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Sample records for polymerase-1 inhibits atm

  1. ATM deficiency sensitizes mantle cell lymphoma cells to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chris T; Muzik, Huong; Turhan, Ali G; Zamò, Alberto; O'Connor, Mark J; Bebb, D Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2010-02-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition is toxic to cells with mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, a concept termed synthetic lethality. However, whether this approach is applicable to other human cancers with defects in other DNA repair genes has yet to be determined. The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is altered in several human cancers including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Here, we characterize a panel of MCL cell lines for ATM status and function and investigate the potential for synthetic lethality in MCL in the presence of small-molecule inhibitors of PARP-1. We show that Granta-519 and UPN2 cells have low levels of ATM protein, are defective in DNA damage-induced ATM-dependent signaling, are radiation sensitive, and have cell cycle checkpoint defects: all characteristics of defective ATM function. Significantly, Granta-519 and UPN2 cells were more sensitive to PARP-1 inhibition than were the ATM-proficient MCL cell lines examined. Furthermore, the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (known previously as AZD2281/KU-0059436) significantly decreased tumor growth and increased overall survival in mice bearing s.c. xenografts of ATM-deficient Granta-519 cells while producing only a modest effect on overall survival of mice bearing xenografts of the ATM-proficient cell line, Z138. Thus, PARP inhibitors have therapeutic potential in the treatment of MCL, and the concept of synthetic lethality extends to human cancers with ATM alterations. PMID:20124459

  2. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 attenuates the toxicity of carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Banasik, Marek; Stedeford, Todd; Strosznajder, Robert P; Takehashi, Masanori; Tanaka, Seigo; Ueda, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is routinely used as a model compound for eliciting centrilobular hepatotoxicity. It can be bioactivated to the trichloromethyl radical, which causes extensive lipid peroxidation and ultimately cell death by necrosis. Overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) can rapidly reduce the levels of (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and adenosine triphosphate and ultimately promote necrosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of PARP-1 could decrease CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, as measured by degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lipid peroxidation,and oxidative DNA damage. For this purpose, male ICR mice were administered intraperitoneally a hepatotoxic dose of CCl4 with or without 6(5H)-phenanthridinone, a potent inhibitor of PARP-1. Animals treated with CCl4 exhibited extensive poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in centrilobular hepatocytes, elevated serum levels of LDH, and increased lipid peroxidation. In contrast, animals treated concomitantly with CCl4 and 6(5H)-phenanthridinone showed significantly lower levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation, serum LDH, and lipid peroxidation. No changes were observed in the levels of oxidative DNA damage regardless of treatment. These results demonstrated that the hepatotoxicity of CCl4is dependent on the overactivation of PARP-1 and that inhibition of this enzyme attenuates the hepatotoxicity of CCl4. PMID:21395487

  3. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  4. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 by arsenite interferes with repair of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Liu, Wenlan; Cooper, Karen L; Qin, Xu-Jun; de Souza Bergo, Patrícia L; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2009-03-13

    Arsenic enhances skin tumor formation when combined with other carcinogens, including UV radiation (UVR). In this study we report that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite synergistically increases UVR-induced oxidative DNA damage in human keratinocytes as detected by 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanine (8-OHdG) formation. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is involved in base excision repair, a process that repairs 8-OHdG lesions. Arsenite suppresses UVR-induced PARP-1 activation in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of PARP-1 activity by 3-aminobenzamide or small interfering RNA silencing of PARP-1 expression significantly increases UVR-induced 8-OHdG formation, suggesting that inhibition of PARP-1 activity by arsenite contributes to oxidative DNA damage. PARP-1 is a zinc finger protein, and mass spectrometry analysis reveals that arsenite can occupy a synthetic apopeptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1 (PARPzf). When the PARPzf peptide is preincubated with Zn(II) followed by incubation with increasing concentrations of arsenite, the ZnPARPzf signal is decreased while the AsPARPzf signal intensity is increased as a function of arsenite dose, suggesting a competition between zinc and arsenite for the same binding site. Addition of Zn(II) abolished arsenite enhancement of UVR-stimulated 8-OHdG generation and restored PARP-1 activity. Our findings demonstrate that arsenite inhibits oxidative DNA damage repair and suggest that interaction of arsenite with the PARP-1 zinc finger domain contributes to the inhibition of PARP-1 activity by arsenite. Arsenite inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is one likely mechanism for the reported co-carcinogenic activities of arsenic in UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:19056730

  5. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  6. NOTCH1 Inhibits Activation of ATM by Impairing the Formation of an ATM-FOXO3a-KAT5/Tip60 Complex.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Marek; Vermezovic, Jelena; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-08-23

    The DNA damage response (DDR) signal transduction pathway is responsible for sensing DNA damage and further relaying this signal into the cell. ATM is an apical DDR kinase that orchestrates the activation and the recruitment of downstream DDR factors to induce cell-cycle arrest and repair. We have previously shown that NOTCH1 inhibits ATM activation upon DNA damage, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show that NOTCH1 does not impair ATM recruitment to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Rather, NOTCH1 prevents binding of FOXO3a and KAT5/Tip60 to ATM through a mechanism in which NOTCH1 competes with FOXO3a for ATM binding. Lack of FOXO3a binding to ATM leads to the loss of KAT5/Tip60 association with ATM. Moreover, expression of NOTCH1 or depletion of ATM impairs the formation of the FOXO3a-KAT5/Tip60 protein complex. Finally, we show that pharmacological induction of FOXO3a nuclear localization sensitizes NOTCH1-driven cancers to DNA-damage-induced cell death. PMID:27524627

  7. Restoration of ATM Expression in DNA-PKcs-Deficient Cells Inhibits Signal End Joining.

    PubMed

    Neal, Jessica A; Xu, Yao; Abe, Masumi; Hendrickson, Eric; Meek, Katheryn

    2016-04-01

    Unlike most DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)-deficient mouse cell strains, we show in the present study that targeted deletion of DNA-PKcs in two different human cell lines abrogates VDJ signal end joining in episomal assays. Although the mechanism is not well defined, DNA-PKcs deficiency results in spontaneous reduction of ATM expression in many cultured cell lines (including those examined in this study) and in DNA-PKcs-deficient mice. We considered that varying loss of ATM expression might explain differences in signal end joining in different cell strains and animal models, and we investigated the impact of ATM and/or DNA-PKcs loss on VDJ recombination in cultured human and rodent cell strains. To our surprise, in DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse cell strains that are proficient in signal end joining, restoration of ATM expression markedly inhibits signal end joining. In contrast, in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells that are deficient in signal end joining, complete loss of ATM enhances signal (but not coding) joint formation. We propose that ATM facilitates restriction of signal ends to the classical nonhomologous end-joining pathway. PMID:26921311

  8. Squalene Inhibits ATM-Dependent Signaling in γIR-Induced DNA Damage Response through Induction of Wip1 Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Tatewaki, Naoto; Konishi, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Miyako; Saito, Masafumi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase plays a crucial role as a master controller in the cellular DNA damage response. Inhibition of ATM leads to inhibition of the checkpoint signaling pathway. Hence, addition of checkpoint inhibitors to anticancer therapies may be an effective targeting strategy. A recent study reported that Wip1, a protein phosphatase, de-phosphorylates serine 1981 of ATM during the DNA damage response. Squalene has been proposed to complement anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, there is little mechanistic information supporting this idea. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of squalene on ATM-dependent DNA damage signals. Squalene itself did not affect cell viability and the cell cycle of A549 cells, but it enhanced the cytotoxicity of gamma-irradiation (γIR). The in vitro kinase activity of ATM was not altered by squalene. However, squalene increased Wip1 expression in cells and suppressed ATM activation in γIR-treated cells. Consistent with the potential inhibition of ATM by squalene, IR-induced phosphorylation of ATM effectors such as p53 (Ser15) and Chk1 (Ser317) was inhibited by cell treatment with squalene. Thus, squalene inhibits the ATM-dependent signaling pathway following DNA damage through intracellular induction of Wip1 expression. PMID:26824362

  9. Squalene Inhibits ATM-Dependent Signaling in γIR-Induced DNA Damage Response through Induction of Wip1 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Tatewaki, Naoto; Konishi, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Miyako; Saito, Masafumi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase plays a crucial role as a master controller in the cellular DNA damage response. Inhibition of ATM leads to inhibition of the checkpoint signaling pathway. Hence, addition of checkpoint inhibitors to anticancer therapies may be an effective targeting strategy. A recent study reported that Wip1, a protein phosphatase, de-phosphorylates serine 1981 of ATM during the DNA damage response. Squalene has been proposed to complement anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, there is little mechanistic information supporting this idea. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of squalene on ATM-dependent DNA damage signals. Squalene itself did not affect cell viability and the cell cycle of A549 cells, but it enhanced the cytotoxicity of gamma-irradiation (γIR). The in vitro kinase activity of ATM was not altered by squalene. However, squalene increased Wip1 expression in cells and suppressed ATM activation in γIR-treated cells. Consistent with the potential inhibition of ATM by squalene, IR-induced phosphorylation of ATM effectors such as p53 (Ser15) and Chk1 (Ser317) was inhibited by cell treatment with squalene. Thus, squalene inhibits the ATM-dependent signaling pathway following DNA damage through intracellular induction of Wip1 expression. PMID:26824362

  10. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Hua, Ning; Xie, Keliang; Zhao, Tingting; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-08-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  11. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HONGWEI; HUA, NING; XIE, KELIANG; ZHAO, TINGTING; YU, YONGHAO

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  12. Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  13. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S.; Yip, Bryan K.; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.

    2014-08-29

    BMN 673, a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor in clinical development with substantial tumor cytotoxicity, forms extensive hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking in the nicotinamide pocket, with its unique disubstituted scaffold extending towards the less conserved edges of the pocket. These interactions might provide structural insight into the ability of BMN 673 to both inhibit catalysis and affect DNA-binding activity. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity.

  14. p38γ Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Contributes to Oncogenic Properties Maintenance and Resistance to Poly (ADP-Ribose)-Polymerase-1 Inhibition in Breast Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyan; Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Gang; Kreike, Bas; Chen, Wei; Sethi, Seema; Miller, Fred R; Wu, Guojun

    2011-01-01

    p38γ MAPK, one of the four members of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), has previously been shown to harbor oncogenic functions. However, the biologic function of p38γ MAPK in breast cancer has not been well defined. In this study, we have shown that p38γ MAPK is overexpressed in highly metastatic human and mouse breast cancer cell lines and p38γ MAPK expression is preferentially associated with basal-like and metastatic phenotypes of breast tumor samples. Ectopic expression of p38γ MAPK did not lead to an increase in oncogenic properties in vitro in most tested mammary epithelial cells. However, knockdown of p38γ MAPK expression resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, invasion in vitro and significant retardation of tumorigenesis, and long-distance metastasis to the lungs in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of p38γ MAPK triggered the activation of AKT signaling. Inhibition of this feedback loop with various PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitors facilitated the effect of targeting p38γ MAPK. We further found that overexpression of p38γ MAPK did not promote cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin and paclitaxel but significantly increased cell resistance to PJ-34, a DNA damage agent poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP) inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we identified that p38γ MAPK overexpression led to marked cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Our study for the first time clearly demonstrates that p38γ MAPK is a promising target for the design of targeted therapies for basal-like breast cancer with metastatic characteristics and for overcoming potential resistance against the PARP inhibitor. PMID:21532888

  15. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K.; Liu, Ke J.; Lau, Serrine S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  16. Enhanced cytotoxicity of PARP inhibition in mantle cell lymphoma harbouring mutations in both ATM and p53.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chris T; Kubota, Eiji; Hamill, Jeffrey D; Klimowicz, Alexander; Ye, Ruiqiong; Muzik, Huong; Dean, Michelle; Tu, LiRen; Gilley, David; Magliocco, Anthony M; McKay, Bruce C; Bebb, D Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2012-06-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promise in the treatment of human malignancies characterized by deficiencies in the DNA damage repair proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 and preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential effectiveness of PARP inhibitors in targeting ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-deficient tumours. Here, we show that mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells deficient in both ATM and p53 are more sensitive to the PARP inhibitor olaparib than cells lacking ATM function alone. In ATM-deficient MCL cells, olaparib induced DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation and stabilization of p53 as well as expression of p53-responsive cell cycle checkpoint regulators, and inhibition of DNA-PK reduced the toxicity of olaparib in ATM-deficient MCL cells. Thus, both DNA-PK and p53 regulate the response of ATM-deficient MCL cells to olaparib. In addition, small molecule inhibition of both ATM and PARP was cytotoxic in normal human fibroblasts with disruption of p53, implying that the combination of ATM and PARP inhibitors may have utility in targeting p53-deficient malignancies. PMID:22416035

  17. MiR-203 inhibits tumor invasion and metastasis in gastric cancer by ATM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Sun, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world. A number of miRNAs are aberrantly expressed during the progression of gastric cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of miR-203 in the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer and the potential mechanism of the effect of miR-203 on the tumor progression of gastric cancer. Our results showed that miR-203 was significantly downregulated in gastric cancer tissues and cells, while ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) was upregulated in gastric cancer tissues and cells and was directly regulated by miR-203. Ectopic overexpression of miR-203 inhibited the colony formation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells. In addition, miR-203 overexpression significantly suppressed the protein level of Snail and obviously promoted the protein level of E-cadherin in gastric cancer cells. ATM knockdown phenocopied the effect of miR-203 overexpression. These results suggested that miR-203 suppressed the migration and invasion of gastric cancer through regulating the level of ATM-mediated-Snail and E-cadherin. MiR-203 might be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27542403

  18. ATR inhibition induces synthetic lethality and overcomes chemoresistance in TP53- or ATM-defective chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Marwan; Davies, Nicholas; Agathanggelou, Angelo; Smith, Edward; Oldreive, Ceri; Petermann, Eva; Stewart, Grant; Brown, Jeff; Lau, Alan; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Taylor, Malcolm; Moss, Paul; Hillmen, Peter; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2016-02-01

    TP53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) defects are associated with genomic instability, clonal evolution, and chemoresistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Currently, therapies capable of providing durable remissions in relapsed/refractory TP53- or ATM-defective CLL are lacking. Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) mediates response to replication stress, the absence of which leads to collapse of stalled replication forks into chromatid fragments that require resolution through the ATM/p53 pathway. Here, using AZD6738, a novel ATR kinase inhibitor, we investigated ATR inhibition as a synthetically lethal strategy to target CLL cells with TP53 or ATM defects. Irrespective of TP53 or ATM status, induction of CLL cell proliferation upregulated ATR protein, which then became activated in response to replication stress. In TP53- or ATM-defective CLL cells, inhibition of ATR signaling by AZD6738 led to an accumulation of unrepaired DNA damage, which was carried through into mitosis because of defective cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in cell death by mitotic catastrophe. Consequently, AZD6738 was selectively cytotoxic to both TP53- and ATM-defective CLL cell lines and primary cells. This was confirmed in vivo using primary xenograft models of TP53- or ATM-defective CLL, where treatment with AZD6738 resulted in decreased tumor load and reduction in the proportion of CLL cells with such defects. Moreover, AZD6738 sensitized TP53- or ATM-defective primary CLL cells to chemotherapy and ibrutinib. Our findings suggest that ATR is a promising therapeutic target for TP53- or ATM-defective CLL that warrants clinical investigation. PMID:26563132

  19. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S.; Yip, Bryan K.; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity. PMID:25195882

  20. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S; Yip, Bryan K; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity. PMID:25195882

  1. Effects of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition on sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injuries in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Jiang, Ning; Xiao, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Jun-ping; Mei, Yi-zhou; Zheng, Pan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Xin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Early studies with first-generation poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have already indicated some therapeutic potential for sulfur mustard (SM) injuries. The available novel and more potential PARP inhibitors, which are undergoing clinical trials as drugs for cancer treatment, bring it back to the centre of interest. However, the role of PARP-1 in SM-induced injury is not fully understood. In this study, we selected a high potent specific PARP inhibitor ABT-888 as an example to investigate the effect of PARP inhibitor in SM injury. The results showed that in both the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) and HaCaT cell model, PARP inhibitor ABT-888 can reduce cell damage induced by severe SM injury. ABT-888 significantly reduced SM induced edema and epidermal necrosis in MEVM. In the HaCaT cell model, ABT-888 can reduce SM-induced NAD+/ATP depletion and apoptosis/necrosis. Then, we studied the mechanism of PARP-1 in SM injury by knockdown of PARP-1 in HaCaT cells. Knockdown of PARP-1 protected cell viability and downregulated the apoptosis checkpoints, including p-JNK, p-p53, Caspase 9, Caspase 8, c-PARP and Caspase 3 following SM-induced injury. Furthermore, the activation of AKT can inhibit autophagy via the regulation of mTOR. Our results showed that SM exposure could significantly inhibit the activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. Knockdown of PARP-1 reversed the SM-induced suppression of the Akt/mTOR pathway. In summary, the results of our study indicated that the protective effects of downregulation of PARP-1 in SM injury may be due to the regulation of apoptosis, necrosis, energy crisis and autophagy. However, it should be noticed that PARP inhibitor ABT-888 further enhanced the phosphorylation of H2AX (S139) after SM exposure, which indicated that we should be very careful in the application of PARP inhibitors in SM injury treatment because of the enhancement of DNA damage. PMID:27077006

  2. Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR and ATM offers clinically important distinctions to enhancing platinum or radiation response in ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Pang-ning; Bateman, Nicholas W.; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Maxwell, George Larry; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Conrads, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Significant reductions in gynecologic (GYN) cancer mortality and morbidity require treatments that prevent and reverse resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. The objective of this study was to determine if pharmacologic inhibition of key DNA damage response kinases in GYN cancers would enhance cell killing by platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation. Methods A panel of human ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer cell lines were treated with platinum drugs or ionizing radiation (IR) along with small molecule pharmacological kinase inhibitors of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad-3-related (ATR). Results Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR significantly enhanced platinum drug response in all GYN cancer cell lines tested, whereas inhibition of ATM did not enhance the response to platinum drugs. Co-inhibition of ATM and ATR did not enhance platinum kill beyond that observed by inhibition of ATR alone. By contrast, inhibiting either ATR or ATM enhanced the response to IR in all GYN cancer cells, with further enhancement achieved with co-inhibition. Conclusions These studies highlight actionable mechanisms operative in GYN cancer cells with potential to maximize response of platinum agents and radiation in newly diagnosed as well as recurrent gynecologic cancers. PMID:25560806

  3. β-elemene enhances both radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity of glioblastoma cells through the inhibition of the ATM signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siwei; Zhou, Lei; Zhao, Yongshun; Yuan, Yuhui

    2015-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a tumor associated with poor prognosis, is known to be resistant to radiotherapy and alkylating agents such as temozolomide (TMZ). β-elemene, a monomer found in Chinese traditional herbs extracted from Curcuma wenyujin, is currently being used as an antitumor drug for different types of tumors including GBM. In the present study, we investigated the roles of β-elemene in the radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity of GBM cells. Human GBM cell lines U87-MG, T98G, U251, LN229 and rat C6 cells were treated with β-elemene combined with radiation or TMZ. We used MTT and colony forming assays to evaluate the proliferation and survival of the cells, and the comet assay to observe DNA damage. Expression of proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting. In the present study, we found that β-elemene inhibited the proliferation and survival of different GBM cell lines when combined with radiotherapy or TMZ via inhibition of DNA damage repair. Treatment of GBM cells with β-elemene decreased the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), AKT and ERK following radiotherapy or chemotherapy. These results revealed that β-elemene could significantly increase the radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity of GBM. β-elemene may be used as a potential drug in combination with the radiotherapy and chemotherapy of GBM. PMID:26062577

  4. Effect of ATM and HDAC Inhibition on Etoposide-Induced DNA Damage in Porcine Early Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, HaiYang; Luo, YiBo; Lin, ZiLi; Lee, In-Won; Kwon, Jeongwoo; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte maturation and embryonic development are sensitive to DNA damage. Compared with somatic cells or oocytes, little is known about the response to DNA damage in early preimplantation embryos. In this study, we examined DNA damage checkpoints and DNA repair mechanisms in parthenogenetic preimplantation porcine embryos. We found that most of the etoposide-treated embryos showed delay in cleavage and ceased development before the blastocyst stage. In DNA-damaged embryos, the earliest positive TUNEL signals were detected on Day 5 of in vitro culture. Caffeine, which is an ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein) kinase inhibitor, and KU55933, which is an ATM kinase inhibitor, were equally effective in rescuing the etoposide-induced cell-cycle blocks. This indicates that ATM plays a central role in the regulation of the checkpoint mechanisms. Treating the embryos with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) increased embryonic development and reduced etoposide-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). The mRNA expression of genes involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways for DSB repair was reduced upon HDACi treatment in 5-day-old embryos. Furthermore, HDACi treatment increased the expression levels of pluripotency-related genes (OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG) and decreased the expression levels of apoptosis-related genes (CASP3 and BAX). These results indicate that early embryonic cleavage and development are disturbed by etoposide-induced DNA damage. ATMi (caffeine or KU55933) treatment bypasses the checkpoint while HDACi treatment improves the efficiency of DSB repair to increase the cleavage and blastocyst rate in porcine early preimplantation embryos. PMID:26556501

  5. Hyperactivation of ATM upon DNA-PKcs inhibition modulates p53 dynamics and cell fate in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Finzel, Ana; Grybowski, Andrea; Strasen, Jette; Cristiano, Elena; Loewer, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    A functional DNA damage response is essential for maintaining genome integrity in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks. It is mainly coordinated by the kinases ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs, which control the repair of broken DNA strands and relay the damage signal to the tumor suppressor p53 to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or senescence. Although many functions of the individual kinases have been identified, it remains unclear how they act in concert to ensure faithful processing of the damage signal. Using specific inhibitors and quantitative analysis at the single-cell level, we systematically characterize the contribution of each kinase for regulating p53 activity. Our results reveal a new regulatory interplay in which loss of DNA-PKcs function leads to hyperactivation of ATM and amplification of the p53 response, sensitizing cells for damage-induced senescence. This interplay determines the outcome of treatment regimens combining irradiation with DNA-PKcs inhibitors in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27280387

  6. p53-dependent but ATM-independent inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest in cadmium-treated human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Feng |; Zhou Tong; Simpson, Dennis; Zhou Yingchun; Boyer, Jayne; Chen Bo |; Jin Taiyi; Cordeiro-Stone, Marila; Kaufmann, William . E-mail: wkarlk@med.unc.edu

    2007-01-15

    This study focused on the activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses in diploid human fibroblasts that were treated with cadmium chloride and the potential roles of ATM and p53 signaling pathways in cadmium-induced responses. The alkaline comet assay indicated that cadmium caused a dose-dependent increase in DNA damage. Cells that were rendered p53-defective by expression of a dominant-negative p53 allele or knockdown of p53 mRNA were more resistant to cadmium-induced inactivation of colony formation than normal and ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells. Synchronized fibroblasts in S were more sensitive to cadmium toxicity than cells in G1, suggesting that cadmium may target some element of DNA replication. Cadmium produced a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis. An immediate inhibition was associated with severe delay in progression through S phase and a delayed inhibition seen 24 h after treatment was associated with accumulation of cells in G2. AT and normal cells displayed similar patterns of inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 delay after treatment with cadmium, while p53-defective cells displayed significantly less of the delayed inhibition of DNA synthesis and accumulation in G2 post-treatment. Total p53 protein and ser15-phosphorylated p53 were induced by cadmium in normal and AT cells. The p53 transactivation target Gadd45{alpha} was induced in both p53-effective and p53-defective cells after 4 h cadmium treatment, and this was associated with an acute inhibition of mitosis. Cadmium produced a very unusual pattern of toxicity in human fibroblasts, inhibiting DNA replication and inducing p53-dependent growth arrest but without induction of p21{sup Cip1/Waf1} or activation of Chk1.

  7. Novel targets for ATM-deficient malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Johannes; Hofmann, Kay; Chen, Shuhua

    2014-01-01

    Conventional chemo- and radiotherapies for the treatment of cancer target rapidly dividing cells in both tumor and non-tumor tissues and can exhibit severe cytotoxicity in normal tissue and impair the patient's immune system. Novel targeted strategies aim for higher efficacy and tumor specificity. The role of ATM protein in the DNA damage response is well known and ATM deficiency frequently plays a role in tumorigenesis and development of malignancy. In addition to contributing to disease development, ATM deficiency also renders malignant cells heavily dependent on other pathways that cooperate with the ATM-mediated DNA damage response to ensure tumor cell survival. Disturbing those cooperative pathways by inhibiting critical protein components allows specific targeting of tumors while sparing healthy cells with normal ATM status. We review druggable candidate targets for the treatment of ATM-deficient malignancies and the mechanisms underlying such targeted therapies. PMID:27308314

  8. When the guardian becomes the enemy: Targeting ATM in PTEN-deficient cancers

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Nuala; Walker, Steven M; Kennedy, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important signaling molecule in the DNA damage response and inhibitors of ATM are under clinical development. We identified a synthetic lethal interaction between ATM inhibition and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss that was the result of increased oxidative stress. Inhibition of ATM therefore represents a novel strategy to target PTEN-associated cancers. PMID:27308567

  9. When the guardian becomes the enemy: Targeting ATM in PTEN-deficient cancers.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Nuala; Walker, Steven M; Kennedy, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important signaling molecule in the DNA damage response and inhibitors of ATM are under clinical development. We identified a synthetic lethal interaction between ATM inhibition and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss that was the result of increased oxidative stress. Inhibition of ATM therefore represents a novel strategy to target PTEN-associated cancers. PMID:27308567

  10. ATM technology and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Nim K.

    1993-01-01

    Networks based on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) are expected to provide cost-effective and ubiquitous infrastructure to support broadband and multimedia services. In this paper, we give an overview of the ATM standards and its associated physical layer transport technologies. We use the experimental HIPPI-ATM-SONET (HAS) interface in the Nectar Gigabit Testbed to illustrate how one can use the SONET/ATM public network to provide transport for bursty gigabit applications.

  11. Chk1 inhibition after replicative stress activates a double strand break response mediated by ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Samuel; Conti, Chiara; Sheikh, Tahir; Patel, Himali; Zabludoff, Sonya; Pommier, Yves; Schwartz, Gary; Tse, Archie

    2010-03-01

    Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) regulates cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage repair in response to genotoxic stress. Inhibition of Chk1 is an emerging strategy for potentiating the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrate that AZD7762, an ATP -competitive Chk1/2 inhibitor induces gammaH2AX in gemcitabine-treated cells by altering both dynamics and stability of replication forks, allowing the firing of suppressed replication origins as measured by DNA fiber combing and causing a dramatic increase in DNA breaks as measured by comet assay. Furthermore, we identify ATM and DNA-PK, rather than ATR, as the kinases mediating gammaH2AX induction, suggesting AZD7762 converts stalled forks into double strand breaks (DSBs). Consistent with DSB formation upon fork collapse, cells deficient in DSB repair by lack of BRCA2, XRCC3 or DNA-PK were selectively more sensitive to combined AZD7762 and gemcitabine. Checkpoint abrogation by AZD7762 also caused premature mitosis in gemcitabine-treated cells arrested in G(1)/early S-phase. Prevention of premature mitotic entry via Cdk1 siRNA knockdown suppressed apoptosis. These results demonstrate that chemosensitization of gemcitabine by Chk1 inhibition results from at least three cellular events, namely, activation of origin firing, destabilization of stalled replication forks and entry of cells with damaged DNA into lethal mitosis. Additionally, the current study indicates that the combination of Chk1 inhibitor and gemcitabine may be particularly effective in targeting tumors with specific DNA repair defects. PMID:20160494

  12. ATM encryption testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Joyce; Deeth, David

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes why encryption was selected by Lockheed Martin Missiles & Space as the means for securing ATM networks. The ATM encryption testing program is part of an ATM network trial provided by Pacific Bell under the California Research Education Network (CalREN). The problem being addressed is the threat to data security which results when changing from a packet switched network infrastructure to a circuit switched ATM network backbone. As organizations move to high speed cell-based networks, there is a break down in the traditional security model which is designed to protect packet switched data networks from external attacks. This is due to the fact that most data security firewalls filter IP packets, restricting inbound and outbound protocols, e.g. ftp. ATM networks, based on cell-switching over virtual circuits, does not support this method for restricting access since the protocol information is not carried by each cell. ATM switches set up multiple virtual connections, thus there is no longer a single point of entry into the internal network. The problem is further complicated by the fact that ATM networks support high speed multi-media applications, including real time video and video teleconferencing which are incompatible with packet switched networks. The ability to restrict access to Lockheed Martin networks in support of both unclassified and classified communications is required before ATM network technology can be fully deployed. The Lockheed Martin CalREN ATM testbed provides the opportunity to test ATM encryption prototypes with actual applications to assess the viability of ATM encryption methodologies prior to installing large scale ATM networks. Two prototype ATM encryptors are being tested: (1) `MILKBUSH' a prototype encryptor developed by NSA for transmission of government classified data over ATM networks, and (2) a prototype ATM encryptor developed by Sandia National Labs in New Mexico, for the encryption of proprietary data.

  13. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  14. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  15. Tyrosine 370 phosphorylation of ATM positively regulates DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-Jen; Lan, Li; Peng, Guang; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Cheng, Chien-Chia; Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Chang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Hsin-Wei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Lavin, Martin; Ang, K Kian; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediates DNA damage response by controling irradiation-induced foci formation, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis. However, how upstream signaling regulates ATM is not completely understood. Here, we show that upon irradiation stimulation, ATM associates with and is phosphorylated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Tyr370 (Y370) at the site of DNA double-strand breaks. Depletion of endogenous EGFR impairs ATM-mediated foci formation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. Moreover, pretreatment with an EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, blocks EGFR and ATM association, hinders CHK2 activation and subsequent foci formation, and increases radiosensitivity. Thus, we reveal a critical mechanism by which EGFR directly regulates ATM activation in DNA damage response, and our results suggest that the status of ATM Y370 phosphorylation has the potential to serve as a biomarker to stratify patients for either radiotherapy alone or in combination with EGFR inhibition. PMID:25601159

  16. ATMS Step By Step.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Library of Australia, Canberra.

    This manual is designed to provide an introduction and basic guide to the use of IBM's Advanced Text Management System (ATMS), the text processing system to be used for the creation of Australian data bases within AUSINET. Instructions are provided for using the system to enter, store, retrieve, and modify data, which may then be displayed at the…

  17. The role of ATM mutations and 11q deletions in disease progression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Tatjana; Skowronska, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Abstract ATM gene alteration is a frequent event in pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and occurs as monoallelic loss in the form of 11q23 deletion, with and without mutation in the remaining ATM allele. ATM is a principal DNA damage response gene and biallelic ATM alterations lead to ATM functional loss and chemoresistance. The introduction of new therapies, such as intensive chemoimmunotherapy and inhibition of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, has changed clinical responses for the majority of CLL tumors including those with 11q deletion, but it remains to be determined whether these strategies can prevent clonal evolution of tumors with biallelic ATM alterations. In this review we discuss ATM function and the consequences of its loss during CLL pathogenesis, differences in clinical behavior of tumors with monoallelic and biallelic ATM alterations, and we outline possible approaches for targeting the ATM null CLL phenotype. PMID:23906020

  18. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  19. Scalable ATM encryption

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In order to provide needed security assurances for traffic carried in Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks, methods of protecting the integrity and privacy of traffic must be employed. Cryptographic methods can be used to assure authenticity and privacy, but are hard to scale and the incorporation of these methods into computer networks can severely impact functionality, reliability, and performance. To study these trade-offs, a research prototype encryptor/decryptor is under development. This prototype is to demonstrate the viability of implementing certain encryption techniques in high speed networks by processing Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) cells in a SONET OC-3 payload. This paper describes the objectives and design trade-offs intended to be investigated with the prototype. User requirements for high performance computing and communication have driven Sandia to do work in the areas of functionality, reliability, security, and performance of high speed communication networks. Adherence to standards (including emerging standards) achieves greater functionality of high speed computer networks by providing wide interoperability of applications, network hardware, and network software.

