Similarly, A. baumannii null umuDAb mutant cells did not have a reduced UmuDˊ2UmuC-mediated mutation rate after DNA damage, suggesting that although this UmuDAb protein may have evolved from a umuDC operon in this genus, it now performs a LexA-like repressor function for a sub-set of DNA damage-induced genes. PMID:27010837

  15. Signal Transduction and Regulatory Mechanisms Involved in Control of the σS (RpoS) Subunit of RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Hengge-Aronis, Regine

    2002-01-01

    The σS (RpoS) subunit of RNA polymerase is the master regulator of the general stress response in Escherichia coli and related bacteria. While rapidly growing cells contain very little σS, exposure to many different stress conditions results in rapid and strong σS induction. Consequently, transcription of numerous σS-dependent genes is activated, many of which encode gene products with stress-protective functions. Multiple signal integration in the control of the cellular σS level is achieved by rpoS transcriptional and translational control as well as by regulated σS proteolysis, with various stress conditions differentially affecting these levels of σS control. Thus, a reduced growth rate results in increased rpoS transcription whereas high osmolarity, low temperature, acidic pH, and some late-log-phase signals stimulate the translation of already present rpoS mRNA. In addition, carbon starvation, high osmolarity, acidic pH, and high temperature result in stabilization of σS, which, under nonstress conditions, is degraded with a half-life of one to several minutes. Important cis-regulatory determinants as well as trans-acting regulatory factors involved at all levels of σS regulation have been identified. rpoS translation is controlled by several proteins (Hfq and HU) and small regulatory RNAs that probably affect the secondary structure of rpoS mRNA. For σS proteolysis, the response regulator RssB is essential. RssB is a specific direct σS recognition factor, whose affinity for σS is modulated by phosphorylation of its receiver domain. RssB delivers σS to the ClpXP protease, where σS is unfolded and completely degraded. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the molecular functions and interactions of these components and tries to establish a framework for further research on the mode of multiple signal input into this complex regulatory system. PMID:12208995

  16. The RNA cleavage activity of RNA polymerase III is mediated by an essential TFIIS-like subunit and is important for transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Chédin, Stéphane; Riva, Michel; Schultz, Patrick; Sentenac, André; Carles, Christophe

    1998-01-01

    Budding yeast RNA polymerase III (Pol III) contains a small, essential subunit, named C11, that is conserved in humans and shows a strong homology to TFIIS. A mutant Pol III, heterocomplemented with Schizosaccharomyces pombe C11, was affected in transcription termination in vivo. A purified form of the enzyme (Pol III Δ), deprived of C11 subunit, initiated properly but ignored pause sites and was defective in termination. Remarkably, Pol III Δ lacked the intrinsic RNA cleavage activity of complete Pol III. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that Pol III RNA cleavage activity is mediated by C11. Mutagenesis in C11 of two conserved residues, which are critical for the TFIIS-dependent cleavage activity of Pol II, is lethal. Immunoelectron microscopy data suggested that C11 is localized on the mobile thumb-like stalk of the polymerase. We propose that C11 allows the enzyme to switch between an RNA elongation and RNA cleavage mode and that the essential role of the Pol III RNA cleavage activity is to remove the kinetic barriers to the termination process. The integration of TFIIS function into a specific Pol III subunit may stem from the opposite requirements of Pol III and Pol II in terms of transcript length and termination efficiency. PMID:9869639

  17. Mutations affecting two adjacent amino acid residues in the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase block transcriptional activation by the bacteriophage P2 Ogr protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, D J; Sunshine, M G; Six, E W; Christie, G E

    1994-01-01

    The bacteriophage P2 ogr gene product is a positive regulator of transcription from P2 late promoters. The ogr gene was originally defined by compensatory mutations that overcame the block to P2 growth imposed by a host mutation, rpoA109, in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase. DNA sequence analysis has confirmed that this mutation affects the C-terminal region of the alpha subunit, changing a leucine residue at position 290 to a histidine (rpoAL290H). We have employed a reporter plasmid system to screen other, previously described, rpoA mutants for effects on activation of a P2 late promoter and have identified a second allele, rpoA155, that blocks P2 late transcription. This mutation lies just upstream of rpoAL290H, changing the leucine residue at position 289 to a phenylalanine (rpoAL289F). The effect of the rpoAL289F mutation is not suppressed by the rpoAL290H-compensatory P2 ogr mutation. P2 ogr mutants that overcome the block imposed by rpoAL289F were isolated and characterized. Our results are consistent with a direct interaction between Ogr and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase and support a model in which transcription factor contact sites within the C terminus of alpha are discrete and tightly clustered. PMID:8002564

  18. Mapping the domain structure of the influenza A virus polymerase acidic protein (PA) and its interaction with the basic protein 1 (PB1) subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Dong Liping; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Tao, Yizhi J.

    2008-09-15

    The influenza A virus polymerase consists of three subunits (PA, PB1, and PB2) necessary for viral RNA synthesis. The heterotrimeric polymerase complex forms through PA interacting with PB1 and PB1 interacting with PB2. PA has been shown to play critical roles in the assembly, catalysis, and nuclear localization of the polymerase. To probe the structure of PA, we isolated recombinant PA from insect cells. Limited proteolysis revealed that PA contained two domains connected by a 20-residue linker (residues 257-276). Far-UV circular dichroism established that the two domains folded into a mixed {alpha}/{beta} structure when separately expressed. In vitro pull-down assays showed that neither individually nor cooperatively expressed PA domains, without the linker, could assure PA-PB1 interaction. Protease treatment of PA-PB1 complex indicated that its PA subunit was significantly more stable than free PA, suggesting that the linker is protected and it constitutes an essential component of the PA-PB1 interface.

  19. Two Routes to Genetic Suppression of RNA Trimethylguanosine Cap Deficiency via C-Terminal Truncation of U1 snRNP Subunit Snp1 or Overexpression of RNA Polymerase Subunit Rpo26.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhicheng R; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-07-01

    The trimethylguanosine (TMG) caps of small nuclear (sn) RNAs are synthesized by the enzyme Tgs1 via sequential methyl additions to the N2 atom of the m(7)G cap. Whereas TMG caps are inessential for Saccharomyces cerevisiae vegetative growth at 25° to 37°, tgs1∆ cells that lack TMG caps fail to thrive at 18°. The cold-sensitive defect correlates with ectopic stoichiometric association of nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) with the residual m(7)G cap of the U1 snRNA and is suppressed fully by Cbc2 mutations that weaken cap binding. Here, we show that normal growth of tgs1∆ cells at 18° is also restored by a C-terminal deletion of 77 amino acids from the Snp1 subunit of yeast U1 snRNP. These results underscore the U1 snRNP as a focal point for TMG cap function in vivo. Casting a broader net, we conducted a dosage suppressor screen for genes that allowed survival of tgs1∆ cells at 18°. We thereby recovered RPO26 (encoding a shared subunit of all three nuclear RNA polymerases) and RPO31 (encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III) as moderate and weak suppressors of tgs1∆ cold sensitivity, respectively. A structure-guided mutagenesis of Rpo26, using rpo26∆ complementation and tgs1∆ suppression as activity readouts, defined Rpo26-(78-155) as a minimized functional domain. Alanine scanning identified Glu89, Glu124, Arg135, and Arg136 as essential for rpo26∆ complementation. The E124A and R135A alleles retained tgs1∆ suppressor activity, thereby establishing a separation-of-function. These results illuminate the structure activity profile of an essential RNA polymerase component. PMID:25911228

  20. Interdependent Roles for Accessory KChIP2, KChIP3 and KChIP4 Subunits in the Generation of Kv4-encoded IA Channels in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Aaron J.; Foeger, Nicholas C.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly activating and inactivating voltage-dependent outward K+ (Kv) current, IA, is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons. IA has long been recognized to play important roles in determining neuronal firing properties and regulating neuronal excitability. Previous work demonstrated that Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 α-subunits are the primary determinants of IA in mouse cortical pyramidal neurons. Accumulating evidence indicates that native neuronal Kv4 channels function in macromolecular protein complexes that contain accessory subunits and other regulatory molecules. The K+ Channel Interacting Proteins (KChIPs) are among the identified Kv4 channel accessory subunits and are thought to be important for the formation and functioning of neuronal Kv4 channel complexes. Molecular genetic, biochemical and electrophysiological approaches were exploited in the experiments described here to examine directly the roles of KChIPs in the generation of functional Kv4-encoded IA channels. These combined experiments revealed that KChIP2, KChIP3 and KChIP4 are robustly expressed in adult mouse posterior (visual) cortex and that all three proteins co-immunoprecipitate with Kv4.2. In addition, in cortical pyramidal neurons from mice lacking KChIP3 (KChIP3−/−), mean IA densities were reduced modestly, whereas in mean IA densities in KChIP2−/− and WT neurons were not significantly different. Interestingly, in both KChIP3−/− and KChIP2−/− cortices the expression levels of the other KChIPs (KChIP2 and 4 or KChIP3 and 4, respectively) were increased. In neurons expressing constructs to mediate simultaneous RNA interference-induced reductions in the expression of KChIP2, 3 and 4, IA densities were markedly reduced and Kv current remodeling was evident. PMID:20943905

  1. A gene-specific effect of an internal deletion in the Bdp1 subunit of the RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Akira; Kassavetis, George A

    2003-07-31

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPR1 gene encodes the RNA subunit of its RNase P, which processes RNA polymerase (pol) III primary transcripts. RPR1, which is transcribed by pol III, has been isolated as a multicopy suppressor of a specific small internal deletion (amino acids 253-269) in the Bdp1 subunit of transcription factor TFIIIB, the core pol III transcription factor. The selective effect of this Bdp1 deletion on RPR1 transcription has been analyzed in vitro. It is shown that TFIIIC-dependent assembly of TFIIIB on the RPR1 promoter is specifically sensitive to this Bdp1 deletion, leading to gene-specifically defective single-round and multiple-round transcription. PMID:12885403

  2. Genetic analysis of the Drosophila DNAprim gene. The function of the 60-kd primase subunit of DNA polymerase opposes the fat facets signaling pathway in the developing eye.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X; Li, Q; Fischer, J A

    2000-01-01

    The Drosophila DNAprim gene encodes the large subunit (60 kD) of DNA primase, the part of DNA polymerase alpha that synthesizes RNA primers during DNA replication. The precise function of the 60-kD subunit is unknown. In a mutagenesis screen for suppressors of the fat facets (faf) mutant eye phenotype, we identified mutations in DNAprim. The faf gene encodes a deubiquitinating enzyme required specifically for patterning the compound eye. The DNA sequences of four DNAprim alleles were determined and these define essential protein domains. We show that while flies lacking DNAprim activity are lethal, flies with reduced DNAprim activity display morphological defects in their eyes, and unlike faf mutants, cell cycle abnormalities in larval eye discs. Mechanisms by which DNA primase levels might influence the faf-dependent cell communication pathway are discussed. PMID:11102374

  3. The B subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae executes an essential function at the initial stage of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Foiani, M; Marini, F; Gamba, D; Lucchini, G; Plevani, P

    1994-01-01

    The four-subunit DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex is unique in its ability to synthesize DNA chains de novo, and some in vitro data suggest its involvement in initiation and elongation of chromosomal DNA replication, although direct in vivo evidence for a role in the initiation reaction is still lacking. The function of the B subunit of the complex is unknown, but the Saccharomyces cerevisiae POL12 gene, which encodes this protein, is essential for cell viability. We have produced different pol12 alleles by in vitro mutagenesis of the cloned gene. The in vivo analysis of our 18 pol12 alleles indicates that the conserved carboxy-terminal two-thirds of the protein contains regions that are essential for cell viability, while the more divergent NH2-terminal portion is partially dispensable. The characterization of the temperature-sensitive pol12-T9 mutant allele demonstrates that the B subunit is required for in vivo DNA synthesis and correct progression through S phase. Moreover, reciprocal shift experiments indicate that the POL12 gene product plays an essential role at the early stage of chromosomal DNA replication, before the hydroxyurea-sensitive step. A model for the role of the B subunit in initiation of DNA replication at an origin is presented. Images PMID:8289832

  4. Mycobacterium RbpA cooperates with the stress-response σB subunit of RNA polymerase in promoter DNA unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yangbo; Morichaud, Zakia; Sudalaiyadum Perumal, Ayyappasamy; Roquet-Baneres, Françoise; Brodolin, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    RbpA, a transcriptional activator that is essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication and survival during antibiotic treatment, binds to RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the absence of promoter DNA. It has been hypothesized that RbpA stimulates housekeeping gene expression by promoting assembly of the σA subunit with core RNAP. Here, using a purified in vitro transcription system of M. tuberculosis, we show that RbpA functions in a promoter-dependent manner as a companion of RNAP essential for promoter DNA unwinding and formation of the catalytically active open promoter complex (RPo). Screening for RbpA activity using a full panel of the M. tuberculosis σ subunits demonstrated that RbpA targets σA and stress-response σB, but not the alternative σ subunits from the groups 3 and 4. In contrast to σA, the σB subunit activity displayed stringent dependency upon RbpA. These results suggest that RbpA-dependent control of RPo formation provides a mechanism for tuning gene expression during the switch between different physiological states, and in the stress response. PMID:25122744

  5. The yeast TFB1 and SSL1 genes, which encode subunits of transcription factor IIH, are required for nucleotide excision repair and RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Buratowski, S; Svejstrup, J Q; Feaver, W J; Wu, X; Kornberg, R D; Donahue, T F; Friedberg, E C

    1995-01-01

    The essential TFB1 and SSL1 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode two subunits of the RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIIH (factor b). Here we show that extracts of temperature-sensitive mutants carrying mutations in both genes (tfb1-101 and ssl1-1) are defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RNA polymerase II transcription but are proficient for base excision repair. RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription at the CYC1 promoter was normal at permissive temperatures but defective in extracts preincubated at a restrictive temperature. In contrast, defective NER was observed at temperatures that are permissive for growth. Additionally, both mutants manifested increased sensitivity to UV radiation at permissive temperatures. The extent of this sensitivity was not increased in a tfb1-101 strain and was only slightly increased in a ssl1-1 strain at temperatures that are semipermissive for growth. Purified factor TFIIH complemented defective NER in both tfb1-101 and ssl1-1 mutant extracts. These results define TFB1 and SSL1 as bona fide NER genes and indicate that, as is the case with the yeast Rad3 and Ss12 (Rad25) proteins, Tfb1 and Ssl1 are required for both RNA polymerase II basal transcription and NER. Our results also suggest that the repair and transcription functions of Tfb1 and Ssl1 are separable. PMID:7891722