  20. Small Molecule Inhibition of miR-544 Biogenesis Disrupts Adaptive Responses to Hypoxia by Modulating ATM-mTOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Strivelli, Jacqueline R; Yang, Wang-Yong; Disney, Matthew D; Phinney, Donald G

    2015-10-16

    Hypoxia induces a complex circuit of gene expression that drives tumor progression and increases drug resistance. Defining these changes allows for an understanding of how hypoxia alters tumor biology and informs design of lead therapeutics. We probed the role of microRNA-544 (miR-544), which silences mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in a hypoxic breast cancer model by using a small molecule (1) that selectively impedes the microRNA's biogenesis. Application of 1 to hypoxic tumor cells selectively inhibited production of the mature microRNA, sensitized cells to 5-fluorouracil, and derepressed mRNAs affected by miR-544 in cellulo and in vivo, including boosting mTOR expression. Thus, small molecule inhibition of miR-544 reverses a tumor cell's physiological response to hypoxia. Importantly, 1 sensitized tumor cells to hypoxia-associated apoptosis at a 25-fold lower concentration than a 2'-O-methyl RNA antagomir and was as selective. Further, the apoptotic effect of 1 was suppressed by treatment of cell with rapamycin, a well-known inhibitor of the mTOR signaling pathway, illustrating the selectivity of the compound. Thus, RNA-directed chemical probes, which could also serve as lead therapeutics, enable interrogation of complex cellular networks in cells and animals. PMID:26181590

  1. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 modulates the lethality of CHK1 inhibitors in carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Clint; Park, Margaret; Eulitt, Patrick; Yang, Chen; Yacoub, Adly; Dent, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that inhibition of CHK1 can promote the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and phosphorylation of histone H2AX and that inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) can affect growth factor-induced ERK1/2 activation. The present studies were initiated to determine whether CHK1 inhibitors interacted with PARP1 inhibition to facilitate apoptosis. Transient expression of dominant-negative CHK1 raised basal ERK1/2 activity and prevented CHK1 inhibitors from activating ERK1/2. CHK1 inhibitors modestly increased the levels of PARP1 ADP ribosylation and molecular or small-molecule inhibition of PARP1 blocked CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated histone H2AX phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2. Stimulated histone H2AX phosphorylation was ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein-dependent. Multiple CHK1 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion with multiple PARP1 inhibitors to cause transformed cell-killing in short-term viability assays and synergistically killed tumor cells in colony-formation assays. Overexpression of BCL-xL or loss of BAX/BAK function, but not the function of BID, suppressed CHK1 inhibitor + PARP1 inhibitor lethality. Inhibition of BCL-2 family protein function enhanced CHK1 inhibitor + PARP1 inhibitor lethality and restored drug-induced cell-killing in cells overexpressing BCL-xL. Thus, PARP1 plays an important role in regulating the ability of CHK1 inhibitors to activate ERK1/2 and the DNA damage response. An inability of PARP1 to modulate this response results in transformed cell death mediated through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. PMID:20696794

  2. Satellite Communications for ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation is an overview on Satellite Communication for the Aeronautical Telecommunication Management (ATM) research. Satellite Communications are being considered by the FAA and NASA as a possible alternative to the present and future ground systems supporting Air Traffic Communications. The international Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have in place Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPS) for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Services (AMSS) which is mainly derived from the pre-existing Inmarsat service that has been in service since the 1980s. The Working Group A of the Aeronautical Mobile Communication Panel of ICAO has also been investigating SARPS for what is called the Next Generation Satellite Service (NGSS) which conforms less to the Inmarsat based architecture and explores wider options in terms of satellite architectures. Several designs are being proposed by Firms such as Boeing, ESA, NASA that are geared toward full or secondary usage of satellite communications for ATM. Satellite communications for ATM can serve several purposes ranging from primary usage where ground services would play a minimal backup role, to an integrated solution where it will be used to cover services, or areas that are less likely to be supported by the proposed and existing ground infrastructure. Such Integrated roles can include usage of satellite communications for oceanic and remote land areas for example. It also can include relieving the capacity of the ground network by providing broadcast based services of Traffic Information Services messages (TIS-B), or Flight Information Services (FIS-B) which can take a significant portion of the ground system capacity. Additionally, satellite communication can play a backup role to support any needs for ground replacement, or additional needed capacity even after the new digital systems are in place. The additional bandwidth that can be provided via satellite communications can also open the door for many new

  3. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 is a novel target to promote axonal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brochier, Camille; Jones, James I.; Willis, Dianna E.; Langley, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the restoration of neurological functions after acute axonal injury are severely limited. In addition to limiting neuronal loss, effective treatments face the challenge of restoring axonal growth within an injury environment where inhibitory molecules from damaged myelin and activated astrocytes act as molecular and physical barriers. Overcoming these barriers to permit axon growth is critical for the development of any repair strategy in the central nervous system. Here, we identify poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) as a previously unidentified and critical mediator of multiple growth-inhibitory signals. We show that exposure of neurons to growth-limiting molecules—such as myelin-derived Nogo and myelin-associated glycoprotein—or reactive astrocyte-produced chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans activates PARP1, resulting in the accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) in the cell body and axon and limited axonal growth. Accordingly, we find that pharmacological inhibition or genetic loss of PARP1 markedly facilitates axon regeneration over nonpermissive substrates. Together, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of axon growth inhibition and identify PARP1 as an effective target to promote axon regeneration. PMID:26598704

  4. Effect and mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in aldosterone-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, WEIWEI; ZHANG, WEILI; SHAO, SHUHONG; GAI, YUSHENG; ZHANG, MINGXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cells and the viability of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) in cells, and to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cell injury. Cultured endothelial cells were treated either with different concentrations of aldosterone for the same duration or with the same concentrations of aldosterone for different durations, and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 in the cells were detected, respectively. Aldosterone receptor antagonists or PARP1 inhibitors were added to cells during treatment with aldosterone and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 were detected. As the concentration of aldosterone increased or the treatment time increased, the number of apoptotic cells and the activity of PARP1 increased. The aldosterone receptor antagonists and PARP1 inhibitors inhibited the increase of apoptosis and PARP1 activity caused by aldosterone treatment. Aldosterone activated the activity of PARP1 via the aldosterone receptor, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Treatment with PARP1 may be used as a target for vascular diseases caused by aldosterone at high concentrations. PMID:25872931

  5. Connecting Remote Clusters with ATM

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, T.C.; Wyckoff, P.S.

    1998-10-01

    Sandia's entry into utilizing clusters of networked workstations is called Computational Plant or CPlant for short. The design of CPlant uses Ethernet to boot the individual nodes, Myrinet to communicate within a node cluster, and ATM to connect between remote clusters. This SAND document covers the work done to enable the use of ATM on the CPlant nodes in the Fall of 1997.

  6. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents. PMID:27229179

  7. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents.

  8. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents. PMID:27229179

  9. ATM CMG bearing failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The cause or causes for the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2) were investigated. Skylab telemetry data were reviewed and presented in the form of parameter distributions. The theory that the problems were caused by marginal bearing lubrication was studied along with the effects of orbital conditions on lubricants. Bearing tests were performed to investigate the effect of lubricant or lack of lubricant in the ATM CMG bearings and the dispersion and migration of the lubricant. The vacuum and weightless conditions of space were simulated in the bearing tests. Analysis of the results of the tests conducted points to inadequate lubrication as the predominant factor causing the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2).

  10. Sandia ATM SONET Interface Logic

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-07-21

    SASIL is used to program the EPLD's (Erasable Programmable Logic Devices) and PAL's (Programmable Array Logic) that make up a large percentage of the Sandia ATM SONET Interface (OC3 version) for the INTEL Paragon.

  11. Using ATM over SATCOM links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comparetto, Gary M.

    1995-01-01

    The Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) protocol is studied from the standpoint of determining what limitations, if any, exist in using it over satellite links. It is concluded that, while there is nothing intrinsic about ATM that would generally preclude its use over satellite links, there are, however, several intrinsic characteristics of satellite links, as well as some satellite system configuration-specific issues, that must be taken into account.

  12. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  13. Security Services Discovery by ATM Endsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Sholander, Peter; Tarman, Thomas

    1999-07-15

    This contribution proposes strawman techniques for Security Service Discovery by ATM endsystems in ATM networks. Candidate techniques include ILMI extensions, ANS extensions and new ATM anycast addresses. Another option is a new protocol based on an IETF service discovery protocol, such as Service Location Protocol (SLP). Finally, this contribution provides strawman requirements for Security-Based Routing in ATM networks.

  14. Traffic Management for Satellite-ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Rohit; Jain, Raj; Fahmy, Sonia; Vandalore, Bobby; Goyal, Mukul

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with "Traffic Management for Satellite-ATM Networks" are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Traffic management issues for TCP/IP based data services over satellite-ATM networks; 2) Design issues for TCP/IP over ATM; 3) Optimization of the performance of TCP/IP over ATM for long delay networks; and 4) Evaluation of ATM service categories for TCP/IP traffic.

  15. Involvement of ATM in homologous recombination after end resection and RAD51 nucleofilament formation

    PubMed Central

    Bakr, A.; Oing, C.; Köcher, S.; Borgmann, K.; Dornreiter, I.; Petersen, C.; Dikomey, E.; Mansour, W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is needed for the initiation of the double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR). ATM triggers DSB end resection by stimulating the nucleolytic activity of CtIP and MRE11 to generate 3′-ssDNA overhangs, followed by RPA loading and RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Here we show for the first time that ATM is also needed for later steps in HR after RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Inhibition of ATM after completion of end resection did not affect RAD51 nucleofilament formation, but resulted in HR deficiency as evidenced by (i) an increase in the number of residual RAD51/γH2AX foci in both S and G2 cells, (ii) the decrease in HR efficiency as detected by HR repair substrate (pGC), (iii) a reduced SCE rate and (iv) the radiosensitization of cells by PARP inhibition. This newly described role for ATM was found to be dispensable in heterochromatin-associated DSB repair, as KAP1-depletion did not alleviate the HR-deficiency when ATM was inhibited after end resection. Moreover, we demonstrated that ATR can partly compensate for the deficiency in early, but not in later, steps of HR upon ATM inhibition. Taken together, we describe here for the first time that ATM is needed not only for the initiation but also for the completion of HR. PMID:25753674

  16. Involvement of ATM in homologous recombination after end resection and RAD51 nucleofilament formation.

    PubMed

    Bakr, A; Oing, C; Köcher, S; Borgmann, K; Dornreiter, I; Petersen, C; Dikomey, E; Mansour, W Y

    2015-03-31

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is needed for the initiation of the double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR). ATM triggers DSB end resection by stimulating the nucleolytic activity of CtIP and MRE11 to generate 3'-ssDNA overhangs, followed by RPA loading and RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Here we show for the first time that ATM is also needed for later steps in HR after RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Inhibition of ATM after completion of end resection did not affect RAD51 nucleofilament formation, but resulted in HR deficiency as evidenced by (i) an increase in the number of residual RAD51/γH2AX foci in both S and G2 cells, (ii) the decrease in HR efficiency as detected by HR repair substrate (pGC), (iii) a reduced SCE rate and (iv) the radiosensitization of cells by PARP inhibition. This newly described role for ATM was found to be dispensable in heterochromatin-associated DSB repair, as KAP1-depletion did not alleviate the HR-deficiency when ATM was inhibited after end resection. Moreover, we demonstrated that ATR can partly compensate for the deficiency in early, but not in later, steps of HR upon ATM inhibition. Taken together, we describe here for the first time that ATM is needed not only for the initiation but also for the completion of HR. PMID:25753674

  17. Gigabit ATM: another technical mistake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Paul

    1998-09-01

    Once upon a time, or more precisely during February 1988 at the CCITT Seoul plenary, and definitely arriving as a revolution, ATM hit the hard-core B-ISDN circuit-switching gang. Initiated by the Telecoms' camp, but, surprisingly, soon to be pushed by computer minded people, ATM's generic technological history is somewhat richer than single-sided stories. Here are two classical elements of that history: Firstly, together with X.25, ATM suffers from the connection versus datagram dichotomy, well known for more than twenty years. Secondly, and lesser known, ATM's use of cells in support of the 'I' of B-ISDN was questioned from the very beginning by the packet switching camp. Furthermore, in this context, there are two other essential elements to be considered: Firstly, the exponential growth of the Internet and later intranets, using Internet technology, sparked by the success of the Web and the WINTEL alliance, resulted in a corresponding demand for both aggregate and end-system network bandwidth. Secondly, servers, historically restricted to the exclusive club of HIPPI-equipped supercomputers, suddenly become ordinary high-end PCs with 64-bit wide PCI busses -- definitely aiming at the Gigabit. Here, if your aim is for Gigabit ATM with 5000-transactions per second classical supercomputers, a 65K ATM MTU -- as implemented by Cray -- might be okay. Following Clark and others, another part of the story is the adoption and redefinition, by the IETF, of the Telecoms' notion of 'Integrated Services' and QoS mechanisms. The quest for low-delay IP packet forwarding, perhaps possible over ATM cut-throughs, has resulted in the switching versus/or integrated-with-routing movement. However, a blow for ATM may be the recent results concerning fast routing table lookup algorithms. This, by making Gigabit routing possible using ordinary Pentium processors may eventually render the much prophesized ATM switching performance unnecessary. Recently, with the rise of Gigabit Ethernet

  18. A novel crosstalk between BRCA1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Bi, Fang-Fang; Chen, Na-Na; Cao, Ji-Min; Sun, Wu-Ping; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Chun-Yan; Yang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    BRCA mutations are the main known hereditary factor for breast cancer. Notably, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) expression status plays a critical role in breast cancer progression and the clinical development of PARP1 inhibitors to treat BRCA-mutated breast cancer has advanced rapidly. However, dynamic crosstalk between BRCA1 and PARP1 remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that: (i) BRCA1 inactivation events (mutation, promoter methylation, or knockdown) were accompanied by increased PARP1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) levels, and a subsequent increase in NAD-dependent PARP1 activity in MDA-MB-231 and primary breast cancer cells; (ii) the overexpression of BRCA1 resulted in decreased PARP1 and NAD levels, and a subsequent impairment in NAD-dependent PARP1 activity in MDA-MB-231 and primary breast cancer cells; and (iii) intracellular NAD levels were largely responsible for regulating PARP1 activity in breast cancer cells, and NAD levels were positively correlated with PARP1 activity in human breast cancer specimens (R = 0.647, P < 0.001). Interestingly, the high efficiency of PARP1 triggered by BRCA1 inactivation may further inhibit BRCA1 transcription by NAD depletion. These results highlight a novel interaction between BRCA1 and PARP1, which may be beneficial for the dynamic balance between BRCA1 and PARP1-related biologic processes, especially for maintaining stable DNA repair ability. All of this may improve our understanding of the basic molecular mechanism underlying BRCA1- and PARP1-related breast cancer progression. PMID:25485588

  19. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Yasunori Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  20. ATM kinase is required for telomere elongation in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stella Suyong; Bohrson, Craig; Pike, Alexandra Mims; Wheelan, Sarah Jo; Greider, Carol Widney

    2015-01-01

    Summary Short telomeres induce a DNA damage response, senescence and apoptosis; thus, maintaining telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell viability. Telomerase addition of telomere repeats is tightly regulated in cells. To probe pathways that regulate telomere addition, we developed the ADDIT assay to measure new telomere addition at a single telomere in vivo. Sequence analysis showed telomerase specific addition of repeats onto a new telomere occurred in just 48 hr. Using the ADDIT assay, we found that ATM is required for addition of new repeats onto telomeres in mouse cells. Evaluation of bulk telomeres, in both human and mouse cells, showed that blocking ATM inhibited telomere elongation. Finally, the activation of ATM through the inhibition of PARP1 resulted in increased telomere elongation, supporting the central role of the ATM pathway in regulating telomere addition. Understanding this role of ATM may yield new areas for possible therapeutic intervention in telomere-mediated disease. PMID:26586427

  1. ATM promotes apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenesis in response to Myc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusapati, Raju V.; Rounbehler, Robert J.; Hong, Sungki; Powers, John T.; Yan, Mingshan; Kiguchi, Kaoru; McArthur, Mark J.; Wong, Paul K.; Johnson, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of the c-myc oncogene contributes to the development of a significant number of human cancers. In response to deregulated Myc activity, the p53 tumor suppressor is activated to promote apoptosis and inhibit tumor formation. Here we demonstrate that p53 induction in response to Myc overexpression requires the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a major regulator of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks. In a transgenic mouse model overexpressing Myc in squamous epithelial tissues, inactivation of Atm suppresses apoptosis and accelerates tumorigenesis. Deregulated Myc expression induces DNA damage in primary transgenic keratinocytes and the formation of H2AX and phospho-SMC1 foci in transgenic tissue. These findings suggest that Myc overexpression causes DNA damage in vivo and that the ATM-dependent response to this damage is critical for p53 activation, apoptosis, and the suppression of tumor development. p53 | DNA damage

  2. A TAD closer to ATM.

    PubMed

    Aymard, Francois; Legube, Gaëlle

    2016-05-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) has been known for decades as the main kinase mediating the DNA double-strand break response. Our recent findings suggest that its major role at the sites of breaks likely resides in its ability to modify both the local chromatin landscape and the global chromosome organization in order to promote repair accuracy. PMID:27314089

  3. [Progress of the ATM Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Activities for each of the following programs are discussed in separate sections for the bimonthly reporting period: Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL); Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM); Other Mission Support Activities, including modeling activities, EAARL activities, and the Scanning Radar Altimeter (SAR); Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM). The tasks undertaken for each program are discussed in the pertinent section of the report.

  4. NPP ATMS Snowfall Rate Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua

    2015-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2015). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. NCEP CMORPH analysis has shown that integration of ATMS SFR has improved the performance of CMORPH-Snow. The ATMS SFR product is also being assessed at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices for its usefulness in weather forecast.

  5. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Terence M.; Nyati, Shyam; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  6. Running TCP/IP over ATM Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Internet protocol (IP) and subnets and describes how IP may operate over asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). Topics include TCP (transmission control protocol), ATM cells and adaptation layers, a basic architectural model for IP over ATM, address resolution, mapping IP to a subnet technology, and connection management strategy. (LRW)

  7. 3-aminobenzamide, one of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 inhibitors, rescuesapoptosisin rat models of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianqing; Song, Wenqi; Deng, Bin; Xing, Ziling; Zhang, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is anubiquitous, DNA repair-associated enzyme, which participates in gene expression, cell death, central nerve system (CNS) disorders and oxidative stress. According to the previous studies, PARP-1 over-activation may lead to over-consumption of ATP and even cell apoptosis. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an inducement towards PARP-1 over-activation due to its massive damage to DNA. 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) is a kind of PARP-1 inhibitors. The relationship among PARP-1, 3-AB, SCI and apoptosis has not been fully understood. Hence, in the present study, we focused on the effects of 3-AB on cell apoptosis after SCI. Accordingly, SCI model was constructed artificially, and 3-AB was injected intrathecally into the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The results demonstrated an increase in cell apoptosis after SCI. Furthermore, PARP-1 was over-activated after SCI but inhibited by 3-AB injection. In addition, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was inhibited but B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) was up-regulated by 3-AB. Interestingly, caspase-3 was not significantly altered with or without 3-AB. In conclusion, our experiments showed that 3-AB, as a PARP-1 inhibitor, could inhibit cell apoptosis after SCI in caspase-independent way, which could provide a better therapeutic target for the treatment of SCI. PMID:26722405

  8. ARF and ATM/ATR cooperate in p53-mediated apoptosis upon oncogenic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pauklin, Siim . E-mail: spauklin@ut.ee; Kristjuhan, Arnold; Maimets, Toivo; Jaks, Viljar

    2005-08-26

    Induction of apoptosis is pivotal for eliminating cells with damaged DNA or deregulated proliferation. We show that tumor suppressor ARF and ATM/ATR kinase pathways cooperate in the induction of apoptosis in response to elevated expression of c-myc, {beta}-catenin or human papilloma virus E7 oncogenes. Overexpression of oncogenes leads to the formation of phosphorylated H2AX foci, induction of Rad51 protein levels and ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of p53. Inhibition of ATM/ATR kinases abolishes both induction of Rad51 and phosphorylation of p53, and remarkably reduces the level of apoptosis induced by co-expression of oncogenes and ARF. However, the induction of apoptosis is downregulated in p53-/- cells and does not depend on activities of ATM/ATR kinases, indicating that efficient induction of apoptosis by oncogene activation depends on coordinated action of ARF and ATM/ATR pathways in the regulation of p53.

  9. Recently emerging signaling landscape of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Attar, Rukset; Arslan, Belkis Atasever; Romero, Mirna Azalea; ul Haq, Muhammad Fahim; Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Research over the years has progressively and sequentially provided near complete resolution of regulators of the DNA repair pathways which are so important for cancer prevention. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM), a high-molecular-weight PI3K-family kinase has emerged as a master regulator of DNA damage signaling and extensive cross-talk between ATM and downstream proteins forms an interlaced signaling network. There is rapidly growing scientific evidence emphasizing newly emerging paradigms in ATM biology. In this review, we provide latest information regarding how oxidative stress induced activation of ATM can be utilized as a therapeutic target in different cancer cell lines and in xenografted mice. Moreover, crosstalk between autophagy and ATM is also discussed with focus on how autophagy inhibition induces apoptosis in cancer cells. PMID:25169474

  10. Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material---ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, J.W.

    1988-03-01

    Materials Characterization Center glasses ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 are designed to simulate high-level waste glasses that are likely to result from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The three Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) are borosilicate glasses based upon the MCC-76-68 glass composition. One radioisotope was added to form each ATM. The radioisotopes added to form ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 were /sup 241/Am, /sup 237/Np, and /sup 239/Pu, respectively. Each of the ATM lots was produced in a nominal lot size of 450 g from feed stock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1200/degree/C in a platinum crucible. Each ATM was then cast into bars. Analyzed compositions of these glasses are listed. The nonradioactive elements were analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), and the radioisotope analyses were done by alpha energy analysis. Results are discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Caffeine metabolites are inhibitors of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Liesbeth; Moonen, Harald J J; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bast, Aalt; Hageman, Geja J

    2006-09-28

    The activity of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (E.C.2.4.2.30), which is highly activated by DNA strand breaks, is associated with the pathophysiology of both acute as well as chronic inflammatory diseases. PARP-1 overactivation and the subsequent extensive turnover of its substrate NAD+ put a large demand on mitochondrial ATP-production. Furthermore, due to its reported role in NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, PARP-1 is considered an interesting target in the treatment of these diseases. In this study the PARP-1 inhibiting capacity of caffeine and several metabolites as well as other (methyl)xanthines was tested using an ELISA-assay with purified human PARP-1. Caffeine itself showed only weak PARP-1 inhibiting activity, whereas the caffeine metabolites 1,7-dimethylxanthine, 3-methylxanthine and 1-methylxanthine, as well as theobromine and theophylline showed significant PARP-1 inhibiting activity. Further evaluation of these compounds in H2O2-treated A549 lung epithelial and RF24 vascular endothelial cells revealed that the decrease in NAD+-levels as well as the formation of the poly(ADP-ribose)polymer was significantly prevented by the major caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethylxanthine. Furthermore, H2O2-induced necrosis could be prevented by a high dose of 1,7-dimethylxanthine. Finally, antioxidant effects of the methylxanthines could be ruled out with ESR and measurement of the TEAC. Concluding, caffeine metabolites are inhibitors of PARP-1 and the major caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethylxanthine has significant PARP-1 inhibiting activity in cultured epithelial and endothelial cells at physiological concentrations. This inhibition could have important implications for nutritional treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory pathologies, like prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injury or vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:16870158

  12. Loss of the DNA Damage Repair Kinase ATM Impairs Inflammasome-Dependent Anti-Bacterial Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Erttmann, Saskia F; Härtlova, Anetta; Sloniecka, Marta; Raffi, Faizal A M; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Edgren, Tomas; Rofougaran, Reza; Resch, Ulrike; Fällman, Maria; Ek, Torben; Gekara, Nelson O

    2016-07-19

    The ATM kinase is a central component of the DNA damage repair machinery and redox balance. ATM dysfunction results in the multisystem disease ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). A major cause of mortality in AT is respiratory bacterial infections. Whether ATM deficiency causes innate immune defects that might contribute to bacterial infections is not known. Here we have shown that loss of ATM impairs inflammasome-dependent anti-bacterial innate immunity. Cells from AT patients or Atm(-/-) mice exhibited diminished interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in response to bacteria. In vivo, Atm(-/-) mice were more susceptible to pulmonary S. pneumoniae infection in a manner consistent with inflammasome defects. Our data indicate that such defects were due to oxidative inhibition of inflammasome complex assembly. This study reveals an unanticipated function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in negative regulation of inflammasomes and proposes a theory for the notable susceptibility of AT patients to pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27421701

  13. Depletion of ATR selectively sensitizes ATM-deficient human mammary epithelial cells to ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Palii, Stela S; Innes, Cynthia L; Paules, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) to double strand breaks is coordinated by 3 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members: the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM), the ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase and the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). ATM and ATR are central players in activating cell cycle checkpoints and function as an active barrier against genome instability and tumorigenesis in replicating cells. Loss of ATM function is frequently reported in various types of tumors, thus placing more reliance on ATR for checkpoint arrest and cell survival following DNA damage. To investigate the role of ATR in the G2/M checkpoint regulation in response to ionizing radiation (IR), particularly when ATM is deficient, cell lines deficient of ATM, ATR, or both were generated using a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral system. Our data suggests that while depletion of ATR or ATM alone in wild-type human mammary epithelial cell cultures (HME-CCs) has little effect on radiosensitivity or IR-induced G2/M checkpoint arrest, depletion of ATR in ATM-deficient cells causes synthetic lethality following IR, which correlates with severe G2/M checkpoint attenuation. ATR depletion also inhibits IR-induced autophagy, regardless of the ATM status, and enhances IR-induced apoptosis particularly when ATM is deficient. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that ATR function is required for the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint activation and subsequent survival of cells with ATM deficiency. The synthetic lethal interaction between ATM and ATR in response to IR supports ATR as a therapeutic target for improved anti-cancer regimens, especially in tumors with a dysfunctional ATM pathway. PMID:25483091

  14. PIASy Mediates SUMO-2/3 Conjugation of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) on Mitotic Chromosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyunju; Al-Ani, Gada; Deckert, Katelyn; Kirkpatrick, Donald; Gygi, Steven P.; Dasso, Mary; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PIASy is a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligase that modifies chromosomal proteins in mitotic Xenopus egg extracts and plays an essential role in mitotic chromosome segregation. We have isolated a novel SUMO-2/3-modified mitotic chromosomal protein and identified it as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1). PARP1 was robustly conjugated to SUMO-2/3 on mitotic chromosomes but not on interphase chromatin. PIASy promotes SUMOylation of PARP1 both in egg extracts and in vitro reconstituted SUMOylation assays. Through tandem mass spectrometry analysis of mitotically SUMOylated PARP1, we identified a residue within the BRCA1 C-terminal domain of PARP1 (lysine 482) as its primary SUMOylation site. Mutation of this residue significantly reduced PARP1 SUMOylation in egg extracts and enhanced the accumulation of species derived from modification of secondary lysine residues in assays using purified components. SUMOylation of PARP1 did not alter in vitro PARP1 enzyme activity, poly-ADP-ribosylation (PARylation), nor did inhibition of SUMOylation of PARP1 alter the accumulation of PARP1 on mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that SUMOylation regulates neither the intrinsic activity of PARP1 nor its localization. However, loss of SUMOylation increased PARP1-dependent PARylation on isolated chromosomes, indicating SUMOylation controls the capacity of PARP1 to modify other chromatin-associated proteins. PMID:20228053

  15. Buffer Management Simulation in ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaprak, E.; Xiao, Y.; Chronopoulos, A.; Chow, E.; Anneberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of a new dynamic buffer allocation management scheme in ATM networks. To achieve this objective, an algorithm that detects congestion and updates the dynamic buffer allocation scheme was developed for the OPNET simulation package via the creation of a new ATM module.

  16. ATM: Restructing Learning for Deaf Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Barbara; Stockford, David

    Governor Baxter School for the Deaf is one of six Maine pilot sites chosen by NYNEX to showcase asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology. ATM is a network connection that allows high bandwidth transmission of data, voice, and video. Its high speed capability allows for high quality two-way full-motion video, which is especially beneficial to a…

  17. Bookmarking promoters in mitotic chromatin: poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 as an epigenetic mark

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Niraj; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics are the heritable changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. After mitosis, it is thought that bookmarking transcription factors remain at promoters, regulating which genes become active and which remain silent. Herein, we demonstrate that poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a genome-wide epigenetic memory mark in mitotic chromatin, and we further show that the presence of PARP-1 is absolutely crucial for reactivation of transcription after mitosis. Based on these findings, a novel molecular model of epigenetic memory transmission through the cell cycle is proposed. PMID:24861619

  18. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is involved in thymic lymphoma development in Atm-/- mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Xianghong; Shen, Jianjun; Wong, Paul K.Y.; Yan, Mingshan

    2009-06-05

    Abnormal thymocyte development with thymic lymphomagenesis inevitably occurs in Atm-/- mice, indicating that ATM plays a pivotal role in regulating postnatal thymocyte development and preventing thymic lymphomagenesis. The mechanism for ATM controls these processes is unclear. We have shown previously that c-Myc, an oncoprotein regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is overexpressed in Atm-/- thymocytes. Here, we show that inhibition of mTOR signaling with its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses normal thymocyte DNA synthesis by downregulating 4EBP1, but not S6K, and that 4EBP1 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression are coordinately increased in Atm-/- thymocytes. Administration of rapamycin to Atm-/- mice attenuates elevated phospho-4EBP1, c-Myc and cyclin D1 in their thymocytes, and delays thymic lymphoma development. These results indicate that mTOR downstream effector 4EBP1 is essential for normal thymocyte proliferation, but deregulation of 4EBP1 in Atm deficiency is a major factor driving thymic lymphomagenesis in the animals.

  19. Loss of ATM kinase activity leads to embryonic lethality in mice.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Pellegrini, Manuela; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Guo, Zhi; Filsuf, Darius; Belkina, Natalya V; You, Zhongsheng; Paull, Tanya T; Sleckman, Barry P; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Nussenzweig, André

    2012-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) mutated (ATM) is a key deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage signaling kinase that regulates DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. The majority of patients with A-T, a cancer-prone neurodegenerative disease, present with null mutations in Atm. To determine whether the functions of ATM are mediated solely by its kinase activity, we generated two mouse models containing single, catalytically inactivating point mutations in Atm. In this paper, we show that, in contrast to Atm-null mice, both D2899A and Q2740P mutations cause early embryonic lethality in mice, without displaying dominant-negative interfering activity. Using conditional deletion, we find that the D2899A mutation in adult mice behaves largely similar to Atm-null cells but shows greater deficiency in homologous recombination (HR) as measured by hypersensitivity to poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibition and increased genomic instability. These results may explain why missense mutations with no detectable kinase activity are rarely found in patients with classical A-T. We propose that ATM kinase-inactive missense mutations, unless otherwise compensated for, interfere with HR during embryogenesis. PMID:22869595

  20. Satellite ATM Networks: Architectures and Guidelines Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonDeak, Thomas C.; Yegendu, Ferit

    1999-01-01

    An important element of satellite-supported asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networking will involve support for the routing and rerouting of active connections. Work published under the auspices of the Telecommunications Industry Association (http://www.tiaonline.org), describes basic architectures and routing protocol issues for satellite ATM (SATATM) networks. The architectures and issues identified will serve as a basis for further development of technical specifications for these SATATM networks. Three ATM network architectures for bent pipe satellites and three ATM network architectures for satellites with onboard ATM switches were developed. The architectures differ from one another in terms of required level of mobility, supported data rates, supported terrestrial interfaces, and onboard processing and switching requirements. The documentation addresses low-, middle-, and geosynchronous-Earth-orbit satellite configurations. The satellite environment may require real-time routing to support the mobility of end devices and nodes of the ATM network itself. This requires the network to be able to reroute active circuits in real time. In addition to supporting mobility, rerouting can also be used to (1) optimize network routing, (2) respond to changing quality-of-service requirements, and (3) provide a fault tolerance mechanism. Traffic management and control functions are necessary in ATM to ensure that the quality-of-service requirements associated with each connection are not violated and also to provide flow and congestion control functions. Functions related to traffic management were identified and described. Most of these traffic management functions will be supported by on-ground ATM switches, but in a hybrid terrestrial-satellite ATM network, some of the traffic management functions may have to be supported by the onboard satellite ATM switch. Future work is planned to examine the tradeoffs of placing traffic management functions onboard a satellite as

  1. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM kinase regulates mitochondrial function, glucose uptake and the carbon starvation response.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  2. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM Kinase Regulates Mitochondrial Function, Glucose Uptake and the Carbon Starvation Response

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  3. ATM functions at the peroxisome to induce pexophagy in response to ROS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangwei; Tripathi, Durga Nand; Jing, Ji; Alexander, Angela; Kim, Jinhee; Powell, Reid T; Dere, Ruhee; Tait-Mulder, Jacqueline; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Paull, Tanya T; Pandita, Raj K; Charaka, Vijaya K; Pandita, Tej K; Kastan, Michael B; Walker, Cheryl Lyn

    2015-10-01

    Peroxisomes are highly metabolic, autonomously replicating organelles that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by-product of fatty acid β-oxidation. Consequently, cells must maintain peroxisome homeostasis, or risk pathologies associated with too few peroxisomes, such as peroxisome biogenesis disorders, or too many peroxisomes, inducing oxidative damage and promoting diseases such as cancer. We report that the PEX5 peroxisome import receptor binds ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and localizes this kinase to the peroxisome. In response to ROS, ATM signalling activates ULK1 and inhibits mTORC1 to induce autophagy. Specificity for autophagy of peroxisomes (pexophagy) is provided by ATM phosphorylation of PEX5 at Ser 141, which promotes PEX5 monoubiquitylation at Lys 209, and recognition of ubiquitylated PEX5 by the autophagy adaptor protein p62, directing the autophagosome to peroxisomes to induce pexophagy. These data reveal an important new role for ATM in metabolism as a sensor of ROS that regulates pexophagy. PMID:26344566

  4. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is dispensable for endonuclease I-SceI-induced homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rass, Emilie; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Zha, Shan; Alt, Frederick W; Xie, Anyong

    2013-03-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated upon DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and phosphorylates numerous DSB response proteins, including histone H2AX on serine 139 (Ser-139) to form γ-H2AX. Through interaction with MDC1, γ-H2AX promotes DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). H2AX Ser-139 can also be phosphorylated by DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and ataxia telangiectasia- and Rad3-related kinase. Thus, we tested whether ATM functions in HR, particularly that controlled by γ-H2AX, by comparing HR occurring at the euchromatic ROSA26 locus between mouse embryonic stem cells lacking either ATM, H2AX, or both. We show here that loss of ATM does not impair HR, including H2AX-dependent HR, but confers sensitivity to inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. Loss of ATM or H2AX has independent contributions to cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The ATM-independent HR function of H2AX requires both Ser-139 phosphorylation and γ-H2AX/MDC1 interaction. Our data suggest that ATM is dispensable for HR, including that controlled by H2AX, in the context of euchromatin, excluding the implication of such an HR function in genomic instability, hypersensitivity to DNA damage, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition associated with ATM deficiency. PMID:23355489

  5. MSFC institutional area network and ATM technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amin, Ashok T.

    1994-01-01

    The New Institutional Area Network (NEWIAN) at Marshall supports over 5000 end users with access to 26 file servers providing work presentation services. It is comprised of some 150 Ethernet LAN's interconnected by bridges/routers which are in turn connected to servers over two dual FDDI rings. The network supports various higher level protocols such as IP, IPX, AppleTalk (AT), and DECNet. At present IPX and AT protocols packets are routed, and IP protocol packets are bridged; however, work is in progress to route all IP packets. The impact of routing IP packets on network operation is examined. Broadband Integrated Services Data Network (BISDN), presently at various stages of development, is intended to provide voice, video, and data transfer services over a single network. BISDN will use asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) as a data transfer technique which provides for transmission, multiplexing, switching, and relaying of small size data units called cells. Limited ATM Wide Area Network (WAN) services are offered by Wiltel, AT&T, Sprint, and others. NASA is testing a pilot ATM WAN with a view to provide Program Support Communication Network services using ATM. ATM supports wide range of data rates and quality of service requirements. It is expected that ATM switches will penetrate campus networks as well. However, presently products in these areas are at various stages of development and standards are not yet complete. We examine development of ATM to help assess its role in the evolution of NEWIAN.

  6. The ATM conversion at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Brenkosh, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Converting a large, heterogeneous, networked, environment to ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) can yield many benefits. Before these benefits can be reaped, however, numerous decisions must be made and implemented. This paper presents a case study which describes the steps that were necessary to convert a backbone network at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico to ATM. It presents each step by explaining its importance and what options were considered along with their tradeoffs. It is hoped that organizations contemplating converting to ATM will have a better understanding of how the transition is implemented after reading this paper.

  7. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and apoptosis inducing factor in neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2003-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is the guardian of the genome acting as a sentinel for genomic damage. However, PARP-1 is also mediator of cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury, glutamate excitotoxicity, and various inflammatory processes. The biochemistry underlying PARP-1-mediated cell death has remained elusive, although NAD(+) consumption and energy failure have been thought to be one of the possible molecular mechanisms. Recent observations link PARP-1 activation with translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus and indicate that AIF is an essential downstream effector of PARP-1-mediated cell death. PARP-1 activation signals AIF release from the mitochondria, resulting in a novel, caspase-independent pathway of programmed cell death. These recent findings suggest that AIF maybe a target for development of future therapeutic treatment for many neurological disorders involving excitotoxicity. PMID:14678748

  8. Mediation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death by apoptosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Poitras, Marc F; Coombs, Carmen; Bowers, William J; Federoff, Howard J; Poirier, Guy G; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2002-07-12

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) protects the genome by functioning in the DNA damage surveillance network. PARP-1 is also a mediator of cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury, glutamate excitotoxicity, and various inflammatory processes. We show that PARP-1 activation is required for translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus and that AIF is necessary for PARP-1-dependent cell death. N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, H2O2, and N-methyl-d-aspartate induce AIF translocation and cell death, which is prevented by PARP inhibitors or genetic knockout of PARP-1, but is caspase independent. Microinjection of an antibody to AIF protects against PARP-1-dependent cytotoxicity. These data support a model in which PARP-1 activation signals AIF release from mitochondria, resulting in a caspase-independent pathway of programmed cell death. PMID:12114629

  9. Poly(ADP)-Ribose Polymerase-1 Inhibitors as a Potential Treatment for Cocaine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Scobie, Kimberly N

    2015-01-01

    As of 2008, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 1.4 million Americans met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for dependence or abuse of cocaine (in any form) in the past 12 months. However, there are no treatments for cocaine use disorders approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). Alterations in gene regulation contribute significantly to the changes that occur in the brain, both structurally and functionally, and the resultant addictive phenotype that occurs with chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. The Emerging Targets of Cocaine Use Disorders meeting sought to explore novel targets for the treatment of stimulant use disorder. The evidence for a role of one novel target, Poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1), was presented at the meeting and will be summarized in this review. PMID:26022260

  10. Dynamics of TCP traffic over ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanow, Allyn; Floyd, Sally

    1995-05-01

    We investigate the performance of TCP connections over ATM networks without ATM-level congestion control and compare it to the performance of TCP over packet-based networks. For simulations of congested networks, the effective throughput of TCP over ATM can be quite low when cells are dropped at the congested ATM switch. The low throughput is due to wasted bandwidth as the congested link transmits cells from 'corrupted' packets, i.e., packets in which at least one cell is dropped by the switch. We investigate two packet-discard strategies that alleviate the effects of fragmentation. Partial packet discard, in which remaining cells are discarded after one cell has been dropped from a packet, somewhat improves throughput. We introduce early packet discard, a strategy in which the switch drops whole packets prior to buffer overflow. This mechanism prevents fragmentation and restores throughput to maximal levels.

  11. A survey of IP over ATM architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Tsang, R.; Brandt, J.; Hutchins, J.

    1997-07-01

    Over the past decade, the Internet has burgeoned into a worldwide information highway consisting of approximately 5 million hosts on over 45,000 interconnected networks. This unprecedented growth, together with the introduction of multimedia workstations, has spurred the development of innovative applications that require high speed, low latency, and real-time transport. Today`s Internet can neither scale in its bandwidth nor guarantee the Quality of Services (QoS) necessary to meet these performance requirements. Many network researchers propose to use the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology as the underlying infrastructure for the next generation of workgroup, campus, and enterprise IP networks. Since ATM is significantly different from today`s legacy network technologies, efficient implementation of IP over ATM is especially challenging. This tutorial paper covers several existing proposals that integrate IP over ATM.

  12. SASIL. Sandia ATM SONET Interface Logic

    SciTech Connect

    Kitta, J.P.

    1994-07-01

    SASIL is used to program the EPLD`s (Erasable Programmable Logic Devices) and PAL`s (Programmable Array Logic) that make up a large percentage of the Sandia ATM SONET Interface (OC3 version) for the INTEL Paragon.

  13. ATM activation in hypoxia - causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Olcina, Monica M; Grand, Roger JA; Hammond, Ester M

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response is a complex signaling cascade that is triggered by cellular stress. This response is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and is considered to act as a barrier to the early stages of tumorigenesis. The integral role of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase in the response to DNA damaging agents is well characterized; however, ATM can also be activated by non-DNA damaging agents. In fact, much has been learnt recently about the mechanism of ATM activation in response to physiologic stresses such as hypoxia that do not induce DNA damage. Regions of low oxygen concentrations that occur in solid tumors are associated with a poor prognostic outcome irrespective of treatment modality. Severe levels of hypoxia induce replication stress and trigger the activation of DNA damage response pathways including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)- and ATM-mediated signaling. In this review, we discuss hypoxia-driven ATM signaling and the possible contribution of ATM activation in this context to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308313

  14. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Represses Liver X Receptor-mediated ABCA1 Expression and Cholesterol Efflux in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Elina; Hussein, Maryem A; Savas, Jeffery N; Ouimet, Mireille; Barrett, Tessa J; Leone, Sarah; Yates, John R; Moore, Kathryn J; Fisher, Edward A; Garabedian, Michael J

    2016-05-20

    Liver X receptors (LXR) are oxysterol-activated nuclear receptors that play a central role in reverse cholesterol transport through up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) that mediate cellular cholesterol efflux. Mouse models of atherosclerosis exhibit reduced atherosclerosis and enhanced regression of established plaques upon LXR activation. However, the coregulatory factors that affect LXR-dependent gene activation in macrophages remain to be elucidated. To identify novel regulators of LXR that modulate its activity, we used affinity purification and mass spectrometry to analyze nuclear LXRα complexes and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as an LXR-associated factor. In fact, PARP-1 interacted with both LXRα and LXRβ. Both depletion of PARP-1 and inhibition of PARP-1 activity augmented LXR ligand-induced ABCA1 expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage line and primary bone marrow-derived macrophages but did not affect LXR-dependent expression of other target genes, ABCG1 and SREBP-1c. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed PARP-1 recruitment at the LXR response element in the promoter of the ABCA1 gene. Further, we demonstrated that LXR is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated by PARP-1, a potential mechanism by which PARP-1 influences LXR function. Importantly, the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide enhanced macrophage ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to the lipid-poor apolipoprotein AI. These findings shed light on the important role of PARP-1 on LXR-regulated lipid homeostasis. Understanding the interplay between PARP-1 and LXR may provide insights into developing novel therapeutics for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27026705

  15. Recruitment and activation of the ATM kinase in the absence of DNA damage sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hartlerode, Andrea J.; Morgan, Mary J.; Wu, Yipin; Buis, Jeffrey; Ferguson, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Two kinases, ATM and DNA-PKcs, control rapid responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The paradigm for ATM control is recruitment and activation by the Mre11–Rad50–NBS1 (MRN) sensor complex, whereas DNA-PKcs requires the sensor Ku (Ku70–Ku80). Using Mus musculus cells harboring targeted mutant alleles of Mre11 and/or Ku70, together with pharmacologic kinase inhibition we demonstrate that ATM can in fact be activated by DSBs in the absence of MRN. When MRN is deficient, DNA-PKcs efficiently substitutes for ATM in facilitating local chromatin responses. Strikingly, in the absence of both MRN and Ku, ATM is recruited to chromatin, phosphorylates H2AX, and triggers the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint, but DNA repair functions of MRN are not restored. This implies that a complex interplay between sensors plays a significant role in ATM control, rather than straightforward recruitment and activation by MRN. PMID:26280532

  16. Interplay between ATM and ATR in the regulation of common fragile site stability.

    PubMed

    Ozeri-Galai, E; Schwartz, M; Rahat, A; Kerem, B

    2008-04-01

    Common fragile sites are specific genomic loci that form constrictions and gaps on metaphase chromosomes under conditions that slow, but do not arrest, DNA replication. These sites have been shown to have a role in various chromosomal rearrangements in tumors. Different DNA damage response proteins were shown to regulate fragile site stability, including ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) and its effector Chk1. Here, we investigated the role of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the main transducer of DNA double-strand break (DSB) signal, in this regulation. We demonstrate that replication stress conditions, which induce fragile site expression, lead to DNA fragmentation and recruitment of phosphorylated ATM to nuclear foci at DSBs. We further show that ATM plays a role in maintaining fragile site stability, which is revealed only in the absence of ATR. However, the activation of ATM under these replication stress conditions is ATR independent. Following conditions that induce fragile site expression both ATR and ATM phosphorylate Chk1, suggesting that both proteins regulate fragile site expression probably via their effect on Chk1 activation. Our findings provide new insights into the interplay between ATR and ATM pathways in response to partial replication inhibition and in the regulation of fragile site stability. PMID:17934520

  17. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Switch Technology and Vendor Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Noemi

    1995-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and software features are described and compared in order to make switch comparisons meaningful. An ATM switch's performance cannot be measured solely based on its claimed switching capacity; traffic management and congestion control are emerging as the determining factors in an ATM network's ultimate throughput. Non-switch ATM products and experiences with actual installations of ATM networks are described. A compilation of select vendor offerings as of October 1994 is provided in chart form.

  18. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  19. DNA vector-based RNAi approach for stable depletion of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Rashmi G.; Ghodgaonkar, Medini M.; Affar, El Bachir; Shah, Girish M. . E-mail: girish.shah@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2005-05-27

    RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique that is now being used in mammalian cells to specifically silence a gene. Some recent studies have used this technique to achieve variable extent of depletion of a nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). These studies reported either transient silencing of PARP-1 using double-stranded RNA or stable silencing of PARP-1 with a DNA vector which was introduced by a viral delivery system. In contrast, here we report that a simple RNAi approach which utilizes a pBS-U6-based DNA vector containing strategically selected PARP-1 targeting sequence, introduced in the cells by conventional CaPO{sub 4} protocol, can be used to achieve stable and specific silencing of PARP-1 in different types of cells. We also provide a detailed strategy for selection and cloning of PARP-1-targeting sequences for the DNA vector, and demonstrate that this technique does not affect expression of its closest functional homolog PARP-2.

  20. The DISN ATM tactical extension demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, William J.; Bowman, Larry; Riehl, Robert; Mallory, June; Sonderegger, Katy

    1997-01-01

    The Defense Information Systems Network (DISN) is comprised of all telecommunications systems, both fixed and mobile, to meet the information systems requirements of the Department of Defense. Scalable communications providing bandwidth on demand will be achieved with a single protocol, specifically Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). This protocol must work over satellites to provide seamless communications connectivity to our deployed forces. A major demonstration was conducted by the Defense Information Systems Agency to evaluate the usage of the ATM protocol over dual satellite hops. Multi-media applications requiring three party video teleconferencing were conducted with multi-casting over switched virtual circuits. Even under the most difficult conditions of 50% cell loss, the applications performed sufficiently well to conclude that ATM over satellite can be used for the DISN.

  1. ATM alterations in childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gumy-Pause, Fabienne; Wacker, Pierre; Maillet, Philippe; Betts, David R; Sappino, André-Pascal

    2006-04-15

    ATM gene alterations and impaired ATM protein expression have been described in various adult lymphoproliferative malignancies, suggesting that ATM contributes to lymphomagenesis. The present study investigated the prevalence of ATM gene and ATM protein expression alterations in sporadic childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Twenty-seven cases of NHL were screened for ATM mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Direct and indirect criteria, including in silico tools, were used to classify the gene alterations. The methylation status of the ATM promoter CpG island was determined in 25 samples; ATM protein expression was assessed by Western blot in 9 lymphomas. ATM alterations were detected in 12 NHLs (44%). Ten different heterozygous base substitutions were identified in 10 NHLs (37%). Five samples (19%) were found to harbor a gene alteration considered to be a mutation or a rare variant potentially pathogenic. In one case, an ATM mutation was found in the germline. Four NHLs (44%) showed reduced or absent ATM protein expression. Except for one sample, no definite genetic or epigenetic alteration was identified to account for impaired ATM protein expression. These observations document a high prevalence of ATM gene and protein expression alterations, suggesting that ATM is involved in childhood NHL. PMID:16631465

  2. NPP After Launch: Characterizing ATMS Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn

    2011-01-01

    The NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) mission is scheduled to launch in the fall of 2011. Although several teams from the government and the instrument contractor will be assessing and characterizing the performance of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) sounding suite, the NASA NPP Science Team will be paying particular attention to the aspects of these sensors that affect their utility for atmospheric and climate research. In this talk we discuss relevant aspects of ATMS and our post launch analysis approach.

  3. ATM interface design issues for IP traffic over ATM/ADSL access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, Jonathan E.; Pampolini, Matteo

    1999-01-01

    The combination of ATM and ADSL is fast becoming an attractive alternative for Internet access for home and small business. ADSL modems allow the use of the existing copper plant at speeds much higher than those afforded by traditional modem technologies. The use of ATM both enables the long-sought goal of an ATM end-to-end network, and allows, through the use of QOS guarantees, efficient use of the limited upstream bandwidth of ADSL. Although the client- server model, which typified classical Internet traffic and newer multimedia IP services, fits well an asymmetric network model, performance can be greatly impacted unless the interactions between ADSL, ATM, and Internet protocols are well understood an taken into account in the design of ATM interfaces. In this paper we investigate the potential limitations on performance in IP/ATM/ADSL networks and explain how, in our ATM interface designs, we have ameliorated these problems and optimized the use of IP services over such networks. We discuss the importance of 'traffic shaping', heretofore afforded little importance for IP traffic, and the impact of latency and asymmetric bandwidth of ADSL, on both traditional and multimedia IP services, in our implementations.

  4. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 modulates Nrf2-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongde; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Tian, Wang; Jaramillo, Melba C; Lau, Alexandria; Zhang, Donna D

    2014-02-01

    The basic leucine zipper transcription factor Nrf2 has emerged as a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis by controlling the expression of a battery of redox-balancing antioxidants and phase II detoxification enzymes. Under oxidative stress conditions, Nrf2 is induced at the protein level through redox-sensitive modifications on critical cysteine residues in Keap1, a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is historically known to function in DNA damage detection and repair; however, recently PARP-1 has been shown to play an important role in other biochemical activities, such as DNA methylation and imprinting, insulator activity, chromosome organization, and transcriptional regulation. The exact role of PARP-1 in transcription modulation and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly defined. In this study, we report that PARP-1 forms complexes with the antioxidant response element (ARE) within the promoter region of Nrf2 target genes and upregulates the transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Interestingly, PARP-1 neither physically interacts with Nrf2 nor promotes the expression of Nrf2. In addition, PARP-1 does not target Nrf2 for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Instead, PARP-1 interacts directly with small Maf proteins and the ARE of Nrf2 target genes, which augments ARE-specific DNA-binding of Nrf2 and enhances the transcription of Nrf2 target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that PARP-1 serves as a transcriptional coactivator, upregulating the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 by enhancing the interaction among Nrf2, MafG, and the ARE. PMID:24140708

  5. Terminal Area ATM Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard

    1997-01-01

    The presentation will highlight the following: (1) A brief review of ATC research underway 15 years ago; (2) A summary of Terminal Area ATM Tool Development ongoing at NASA Ames; and (3) A projection of research activities 10-15 years from now.

  6. ATM regulates 3-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A.; Clarke, Ian D.; Barszczyk, Mark S.; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W.; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T.; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a frontline therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed; increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using a siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. PMID:25100205

  7. Inactivation of the ATMIN/ATM pathway protects against glioblastoma formation.

    PubMed

    Blake, Sophia M; Stricker, Stefan H; Halavach, Hanna; Poetsch, Anna R; Cresswell, George; Kelly, Gavin; Kanu, Nnennaya; Marino, Silvia; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Pollard, Steven M; Behrens, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive human primary brain cancer. Using a Trp53-deficient mouse model of GBM, we show that genetic inactivation of the Atm cofactor Atmin, which is dispensable for embryonic and adult neural development, strongly suppresses GBM formation. Mechanistically, expression of several GBM-associated genes, including Pdgfra, was normalized by Atmin deletion in the Trp53-null background. Pharmacological ATM inhibition also reduced Pdgfra expression, and reduced the proliferation of Trp53-deficient primary glioma cells from murine and human tumors, while normal neural stem cells were unaffected. Analysis of GBM datasets showed that PDGFRA expression is also significantly increased in human TP53-mutant compared with TP53-wild-type tumors. Moreover, combined treatment with ATM and PDGFRA inhibitors efficiently killed TP53-mutant primary human GBM cells, but not untransformed neural stem cells. These results reveal a new requirement for ATMIN-dependent ATM signaling in TP53-deficient GBM, indicating a pro-tumorigenic role for ATM in the context of these tumors. PMID:26984279

  8. Inactivation of the ATMIN/ATM pathway protects against glioblastoma formation

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Sophia M; Stricker, Stefan H; Halavach, Hanna; Poetsch, Anna R; Cresswell, George; Kelly, Gavin; Kanu, Nnennaya; Marino, Silvia; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Pollard, Steven M; Behrens, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive human primary brain cancer. Using a Trp53-deficient mouse model of GBM, we show that genetic inactivation of the Atm cofactor Atmin, which is dispensable for embryonic and adult neural development, strongly suppresses GBM formation. Mechanistically, expression of several GBM-associated genes, including Pdgfra, was normalized by Atmin deletion in the Trp53-null background. Pharmacological ATM inhibition also reduced Pdgfra expression, and reduced the proliferation of Trp53-deficient primary glioma cells from murine and human tumors, while normal neural stem cells were unaffected. Analysis of GBM datasets showed that PDGFRA expression is also significantly increased in human TP53-mutant compared with TP53-wild-type tumors. Moreover, combined treatment with ATM and PDGFRA inhibitors efficiently killed TP53-mutant primary human GBM cells, but not untransformed neural stem cells. These results reveal a new requirement for ATMIN-dependent ATM signaling in TP53-deficient GBM, indicating a pro-tumorigenic role for ATM in the context of these tumors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08711.001 PMID:26984279

  9. Role of ATM in bystander signaling between human monocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Ghosh, Anu; Krishna, Malini

    2015-12-01

    The response of a cell or tissue to ionizing radiation is mediated by direct damage to cellular components and indirect damage mediated by radiolysis of water. Radiation affects both irradiated cells and the surrounding cells and tissues. The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined by the presence of biological effects in cells that were not themselves in the field of irradiation. To establish the contribution of the bystander effect in the survival of the neighboring cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells were exposed to gamma-irradiation, 2Gy. The medium from the irradiated cells was transferred to non-irradiated A549 cells. Irradiated A549 cells as well as non-irradiated A549 cells cultured in the presence of medium from irradiated cells showed decrease in survival and increase in γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci, indicating a bystander effect. Bystander signaling was also observed between different cell types. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and gamma-irradiated U937 (human monocyte) cells induced a bystander response in non-irradiated A549 (lung carcinoma) cells as shown by decreased survival and increased γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci. Non-stimulated and/or irradiated U937 cells did not induce such effects in non-irradiated A549 cells. Since ATM protein was activated in irradiated cells as well as bystander cells, it was of interest to understand its role in bystander effect. Suppression of ATM with siRNA in A549 cells completely inhibited bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. On the other hand suppression of ATM with siRNA in PMA stimulated U937 cells caused only a partial inhibition of bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. These results indicate that apart from ATM, some additional factor may be involved in bystander effect between different cell types. PMID:26653982

  10. FACET: Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmoria, Karl D.; Banavar, Sridhar; Chatterji, Gano B.; Sheth, Kapil S.; Grabbe, Shon

    2000-01-01

    FACET (Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool) is an Air Traffic Management research tool being developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. This paper describes the design, architecture and functionalities of FACET. The purpose of FACET is to provide E simulation environment for exploration, development and evaluation of advanced ATM concepts. Examples of these concepts include new ATM paradigms such as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management, airspace redesign and new Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for controllers working within the operational procedures of the existing air traffic control system. FACET is currently capable of modeling system-wide en route airspace operations over the contiguous United States. Airspace models (e.g., Center/sector boundaries, airways, locations of navigation aids and airports) are available from databases. A core capability of FACET is the modeling of aircraft trajectories. Using round-earth kinematic equations, aircraft can be flown along flight plan routes or great circle routes as they climb, cruise and descend according to their individual aircraft-type performance models. Performance parameters (e.g., climb/descent rates and speeds, cruise speeds) are obtained from data table lookups. Heading, airspeed and altitude-rate dynamics are also modeled. Additional functionalities will be added as necessary for specific applications. FACET software is written in Java and C programming languages. It is platform-independent, and can be run on a variety of computers. FACET has been designed with a modular software architecture to enable rapid integration of research prototype implementations of new ATM concepts. There are several advanced ATM concepts that are currently being implemented in FACET airborne separation assurance, dynamic density predictions, airspace redesign (re-sectorization), benefits of a controller DST for direct-routing, and the integration of commercial space transportation system operations into the U.S. National

  11. Remote facility sharing with ATM networks [PC based ATM Link Delay Simulator (LDS)]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. T.

    2001-06-01

    The ATM Link Delay Simulator (LDS) adds propagation delay to the ATM link on which it is installed, to allow control of link propagation delay in network protocol experiments simulating an adjustable piece of optical fiber. Our LDS simulates a delay of between 1.5 and 500 milliseconds and is built with commodity PC hardware, only the ATM network interface card is not generally available. Our implementation is special in that it preserves the exact spacing of ATM data cells a feature that requires sustained high performance. Our implementation shows that applications demanding sustained high performance are possible on commodity PC hardware. This illustrates the promise that PC hardware has for adaptability to demanding specialized testing of high speed network.

  12. ATM/cable arch and beam structural test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structural testing is described of an Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) cable arch and beam assembly, using static loads to simulate the critical conditions expected during transportation and launch of the ATM. All test objectives were met. Stress and deflection data show that the assembly is structurally adequate for use in the ATM.

  13. A Managerial Analysis of ATM in Facilitating Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littman, Marlyn Kemper

    In this paper, the fundamental characteristics and capabilities of ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) networks in a distance learning environment are examined. Current and projected ATM applications are described, and issues and challenges associated with developing ATM networking solutions for instructional delivery are explored. Other topics…

  14. Doxorubicin-induced necrosis is mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) but is independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Gui, Xiangai; Achek, Asma; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Necrosis, unregulated cell death, is characterized by plasma membrane rupture as well as nuclear and cellular swelling. However, it has recently been reported that necrosis is a regulated form of cell death mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1). PARP1 is thought to mediate necrosis by inducing DNA damage, although this remains unconfirmed. In this study, we examined the mechanisms of PARP1-mediated necrosis following doxorubicin (DOX)-induced DNA damage in human kidney proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. DOX initiated DNA damage response (DDR) and upregulated PARP1 and p53 expression, resulting in morphological changes similar to those observed during necrosis. Additionally, DOX induced mitochondrial hyper-activation, as evidenced by increased mitochondrial respiration and cytosolic ATP (cATP) production. However, DOX affected mitochondrial mass. DOX-induced DNA damage, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (cROS) generation, and mitochondrial hyper-activation decreased in cells with inhibited PARP1 expression, while generation of nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) remained unaffected. Moreover, DOX-induced DNA damage, cell cycle changes, and oxidative stress were not affected by p53 inhibition. These findings suggest that DNA damage induced necrosis through a PARP1-dependent and p53-independent pathway. PMID:26522181

  15. ATM photoheliograph. [at a solar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prout, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The design and fabrication are presented of a 65 cm photoheliograph functional verification unit (FVU) installed in a major solar observatory. The telescope is used in a daily program of solar observation while serving as a test bed for the development of instrumentation to be included in early space shuttle launched solar telescopes. The 65 cm FVU was designed to be mechanically compatible with the ATM spar/canister and would be adaptable to a second ATM flight utilizing the existing spar/canister configuration. An image motion compensation breadboard and a space-hardened, remotely tuned H alpha filter, as well as solar telescopes of different optical configurations or increased aperture are discussed.

  16. ATM Mutations in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Choi, Michael; Kipps, Thomas; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-08-01

    Activation of checkpoint arrest and homologous DNA repair are necessary for maintenance of genomic integrity during DNA replication. Germ-line mutations of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene result in the well-characterized ataxia telangiectasia syndrome, which manifests with an increased cancer predisposition, including a 20% to 30% lifetime risk of lymphoid, gastric, breast, central nervous system, skin, and other cancers. Somatic ATM mutations or deletions are commonly found in lymphoid malignancies, as well as a variety of solid tumors. Such mutations may result in chemotherapy resistance and adverse prognosis, but may also be exploited by existing or emerging targeted therapies that produce synthetic lethal states. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1781-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27413114

  17. Neuroprotective effects of a novel water-soluble poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibitor, MP-124, in in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Egi, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Shigeru; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Fujio, Masakazu; Yuki, Satoshi; Akira, Toshiaki

    2011-05-10

    Cerebral ischemia induces excessive activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), leading to neuronal cell death and the development of post-ischemic dysfunction. Blockade of PARP-related signals during cerebral ischemia has become a focus of interest as a new therapeutic approach for acute stroke treatment. The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacological profiles of MP-124, a novel water-soluble PARP-1 inhibitor, and its neuroprotective effects on ischemic injury in vitro and in vivo. MP-124 demonstrated competitive inhibition of the PARP-1 activity of human recombinant PARP-1 enzyme (Ki=16.5nmol/L). In P388D(1) cells, MP-124 inhibited the LDH leakage induced by H(2)O(2) in a concentration-dependent manner. (IC(50)=20.8nmol/L). In rat primary cortical neurons, MP-124 also inhibited the NAD depletion and polymerized ADP-ribose formation induced by H(2)O(2) exposure. Moreover, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of MP-124 in rat permanent and transient stroke models. In the rat permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, MP-124 was administered intravenously for 24h from 5min after the onset of MCAO. MP-124 (1, 3 and 10mg/kg/h) significantly inhibited the cerebral infarction in a dose-dependent manner (18, 42 and 48%). In rat transient MCAO model, MP-124 was administered intravenously from 30min after the onset of MCAO. MP-124 (3 and 10mg/kg/h) significantly reduced the infarct volume (53% and 50%). The present findings suggest that MP-124 acts as a potent neuroprotective agent in focal ischemia and its actions can be attributed to a reduction in NAD depletion and PAR formation. PMID:21420942

  18. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  19. ATM Coastal Topography-Mississippi, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Mississippi coastline, from Lakeshore to Petit Bois Island, acquired September 9-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS

  20. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  1. WWOX guards genome stability by activating ATM

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Idit; Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) tend to break upon replication stress and have been suggested to be “hot spots” for genomic instability. Recent evidence, however, implies that in the wake of DNA damage, WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX, the gene product of the FRA16D fragile site), associates with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and regulates its activation to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:27308504

  2. Experiences with the AEROnet/PSCN ATM Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurak, Richard S.; Lisotta, Anthony J.; McCabe, James D.; Nothaft, Alfred E.; Russell, Kelly R.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the experience gained by the AEROnet/PSCN networking team in deploying a prototype Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) based network as part of the wide-area network for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program at NASA Ames Research Center. The objectives of this prototype were to test concepts in using ATM over wide-area Internet Protocol (IP) networks and measure end-to-end system performance. This testbed showed that end-to-end ATM over a DS3 reaches approximately 80% of the throughput achieved from a FDDI to DS3 network. The 20% reduction in through-put can be attributed to the overhead associated with running ATM. As a result, we conclude that if the loss in capacity due to ATM overhead is balanced by the reduction in cost of ATM services, as compared to dedicated circuits, then ATM can be a viable alternative.

  3. Ionizing radiation-induced XRCC4 phosphorylation is mediated through ATM in addition to DNA-PK

    PubMed Central

    SHARMA, Mukesh Kumar; KAMDAR, Radhika Pankaj; FUKUCHI, Mikoto; MATSUMOTO, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4 (X-ray cross-complementation group 4) is a protein associated with DNA ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end-joining. It has been shown that, in response to irradiation or treatment with DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes phosphorylation, requiring DNA-PK. Here we explored possible role of ATM, which is structurally related to DNA-PK, in the regulation of XRCC4. The radiosensitizing effects of DNA-PK inhibitor and/or ATM inhibitor were dependent on XRCC4. DNA-PK inhibitor and ATM inhibitor did not affect the ionizing radiation-induced chromatin recruitment of XRCC4. Ionizing radiation-induced phosphorylation of XRCC4 in the chromatin-bound fraction was largely inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor but further diminished by the combination with ATM inhibitor. The present results indicated that XRCC4 phosphorylation is mediated through ATM as well as DNA-PK, although DNA-PK plays the major role. We would propose a possible model that DNA-PK and ATM acts in parallel upstream of XRCC4, regulating through phosphorylation. PMID:25391321

  4. ATM Quality of Service Tests for Digitized Video Using ATM Over Satellite: Laboratory Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Brooks, David E.; Frantz, Brian D.

    1997-01-01

    A digitized video application was used to help determine minimum quality of service parameters for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) over satellite. For these tests, binomially distributed and other errors were digitally inserted in an intermediate frequency link via a satellite modem and a commercial gaussian noise generator. In this paper, the relation- ship between the ATM cell error and cell loss parameter specifications is discussed with regard to this application. In addition, the video-encoding algorithms, test configurations, and results are presented in detail.

  5. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  6. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K.; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  7. ATMS Snowfall Rate Product and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, H.; Kongoli, C.; Dong, J.; Wang, N. Y.; Ferraro, R. R.; Zavodsky, B.; Banghua Yan, B.

    2015-12-01

    A snowfall rate (SFR) algorithm has been developed for the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) aboard S-NPP and future JPSS satellites. The product is based on the NOAA/NESDIS operational Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) SFR but with several key advancements. The algorithm has benefited from continuous development to improve accuracy and snowfall detection efficiency. The enhancements also expand the applicable temperature range for the algorithm and allow significantly more snowfall to be detected than the operational SFR. Another major improvement is the drastically reduced product latency by using Direct Broadcast (DB) data. The new developments have also been implemented in the MHS SFR to ensure product consistency across satellites. Currently, there are five satellites that carry either ATMS or MHS: S-NPP, NOAA-18/-19 and Metop-A/-B. The combined satellites deliver up to ten SFR estimates a day at any location over land in mid-latitudes. The product provides much needed winter precipitation estimates for applications such as weather forecasting and hydrology. Both ATMS and MHS SFR serve as input to a global precipitation analysis product, the NOAA/NCEP CMORPH-Snow. SFR is the sole satellite-based snowfall estimates in the blended product. In addition, ATMS and MHS SFR was assessed at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and NESDIS/Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) for its operational values in winter 2015. This is a joint effort among NASA/SPoRT, NOAA/NESDIS, University of Maryland/CICS, and the WFOs. The feedback from the assessment indicated that SFR provides useful information for snowfall forecast. It is especially valuable for areas with poor radar coverage and ground observations. The feedback also identified some limitations of the product such as inadequate detection of shallow snowfall. The algorithm developers will continue to improve product quality as well as developing SFR for new microwave sensors and over ocean in a project

  8. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment. PMID:26506520

  9. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment. PMID:26506520

  10. Traffic Management in ATM Networks Over Satellite Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Rohit; Jain, Raj; Goyal, Mukul; Fahmy, Sonia; Vandalore, Bobby; vonDeak, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a survey of the traffic management Issues in the design and implementation of satellite Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks. The report focuses on the efficient transport of Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) traffic over satellite ATM. First, a reference satellite ATM network architecture is presented along with an overview of the service categories available in ATM networks. A delay model for satellite networks and the major components of delay and delay variation are described. A survey of design options for TCP over Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR), Guaranteed Frame Rate (GFR) and Available Bit Rate (ABR) services in ATM is presented. The main focus is on traffic management issues. Several recommendations on the design options for efficiently carrying data services over satellite ATM networks are presented. Most of the results are based on experiments performed on Geosynchronous (GEO) latencies. Some results for Low Earth Orbits (LEO) and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) latencies are also provided.

  11. BNL-NYSERNet ATM project report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, M.; Peskin, A.; Rabinowitz, G.

    1997-07-01

    In 1994, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NYSERNet, Incorporated embarked on a joint project to develop a prototype Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Regional Network testbed. This project was funded as a three-year effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Activity (CRADA) agreement between the parties, with half the funds being provided directly by the U.S. Department of Energy and the remainder as an in-kind contribution by NYSERNet. This report documents that effort as it comes to a close, providing an account of the original goals, the accomplishments of the projects, and the results as they might apply to the future. It is useful to remember that, when the collaboration discussions first began in 1993, it was far from certain that ATM would be the technology of choice for the then-next generation of the Internet. That, of course, has turned out to be the case, which in retrospect makes this experience particularly valuable. The investigators were not totally prescient, however, and the project changed during its duration to account for changes in technology, available infrastructure, and other circumstances.

  12. Preliminary experiences with telemedicine, multimedia, and ATM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, James E., Jr.; Deforge, Christian; Kim, Yongmin

    1996-04-01

    With the goal of eventually increasing the quality of medical care, especially in remote areas, we have developed a system for telemedicine research based on a combination of ATM networking and a high-speed DSP board based on the Texas Instruments TMS320C80. The purpose of the system is to give health care providers at remote locations the ability to consult with specialists using a combination of video, audio, and externally-acquired images. The system can also be used for education purposes to support bi-directional video/audio communications for grand round lectures, classes, and case conferences. In order to maximize the utilization of the available transmission medium (ranging from land-based copper and fiber optic cable to satellite link) while providing the best possible video and audio quality, the compression performed by the system is adaptable to a wide variety of bandwidths. After about two years of experience with telemedicine in a research environment, we have some preliminary findings to report regarding the performance of a telemedicine application combining ATM and programmable multimedia processors in PC environments.