  6. Reverse Genetics of Drosophila RNA Polymerase II: Identification and Characterization of Rpii140, the Genomic Locus for the Second-Largest Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B. J.; Mortin, M. A.; Greenleaf, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have used a reverse genetics approach to isolate genes encoding two subunits of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II. RpII18 encodes the 18-kDa subunit and maps cytogenetically to polytene band region 83A. RpII140 encodes the 140-kDa subunit and maps to polytene band region 88A10:B1,2. Focusing on RpII140, we used in situ hybridization to map this gene to a small subinterval defined by the endpoints of a series of deficiencies impinging on the 88A/B region and showed that it does not represent a previously known genetic locus. Two recently defined complementation groups, A5 and Z6, reside in the same subinterval and thus were candidates for the RpII140 locus. Phenotypes of A5 mutants suggested that they affect RNA polymerase II, in that the lethal phase and the interaction with developmental loci such as Ubx resemble those of mutants in the gene for the largest subunit, RpII215. Indeed, we have achieved complete genetic rescue of representative recessive lethal mutations of A5 with a P-element construct containing a 9.1-kb genomic DNA fragment carrying RpII140. Interestingly, the initial construct also rescued lethal alleles in the neighboring complementation group, Z6, revealing that the 9.1-kb insert carries two genes. Deleting coding region sequences of RpII140, however, yielded a transformation vector that failed to rescue A5 alleles but continued to rescue Z6 alleles. These results strongly support the conclusion that the A5 complementation group is equivalent to the genomic RpII140 locus. PMID:8325487

  7. Kv4.2 and accessory dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 10 (DPP10) subunit preferentially form a 4:2 (Kv4.2:DPP10) channel complex.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2015-09-11

    Kv4 is a member of the voltage-gated K(+) channel family and forms a complex with various accessory subunits. Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein (DPP) is one of the auxiliary subunits for the Kv4 channel. Although DPP has been well characterized and is known to increase the current amplitude and accelerate the inactivation and recovery from inactivation of Kv4 current, it remains to be determined how many DPPs bind to one Kv4 channel. To examine whether the expression level of DPP changes the biophysical properties of Kv4, we expressed Kv4.2 and DPP10 in different ratios in Xenopus oocytes and analyzed the currents under two-electrode voltage clamp. The current amplitude and the speed of recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2 changed depending on the co-expression level of DPP10. This raised the possibility that the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex is variable and affects the biophysical properties of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of DPP10 alone by subunit counting using single-molecule imaging. Approximately 70% of the DPP10 formed dimers in the plasma membrane, and the rest existed as monomers in the absence of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex; Kv4.2-mCherry and mEGFP-DPP10 were co-expressed in different ratios and the stoichiometries of Kv4.2-DPP10 complexes were evaluated by the subunit counting method. The stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex was variable depending on the relative expression level of each subunit, with a preference for 4:2 stoichiometry. This preference may come from the bulky dimeric structure of the extracellular domain of DPP10. PMID:26209633

  8. Spacing requirements for interactions between the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the cAMP receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, G S; Busby, S J; Savery, N J

    1998-01-01

    During transcription initiation at bacterial promoters, the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD) can interact with DNA-sequence elements (known as UP elements) and with activator proteins. We have constructed a series of semi-synthetic promoters carrying both an UP element and a consensus DNA-binding site for the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP; a factor that activates transcription by making direct contacts with alphaCTD). At these promoters, the UP element was located at a variety of distances upstream of the CRP-binding site, which was fixed at position -41.5 bp upstream of the transcript start. At some positions, the UP element caused enhanced promoter activity whereas, at other positions, it had very little effect. In no case was the CRP-dependence of the promoter relieved. DNase I and hydroxyl-radical footprinting were used to study ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-promoter complexes formed at two of the most active of these promoters, and co-operativity between the binding of CRP and purified alpha subunits was studied. The footprints show that alphaCTD binds to the UP element as it is displaced upstream but that this displacement does not prevent alphaCTD from being contacted by CRP. Models to account for this are discussed. PMID:9461538

  9. Subunit-selective mutagenesis indicates minimal polymerase activity in heterodimer-associated p51 HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Le Grice, S F; Naas, T; Wohlgensinger, B; Schatz, O

    1991-12-01

    We have purified and determined functional parameters of reconstituted, recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) heterodimers within which either the p66 or p51 polypeptide was selectively mutated in one or both aspartic acid residues constituting the proposed polymerase active site (-Y-M-D-D-). Heterodimers containing a mutated p51 polypeptide retain almost wild type levels of both RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNaseH) activity. In contrast, heterodimers whose p66 polypeptide was likewise mutated exhibit wild type RNaseH activity but are deficient in RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. These results indicate that in heterodimer RT, the p51 component cannot compensate for active site mutations eliminating the activity of p66, indirectly implying that solely the p66 aspartic acid residues of heterodimer are crucial for catalysis. PMID:1718745

  10. Abundant Intergenic TAACTGA Direct Repeats and Putative Alternate RNA Polymerase β′ Subunits in Marine Beggiatoaceae Genomes: Possible Regulatory Roles and Origins

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequences of several giant marine sulfur-oxidizing bacteria present evidence of a possible post-transcriptional regulatory network that may have been transmitted to or from two distantly related bacteria lineages. The draft genome of a Cand. “Maribeggiatoa” filament from the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) seafloor contains 169 sets of TAACTGA direct repeats and one indirect repeat, with two to six copies per set. Related heptamers are rarely or never found as direct repeats. TAACTGA direct repeats are also found in some other Beggiatoaceae, Thiocystis violascens, a range of Cyanobacteria, and five Bacteroidetes. This phylogenetic distribution suggests they may have been transmitted horizontally, but no mechanism is evident. There is no correlation between total TAACTGA occurrences and repeats per genome. In most species the repeat units are relatively short, but longer arrays of up to 43 copies are found in several Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria. The majority of TAACTGA repeats in the Cand. “Maribeggiatoa” Orange Guaymas (BOGUAY) genome are within several nucleotides upstream of a putative start codon, suggesting they may be binding sites for a post-transcriptional regulator. Candidates include members of the ribosomal protein S1, Csp (cold shock protein), and Csr (carbon storage regulator) families. No pattern was evident in the predicted functions of the open reading frames (ORFs) downstream of repeats, but some encode presumably essential products such as ribosomal proteins. Among these is an ORF encoding a possible alternate or modified RNA polymerase beta prime subunit, predicted to have the expected subunit interaction domains but lacking most catalytic residues. A similar ORF was found in the Thioploca ingrica draft genome, but in no others. In both species they are immediately upstream of putative sensor kinase genes with nearly identical domain structures. In the marine Beggiatoaceae, a role for the TAACTGA repeats in

  11. Abundant Intergenic TAACTGA Direct Repeats and Putative Alternate RNA Polymerase β' Subunits in Marine Beggiatoaceae Genomes: Possible Regulatory Roles and Origins.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequences of several giant marine sulfur-oxidizing bacteria present evidence of a possible post-transcriptional regulatory network that may have been transmitted to or from two distantly related bacteria lineages. The draft genome of a Cand. "Maribeggiatoa" filament from the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) seafloor contains 169 sets of TAACTGA direct repeats and one indirect repeat, with two to six copies per set. Related heptamers are rarely or never found as direct repeats. TAACTGA direct repeats are also found in some other Beggiatoaceae, Thiocystis violascens, a range of Cyanobacteria, and five Bacteroidetes. This phylogenetic distribution suggests they may have been transmitted horizontally, but no mechanism is evident. There is no correlation between total TAACTGA occurrences and repeats per genome. In most species the repeat units are relatively short, but longer arrays of up to 43 copies are found in several Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria. The majority of TAACTGA repeats in the Cand. "Maribeggiatoa" Orange Guaymas (BOGUAY) genome are within several nucleotides upstream of a putative start codon, suggesting they may be binding sites for a post-transcriptional regulator. Candidates include members of the ribosomal protein S1, Csp (cold shock protein), and Csr (carbon storage regulator) families. No pattern was evident in the predicted functions of the open reading frames (ORFs) downstream of repeats, but some encode presumably essential products such as ribosomal proteins. Among these is an ORF encoding a possible alternate or modified RNA polymerase beta prime subunit, predicted to have the expected subunit interaction domains but lacking most catalytic residues. A similar ORF was found in the Thioploca ingrica draft genome, but in no others. In both species they are immediately upstream of putative sensor kinase genes with nearly identical domain structures. In the marine Beggiatoaceae, a role for the TAACTGA repeats in translational

  12. A Novel Functional Site in the PB2 Subunit of Influenza A Virus Essential for Acetyl-CoA Interaction, RNA Polymerase Activity, and Viral Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Dai; Shoji, Masaki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Hirota, Takenori; Nagae, Monami; Yanagisawa, Shin; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohmi, Naho; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, components of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus, are essential for viral transcription and replication. The PB2 subunit binds to the host RNA cap (7-methylguanosine triphosphate (m7GTP)) and supports the endonuclease activity of PA to “snatch” the cap from host pre-mRNAs. However, the structure of PB2 is not fully understood, and the functional sites remain unknown. In this study, we describe a novel Val/Arg/Gly (VRG) site in the PB2 cap-binding domain, which is involved in interaction with acetyl-CoA found in eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs). In vitro experiments revealed that the recombinant PB2 cap-binding domain that includes the VRG site interacts with acetyl-CoA; moreover, it was found that this interaction could be blocked by CoA and various HAT inhibitors. Interestingly, m7GTP also inhibited this interaction, suggesting that the same active pocket is capable of interacting with acetyl-CoA and m7GTP. To elucidate the importance of the VRG site on PB2 function and viral replication, we constructed a PB2 recombinant protein and recombinant viruses including several patterns of amino acid mutations in the VRG site. Substitutions of the valine and arginine residues or of all 3 residues of the VRG site to alanine significantly reduced the binding ability of PB2 to acetyl-CoA and its RNA polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses containing the same mutations could not be replicated in cultured cells. These results indicate that the PB2 VRG sequence is a functional site that is essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication. PMID:25063805

  13. Analysis of the Interaction of the Novel RNA Polymerase II (pol II) Subunit hsRPB4 with Its Partner hsRPB7 and with pol II

    PubMed Central

    Khazak, Vladimir; Estojak, Joanne; Cho, Helen; Majors, Jenifer; Sonoda, Gonosuke; Testa, Joseph R.; Golemis, Erica A.

    1998-01-01

    Under conditions of environmental stress, prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectively utilize particular subunits of RNA polymerase II (pol II) to alter transcription to patterns favoring survival. In S. cerevisiae, a complex of two such subunits, RPB4 and RPB7, preferentially associates with pol II during stationary phase; of these two subunits, RPB4 is specifically required for survival under nonoptimal growth conditions. Previously, we have shown that RPB7 possesses an evolutionarily conserved human homolog, hsRPB7, which was capable of partially interacting with RPB4 and the yeast transcriptional apparatus. Using this as a probe in a two-hybrid screen, we have now established that hsRPB4 is also conserved in higher eukaryotes. In contrast to hsRPB7, hsRPB4 has diverged so that it no longer interacts with yeast RPB7, although it partially complements rpb4− phenotypes in yeast. However, hsRPB4 associates strongly and specifically with hsRPB7 when expressed in yeast or in mammalian cells and copurifies with intact pol II. hsRPB4 expression in humans parallels that of hsRPB7, supporting the idea that the two proteins may possess associated functions. Structure-function studies of hsRPB4-hsRPB7 are used to establish the interaction interface between the two proteins. This identification completes the set of human homologs for RNA pol II subunits defined in yeast and should provide the basis for subsequent structural and functional characterization of the pol II holoenzyme. PMID:9528765

  14. Essential roles of Bdp1, a subunit of RNA polymerase III initiation factor TFIIIB, in transcription and tRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Akira; Kassavetis, George A; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2002-05-01

    The essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene BDP1 encodes a subunit of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription factor (TFIIIB); TATA box binding protein (TBP) and Brf1 are the other subunits of this three-protein complex. Deletion analysis defined three segments of Bdp1 that are essential for viability. A central segment, comprising amino acids 327 to 353, was found to be dispensable, and cells making Bdp1 that was split within this segment, at amino acid 352, are viable. Suppression of bdp1 conditional viability by overexpressing SPT15 and BRF1 identified functional interactions of specific Bdp1 segments with TBP and Brf1, respectively. A Bdp1 deletion near essential segment I was synthetically lethal with overexpression of PCF1-1, a dominant gain-of-function mutation in the second tetracopeptide repeat motif (out of 11) of the Tfc4 (tau(131)) subunit of TFIIIC. The analysis also identifies a connection between Bdp1 and posttranscriptional processing of Pol III transcripts. Yeast genomic library screening identified RPR1 as the specific overexpression suppressor of very slow growth at 37 degrees C due to deletion of Bdp1 amino acids 253 to 269. RPR1 RNA, a Pol III transcript, is the RNA subunit of RNase P, which trims pre-tRNA transcript 5' ends. Maturation of tRNA was found to be aberrant in bdp1-Delta 253-269 cells, and RPR1 transcription with the highly resolved Pol III transcription system in vitro was also diminished when recombinant Bdp1 Delta 253-269 replaced wild-type Bdp1. Physical interaction of RNase P with Bdp1 was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and pull-down assays. PMID:11971960

  15. Essential Roles of Bdp1, a Subunit of RNA Polymerase III Initiation Factor TFIIIB, in Transcription and tRNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Akira; Kassavetis, George A.; Geiduschek, E. Peter

    2002-01-01

    The essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene BDP1 encodes a subunit of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription factor (TFIIIB); TATA box binding protein (TBP) and Brf1 are the other subunits of this three-protein complex. Deletion analysis defined three segments of Bdp1 that are essential for viability. A central segment, comprising amino acids 327 to 353, was found to be dispensable, and cells making Bdp1 that was split within this segment, at amino acid 352, are viable. Suppression of bdp1 conditional viability by overexpressing SPT15 and BRF1 identified functional interactions of specific Bdp1 segments with TBP and Brf1, respectively. A Bdp1 deletion near essential segment I was synthetically lethal with overexpression of PCF1-1, a dominant gain-of-function mutation in the second tetracopeptide repeat motif (out of 11) of the Tfc4 (τ131) subunit of TFIIIC. The analysis also identifies a connection between Bdp1 and posttranscriptional processing of Pol III transcripts. Yeast genomic library screening identified RPR1 as the specific overexpression suppressor of very slow growth at 37°C due to deletion of Bdp1 amino acids 253 to 269. RPR1 RNA, a Pol III transcript, is the RNA subunit of RNase P, which trims pre-tRNA transcript 5′ ends. Maturation of tRNA was found to be aberrant in bdp1-Δ253-269 cells, and RPR1 transcription with the highly resolved Pol III transcription system in vitro was also diminished when recombinant Bdp1Δ253-269 replaced wild-type Bdp1. Physical interaction of RNase P with Bdp1 was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and pull-down assays. PMID:11971960

  16. In Silico Screening for Novel Inhibitors of DNA Polymerase III Alpha Subunit of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbDnaE2, H37Rv)

    PubMed Central

    Jadaun, Alka; Sudhakar D, Raja; Subbarao, N.; Dixit, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a pandemic disease is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). DNA polymerase III encoded by DnaE2 of Mtb is specifically required for its survival in vivo, and hence can be considered to be a potential drug target. Amino acid sequence analysis of the MtbDnaE2 and its human counterpart does not show any significant similarity. Therefore, a 3D model of the MtbDnaE2 was generated using Modeller 9v10 with the template structure of E. Coli DNA polymerase III alpha subunit (2HNH_A). The generated models were validated using a number of programmes such as RAMPAGE/PROCHECK, VERIFY_3D, and ProSA. MtbDnaE2 has few conserved residues and four conserved domains similar to that present in DNA polymerase III of E. coli. In silico screening was performed with bioactive anti-tuberculosis compounds and 6-AU (a known inhibitor of DNA polymerase III of Bacillus subtilis) and its analogues against the modeled MtbDnaE2 structure. Docking was performed using GOLD v5.2 software which resulted in the identification of top ten compounds with high GOLD fitness scores and binding affinity (X-Score). To further evaluate the efficacy of these compounds, in silico ADMET analysis was performed using MedChem Designer v3. Given their high binding affinity to the targeted MtbDnaE2, which is essential for DNA replication in the Mtb and good ADMET properties, these compounds are promising candidates for further evaluation and development as anti-tubercular agents. PMID:25811866

  17. The tamas gene, identified as a mutation that disrupts larval behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125).