  13. ATM and KAT5 safeguard replicating chromatin against formaldehyde damage

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Wong, Victor C.; DeLoughery, Zachary; Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Many carcinogens damage both DNA and protein constituents of chromatin, and it is unclear how cells respond to this compound injury. We examined activation of the main DNA damage-responsive kinase ATM and formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) by formaldehyde (FA) that forms histone adducts and replication-blocking DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC). We found that low FA doses caused a strong and rapid activation of ATM signaling in human cells, which was ATR-independent and restricted to S-phase. High FA doses inactivated ATM via its covalent dimerization and formation of larger crosslinks. FA-induced ATM signaling showed higher CHK2 phosphorylation but much lower phospho-KAP1 relative to DSB inducers. Replication blockage by DPC did not produce damaged forks or detectable amounts of DSB during the main wave of ATM activation, which did not require MRE11. Chromatin-monitoring KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase was responsible for acetylation and activation of ATM by FA. KAT5 and ATM were equally important for triggering of intra-S-phase checkpoint and ATM signaling promoted recovery of normal human cells after low-dose FA. Our results revealed a major role of the KAT5-ATM axis in protection of replicating chromatin against damage by the endogenous carcinogen FA. PMID:26420831

  14. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1–Sirtuin 1 Functional Interplay Regulates LPS-Mediated High Mobility Group Box 1 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Thomas D; Di Caro, Valentina; Piganelli, Jon; Billiar, Timothy R; Clark, Robert SB; Aneja, Rajesh K

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions that lead to the release of the prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) also result in activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1; now known as ADP-ribosyl transferase 1 [ARTD1]). Persistent activation of PARP1 promotes energy failure and cell death. The role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HMGB1 release has been explored previously; however, PARP1 is a versatile enzyme and performs several other functions including cross-talk with another nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- (NAD+) dependent member of the Class III histone deacetylases (HDACs), sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). Previously, it has been shown that the hyperacetylation of HMGB1 is a seminal event prior to its secretion, a process that also is dependent on HDACs. Therefore, in this study, we seek to determine if PARP1 inhibition alters LPS-mediated HMGB1 hyperacetylation and subsequent secretion due to its effect on SIRT1. We demonstrate in an in vitro model that LPS treatment leads to hyperacetylated HMGB1 with concomitant reduction in nuclear HDAC activity. Treatment with PARP1 inhibitors mitigates the LPS-mediated reduction in nuclear HDAC activity and decreases HMGB1 acetylation. By utilizing an NAD+-based mechanism, PARP1 inhibition increases the activity of SIRT1. Consequently, there is an increased nuclear retention and decreased extracellular secretion of HMGB1. We also demonstrate that PARP1 physically interacts with SIRT1. Further confirmation of this data was obtained in a murine model of sepsis, that is, administration of PJ-34, a specific PARP1 inhibitor, led to decreased serum HMGB1 concentrations in mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) as compared with untreated mice. In conclusion, our study provides new insights in understanding the molecular mechanisms of HMGB1 secretion in sepsis. PMID:25517228

  15. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Protects against Hyperglycemic-Induced Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Improves Myocardial Dysfunction by Suppressing Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Guang-hao; Feng, Min; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jia-ning; Dong, Wen-qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Under high glucose conditions, endothelial cells respond by acquiring fibroblast characteristics, that is, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), contributing to diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has cardioprotective properties independent of its glucose-lowering effect. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here we investigated whether GLP-1 inhibits myocardial EndMT in diabetic mice and whether this is mediated by suppressing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice were treated with or without GLP-1 analog (24 nmol/kg daily) for 24 wks. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in normal glucose (NG) (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG) (30 mmol/L) medium with or without GLP-1analog. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were performed to evaluate EndMT and PARP-1 activity. Diabetes mellitus attenuated cardiac function and increased cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with the GLP-1 analog improved diabetes mellitus–related cardiac dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that hyperglycemia markedly increased the percentage of von Willebrand factor (vWF)+/alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+ cells in total α-SMA+ cells in diabetic hearts compared with controls, which was attenuated by GLP-1 analog treatment. In cultured HAECs, immunofluorescent staining and Western blot also showed that both GLP-1 analog and PARP-1 gene silencing could inhibit the HG-induced EndMT. In addition, GLP-1 analog could attenuate PARP-1 activation by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, GLP-1 treatment could protect against the hyperglycemia-induced EndMT and myocardial dysfunction. This effect is mediated, at least partially, by suppressing PARP-1 activation. PMID:25715248

  16. Structural characterization of AtmS13, a putative sugar aminotransferase involved in indolocarbazole AT2433 aminopentose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanteri; Kim, Youngchang; Wang, Fengbin; Bigelow, Lance; Endres, Michael; Kharel, Madan K; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Bingman, Craig A; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Thorson, Jon S; Phillips, George N

    2015-08-01

    AT2433 from Actinomadura melliaura is an indolocarbazole antitumor antibiotic structurally distinguished by its unique aminodideoxypentose-containing disaccharide moiety. The corresponding sugar nucleotide-based biosynthetic pathway for this unusual sugar derives from comparative genomics where AtmS13 has been suggested as the contributing sugar aminotransferase (SAT). Determination of the AtmS13 X-ray structure at 1.50-Å resolution reveals it as a member of the aspartate aminotransferase fold type I (AAT-I). Structural comparisons of AtmS13 with homologous SATs that act upon similar substrates implicate potential active site residues that contribute to distinctions in sugar C5 (hexose vs. pentose) and/or sugar C2 (deoxy vs. hydroxyl) substrate specificity. PMID:26061967

  17. Reactive oxygen species abrogate the anticarcinogenic effect of eicosapentaenoic acid in Atm-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Ralf; Reichenbach, Janine; Koch, Claudia; Kloess, Stephan; Koehl, Ulrike; Mueller, Klaus; Baer, Patrick; Beermann, Christopher; Boehles, Hansjosef; Zielen, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are able to suppress cell proliferation and inhibit tumor growth. The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of a high dose EPA on the development of the tumor phenotype in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (Atm)-deficient mice, a genetic cancer model that is associated with increased levels of oxidative stress. We analyzed toxicity, proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and apoptosis of EPA in vitro and latency to tumorigenesis in vivo. Because of the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the tumor incidence in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), we further analyzed the effect of EPA on the generation of ROS and oxidative DNA damage (ODD). EPA effectively inhibited proliferation, altered cell-cycle progression, and induced apoptosis of tumor cells (AT-4). EPA showed no effect on the latency to tumorigenesis in Atm-deficient mice. EPA treatment was accompanied by a significant increase of ROS and ODD. Our results demonstrate the antiproliferative effect of EPA on tumor cells by alteration of cell-cycle progression and induction of apoptosis in vitro. On the other hand, EPA treatment of Atm-deficient mice led to the formation of ROS and accumulation of ODD that might have abrogated the anticarcinogenic effect caused by EPA. PMID:20574919

  18. Parametric analysis of ATM solar array.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, B. K.; Adkisson, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The paper discusses the methods used for the calculation of ATM solar array performance characteristics and provides the parametric analysis of solar panels used in SKYLAB. To predict the solar array performance under conditions other than test conditions, a mathematical model has been developed. Four computer programs have been used to convert the solar simulator test data to the parametric curves. The first performs module summations, the second determines average solar cell characteristics which will cause a mathematical model to generate a curve matching the test data, the third is a polynomial fit program which determines the polynomial equations for the solar cell characteristics versus temperature, and the fourth program uses the polynomial coefficients generated by the polynomial curve fit program to generate the parametric data.

  19. FPGA Based Reconfigurable ATM Switch Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.; Jones, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with "FPGA Based Reconfigurable ATM Switch Test Bed" are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Network performance evaluation; 2) traditional approaches; 3) software simulation; 4) hardware emulation; 5) test bed highlights; 6) design environment; 7) test bed architecture; 8) abstract sheared-memory switch; 9) detailed switch diagram; 10) traffic generator; 11) data collection circuit and user interface; 12) initial results; and 13) the following conclusions: Advances in FPGA make hardware emulation feasible for performance evaluation, hardware emulation can provide several orders of magnitude speed-up over software simulation; due to the complexity of hardware synthesis process, development in emulation is much more difficult than simulation and requires knowledge in both networks and digital design.

  20. Ionizing radiation induces ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM)-mediated phosphorylation of LKB1/STK11 at Thr-366.

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Gopal P; Deak, Maria; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Morrice, Nick; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Smythe, Carl; Shiloh, Yosef; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Alessi, Dario R

    2002-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase LKB1 functions as a tumour suppressor, and mutations in this enzyme lead to the inherited Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome. We previously found that LKB1 was phosphorylated at Thr-366 in vivo, a residue conserved in mammalian, Xenopus and Drosophila LKB1, located on a C-terminal non-catalytic moiety of the enzyme. Mutation of Thr-366 to Ala or Asp partially inhibited the ability of LKB1 to suppress growth of G361 melanoma cells, but did not affect LKB1 activity in vitro or LKB1 localization in vivo. As a first step in exploring the role of this phosphorylation further, we have generated a phosphospecific antibody specifically recognizing LKB1 phosphorylated at Thr-366 and demonstrate that exposure of cells to ionizing radiation (IR) induced a marked phosphorylation of LKB1 at Thr-366 in the nucleus. Thr-366 lies in an optimal phosphorylation motif for the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-like kinases DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia-related kinase (ATR), which function as sensors for DNA damage in cells and mediate cellular responses to DNA damage. We demonstrate that both DNA-PK and ATM efficiently phosphorylate LKB1 at Thr-366 in vitro and provide evidence that ATM mediates this phosphorylation in vivo. This is based on the finding that LKB1 is not phosphorylated in a cell line lacking ATM in response to IR, and that agents which induce cellular responses via ATR in preference to ATM poorly induce phosphorylation of LKB1 at Thr-366. These observations provide the first link between ATM and LKB1 and suggest that ATM could regulate LKB1. PMID:12234250

  1. Dissecting cellular responses to irradiation via targeted disruptions of the ATM-CHK1-PP2A circuit

    PubMed Central

    Palii, Stela S.; Cui, Yuxia; Innes, Cynthia L.; Paules, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of proliferating cells to genotoxic stresses activates a cascade of signaling events termed the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR preserves genetic stability by detecting DNA lesions, activating cell cycle checkpoints and promoting DNA damage repair. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad 3-related kinase (ATR) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) are crucial for sensing lesions and signal transduction. The checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) is a traditional ATR target involved in DDR and normal cell cycle progression and represents a pharmacological target for anticancer regimens. This study employed cell lines stably depleted for CHK1, ATM or both for dissecting cross-talk and compensatory effects on G₂/M checkpoint in response to ionizing radiation (IR). We show that a 90% depletion of CHK1 renders cells radiosensitive without abrogating their IR-mediated G₂/M checkpoint arrest. ATM phosphorylation is enhanced in CHK1-deficient cells compared with their wild-type counterparts. This correlates with lower nuclear abundance of the PP2A catalytic subunit in CHK1-depleted cells. Stable depletion of CHK1 in an ATM-deficient background showed only a 50% reduction from wild-type CHK1 protein expression levels and resulted in an additive attenuation of the G₂/M checkpoint response compared with the individual knockdowns. ATM inhibition and 90% CHK1 depletion abrogated the early G₂/M checkpoint and precluded the cells from mounting an efficient compensatory response to IR at later time points. Our data indicates that dual targeting of ATM and CHK1 functionalities disrupts the compensatory response to DNA damage and could be exploited for developing efficient anti-neoplastic treatments. PMID:23462183

  2. Multimedia Applications in Heterogeneous Internet/ATM Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Lars C.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of multimedia systems focuses on interaction approaches for the quality of service (QoS) architectures developed for the Internet and for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). Highlights include interactions, videoconferencing, video on demand, a comparison of the ATM and IntServ QoS architectures, interaction models, and subordination…

  3. ATM Technology Adoption in U.S. Campus Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Engui; Perry, John F.; Anderson, Larry S.; Brook, R. Dan; Hare, R. Dwight; Moore, Arnold J.; Xu, Xiaohe

    This study examined the relationships between ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) adoption in universities and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information processing maturity. Another purpose of the study was to identify the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking. Subjects were university domain LAN…

  4. ATM LAN Emulation: Getting from Here to There.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learn, Larry L., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses current LAN (local area network) configuration and explains ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) as the future telecommunications transport. Highlights include LAN emulation, which enables the interconnection of legacy LANs and the new ATM environment; virtual LANs; broadcast servers; and standards. (LRW)

  5. ATM: The Key To Harnessing the Power of Networked Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Rod

    1996-01-01

    ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) network technology handles the real-time continuous traffic flow necessary to support desktop multimedia applications. Describes network applications already used: desktop video collaboration, distance learning, and broadcasting video delivery. Examines the architecture of ATM technology, video delivery and sound…

  6. Discovery of Novel 3-Quinoline Carboxamides as Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable Inhibitors of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) Kinase.

    PubMed

    Degorce, Sébastien L; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Dishington, Allan; Ducray, Richard; Glossop, Steven C; Hassall, Lorraine A; Lach, Franck; Lau, Alan; McGuire, Thomas M; Nowak, Thorsten; Ouvry, Gilles; Pike, Kurt G; Thomason, Andrew G

    2016-07-14

    A novel series of 3-quinoline carboxamides has been discovered and optimized as selective inhibitors of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. From a modestly potent HTS hit (4), we identified molecules such as 6-[6-(methoxymethyl)-3-pyridinyl]-4-{[(1R)-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)ethyl]amino}-3-quinolinecarboxamide (72) and 7-fluoro-6-[6-(methoxymethyl)pyridin-3-yl]-4-{[(1S)-1-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)ethyl]amino}quinoline-3-carboxamide (74) as potent and highly selective ATM inhibitors with overall ADME properties suitable for oral administration. 72 and 74 constitute excellent oral tools to probe ATM inhibition in vivo. Efficacy in combination with the DSB-inducing agent irinotecan was observed in a disease relevant model. PMID:27259031

  7. ATM test and integration. [Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. W.; Mitchell, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The test and checkout philosophy of the test program for the Skylab ATM module and the overall test flow including in-process, post-manufacturing, vibration, thermal vacuum, and prelaunch checkout activities are described. Capabilities and limitations of the test complex and its use of automation are discussed. Experiences with the organizational principle of using a dedicated test team for all checkout activities are reported. Material on the development of the ATM subsystems, the experimental program and the requirements of the scientific community, and the integration and verification of the complex systems/subsystems of the ATM are presented. The performance of the ATM test program in such areas as alignment, systems and subsystems, contamination control, and experiment operation is evaluated. The conclusions and recommendations resulting from the ATM test program are enumerated.

  8. ATM regulates proteasome-dependent subnuclear localization of TRF1, which is important for telomere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    McKerlie, Megan; Lin, Sichun; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a PI-3 kinase essential for maintaining genomic stability, has been shown to regulate TRF1, a negative mediator of telomerase-dependent telomere extension. However, little is known about ATM-mediated TRF1 phosphorylation site(s) in vivo. Here, we report that ATM phosphorylates S367 of TRF1 and that this phosphorylation renders TRF1 free of chromatin. We show that phosphorylated (pS367)TRF1 forms distinct non-telomeric subnuclear foci and that these foci occur predominantly in S and G2 phases, implying that their formation is cell cycle regulated. We show that phosphorylated (pS367)TRF1-containing foci are sensitive to proteasome inhibition. We find that a phosphomimic mutation of S367D abrogates TRF1 binding to telomeric DNA and renders TRF1 susceptible to protein degradation. In addition, we demonstrate that overexpressed TRF1-S367D accumulates in the subnuclear domains containing phosphorylated (pS367)TRF1 and that these subnuclear domains overlap with nuclear proteasome centers. Taken together, these results suggest that phosphorylated (pS367)TRF1-containing foci may represent nuclear sites for TRF1 proteolysis. Furthermore, we show that TRF1 carrying the S367D mutation is unable to inhibit telomerase-dependent telomere lengthening or to suppress the formation of telomere doublets and telomere loss in TRF1-depleted cells, suggesting that S367 phosphorylation by ATM is important for the regulation of telomere length and stability. PMID:22266654

  9. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vendetti, Frank P.; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P.; O'Connor, Mark J.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts. PMID:26517239

  10. Phosphorylation of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large Tumor Antigen at Serine 816 by ATM Kinase Induces Apoptosis in Host Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H.; You, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a highly aggressive form of skin cancer. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) infection and DNA integration into the host genome correlate with 80% of all Merkel cell carcinoma cases. Integration of the MCV genome frequently results in mutations in the large tumor antigen (LT), leading to expression of a truncated LT that retains pRB binding but with a deletion of the C-terminal domain. Studies from our laboratory and others have shown that the MCV LT C-terminal helicase domain contains growth-inhibiting properties. Additionally, we have shown that host DNA damage response factors are recruited to viral replication centers. In this study, we identified a novel MCV LT phosphorylation site at Ser-816 in the C-terminal domain. We demonstrate that activation of the ATM pathway stimulated MCV LT phosphorylation at Ser-816, whereas inhibition of ATM kinase activity prevented LT phosphorylation at this site. In vitro phosphorylation experiments confirmed that ATM kinase is responsible for phosphorylating MCV LT at Ser-816. Finally, we show that ATM kinase-mediated MCV LT Ser-816 phosphorylation may contribute to the anti-tumorigenic properties of the MCV LT C-terminal domain. PMID:25480786

  11. The ATM protein: the importance of being active.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Yosef; Ziv, Yael

    2012-08-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the cellular response to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand breaks by phosphorylating numerous players in the extensive DNA damage response network. Two papers in this issue (Daniel et al. 2012. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb201204035; Yamamoto et al. 2012. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb201204098) strikingly show that, in mice, the presence of a catalytically inactive version of ATM is embryonically lethal. This is surprising because mice completely lacking ATM have a much more moderate phenotype. The findings impact on basic cancer research and cancer therapeutics. PMID:22869592

  12. Deoxycytidine Kinase Augments ATM-Mediated DNA Repair and Contributes to Radiation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bunimovich, Yuri L.; Nair-Gill, Evan; Riedinger, Mireille; McCracken, Melissa N.; Cheng, Donghui; McLaughlin, Jami; Radu, Caius G.; Witte, Owen N.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and adequate generation of deoxyribonucleotides is critical to successful DNA repair. We show that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) integrates the DNA damage response with DNA metabolism by regulating the salvage of deoxyribonucleosides. Specifically, ATM phosphorylates and activates deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) at serine 74 in response to ionizing radiation (IR). Activation of dCK shifts its substrate specificity toward deoxycytidine, increases intracellular dCTP pools post IR, and enhances the rate of DNA repair. Mutation of a single serine 74 residue has profound effects on murine T and B lymphocyte development, suggesting that post-translational regulation of dCK may be important in maintaining genomic stability during hematopoiesis. Using [18F]-FAC, a dCK-specific positron emission tomography (PET) probe, we visualized and quantified dCK activation in tumor xenografts after IR, indicating that dCK activation could serve as a biomarker for ATM function and DNA damage response in vivo. In addition, dCK-deficient leukemia cell lines and murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibited increased sensitivity to IR, indicating that pharmacologic inhibition of dCK may be an effective radiosensitization strategy. PMID:25101980

  13. ATM localization and gene expression in the adult mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Leemput, Julia; Masson, Christel; Bigot, Karine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Dansault, Anouk; Provost, Alexandra; Gadin, Stéphanie; Aoufouchi, Said; Menasche, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Purpose High levels of metabolism and oxygen consumption in most adult murine ocular compartments, combined with exposure to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are major sources of oxidative stress, causing DNA damage in ocular cells. Of all mammalian body cells, photoreceptor cells consume the largest amount of oxygen and generate the highest levels of oxidative damage. The accumulation of such damage throughout life is a major factor of aging tissues. Several multiprotein complexes have recently been identified as the major sensors and mediators involved in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The activity of these complexes initially seemed to be restricted to dividing cells, given their ultimate role in major cell cycle checkpoints. However, it was later established that they are also active in post-mitotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate that the DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for the development, maintenance, and normal functioning of the adult central nervous system. One major molecular factor in the DDR is the protein, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). It is required for the rapid induction of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks. These cytotoxic DNA lesions may be caused by oxidative damage. To understand how ATM prevents oxidative stress and participates in the maintenance of genomic integrity and cell viability of the adult retina, we determined the ATM expression patterns and studied its localization in the adult mouse eye. Methods Atm gene expression was analyzed by RT–PCR experiments and its localization by in situ hybridization on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. ATM protein expression was determined by western blot analysis of proteins homogenates extracted from several mouse tissues and its localization by immunohistochemistry experiments performed on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. In addition, subcellular localization was realized by confocal microscopy imaging of ocular tissue

  14. Methylation of the ATM promoter in glioma cells alters ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Kanaklata; Wang, Lilin; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Price, Brendan D. . E-mail: brendan_price@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-06-09

    Glioblastomas are among the malignancies most resistant to radiation therapy. In contrast, cells lacking the ATM protein are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. The relationship between ATM protein expression and radiosensitivity in 3 glioma cell lines was examined. T98G cells exhibited normal levels of ATM protein, whereas U118 and U87 cells had significantly lower levels of ATM and increased (>2-fold) sensitivity to ionizing radiation compared to T98G cells. The ATM promoter was methylated in U87 cells. Demethylation by azacytidine treatment increased ATM protein levels in the U87 cells and decreased their radiosensitivity. In contrast, the ATM promoter in U118 cells was not methylated. Further, expression of exogenous ATM did not significantly alter the radiosensitivity of U118 cells. ATM expression is therefore heterogeneous in the glioma cells examined. In conclusion, methylation of the ATM promoter may account for the variable radiosensitivity and heterogeneous ATM expression in a fraction of glioma cells.

  15. The Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS) concept

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeneman, J.L.

    1993-08-01

    The Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS) has been designed to address the need for global monitoring of the status and location of proliferation-sensitive items. Conceived to utilize the proposed Global Verification and Location System (GVLS) satellite link, ATMS could use the existing International Maritime Satellite commercial communication system until GVLS is operational. The ATMS concept uses sensor packs to monitor items and environmental conditions, collects a variety of events data through a sensor processing unit, and transmits the data to a satellite, which then sends data to ground stations. Authentication and encryption algorithms will be used to secure the data. A typical ATMS application would be to track and monitor the safety and security of a number of items in transit along a scheduled shipping route. This paper also discusses a possible proof-of-concept system demonstration.

  16. ExpandplusCrystal Structures of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Zinc Fingers Bound to DNA

    SciTech Connect

    M Langelier; J Planck; S Roy; J Pascal

    2011-12-31

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has two homologous zinc finger domains, Zn1 and Zn2, that bind to a variety of DNA structures to stimulate poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis activity and to mediate PARP-1 interaction with chromatin. The structural basis for interaction with DNA is unknown, which limits our understanding of PARP-1 regulation and involvement in DNA repair and transcription. Here, we have determined crystal structures for the individual Zn1 and Zn2 domains in complex with a DNA double strand break, providing the first views of PARP-1 zinc fingers bound to DNA. The Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA structures establish a novel, bipartite mode of sequence-independent DNA interaction that engages a continuous region of the phosphodiester backbone and the hydrophobic faces of exposed nucleotide bases. Biochemical and cell biological analysis indicate that the Zn1 and Zn2 domains perform distinct functions. The Zn2 domain exhibits high binding affinity to DNA compared with the Zn1 domain. However, the Zn1 domain is essential for DNA-dependent PARP-1 activity in vitro and in vivo, whereas the Zn2 domain is not strictly required. Structural differences between the Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA complexes, combined with mutational and structural analysis, indicate that a specialized region of the Zn1 domain is re-configured through the hydrophobic interaction with exposed nucleotide bases to initiate PARP-1 activation.

  17. Coordinated Regulation of TIP60 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 in Damaged-Chromatin Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Masae; Furuya, Kanji; Fukuto, Atsuhiko; Matsuda, Ryo; Adachi, Jun; Matsuda, Tomonari; Kakizuka, Akira; Ikura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-15

    The dynamic exchange of histones alleviates the nucleosome barrier and simultaneously facilitates various aspects of cellular DNA metabolism, such as DNA repair and transcription. In response to DNA damage, the acetylation of Lys5 in the histone variant H2AX, catalyzed by TIP60, plays a key role in promoting histone exchange; however, the detailed molecular mechanism still is unclear. Here, we show that the TIP60 complex includes poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 is required for the rapid exchange of H2AX on chromatin at DNA damage sites. It is known that PARP-1 binds dynamically to damaged chromatin and is crucial for the subsequent recruitment of other repair factors, and its auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is required for the dynamics. We also show that the acetylation of histone H2AX at Lys5 by TIP60, but not the phosphorylation of H2AX, is required for the ADP-ribosylation activity of PARP-1 and its dynamic binding to damaged chromatin. Our results indicate the reciprocal regulation of K5 acetylation of H2AX and PARP-1, which could modulate the chromatin structure to facilitate DNA metabolism at damage sites. This could explain the rather undefined roles of PARP-1 in various DNA damage responses. PMID:26976643

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Radioiodinated Tracer with Specificity for Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zmuda, Filip; Malviya, Gaurav; Blair, Adele; Boyd, Marie; Chalmers, Anthony J; Sutherland, Andrew; Pimlott, Sally L

    2015-11-12

    Interest in nuclear imaging of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has grown in recent years due to the ability of PARP-1 to act as a biomarker for glioblastoma and increased clinical use of PARP-1 inhibitors. This study reports the identification of a lead iodinated analog 5 of the clinical PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib as a potential single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging agent. Compound 5 was shown to be a potent PARP-1 inhibitor in cell-free and cellular assays, and it exhibited mouse plasma stability but approximately 3-fold greater intrinsic clearance when compared to olaparib. An (123)I-labeled version of 5 was generated using solid state halogen exchange methodology. Ex vivo biodistribution studies of [(123)I]5 in mice bearing subcutaneous glioblastoma xenografts revealed that the tracer had the ability to be retained in tumor tissue and bind to PARP-1 with specificity. These findings support further investigations of [(123)I]5 as a noninvasive PARP-1 SPECT imaging agent. PMID:26469301

  19. Implementing and testing ATM in a production LAN

    SciTech Connect

    Naegle, J.; Testi, N.; Tolendino, L.; Zepper, J.

    1995-06-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology is currently receiving extensive attention in the computer networking arena. Many experts predict that ATM will be the future networking technology for both the Local Area Network (LAN) and the Wide Area Network (WAN). This paper presents the results of a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories` Advanced Networking Department and Engineering Sciences Center to study the implementation of ATM in one of Sandia`s most heavily loaded production networks. The network consists of over 120 Sun Sparc 10s and 20s, two SparcCenter 2000s, a 12 node parallel IBM SP-2, and several other miscellaneous high-end workstations. The existing network was first characterized through extensive traffic measurements to better understand the capabilities and limitations of the existing network technologies and to provide a baseline for comparison to an ATM network. This characterization was used to select a subset of the network elements which would benefit most from conversion to the ATM technology. This subset was then converted to equipment based on the latest ATM standards. With direct OC-3c (155 Mbps) host connections for the workstations and the file and compute servers, we demonstrated as much as 122 Mbps throughput (memory-to-memory TCP/IP transfers) between endpoints. Flow control in the classical many-to-one client server environment was also investigated. Throughout all of our tests, the interaction of the user applications with the network technologies was documented and possible improvements were tested. The performance and reliability of the ATM network was compared to the original network to determine the benefits and liabilities of the ATM technology.

  20. Synthetic lethality in ATM-deficient RAD50-mutant tumors underlie outlier response to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Iyer, Gopa; Hohl, Marcel; Asthana, Saurabh; Inagaki, Akiko; Schultz, Nikolaus; Hanrahan, Aphrothiti J.; Scott, Sasinya N.; Brannon, A. Rose; McDermott, Gregory C.; Pirun, Mono; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Kim, Philip; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Schwartz, Gary K.; Reuter, Victor; Bochner, Bernard H.; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Berger, Michael F.; Petrini, John H.J.; Solit, David B.; Taylor, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic solid tumors are almost invariably fatal. Patients with disseminated small-cell cancers have a particularly unfavorable prognosis with most succumbing to their disease within two years. Here, we report on the genetic and functional analysis of an outlier curative response of a patient with metastatic small cell cancer to combined checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) inhibition and DNA damaging chemotherapy. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a clonal hemizygous mutation in the Mre11 complex gene RAD50 that attenuated ATM signaling which in the context of Chk1 inhibition contributed, via synthetic lethality, to extreme sensitivity to irinotecan. As Mre11 mutations occur in a diversity of human tumors, the results suggest a tumor-specific combination therapy strategy whereby checkpoint inhibition in combination with DNA damaging chemotherapy is synthetically lethal in tumor but not normal cells with somatic mutations that impair Mre11 complex function. PMID:24934408

  1. Tropical Cyclone Warm Core Structure Retrieved from ATMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Zhu, T.; Weng, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on board Suomi NPP was successfully launched on October 28, 2011. ATMS consists of a microwave radiometer that measures microwave radiances at 22 channels from 23.8 GHz to 183.3 GHz. Combining the capabilities of current Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), ATMS provides sounding observations with improved sampling and coverage for retrieving atmospheric vertical temperature and moisture profiles. A new algorithm is developed to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles for tropical cyclone with ATMS data. The cross-track asymmetric pattern is investigated for ATMS three window channels. It is found that the asymmetric biases are close to the simulations when the polarization alignment angles are set between 91o and 92o. The algorithm is applied for Tropical Cyclone Giovanna case study and compared with the retrievals from NOAA-15 AMSU-A observation. ATMS retrievals clearly depict the cold temperature anomalies in TC spiral rain bands and the storm warm core. More case study results will be provided at the conference.

  2. ATM controls meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Pan, Jing; Cole, Francesca; Thelen, Michael P; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2011-11-10

    In many organisms, developmentally programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) formed by the SPO11 transesterase initiate meiotic recombination, which promotes pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes. Because every chromosome must receive a minimum number of DSBs, attention has focused on factors that support DSB formation. However, improperly repaired DSBs can cause meiotic arrest or mutation; thus, having too many DSBs is probably as deleterious as having too few. Only a small fraction of SPO11 protein ever makes a DSB in yeast or mouse and SPO11 and its accessory factors remain abundant long after most DSB formation ceases, implying the existence of mechanisms that restrain SPO11 activity to limit DSB numbers. Here we report that the number of meiotic DSBs in mouse is controlled by ATM, a kinase activated by DNA damage to trigger checkpoint signalling and promote DSB repair. Levels of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, by-products of meiotic DSB formation, are elevated at least tenfold in spermatocytes lacking ATM. Moreover, Atm mutation renders SPO11-oligonucleotide levels sensitive to genetic manipulations that modulate SPO11 protein levels. We propose that ATM restrains SPO11 via a negative feedback loop in which kinase activation by DSBs suppresses further DSB formation. Our findings explain previously puzzling phenotypes of Atm-null mice and provide a molecular basis for the gonadal dysgenesis observed in ataxia telangiectasia, the human syndrome caused by ATM deficiency. PMID:22002603

  3. Down-Regulation of EBV-LMP1 Radio-Sensitizes Nasal Pharyngeal Carcinoma Cells via NF-κB Regulated ATM Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lanbo; Tang, Min; Liu, Liyu; Li, Zijian; Deng, Mengyao; Sun, Lunquan; Cao, Ya

    2011-01-01

    Background The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) encoded by EBV is expressed in the majority of EBV-associated human malignancies and has been suggested to be one of the major oncogenic factors in EBV-mediated carcinogenesis. In previous studies we experimentally demonstrated that down-regulation of LMP1 expression by DNAzymes could increase radiosensitivity both in cells and in a xenograft NPC model in mice. Results In this study we explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiosensitization caused by the down-regulation of LMP1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. It was confirmed that LMP1 could up-regulate ATM expression in NPCs. Bioinformatic analysis of the ATM ptomoter region revealed three tentative binding sites for NF-κB. By using a specific inhibitor of NF-κB signaling and the dominant negative mutant of IkappaB, it was shown that the ATM expression in CNE1-LMP1 cells could be efficiently suppressed. Inhibition of LMP1 expression by the DNAzyme led to attenuation of the NF-κB DNA binding activity. We further showed that the silence of ATM expression by ATM-targeted siRNA could enhance the radiosensitivity in LMP1 positive NPC cells. Conclusions Together, our results indicate that ATM expression can be regulated by LMP1 via the NF-κB pathways through direct promoter binding, which resulted in the change of radiosensitivity in NPCs. PMID:22096476

  4. p21CDKN1A Regulates the Binding of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 to DNA Repair Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Tillhon, Micol; Cazzalini, Ornella; Stivala, Lucia A.; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Lavrik, Olga; Prosperi, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle inhibitor p21CDKN1A was previously found to interact directly with DNA nick-sensor poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and to promote base excision repair (BER). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this BER-related association of p21 with PARP-1 remains to be clarified. In this study we investigate the capability of p21 to influence PARP-1 binding to DNA repair intermediates in a reconstituted BER system in vitro. Using model photoreactive BER substrates containing single-strand breaks, we found that full-length recombinant GST-tagged p21 but not a C-terminal domain truncated form of p21 was able to stimulate the PARP-1 binding to BER intermediates with no significant influence on the catalytic activity of PARP-1. In addition, we investigate whether the activation of PARP-1 through poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) synthesis, is required for its interaction with p21. We have found that in human fibroblasts and in HeLa cells treated with the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), the interaction of p21 with PARP-1 was greatly dependent on PAR synthesis. In fact, an anti-PAR antibody was able to co-immunoprecipitate p21 and PARP-1 from extracts of MNNG-treated cells, while blocking PAR synthesis with the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib, drastically reduced the amount of p21 co-immunoprecipitated by a PARP-1 antibody. Our results provide the first evidence that p21 can stimulate the binding of PARP-1 to DNA repair intermediates, and that this cooperation requires PAR synthesis. PMID:26730949

  5. Assessment of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks for regional teleradiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Valentino, Daniel J.; Grant, Edward G.; Rahbar, Darius; Kiszonas, Mike; Franco, Ricky; Shimabuku, Guy H.; Hagan, Girish T.; Melany, Michelle; Narin, Sherelle L.; Ragavendra, Nagesh

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ATM network capabilities on the clinical practice of regional teleradiology, by providing immediate interactive radiology consultations between subspecialists and general radiologists at affiliated academic institutions. PACS installed at three affiliated hospitals (UCLA Medical Center, West LA VAMC and UCLA Olive-View Medical Centers) were connected via an ATM network. Two commercial PACS (Agfa) systems, one at the VAMC and one in an ultrasound outpatient clinic at UCLA were connected via ATM switches (Newbridge, Inc.) and a Santa Monica GTE central office switch. We evaluated this initial system configuration and measured image transfer performance, including memory-to-memory, disk-to-disk, disk-to-archive with and without DICOM protocols. Although the memory-to-memory data rate was 25 Mbps, the average remote disk-to-disk image transfer performance, using DICOM 3.0 communications protocols on SUN SPARCstation 10 servers, was 3 to 5 Mbps. Using these capabilities, timely interactive subspecialty consultations between radiologists was successfully performed while both were at different physical locations. We present the use of ATM technology in a realistic clinical environment and evaluate its impact on patient care and clinical teaching within the radiology departments of 2 institutions. Image communications over a regional PACS using an ATM network can allow interactive consultations between different subspecialist and general radiologists or other specialized radiologist spread over three different medical centers.

  6. Snowfall Rate Retrieval using NPP ATMS Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua; Zhao, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2014). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The ATMS SFR product is validated against radar and gauge snowfall data and shows that the ATMS algorithm outperforms the AMSU/MHS SFR.

  7. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Tim J.; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J.

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  8. A simulation study of TCP performance in ATM networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chien Fang; Chen, Helen; Hutchins, J.

    1994-08-01

    This paper presents a simulation study of TCP performance over congested ATM local area networks. We simulated a variety of schemes for congestion control for ATM LANs, including a simple cell-drop, a credit-based flow control scheme that back-pressures individual VC`s, and two selective cell-drop schemes. Our simulation results for congested ATM LANs show the following: (1) TCP performance is poor under simple cell-drop, (2) the selective cell-drop schemes increase effective link utilization and result in higher TCP throughputs than the simple cell-drop scheme, and (3) the credit-based flow control scheme eliminates cell loss and achieves maximum performance and effective link utilization.

  9. Scalable end-to-end ATM encryption test results

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.

    1995-10-01

    Customers of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) services may need a variety of data authenticity and privacy assurances. Cryptographic methods can be used to assure authenticity and privacy, but are hard to scale for implementation at high speed. The incorporation of these methods into computer networks can severely impact functionality, reliability, and performance. To study these trade-offs, a prototype encryptor/decryptor was developed. This effort demonstrated the viability of implementing certain encryption techniques in high speed networks. The research prototype processes ATM cells in a SONET OC-3 payload. This paper describes the functionality, reliability, security, and performance design trade-offs investigated with the prototype.