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, B; Roote, J; Campos, A R

    1999-01-01

    From a screen of pupal lethal lines of Drosophila melanogaster we identified a mutant strain that displayed a reproducible reduction in the larval response to light. Moreover, this mutant strain showed defects in the development of the adult visual system and failure to undergo behavioral changes characteristic of the wandering stage. The foraging third instar larvae remained in the food substrate for a prolonged period and died at or just before pupariation. Using a new assay for individual larval photobehavior we determined that the lack of response to light in these mutants was due to a primary deficit in locomotion. The mutation responsible for these phenotypes was mapped to the lethal complementation group l(2)34Dc, which we renamed tamas (translated from Sanskrit as "dark inertia"). Sequencing of mutant alleles demonstrated that tamas codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125). PMID:10581287

  18. Identification of beta-subunit of bacterial RNA-polymerase--a non-species-specific bacterial protein--as target of antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Roesler, Kai-Wolfgang; Schmider, Wolfgang; Kist, Manfred; Batsford, Stephen; Schiltz, Emile; Oelke, Mathias; Tuczek, Anja; Dettenborn, Therese; Behringer, Dirk; Kreisel, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    Several observations suggest that bacteria induce autoimmunity in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Since no PBC-specific bacterial species could be identified, it can be speculated that the triggers are non-species-specific bacterial proteins. This hypothesis would imply that several or even all bacterial species can trigger PBC. Therefore, we investigated whether PBC exhibits immune reactions to non-species-specific bacterial antigens. Yersinia enterocolitica O3 was screened for the presence of proteins that were labeled by immunoblotting using PBC sera. We focused our investigations on a 160-kDa protein, which was further enriched and characterized by partial N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The prevalence of antibodies to this protein was determined by immunoblotting in a variety of diseases. The 160-kDa protein was identified as the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA-polymerase, a highly conserved bacterial protein with a very high degree of sequence identity among all bacterial species. Antibodies to the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase were specific for this protein. Until now no mammalian protein could be found that cross-reacts with these antibodies. The prevalence of antibodies to the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase (ARPA) using the protein from Yersinia enterocolitica O3 (serum dilution 1:1000) was: healthy controls (HC, N = 101) 7.9%, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, N = 61) 32.8%, autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH, N = 46) 26.1%, alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC, N = 44) 9.1%, Crohn's disease (CD, N = 38) 7.9%, ulcerative colitis (UC, N = 24) 8.3%, primary sclerosing cholangitis + UC (PSC/UC, N = 11) 0%, acute yersiniosis (Yers, N = 36) 19.4%, acute infection with Campylobacter jejuni (Camp, N = 10) 0%, acute Q-fever (QF, N = 16) 6.25%, chronic hepatitis C (HCV, N = 39) 7.7%, c-ANCA-positive vasculitis (Vasc, N = 40) 15%, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, N = 28) 10.7%, and malaria tropica (MT, N = 24) 16.7%. There was no significant

  19. RPC53 encodes a subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase C (III) whose inactivation leads to a predominantly G1 arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, C; Micouin, J Y; Chiannilkulchai, N; Treich, I; Buhler, J M; Sentenac, A

    1992-01-01

    RPC53 is shown to be an essential gene encoding the C53 subunit specifically associated with yeast RNA polymerase C (III). Temperature-sensitive rpc53 mutants were generated and showed a rapid inhibition of tRNA synthesis after transfer to the restrictive temperature. Unexpectedly, the rpc53 mutants preferentially arrested their cell division in the G1 phase as large, round, unbudded cells. The RPC53 DNA sequence is predicted to code for a hydrophilic M(r)-46,916 protein enriched in charged amino acid residues. The carboxy-terminal 136 amino acids of C53 are significantly similar (25% identical amino acid residues) to the same region of the human BN51 protein. The BN51 cDNA was originally isolated by its ability to complement a temperature-sensitive hamster cell mutant that undergoes a G1 cell division arrest, as is true for the rpc53 mutants. Images PMID:1406624

  20. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Annita; Neben, Cynthia L.; Merrill, Amy E.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) by RNA polymerases (Pol) I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention. PMID:27448281

  1. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noack Watt, Kristin E; Achilleos, Annita; Neben, Cynthia L; Merrill, Amy E; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) by RNA polymerases (Pol) I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention. PMID:27448281

  2. Requirement for functional BK channels in maintaining oscillation in venomotor tone revealed by species differences in expression of the β1 accessory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Kandlikar, Sachin S; Westcott, Erika B; Fink, Gregory D; Galligan, James J

    2011-01-01

    We determined the possible role of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels in regulation of venous tone in small capacitance veins and blood pressure. In rat mesenteric venous smooth muscle cells (MV SMC), BK channel α- and β1-subunits were co-expressed, unitary BK currents were detected, and single channel currents were sensitive to voltage and [Ca2+]i. Rat MV SMCs displayed Ca2+ sparks and iberiotoxin (IBTX)-sensitive spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs). Under resting conditions in vitro, rat MV exhibited nifedipine-sensitive spontaneous oscillatory constrictions. Blockade of BK channels by paxilline and Ca2+ sparks by ryanodine constricted rat MV. Nifedipine caused venodilation and blocked paxilline-, KCl (20 mM) and BayK 8644-induced contraction. Acute inhibition of BK channels with IBTX in vivo increased blood pressure and reduced venous capacitance, measured as an increase in mean circulatory filling pressure in conscious rats. BK channel α-subunits and L-type Ca2+ channel α1-C subunits are expressed in murine MV. However, these channels are not functional as murine MV lacked nifedipine-sensitive basal tone and rhythmic constrictions. Murine MV were also insensitive to paxilline, ryanodine, KCl and BayK8644, consistent with our previous studies showing that murine MV do not have BK β1-subunits. These data show that not only there are species-dependent properties in ion channel control of venomotor tone, but also that BK channels are required for rhythmic oscillations in venous tone. PMID:21885988

  3. Structural bases of dimerization of yeast telomere protein Cdc13 and its interaction with the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase [alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jia; Yang, Yuting; Wan, Ke; Mao, Ninghui; Yu, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Chien; DeZwaan, Diane C.; Freeman, Brian C.; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lue, Neal F.; Lei, Ming

    2011-08-24

    Budding yeast Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 (CST) complex plays an essential role in telomere protection and maintenance, and has been proposed to be a telomere-specific replication protein A (RPA)-like complex. Previous genetic and structural studies revealed a close resemblance between Stn1-Ten1 and RPA32-RPA14. However, the relationship between Cdc13 and RPA70, the largest subunit of RPA, has remained unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold of Cdc13. Although Cdc13 has an RPA70-like domain organization, the structures of Cdc13 OB folds are significantly different from their counterparts in RPA70, suggesting that they have distinct evolutionary origins. Furthermore, our structural and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected dimerization by the N-terminal OB fold and showed that homodimerization is probably a conserved feature of all Cdc13 proteins. We also uncovered the structural basis of the interaction between the Cdc13 N-terminal OB fold and the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase {alpha} (Pol1), and demonstrated a role for Cdc13 dimerization in Pol1 binding. Analysis of the phenotypes of mutants defective in Cdc13 dimerization and Cdc13-Pol1 interaction revealed multiple mechanisms by which dimerization regulates telomere lengths in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms and evolution of Cdc13.

  4. Role of the Polymerase ϵ sub-unit DPB2 in DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Garcia, José Antonio; Domenichini, Séverine; Mazubert, Christelle; Bourge, Mickael; White, Charles; Hudik, Elodie; Bounon, Rémi; Tariq, Zakia; Delannoy, Etienne; del Olmo, Ivan; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose Antonio; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication maintains genome stability in dividing cells and from one generation to the next. This is particularly important in plants because the whole plant body and reproductive cells originate from meristematic cells that retain their proliferative capacity throughout the life cycle of the organism. DNA replication involves large sets of proteins whose activity is strictly regulated, and is tightly linked to the DNA damage response to detect and respond to replication errors or defects. Central to this interconnection is the replicative polymerase DNA Polymerase ϵ (Pol ϵ) which participates in DNA replication per se, as well as replication stress response in animals and in yeast. Surprisingly, its function has to date been little explored in plants, and notably its relationship with DNA Damage Response (DDR) has not been investigated. Here, we have studied the role of the largest regulatory sub-unit of Arabidopsis DNA Pol ϵ: DPB2, using an over-expression strategy. We demonstrate that excess accumulation of the protein impairs DNA replication and causes endogenous DNA stress. Furthermore, we show that Pol ϵ dysfunction has contrasting outcomes in vegetative and reproductive cells and leads to the activation of distinct DDR pathways in the two cell types. PMID:27193996

  5. Regulation of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit variants in human myasthenia gravis. Quantification of steady-state levels of messenger RNA in muscle biopsy using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, T; Levasseur, P; Truffault, F; Cottin, C; Gaud, C; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1994-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by auto-antibodies that attack the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the decrease in AChR levels at the neuromuscular junction, we investigated the regulation of AChR expression by analyzing mRNA of the two AChR alpha subunit isoforms (P3A+ and P3A-) in muscle samples from myasthenic patients relative to controls. We applied a quantitative method based on reverse transcription of total RNA followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using an internal standard we constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. An increased expression of mRNA coding for the alpha subunit of the AChR isoforms was observed in severely affected patients (P < 0.003 versus controls) but not in moderately affected patients, independently of the anti-AChR antibody titer. Study of mRNA precursor levels indicates a higher expression in severely affected patients compared to controls, suggesting an enhanced rate of transcription of the message coding for the alpha subunit isoforms in these patients. We have also reported that mRNA encoding both isoforms are expressed at an approximate 1:1 ratio in controls and in patients. We have thus identified a new biological parameter correlated with disease severity, and provide evidence of a compensatory mechanism to balance the loss of AChR in human myasthenia gravis, which is probably triggered only above a certain degree of AChR loss. Images PMID:8040257

  6. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  7. NRPD4, a Protein Related to the RPB4 Subunit of RNA Polymerase II, is a Component of RNA Polymerases IV and V and is Required for RNA-directed DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xin-Jian; Hsu, Yi-Feng; Pontes, Olga; Zhu, Jianhua; Lu, Jian; Bressan, Ray A.; Pikaard, Craig S.; Wang, Co-Shine; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an RNAi-based mechanism for establishing transcriptional gene silencing in plants. The plant-specific RNA polymerases IV and V are required for the generation of 24-nucleotide (nt) siRNAs and for guiding sequence-specific DNA methylation by the siRNAs, respectively. However, unlike the extensively studied multisubunit Pol II, our current knowledge about Pol IV and Pol V is restricted to only the two largest subunits NRPD1a/NRPD1 and NRPD1b/NRPE1 and the one second-largest subunit NRPD2a. It is unclear whether other subunits may be required for the functioning of Pol IV and Pol V in RdDM. From a genetic screen for second-site suppressors of the DNA demethylase mutant ros1, we identified a new component (referred to as RDM2) as well as seven known components (NRPD1, NRPE1, NRPD2a, AGO4, HEN1, DRD1, and HDA6) of the RdDM pathway. The differential effects of the mutations on two mechanistically distinct transcriptional silencing reporters suggest that RDM2, NRPD1, NRPE1, NRPD2a, HEN1, and DRD1 function only in the siRNA-dependent pathway of transcriptional silencing, whereas HDA6 and AGO4 have roles in both siRNA-dependent and -independent pathways of transcriptional silencing. In the rdm2 mutants, DNA methylation and siRNA accumulation were reduced substantially at loci previously identified as endogenous targets of Pol IV and Pol V, including 5S rDNA, MEA-ISR, AtSN1, AtGP1, and AtMU1. The amino acid sequence of RDM2 is similar to that of RPB4 subunit of Pol II, but we show evidence that RDM2 has diverged significantly from RPB4 and cannot function in Pol II. An association of RDM2 with both NRPD1 and NRPE1 was observed by coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunolocalization assays. Our results show that RDM2/NRPD4/NRPE4 is a new component of the RdDM pathway in Arabidopsis and that it functions as part of Pol IV and Pol V.

  8. Structural Basis of Rev1-mediated Assembly of a Quaternary Vertebrate Translesion Polymerase Complex Consisting of Rev1, Heterodimeric Polymerase (Pol) ζ, and Pol κ*

    PubMed Central

    Wojtaszek, Jessica; Lee, Chul-Jin; D'Souza, Sanjay; Minesinger, Brenda; Kim, Hyungjin; D'Andrea, Alan D.; Walker, Graham C.; Zhou, Pei

    2012-01-01

    DNA synthesis across lesions during genomic replication requires concerted actions of specialized DNA polymerases in a potentially mutagenic process known as translesion synthesis. Current models suggest that translesion synthesis in mammalian cells is achieved in two sequential steps, with a Y-family DNA polymerase (κ, η, ι, or Rev1) inserting a nucleotide opposite the lesion and with the heterodimeric B-family polymerase ζ, consisting of the catalytic Rev3 subunit and the accessory Rev7 subunit, replacing the insertion polymerase to carry out primer extension past the lesion. Effective translesion synthesis in vertebrates requires the scaffolding function of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rev1 that interacts with the Rev1-interacting region of polymerases κ, η, and ι and with the Rev7 subunit of polymerase ζ. We report the purification and structure determination of a quaternary translesion polymerase complex consisting of the Rev1 CTD, the heterodimeric Pol ζ complex, and the Pol κ Rev1-interacting region. Yeast two-hybrid assays were employed to identify important interface residues of the translesion polymerase complex. The structural elucidation of such a quaternary translesion polymerase complex encompassing both insertion and extension polymerases bridged by the Rev1 CTD provides the first molecular explanation of the essential scaffolding function of Rev1 and highlights the Rev1 CTD as a promising target for developing novel cancer therapeutics to suppress translesion synthesis. Our studies support the notion that vertebrate insertion and extension polymerases could structurally cooperate within a megatranslesion polymerase complex (translesionsome) nucleated by Rev1 to achieve efficient lesion bypass without incurring an additional switching mechanism. PMID:22859295

  9. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase alpha catalytic subunit interacts with Cdc68/Spt16 and with Pob3, a protein similar to an HMG1-like protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wittmeyer, J; Formosa, T