  10. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion differentially activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and Bax to induce nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kay L H; Hsu, Chin; Chan, Julie Y H

    2009-07-01

    We reported previously that complete spinal cord transection (SCT) results in depression of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity that triggers apoptosis via sequential activations of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)- and caspase-dependent cascades in the injured spinal cord. This study tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion (O(2)(.-)) serve as the interposing signals between SCT and impaired mitochondrial respiratory functions. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats manifested a significant increase in NO or O(2)(.-) level in the injured spinal cord during the first 3 days after SCT. The augmented O(2)(.-) production, along with concomitant reduction in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity or ATP level, nuclear translocation of AIF, cytosolic release of cytochrome c, and DNA fragmentation were reversed by osmotic minipump infusion of a NO trapping agent, carboxy-PTIO, or a superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, into the epicenter of the transected spinal cord. Intriguingly, carboxy-PTIO significantly suppressed upregulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in the nucleus, attenuated nuclear translocation of AIF, inhibited mitochondrial translocation of Bax and antagonized mitochondrial release of cytochrome c; whereas tempol only inhibited the later two cellular events after SCT. We conclude that overproduction of NO and O(2)(.-) in the injured spinal cord promulgates mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers AIF- and caspase-dependent apoptotic signaling cascades via differential upregulation of nuclear PARP-1 and mitochondrial translocation of Bax. PMID:19473058

  11. Transition in Survival From Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity to Increased Radioresistance Is Independent of Activation of ATM SER1981 Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Sarah A.; Collis, Spencer J.; Joiner, Michael C.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The molecular basis of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the roles of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activity and the downstream ATM-dependent G{sub 2}-phase cell cycle checkpoint in overcoming HRS and triggering radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Survival was measured using a high-resolution clonogenic assay. ATM Ser1981 activation was measured by Western blotting. The role of ATM was determined in survival experiments after molecular (siRNA) and chemical (0.4 mM caffeine) inhibition and chemical (20 {mu}g/mL chloroquine, 15 {mu}M genistein) activation 4-6 h before irradiation. Checkpoint responsiveness was assessed in eight cell lines of differing HRS status using flow cytometry to quantify the progression of irradiated (0-2 Gy) G{sub 2}-phase cells entering mitosis, using histone H3 phosphorylation analysis. Results: The dose-response pattern of ATM activation was concordant with the transition from HRS to radioresistance. However, ATM activation did not play a primary role in initiating increased radioresistance. Rather, a relationship was discovered between the function of the downstream ATM-dependent early G{sub 2}-phase checkpoint and the prevalence and overcoming of HRS. Four cell lines that exhibited HRS failed to show low-dose (<0.3-Gy) checkpoint function. In contrast, four HRS-negative cell lines exhibited immediate cell cycle arrest for the entire 0-2-Gy dose range. Conclusion: Overcoming HRS is reliant on the function of the early G{sub 2}-phase checkpoint. These data suggest that clinical exploitation of HRS could be achieved by combining radiotherapy with chemotherapeutic agents that modulate this cell cycle checkpoint.

  12. Targeting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling restores subventricular zone neural stem cells and corrects neuromotor deficits in Atm knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesun; Wong, Paul K Y

    2012-07-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a progressive degenerative disorder that results in major neurological disability. In A-T patients, necropsy has revealed atrophy of cerebellar cortical layers along with Purkinje and granular cell loss. We have previously identified an oxidative stress-mediated increase in phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the resultant downregulation of Bmi-1 and upregulation of p21 as key components of the mechanism causing defective proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of Atm(-/-) mice. However, the in vivo aspect of alteration in SVZ tissue and the functional significance of p38MAPK activation in NSCs for neuropathogenesis of ATM deficiency remain unknown. Here we show that the NSC population was abnormally decreased in the SVZ of 3-month-old Atm(-/-) mice; this decrease was accompanied by p38MAPK activation. However, after a 2-month treatment with the p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580, starting at 1 month old, Atm(-/-) mice showed restoration of normal levels of Bmi-1 and p21 with the rescue of NSC population in the SVZ. In addition, treated Atm(-/-) mice exhibited more Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Most importantly, motor coordination of Atm(-/-) mice was significantly improved in the treatment group. Our results show for the first time in vivo evidence of depleted NSCs in the SVZ of Atm(-/-) mice and also demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of p38MAPK signaling has the potential to treat neurological defects of A-T. This study provides a promising approach targeting the oxidative stress-dependent p38 signaling pathway not only for A-T but also for other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23197859

  13. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 is the ionizing radiation-activated p53 serine 46 kinase and is regulated by ATM.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Ilka; Krüger, Jana; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2007-03-01

    Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46) is important to activate the apoptotic program. The protein kinase that phosphorylates p53 Ser(46) in response to DNA double-strand breaks is currently unknown. The identification of this kinase is of particular interest because it may contribute to the outcome of cancer therapy. Here, we report that ionizing radiation (IR) provokes homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) accumulation, activation, and complex formation with p53. IR-induced HIPK2 up-regulation strictly correlates with p53 Ser(46) phosphorylation. Down-regulation of HIPK2 by RNA interference specifically inhibits IR-induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46). Moreover, we show that HIPK2 activation after IR is regulated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Cells from ataxia telangiectasia patients show defects in HIPK2 accumulation. Concordantly, IR-induced HIPK2 accumulation is blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of ATM. Furthermore, ATM down-regulation by RNA interference inhibited IR-induced HIPK2 accumulation, whereas checkpoint kinase 2 deficiency showed no effect. Taken together, our findings indicate that HIPK2 is the IR-activated p53 Ser(46) kinase and is regulated by ATM. PMID:17332358

  14. Skylab ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer observations versus solar flare activity: An event compilation. [tables (data)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An event compilation is presented which correlates ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer solar observations with solar flare activity. Approximately 1,070 h of pulse height analyzed X-ray proportional counter data were obtained with the X-ray event analyzer during Skylab. During its operation, 449 flares (including 343 flare peaks) were observed. Seventy events of peak X-ray emission or = Cl were simultaneously observed by ground based telescopes, SOLRAD 9 and/or Vela, and the X-ray event analyzer. These events were observed from preflare through flare rise to peak and through flare decline.

  15. Mutant IDH1 Downregulates ATM and Alters DNA Repair and Sensitivity to DNA Damage Independent of TET2.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y; Tseng, Alan; Beerman, Isabel; Elia, Andrew J; Bendall, Sean C; Lemonnier, François; Kron, Ken J; Cescon, David W; Hao, Zhenyue; Lind, Evan F; Takayama, Naoya; Planello, Aline C; Shen, Shu Yi; Shih, Alan H; Larsen, Dana M; Li, Qinxi; Snow, Bryan E; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Gorrini, Chiara; Bassi, Christian; Thu, Kelsie L; Murakami, Kiichi; Elford, Alisha R; Ueda, Takeshi; Straley, Kimberly; Yen, Katharine E; Melino, Gerry; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Levine, Ross L; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Lupien, Mathieu; Rossi, Derrick J; Nolan, Garry P; Cairns, Rob A; Mak, Tak W

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1) are common drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but their mechanism is not fully understood. It is thought that IDH1 mutants act by inhibiting TET2 to alter DNA methylation, but there are significant unexplained clinical differences between IDH1- and TET2-mutant diseases. We have discovered that mice expressing endogenous mutant IDH1 have reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), in contrast to Tet2 knockout (TET2-KO) mice. Mutant IDH1 downregulates the DNA damage (DD) sensor ATM by altering histone methylation, leading to impaired DNA repair, increased sensitivity to DD, and reduced HSC self-renewal, independent of TET2. ATM expression is also decreased in human IDH1-mutated AML. These findings may have implications for treatment of IDH-mutant leukemia. PMID:27424808

  16. Using ATM over hybrid fiber-coax networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Mark

    1995-11-01

    Cable TV companies and regional Bell operating companies, e.g. PacBell, are preparing for the future by installing or rebuilding existing all-coaxial cable plants into hybrid-fiber coaxial plants and by offering a wide range of interactive services which they feel will be most attractive to their subscriber base. These new-to-cable services span a wide range of performance attributes, each placing its own demands on the capabilities of the broadband bearer service system. These services include, but are not limited to: video-on-demand, digital video, video telephony, voice telephony, and a suite of interactive digital data services ranging from traditional Internet and information service access (e.g., Compuserve and Prodigy) to multi-player gaming. The future broadband infrastructure challenge can be met by developing a novel family of integrated bearer service products which communicate using asynchronous transfer mode protocols over the cable TV network. This paper summarizes the ATM over HFC definition work taking place in the ATM Forum's Residential Broadband Working Group and the standards progress in the IEEE P802.14 Cable TV Media Access Control and Physical Protocol Working Group. Finally, an example of bridging Ethernet packets over ATM over HFC is discussed. This paper focuses on the aspects of ATM and the MAC layer and does not detail the rf or physical environment.

  17. The ATM signaling network in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Stracker, Travis H.; Roig, Ignasi; Knobel, Philip A.; Marjanović, Marko

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism, and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence (Jackson and Bartek, 2009). DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent one of the most cytotoxic DNA lesions and defects in their metabolism underlie many human hereditary diseases characterized by genomic instability (Stracker and Petrini, 2011; McKinnon, 2012). Patients with hereditary defects in the DDR display defects in development, particularly affecting the central nervous system, the immune system and the germline, as well as aberrant metabolic regulation and cancer predisposition. Central to the DDR to DSBs is the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a master controller of signal transduction. Understanding how ATM signaling regulates various aspects of the DDR and its roles in vivo is critical for our understanding of human disease, its diagnosis and its treatment. This review will describe the general roles of ATM signaling and highlight some recent advances that have shed light on the diverse roles of ATM and related proteins in human disease. PMID:23532176

  18. Self-healing ATM network based on multilink principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlandegem, Thierry; Vankwikelberge, Patrick; Vanderstreaten, Hans

    1994-01-01

    Self-healing is the ability of a network to reconfigure itself around failures such that calls in progress are not dropped and suffer of no almost no degradation in quality of service. Providing self-healing capabilities in all parts of the future ATM network in a cost effective way is therefore a key challenge. In this paper a new self-healing method based on the multilink concept is presented for dedicated parts of the ATM network, such as, for instance, feeder networks. In the multilink concept that is proposed here, the cells of an ATM connection carried by a multilink are distributed over several physical links. If a physical link supporting the multilink fails, the cells will be distributed among the remaining physical links thus providing self-healing capacity. In this way the quality of service can be maintained at the expense of a higher load on the remaining physical links. The speed of restoration only realize on the detection and signaling of the failure since spare capacity is available on the very multilink. The sharing of spare capacity in addition to the statistical multiplexing gain provides a cost effective self-healing method and leads to a simplified network resource management. The proposed multilink concept is based on extension of the multipath self-routing concept, which is currently applied by Alcatel in its ATM switching fabric.

  19. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material--ATM-104

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material 104 (ATM-104), which is spent fuel from Assembly DO47 of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1), a pressurized-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-104 consists of 128 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 42 MWd/kgM and expected fission gas release of about 1%. A variety of analyses were performed to investigate cladding characteristics, radionuclide inventory, and redistribution of fission products. Characterization data include (1) fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling history; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) and electron probe microanalyses (EPMA); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding.

  20. Observing and recording instantaneous images on ATM television monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, N. P.; Delamere, W. A.; Tousey, R.

    1977-01-01

    A persistent image-converter device was utilized to make visible to the astronaut solar images that were isolated, instantaneous flashes on the ATM TV monitors. In addition, these instantaneous images, as well as normal TV images, were recorded with a Polaroid SX-70 camera for study by the astronauts.

  1. HIPPI, Fibre Channel, and ATM as gigabit/s LANs

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.

    1993-12-31

    Computer networks that operate in the gigabit per second speed range are becoming very important for interconnecting supercomputers and other high end equipment. Some trends and applications are examined and criteria for selecting an interconnection technology are developed. HIPPI is the current interface of choice, while Fibre Channel and ATM are emerging standards. These systems are examined as to their backgrounds, advantages, and shortcomings.

  2. Gigabit LAN issues: HIPPI, Fibre Channel, or ATM?

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.

    1994-12-01

    Computer networks that operate in the gigabit per second speed range are becoming very important for interconnecting supercomputers, clusters of workstations, and other high end equipment. HIPPI is the current interface of choice, while Fibre Channel and ATM are emerging standards. These systems are examined as to their backgrounds, advantages, and shortcomings.

  3. Adaptive Restoration of Airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect

    D. Yuan; E. Doak; P. Guss; A. Will

    2002-01-01

    To incorporate the georegistration and restoration processes into airborne data processing in support of U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear emergency response task, we developed an adaptive restoration filter for airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM thermal data based on the Wiener filtering theory. Preliminary assessment shows that this filter enhances the detectability of small weak thermal anomalies in AADS1268 thermal images.

  4. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  5. Performance evaluation of response time in ATM LANs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Brandt, J.

    1995-12-11

    This contribution compares the response-time performance of ATM LANs using ABR EFCI, UBR FIFO, and UBR with per VC queuing switches. Our study is based on experimental as well as simulation results. We found that, with or without congestion, UBR switches with per VC queuing provide the best response times.

  6. Comparison of congestion controls for data services on ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yonshik; Campbell, Graham

    1999-11-01

    The Internet consists of a network of networks. Internet users and service provides want to provide and receive multiple services. The legacy networks till now have provided narrow bandwidth that has restricted the range of services. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) can simultaneously deliver multiple services over one network and today ATM has become a component of the Internet. An ATM switch can deliver current Internet data using UBR or ABR services. Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) using AAL5 is the most common offering these days for data transport. Because UBR does not guarantee any QoS categories and it is a `best effort' service, cell-discarding protocols must coexist. Congestion control is always a host topic for data networks. In data networks many flow mechanisms to resolve network congestion have been proposed. Cell loss is one of the most important and critical categories for traffic management of data networking. We compare the well-known Early Packet Discard for UBR with Quantum Flow Control for ABR services with TCP over ATM. Simulation results are provided that allow a comparison of both techniques.

  7. U-View: Student Access to Information Using ATMs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springfield, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of Boston College's system allowing students to display and print their campus records at automated teller machines (ATMs) around the institution looks at the system's evolution, current operations, human factors affecting system design and operation, shared responsibility, campus acceptance, future enhancements, and cost…

  8. High-performance testbed network with ATM technology for neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. K.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Dillon, William P.; Lou, Shyhliang A.; Bazzill, Todd M.; Wong, Albert W. K.; Gould, Robert G.

    1995-05-01

    Today's teleradiology transmits images with telephone lines (from 14400 to 1.5 Mbits/sec). However, the large amount of data commonly produced during an MR or CT procedure can limit some applications of teleradiology. This paper is a progress report of a high speed (155 Mbits/sec) testbed teleradiology network using asynchronous transfer mode (ATM OC 3) technology for neuroradiology. The network connects radiology departments of four affiliated hospitals and one MR imaging center within the San Francisco Bay Area with ATM switches through the Pacific Bell ATM main switch at Oakland, California; they are: University of California at San Francisco Hospital and Medical School (UCSF), Mt. Zion Hospital (MZH), San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC), San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH), and San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Imaging Center (SFMRC). UCSF serves as the expert center and the ATM switch is connected to its PACS infrastructure, the others are considered as satellite sites. Images and related patient data are transmitted from the four satellite sites to the expert canter for interpretation and consultation.

  9. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals That Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression through EZH2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kayla A; Cesaroni, Matteo; Denny, Michael F; Lupey, Lena N; Tempera, Italo

    2015-12-01

    Posttranslational modifications, such as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), regulate chromatin-modifying enzymes, ultimately affecting gene expression. This study explores the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) on global gene expression in a lymphoblastoid B cell line. We found that inhibition of PARP catalytic activity with olaparib resulted in global gene deregulation, affecting approximately 11% of the genes expressed. Gene ontology analysis revealed that PARP could exert these effects through transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling enzymes, including the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2. EZH2 mediates the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), a modification associated with chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Both pharmacological inhibition of PARP and knockdown of PARP1 induced the expression of EZH2, which resulted in increased global H3K27me3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that PARP1 inhibition led to H3K27me3 deposition at EZH2 target genes, which resulted in gene silencing. Moreover, increased EZH2 expression is attributed to the loss of the occupancy of the transcription repressor E2F4 at the EZH2 promoter following PARP inhibition. Together, these data show that PARP plays an important role in global gene regulation and identifies for the first time a direct role of PARP1 in regulating the expression and function of EZH2. PMID:26370511

  10. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals That Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression through EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kayla A.; Cesaroni, Matteo; Denny, Michael F.; Lupey, Lena N.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications, such as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), regulate chromatin-modifying enzymes, ultimately affecting gene expression. This study explores the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) on global gene expression in a lymphoblastoid B cell line. We found that inhibition of PARP catalytic activity with olaparib resulted in global gene deregulation, affecting approximately 11% of the genes expressed. Gene ontology analysis revealed that PARP could exert these effects through transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling enzymes, including the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2. EZH2 mediates the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), a modification associated with chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Both pharmacological inhibition of PARP and knockdown of PARP1 induced the expression of EZH2, which resulted in increased global H3K27me3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that PARP1 inhibition led to H3K27me3 deposition at EZH2 target genes, which resulted in gene silencing. Moreover, increased EZH2 expression is attributed to the loss of the occupancy of the transcription repressor E2F4 at the EZH2 promoter following PARP inhibition. Together, these data show that PARP plays an important role in global gene regulation and identifies for the first time a direct role of PARP1 in regulating the expression and function of EZH2. PMID:26370511

  11. Delivery of very high bandwidth with ATM switches and SONET

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, S.A.

    1992-10-01

    The choice of technologies for the delivery of very high bandwidth throughout a facility capable of ultimately achieving gigabits per second performance, is a crucial one for any high technology facility. The components of a high bandwidth delivery system include high performance sources and sinks in the form of central facilities (major mainframes, large file storage and specialized peripherals) and powerful, full bandwidth distributed local area networks (LANs). In order to deliver bandwidth among the sources and sinks, a ubiquitous inter-/intra-building cable plant consisting of single mode and multimode fiber as well as twisted pair copper is required. The selection of the ``glue`` to transport and interconnect the LANs with the central facility over the pervasive cable plant is the focus of this paper. A design philosophy for high performance communications systems is proposed. A description of the traditional problems that must be overcome to provide very high bandwidth beyond the narrow confines of a computer center is given. The advantages of ATM switching and SONET physical transport are explored in the structured design presentation. The applicability of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching (interconnection) and Synchronous Optical NETwork (SONET) (transport) for high bandwidth delivery is described using the environment and requirements of Sandia National Laboratories as a context to examine the suitability of those technologies. The synergy and utility of ATM and SONET in the campus network are explored. Other methods for distributing high data rates are compared and contrasted to ATM and SONET with respect to cable plant impact, reliability/availability, maintainability, and capacity. Sandia is implementing a standards based foundation utilizing a pervasive single mode fiber cable plant, SONET transport, and ATM switching to meet the goals of gigabit networking.

  12. ATM is required for rapid degradation of cyclin D1 in response to {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Dong Wan; Baek, Hye Jung; Motoyama, Noboru; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-01-23

    The cellular response to DNA damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation activates cell-cycle arrest to permit DNA repair and to prevent replication. Cyclin D1 is the key molecule for transition between the G1 and S phases of the cell-cycle, and amplification or overexpression of cyclin D1 plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers. To study the regulation of cyclin D1 in the DNA-damaged condition, we analyzed the proteolytic regulation of cyclin D1 expression upon {gamma}-irradiation. Upon {gamma}-irradiation, a rapid reduction in cyclin D1 levels was observed prior to p53 stabilization, indicating that the stability of cyclin D1 is controlled in a p53-independent manner. Further analysis revealed that irradiation facilitated ubiquitination of cyclin D1 and that a proteasome inhibitor blocked cyclin D1 degradation under the same conditions. Interestingly, after mutation of threonine residue 286 of cyclin D1, which is reported to be the GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation site, the mutant protein showed resistance to irradiation-induced proteolysis although inhibitors of GSK-3{beta} failed to prevent cyclin D1 degradation. Rather, ATM inhibition markedly prevented cyclin D1 degradation induced by {gamma}-irradiation. Our data indicate that communication between ATM and cyclin D1 may be required for maintenance of genomic integrity achieved by rapid arrest of the cell-cycle, and that disruption of this crosstalk may increase susceptibility to cancer.

  13. Control of HIPK2 stability by ubiquitin ligase Siah-1 and checkpoint kinases ATM and ATR.

    PubMed

    Winter, Melanie; Sombroek, Dirk; Dauth, Ilka; Moehlenbrink, Jutta; Scheuermann, Karin; Crone, Johanna; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2008-07-01

    The tumour suppressor HIPK2 is an important regulator of cell death induced by DNA damage, but how its activity is regulated remains largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that HIPK2 is an unstable protein that colocalizes and interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah-1 in unstressed cells. Siah-1 knockdown increases HIPK2 stability and steady-state levels, whereas Siah-1 expression facilitates HIPK2 polyubiquitination, degradation and thereby inactivation. During recovery from sublethal DNA damage, HIPK2, which is stabilized on DNA damage, is degraded through a Siah-1-dependent, p53-controlled pathway. Downregulation of Siah-1 inhibits HIPK2 degradation and recovery from damage, driving the cells into apoptosis. We have also demonstrated that DNA damage triggers disruption of the HIPK2-Siah-1 complex, resulting in HIPK2 stabilization and activation. Disruption of the HIPK2-Siah-1 complex is mediated by the ATM/ATR pathway and involves ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of Siah-1 at Ser 19. Our results provide a molecular framework for HIPK2 regulation in unstressed and damaged cells. PMID:18536714

  14. The Relationships between Selected Organizational Variables and ATM Technology Adoption in Campus Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Engui

    1998-01-01

    Determines the relationships between ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) adoption and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information-processing maturity. Identifies the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking in the United States. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  15. Delivery of very high bandwidth with ATM switches and SONET. [Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Synchronous Optical NETwork (SONET)

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, S.A.

    1992-10-01

    The choice of technologies for the delivery of very high bandwidth throughout a facility capable of ultimately achieving gigabits per second performance, is a crucial one for any high technology facility. The components of a high bandwidth delivery system include high performance sources and sinks in the form of central facilities (major mainframes, large file storage and specialized peripherals) and powerful, full bandwidth distributed local area networks (LANs). In order to deliver bandwidth among the sources and sinks, a ubiquitous inter-/intra-building cable plant consisting of single mode and multimode fiber as well as twisted pair copper is required. The selection of the glue'' to transport and interconnect the LANs with the central facility over the pervasive cable plant is the focus of this paper. A design philosophy for high performance communications systems is proposed. A description of the traditional problems that must be overcome to provide very high bandwidth beyond the narrow confines of a computer center is given. The advantages of ATM switching and SONET physical transport are explored in the structured design presentation. The applicability of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching (interconnection) and Synchronous Optical NETwork (SONET) (transport) for high bandwidth delivery is described using the environment and requirements of Sandia National Laboratories as a context to examine the suitability of those technologies. The synergy and utility of ATM and SONET in the campus network are explored. Other methods for distributing high data rates are compared and contrasted to ATM and SONET with respect to cable plant impact, reliability/availability, maintainability, and capacity. Sandia is implementing a standards based foundation utilizing a pervasive single mode fiber cable plant, SONET transport, and ATM switching to meet the goals of gigabit networking.

  16. Identification of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 as the OXPHOS-generated ATP sensor of nuclei of animal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kun, Ernest Kirsten, Eva; Hakam, Alaeddin; Bauer, Pal I.; Mendeleyev, Jerome

    2008-02-08

    Our results show that in the intact normal animal cell mitochondrial ATP is directly connected to nuclear PARP-1 by way of a specific adenylate kinase enzymatic path. This mechanism is demonstrated in two models: (a) by its inhibition with a specific inhibitor of adenylate kinase, and (b) by disruption of ATP synthesis through uncoupling of OXPHOS. In each instance the de-inhibited PARP-1 is quantitatively determined by enzyme kinetics. The nuclear binding site of PARP-1 is Topo I, and is identified as a critical 'switchpoint' indicating the nuclear element that connects OXPHOS with mRNA synthesis in real time. The mitochondrial-nuclear PARP-1 pathway is not operative in cancer cells.

  17. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits antitumoral activity in mouse models of MLL-rearranged AML.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Day, Amanda; Murga, Matilde; Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Among the various subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies because of an attenuated response by p53, a protein that induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AML(MLL) cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AML(MLL) and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AML(MLL) mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR or ATM inhibition represent potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias. PMID:27625305

  18. Synthesis and SAR of novel tricyclic quinoxalinone inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashiro, Julie; Woods, Keith W.; Park, Chang H.; Liu, Xuesong; Shi, Yan; Johnson, Eric F.; Bouska, Jennifer J.; Olson, Amanda M.; Luo, Yan; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Giranda, Vincent L.; Penning, Thomas D.

    2010-09-03

    Based on screening hit 1, a series of tricyclic quinoxalinones have been designed and evaluated for inhibition of PARP-1. Substitutions at the 7- and 8-positions of the quinoxalinone ring led to a number of compounds with good enzymatic and cellular potency. The tricyclic quinoxalinone class is sensitive to modifications of both the amine substituent and the tricyclic core. The synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies are presented.

  19. Radiosensitization of Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo through Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibition with ABT-888

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew J.; Reyes, Juvenal; Armour, Michael; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1/2 (PARP-1/2) inhibition enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo, and the mechanism by which this occurs. Methods Pancreatic carcinoma cells were treated with ABT-888, radiation, or both. In vitro cell viability, apoptosis, and PARP activity were measured. Orthotopic xenografts were generated in athymic mice and treated with ABT-888 (25 mg/kg), radiation (5 Gy), both, or no treatment. Mice were monitored with bioluminescence imaging. RESULTS In vitro, treatment with ABT-888 and radiation led to higher rates of cell death after 8 days (P < .01). Co-treatment with 5 Gy and 1, 10 or 100 μmol/l of ABT-888 led to dose enhancement factors of 1.29, 1.41 and 2.36, respectively. Caspase activity was not significantly increased when treated with ABT-888 (10 μmol/l) alone (1.28-fold, P = .08), but became significant when radiation was added (2.03-fold, P < .01). PARP activity increased post-radiation and was abrogated following co-treatment with ABT-888. In vivo, treatment with ABT-888, radiation or both led to tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of 8, 30 and 39 days, and survival at 60 days of 0%, 0% and 40%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS ABT-888 with radiation significantly enhanced tumor response in vitro and in vivo. ABT-888 inhibited PAR protein polymerization resulting in dose-dependent feedback up-regulation of PARP and p-ATM suggesting increased DNA damage. This translated into enhancement in TGI and survival with radiation in vivo. In vitro PAR levels correlated with levels of tumor apoptosis suggesting potential as a predictive biomarker. These data are being used to support a Phase I study in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:24836647

  20. Application of Computer Simulation to Teach ATM Access to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Daniel K.; Stock, Steven E.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates use of computer simulation for teaching ATM use to adults with intellectual disabilities. ATM-SIM is a computer-based trainer used for teaching individuals with intellectual disabilities how to use an automated teller machine (ATM) to access their personal bank accounts. In the pilot evaluation, a prototype system was…

  1. Discovery and Structure–Activity Relationship of Novel 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran-7-carboxamide and 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran-3(2H)-one-7-carboxamide Derivatives as Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Novel substituted 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-7-carboxamide (DHBF-7-carboxamide) and 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-3(2H)-one-7-carboxamide (DHBF-3-one-7-carboxamide) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). A structure-based design strategy resulted in lead compound 3 (DHBF-7-carboxamide; IC50 = 9.45 μM). To facilitate synthetically feasible derivatives, an alternative core was designed, DHBF-3-one-7-carboxamide (36, IC50 = 16.2 μM). The electrophilic 2-position of this scaffold was accessible for extended modifications. Substituted benzylidene derivatives at the 2-position were found to be the most potent, with 3′,4′-dihydroxybenzylidene 58 (IC50 = 0.531 μM) showing a 30-fold improvement in potency. Various heterocycles attached at the 4′-hydroxyl/4′-amino of the benzylidene moiety resulted in significant improvement in inhibition of PARP-1 activity (e.g., compounds 66–68, 70, 72, and 73; IC50 values from 0.718 to 0.079 μM). Compound 66 showed selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient DT40 cells. Crystal structures of three inhibitors (compounds (−)-13c, 59, and 65) bound to a multidomain PARP-1 structure were obtained, providing insights into further development of these inhibitors. PMID:24922587

  2. ATM germline heterozygosity does not play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia initiation but influences rapid disease progression through loss of the remaining ATM allele

    PubMed Central

    Skowronska, Anna; Austen, Belinda; Powell, Judith E.; Weston, Victoria; Oscier, David G.; Dyer, Martin J.S.; Matutes, Estella; Pratt, Guy; Fegan, Christopher; Moss, Paul; Taylor, Malcolm A.; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia patients, with constitutional bi-allelic ATM mutations, have a marked risk of lymphoid tumors and ATM mutation carriers have a smaller risk of cancer. Sporadic ATM mutations occur in 10–20% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and are often associated with chromosome 11q deletions which cause loss of an ATM allele. The role of constitutional ATM mutations in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia is unknown. Here we investigated the frequency of constitutional ATM mutations in either of two chronic lymphocytic leukemia cohorts, those with and without a chromosome 11q deletion. We found that in comparison to controls, constitutional pathogenic ATM mutations were increased in patients with chromosome 11q deletions (6 of 140 vs. 0 of 281, P=0.001) but not in those without 11q deletions (2 of 178 vs. 0 of 281, P=0.15). These results suggest that ATM germline heterozygosity does not play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia initiation but rather influences rapid disease progression through ATM loss. PMID:21933854

  3. Molecular Characterization and Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis Class VIII Myosin, ATM1*

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Takeshi; Tominaga, Motoki; Matsumoto, Rie; Sato, Kei; Nakano, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Ito, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    Land plants possess myosin classes VIII and XI. Although some information is available on the molecular properties of class XI myosins, class VIII myosins are not characterized. Here, we report the first analysis of the enzymatic properties of class VIII myosin. The motor domain of Arabidopsis class VIII myosin, ATM1 (ATM1-MD), and the motor domain plus one IQ motif (ATM1-1IQ) were expressed in a baculovirus system and characterized. ATM1-MD and ATM1-1IQ had low actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity (Vmax = 4 s−1), although their affinities for actin were high (Kactin = 4 μm). The actin-sliding velocities of ATM1-MD and ATM1-1IQ were 0.02 and 0.089 μm/s, respectively, from which the value for full-length ATM1 is calculated to be ∼0.2 μm/s. The results of actin co-sedimentation assay showed that the duty ratio of ATM1 was ∼90%. ADP dissociation from the actin·ATM1 complex (acto-ATM1) was extremely slow, which accounts for the low actin-sliding velocity, low actin-activated ATPase activity, and high duty ratio. The rate of ADP dissociation from acto-ATM1 was markedly biphasic with fast and slow phase rates (5.1 and 0.41 s−1, respectively). Physiological concentrations of free Mg2+ modulated actin-sliding velocity and actin-activated ATPase activity by changing the rate of ADP dissociation from acto-ATM1. GFP-fused full-length ATM1 expressed in Arabidopsis was localized to plasmodesmata, plastids, newly formed cell walls, and actin filaments at the cell cortex. Our results suggest that ATM1 functions as a tension sensor/generator at the cell cortex and other structures in Arabidopsis. PMID:24637024

  4. Alterations in cellular energy metabolism associated with the antiproliferative effects of the ATM inhibitor KU-55933 and with metformin.

    PubMed

    Zakikhani, Mahvash; Bazile, Miguel; Hashemi, Sina; Javeshghani, Shiva; Avizonis, Daina; St Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AMPK activation, glucose uptake and lactate production while reducing mitochondrial membrane potential and coupled respiration. The stimulation of glycolysis by KU-55933 did not fully compensate for the reduction in mitochondrial functions, leading to decreased cellular ATP levels and energy stress. These actions are similar to those previously described for the biguanide metformin, a partial inhibitor of respiratory complex I. Both compounds decreased mitochondrial coupled respiration and reduced cellular concentrations of fumarate, malate, citrate, and alpha-ketogluterate. Succinate levels were increased by KU-55933 levels and decreased by metformin, indicating that the effects of ATM inhibition and metformin are not identical. These observations suggest a role for ATM in mitochondrial function and show that both KU-55933 and metformin perturb the TCA cycle as well as oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23185347

  5. Alterations in Cellular Energy Metabolism Associated with the Antiproliferative Effects of the ATM Inhibitor KU-55933 and with Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Zakikhani, Mahvash; Bazile, Miguel; Hashemi, Sina; Javeshghani, Shiva; Avizonis, Daina; Pierre, Julie St; Pollak, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AMPK activation, glucose uptake and lactate production while reducing mitochondrial membrane potential and coupled respiration. The stimulation of glycolysis by KU-55933 did not fully compensate for the reduction in mitochondrial functions, leading to decreased cellular ATP levels and energy stress. These actions are similar to those previously described for the biguanide metformin, a partial inhibitor of respiratory complex I. Both compounds decreased mitochondrial coupled respiration and reduced cellular concentrations of fumarate, malate, citrate, and alpha-ketogluterate. Succinate levels were increased by KU-55933 levels and decreased by metformin, indicating that the effects of ATM inhibition and metformin are not identical. These observations suggest a role for ATM in mitochondrial function and show that both KU-55933 and metformin perturb the TCA cycle as well as oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23185347

  6. Quercetin reduces obesity-associated ATM infiltration and inflammation in mice: a mechanism including AMPKα1/SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Lei; Bian, Hui-Xi; Xu, Na; Bao, Bin; Liu, Jian

    2014-03-01

    Adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) plays a central role in obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid, possesses anti-inflammation and anti-insulin resistance properties. However, it is unclear whether quercetin can alleviate high-fat diet (HFD)-induced ATM infiltration and inflammation in mice. In this study, 5-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed low-fat diet, HFD, or HFD with 0.l% quercetin for 12 weeks, respectively. Dietary quercetin reduced HFD-induced body weight gain and improved insulin sensitivity and glucose intolerance in mice. Meanwhile, dietary quercetin enhanced glucose transporter 4 translocation and protein kinase B signal in epididymis adipose tissues (EATs), suggesting that it heightened glucose uptake in adipose tissues. Histological and real-time PCR analysis revealed that quercetin attenuated mast cell and macrophage infiltration into EATs in HFD-fed mice. Dietary quercetin also modified the phenotype ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, lowered the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and enhanced adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α1 phosphorylation and silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) expression in EATs. Further, using AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β4-ribofuranoside and inhibitor Compound C, we found that quercetin inhibited polarization and inflammation of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages through an AMPKα1/SIRT1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, dietary quercetin might suppress ATM infiltration and inflammation through the AMPKα1/SIRT1 pathway in HFD-fed mice. PMID:24465016

  7. Digital Coin Business Model Using the Coin ATM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Won-Gyo; Park, Sang-Sung; Shin, Young-Geun; Jang, Dong-Sik

    2009-08-01

    Because about 83.6 billion won worth coins are not collected annually, 35 billion won of government money is being wasted for producing new coins in Korea. In order to improve unnecessary government money leakage, we now have to develop a proper way of managing small valued money such as coins. We have already developed the coin ATM to solve such problem in the previous study. In this study, we proposed business model, which enables users to deposit or consume such small amount of money with the coin ATM. The proposed business model has advantages that enable to connect various payment system and is efficient to consume such small amount of money. This business model improves not only the way of managing small valued money but also the way of consuming small valued money. Furthermore, our business model can contribute to activating circulation of coins as well as preventing leakage of government money.

  8. ATM-based cluster computing for multi-problem domains

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.Y.; Brandt, J.M.; Armstrong, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    This study evaluates the performance of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) local area network (LAN) for general as well as parallel distributed computing. General distributed computing uses client-server based applications that employ Remote Procedure Call (RPC) on top of the TCP/UDP/IP protocol. These applications typically require high throughput, good response time, and fairness. In contrast, parallel applications favor much simpler models of computation which require more direct access to data among processors. To efficiently run these programs, the network needs to achieve hardware speed. This paper describe our experience in building a multi-programmed distributed computing environment using Digital Equipment Corporation`s (DEC) AN2 ATM switch and Alpha workstations. We extend our study to include more elaborate network using simulation results.

  9. Delivery of very high bandwidth with ATM switches and SONET

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, S.A.

    1993-08-01

    To deliver high bandwidth, a ubiquitous inter-/intra-building cable plant consisting of single mode and multimode fiber as well as twisted pair copper is required. The selection of the ``glue`` to transport and interconnect distributed LANs with central facility resources over a pervasive cable plant is the focus of this paper. A description of the traditional problems that must be overcome to provide very high bandwidth beyond the narrow confines of a computer center is given. The applicability of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching (interconnection) and Synchronous Optical NETwork (SONET) (transport) for high bandwidth delivery is described using the environment and requirements of Sandia National Laboratories. Other methods for distributing high data rates are compared and contrasted. Sandia is implementing a standards based foundation utilizing a pervasive single mode fiber cable plant, SONET transport, and ATM switching to meet the goals of gigabit networking.

  10. Performance of ATM/OC-12 on the Intel Paragon

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.H.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes communication performance of GigaNet`s OC12 ATM interface for the Intel Paragon. One-way latency of 41 {micro}s and bandwidth of 68 MB/s (full OC12) are measured using GigaNet`s AAL5 API between two Paragons. Performance is compared with Ethernet, HiPPI, and the Paragon`s native message-passing facility.

  11. ATM Coastal Topography-Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klipp, Emily S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Yates, Xan; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Texas coastline within UTM zone 15, from Matagorda Peninsula to Galveston Island, acquired October 12-13, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant

  12. ATM Coastal Topography-Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klipp, Emily S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Yates, Xan; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Texas coastline within UTM zone 14, acquired October 12-13, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used

  13. ATM Coastal Topography-Florida 2001: Western Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the western Florida panhandle coastline, acquired October 2-4 and 7-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used

  14. ATM Coastal Topography-Florida 2001: Eastern Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the eastern Florida panhandle coastline, acquired October 2, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create

  15. Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia with Myelodysplasia-related Changes Associated with ATM Gene Deletion.

    PubMed

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Momoka; Kurogi, Kazuya; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a tumor suppressor gene, and its somatic inactivation plays a role in the pathogenesis of lymphoid malignancies. However, the role of ATM in patients with myeloid malignancies is still unknown. We herein report a case of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) with ATM gene deletion. An 84-year-old Japanese woman presenting with a pale face and pancytopenia was admitted to our institution and diagnosed to have AMKL with ATM gene deletion. She was treated with intravenous azacitidine. The azacitidine treatment was effective for approximately 1 year. Somatic inactivation of the ATM gene may therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of AMKL. PMID:27301517

  16. Call admission algorithms in multiservice and multiclass ATM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, Salima; Hebuterne, Gerard

    2004-09-01

    The introduction of new ATM service categories increases the benefits of ATM, making the technology suitable for a virtually unlimited range of applications. Connection Admission Control (CAC) is defined as the set of actions taken by the network during the call (virtual connection) set-up phase, or during call re-negotiation phase, to determine whether a connection request can be accepted or rejected. Network resources (port bandwidth and buffer space) are reserved to the incoming connection at each switching element traversed, if so required, by the service category. The major focus of this paper is call admission in the context of multi-service, multi-class ATM networks. Several strategies suggesting rules on bandwidth sharing are found in the litterature. This study investigates particularly the Complete Sharing approach. Two service categories are concerned, namely, Constant Bit rate/Deterministic Bit Rate (CBR/DBR) and Variable Bit Rate/Statistical Bit Rate (VBR/SBR). Each service category is represented by a set of call classes corresponding to different bandwidth needs. We propose two algorithms to solve the underlying Markovian system: Product-form and Recursive solutions. A performance study based on the latter algorithm is implemented. We analyze the results of this very sharing strategy and set the not-to-violate limits for a beneficial use of it.

  17. Very long baseline connected interferometry via the ATM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yukio; Kaneko, Akihiro; Amagai, Jun; Yoshino, Taizoh; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Fujisawa, Kenta; Uose, Hisao; Iwamura, Sotetsu; Hoshino, Takashi; Nakajima, Junichi; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2000-06-01

    The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), the National Astronomical Observatory (NAO), the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), and the Telecommunication Network Laboratory Group of Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation have developed a real-time VLBI array, maximum baseline-length was 208 km. The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observed data is transmitted through a high-speed asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network (2,488- Gbps [STM-16/OC-48] ATM network) instead of being recorded onto magnetic tapes. The system was composed of two real-time VLSI networks: the Keystone Project network of CRL (which is used for measuring crustal deformation in the Tokyo metropolitan area), and the OLIVE (optically linked VLBI experiment) network of NAO and ISAS which is used for astronomy (space-VLBI). The acquired VLBI data were corrected via the ATM network and the cross-correlation processing were done simultaneously. A radio flares on the weak radio source (HR1099) and weak radio sources were detected.

  18. Final report for the protocol extensions for ATM Security Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Tarman, T.D.; Pierson, L.G.; Brenkosh, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    This is the summary report for the Protocol Extensions for Asynchronous Transfer Mode project, funded under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. During this one-year effort, techniques were examined for integrating security enhancements within standard ATM protocols, and mechanisms were developed to validate these techniques and to provide a basic set of ATM security assurances. Based on our experience during this project, recommendations were presented to the ATM Forum (a world-wide consortium of ATM product developers, service providers, and users) to assist with the development of security-related enhancements to their ATM specifications. As a result of this project, Sandia has taken a leading role in the formation of the ATM Forum`s Security Working Group, and has gained valuable alliances and leading-edge experience with emerging ATM security technologies and protocols.

  19. The effect of algorithm-agile encryption on ATM quality of service

    SciTech Connect

    Sholander, P.; Tarman, T.; Pierson, L.; Hutchinson, R.

    1997-04-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) users often open multiple ATM Virtual Circuits (VCs) to multiple ATM users on multiple ATM networks. Each network and user may implement a different encryption policy. Hence ATM users may need shared, flexible hardware-based 3encryption that supports multiple encryption algorithms for multiple concurrent ATM users and VCs. An algorithm-agile encryption architecture, that uses multiple, parallel encryption-pipelines, is proposed. That algorithm-agile encryptor`s effect on the ATM Quality of Service (QoS) metrics, such as Cell Transfer Delay (CTD) and Cell Delay Variation (CDV), is analyzed. Bounds on the maximum CDV and the CDV`s probability density are derived.

  20. Phosphorylation of p300 by ATM controls the stability of NBS1

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Ryoung; Choi, Jae Duk; Jeong, Gajin; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-07-09

    Acetyltransferase, p300 is a transcriptional cofactor of signal-responsive transcriptional regulation. The surveillance kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in regulation of a wide range of cellular DNA damage responses. Here, we investigated whether and how ATM mediates phosphorylation of p300 in response to DNA damage and how p300 phosphorylation is functionally linked to DNA damage. ATM-phosphorylated p300 in vitro and in vivo, in response to DNA damage. Phosphorylation of p300 proteins was observed upon {gamma}-irradiation in ATM{sup +} cells but not ATM{sup -} cells. Importantly, expression of nonphosphorylatable serine to alanine form of p300 (S106A) destabilized both p300 and NBS1 proteins, after DNA damage. These data demonstrate that ATM transduces a DNA damage signal to p300, and that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of p300 is required for stabilization of NBS1 proteins in response to DNA damage.

  1. Transcriptional Reprogramming and Resistance to Colonic Mucosal Injury in Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1)-deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Larmonier, Claire B; Shehab, Kareem W; Laubitz, Daniel; Jamwal, Deepa R; Ghishan, Fayez K; Kiela, Pawel R

    2016-04-22

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize and bind branched polymers of ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins using NAD as a substrate and participate in the control of gene transcription and DNA repair. PARP1, the most abundant isoform, regulates the expression of proinflammatory mediator cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, and inhibition of PARP1 enzymatic activity reduced or ameliorated autoimmune diseases in several experimental models, including colitis. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the protective effects of PARP1 inhibition in colitis and the cell types in which Parp1 deletion has the most significant impact are unknown. The objective of the current study was to determine the impact of Parp1 deletion on the innate immune response to mucosal injury and on the gut microbiome composition. Parp1 deficiency was evaluated in DSS-induced colitis in WT, Parp1(-/-), Rag2(-/-), and Rag2(-/-)×Parp1(-/-) double knock-out mice. Genome-wide analysis of the colonic transcriptome and fecal 16S amplicon profiling was performed. Compared with WT, we demonstrated that Parp1(-/-) were protected from dextran-sulfate sodium-induced colitis and that this protection was associated with a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming in the colon. PARP1 deficiency was also associated with a modulation of the colonic microbiota (increases relative abundance of Clostridia clusters IV and XIVa) and a concomitant increase in the frequency of mucosal CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. The protective effects conferred by Parp1 deletion were lost in Rag2(-/-) × Parp1(-/-) mice, highlighting the role of the adaptive immune system for full protection. PMID:26912654

  2. Development of a global flood monitoring system using ATMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temimi, M.; Tesfagiorgis, K. B.; Lacava, T.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an operational global flood monitoring system using NPP-ATMS microwave brightness temperature measurements. The operational tool is based on a microwave-based soil wetness index (SWI). Swath-wise brightness temperatures (BT) of ATMS 89 GHz and 23 GHz channels are routinely downloaded from NOAA's CLASS. Each swath data is resampled to a regular grid of 35 km by 35 km using the nearest neighborhood technique to produce daily global brightness temperature maps. Global values of SWI are calculated using the difference in BT between the 89 and 23 GHz channels. Using these daily SWI values, we implemented the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) to calculate the Soil Wetness Variational Index (SWVI) which is dependent on the mean and standard deviation of SWIs of the same months of previous years using ATMS data. These SWVI values are influenced by changes in surface conditions. The determined mean and standard deviation values of SWI that were used to estimate the SWVI were determined on a monthly basis to mitigate the impact of the seasonal variation of the vegetation cover and surface conditions on the microwave signal. The determined SWVI using ATMS data showed significant sensitivity to inundation and allows for capturing changes in wet areas (inundation, flooding or very wet surface) across the globe. Snow and ice on the ground were masked out using a threshold-based approach that uses microwave brightness temperature observations. The advantage of the new ATMS sensor with respect to the older AMSU sensor that has similar channels consists of narrower orbit gaps and better spatial coverage and resolution. We nevertheless adapted the developed tool to AMSU data to investigate time series of inundation records across the globe since 2002. The obtained maps were verified against historical flood events in Australia and other parts of the world. Relationship between determined inundation and measured discharge was analyzed. A

  3. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors. PMID:25046176

  4. Low-dose irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation results in ATM activation and increased lethality in Atm-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pietzner, J; Merscher, B M; Baer, P C; Duecker, R P; Eickmeier, O; Fußbroich, D; Bader, P; Del Turco, D; Henschler, R; Zielen, S; Schubert, R

    2016-04-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a genetic instability syndrome characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, severe bronchial complications, hypersensitivity to radiotherapy and an elevated risk of malignancies. Repopulation with ATM-competent bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) significantly prolonged the lifespan and improved the phenotype of Atm-deficient mice. The aim of the present study was to promote BMDC engraftment after bone marrow transplantation using low-dose irradiation (IR) as a co-conditioning strategy. Atm-deficient mice were transplanted with green fluorescent protein-expressing, ATM-positive BMDCs using a clinically relevant non-myeloablative host-conditioning regimen together with TBI (0.2-2.0 Gy). IR significantly improved the engraftment of BMDCs into the bone marrow, blood, spleen and lung in a dose-dependent manner, but not into the cerebellum. However, with increasing doses, IR lethality increased even after low-dose IR. Analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung histochemistry revealed a significant enhancement in the number of inflammatory cells and oxidative damage. A delay in the resolution of γ-H2AX-expression points to an insufficient double-strand break repair capacity following IR with 0.5 Gy in Atm-deficient splenocytes. Our results demonstrate that even low-dose IR results in ATM activation. In the absence of ATM, low-dose IR leads to increased inflammation, oxidative stress and lethality in the Atm-deficient mouse model. PMID:26752140

  5. ATM function and its relationship with ATM gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with the recurrent deletion (11q22.3-23.2).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Chen, H-C; Su, X; Thompson, P A; Liu, X; Do, K-A; Wierda, W; Keating, M J; Plunkett, W

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10-20% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients exhibit del(11q22-23) before treatment, this cohort increases to over 40% upon progression following chemoimmunotherapy. The coding sequence of the DNA damage response gene, ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), is contained in this deletion. The residual ATM allele is frequently mutated, suggesting a relationship between gene function and clinical response. To investigate this possibility, we sought to develop and validate an assay for the function of ATM protein in these patients. SMC1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1) and KAP1 (KRAB-associated protein 1) were found to be unique substrates of ATM kinase by immunoblot detection following ionizing radiation. Using a pool of eight fluorescence in situ hybridization-negative CLL samples as a standard, the phosphorylation of SMC1 and KAP1 from 46 del (11q22-23) samples was analyzed using normal mixture model-based clustering. This identified 13 samples (28%) that were deficient in ATM function. Targeted sequencing of the ATM gene of these samples, with reference to genomic DNA, revealed 12 somatic mutations and 15 germline mutations in these samples. No strong correlation was observed between ATM mutation and function. Therefore, mutation status may not be taken as an indicator of ATM function. Rather, a direct assay of the kinase activity should be used in the development of therapies. PMID:27588518

  6. Cucurbitacin B induced ATM-mediated DNA damage causes G2/M cell cycle arrest in a ROS-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiajie; Wu, Guosheng; Bao, Jiaolin; Hao, Wenhui; Lu, Jinjian; Chen, Xiuping

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacins are a class of triterpenoids widely distributed in plant kingdom with potent anti-cancer activities both in vitro and in vivo by inducing cycle arrest, autophagy, and apoptosis. Cucurbitacin B (Cuc B), could induce S or G2/M cell cycle arrest in cancer cells while the detailed mechanisms remain to be clear. This study was designed to precisely dissect the signaling pathway(s) responsible for Cuc B induced cell cycle arrest in human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells. We demonstrated that low concentrations of Cuc B dramatically induced G2/M phase arrest in A549 cells. Cuc B treatment caused DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) without affecting the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the potential molecular target for Cuc B. Cuc B triggers ATM-activated Chk1-Cdc25C-Cdk1, which could be reversed by both ATM siRNA and Chk1 siRNA. Cuc B also triggers ATM-activated p53-14-3-3-σ pathways, which could be reversed by ATM siRNA. Cuc B treatment also led to increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which was inhibited by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) pretreatment. Furthermore, NAC pretreatment inhibited Cuc B induced DNA damage and G2/M phase arrest. Taken together, these results suggested that Cuc B induces DNA damage in A549 cells mediated by increasing intracellular ROS formation, which lead to G2/M cell phase arrest through ATM-activated Chk1-Cdc25C-Cdk1 and p53-14-3-3-σ parallel branches. These observations provide novel mechanisms and potential targets for better understanding of the anti-cancer mechanisms of cucurbitacins. PMID:24505404

  7. Cucurbitacin B Induced ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Causes G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest in a ROS-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiajie; Wu, Guosheng; Bao, Jiaolin; Hao, Wenhui; Lu, Jinjian; Chen, Xiuping

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacins are a class of triterpenoids widely distributed in plant kingdom with potent anti-cancer activities both in vitro and in vivo by inducing cycle arrest, autophagy, and apoptosis. Cucurbitacin B (Cuc B), could induce S or G2/M cell cycle arrest in cancer cells while the detailed mechanisms remain to be clear. This study was designed to precisely dissect the signaling pathway(s) responsible for Cuc B induced cell cycle arrest in human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells. We demonstrated that low concentrations of Cuc B dramatically induced G2/M phase arrest in A549 cells. Cuc B treatment caused DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) without affecting the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the potential molecular target for Cuc B. Cuc B triggers ATM-activated Chk1-Cdc25C-Cdk1, which could be reversed by both ATM siRNA and Chk1 siRNA. Cuc B also triggers ATM-activated p53-14-3-3-σ pathways, which could be reversed by ATM siRNA. Cuc B treatment also led to increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which was inhibited by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) pretreatment. Furthermore, NAC pretreatment inhibited Cuc B induced DNA damage and G2/M phase arrest. Taken together, these results suggested that Cuc B induces DNA damage in A549 cells mediated by increasing intracellular ROS formation, which lead to G2/M cell phase arrest through ATM-activated Chk1-Cdc25C-Cdk1 and p53-14-3-3-σ parallel branches. These observations provide novel mechanisms and potential targets for better understanding of the anti-cancer mechanisms of cucurbitacins. PMID:24505404

  8. Characterization of Torin2, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR, ATM and ATR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Xu, Chunxiao; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Xin; Hur, Wooyoung; Liu, Yan; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas P.; Wang, Jinhua; Westover, Kenneth D.; Gao, Peng; Ercan, Dalia; Niepel, Mario; Thoreen, Carson C.; Kang, Seong A.; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Wang, Yuchuan; Tupper, Tanya; Altabef, Abigail; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.; Chou, Danny M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Janne, Pasi A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    mTOR is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that serves as a central regulator of cell growth, survival and autophagy. Deregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway occurs commonly in cancer and numerous inhibitors targeting the ATP-binding site of these kinases are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Here we report the characterization of Torin2, a second generation ATP-competitive inhibitor that is potent and selective for mTOR with a superior pharmacokinetic profile to previous inhibitors. Torin2 inhibited mTORC1-dependent T389 phosphorylation on S6K (RPS6KB1) with an EC50 of 250 pM with approximately 800-fold selectivity for cellular mTOR versus PI3K. Torin2 also exhibited potent biochemical and cellular activity against PIKK family kinases including ATM (EC50 28 nM), ATR (EC50 35 nM) and DNA-PK (EC50 118 nM) (PRKDC), the inhibition of which sensitized cells to Irradiation. Similar to the earlier generation compound Torin1 and in contrast to other reported mTOR inhibitors, Torin2 inhibited mTOR kinase and mTORC1 signaling activities in a sustained manner suggestive of a slow dissociation from the kinase. Cancer cell treatment with Torin2 for 24 hours resulted in a prolonged block in negative feedback and consequent T308 phosphorylation on Akt. These effects were associated with strong growth inhibition in vitro. Single agent treatment with Torin2 in vivo did not yield significant efficacy against KRAS-driven lung tumors, but the combination of Torin2 with MEK inhibitor AZD6244 yielded a significant growth inhibition. Taken together, our findings establish Torin2 as a strong candidate for clinical evaluation in a broad number of oncological settings where mTOR signaling has a pathogenic role. PMID:23436801

  9. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07270.001 PMID:26030852

  10. Impaired insulin-stimulated glucose transport in ATM-deficient mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ching, James Kain; Spears, Larry D; Armon, Jennifer L; Renth, Allyson L; Andrisse, Stanley; Collins, Roy L; Fisher, Jonathan S

    2013-06-01

    There are reports that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a role in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, although this is not the case in some cell types. Because Akt plays a key role in insulin signaling, which leads to glucose transport in skeletal muscle, the predominant tissue in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal, we examined whether insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and (or) glucose transport would be decreased in skeletal muscle of mice lacking functional ATM, compared with muscle from wild-type mice. We found that in vitro insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was normal in soleus muscle from mice with 1 nonfunctional allele of ATM (ATM+/-) and from mice with 2 nonfunctional alleles (ATM-/-). However, insulin did not stimulate glucose transport or the phosphorylation of AS160 in ATM-/- soleus. ATM protein level was markedly higher in wild-type extensor digitorum longus (EDL) than in wild-type soleus. In EDL from ATM-/- mice, insulin did not stimulate glucose transport. However, in contrast to findings for soleus, insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was blunted in ATM-/- EDL, concomitant with a tendency for insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity to be decreased. Together, the findings suggest that ATM plays a role in insulin-stimulated glucose transport at the level of AS160 in muscle comprised of slow and fast oxidative-glycolytic fibers (soleus) and at the level of Akt in muscle containing fast glycolytic fibers (EDL). PMID:23724874

  11. Regulation of Epstein-Barr virus OriP replication by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Italo; Deng, Zhong; Atanasiu, Constandache; Chen, Chi-Ju; D'Erme, Maria; Lieberman, Paul M

    2010-05-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is an abundant, chromatin-associated, NAD-dependent enzyme that functions in multiple chromosomal processes, including DNA replication and chromatin remodeling. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) origin of plasmid replication (OriP) is a dynamic genetic element that confers stable episome maintenance, DNA replication initiation, and chromatin organization functions. OriP function depends on the EBV-encoded origin binding protein EBNA1. We have previously shown that EBNA1 is subject to negative regulation by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation). We now show that PARP1 physically associates with OriP in latently EBV-infected B cells. Short hairpin RNA depletion of PARP1 enhances OriP replication activity and increases EBNA1, origin recognition complex 2 (ORC2), and minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) association with OriP. Pharmacological inhibitors of PARP1 enhance OriP plasmid maintenance and increase EBNA1, ORC2, and MCM3 occupancy at OriP. PARylation in vitro inhibits ORC2 recruitment and remodels telomere repeat factor (TRF) binding at the dyad symmetry (DS) element of OriP. Purified PARP1 can ribosylate EBNA1 at multiple sites throughout its amino terminus but not in the carboxy-terminal DNA binding domain. We also show that EBNA1 linking regions (LR1 and LR2) can bind directly to oligomers of PAR. We propose that PARP1-dependent PARylation of EBNA1 and adjacently bound TRF2 induces structural changes at the DS element that reduce EBNA1 DNA binding affinity and functional recruitment of ORC. PMID:20219917

  12. ATM Alters the Otherwise Robust Chromatin Mobility at Sites of DNA Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs) in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annabelle; Durante, Marco; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Jakob, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) which can lead to the formation of chromosome rearrangements through error prone repair. In mammalian cells the positional stability of chromatin contributes to the maintenance of genome integrity. DSBs exhibit only a small, submicron scale diffusive mobility, but a slight increase in the mobility of chromatin domains by the induction of DSBs might influence repair fidelity and the formation of translocations. The radiation-induced local DNA decondensation in the vicinity of DSBs is one factor potentially enhancing the mobility of DSB-containing chromatin domains. Therefore in this study we focus on the influence of different chromatin modifying proteins, known to be activated by the DNA damage response, on the mobility of DSBs. IRIF (ionizing radiation induced foci) in U2OS cells stably expressing 53BP1-GFP were used as a surrogate marker of DSBs. Low angle charged particle irradiation, known to trigger a pronounced DNA decondensation, was used for the defined induction of linear tracks of IRIF. Our results show that movement of IRIF is independent of the investigated chromatin modifying proteins like ACF1 or PARP1 and PARG. Also depletion of proteins that tether DNA strands like MRE11 and cohesin did not alter IRIF dynamics significantly. Inhibition of ATM, a key component of DNA damage response signaling, resulted in a pronounced confinement of DSB mobility, which might be attributed to a diminished radiation induced decondensation. This confinement following ATM inhibition was confirmed using X-rays, proving that this effect is not restricted to densely ionizing radiation. In conclusion, repair sites of DSBs exhibit a limited mobility on a small spatial scale that is mainly unaffected by depletion of single remodeling or DNA tethering proteins. However, it relies on functional ATM kinase which is considered to influence the chromatin structure after irradiation. PMID:24651490

  13. ER-Dependent Ca++-mediated Cytosolic ROS as an Effector for Induction of Mitochondrial Apoptotic and ATM-JNK Signal Pathways in Gallic Acid-treated Human Oral Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Liang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2016-02-01

    Release of calcium (Ca(++)) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been proposed to be involved in induction of apoptosis by oxidative stress. Using inhibitor of ER Ca(++) release dantrolene and inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(++) uptake Ru-360, we demonstrated that Ca(++) release from the ER was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis of human oral cancer (OC) cells induced by gallic acid (GA). Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase inhibited tunicamycin-induced induction of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, C/EBP homologous protein, pro-caspase-12 cleavage, cytosolic Ca(++) increase and apoptosis, but did not attenuate the increase in cytosolic Ca(++) level and apoptosis induced by GA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis by GA was blocked by dantrolene. The specificity of ROS-mediated ATM-JNK activation was confirmed by treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger. Blockade of ATM activation by specific inhibitor KU55933, short hairpin RNA, or kinase-dead ATM overexpression suppressed JNK phosphorylation but did not completely inhibit cytosolic ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, pro-caspase-3 cleavage, and apoptosis induced by GA. Taken together, these results indicate that GA induces OC cell apoptosis by inducing the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic and ATM-JNK signal pathways, likely through ER Ca(++)-mediated ROS production. PMID:26851027

  14. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 in neurological diseases: A promising trove for new pharmacological interventions to enter clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Jangra, Ashok; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The highly conserved abundant nuclear protein poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 (PARP1) functions at the center of cellular stress response and is mainly implied in DNA damage repair mechanism. Apart from its involvement in DNA damage repair, it does sway multiple vital cellular processes such as cell death pathways, cell aging, insulator function, chromatin modification, transcription and mitotic apparatus function. Since brain is the principal organ vulnerable to oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, upon stress encounters robust DNA damage can occur and intense PARP1 activation may result that will lead to various CNS diseases. In the context of soaring interest towards PARP1 as a therapeutic target for newer pharmacological interventions, here in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of the role of PARP1 in the neurological diseases and the potential of its inhibitors to enter clinical translation, along with its structural and functional aspects. PMID:25049175

  15. Kinase-dead ATM protein is highly oncogenic and can be preferentially targeted by Topo-isomerase I inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Wang, Jiguang; Sprinzen, Lisa; Xu, Jun; Haddock, Christopher J; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J; Loredan, Denis G; Jiang, Wenxia; Vindigni, Alessandro; Wang, Dong; Rabadan, Raul; Zha, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATM kinase, a master regulator of DNA damage responses, are found in many cancers, but their impact on ATM function and implications for cancer therapy are largely unknown. Here we report that 72% of cancer-associated ATM mutations are missense mutations that are enriched around the kinase domain. Expression of kinase-dead ATM (AtmKD/-) is more oncogenic than loss of ATM (Atm-/-) in mouse models, leading to earlier and more frequent lymphomas with Pten deletions. Kinase-dead ATM protein (Atm-KD), but not loss of ATM (Atm-null), prevents replication-dependent removal of Topo-isomerase I-DNA adducts at the step of strand cleavage, leading to severe genomic instability and hypersensitivity to Topo-isomerase I inhibitors. Correspondingly, Topo-isomerase I inhibitors effectively and preferentially eliminate AtmKD/-, but not Atm-proficientor Atm-/- leukemia in animal models. These findings identify ATM kinase-domain missense mutations as a potent oncogenic event and a biomarker for Topo-isomerase I inhibitor based therapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14709.001 PMID:27304073

  16. RAD18, WRNIP1 and ATMIN promote ATM signalling in response to replication stress.

    PubMed

    Kanu, N; Zhang, T; Burrell, R A; Chakraborty, A; Cronshaw, J; DaCosta, C; Grönroos, E; Pemberton, H N; Anderton, E; Gonzalez, L; Sabbioneda, S; Ulrich, H D; Swanton, C; Behrens, A

    2016-07-28

    The DNA replication machinery invariably encounters obstacles that slow replication fork progression, and threaten to prevent complete replication and faithful segregation of sister chromatids. The resulting replication stress activates ATR, the major kinase involved in resolving impaired DNA replication. In addition, replication stress also activates the related kinase ATM, which is required to prevent mitotic segregation errors. However, the molecular mechanism of ATM activation by replication stress is not defined. Here, we show that monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), a marker of stalled replication forks, interacts with the ATM cofactor ATMIN via WRN-interacting protein 1 (WRNIP1). ATMIN, WRNIP1 and RAD18, the E3 ligase responsible for PCNA monoubiquitination, are specifically required for ATM signalling and 53BP1 focus formation induced by replication stress, not ionising radiation. Thus, WRNIP1 connects PCNA monoubiquitination with ATMIN/ATM to activate ATM signalling in response to replication stress and contribute to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:26549024

  17. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  18. Design Issues for Traffic Management for the ATM UBR + Service for TCP Over Satellite Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj

    1999-01-01

    This project was a comprehensive research program for developing techniques for improving the performance of Internet protocols over Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) based satellite networks. Among the service categories provided by ATM networks, the most commonly used category for data traffic is the unspecified bit rate (UBR) service. UBR allows sources to send data into the network without any feedback control. The project resulted in the numerous ATM Forum contributions and papers.

  19. Pilot Performance on New ATM Operations: Maintaining In-Trail Separation and Arrival Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Yankosky, L. J.; Johnson, Walter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) may enable new Air Traffic Management (ATM) operations. However, CDTI is not the only source of traffic information in the cockpit; ATM procedures may provide information, implicitly and explicitly, about other aircraft. An experiment investigated pilot ability to perform two new ATM operations - maintaining in-trail separation from another aircraft and sequencing into an arrival stream. In the experiment, pilots were provided different amounts of information from displays and procedures. The results are described.

  20. Performance analysis of reactive congestion control for ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Kenji; Oie, Yuji; Murata, Masayuki; Miyahara, Hideo

    1995-05-01

    In ATM networks, preventive congestion control is widely recognized for efficiently avoiding congestion, and it is implemented by a conjunction of connection admission control and usage parameter control. However, congestion may still occur because of unpredictable statistical fluctuation of traffic sources even when preventive control is performed in the network. In this paper, we study another kind of congestion control, i.e., reactive congestion control, in which each source changes its cell emitting rate adaptively to the traffic load at the switching node (or at the multiplexer). Our intention is that, by incorporating such a congestion control method in ATM networks, more efficient congestion control is established. We develop an analytical model, and carry out an approximate analysis of reactive congestion control algorithm. Numerical results show that the reactive congestion control algorithms are very effective in avoiding congestion and in achieving the statistical gain. Furthermore, the binary congestion control algorithm with pushout mechanism is shown to provide the best performance among the reactive congestion control algorithms treated here.

  1. ATM-distributed PACS server for ICU application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joseph K.; Wong, Albert W. K.; Huang, H. K.; Bazzill, Todd M.; Zhang, Jianguo; Andriole, Katherine P.

    1996-05-01

    In order for PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications System) to better serve our intensive care units (ICUs), we, at University of California, San Francisco, have designed and developed a client/server application that is specifically tailored to provide fast, reliable access to our PACS data from diagnostic viewing stations in the ICUs. One of our utmost design criteria is to ensure consistent delivery of high speed, high performance data throughput, and yet, the system should be cost-effective and render minimal maintenance. As high technology advances, we are able to utilize powerful mass storage device such as raid disk, which serves as a central image repository, to store images and data. We are also able to utilize Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology, which is regarded as the prevailing technology for reliable, high speed data communications, to transfer large imagery data sets across systems and networks. This paper describes the design and mechanism of how ICU viewing stations take advantages of sharing a high performance raid disk, and ATM technology in data transfer for timely delivery of images in a clinical setting.

  2. Real-time VLBI system using ATM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, H.; Imae, M.; Kondo, T.; Sekido, M.; Hama, S.; Hoshino, T.; Uose, H.; Yamamoto, T.

    2000-05-01

    The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), Tokyo, Japan, and the Telecommunication Network Laboratory Group, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp., Tokyo, Japan, have developed a highly precise, very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) system using a high speed asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network. The observed data is transmitted through a 2.488-Gbps ATM network [STM-16/OC-48] instead of being recorded onto magnetic tape. The system was specially designed for the Key Stone Project (KSP), a project begun in 1994 to measure crustal deformation in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Cross-correlation processing and data observations are carried out simultaneously by one operator. It takes about one hour to analyze the data after the observations and correlations are completed. In regular geodetic VLBI experiments run every other day for 24 h, a horizontal position uncertainty of about 2 mm and a vertical position uncertainty of about 10 mm were achieved. The system was designed to enable automated operation throughout the entire process. The results obtained are available to the public via the Internet at http:ksp.crl.go.jp. This system is a significant advance in VLBI and should provide more precise information about crustal deformation in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

  3. Achieving High Throughput for Data Transfer over ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.; Townsend, Jeffrey N.

    1996-01-01

    File-transfer rates for ftp are often reported to be relatively slow, compared to the raw bandwidth available in emerging gigabit networks. While a major bottleneck is disk I/O, protocol issues impact performance as well. Ftp was developed and optimized for use over the TCP/IP protocol stack of the Internet. However, TCP has been shown to run inefficiently over ATM. In an effort to maximize network throughput, data-transfer protocols can be developed to run over UDP or directly over IP, rather than over TCP. If error-free transmission is required, techniques for achieving reliable transmission can be included as part of the transfer protocol. However, selected image-processing applications can tolerate a low level of errors in images that are transmitted over a network. In this paper we report on experimental work to develop a high-throughput protocol for unreliable data transfer over ATM networks. We attempt to maximize throughput by keeping the communications pipe full, but still keep packet loss under five percent. We use the Bay Area Gigabit Network Testbed as our experimental platform.