    1997-01-01

    We have used DNA polymerase alpha affinity chromatography to identify factors involved in eukaryotic DNA replication in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two proteins that bound to the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase alpha (Pol1 protein) are encoded by the essential genes CDC68/SPT16 and POB3. The binding of both proteins was enhanced when extracts lacking a previously characterized polymerase binding protein, Ctf4, were used. This finding suggests that Cdc68 and Pob3 may compete with Ctf4 for binding to Pol1. Pol1 and Pob3 were coimmunoprecipitated from whole-cell extracts with antiserum directed against Cdc68, and Pol1 was immunoprecipitated from whole-cell extracts with antiserum directed against the amino terminus of Pob3, suggesting that these proteins may form a complex in vivo. CDC68 also interacted genetically with POL1 and CTF4 mutations; the maximum permissive temperature of double mutants was lower than for any single mutant. Overexpression of Cdc68 in a pol1 mutant strain dramatically decreased cell viability, consistent with the formation or modulation of an essential complex by these proteins in vivo. A mutation in CDC68/SPT16 had previously been shown to cause pleiotropic effects on the regulation of transcription (J. A. Prendergrast et al., Genetics 124:81-90, 1990; E. A. Malone et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5710-5717, 1991; A. Rowley et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5718-5726, 1991), with a spectrum of phenotypes similar to those caused by mutations in the genes encoding histone proteins H2A and H2B (Malone et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5710-5717, 1991). We show that at the nonpermissive temperature, cdc68-1 mutants arrest as unbudded cells with a 1C DNA content, consistent with a possible role for Cdc68 in the prereplicative stage of the cell cycle. The cdc68-1 mutation caused elevated rates of chromosome fragment loss, a phenotype characteristic of genes whose native products are required for normal DNA metabolism. However, this mutation did not

  10. The last CTD repeat of the mammalian RNA polymerase II large subunit is important for its stability

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Rob D.; Palancade, Benoit; Lang, Andreas; Bensaude, Olivier; Eick, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) has been shown to affect the initiation, and transition to elongation of the Pol II complex. The differential phosphorylation of serines within this domain coincides with the recruitment of factors important for pre-mRNA processing and transcriptional elongation. A role for tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation has yet to be described. The discovery of kinases that express a preference for specific residues within this sequence suggests a mechanism for the controlled recruitment and displacement of CTD-interacting partners during the transcription cycle. The last CTD repeat (CTD52) contains unique interaction sites for the only known CTD tyrosine kinases, Abl1/c-Abl and Abl2/Arg, and the serine/threonine kinase casein kinase II (CKII). Here, we show that removal or severe disruption of the last CTD repeat, but not point mutation of its CKII sites, results in its proteolytic degradation to the Pol IIb form in vivo, but does not appear to affect the specific transcription of genes. These results suggest a possible mechanism of transcription control through the proteolytic removal of the Pol II CTD. PMID:14704341

  11. RNA Polymerase II Second Largest Subunit Molecular Identification of Boletus griseipurpureus Corner From Thailand and Antibacterial Activity of Basidiocarp Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Aung-aud-chariya, Amornrat; Bangrak, Phuwadol; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Phupong, Worrapong; Aggangan, Nelly Siababa; Kamlangdee, Niyom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Boletus griseipurpureus Corner, an edible mushroom, is a putative ectomycorrhizal fungus. Currently, the taxonomic boundary of this mushroom is unclear and its bitter taste makes it interesting for evaluating its antibacterial properties. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic variation of this mushroom and also to evaluate any antibacterial activities. Materials and Methods: Basidiocarps were collected from 2 north-eastern provinces, Roi Et and Ubon Ratchathani, and from 2 southern provinces, Songkhla and Surat Thani, in Thailand. Genomic DNA was extracted and molecular structure was examined using the RNA polymerase II (RPB2) analysis. Antibacterial activities of basidiocarp extracts were conducted with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29523 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) 189 using the agar-well diffusion method. Results: All the samples collected for this study constituted a monophyletic clade, which was closely related with the Boletus group of polypore fungi. For the antibacterial study, it was found that the crude methanol extract of basidiomes inhibited the growth of all bacteria in vitro more than the crude ethyl acetate extract. Conclusions: Basidomes collected from four locations in Thailand had low genetic variation and their extracts inhibited the growth of all tested bacteria. The health benefits of this edible species should be evaluated further. PMID:25834720

  12. Two Distinctive Binding Modes of Endonuclease Inhibitors to the N-Terminal Region of Influenza Virus Polymerase Acidic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Fudo, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Norio; Nukaga, Michiyoshi; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2016-05-10

    Influenza viruses are global threat to humans, and the development of new antiviral agents are still demanded to prepare for pandemics and to overcome the emerging resistance to the current drugs. Influenza polymerase acidic protein N-terminal domain (PAN) has endonuclease activity and is one of the appropriate targets for novel antiviral agents. First, we performed X-ray cocrystal analysis on the complex structures of PAN with two endonuclease inhibitors. The protein crystallization and the inhibitor soaking were done at pH 5.8. The binding modes of the two inhibitors were different from a common binding mode previously reported for the other influenza virus endonuclease inhibitors. We additionally clarified the complex structures of PAN with the same two endonuclease inhibitors at pH 7.0. In one of the crystal structures, an additional inhibitor molecule, which chelated to the two metal ions in the active site, was observed. On the basis of the crystal structures at pH 7.0, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for both of the complexes. The analysis of simulation results suggested that the binding mode of each inhibitor to PAN was stable in spite of the partial deviation of the simulation structure from the crystal one. Furthermore, crystal structure analysis and MD simulation were performed for PAN in complex with an inhibitor, which was already reported to have a high compound potency for comparison. The findings on the presence of multiple binding sites at around the PAN substrate-binding pocket will provide a hint for enhancing the binding affinity of inhibitors. PMID:27088785

  13. Evasion of the Innate Immune Response: the Old World Alphavirus nsP2 Protein Induces Rapid Degradation of Rpb1, a Catalytic Subunit of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Kulemzin, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    The Old World alphaviruses are emerging human pathogens with an ability to cause widespread epidemics. The latest epidemic of Chikungunya virus, from 2005 to 2007, affected over 40 countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. The Old World alphaviruses are highly cytopathic and known to evade the cellular antiviral response by inducing global inhibition of transcription in vertebrate cells. This function was shown to be mediated by their nonstructural nsP2 protein; however, the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon has remained unknown. Here, we report that nsP2 proteins of Sindbis, Semliki Forest, and Chikungunya viruses inhibit cellular transcription by inducing rapid degradation of Rpb1, a catalytic subunit of the RNAPII complex. This degradation of Rpb1 is independent of the nsP2-associated protease activity, but, instead, it proceeds through nsP2-mediated Rpb1 ubiquitination. This function of nsP2 depends on the integrity of the helicase and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase-like domains, and point mutations in either of these domains abolish Rpb1 degradation. We go on to show that complete degradation of Rpb1 in alphavirus-infected cells occurs within 6 h postinfection, before other previously described virus-induced changes in cell physiology, such as apoptosis, autophagy, and inhibition of STAT1 phosphorylation, are detected. Since Rpb1 is a subunit that catalyzes the polymerase reaction during RNA transcription, degradation of Rpb1 plays an indispensable role in blocking the activation of cellular genes and downregulating cellular antiviral response. This indicates that the nsP2-induced degradation of Rpb1 is a critical mechanism utilized by the Old World alphaviruses to subvert the cellular antiviral response. PMID:22514352

  14. The 25 kDa Subunit of Cleavage Factor Im Is a RNA-Binding Protein That Interacts with the Poly(A) Polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Pezet-Valdez, Marisol; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; Ospina-Villa, Juan David; Ramírez-Moreno, María Esther; Orozco, Esther; Charcas-López, Socorro; Soto-Sánchez, Jacqueline; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; López-Casamicha, Mavil; López-Camarillo, César; Marchat, Laurence A.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3´ end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25) from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X) domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25) was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A) polymerase (EhPAP) that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A) tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A) polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3´ end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite. PMID:23840799

  15. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A) polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pezet-Valdez, Marisol; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; Ospina-Villa, Juan David; Ramírez-Moreno, María Esther; Orozco, Esther; Charcas-López, Socorro; Soto-Sánchez, Jacqueline; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; López-Casamicha, Mavil; López-Camarillo, César; Marchat, Laurence A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25) from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X) domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25) was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A) polymerase (EhPAP) that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A) tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A) polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite. PMID:23840799

  16. Conditional expression of RPA190, the gene encoding the largest subunit of yeast RNA polymerase I: effects of decreased rRNA synthesis on ribosomal protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wittekind, M; Kolb, J M; Dodd, J; Yamagishi, M; Mémet, S; Buhler, J M; Nomura, M

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of ribosomal proteins (r proteins) under the conditions of greatly reduced RNA synthesis were studied by using a strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which the production of the largest subunit (RPA190) of RNA polymerase I was controlled by the galactose promoter. Although growth on galactose medium was normal, the strain was unable to sustain growth when shifted to glucose medium. This growth defect was shown to be due to a preferential decrease in RNA synthesis caused by deprivation of RNA polymerase I. Under these conditions, the accumulation of r proteins decreased to match the rRNA synthesis rate. When proteins were pulse-labeled for short periods, no or only a weak decrease was observed in the differential synthesis rate of several r proteins (L5, L39, L29 and/or L28, L27 and/or S21) relative to those of control cells synthesizing RPA190 from the normal promoter. Degradation of these r proteins synthesized in excess was observed during subsequent chase periods. Analysis of the amounts of mRNAs for L3 and L29 and their locations in polysomes also suggested that the synthesis of these proteins relative to other cellular proteins were comparable to those observed in control cells. However, Northern analysis of several r-protein mRNAs revealed that the unspliced precursor mRNA for r-protein L32 accumulated when rRNA synthesis rates were decreased. This result supports the feedback regulation model in which excess L32 protein inhibits the splicing of its own precursor mRNA, as proposed by previous workers (M. D. Dabeva, M. A. Post-Beittenmiller, and J. R. Warner, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5854-5857, 1986). Images PMID:2183018

  17. Phenotypic characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants of vaccinia virus with mutations in a 135,000-Mr subunit of the virion-associated DNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Ensinger, M J

    1987-01-01

    The phenotypic defects of three temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of vaccinia virus, the ts mutations of which were mapped to the gene for one of the high-molecular-weight subunits of the virion-associated DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, were characterized. Because the virion RNA polymerase is required for the initiation of the viral replication cycle, it has been predicted that this type of mutant is defective in viral DNA replication and the synthesis of early viral proteins at the nonpermissive temperature. However, all three mutants synthesized both DNA and early proteins, and two of the three synthesized late proteins as well. RNA synthesis in vitro by permeabilized mutant virions was not more ts than that by the wild type. Furthermore, only one of three RNA polymerase activities that was partially purified from virions assembled at the permissive temperature displayed altered biochemical properties in vitro that could be correlated with its ts mutation: the ts13 activity had reduced specific activity, increased temperature sensitivity, and increased thermolability under a variety of preincubation conditions. Although the partially purified polymerase activity of a second mutant, ts72, was also more thermolabile than the wild-type activity, the thermolability was shown to be the result of a second mutation within the RNA polymerase gene. These results suggest that the defects in these mutants affect the assembly of newly synthesized polymerase subunits into active enzyme or the incorporation of RNA polymerase into maturing virions; once synthesized at the permissive temperature, the mutant polymerases are able to function in the initiation of subsequent rounds of infection at the nonpermissive temperature. Images PMID:3573151

  18. Interaction of T4 AsiA with its target sites in the RNA polymerase sigma70 subunit leads to distinct and opposite effects on transcription.

    PubMed

    Minakhin, Leonid; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Adelman, Karen; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Heyduk, Tomasz; Severinov, Konstantin

    2003-02-21

    Bacteriophage T4 AsiA is a homodimeric protein that orchestrates a switch from the host and early viral transcription to middle viral transcription by binding to the sigma(70) subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme (Esigma(70)) and preventing promoter complex formation on most E.coli and early T4 promoters. In addition, Esigma(70)AsiA, but not Esigma(70), is a substrate of transcription activation by T4-encoded DNA-binding protein MotA, a co-activator of transcription from middle viral promoters. The molecular determinants of sigma(70)-AsiA interaction necessary for transcription inhibition reside in the sigma(70) conserved region 4.2, which recognizes the -35 promoter consensus element. The molecular determinants of sigma(70)-AsiA interaction necessary for MotA-dependent transcription activation have not been identified. Here, we show that in the absence of sigma(70) region 4.2, AsiA interacts with sigma(70) conserved region 4.1 and activates transcription in a MotA-independent manner. Further, we show that the AsiA dimer must dissociate to interact with either region 4.2 or region 4.1 of sigma(70). We propose that MotA may co-activate transcription by restricting AsiA binding to sigma(70) region 4.1. PMID:12581632

  19. Thermoinducible filamentation in Escherichia coli due to an altered RNA polymerase beta subunit is suppressed by high levels of ppGpp.

    PubMed Central

    Vinella, D; D'Ari, R

    1994-01-01

    The Escherichia coli strain known as GC2553, FB8, UTH1038, or K12S (Luria), considered an F- lambda- wild-type strain, is shown here to carry a cryptic mutation, ftsR1, causing nonlethal filamentation during exponential growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth at 42 degrees C and the inability to grow in salt-free LB broth at 42 degrees C. The ftsR1 mutation is completely suppressed in genetic backgrounds which increase RelA-dependent synthesis of the nucleotide ppGpp, i.e., argS201 (Mecr) and alaS21 (Mecr) mutations, affecting aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, or the presence of a plac-relA' plasmid. These backgrounds also confer resistance in LB broth to the beta-lactam mecillinam, an antibiotic which specifically inhibits penicillin-binding protein 2 and, in wild-type cells, causes an indirect block in cell division. Furthermore, the ftsR1 mutant (but not an isogenic ftsR+ strain) is sensitive to mecillinam in minimal glucose medium at 37 degrees C. Since the division block caused by mecillinam can be overcome by overproduction of the cell division protein FtsZ, we tested the effect of plasmid pZAQ (carrying the ftsZ, ftsA, and ftsQ genes) on the ftsR1 mutant; it suppressed the filamentation in LB broth and the mecillinam sensitivity on minimal glucose medium at 37 degrees C but not the growth defect in salt-free LB broth at 42 degrees C. Genetic analysis indicated that the full phenotype of the ftsR1 mutant is due to a single mutation in the rpoB gene (90 min), coding for the beta subunit of RNA polymerase; we call this allele rpoB369(Fts). We propose that the rpoB369(Fts) mutation alters the specificity of the polymerase and that the mutant enzyme can recover normal activity in the presence of high salt concentrations or via interaction with the nucleotide ppGpp. PMID:8106339

  20. A Mutation of RNA Polymerase β′ Subunit (RpoC) Converts Heterogeneously Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA) into “Slow VISA”

    PubMed Central

    Hishinuma, Tomomi; Katayama, Yuki; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Various mutations in the rpoB gene, which encodes the RNA polymerase β subunit, are associated with increased vancomycin (VAN) resistance in vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) and heterogeneously VISA (hVISA) strains. We reported that rpoB mutations are also linked to the expression of the recently found “slow VISA” (sVISA) phenotype (M. Saito, Y. Katayama, T. Hishinuma, A. Iwamoto, Y. Aiba, K Kuwahara-Arai, L. Cui, M. Matsuo, N. Aritaka, and K. Hiramatsu, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 58:5024–5035, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02470-13). Because RpoC and RpoB are components of RNA polymerase, we examined the effect of the rpoC(P440L) mutation on the expression of the sVISA phenotype in the Mu3fdh2*V6-5 strain (V6-5), which was derived from a previously reported hVISA strain with the VISA phenotype. V6-5 had an extremely prolonged doubling time (DT) (72 min) and high vancomycin MIC (16 mg/liter). However, the phenotype of V6-5 was unstable, and the strain frequently reverted to hVISA with concomitant loss of low growth rate, cell wall thickness, and reduced autolysis. Whole-genome sequencing of phenotypic revertant strain V6-5-L1 and comparison with V6-5 revealed a second mutation, F562L, in rpoC. Introduction of the wild-type (WT) rpoC gene using a multicopy plasmid resolved the sVISA phenotype of V6-5, indicating that the rpoC(P440L) mutant expressed the sVISA phenotype in hVISA. To investigate the mechanisms of resistance in the sVISA strain, we independently isolated an additional 10 revertants to hVISA and VISA. In subsequent whole-genome analysis, we identified compensatory mutations in the genes of three distinct functional categories: the rpoC gene itself as regulatory mutations, peptidoglycan biosynthesis genes, and relQ, which is involved in the stringent response. It appears that the rpoC(P440L) mutation causes the sVISA phenotype by augmenting cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis and through the control of the stringent

  1. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  2. The PB2 Subunit of the Influenza Virus RNA Polymerase Affects Virulence by Interacting with the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling Protein and Inhibiting Expression of Beta Interferon▿

    PubMed Central

    Graef, Katy M.; Vreede, Frank T.; Lau, Yuk-Fai; McCall, Amber W.; Carr, Simon M.; Subbarao, Kanta; Fodor, Ervin

    2010-01-01

    The PB2 subunit of the influenza virus RNA polymerase is a major virulence determinant of influenza viruses. However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. It was previously shown that the PB2 protein, in addition to its nuclear localization, also accumulates in the mitochondria. Here, we demonstrate that the PB2 protein interacts with the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, MAVS (also known as IPS-1, VISA, or Cardif), and inhibits MAVS-mediated beta interferon (IFN-β) expression. In addition, we show that PB2 proteins of influenza viruses differ in their abilities to associate with the mitochondria. In particular, the PB2 proteins of seasonal human influenza viruses localize to the mitochondria while PB2 proteins of avian influenza viruses are nonmitochondrial. This difference in localization is caused by a single amino acid polymorphism in the PB2 mitochondrial targeting signal. In order to address the functional significance of the mitochondrial localization of the PB2 protein in vivo, we have generated two recombinant human influenza viruses encoding either mitochondrial or nonmitochondrial PB2 proteins. We found that the difference in the mitochondrial localization of the PB2 proteins does not affect the growth of these viruses in cell culture. However, the virus encoding the nonmitochondrial PB2 protein induces higher levels of IFN-β and, in an animal model, is attenuated compared to the isogenic virus encoding a mitochondrial PB2. Overall this study implicates the PB2 protein in the regulation of host antiviral innate immune pathways and suggests an important role for the mitochondrial association of the PB2 protein in determining virulence. PMID:20538852

  3. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-upstream sequence governing the cell cycle-dependent transcription of mouse DNA polymerase alpha 68 kDa subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, N S; Izumi, M; Uchida, H; Yokoi, M; Miyazawa, H; Hanaoka, F

    2000-04-01

    We have isolated the genomic DNA fragment spanning the 5-end and the first four exons encoding the 68 kDa subunit (p68) of the mouse DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex [corrected]. The p68 promoter region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains a GC-rich sequence, two palindrome sequences and two putative E2F-binding sites [corrected]. A series of transient expression assays using a luciferase reporter gene indicated that a region from nucleotide position -89 to -30 (-89/-30) with respect to the transcription initiation site is crucial for basal transcription of the p68 gene in proliferating NIH 3T3 cells. In particular, part of the GC-rich sequence (-57/-46) and the palindrome (-81/-62) elements were necessary for promoter activity, both of which share homology with the E-box sequence. Gel mobility shift assays using NIH 3T3 nuclear extracts revealed that the upstream stimulatory factor, known as an E-box-binding protein, binds to these sites. Moreover, we observed binding of E2F to two sites near the transcription initiation site (-11/-3 and +9/+16). A transient luciferase expression assay using synchronized NIH 3T3 cells in G(0)phase revealed that these E2F sites are essential for transcription induction of the p68 gene after serum stimulation, but are dispensable for basal transcription. These results indicate that growth-dependent regulation of transcription of the mouse p68 and p180 genes is mediated by a common factor, E2F; however, basal transcription of the genes, interestingly, is regulated by different transcription factors. PMID:10710418

  4. A Sequence-Specific Interaction between the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA Gene Repeats and a Locus Encoding an RNA Polymerase I Subunit Affects Ribosomal DNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cahyani, Inswasti; Cridge, Andrew G.; Engelke, David R.; Ganley, Austen R. D.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of eukaryotic genomes is linked to their functions. However, how individual features of the global spatial structure contribute to nuclear function remains largely unknown. We previously identified a high-frequency interchromosomal interaction within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome that occurs between the intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats and the intergenic sequence between the locus encoding the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit and a lysine tRNA gene [i.e., RPA135-tK(CUU)P]. Here, we used quantitative chromosome conformation capture in combination with replacement mapping to identify a 75-bp sequence within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region that is involved in the interaction. We demonstrate that the RPA135-IGS1 interaction is dependent on the rDNA copy number and the Msn2 protein. Surprisingly, we found that the interaction does not govern RPA135 transcription. Instead, replacement of a 605-bp region within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region results in a reduction in the RPA135-IGS1 interaction level and fluctuations in rDNA copy number. We conclude that the chromosomal interaction that occurs between the RPA135-tK(CUU)P and rDNA IGS1 loci stabilizes rDNA repeat number and contributes to the maintenance of nucleolar stability. Our results provide evidence that the DNA loci involved in chromosomal interactions are composite elements, sections of which function in stabilizing the interaction or mediating a functional outcome. PMID:25421713

  5. Exo1 phosphorylation status controls the hydroxyurea sensitivity of cells lacking the Pol32 subunit of DNA polymerases delta and zeta

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Lillian; Schmidt, Kristina H.

    2015-01-01

    Exo1 belongs to the Rad2 family of structure-specific nucleases and possesses 5′-3′ exonuclease activity on double-stranded DNA substrates. Exo1 interacts physically with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins Msh2 and Mlh1 and is involved in the excision of the mispaired nucleotide. Independent of its role in MMR, Exo1 contributes to long-range resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends to facilitate their repair by homologous recombination (HR), and was recently identified as a component of error-free DNA damage tolerance pathways. Here we show that Exo1 activity increases the hydroxyurea sensitivity of cells lacking Pol32, a subunit of DNA polymerases δ and ζ Both, phospho-mimicking and dephospho-mimicking exo1 mutants act as hypermorphs, as evidenced by an increase in HU sensitivity of pol32Δ cells, suggesting that they are trapped in an active form and that phosphorylation of Exo1 at residues S372, S567, S587, S692 is necessary, but insufficient, for the accurate regulation of Exo1 activity at stalled replication forks. In contrast, neither phosphorylation status is important for Exo1's role in MMR or in the suppression of genome instability in cells lacking Sgs1 helicase. This ability of an EXO1 deletion to suppress the HU hypersensitivity of pol32Δ cells is in contrast to the negative genetic interaction between deletions of EXO1 and POL32 in MMS-treated cells as well as the role of EXO1 in DNA-damage treated rad53 and mec1 mutants. PMID:25457771

  6. The rpoZ Gene, Encoding the RNA Polymerase Omega Subunit, Is Required for Antibiotic Production and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces kasugaensis

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Ikuo; Kasuga, Kano; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Fukasawa, Akira; Mizuno, Satoshi; Arisawa, Akira; Akagawa, Hisayoshi

    2002-01-01

    The occurrence of pleiotropic mutants that are defective in both antibiotic production and aerial mycelium formation is peculiar to streptomycetes. Pleiotropic mutant KSB was isolated from wild-type Streptomyces kasugaensis A1R6, which produces kasugamycin, an antifungal aminoglycoside antibiotic. A 9.3-kb DNA fragment was cloned from the chromosomal DNA of strain A1R6 by complementary restoration of kasugamycin production and aerial hypha formation to mutant KSB. Complementation experiments with deletion plasmids and subsequent DNA analysis indicated that orf5, encoding 90 amino acids, was responsible for the restoration. A protein homology search revealed that orf5 was a homolog of rpoZ, the gene that is known to encode RNA polymerase subunit omega (ω), thus leading to the conclusion that orf5 was rpoZ in S. kasugaensis. The pleiotropy of mutant KSB was attributed to a 2-bp frameshift deletion in the rpoZ region of mutant KSB, which probably resulted in a truncated, incomplete ω of 47 amino acids. Furthermore, rpoZ-disrupted mutant R6D4 obtained from strain A1R6 by insertion of Tn5 aphII into the middle of the rpoZ-coding region produced neither kasugamycin nor aerial mycelia, similar to mutant KSB. When rpoZ of S. kasugaensis and Streptomyces coelicolor, whose deduced products differed in the sixth amino acid residue, were introduced into mutant R6D4 via a plasmid, both transformants produced kasugamycin and aerial hyphae without significant differences. This study established that rpoZ is required for kasugamycin production and aerial mycelium formation in S. kasugaensis and responsible for pleiotropy. PMID:12426327

  7. NMR structure of a complex containing the TFIIF subunit RAP74 and the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao D.; Abbott, Karen L.; Potempa, Krzysztof; Kobor, Michael S.; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G.

    2003-01-01

    FCP1 [transcription factor IIF (TFIIF)-associated carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase] is the only identified phosphatase specific for the phosphorylated CTD of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The phosphatase activity of FCP1 is enhanced in the presence of the large subunit of TFIIF (RAP74 in humans). It has been demonstrated that the CTD of RAP74 (cterRAP74; residues 436–517) directly interacts with the highly acidic CTD of FCP1 (cterFCP; residues 879–961 in human). In this manuscript, we have determined a high-resolution solution structure of a cterRAP74/cterFCP complex by NMR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the cterFCP protein is completely disordered in the unbound state, but forms an α-helix (H1′; E945–M961) in the complex. The cterRAP74/cterFCP binding interface relies extensively on van der Waals contacts between hydrophobic residues from the H2 and H3 helices of cterRAP74 and hydrophobic residues from the H1′ helix of cterFCP. The binding interface also contains two critical electrostatic interactions involving aspartic acid residues from H1′ of cterFCP and lysine residues from both H2 and H3 of cterRAP74. There are also three additional polar interactions involving highly conserved acidic residues from the H1′ helix. The cterRAP74/cterFCP complex is the first high-resolution structure between an acidic residue-rich domain from a holoenzyme-associated regulatory protein and a general transcription factor. The structure defines a clear role for both hydrophobic and acidic residues in protein/protein complexes involving acidic residue-rich domains in transcription regulatory proteins. PMID:12732728

  8. NMR structure of a complex containing the TFIIF subunit RAP74 and the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao D; Abbott, Karen L; Potempa, Krzysztof; Kobor, Michael S; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2003-05-13

    FCP1 [transcription factor IIF (TFIIF)-associated carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase] is the only identified phosphatase specific for the phosphorylated CTD of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). The phosphatase activity of FCP1 is enhanced in the presence of the large subunit of TFIIF (RAP74 in humans). It has been demonstrated that the CTD of RAP74 (cterRAP74; residues 436-517) directly interacts with the highly acidic CTD of FCP1 (cterFCP; residues 879-961 in human). In this manuscript, we have determined a high-resolution solution structure of a cterRAP74cterFCP complex by NMR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the cterFCP protein is completely disordered in the unbound state, but forms an alpha-helix (H1'; E945-M961) in the complex. The cterRAP74cterFCP binding interface relies extensively on van der Waals contacts between hydrophobic residues from the H2 and H3 helices of cterRAP74 and hydrophobic residues from the H1' helix of cterFCP. The binding interface also contains two critical electrostatic interactions involving aspartic acid residues from H1' of cterFCP and lysine residues from both H2 and H3 of cterRAP74. There are also three additional polar interactions involving highly conserved acidic residues from the H1' helix. The cterRAP74cterFCP complex is the first high-resolution structure between an acidic residue-rich domain from a holoenzyme-associated regulatory protein and a general transcription factor. The structure defines a clear role for both hydrophobic and acidic residues in proteinprotein complexes involving acidic residue-rich domains in transcription regulatory proteins. PMID:12732728

  9. E. coli RNA polymerase, deleted in the C-terminal part of its alpha-subunit, interacts differently with the cAMP-CRP complex at the lacP1 and at the galP1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, A; Igarashi, K; Ishihama, A; Lavigne, M; Buckle, M; Buc, H

    1993-01-01

    A deletion of the C-terminal part of the alpha-subunit of RNA polymerase is known to affect differently promoters activated by CRP depending on the location of the CRP binding site at the promoter. When the CRP binding site is located at -61.5, as at lacP1 (a type I promoter), activation is strongly impaired while it is not significantly affected at galP1 where CRP binds 41.5 bp upstream of the start of the message (type II promoter). We have investigated the differences in the architecture of the corresponding open complexes by comparing the positioning of holoenzymes reconstituted respectively with native or with truncated alpha-subunits (containing the first 235 or 256 residues of a) at two 'up' promoter mutants of the lacP1 and galP1 promoters (respectively lacUV5 and gal9A16C). First, the affinity of wild-type RNA polymerase for both promoters is increased by the presence of CRP and cAMP. By contrast, holoenzymes reconstituted with truncated alpha-subunits, show cooperative binding at the galP1 promoter only. Second, footprinting data confirm these observations and indicate that the truncated holoenzymes are unable to recognize regions of the promoter upstream from position -40. The absence of contacts between the truncated enzymes and CRP at the lacP1 promoter can explain the deficiency in activation. At the galP1 promoter, where the CRP site is closer to the initiation site, protein-protein contacts can still occur with the truncated polymerases, showing that the C-terminal part of the alpha-subunit is not involved in activation. Images PMID:8382795