  4. Functional studies on the ATM intronic splicing processing element

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Stuani, Cristiana; Parvizpur, Alireza; Baralle, Francisco E.; Pagani, Franco

    2005-01-01

    In disease-associated genes, the understanding of the functional significance of deep intronic nucleotide variants may represent a difficult challenge. We have previously reported a new disease-causing mechanism that involves an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) in ATM, composed of adjacent consensus 5′ and 3′ splice sites. A GTAA deletion within ISPE maintains potential adjacent splice sites, disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates an aberrant exon. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of U1 snRNA through complementarity within a ∼40 nt window downstream of the ISPE prevents aberrant splicing. By selective mutagenesis at the adjacent consensus ISPE splice sites, we show that this effect is not due to a resplicing process occurring at the ISPE. Functional comparison of the ATM mouse counterpart and evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediates derived from affected cell lines and hybrid minigene assays indicate that U1 snRNP binding at the ISPE interferes with the cryptic acceptor site. Activation of this site results in a stringent 5′–3′ order of intron sequence removal around the cryptic exon. Artificial U1 snRNA loading by complementarity to heterologous exonic sequences represents a potential therapeutic method to prevent the usage of an aberrant CFTR cryptic exon. Our results suggest that ISPE-like intronic elements binding U1 snRNPs may regulate correct intron processing. PMID:16030351

  5. Drug repurposing screen identifies lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill breast cancer associated gene-1 mutant and wild type breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a devastating disease that results in approximately 40,000 deaths each year in the USA. Current drug screening and chemopreventatitive methods are suboptimal, due in part to the poor specificity of compounds for cancer cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor (PARPi)-mediated therapy is a promising approach for familial breast cancers caused by mutations of breast cancer-associated gene-1 and -2 (BRCA1/2), yet drug resistance frequently occurs during the treatment. Moreover, PARPis exhibit very little effect on cancers that are proficient for DNA repair and clinical efficacy for PARPis as single-agent therapies has yet to be illustrated. Methods Using a quantitative high-throughput screening approach, we screened a library containing 2,816 drugs, most of which are approved for human or animal use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or other countries, to identify compounds that sensitize breast cancer cells to PARPi. After initial screening, we performed further cellular and molecular analysis on lestaurtinib, which is an orally bioavailable multikinase inhibitor and has been used in clinical trials for myeloproliferative disorders and acute myelogenous leukemia. Results Our study indicated that lestaurtinib is highly potent against breast cancers as a mono-treatment agent. It also strongly enhanced the activity of the potent PARPi AG14361 on breast cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The inhibition of cancer growth is measured by increased apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation. Consistent with this, the treatment results in activation of caspase 3/7, and accumulation of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, irrespective of their BRCA1 status. Finally, we demonstrated that AG14361 inhibits NF-κB signaling, which is further enhanced by lestaurtinib treatment. Conclusions Lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the PARP1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill BRCA1 mutant and wild-type breast cancer

  6. ATM mediates spermidine-induced mitophagy via PINK1 and Parkin regulation in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongmei; Qiu, Qian; Gu, Xueyan; Tian, Yihong; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    The ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) protein has recently been proposed to play critical roles in the response to mitochondrial dysfunction by initiating mitophagy. Here, we have used ATM-proficient GM00637 cells and ATM-deficient GM05849 cells to investigate the mitophagic effect of spermidine and to elucidate the role of ATM in spermdine-induced mitophagy. Our results indicate that spermidine induces mitophagy by eliciting mitochondrial depolarization, which triggers the formation of mitophagosomes and mitolysosomes, thereby promoting the accumulation of PINK1 and translocation of Parkin to damaged mitochondria, finally leading to the decreased mitochondrial mass in GM00637 cells. However, in GM05849 cells or GM00637 cells pretreated with the ATM kinase inhibitor KU55933, the expression of full-length PINK1 and the translocation of Parkin are blocked, and the colocalization of Parkin with either LC3 or PINK1 is disrupted. These results suggest that ATM drives the initiation of the mitophagic cascade. Our study demonstrates that spermidine induces mitophagy through ATM-dependent activation of the PINK1/Parkin pathway. These findings underscore the importance of a mitophagy regulatory network of ATM and PINK1/Parkin and elucidate a novel mechanism by which ATM influences spermidine-induced mitophagy. PMID:27089984

  7. Results from CrIS/ATMS Obtained Using an "AIRS Version-6 Like" Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    A main objective of AIRS/AMSU on EOS is to provide accurate sounding products that are used to generate climate data sets. Suomi NPP carries CrIS/ATMS that were designed as follow-ons to AIRS/AMSU. Our objective is to generate a long term climate data set of products derived from CrIS/ATMS to serve as a continuation of the AIRS/AMSU products. We have modified an improved version of the operational AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm for use with CrIS/ATMS. CrIS/ATMS products are of very good quality, and are comparable to, and consistent with, those of AIRS.

  8. Premeiotic germ cell defect in seminiferous tubules of Atm-null testis

    SciTech Connect

    Takubo, Keiyo . E-mail: keiyot@gmail.com; Hirao, Atsushi; Ohmura, Masako; Azuma, Masaki; Arai, Fumio; Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio . E-mail: sudato@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp

    2006-12-29

    Lifelong spermatogenesis is maintained by coordinated sequential processes including self-renewal of stem cells, proliferation of spermatogonial cells, meiotic division, and spermiogenesis. It has been shown that ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) is required for meiotic division of the seminiferous tubules. Here, we show that, in addition to its role in meiosis, ATM has a pivotal role in premeiotic germ cell maintenance. ATM is activated in premeiotic spermatogonial cells and the Atm-null testis shows progressive degeneration. In Atm-null testicular cells, differing from bone marrow cells of Atm-null mice, reactive oxygen species-mediated p16{sup Ink4a} activation does not occur in Atm-null premeiotic germ cells, which suggests the involvement of different signaling pathways from bone marrow defects. Although Atm-null bone marrow undergoes p16{sup Ink4a}-mediated cellular senescence program, Atm-null premeiotic germ cells exhibited cell cycle arrest and apoptotic elimination of premeiotic germ cells, which is different from p16{sup Ink4a}-mediated senescence.

  9. Drosophila ATM and ATR checkpoint kinases control partially redundant pathways for telomere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xiaolin; Srikanta, Deepa; Fanti, Laura; Pimpinelli, Sergio; Badugu, RamaKrishna; Kellum, Rebecca; Rong, Yikang S.

    2005-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) checkpoint kinases play distinct, but partially overlapping, roles in DNA damage response. Yet their interrelated function has not been defined for telomere maintenance. We discover in Drosophila that the two proteins control partially redundant pathways for telomere protection: the loss of ATM leads to the fusion of some telomeres, whereas the loss of both ATM and ATR renders all telomeres susceptible to fusion. The ATM-controlled pathway includes the Mre11 and Nijmegen breakage syndrome complex but not the Chk2 kinase, whereas the ATR-regulated pathway includes its partner ATR-interacting protein but not the Chk1 kinase. This finding suggests that ATM and ATR regulate different molecular events at the telomeres compared with the sites of DNA damage. This compensatory relationship between ATM and ATR is remarkably similar to that observed in yeast despite the fact that the biochemistry of telomere elongation is completely different in the two model systems. We provide evidence suggesting that both the loading of telomere capping proteins and normal telomeric silencing requires ATM and ATR in Drosophila and propose that ATM and ATR protect telomere integrity by safeguarding chromatin architecture that favors the loading of telomere-elongating, capping, and silencing proteins. PMID:16203987

  10. ATM Quality of Service Parameters at 45 Mbps Using a Satellite Emulator: Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Bobinsky, Eric A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of 45-Mbps DS3 intermediate-frequency loopback measurements of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) quality of service parameters (cell error ratio and cell loss ratio) are presented. These tests, which were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of satellite-ATM interoperability research, represent initial efforts to quantify the minimum parameters for stringent ATM applications, such as MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 video transmission. Portions of these results were originally presented to the International Telecommunications Union's ITU-R Working Party 4B in February 1996 in support of their Draft Preliminary Recommendation on the Transmission of ATM Traffic via Satellite.

  11. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and DNA damage response with analysis of intracellular ATM signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Sriram; Viswanathan, Preeti; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity by preventing and overcoming DNA damage is critical for cell survival. Deficiency or aberrancy in the DNA damage response, for example, through ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling, lead to pathophysiological perturbations in organs throughout the body. Therefore, control of DNA damage is of major interest for development of therapeutic agents. Such efforts will greatly benefit from convenient and simple diagnostic and/or drug development tools to demonstrate whether ATM and related genes have been activated and to then determine whether these have been returned to normal levels of activity because pathway members sense and also repair DNA damage. To overcome difficulties in analyzing differences in multitudinous ATM pathway members following DNA damage, we measured ATM promoter activity with a fluorescent td-Tomato reporter gene to interrogate the global effects of ATM signaling pathways. In cultured HuH-7 cell line derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma, cis-platinum, acetaminophen, or hydrogen peroxide caused DNA strand breaks and ATM pathway activation as shown by γH2AX expression, which in turn, led to rapid and sustained increases in ATM promoter activity. This assay of ATM promoter activity identified biological agents capable of controlling cellular DNA damage in toxin-treated HuH-7 cells and in mice after onset of drug-induced acute liver failure. Therefore, the proposed assay of ATM promoter activity in HuH-7 cells was appropriately informative for treating DNA damage. High-throughput screens using ATM promoter activation will be helpful for therapeutic development in DNA damage-associated abnormal ATM signaling in various cell types and organs. PMID:24927134

  12. mda-7/IL-24 Induces Cell Death in Neuroblastoma through a Novel Mechanism Involving AIF and ATM.

    PubMed

    Bhoopathi, Praveen; Lee, Nathaniel; Pradhan, Anjan K; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Sarkar, Devanand; Emdad, Luni; Fisher, Paul B

    2016-06-15

    Advanced stages of neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial malignant solid tumor of the central nervous system in infants and children, are refractive to therapy. Ectopic expression of melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24) promotes broad-spectrum antitumor activity in vitro, in vivo in preclinical animal models, and in a phase I clinical trial in patients with advanced cancers without harming normal cells. mda-7/IL-24 exerts cancer-specific toxicity (apoptosis or toxic autophagy) by promoting endoplasmic reticulum stress and modulating multiple signal transduction pathways regulating cancer cell growth, invasion, metastasis, survival, and angiogenesis. To enhance cancer-selective expression and targeted anticancer activity of mda-7/IL-24, we created a tropism-modified cancer terminator virus (Ad.5/3-CTV), which selectively replicates in cancer cells producing robust expression of mda-7/IL-24 We now show that Ad.5/3-CTV induces profound neuroblastoma antiproliferative activity and apoptosis in a caspase-3/9-independent manner, both in vitro and in vivo in a tumor xenograft model. Ad.5/3-CTV promotes these effects through a unique pathway involving apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation into the nucleus. Inhibiting AIF rescued neuroblastoma cells from Ad.5/3-CTV-induced cell death, whereas pan-caspase inhibition failed to promote survival. Ad.5/3-CTV infection of neuroblastoma cells increased ATM phosphorylation instigating nuclear translocation and increased γ-H2AX, triggering nuclear translocation and intensified expression of AIF. These results were validated further using two ATM small-molecule inhibitors that attenuated PARP cleavage by inhibiting γ-H2AX, which in turn inhibited AIF changes in Ad.5/3-CTV-infected neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, we elucidate a novel pathway for mda-7/IL-24-induced caspase-independent apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells mediated through modulation of AIF, ATM, and γ-H2AX. Cancer

  13. Wide-area ATM networking for large-scale MPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, P.M.; Geist, G.A. II

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents early experiences with using high-speed ATM interfaces to connect multiple Intel Paragons on both local and wide area networks. The testbed includes the 1024 and 512 node Paragons running the OSF operating system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the 1840 node Paragon running the Puma operating system at Sandia National Laboratories. The experimental OC-12 (622 Mbits/sec) interfaces are built by GigaNet and provide a proprietary API for sending AAL-5 encapsulated packets. PVM is used as the massaging infrastructure and significant modifications have been made to use the GigaNet API, operate in the Puma environment, and attain acceptable performance over local networks. These modifications are described along with a discussion of roadblocks to networking MPPs with high-performance interfaces. Our early prototype utilizes approximately 25 percent of an OC-12 circuit and 80 percent of an OC-3 circuit in send plus acknowledgment ping-pong tests.

  14. Analysis of components from drip tests with ATM-10 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    Waste package assemblies consisting of actinide-doped West Valley ATM-10 reference glass and sensitized 304L stainless steel have been reacted with simulated repository groundwater using the Unsaturated Test Method. Analyses of surface corrosion and reaction products resulting from tests that were terminated at scheduled intervals between 13 and 52 weeks are reported. Analyses reveal complex interactions between the groundwater, the sensitized stainless steel waste form holder, and the glass. Alteration phases form that consist mainly of smectite clay, brockite, and an amorphous thorium iron titanium silicate, the latter two incorporating thorium, uranium, and possibly transuranics. The results from the terminated tests, combined with data from tests that are still ongoing, will help determine the suitability of glass waste forms in the proposed high-level repository at the Yucca Mountain Site.

  15. Self-healing ATM networks based on virtual path concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanura, Ryutaro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Tokizawa, Ikuo

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes self-healing network techniques suitable for ATM networks in order to realize a high-reliable B-ISDN. First the characteristic of virtual paths (VP) and their influence on failure restoration are discussed. A high-speed restoration technique which exploits the benefits of VP's is then proposed and described. The technique simplifies the message transmission processes and reduces the number of generated messages by using preassigned backup virtual paths. Next, the scheme used to design the backup VP routes and spare resource distribution for each link is proposed in order to create a network that applies the proposed restoration scheme. Next, self-reconstruction techniques of backup virtual paths are proposed for the realization of a reversionless restoration cycle. Finally, the feasibility of distributed control operation is discussed.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet spectrograph ATM experiment S082B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoe, J.-D. F.; Brueckner, G. E.; Purcell, J. D.; Tousey, R.

    1977-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet double-dispersion photographic spectrograph for the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) experiment S082B on Skylab is described. Novel features were the use of a predisperser grating with a ruling whose spacing varied approximately linearly with distance for the purpose of increasing the instrument speed by reducing the astigmatism and a photoelectric servosystem to stabilize to 1 sec of arc the solar image at various near-limb positions. The 970-3940-A range was covered in two sections with effective resolving power of approximately 30,000 from 1100 A to 1970 A. The spatial resolution was 2 x 60 solar sec of arc. During the Skylab mission 6400 exposures were made with the instrument pointed by an astronaut at selected and recorded solar positions.

  17. ATM protein is located on presynaptic vesicles and its deficit leads to failures in synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vail, Graham; Cheng, Aifang; Han, Yu Ray; Zhao, Teng; Du, Shengwang; Loy, Michael M T; Herrup, Karl; Plummer, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a multisystemic disorder that includes a devastating neurodegeneration phenotype. The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein is well-known for its role in the DNA damage response, yet ATM is also found in association with cytoplasmic vesicular structures: endosomes and lysosomes, as well as neuronal synaptic vesicles. In keeping with this latter association, electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral pathway in hippocampal slices from ATM-deficient mice does not elicit normal long-term potentiation (LTP). The current study was undertaken to assess the nature of this deficit. Theta burst-induced LTP was reduced in Atm(-/-) animals, with the reduction most pronounced at burst stimuli that included 6 or greater trains. To assess whether the deficit was associated with a pre- or postsynaptic failure, we analyzed paired-pulse facilitation and found that it too was significantly reduced in Atm(-/-) mice. This indicates a deficit in presynaptic function. As further evidence that these synaptic effects of ATM deficiency were presynaptic, we used stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction revealed that ATM is significantly more closely associated with Piccolo (a presynaptic marker) than with Homer1 (a postsynaptic marker). These results underline how, in addition to its nuclear functions, ATM plays an important functional role in the neuronal synapse where it participates in the regulation of presynaptic vesicle physiology. PMID:27075534

  18. ATM kinase activity modulates Fas sensitivity through the regulation of FLIP in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Venturina; di Bari, Maria Giovanna; Cursi, Silvia; Condò, Ivano; Cencioni, Maria Teresa; Testi, Roberto; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Cundari, Enrico; Barilà, Daniela

    2008-01-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare cancer-predisposing genetic disease, caused by the lack of functional ATM kinase, a major actor of the double strand brakes (DSB) DNA-damage response. A-T patients show a broad and diverse phenotype, which includes an increased rate of lymphoma and leukemia development. Fas-induced apoptosis plays a fundamental role in the homeostasis of the immune system and its defects have been associated with autoimmunity and lymphoma development. We therefore investigated the role of ATM kinase in Fas-induced apoptosis. Using A-T lymphoid cells, we could show that ATM deficiency causes resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis. A-T cells up-regulate FLIP protein levels, a well-known inhibitor of Fas-induced apoptosis. Reconstitution of ATM kinase activity was sufficient to decrease FLIP levels and to restore Fas sensitivity. Conversely, genetic and pharmacologic ATM kinase inactivation resulted in FLIP protein up-regulation and Fas resistance. Both ATM and FLIP are aberrantly regulated in Hodgkin lymphoma. Importantly, we found that reconstitution of ATM kinase activity decreases FLIP protein levels and restores Fas sensitivity in Hodgkin lymphoma-derived cells. Overall, these data identify a novel molecular mechanism through which ATM kinase may regulate the immune system homeostasis and impair lymphoma development. PMID:17932249

  19. The effects of mobile ATM switches on PNNI peer group operation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-04-01

    This contribution discusses why, and how, mobile networks and mobile switches might be discussed during Phase 1 of the WATM standards process. Next, it reviews mobile routers within Mobile IP. That IP mobility architecture may not apply to the proposed mobile ATM switches. Finally, it discusses problems with PNNI peer group formation and operation when mobile ATM switches are present.

  20. ATM: An unexpected tumor-promoting factor in HER2-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stagni, Venturina; Oropallo, Veronica; Barilà, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ATM kinase is a gatekeeper of genome stability. However, its role in several other signaling pathways suggests that it might not always act as a tumor suppressor. Here, we discuss recent data that unveil a function of ATM as a tumor promoter in HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:27308589

  1. Neurons in Vulnerable Regions of the Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Display Reduced ATM Signaling123

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xuting; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Jiali; Kofler, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a multisystemic disease caused by mutations in the ATM (A-T mutated) gene. It strikes before 5 years of age and leads to dysfunctions in many tissues, including the CNS, where it leads to neurodegeneration, primarily in cerebellum. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), by contrast, is a largely sporadic neurodegenerative disorder that rarely strikes before the 7th decade of life with primary neuronal losses in hippocampus, frontal cortex, and certain subcortical nuclei. Despite these differences, we present data supporting the hypothesis that a failure of ATM signaling is involved in the neuronal death in individuals with AD. In both, partially ATM-deficient mice and AD mouse models, neurons show evidence for a loss of ATM. In human AD, three independent indices of reduced ATM function—nuclear translocation of histone deacetylase 4, trimethylation of histone H3, and the presence of cell cycle activity—appear coordinately in neurons in regions where degeneration is prevalent. These same neurons also show reduced ATM protein levels. And though they represent only a fraction of the total neurons in each affected region, their numbers significantly correlate with disease stage. This previously unknown role for the ATM kinase in AD pathogenesis suggests that the failure of ATM function may be an important contributor to the death of neurons in AD individuals. PMID:27022623

  2. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Akinori; Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  3. Fragments of ATM which have dominant-negative or complementing activity.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, S E; Lovly, C; Pandita, T K; Shiloh, Y; Kastan, M B

    1997-01-01

    The ATM protein has been implicated in pathways controlling cell cycle checkpoints, radiosensitivity, genetic instability, and aging. Expression of ATM fragments containing a leucine zipper motif in a human tumor cell line abrogated the S-phase checkpoint after ionizing irradiation and enhanced radiosensitivity and chromosomal breakage. These fragments did not abrogate irradiation-induced G1 or G2 checkpoints, suggesting that cell cycle checkpoint defects alone cannot account for chromosomal instability in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells. Expression of the carboxy-terminal portion of ATM, which contains the PI-3 kinase domain, complemented radiosensitivity and the S-phase checkpoint and reduced chromosomal breakage after irradiation in AT cells. These observations suggest that ATM function is dependent on interactions with itself or other proteins through the leucine zipper region and that the PI-3 kinase domain contains much of the significant activity of ATM. PMID:9121450

  4. An ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase mediated response to DNA damage down-regulates the mRNA-binding potential of THOC5

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sheetal; Tran, Doan Duy Hai; Klebba-Faerber, Sabine; Kardinal, Christian; Whetton, Anthony D.; Tamura, Teruko

    2011-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, transcription is blocked by inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity. The regulation of a preexisting pool of mRNAs, therefore, plays a key role in DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, or inhibition of differentiation. THOC5 is a member of the THO complex and plays a role in the export of a subset of mRNA, which plays an important role in hematopoiesis and maintaining primitive cells. Since three serine residues in the PEST domain of THOC5 have been shown to be directly phosphorylated by ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, we examined the THOC5-dependent mRNA export under DNA damage. We show here that DNA damage drastically decreased the cytoplasmic pool of a set of THOC5-dependent mRNAs and impaired the THOC5/mRNA complex formation. The mRNP complex formed with nonphosphorylation mutant (S307/312/314A) THOC5, but not with a C-terminal deletion mutant after DNA damage, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of THOC5, but not its phosphorylation in the PEST domain, is necessary for the regulation of the mRNA-binding potency of THOC5. The cytoplasmic THOC5-dependent mRNAs were recovered by treatment with ATM kinase-specific or p53-specific siRNA, as well as by treatment with ATM kinase inhibitor, KU55933, under DNA damage conditions, suggesting that the ATM–kinase–p53 pathway is involved in this response to the DNA damage. Furthermore, the treatment with KU55933 blocked DNA damage-induced THOC5mRNP complex dissociation, indicating that activation of ATM kinase suppresses the ability of THOC5 to bind to its target mRNAs. PMID:21937706

  5. Jaridonin-induced G2/M phase arrest in human esophageal cancer cells is caused by reactive oxygen species-dependent Cdc2-tyr15 phosphorylation via ATM-Chk1/2-Cdc25C pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Cheng; Su, Nan; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Wen; Ke, Yu; Zi, Xiaolin; Zhao, Ning-Min; Qin, Yu-Hua; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Hong-Min

    2015-01-15

    Jaridonin, a novel diterpenoid from Isodon rubescens, has been shown previously to inhibit proliferation of esophageal squamous cancer cells (ESCC) through G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. However, the involved mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we found that the cell cycle arrest by Jaridonin was associated with the increased expression of phosphorylation of ATM at Ser1981 and Cdc2 at Tyr15. Jaridonin also resulted in enhanced phosphorylation of Cdc25C via the activation of checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2, as well as in increased phospho-H2A.X (Ser139), which is known to be phosphorylated by ATM in response to DNA damage. Furthermore, Jaridonin-mediated alterations in cell cycle arrest were significantly attenuated in the presence of NAC, implicating the involvement of ROS in Jaridonin's effects. On the other hand, addition of ATM inhibitors reversed Jaridonin-related activation of ATM and Chk1/2 as well as phosphorylation of Cdc25C, Cdc2 and H2A.X and G2/M phase arrest. In conclusion, these findings identified that Jaridonin-induced cell cycle arrest in human esophageal cancer cells is associated with ROS-mediated activation of ATM-Chk1/2-Cdc25C pathway. PMID:25450480

  6. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M; Finch-Savage, William E; West, Christopher E

    2016-08-23

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  7. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds

    PubMed Central

    Waterworth, Wanda M.; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M.; Finch-Savage, William E.; West, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  8. ATM-Dependent Hyper-Radiosensitivity in Mammalian Cells Irradiated by Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Lian; Yu Dong Furusawa, Yoshiya; Cao Jianping; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fan Saijun

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and the later appearing radioresistance (termed induced radioresistance [IRR]) was mainly studied in low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation with survival observation. The aim of this study was to find out whether equivalent hypersensitivity occurred in high LET radiation, and the roles of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Methods and Materials: Survival and mutation were measured by clonogenic assay and HPRT mutation assay. ATM Ser1981 activation was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. Pretreatment of specific ATM inhibitor (10 {mu}M KU55933) and activator (20 {mu}g/mL chloroquine) before carbon radiation were adopted to explore the involvement of ATM. The roles of ATM were also investigated in its G2/M checkpoint function with histone H3 phosphorylation analysis and flow cytometric assay, and DNA double strand break (DSB) repair function measured using {gamma}-H2AX foci assay. Results: HRS/IRR was observed with survival and mutation in normal human skin fibroblast cells by carbon ions, while impaired in cells with intrinsic ATM deficiency or normal cells modified with specific ATM activator or inhibitor before irradiation. The dose-response pattern of ATM kinase activation was concordant with the transition from HRS to IRR. The ATM-dependent 'early' G2 checkpoint arrest and DNA DSB repair efficiency could explain the difference between HRS and IRR. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the HRS/IRR by carbon ion radiation is an ATM-dependent phenomenon in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  9. Contribution of mutations in ATM to breast cancer development in the Czech population.

    PubMed

    Soukupova, Jana; Dundr, Pavel; Kleibl, Zdenek; Pohlreich, Petr

    2008-06-01

    Mutations in the ATM gene are the cause of a rare autosomal recessive syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). Of the general population, approximately 0.35-1% has been estimated to be heterozygous for a germline mutation in the ATM gene. The finding that ATM heterozygotes have an increased breast cancer risk was supported by some studies but not confirmed by others. In our study, the entire coding sequence of the ATM gene was prescreened for mutations by the protein truncation test to detect the chain-terminating mutations that are highly predominant in patients with AT. DNA sequencing then characterized 3 (1.9%) pathogenic mutations among 161 high-risk breast cancer patients. The c.5177+1G>A splicing mutation was a novel gene alteration. No mutation was detected in a group of 183 control individuals. Our results suggest that truncating mutations in ATM increase breast cancer risk and contribute to inherited breast cancer. The analysis further uncovered the c.1066-6T>G splicing mutation once among high-risk patients (0.6%) and twice among controls (1.1%) suggesting that this mutation does not confer an increase in breast cancer risk. On the other hand, individuals heterozygous for this truncating variant displayed loss of exon 11 in approximately 50% of ATM transcripts. Immunohistochemistry did not detect the ATM protein in the tumor sample carrying this mutation. Thus, the association of the c.1066-6T>G mutation with familial breast cancer remains uncertain. Loss of the wild-type ATM allele has not been detected in the tumor samples from heterozygous carriers of the ATM mutation. Our experiments did not detect the hypermethylation of the ATM promoter in any of the DNA samples from tumor tissues. PMID:18497957

  10. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor; Nicolas, Francisco; Moxon, Simon; Haro, Juan de; Calo, Silvia; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa; Dalmay, Tamas

    2011-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi

  11. Poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) Binding to Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Is Critical For PAR Polymerase-1-Dependent Cell Death (Parthanatos)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingfei; Kim, No Soo; Haince, Jean-Francois; Kang, HoChul; David, Karen K.; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) plays a pivotal role in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)-mediated cell death (parthanatos), during which it is released from the mitochondria and translocates to the nucleus. Here, we show that AIF is a high affinity poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)–binding protein and that PAR binding to AIF is required for parthanatos both in vitro and in vivo. AIF bound PAR at a site distinct from AIF’s DNA binding site and this interaction triggered AIF release from the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Mutation of the PAR binding site in AIF did not affect its NADH oxidase activity, its ability to bind FAD or DNA, or its ability to induce nuclear condensation. However, this AIF mutant was not released from mitochondria and did not translocate to the nucleus or mediate cell death following PARP-1 activation. These results suggest a mechanism for PARP-1 to initiate AIF-mediated cell death and indicate that AIF’s bioenergetic cell survival-promoting functions are separate from its effects as a mitochondrially-derived death effector. Interference with the PAR-AIF interaction or PAR signaling may provide unique opportunities for preventing cell death following activation of PARP-1. PMID:21467298

  12. Differential regulation of activator protein-1 and heat shock factor-1 in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury: role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Hake, Paul W; O'Connor, Michael; Denenberg, Alvin; Wong, Hector R; Kong, Sue; Aronow, Bruce J

    2004-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme activated in response to DNA strand breaks, has been implicated in cell dysfunction in myocardial reperfusion injury. PARP-1 has also been shown to participate in transcription and regulation of gene expression. In this study, we investigated the role of PARP-1 on the signal transduction pathway of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) in myocardial reperfusion injury. Mice genetically deficient of PARP-1 (PARP-1(-/-) mice) exhibited a significant reduction of myocardial damage after occlusion and reperfusion of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery compared with their wild-type littermates. This cardioprotection was associated with a reduction of the phosphorylative activity of JNK and, subsequently, reduction of the DNA binding of the signal transduction factor AP-1. On the contrary, in PARP-1(-/-) mice, DNA binding of HSF-1 was enhanced and was associated with a significant increase of the cardioprotective heat shock protein (HSP)70 compared with wild-type mice. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of several AP-1-dependent genes of proinflammatory mediators and HSPs was altered in PARP-1(-/-) mice. The data indicate that PARP-1 may exert a pathological role in reperfusion injury by functioning as an enhancing factor of AP-1 activation and as a repressing factor of HSF-1 activation and HSP70 expression. PMID:14670820

  13. Regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 activity by the phosphorylation state of the nuclear NAD biosynthetic enzyme NMN adenylyl transferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Felicitas; Lau, Corinna; Ziegler, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear NAD+ metabolism constitutes a major component of signaling pathways. It includes NAD+-dependent protein deacetylation by members of the Sir2 family and protein modification by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 has emerged as an important mediator of processes involving DNA rearrangements. High-affinity binding to breaks in DNA activates PARP-1, which attaches poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to target proteins. NMN adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) catalyze the final step of NAD+ biosynthesis. We report here that the nuclear isoform NMNAT-1 stimulates PARP-1 activity and binds to PAR. Its overexpression in HeLa cells promotes the relocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria to the nucleus, a process known to depend on poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Moreover, NMNAT-1 is subject to phosphorylation by protein kinase C, resulting in reduced binding to PAR. Mimicking phosphorylation, substitution of the target serine residue by aspartate precludes PAR binding and stimulation of PARP-1. We conclude that, depending on its state of phosphorylation, NMNAT-1 binds to activated, automodifying PARP-1 and thereby amplifies poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. PMID:17360427

  14. Conformational Activation of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 upon DNA Binding Revealed by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a nuclear protein that plays key roles in several fundamental cellular processes. PARP-1 catalyzes the polymerization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide on itself and other acceptor proteins, forming long branched poly(ADP-ribose) polymers. The catalytic activity of PARP-1 is stimulated upon binding to damaged DNA, but how this signal is transmitted from the N-terminal DNA binding domain to the C-terminal catalytic domain in the context of the full-length enzyme is unknown. In this paper, small-angle X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were used to gain insight into the conformational changes that occur during the catalytic activation of PARP-1 by an 8-mer DNA ligand. The data are consistent with a model in which binding of the DNA ligand establishes interdomain interactions between the DNA binding and catalytic domains, which induces an allosteric change in the active site that promotes catalysis. Moreover, the PARP-1–8-mer complex is seen to adopt a conformation that is poised to recruit DNA repair factors to the site of DNA damage. This study provides the first structural information about the DNA-induced conformational activation of full-length PARP-1. PMID:24588584

  15. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Francisco Esteban; Moxon, Simon; de Haro, Juan P; Calo, Silvia; Grigoriev, Igor V; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M; Dalmay, Tamas

    2010-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi. PMID:20427422

  16. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A.; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer. PMID:26683224

  17. A Novel ATM/TP53/p21-Mediated Checkpoint Only Activated by Chronic γ-Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sasatani, Megumi; Iizuka, Daisuke; Masuda, Yuji; Inaba, Toshiya; Suzuki, Keiji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Umata, Toshiyuki; Kamiya, Kenji; Suzuki, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Different levels or types of DNA damage activate distinct signaling pathways that elicit various cellular responses, including cell-cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence, and apoptosis. Whereas a range of DNA-damage responses have been characterized, mechanisms underlying subsequent cell-fate decision remain elusive. Here we exposed cultured cells and mice to different doses and dose rates of γ-irradiation, which revealed cell-type-specific sensitivities to chronic, but not acute, γ-irradiation. Among tested cell types, human fibroblasts were associated with the highest levels of growth inhibition in response to chronic γ-irradiation. In this context, fibroblasts exhibited a reversible G1 cell-cycle arrest or an irreversible senescence-like growth arrest, depending on the irradiation dose rate or the rate of DNA damage. Remarkably, when the same dose of γ-irradiation was delivered chronically or acutely, chronic delivery induced considerably more cellular senescence. A similar effect was observed with primary cells isolated from irradiated mice. We demonstrate a critical role for the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/tumor protein p53 (TP53)/p21 pathway in regulating DNA-damage-associated cell fate. Indeed, blocking the ATM/TP53/p21 pathway deregulated DNA damage responses, leading to micronucleus formation in chronically irradiated cells. Together these results provide insights into the mechanisms governing cell-fate determination in response to different rates of DNA damage. PMID:25093836

  18. The ABC-transporter AtmA is involved in nickel and cobalt resistance of Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34.

    PubMed

    Mikolay, André; Nies, Dietrich H

    2009-08-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 genome contains an ortholog of Atm1p named AtmA (Rmet_0391, YP_582546). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ABC-type transport system Atm1p is involved in export of iron-sulfur clusters from mitochondria into the cytoplasm for assembly of cytoplasmic iron-sulfur containing proteins. An atmA mutant of C. metallidurans was sensitive to nickel and cobalt but not iron cations. AtmA increased also resistance to these cations in Escherichia coli strains that carry deletions of the genes for other nickel and cobalt transport systems. In C. metallidurans, atmA expression was not significantly induced by nickel and cobalt, but repressed by zinc. AtmA was purified as a 70 kDa protein after expression in E. coli. ATPase activity of AtmA was stimulated by nickel and cobalt. PMID:19132541

  19. Identification of p32 as a novel substrate for ATM in heart

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Hisakazu; Takashima, Seiji Asano, Yoshihiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Satoru; Seguchi, Osamu; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Atsushi; Higo, Shuichiro; Ogai, Akiko; Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Hori, Masatsugu

    2008-02-22

    Chemotherapeutic agents to induce DNA damage have been limited to use due to severe side effects of cardiotoxicity. ATM (Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) is an essential protein kinase in triggering DNA damage responses. However, it is unclear how the ATM-mediated DNA damage responses are involved in the cardiac cell damage. To elucidate these functions in heart, we searched for specific substrates of ATM from mouse heart homogenate. Combining an in vitro phosphorylation following anion-exchange chromatography with purification by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we successfully identified p32, an ASF/SF2-associated protein, as a novel substrate for ATM. An in vitro kinase assay using recombinant p32 revealed that ATM directly phosphorylated p32. Furthermore, we determined Ser 148 of p32 as an ATM phosphorylation site. Since p32 is known to regulate mRNA splicing and transcription, p32 phosphorylation by ATM might be a new transcriptional regulatory pathway for specific DNA damage responses in heart.

  20. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mandriota, Stefano J.; Valentijn, Linda J.; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R.; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B.; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F.; Maris, John M.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma. PMID:26053094

  1. Integrated Service Provisioning in an Ipv6 over ATM Research Network

    SciTech Connect

    Eli Dart; Helen Chen; Jerry Friesen; Jim Brandt; Jim Hutchins; Perry Robertson

    1999-02-01

    During the past few years, the worldwide Internet has grown at a phenomenal rate, which has spurred the proposal of innovative network technologies to support the fast, efficient and low-latency transport of a wide spectrum of multimedia traffic types. Existing network infrastructures have been plagued by their inability to provide for real-time application traffic as well as their general lack of resources and resilience to congestion. This work proposes to address these issues by implementing a prototype high-speed network infrastructure consisting of Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) on top of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) transport medium. Since ATM is connection-oriented whereas IP uses a connection-less paradigm, the efficient integration of IPv6 over ATM is especially challenging and has generated much interest in the research community. We propose, in collaboration with an industry partner, to implement IPv6 over ATM using a unique approach that integrates IP over fast A TM hardware while still preserving IP's connection-less paradigm. This is achieved by replacing ATM's control software with IP's routing code and by caching IP's forwarding decisions in ATM's VPI/VCI translation tables. Prototype ''VR'' and distributed-parallel-computing applications will also be developed to exercise the realtime capability of our IPv6 over ATM network.