  10. Interaction between the Rev1 C-terminal Domain and the PolD3 Subunit of Polζ Suggests a Mechanism of Polymerase Exchange upon Rev1/Polζ-Dependent Translesion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pustovalova, Yulia; Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; D’Souza, Sanjay; Rizzo, Alessandro A.; Korza, George; Walker, Graham C.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2016-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) is a mutagenic branch of cellular DNA damage tolerance that enables bypass replication over DNA lesions carried out by specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerases. The replicative bypass of most types of DNA damage is performed in a two-step process of Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS. In the first step, a Y-family TLS enzyme, typically Polη, Polι or Polκ, inserts a nucleotide across DNA lesion. In the second step, a four-subunit B-family DNA polymerase Polζ (Rev3/Rev7/PolD2/PolD3 complex) extends the distorted DNA primer-template. The coordinated action of error-prone TLS enzymes is regulated through their interactions with the two scaffold proteins, the sliding clamp PCNA and the TLS polymerase Rev1. Rev1 interactions with all other TLS enzymes are mediated by its C-terminal domain (Rev1-CT), which can simultaneously bind the Rev7 subunit of Polζ and Rev1-interacting regions (RIRs) from Polη, Polι or Polκ. In this work, we identified a previously unknown RIR motif in the C-terminal part of PolD3 subunit of Polζ whose interaction with the Rev1-CT is among the tightest mediated by RIR motifs. Three-dimensional structure of the Rev1-CT/PolD3-RIR complex determined by NMR spectroscopy revealed a structural basis for the relatively high affinity of this interaction. The unexpected discovery of PolD3-RIR motif suggests a mechanism of 'inserter' to 'extender' DNA polymerase switch upon Rev1/Polζ-dependent TLS, in which the PolD3-RIR binding to the Rev1-CT (i) helps displace the 'inserter' Polη, Polι or Polκ from its complex with Rev1, and (ii) facilitates assembly of the four-subunit 'extender' Polζ through simultaneous interaction of Rev1-CT with Rev7 and PolD3 subunits. PMID:26982350

  11. The epitope for the polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody 8RB13 is in the flap-domain of the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase and can be used as an epitope tag for immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Elizabeth S; Nagy, Lauren H; Batalla, Pilar; Arthur, Terrance M; Thompson, Nancy E; Burgess, Richard R

    2011-05-01

    Polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies (PR-mAbs) are useful for the purification of proteins in an easy, one step immunoaffinity step. These antibodies allow for gentle purification of proteins and protein complexes using a combination of a low molecular weight polyhydroxylated compound (polyol) and a nonchaotrophic salt in the eluting buffer. mAb 8RB13 has been characterized as one of these PR-mAbs and has been used to purify RNA polymerase from five species of bacteria. Here the epitope for 8RB13 has been identified as PEEKLLRAIFGEKAS, a sequence that is highly conserved in the β-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase. This sequence is located in the "beta-flap" domain of RNA polymerase (and essentially comprises the "flap-tip helix"), an important binding site for sigma70. This location explains why only the core RNAP is purified using this mAb. This amino acid sequence has been developed into an epitope tag that can be used to purify a target protein from either bacterial or eukaryotic cells when genetically fused to a protein of interest. PMID:21215316

  12. The Trypanosoma brucei DNA polymerase alpha core subunit gene is developmentally regulated and linked to a constitutively expressed open reading frame.

    PubMed Central

    Leegwater, P A; Strating, M; Murphy, N B; Kooy, R F; van der Vliet, P C; Overdulve, J P

    1991-01-01

    As an initial step towards the characterization of replicative DNA polymerases of trypanosomes, we have cloned, sequenced and examined the expression of the Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei brucei gene that encodes the DNA polymerase alpha catalytic core (pol alpha). The protein sequence contains the six conserved regions that have been recognized previously in eukaryotic and viral replicative DNA polymerases. In addition, we have identified a seventh region which appears to be conserved primarily in alpha-type DNA polymerases. The T.brucei DNA pol alpha core N-terminus is 123 and 129 amino acids smaller than that of the human and yeast homologue, respectively. The gene is separated by 386 bp from an upstream open reading frame (ORF) of 442 codons. Stable transcripts of the upstream sequence are detected in both dividing and non-dividing forms, while pol alpha transcripts are detected principally in dividing forms. Allelic copies of the T.brucei pol alpha region exhibit restriction site polymorphisms; one such sequence polymorphism affects the amino acid sequence of the T.brucei DNA pol alpha core. The T.brucei pol alpha region cross-hybridizes weakly with that of T.(Nannomonas) congolense and T.(Duttonella) vivax. Images PMID:1754381

  13. Preferential interaction of the his pause RNA hairpin with RNA polymerase β subunit residues 904–950 correlates with strong transcriptional pausing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daguang; Severinov, Konstantin; Landick, Robert

    1997-01-01

    RNA secondary structures (hairpins) that form as the nascent RNA emerges from RNA polymerase are important components of many signals that regulate transcription, including some pause sites, all ρ-independent terminators, and some antiterminators. At the his leader pause site, a 5-bp-stem, 8-nt-loop pause RNA hairpin forms 11 nt from the RNA 3′ end and stabilizes a transcription complex conformation slow to react with NTP substrate. This stabilization appears to depend at least in part on an interaction with RNA polymerase. We tested for RNA hairpin interaction with the paused polymerase by crosslinking 5-iodoUMP positioned specifically in the hairpin loop. In the paused conformation, strong and unusual crosslinking of the pause hairpin to β904–950 replaced crosslinking to β′ and to other parts of β that occurred in nonpaused complexes prior to hairpin formation. These changes in nascent RNA interactions may inhibit reactive alignment of the RNA 3′ end in the paused complex and be related to events at ρ-independent terminators. PMID:9237994

  14. The structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Bzik, D J

    1991-08-01

    During the past few years the characterization of several Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase subunits has revealed potentially significant differences between the corresponding subunits of the host and parasite enzymes(1-3). The largest subunits of P. falciparum RNA polymerase II and III contain enlarged variable domains that separate conserved domains in these subunits. The partially characterized beta and beta '-like subunits of an organellar P. falciparum RNA polymerase also appear to be distinct from the host RNA polymerases. In this review David Bzik discusses the structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium. PMID:15463499

  15. Characterization by automated DNA sequencing of mutations in the gene (rpoB) encoding the RNA polymerase beta subunit in rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from New York City and Texas.

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, V; Li, L L; Iordanescu, S; Hamrick, M R; Wanger, A; Kreiswirth, B N; Musser, J M

    1994-01-01

    Automated DNA sequencing was used to characterize mutations associated with rifampin resistance in a 69-bp region of the gene, rpoB, encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The data confirmed that greater than 90% of rifampin-resistant strains have sequence alterations in this region and showed that most are missense mutations. The analysis also identified several mutant rpoB alleles not previously associated with resistant organisms and one short region of rpoB that had an unusually high frequency of insertions and deletions. Although many strains with an identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern have the same variant rpoB allele, some do not, a result that suggests the occurrence of evolutionary divergence at the clone level. PMID:8027320

  16. The sua8 suppressors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode replacements of conserved residues within the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and affect transcription start site selection similarly to sua7 (TFIIB) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Berroteran, R W; Ware, D E; Hampsey, M

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sua8 gene were found to be suppressors of an aberrant ATG translation initiation codon in the leader region of the cyc1 gene. Analysis of cyc1 transcripts from sua8 mutants revealed that suppression is a consequence of diminished transcription initiation at the normal start sites in favor of initiation at downstream sites, including a site between the aberrant and normal ATG start codons. This effect is not cyc1 gene specific since initiation at other genes, including ADH1, CYC7, and HIS4, was similarly affected, although initiation at HIS3 and SPT15 was unaffected. The SUA8 gene was cloned and partially sequenced, revealing identity to RPB1, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The sua8 suppressors are the result of single amino acid replacements of highly conserved residues. Three replacements were found either within or immediately preceding homology block D, and a fourth was found adjacent to homology block H, indicating that these regions play a role in defining start sites in vivo. Nearly identical effects on start site selection were observed for sua7 suppressors, which encode altered forms of TFIIB. Synthetic lethality was associated with double sua7 sua8 suppressor mutations, and recessive sua7 mutants failed to fully complement recessive sua8 mutants in heterozygous diploids (nonallelic noncomplementation). These data indicate that the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB are important determinants of transcription start site selection in S. cerevisiae and suggest that this function might be conferred by interaction between these two proteins. Images PMID:8264591

  17. Tagetitoxin Inhibits RNA Polymerase through Trapping of the Trigger Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Artsimovitch, Irina; Svetlov, Vladimir; Nemetski, Sondra Maureen; Epshtein, Vitaly; Cardozo, Timothy; Nudler, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    Tagetitoxin (Tgt) inhibits multisubunit chloroplast, bacterial, and some eukaryotic RNA polymerases (RNAPs). A crystallographic structure of Tgt bound to bacterial RNAP apoenzyme shows that Tgt binds near the active site but does not explain why Tgt acts only at certain sites. To understand the Tgt mechanism, we constructed a structural model of Tgt bound to the transcription elongation complex. In this model, Tgt interacts with the β′ subunit trigger loop (TL), stabilizing it in an inactive conformation. We show that (i) substitutions of the Arg residue of TL contacted by Tgt confer resistance to inhibitor; (ii) Tgt inhibits RNAP translocation, which requires TL movements; and (iii) paused complexes and a “slow” enzyme, in which the TL likely folds into an altered conformation, are resistant to Tgt. Our studies highlight the role of TL as a target through which accessory proteins and antibiotics can alter the elongation complex dynamics. PMID:21976682

  18. Accessory lateral discoid meniscus.

    PubMed

    Saygi, Baransel; Yildirim, Yakup; Senturk, Salih; Sezgin Ramadan, Saime; Gundes, Hakan

    2006-12-01

    The lateral meniscus tends to have more developmental variation than the medial counterpart. This is a report of an accessory discoid layer of lateral meniscus. All arthroscopic, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathological views are presented. PMID:16710729

  19. Med8, a subunit of the mediator CTD complex of RNA polymerase II, directly binds to regulatory elements of SUC2 and HXK2 genes.

    PubMed

    Chaves, R S; Herrero, P; Moreno, F

    1999-01-19

    In a search to identify new factors required for expression of SUC2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have partially purified a 27 kDa protein (p27) that bound both the DRSs of the HXK2 gene and the UASs of SUC2 gene. The amino terminal sequence of p27 identified the MED8 gene (open reading frame YBR193C), located in chromosome II of S. cerevisiae, as the gene coding for the protein. Disruption of this gene has demonstrated that is an essential gene for yeast growth. To determine whether the p27 protein represents the Med8 product, we expressed MED8 gene in E. coli and demonstrated that the heterologous synthesized protein specifically binds to both UASSUC2 and DRS2HXK2. This observation suggests that Med8 may be important for the coupling of the glucose repression pathway of SUC2 gene to the HXK2 gene expression. Med8 has been described as a mediator protein interacting with the CTD of the RNA polymerase II. Thus, the role of Med8 could be to act as coupling factor by linking activating and repressing transcription complexes to the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme transcriptional machinery. PMID:9918841

  20. Molecular characterization of a gene POLR2H encoded an essential subunit for RNA polymerase II from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda Melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-Jie; Hou, Yi-Ling; Hou, Wan-Ru

    2013-02-01

    The Giant Panda is an endangered and valuable gene pool in genetic, its important functional gene POLR2H encodes an essential shared peptide H of RNA polymerases. The genomic DNA and cDNA sequences were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) adopting touchdown-PCR and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The length of the genomic sequence of the Giant Panda is 3,285 bp, including five exons and four introns. The cDNA fragment cloned is 509 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 453 bp encoding 150 amino acids. Alignment analysis indicated that both the cDNA and its deduced amino acid sequence were highly conserved. Protein structure prediction showed that there was one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, four casein kinase II phosphorylation sites and one amidation site in the POLR2H protein, further shaping advanced protein structure. The cDNA cloned was expressed in Escherichia coli, which indicated that POLR2H fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form brought about the accumulation of an expected 20.5 kDa polypeptide in line with the predicted protein. On the basis of what has already been achieved in this study, further deep-in research will be conducted, which has great value in theory and practical significance. PMID:23070920

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase III recruitment factor subunits Brf1 and Bdp1 impose a strict sequence preference for the downstream half of the TATA box.

    PubMed

    Tsihlis, Nick D; Grove, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Association of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) with its cognate site within eukaryotic promoters is key to accurate and efficient transcriptional initiation. To achieve recruitment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase III, TBP is associated with two additional factors, Brf1 and Bdp1, to form the initiation factor TFIIIB. Previous data have suggested that the structure or dynamics of the TBP-DNA complex may be altered upon entry of Brf1 and Bdp1 into the complex. We show here, using the altered specificity TBP mutant TBPm3 and an iterative in vitro selection assay, that entry of Brf1 and Bdp1 into the complex imposes a strict sequence preference for the downstream half of the TATA box. Notably, the selected sequence (TGTAAATA) is a perfect match to the TATA box of the RNA polymerase III-transcribed U6 small nuclear RNA (SNR6) gene. We suggest that the selected T*A base pair step at the downstream end of the 8 bp TBP site may provide a DNA flexure that promotes TFIIIB-DNA complex formation. PMID:17028095

  2. Transcription Initiation in a Single-subunit RNA Polymerase proceeds through DNA Scrunching and Rotation of the N-terminal subdomains†

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Guo-Qing; Roy, Rahul; Ha, Taekjip; Patel, Smita S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Elucidating the mechanism of transcription initiation by RNA polymerases (RNAP) is essential for understanding gene transcription and regulation. Although several models such as DNA scrunching, RNAP translation, and RNAP rotation have been proposed, the mechanism of initiation by T7 RNAP has remained unclear. Using ensemble and single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies, we provide evidence for concerted DNA scrunching and rotation during initiation by T7 RNAP. A constant spatial distance between the upstream and downstream edges of initiation complexes making 4-7 nt RNA supports the DNA scrunching model, but not the RNAP translation or the pure rotation model. DNA scrunching is accompanied by moderate hinging motion (18 ± 4°) of the promoter towards the downstream DNA. The observed step-wise conformational changes provide a basis to understand abortive RNA synthesis during early stages of initiation and promoter escape during the later stages that allows transition to processive elongation. PMID:18538655

  3. Modulation of the W748S mutation in DNA polymerase γ by the E1143G polymorphism in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sherine S.L.; Longley, Matthew J.; Copeland, William C.

    2007-01-01

    DNA polymerase gamma (pol γ) is required for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Over 80 mutations in POLG, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of pol γ, have been linked with disease. The W748S mutation in POLG is the most common mutation in ataxia-neuropathy spectrum disorders and is generally found in cis with the common E1143G polymorphism. It has been unclear whether E1143G participates in the disease process. We investigated the biochemical consequences of pol γ proteins containing W748S or E1143G, or both. W748S pol γ exhibited low DNA polymerase activity, low processivity and a severe DNA-binding defect. However, interactions between the catalytic and accessory subunits were normal. Despite the benefits derived from binding with the accessory subunit, catalytic activities did not reach wild-type (WT) levels. Also, nucleotide selectivity decreased 2.1-fold compared with WT. Surprisingly, pol γ containing only E1143G was 1.4-fold more active than WT, and this increased polymerase activity could be due to higher thermal stability for E1143G pol γ. The E1143G substitution partially rescued the deleterious effects of the W748S mutation, as DNA binding, catalytic activity and fidelity values were intermediate for W748S-E1143G. However, W748S-E1143G had a notably lower change in enthalpy for protein folding than W748S alone. We suggest that when E1143G is in cis with other pathogenic mutations, it can modulate the effects of these mutations. For W748S-E1143G pol γ, the benefits bestowed by E1143G include increased DNA binding and polymerase activity; however, E1143G was somewhat detrimental to protein stability. PMID:17088268

  4. Binding interface between the Salmonella σS/RpoS subunit of RNA polymerase and Crl: hints from bacterial species lacking crl

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Paola; Sizun, Christina; Levi-Acobas, Fabienne; Nowakowski, Mireille; Monteil, Véronique; Bontems, François; Bellalou, Jacques; Mayer, Claudine; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In many Gram-negative bacteria, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), the sigma factor RpoS/σS accumulates during stationary phase of growth, and associates with the core RNA polymerase enzyme (E) to promote transcription initiation of genes involved in general stress resistance and starvation survival. Whereas σ factors are usually inactivated upon interaction with anti-σ proteins, σS binding to the Crl protein increases σS activity by favouring its association to E. Taking advantage of evolution of the σS sequence in bacterial species that do not contain a crl gene, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we identified and assigned a critical arginine residue in σS to the S. Typhimurium σS-Crl binding interface. We solved the solution structure of S. Typhimurium Crl by NMR and used it for NMR binding assays with σS and to generate in silico models of the σS-Crl complex constrained by mutational analysis. The σS-Crl models suggest that the identified arginine in σS interacts with an aspartate of Crl that is required for σS binding and is located inside a cavity enclosed by flexible loops, which also contribute to the interface. This study provides the basis for further structural investigation of the σS-Crl complex. PMID:26338235

  5. Accessory oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneswaran, Manica Ramamoorthy; Varadarajan, Usha; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Kamatchi, Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a patient around 11 years with the complaint of extra mouth who reported to the hospital for removal of that extra mouth. On examination there was accessory oral cavity with small upper and lower lips, seven teeth and saliva was drooling out. Under general anesthesia crevicular incision from 32 to 43 was put and labial gingiva with alveolar mucosa was reflected completely and bone exposed to lower border of mandible. There were seven teeth resembling lower permanent anterior teeth in the accessory mouth, which was excised with the accessory lips. 41 extracted and osteotomy carried out extending the incision from the extracted site and osteotomy carried out. Dermoid cyst both below and above the mylohyoid muscle and rudimentary tongue found and excised and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. The wound was closed and uneventful healing noted to the satisfaction of the patient. This is a rare and interesting case which has been documented. PMID:23833508

  6. Wolbachia Transcription Elongation Factor “Wol GreA” Interacts with α2ββ′σ Subunits of RNA Polymerase through Its Dimeric C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Shrivastava, Nidhi; Chahar, Dhanvantri; Gupta, Chhedi Lal; Bajpai, Preeti; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Wolbachia, an endosymbiont of filarial nematode, is considered a promising target for therapy against lymphatic filariasis. Transcription elongation factor GreA is an essential factor that mediates transcriptional transition from abortive initiation to productive elongation by stimulating the escape of RNA polymerase (RNAP) from native prokaryotic promoters. Upon screening of 6257 essential bacterial genes, 57 were suggested as potential future drug targets, and GreA is among these. The current study emphasized the characterization of Wol GreA with its domains. Methodology/Principal Findings Biophysical characterization of Wol GreA with its N-terminal domain (NTD) and C-terminal domain (CTD) was performed with fluorimetry, size exclusion chromatography, and chemical cross-linking. Filter trap and far western blotting were used to determine the domain responsible for the interaction with α2ββ′σ subunits of RNAP. Protein-protein docking studies were done to explore residual interaction of RNAP with Wol GreA. The factor and its domains were found to be biochemically active. Size exclusion and chemical cross-linking studies revealed that Wol GreA and CTD exist in a dimeric conformation while NTD subsists in monomeric conformation. Asp120, Val121, Ser122, Lys123, and Ser134 are the residues of CTD through which monomers of Wol GreA interact and shape into a dimeric conformation. Filter trap, far western blotting, and protein-protein docking studies revealed that dimeric CTD of Wol GreA through Lys82, Ser98, Asp104, Ser105, Glu106, Tyr109, Glu116, Asp120, Val121, Ser122, Ser127, Ser129, Lys140, Glu143, Val147, Ser151, Glu153, and Phe163 residues exclusively participates in binding with α2ββ′σ subunits of polymerase. Conclusions/Significance To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first documentation of the residual mode of action in wolbachial mutualist. Therefore, findings may be crucial to understanding the transcription mechanism of

  7. Transcription of the catalytic 180-kDa subunit gene of mouse DNA polymerase alpha is controlled by E2F, an Ets-related transcription factor, and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Izumi, M; Yokoi, M; Nishikawa, N S; Miyazawa, H; Sugino, A; Yamagishi, M; Yamaguchi, M; Matsukage, A; Yatagai, F; Hanaoka, F

    2000-07-24

    We have isolated a genomic DNA fragment spanning the 5'-end of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA polymerase alpha. The nucleotide sequence of the upstream region was G/C-rich and lacked a TATA box. Transient expression assays in cycling NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the GC box of 20 bp (at nucleotides -112/-93 with respect to the transcription initiation site) and the palindromic sequence of 14 bp (at nucleotides -71/-58) were essential for basal promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Sp1 binds to the GC box. We also purified a protein capable of binding to the palindrome and identified it as GA-binding protein (GABP), an Ets- and Notch-related transcription factor. Transient expression assays in synchronized NIH 3T3 cells revealed that three variant E2F sites near the transcription initiation site (at nucleotides -23/-16, -1/+7 and +17/+29) had no basal promoter activity by themselves, but were essential for growth-dependent stimulation of the gene expression. These data indicate that E2F, GABP and Sp1 regulate the gene expression of this principal replication enzyme. PMID:11004506

  8. Replication-competent influenza A virus that encodes a split-green fluorescent protein-tagged PB2 polymerase subunit allows live-cell imaging of the virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Avilov, Sergiy V; Moisy, Dorothée; Munier, Sandie; Schraidt, Oliver; Naffakh, Nadia; Cusack, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Studies on the intracellular trafficking of influenza virus ribonucleoproteins are currently limited by the lack of a method enabling their visualization during infection in single cells. This is largely due to the difficulty of encoding fluorescent fusion proteins within the viral genome. To circumvent this limitation, we used the split-green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system (S. Cabantous, T. C. Terwilliger, and G. S. Waldo, Nat. Biotechnol. 23:102-107, 2005) to produce a quasi-wild-type recombinant A/WSN/33/influenza virus which allows expression of individually fluorescent PB2 polymerase subunits in infected cells. The viral PB2 proteins were fused to the 16 C-terminal amino acids of the GFP, whereas the large transcomplementing GFP fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cultured cells that were permissive to infection. This system was used to characterize the intranuclear dynamics of PB2 by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and to visualize the trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) by dynamic light microscopy in live infected cells. Following nuclear export, vRNPs showed a transient pericentriolar accumulation and intermittent rapid (∼1 μm/s), directional movements in the cytoplasm, dependent on both microtubules and actin filaments. Our data establish the potential of split-GFP-based recombinant viruses for the tracking of viral proteins during a quasi-wild-type infection. This new virus, or adaptations of it, will be of use in elucidating many aspects of influenza virus host cell interactions as well as in screening for new antiviral compounds. Furthermore, the existence of cell lines stably expressing the complementing GFP fragment will facilitate applications to many other viral and nonviral systems. PMID:22114331

  9. Accessory apartment conversion programs.

    PubMed

    Retsinas, J; Retsinas, N P

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, state housing finance agencies have joined with state units on aging to develop programs to help the frail, elderly homeowner. Under an accessory apartment conversion program, a low-income homeowner will borrow money at a reduced interest rate to underwrite conversion of excess space into a rental apartment. The tenant will provide additional income as well as, ideally, certain kinds of personal assistance and a friendly presence. To date, few elderly clients have used this option. The initial rationale for the program is explained as are plausible reasons for the fact that it has not met expectations. PMID:10186784

  10. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  11. Evidence that sigma factors are components of chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, R F; Zhang, F; Hu, J; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase(s), which have been incompletely characterized and have been examined in a limited number of species. Plastid genomes contain rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2 coding for alpha, beta, beta', and beta" RNA polymerase subunits that are homologous to the alpha, beta, and beta' subunits that constitute the core moiety of RNA polymerase in bacteria. However, genes with homology to sigma subunits in bacteria have not been found in plastid genomes. An antibody directed against the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was used to probe western blots of purified chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize, rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Cyanidium caldarium. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize and rice contained an immunoreactive 64-kD protein. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. reinhardtii contained immunoreactive 100- and 82-kD proteins, and chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. caldarium contained an immunoreactive 32-kD protein. The elution profile of enzyme activity of both algal chloroplast RNA polymerases coeluted from DEAE with the respective immunoreactive proteins, indicating that they are components of the enzyme. These results provide immunological evidence for sigma-like factors in chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants and algae. PMID:8159791

  12. Automobile accessories: Assessment and improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.

    1995-11-01

    With mandates and regulatory policies to meet both the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), designing vehicles of the future will become a difficult task. As we look into the use of electric and hybrid vehicles, reduction of the required power demand by influential automobile components is necessary in order to obtain performance and range goals. Among those automobile components are accessories. Accessories have a profound impact on the range and mileage of future vehicles with limited amounts of energy or without power generating capabilities such as conventional vehicles. Careful assessment of major power consuming accessories helps us focus on those that need improvement and contributes to attainment of mileage and range goals for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  13. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual... Surgical Devices § 878.4950 Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. (a) Identification. A manual operating table and accessories and a manual operating chair...

  14. Teaching Techniques for Accessory Percussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micallef, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Everyone is familiar with the main percussion instruments of the contemporary orchestra: bass drum, snare drum, suspended cymbal, vibraphone, and timpani. But as source material broadens, so do the demands placed on the percussion section. Accessory, or auxiliary percussion, can make the difference between a typical rendition of a well-known piece…

  15. 14 CFR 25.1167 - Accessory gearboxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accessory gearboxes. 25.1167 Section 25... Accessory gearboxes. For airplanes equipped with an accessory gearbox that is not certificated as part of an engine— (a) The engine with gearbox and connecting transmissions and shafts attached must be subjected...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1167 - Accessory gearboxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accessory gearboxes. 25.1167 Section 25... Accessory gearboxes. For airplanes equipped with an accessory gearbox that is not certificated as part of an engine— (a) The engine with gearbox and connecting transmissions and shafts attached must be subjected...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1167 - Accessory gearboxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accessory gearboxes. 25.1167 Section 25... Accessory gearboxes. For airplanes equipped with an accessory gearbox that is not certificated as part of an engine— (a) The engine with gearbox and connecting transmissions and shafts attached must be subjected...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1167 - Accessory gearboxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accessory gearboxes. 25.1167 Section 25... Accessory gearboxes. For airplanes equipped with an accessory gearbox that is not certificated as part of an engine— (a) The engine with gearbox and connecting transmissions and shafts attached must be subjected...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1167 - Accessory gearboxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessory gearboxes. 25.1167 Section 25... Accessory gearboxes. For airplanes equipped with an accessory gearbox that is not certificated as part of an engine— (a) The engine with gearbox and connecting transmissions and shafts attached must be subjected...

  20. A multiprotein complex that interacts with RNA polymerase II elongator.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Takagi, Y; Jiang, Y; Tokunaga, M; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Kornberg, R D

    2001-08-10

    A three-subunit Hap complex that interacts with the RNA polymerase II Elongator was isolated from yeast. Deletions of genes for two Hap subunits, HAP1 and HAP3, confer pGKL killer-insensitive and weak Elongator phenotypes. Preferential interaction of the Hap complex with free rather than RNA polymerase II-associated Elongator suggests a role in the regulation of Elongator activity. PMID:11390369

  1. Exploring RNA polymerase regulation by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.; Knauer, Stefan H.; Rösch, Paul

    2015-01-01

    RNA synthesis is a central process in all organisms, with RNA polymerase (RNAP) as the key enzyme. Multisubunit RNAPs are evolutionary related and are tightly regulated by a multitude of transcription factors. Although Escherichia coli RNAP has been studied extensively, only little information is available about its dynamics and transient interactions. This information, however, are crucial for the complete understanding of transcription regulation in atomic detail. To study RNAP by NMR spectroscopy we developed a highly efficient procedure for the assembly of active RNAP from separately expressed subunits that allows specific labeling of the individual constituents. We recorded [1H,13C] correlation spectra of isoleucine, leucine, and valine methyl groups of complete RNAP and the separately labeled β’ subunit within reconstituted RNAP. We further produced all RNAP subunits individually, established experiments to determine which RNAP subunit a certain regulator binds to, and identified the β subunit to bind NusE. PMID:26043358

  2. Surface for Catalysis by Poliovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Lyle, John M.; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, replicates the viral genomic RNA on the surface of virus-induced intracellular membranes. Macromolecular assemblies of 3Dpol form linear array of subunits that propagate along a strong protein-protein interaction called interface-I, as was observed in the crystal structure of wild-type poliovirus polymerase. These “filaments” recur with slight modifications in planar sheets and, with additional modifications that accommodate curvature, in helical tubes of the polymerase, by packing filaments together via a second set of interactions. Periodic variations of subunit orientations within 3Dpol tubes give rise to “ghost reflections” in diffraction patterns computed from electron cryomicrographs of helical arrays. The ghost reflections reveal that polymerase tubes are formed by bundles of 4–6 interface-I filaments, which are then connected to the next bundle of filaments with a perturbation of interface interactions between bundles. While enzymatically inactive polymerase is also capable of oligomerization, much thinner tubes are formed that lack interface-I interactions between adjacent subunits, suggesting that long-range allostery produces conformational changes that extend from the active site to the protein-protein interface. Macromolecular assemblies of poliovirus polymerase show repeated use of flexible interface interactions for polymerase lattice formation, suggesting that adaptability of polymerase-polymerase interactions facilitates RNA replication. In addition, the presence of a positively charged groove identified in polymerase arrays may help position and stabilize the RNA template during replication. PMID:23583774

  3. Repeated tertiary fold of RNA polymerase II and implications for DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Fu, J; Gerstein, M; David, P R; Gnatt, A L; Bushnell, D A; Edwards, A M; Kornberg, R D

    1998-07-17

    X-ray diffraction data from two forms of yeast RNA polymerase II crystals indicate that the two largest subunits of the polymerase, Rpb1 and Rpb2, may have similar folds, as is suggested by secondary structure predictions. DNA may bind between the two subunits with its 2-fold axis aligned to a pseudo 2-fold axis of the protein. PMID:9665838

  4. Ancient origin, functional conservation and fast evolution of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Proshkina, Galina M.; Shematorova, Elena K.; Proshkin, Sergey A.; Zaros, Cécile; Thuriaux, Pierre; Shpakovski, George V.

    2006-01-01

    RNA polymerase III contains seventeen subunits in yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and in human cells. Twelve of them are akin to the core RNA polymerase I or II. The five other are RNA polymerase III-specific and form the functionally distinct groups Rpc31-Rpc34-Rpc82 and Rpc37-Rpc53. Currently sequenced eukaryotic genomes revealed significant homology to these seventeen subunits in Fungi, Animals, Plants and Amoebozoans. Except for subunit Rpc31, this also extended to the much more distantly related genomes of Alveolates and Excavates, indicating that the complex subunit organization of RNA polymerase III emerged at a very early stage of eukaryotic evolution. The Sch.pombe subunits were expressed in S.cerevisiae null mutants and tested for growth. Ten core subunits showed heterospecific complementation, but the two largest catalytic subunits (Rpc1 and Rpc2) and all five RNA polymerase III-specific subunits (Rpc82, Rpc53, Rpc37, Rpc34 and Rpc31) were non-functional. Three highly conserved RNA polymerase III-specific domains were found in the twelve-subunit core structure. They correspond to the Rpc17-Rpc25 dimer, involved in transcription initiation, to an N-terminal domain of the largest subunit Rpc1 important to anchor Rpc31, Rpc34 and Rpc82, and to a C-terminal domain of Rpc1 that presumably holds Rpc37, Rpc53 and their Rpc11 partner. PMID:16877568

  5. Phosphoesterase domains associated with DNA polymerases of diverse origins.

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    1998-01-01

    Computer analysis of DNA polymerase protein sequences revealed previously unidentified conserved domains that belong to two distinct superfamilies of phosphoesterases. The alpha subunits of bacterial DNA polymerase III and two distinct family X DNA polymerases are shown to contain an N-terminal domain that defines a novel enzymatic superfamily, designated PHP, after polymerase and histidinol phosphatase. The predicted catalytic site of the PHP superfamily consists of four motifs containing conserved histidine residues that are likely to be involved in metal-dependent catalysis of phosphoester bond hydrolysis. The PHP domain is highly conserved in all bacterial polymerase III alpha subunits, but in proteobacteria and mycoplasmas, the conserved motifs are distorted, suggesting a loss of the enzymatic activity. Another conserved domain, found in the small subunits of archaeal DNA polymerase II and eukaryotic DNA polymerases alpha and delta, is shown to belong to the superfamily of calcineurin-like phospho-esterases, which unites a variety of phosphatases and nucleases. The conserved motifs required for phospho-esterase activity are intact in the archaeal DNA polymerase subunits, but are disrupted in their eukaryotic orthologs. A hypothesis is proposed that bacterial and archaeal replicative DNA polymerases possess intrinsic phosphatase activity that hydrolyzes the pyrophosphate released during nucleotide polymerization. As proposed previously, pyrophosphate hydrolysis may be necessary to drive the polymerization reaction forward. The phosphoesterase domains with disrupted catalytic motifs may assume an allosteric, regulatory function and/or bind other subunits of DNA polymerase holoenzymes. In these cases, the pyrophosphate may be hydrolyzed by a stand-alone phosphatase, and candidates for such a role were identified among bacterial PHP superfamily members. PMID:9685491

  6. Advanced Accessory Power Supply Topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Marlino, L.D.

    2010-06-15

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) began December 8, 2000 and ended September 30, 2009. The total funding provided by the Participant (General Motors Advanced Technology Vehicles [GM]) during the course of the CRADA totaled $1.2M enabling the Contractor (UT-Battelle, LLC [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a.k.a. ORNL]) to contribute significantly to the joint project. The initial task was to work with GM on the feasibility of developing their conceptual approach of modifying major components of the existing traction inverter/drive to develop low cost, robust, accessory power. Two alternate methods for implementation were suggested by ORNL and both were proven successful through simulations and then extensive testing of prototypes designed and fabricated during the project. This validated the GM overall concept. Moreover, three joint U.S. patents were issued and subsequently licensed by GM. After successfully fulfilling the initial objective, the direction and duration of the CRADA was modified and GM provided funding for two additional tasks. The first new task was to provide the basic development for implementing a cascaded inverter technology into hybrid vehicles (including plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and electric). The second new task was to continue the basic development for implementing inverter and converter topologies and new technology assessments for hybrid vehicle applications. Additionally, this task was to address the use of high temperature components in drive systems. Under this CRADA, ORNL conducted further research based on GM’s idea of using the motor magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply that is nongalvanically coupled to the terminals of the high voltage dc-link battery of hybrid vehicles. In order not to interfere with the motor’s torque, ORNL suggested to use the zero-sequence, highfrequency harmonics carried by the main fundamental motor current for producing the accessory power

  7. Mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; Herndon, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of optimum mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators involves matching the criteria for emergency response with the available technology. This paper presents a general background to teleoperations, a potpourri of the manipulator systems available, and an argument for force reflecting manipulation. The theme presented is that the accomplishment of humanlike endeavors in hostile environments will be most successful when man model capabilities are utilized. The application of recent electronic technology to manipulator development has made new tools available to be applied to emergency response activities. The development activities described are products of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  8. On the multiple roles of the voltage gated sodium channel β1 subunit in genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Debora; Moran, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are intrinsic plasma membrane proteins that initiate the action potential in electrically excitable cells. They are composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and associated β-subunits. The β1-subunit was the first accessory subunit to be cloned. It can be important for controlling cell excitability and modulating multiple aspects of sodium channel physiology. Mutations of β1 are implicated in a wide variety of inherited pathologies, including epilepsy and cardiac conduction diseases. This review summarizes β1-subunit related channelopathies pointing out the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and their underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26042039

  9. Interaction between the RNA-dependent ATPase and poly(A) polymerase subunits of the TRAMP complex is mediated by short peptides and important for snoRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Losh, Jillian S.; King, Alejandra Klauer; Bakelar, Jeremy; Taylor, Lacy; Loomis, John; Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Johnson, Sean J.; van Hoof, Ambro

    2015-01-01

    The RNA exosome is one of the main 3′ to 5′ exoribonucleases in eukaryotic cells. Although it is responsible for degradation or processing of a wide variety of substrate RNAs, it is very specific and distinguishes between substrate and non-substrate RNAs as well as between substrates that need to be 3′ processed and those that need to be completely degraded. This specificity does not appear to be determined by the exosome itself but rather by about a dozen other proteins. Four of these exosome cofactors have enzymatic activity, namely, the nuclear RNA-dependent ATPase Mtr4, its cytoplasmic paralog Ski2 and the nuclear non-canonical poly(A) polymerases, Trf4 and Trf5. Mtr4 and either Trf4 or Trf5 assemble into a TRAMP complex. However, how these enzymes assemble into a TRAMP complex and the functional consequences of TRAMP complex assembly remain unknown. Here, we identify an important interaction site between Mtr4 and Trf5, and show that disrupting the Mtr4/Trf interaction disrupts specific TRAMP and exosome functions, including snoRNA processing. PMID:25589546

  10. Interaction between the RNA-dependent ATPase and poly(A) polymerase subunits of the TRAMP complex is mediated by short peptides and important for snoRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Losh, Jillian S; King, Alejandra Klauer; Bakelar, Jeremy; Taylor, Lacy; Loomis, John; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Johnson, Sean J; van Hoof, Ambro

    2015-02-18

    The RNA exosome is one of the main 3′ to 5′ exoribonucleases in eukaryotic cells. Although it is responsible for degradation or processing of a wide variety of substrate RNAs, it is very specific and distinguishes between substrate and non-substrate RNAs as well as between substrates that need to be 3′ processed and those that need to be completely degraded. This specificity does not appear to be determined by the exosome itself but rather by about a dozen other proteins. Four of these exosome cofactors have enzymatic activity, namely, the nuclear RNA-dependent ATPase Mtr4, its cytoplasmic paralog Ski2 and the nuclear non-canonical poly(A) polymerases, Trf4 and Trf5. Mtr4 and either Trf4 or Trf5 assemble into a TRAMP complex. However, how these enzymes assemble into a TRAMP complex and the functional consequences of TRAMP complex assembly remain unknown. Here, we identify an important interaction site between Mtr4 and Trf5, and show that disrupting the Mtr4/Trf interaction disrupts specific TRAMP and exosome functions, including snoRNA processing. PMID:25589546

  11. Subunit architecture of general transcription factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Brian J; Brignole, Edward J; Azubel, Maia; Murakami, Kenji; Voss, Neil R; Bushnell, David A; Asturias, Francisco J; Kornberg, Roger D

    2012-02-01

    Structures of complete 10-subunit yeast TFIIH and of a nested set of subcomplexes, containing 5, 6, and 7 subunits, have been determined by electron microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstruction. Consistency among all the structures establishes the location of the "minimal core" subunits (Ssl1, Tfb1, Tfb2, Tfb4, and Tfb5), and additional densities can be specifically attributed to Rad3, Ssl2, and the TFIIK trimer. These results can be further interpreted by placement of previous X-ray structures into the additional densities to give a preliminary picture of the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex. In this picture, the key catalytic components of TFIIH, the Ssl2 ATPase/helicase and the Kin28 protein kinase are in proximity to their targets, downstream promoter DNA and the RNA polymerase C-terminal domain. PMID:22308316

  12. 21 CFR 878.4350 - Cryosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and accessories. (a) Identification—(1) Cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories. A cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories is a device...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4350 - Cryosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and accessories. (a) Identification—(1) Cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories. A cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories is a device...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4350 - Cryosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and accessories. (a) Identification—(1) Cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories. A cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories is a device...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4350 - Cryosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and accessories. (a) Identification—(1) Cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories. A cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories is a device...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4350 - Cryosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and accessories. (a) Identification—(1) Cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories. A cryosurgical unit with a liquid nitrogen cooled cryoprobe and accessories is a device...

  17. The Balance between Recombination Enzymes and Accessory Replicative Helicases in Facilitating Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Aisha H; Atkinson, John; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Accessory replicative helicases aid the primary replicative helicase in duplicating protein-bound DNA, especially transcribed DNA. Recombination enzymes also aid genome duplication by facilitating the repair of DNA lesions via strand exchange and also processing of blocked fork DNA to generate structures onto which the replisome can be reloaded. There is significant interplay between accessory helicases and recombination enzymes in both bacteria and lower eukaryotes but how these replication repair systems interact to ensure efficient genome duplication remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the DNA content defects of Escherichia coli cells lacking the strand exchange protein RecA are driven primarily by conflicts between replication and transcription, as is the case in cells lacking the accessory helicase Rep. However, in contrast to Rep, neither RecA nor RecBCD, the helicase/exonuclease that loads RecA onto dsDNA ends, is important for maintaining rapid chromosome duplication. Furthermore, RecA and RecBCD together can sustain viability in the absence of accessory replicative helicases but only when transcriptional barriers to replication are suppressed by an RNA polymerase mutation. Our data indicate that the minimisation of replisome pausing by accessory helicases has a more significant impact on successful completion of chromosome duplication than recombination-directed fork repair. PMID:27483323

  18. The Balance between Recombination Enzymes and Accessory Replicative Helicases in Facilitating Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Atkinson, John; Lloyd, Robert G.; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Accessory replicative helicases aid the primary replicative helicase in duplicating protein-bound DNA, especially transcribed DNA. Recombination enzymes also aid genome duplication by facilitating the repair of DNA lesions via strand exchange and also processing of blocked fork DNA to generate structures onto which the replisome can be reloaded. There is significant interplay between accessory helicases and recombination enzymes in both bacteria and lower eukaryotes but how these replication repair systems interact to ensure efficient genome duplication remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the DNA content defects of Escherichia coli cells lacking the strand exchange protein RecA are driven primarily by conflicts between replication and transcription, as is the case in cells lacking the accessory helicase Rep. However, in contrast to Rep, neither RecA nor RecBCD, the helicase/exonuclease that loads RecA onto dsDNA ends, is important for maintaining rapid chromosome duplication. Furthermore, RecA and RecBCD together can sustain viability in the absence of accessory replicative helicases but only when transcriptional barriers to replication are suppressed by an RNA polymerase mutation. Our data indicate that the minimisation of replisome pausing by accessory helicases has a more significant impact on successful completion of chromosome duplication than recombination-directed fork repair. PMID:27483323

  19. 46 CFR 169.671 - Accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accessories. 169.671 Section 169.671 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and... Gross Tons § 169.671 Accessories. Each light, receptacle and switch exposed to the weather must...

  20. 46 CFR 169.671 - Accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accessories. 169.671 Section 169.671 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and... Gross Tons § 169.671 Accessories. Each light, receptacle and switch exposed to the weather must...

  1. Three Accessories for a Rotating Platform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, James A.; Fryer, Oscar G.

    1980-01-01

    Describes three accessories developed to be used in conjunction with the rotating platform or turntable. Three demonstrations using these accessories are included. These demonstrations are: (a) conservation of angular momentum; (b) gravity-defying goblets; and (c) direct measurement of centripetal force. (HM)

  2. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  3. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  4. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  5. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  6. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  7. PDIP46 (DNA polymerase δ interacting protein 46) is an activating factor for human DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rong; Yue, Fu; Lin, Szu Hua Sharon; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Lee, Ernest Y. C.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Marietta Y. W. T.

    2016-01-01

    PDIP46 (SKAR, POLDIP3) was discovered through its interaction with the p50 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Its functions in DNA replication are unknown. PDIP46 associates with Pol δ in cell extracts both by immunochemical and protein separation methods, as well as by ChIP analyses. PDIP46 also interacts with PCNA via multiple copies of a novel PCNA binding motif, the APIMs (AlkB homologue-2 PCNA-Interacting Motif). Sites for both p50 and PCNA binding were mapped to the N-terminal region containing the APIMs. Functional assays for the effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ activity on singly primed ssM13 DNA templates revealed that it is a novel and potent activator of Pol δ. The effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ in primer extension, strand displacement and synthesis through simple hairpin structures reveal a mechanism where PDIP46 facilitates Pol δ4 synthesis through regions of secondary structure on complex templates. In addition, evidence was obtained that PDIP46 is also capable of exerting its effects by a direct interaction with Pol δ, independent of PCNA. Mutation of the Pol δ and PCNA binding region resulted in a loss of PDIP46 functions. These studies support the view that PDIP46 is a novel accessory protein for Pol δ that is involved in cellular DNA replication. This raises the possibility that altered expression of PDIP46 or its mutation may affect Pol δ functions in vivo, and thereby be a nexus for altered genomic stability. PMID:26819372

  8. Carcinoma in accessory axillary breast.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Seema; Mishra, Shashi Prakash; Kumar, Satendra; Khanna, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of carcinoma developing in an accessory breast. The patient presented with a progressive lump in her right axilla for 1 year. On examination, there was a well-developed nipple areola complex in the right axilla overlying a hard, fixed 5 × 3 cm lump. On investigation, core biopsy revealed poorly differentiated carcinoma of the breast. Mammography also revealed features of a malignant lesion with skin and muscle infiltration. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered followed by modified radical mastectomy after three cycles. Immunohistochemistry study showed positive status of oestrogen and progesterone receptors, and negative HER-2 neu. Three more cycles of chemotherapy along with 50 Gy radiotherapy were given in an adjuvant setting followed by hormone therapy. PMID:26260957

  9. Accessory tragus: a dentist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Banda, Naveen Reddy; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Banda, Vanaja Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Accessory tragus (AT) also referred as preauricular tag is a rudimentary tag of ear tissue This paper presents two specific cases: one hereditary and another sporadic case of AT. A general clinical description of AT, its associated syndromes, embryology aetiopathogenesis and management is discussed. A dentist can play an important role in spotting the AT during their head and neck examination. The presence of this defect can be correlated to other congenital defects of first branchial arch. On recognising its occurrence, the dentist can refer to a specialist for thorough investigation management. A dentist can play a vital role in encouraging and counselling the parents for the correction of such defects as it improves the aesthetics of the face. Usually, children with these defects are often targets of teasing by peers. PMID:23761605

  10. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365