  2. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mandriota, Stefano J; Valentijn, Linda J; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F; Maris, John M; Hogarty, Michael D; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J; Versteeg, Rogier; Ansari, Marc; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma. PMID:26053094

  3. Function of the ATR N-terminal domain revealed by an ATM/ATR chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xinping; Zhao Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G.; Cortez, David . E-mail: david.cortez@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-05-01

    The ATM and ATR kinases function at the apex of checkpoint signaling pathways. These kinases share significant sequence similarity, phosphorylate many of the same substrates, and have overlapping roles in initiating cell cycle checkpoints. However, they sense DNA damage through distinct mechanisms. ATR primarily senses single stranded DNA (ssDNA) through its interaction with ATRIP, and ATM senses double strand breaks through its interaction with Nbs1. We determined that the N-terminus of ATR contains a domain that binds ATRIP. Attaching this domain to ATM allowed the fusion protein (ATM*) to bind ATRIP and associate with RPA-coated ssDNA. ATM* also gained the ability to localize efficiently to stalled replication forks as well as double strand breaks. Despite having normal kinase activity when tested in vitro and being phosphorylated on S1981 in vivo, ATM* is defective in checkpoint signaling and does not complement cellular deficiencies in either ATM or ATR. These data indicate that the N-terminus of ATR is sufficient to bind ATRIP and to promote localization to sites of replication stress.

  4. Abacus switch: a new scalable multicast ATM switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, H. Jonathan; Park, Jin-Soo; Choe, Byeong-Seog

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a new architecture for a scalable multicast ATM switch from a few tens to thousands of input ports. The switch, called Abacus switch, has a nonblocking memoryless switch fabric followed by small switch modules at the output ports; the switch has input and output buffers. Cell replication, cell routing, output contention resolution, and cell addressing are all performed distributedly in the Abacus switch so that it can be scaled up to thousnads input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to resolve output port contention while achieving input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to reolve output port contention while achieving input buffers sharing, fairness among the input ports, and multicast call splitting. The channel grouping concept is also adopted in the switch to reduce the hardware complexity and improve the switch's throughput. The Abacus switch has a regular structure and thus has the advantages of: 1) easy expansion, 2) relaxed synchronization for data and clock signals, and 3) building the switch fabric using existing CMOS technology.

  5. Anomalous preservation of pure methane hydrate at 1 atm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Direct measurement of decomposition rates of pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate reveals a thermal regime where methane hydrate metastably `preserves' in bulk by as much as 75 K above its nominal equilibrium temperature (193 K at 1 atm). Rapid release of the sample pore pressure at isothermal conditions between 242 and 271 K preserves up to 93% of the hydrate for at least 24 h, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this regime. Subsequent warming through the H2O ice point then induces rapid and complete dissociation, allowing controlled recovery of the total expected gas yield. This behavior is in marked contrast to that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Anomalous preservation has potential application for successful retrieval of natural gas hydrate or hydrate-bearing sediments from remote settings, as well as for temporary low-pressure transport and storage of natural gas.

  6. NASA's ATM Technology Demonstration-1: Integrated Concept of Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Swenson, Harry N.; Prevot, Thomas; Callantine, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes operations and procedures envisioned for NASA s Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration #1 (ATD-1). The ATD-1 Concept of Operations (ConOps) demonstration will integrate three NASA technologies to achieve high throughput, fuel-efficient arrival operations into busy terminal airspace. They are Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering (TMA-TM) for precise time-based schedules to the runway and points within the terminal area, Controller-Managed Spacing (CMS) decision support tools for terminal controllers to better manage aircraft delay using speed control, and Flight deck Interval Management (FIM) avionics and flight crew procedures to conduct airborne spacing operations. The ATD-1 concept provides de-conflicted and efficient operations of multiple arrival streams of aircraft, passing through multiple merge points, from top-of-descent (TOD) to touchdown. It also enables aircraft to conduct Optimized Profile Descents (OPDs) from en route altitude to the runway, using primarily speed control to maintain separation and schedule. The ATD-1 project is currently addressing the challenges of integrating the three technologies, and implantation into an operational environment. Goals of the ATD-1 demonstration include increasing the throughput of high-density airports, reducing controller workload, increasing efficiency of arrival operations and the frequency of trajectory-based operations, and promoting aircraft ADS-B equipage.

  7. Video transmission on ATM networks. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yun-Chung

    1993-01-01

    The broadband integrated services digital network (B-ISDN) is expected to provide high-speed and flexible multimedia applications. Multimedia includes data, graphics, image, voice, and video. Asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) is the adopted transport techniques for B-ISDN and has the potential for providing a more efficient and integrated environment for multimedia. It is believed that most broadband applications will make heavy use of visual information. The prospect of wide spread use of image and video communication has led to interest in coding algorithms for reducing bandwidth requirements and improving image quality. The major results of a study on the bridging of network transmission performance and video coding are: Using two representative video sequences, several video source models are developed. The fitness of these models are validated through the use of statistical tests and network queuing performance. A dual leaky bucket algorithm is proposed as an effective network policing function. The concept of the dual leaky bucket algorithm can be applied to a prioritized coding approach to achieve transmission efficiency. A mapping of the performance/control parameters at the network level into equivalent parameters at the video coding level is developed. Based on that, a complete set of principles for the design of video codecs for network transmission is proposed.

  8. MAC protocol for an ATM-based SuperPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelopoulos, John D.; Koulouris, John; Fragoulopoulos, Stratos K.

    1996-11-01

    Developments in optical amplifiers and the tendency towards fewer and larger switching stages made feasible and desirable the concept of SuperPONs with a range of 100km. Up to 15000 residential customers can share the SuperPON on a TDMA basis lowering the cost of access to B-ISDN services. Tree PONs require a MAC protocol to arbitrate the access to upstream slots among the competing customer ATM cells in a dynamic and efficient way. The protocol presented in this work combines different access mechanisms according to service quality requirements. All bursty traffic is manipulated transparently using a reservation approach with closed loop control so as to handle the unpredictability of arrivals. In contrast, voice, N-ISDN and other delay sensitive services are provided with unsolicited access permits. In addition, composite cells offered quasi- synchronous permits are used to support STM legacy traffic without echo-cancellers. So, ABR traffic which is delay tolerant and more cost sensitive, can and should be concentrated with full exploitation of multiplexing gain prospects. The permit distribution algorithm focuses on cell spacing, control of CDV, almost jitter free access for synchronous traffic and efficiency for ABR traffic.

  9. Telemedicine with integrated data security in ATM-based networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Andreas; Bernarding, Johannes; Kurth, Ralf; Wenzel, Rudiger; Villringer, Arno; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    1997-05-01

    Telemedical services rely on the digital transfer of large amounts of data in a short time. The acceptance of these services requires therefore new hard- and software concepts. The fast exchange of data is well performed within a high- speed ATM-based network. The fast access to the data from different platforms imposes more difficult problems, which may be divided into those relating to standardized data formats and those relating to different levels of data security across nations. For a standardized access to the formats and those relating to different levels of data security across nations. For a standardized access to the image data, a DICOM 3.0 server was implemented.IMages were converted into the DICOM 3.0 standard if necessary. The access to the server is provided by an implementation of DICOM in JAVA allowing access to the data from different platforms. Data protection measures to ensure the secure transfer of sensitive patient data are not yet solved within the DICOM concept. We investigated different schemes to protect data using the DICOM/JAVA modality with as little impact on data transfer speed as possible.

  10. Cross talk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 methylation and oxidative stress involved in the toxic effect of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Gao, Ai

    2015-01-01

    Given the tremendous growth in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs), concerns about the potential health hazards of TNPs to humans have been raised. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, is involved in many molecular and cellular processes. Limited data demonstrated that certain nanomaterials induced the aberrant hypermethylation of PARP-1. However, the mechanism involved in TNP-induced PARP-1 abnormal methylation has not been studied. A549 cells were incubated with anatase TNPs (22.1 nm) for 24 hours pretreatment with or without methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger α-lipoic acid to assess the possible role of methylation and ROS in the toxic effect of TNPs. After TNPs characterization, a battery of assays was performed to evaluate the toxic effect of TNPs, PARP-1 methylation status, and oxidative damage. Results showed that TNPs decreased the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, in accordance with the increase of lactate dehydrogenase activity, which indicated membrane damage of cells. Similar to the high level of PARP-1 methylation, the generation of ROS was significantly increased after exposure to TNPs for 24 hours. Furthermore, α-lipoic acid decreased TNP-induced ROS generation and then attenuated TNP-triggered PARP-1 hypermethylation. Meanwhile, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine simultaneously decreased the ROS generation induced by TNPs, resulting in the decline of PARP-1 methylation. In summary, TNPs triggered the aberrant hypermethylation of the PARP-1 promoter and there was a cross talk between oxidative stress and PARP-1 methylation in the toxic effect of TNPs. PMID:26366077

  11. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  12. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Interacts with Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 (NRF-1) and Plays a Role in NRF-1 Transcriptional Regulation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad B.; Ji, Ping; Anish, Ramakrishnan; Jacobson, Raymond H.; Takada, Shinako

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) is one of the key transcriptional activators for nuclear-coded genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as for many housekeeping genes. A transcriptional co-activator PGC-1 and its related family member PRC have previously been shown to interact with NRF-1 and co-activate NRF-1. We show here that NRF-1 can also directly interact with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and co-purify the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex. Our in vitro binding experiments show that DNA-binding/dimerization domain of NRF-1 and the N-terminal half of PARP-1, which contains two Zinc fingers and the auto-modification domain, are responsible for the interaction, and that this interaction occurs with or without PARP-1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation). DNA-bound NRF-1 can form a complex with PARP-1, suggesting that NRF-1 can recruit the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex to the promoter. PARP-1 can also PARylate the DNA-binding domain of NRF-1 and negatively regulate NRF-1·PARP-1 interaction. Transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that PARP-1 plays a role during transcriptional activation by NRF-1. Our finding identifies a new aspect of transcriptional regulation used by NRF-1. PMID:19181665

  13. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 and DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Have Equivalent Roles in Double Strand Break Repair Following Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jody; Smith, Graeme; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are predominantly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), involving DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), well characterized for its role in single strand break repair, may also facilitate DSB repair. We investigated the activation of these enzymes by differing DNA ends and their interaction in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: The effect of PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors (KU-0058684 and NU7441) on repair of IR-induced DSBs was investigated in DNA-PK and PARP-1 proficient and deficient cells by measuring gammaH2AX foci and neutral comets. Complementary in vitro enzyme kinetics assays demonstrated the affinities of DNA-PK and PARP-1 for DSBs with varying DNA termini. Results: DNA-PK and PARP-1 both promoted the fast phase of resolution of IR-induced DSBs in cells. Inactivation of both enzymes was not additive, suggesting that PARP-1 and DNA-PK cooperate within the same pathway to promote DSB repair. The affinities of the two enzymes for oligonucleotides with blunt, 3' GGG or 5' GGG overhanging termini were similar and overlapping (K{sub dapp} = 2.6-6.4nM for DNA-PK; 1.7-4.5nM for PARP-1). DNA-PK showed a slightly greater affinity for overhanging DNA and was significantly more efficient when activated by a 5' GGG overhang. PARP-1 had a preference for blunt-ended DNA and required a separate factor for efficient stimulation by a 5' GGG overhang. Conclusion: DNA-PK and PARP-1 are both required in a pathway facilitating the fast phase of DNA DSB repair.

  14. CATCOM catalyst 5 atm 1000 hour aging study using No. 2 fuel oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgerby, I. T.; Olson, B. A.; Lee, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    The durability of the CATCOM catalyst for use in catalytically supported thermal combustion has been demonstrated at 5 atm, complementing a previous 1000 hour durability study at 1 atm. Both of these studies were conducted at about 640 K air preheat temperature at a reference velocity of about 14 m/s; the adiabatic flame temperature of the fuel/air mixture was about 1530 K. The catalyst proved to be capable of low emissions operations after 1000 hours of diesel fuel aging. However, more severe deactivation occurred in the 5 atm test; this was attributed to a loss in kinetic (ignition) activity.

  15. Implementation of an anisotropic turbulence model in the COMMIX-1C/ATM computer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, M.; Chang, F. C.

    The computer code COMMIX-1C/ATM, which describes single-phase, three-dimensional transient thermofluid dynamic problems, provided the framework for the extension of the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model to a six-equation model with additional transport equations for the turbulence heat fluxes and the variance of temperature fluctuations. The new model which allows simulation of anisotropic turbulence in stratified shear flows is referred to as the Anisotropic Turbulence Model (ATM). The ATM has been verified with numerical computations of stable and unstable stratified shear flow between parallel plates.

  16. ATM QoS Experiments Using TCP Applications: Performance of TCP/IP Over ATM in a Variety of Errored Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Brian D.; Ivancic, William D.

    2001-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Quality of Service (QoS) experiments using the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) were performed for various link delays. The link delay was set to emulate a Wide Area Network (WAN) and a Satellite Link. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate the ATM QoS requirements for applications that utilize advance TCP/IP protocols implemented with large windows and Selective ACKnowledgements (SACK). The effects of cell error, cell loss, and random bit errors on throughput were reported. The detailed test plan and test results are presented herein.

  17. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): A New Operational Sensor Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, Cheng-H Joseph; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Mike; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; Gu, Degui; Foo, Alex; Ibrahim, Wael; Robinson, Kris; Chidester, Lynn; Shiue, James

    2012-01-01

    ATMS is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface

  18. Ten new ATM alterations in Polish patients with ataxia-telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Podralska, Marta Joanna; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Ślęzak, Ryszard; Lewandowicz-Uszyńska, Aleksandra; Pietrucha, Barbara; Kołtan, Sylwia; Wigowska-Sowińska, Jadwiga; Pilch, Jacek; Mosor, Maria; Ziółkowska-Suchanek, Iwona; Dzikiewicz-Krawczyk, Agnieszka; Słomski, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Inherited biallelic mutations of the ATM gene are responsible for the development of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). The objective of the present study was to conduct molecular analysis of the ATM gene in a cohort of 24 Polish patients with ataxia-telangiectasia with aim being to provide an updated mutational spectrum in Polish AT patients. As a result of molecular analysis, the status of recurrent mutation was confirmed and ten new ATM variants were detected. Application of MLPA analysis allowed the detection of large genomic deletion. Previously, this type of mutation had never been seen in our population. Finally, in silico analysis was carried out for newly detected ATM alterations. In addition, functional analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of intronic variants: c.3402+30_3402+32delATC. PMID:25614872

  19. Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-..mu..m iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Advisor-Teller Money Manager (ATM) Therapy for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Marc I.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Ablondi, Karen; Black, Anne C.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Patients with concomitant psychiatric and substance use disorders are commonly assigned representative payees or case managers to help manage their funds, but money management has not been conceptualized as a theory-based treatment. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of a money management–based therapy, advisor-teller money manager (ATM), on substance abuse or dependence. Methods Ninety patients at a community mental health center who had a history of cocaine or alcohol abuse or dependence were assessed after random assignment to 36 weeks of ATM (N=47) or a control condition in which use of a financial workbook was reviewed (N=43). Patients assigned to ATM were encouraged to deposit their funds into a third-party account, plan weekly expenditures, and negotiate monthly budgets. Substance use calendars and urine toxicology tests were collected every other week for 36 weeks and again 52 weeks after randomization. Results Patients assigned to ATM had significantly more negative toxicologies for cocaine metabolite over time than patients in the control group, and treating clinicians rated ATM patients as significantly more likely to be abstinent from illicit drugs. Self-reported abstinence from alcohol did not significantly differ between groups. Unexpectedly, patients assigned to ATM were more likely to be assigned a representative payee or a conservator than control participants during the follow-up period (ten of 47 versus two of 43). One patient in ATM assaulted the therapist when his check had not arrived. Conclusions ATM is an efficacious therapy for the treatment of cocaine abuse or dependence among people with concomitant psychiatric illness but requires protection of patient autonomy and staff safety. PMID:20592006

  1. Congestion control and charging for the ABR service category in ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casals, O.; Blondia, Chris L.; Cerda, Llorenc; Van Houdt, Benny

    1998-10-01

    The available bit service (ABR) is a promising 'best effort' service designed to achieve in ATM networks high efficiency and low cell loss. Since the ATM forum approved a first standard, intensive research has been done about ABR. The aim of this paper is to analyze the main research topics involved in ABR, namely: the evaluation of traffic and congestion control schemes, conformance definition and policing and charging.

  2. ATM Polymorphisms Are Associated With Risk of Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Yang Ming; Bi Nan; Fang Mingjing; Sun Tong; Ji Wei; Tan Wen; Zhao Lujun; Yu Dianke; Lin Dongxin; Wang Luhua

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Since the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein plays crucial roles in repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, control of cell cycle checkpoints, and radiosensitivity, we hypothesized that variations in this gene might be associated with radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 253 lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation between 2004 and 2006 were included in this study. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to grade RP. Five haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ATM gene were genotyped using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of RP for genotypes were computed by the Cox model, adjusted for clinical factors. The function of the ATM SNP associated with RP was examined by biochemical assays. Results: During the median 22-month follow-up, 44 (17.4%) patients developed grade {>=} 2 RP. In multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for other clinical predictors, we found two ATM variants were independently associated with increased RP risk. They were an 111G > A) polymorphism (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.07-5.80) and an ATM 126713G > A polymorphism (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.16-5.28). Furthermore, genotype-dependent differences in ATM expression were demonstrated both in cell lines (p < 0.001) and in individual lung tissue samples (p = 0.003), which supported the results of the association study. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms of ATM are significantly associated with RP risk. These variants might exert their effect through regulation of ATM expression and serve as independent biomarkers for prediction of RP in patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy.

  3. ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of All Three Members of the MRN Complex: From Sensor to Adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, Martin F.; Kozlov, Sergei; Gatei, Magtouf; Kijas, Amanda W.

    2015-01-01

    The recognition, signalling and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) involves the participation of a multitude of proteins and post-translational events that ensure maintenance of genome integrity. Amongst the proteins involved are several which when mutated give rise to genetic disorders characterised by chromosomal abnormalities, cancer predisposition, neurodegeneration and other pathologies. ATM (mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and members of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN complex) play key roles in this process. The MRN complex rapidly recognises and locates to DNA DSB where it acts to recruit and assist in ATM activation. ATM, in the company of several other DNA damage response proteins, in turn phosphorylates all three members of the MRN complex to initiate downstream signalling. While ATM has hundreds of substrates, members of the MRN complex play a pivotal role in mediating the downstream signalling events that give rise to cell cycle control, DNA repair and ultimately cell survival or apoptosis. Here we focus on the interplay between ATM and the MRN complex in initiating signaling of breaks and more specifically on the adaptor role of the MRN complex in mediating ATM signalling to downstream substrates to control different cellular processes. PMID:26512707

  4. Accuracy Assessments of ATMS Upper-Level Temperature Sounding Channels Using COSMIC RO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Weng, F.; Zou, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on board Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) is a 22-channel passive microwave radiometer that can provide high-spatial-resolution data for generating temperature and moisture soundings in cloudy conditions. Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) data have high vertical resolution, are not affected by clouds, and are most accurate from 8 to 30 km, making them ideally suited for estimating the precision of ATMS measurements for upper level temperature sounding channels. In this study, Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) RO data are collocated with ATMS observation from December 10, 2011 to June 30, 2012. Compared with GPS simulations using the U.S. Joint Center of Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), the global biases of brightness temperatures from ATMS measurements are within 0.5K for channels 6 to 13 for clear-sky data over ocean. This value is well within the pre-launch specification, indicating that the ATMS upper level temperature sounding channels have high accuracy. The monthly variation and angular dependence of ATMS bias are also examined.

  5. Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

  6. Downregulated Ku70 and ATM associated to poor prognosis in colorectal cancer among Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuanfang; Gao, Jingyan; Lu, Yuanming

    2014-01-01

    Background Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) are a key factor in carcinogenesis. The necessary repair of DSBs is pivotal in maintaining normal cell division. To address the relationship between altered expression of DSB repair of proteins Ku70 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in colorectal cancer (CRC), we examined the expression levels and patterns of Ku70 and ATM in CRC samples. Methods Expression and coexpression of Ku70 and ATM were investigated by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays and confirmed further with fluorescent immunohistochemistry in CRC and pericancerous samples from 112 Chinese patients. Results Downexpression patterns for both Ku70 and ATM were found in the CRC samples and were significantly associated with advanced tumor node metastasis stage and decreased 5-year overall survival rate. Conclusion Downregulated Ku70 and ATM were associated with poor disease-free survival. Loss of Ku70 and ATM expression might act as a biomarker to predict poor prognosis in patients with CRC. PMID:25368522

  7. Breaking the bottleneck: high-speed medical image transmission through ATM network--implementation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hailei L.; Meissner, Marion C.; Cleary, Kevin R.; Rodgers, James E.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper, Georgetown University Medical Center's (GUMC) experience with utilizing ATM technology in a telemedicine application will be presented. This application involves 3D radiation treatment planning where radiological imaging, calculation of the treatment plan, and 3D display all take place at different sites. To do this, GUMC must exchange large amounts of radiology images and data with other institutions in real time. A high speed network consisting of an ATM infrastructure and satellite links was created to connect seamlessly the three sites, GUMC, University of Hawaii, and Ohio Supercomputing Center, which are thousands of miles apart. This paper studies the performance of the ATM network between GUMC and Goddard Space Flight Center, which provides satellite service to link partners in this project. The steps required to test and evaluate the ATM system will be presented. A performance comparison between ATM and Internet-LAN connections will be featured in the presentation. In particular, the theoretical speed of 155 Mbps is hard to reach due to the lack of ATM-native protocols in the transport level of the communication structure.

  8. Drosophila ATM and ATR have distinct activities in the regulation of meiotic DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Eric F; Pedersen, Michael; Tiong, Stanley; White-Brown, Sanese K; Paul, Anshu; Campbell, Shelagh D; McKim, Kim S

    2011-10-31

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia-related (ATR) kinases are conserved regulators of cellular responses to double strand breaks (DSBs). During meiosis, however, the functions of these kinases in DSB repair and the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage checkpoint are unclear. In this paper, we show that ATM and ATR have unique roles in the repair of meiotic DSBs in Drosophila melanogaster. ATR mutant analysis indicated that it is required for checkpoint activity, whereas ATM may not be. Both kinases phosphorylate H2AV (γ-H2AV), and, using this as a reporter for ATM/ATR activity, we found that the DSB repair response is surprisingly dynamic at the site of DNA damage. γ-H2AV is continuously exchanged, requiring new phosphorylation at the break site until repair is completed. However, most surprising is that the number of γ-H2AV foci is dramatically increased in the absence of ATM, but not ATR, suggesting that the number of DSBs is increased. Thus, we conclude that ATM is primarily required for the meiotic DSB repair response, which includes functions in DNA damage repair and negative feedback control over the level of programmed DSBs during meiosis. PMID:22024169

  9. Alteration in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated epigenetic regulation leads to Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhang, Ying; Hart, Ronald P; Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl; Li, Jiali

    2015-12-01

    A long-standing mystery surrounding ataxia-telangiectasia is why it is mainly cerebellar neurons, Purkinje cells in particular, that appear vulnerable to ATM deficiency. Here we present data showing that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a newly recognized epigenetic marker found at high levels in neurons, is substantially reduced in human ataxia-telangiectasia and Atm(-/-) mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. We further show that TET1, an enzyme that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5hmC, responds to DNA damage and manipulation of TET1 activity directly affects the DNA damage signalling and ATM-deficient neuronal cell cycle re-entry and death. Quantitative genome-wide analysis of 5hmC-containing sequences shows that in ATM deficiency there is a cerebellum- and Purkinje cell-specific shift in 5hmC enrichment in both regulatory elements and repeated sequences. Finally, we verify that TET1-mediated 5hmC production is linked to the degenerative process of Purkinje cells and behavioural deficits in Atm(-/-) mice. Taken together, the selective loss of 5hmC plays a critical role in driving Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency. PMID:26510954

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and its cleavage products differentially modulate cellular protection through NF-kappaB-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Castri, Paola; Lee, Yang-Ja; Ponzio, Todd; Maric, Dragan; Spatz, Maria; Bembry, Joliet; Hallenbeck, John

    2014-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and its cleavage products regulate cell viability and NF-kappaB activity when expressed in neurons. PARP-1 cleavage generates a 24 kDa (PARP-1(24)) and an 89 kDa fragment (PARP-1(89)). Compared to WT (PARP-1WT), the expression of an uncleavable PARP-1 (PARP-1(UNCL)) or of PARP-1(24) conferred protection from oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) or OGD/restoration of oxygen and glucose (ROG) damage in vitro, whereas expression of PARP-1(89) was cytotoxic. Viability experiments were performed in SH-SY5Y, a human neuroblastoma cell line, as well as in rat primary cortical neurons. Following OGD, the higher viability in the presence of PARP-1UNCL or PARP-1(24) was not accompanied with decreased formation of poly(ADP-riboses) or higher NAD levels. PARP-1 is a known cofactor for NF-kappaB, hence we investigated whether PARP-1 cleavage influences the inflammatory response. All PARP-1 constructs mimicked PARP-1WT in regard to induction of NF-kappaB translocation into the nucleus and its increased activation during ischemic challenge. However, expression of PARP-1(89) construct induced significantly higher NF-kB activity than PARP-1WT; and the same was true for NF-kappaB-dependent iNOS promoter binding activity. At a protein level, PARP-1UNCL and PARP-1(24) decreased iNOS (and lower levels of iNOS transcript) and COX-2, and increased Bcl-xL The increased levels of NF-kB and iNOS transcriptional activities, seen with cytotoxic PARP-189, were accompanied by higher protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS (and higher levels of INOS transcript) and lower protein expression of Bcl-xL Taken together, these findings suggest that PARP-1 cleavage products may regulate cellular viability and inflammatory responses in opposing ways during in vitro models of "ischemia". PMID:24333653

  11. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and its cleavage products differentially modulate cellular protection through NF-kB-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Castri, Paola; Lee, Yang-ja; Ponzio, Todd; Maric, Dragan; Spatz, Maria; Bembry, Joliet; Hallenbeck, John

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and its cleavage products regulate cell viability and NF-kB activity when expressed in neurons. PARP-1 cleavage generates a 24kDa (PARP-124) and an 89kDa fragment (PARP-189). Compared to WT (PARP-1WT), the expression of an uncleavable PARP-1 (PARP-1UNCL) or of PARP-124 conferred protection from oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) or OGD/restoration of oxygen and glucose (ROG) damage in vitro, whereas expression of PARP-189 was cytotoxic. Viability experiments were performed in SH-SY5Y, a human neuroblastoma cell line, as well as in rat primary cortical neurons. Following OGD, the higher viability in the presence of PARP-1UNCL or PARP-124 was not accompanied with decreased formation of poly(ADP-riboses) or higher NAD levels. PARP-1 is a known cofactor for NF-kB, hence we investigated whether PARP-1 cleavage influences the inflammatory response. All PARP-1 constructs mimicked PARP-1WT in regards to induction of NF-kB translocation into the nucleus and its increased activation during ischemic challenge. However, expression of PARP-189 construct induced significantly higher NF-kB activity than PARP-1WT; and the same was true for NF-kB-dependent iNOS promoter binding activity. At a protein level, PARP-1UNCL and PARP-124 decreased iNOS (and lower levels of iNOS transcript) and COX-2, and increased Bcl-xL. The increased levels of NF-kB and iNOS transcriptional activities, seen with cytotoxic PARP-189, were accompanied by higher protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS (and higher levels of iNOS transcript) and lower protein expression of Bcl-xL. Taken together, these findings suggest that PARP-1 cleavage products may regulate cellular viability and inflammatory responses in opposing ways during in vitro models of “ischemia”. PMID:24333653

  12. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  13. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Taisuke; Nagamatsu, Go; Kosaka, Takeo; Takubo, Keiyo; Hotta, Akitsu; Ellis, James; Suda, Toshio

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} iPS cells were induced with a fluorescence monitoring system. {yields} ATM-deficient tail-tip fibroblasts exhibited quite a low reprogramming efficiency. {yields} iPS cells obtained from ATM-deficient cells had pluripotent cell characteristics. {yields} ATM-deficient iPS cells had abnormal chromosomes, which were accumulated in culture. -- Abstract: During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  14. Cancer risk according to type and location of ATM mutation in ataxia-telangiectasia families.

    PubMed

    Cavaciuti, E; Laugé, A; Janin, N; Ossian, K; Hall, J; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Andrieu, N

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) heterozygotes in AT families have an increased risk of cancer, particularly of breast cancer (BC). However, in BC case-control studies, no significant differences were found in the frequency of ATM mutations between patients and controls. In such studies missense mutations were found more frequently than truncating mutations, suggesting that the cancer risk depends on mutation type. To investigate this possibility, we assessed the risk of BC according to the type and position of the ATM truncating mutation in extended AT families. DNA or RNA that had been isolated from blood or buccal cells of AT children and their relatives was screened for ATM germ-line mutations using restriction endonuclease fingerprinting, the protein truncation test, fluorescence-assisted mismatch analysis, and direct sequencing. The standardized incidence ratio of cancer associated with ATM heterozygosity status and type of mutation was estimated. We tested for genotype-phenotype correlations by simulations, permuting mutations among parental branches. No significant difference was found in the relative risk of breast cancer or any other type of cancer based on mutation type. However, the occurrence of BC may be associated with truncating mutations in certain binding domains of the ATM protein (e.g., P53/BRCA1, beta-adaptin, and FAT domains; P = 0.006). In this limited sample set, the presence of missense or truncating ATM mutations was not associated with different cancer risks. The risk of BC appeared to be associated with the alteration of binding domains rather than with the length of the predicted ATM protein. PMID:15390180

  15. The ATM kinase signaling induced by the low-energy β-particles emitted by (33)P is essential for the suppression of chromosome aberrations and is greater than that induced by the energetic β-particles emitted by (32)P.

    PubMed

    White, Jason S; Yue, Ning; Hu, Jing; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2011-03-15

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) encodes a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase whose activity is increased in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Here we examine ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to either (32)P- or (33)P-orthophosphate under conditions typically employed in metabolic labelling experiments. We calculate that the absorbed dose of IR delivered to a 5cm×5cm monolayer of cells incubated in 2ml media containing 1mCi of the high-energy (1.70MeV) β-particle emitter (32)P-orthophosphate for 30min is ∼1Gy IR. The absorbed dose of IR following an otherwise identical exposure to the low-energy (0.24MeV) β-particle emitter (33)P-orthophosphate is ∼0.18Gy IR. We show that low-energy β-particles emitted by (33)P induce a greater number of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) and greater ATM kinase signaling than energetic β-particles emitted by (32)P. Hence, we demonstrate that it is inappropriate to use (33)P-orthophosphate as a negative control for (32)P-orthophosphate in experiments investigating DNA damage responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Significantly, we show that ATM accumulates in the chromatin fraction when ATM kinase activity is inhibited during exposure to either radionuclide. Finally, we also show that chromosome aberrations accumulate in cells when ATM kinase activity is inhibited during exposure to ∼0.36Gy β-particles emitted by (33)P. We therefore propose that direct cellular exposure to (33)P-orthophosphate is an excellent means to induce and label the IR-induced, ATM kinase-dependent phosphoproteome. PMID:21315088

  16. Analysis of CrIS-ATMS Data Using an AIRS Science Team Version 6 - Like Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis C.

    2013-01-01

    CrIS/ATMS is flying on NPP and is scheduled to fly on JPSS-1. CrIS/ATMS has roughly equivalent capabilities to AIRS/AMSU. The AIRS Science Team Version 6 retrieval algorithm is currently producing very high quality level-3 Climate Data Records (CDR's) that will be critical for understanding climate processes AIRS CDRs should eventually cover the period September 2002 through at least 2020. CrIS/ATMS is the only scheduled follow on to AIRS AMSU. I have been asked by Ramesh Kakar if CrIS/ATMS can be counted on to adequately continue the AIRS/AMSU CDRs beyond 2020, or is something better needed? This research is being done to answer that question. A minimum requirement to obtain a yes answer is that CrIS/ATMS be analyzed using an AIRS Version 6 - like algorithm. NOAA is currently generating CrIS/ATMS products using 2 algorithms: IDPS and NUCAPS

  17. Oxidative DNA damage induces the ATM-mediated transcriptional suppression of the Wnt inhibitor WIF-1 in systemic sclerosis and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Svegliati, Silvia; Marrone, Giusi; Pezone, Antonio; Spadoni, Tatiana; Grieco, Antonella; Moroncini, Gianluca; Grieco, Domenico; Vinciguerra, Maria; Agnese, Savina; Jüngel, Astrid; Distler, Oliver; Musti, Anna Maria; Gabrielli, Armando; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2014-09-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by extensive visceral organ and skin fibrosis. SSc patients have increased production of autoreactive antibodies and Wnt signaling activity. We found that expression of the gene encoding Wnt inhibitor factor 1 (WIF-1) was decreased in fibroblasts from SSc patient biopsies. WIF-1 deficiency in SSc patient cells correlated with increased abundance of the Wnt effector β-catenin and the production of collagen. Knocking down WIF-1 in normal fibroblasts increased Wnt signaling and collagen production. WIF-1 loss and DNA damage were induced in normal fibroblasts by either SSc patient immunoglobulins or oxidative DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet light, hydrogen peroxide, or bleomycin. The DNA damage checkpoint kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediated WIF-1 silencing through the phosphorylation of the transcription factor c-Jun, which in turn activated the expression of the gene encoding activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3). ATF3 and c-Jun were recruited together with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) to the WIF-1 promoter and inhibited WIF-1 expression. Preventing the accumulation of reactive oxygen species or inhibiting the activation of ATM, c-Jun, or HDACs restored WIF-1 expression in cultured SSc patient cells. Trichostatin A, an HDAC inhibitor, prevented WIF-1 loss, β-catenin induction, and collagen accumulation in an experimental fibrosis model. Our findings suggest that oxidative DNA damage induced by SSc autoreactive antibodies enables Wnt activation that contributes to fibrosis. PMID:25185156

  18. Existing and Required Modeling Capabilities for Evaluating ATM Systems and Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odoni, Amedeo R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Delahaye, Daniel; Deyst, John J.; Feron, Eric; Hansman, R. John; Khan, Kashif; Kuchar, James K.; Pujet, Nicolas; Simpson, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    ATM systems throughout the world are entering a period of major transition and change. The combination of important technological developments and of the globalization of the air transportation industry has necessitated a reexamination of some of the fundamental premises of existing Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts. New ATM concepts have to be examined, concepts that may place more emphasis on: strategic traffic management; planning and control; partial decentralization of decision-making; and added reliance on the aircraft to carry out strategic ATM plans, with ground controllers confined primarily to a monitoring and supervisory role. 'Free Flight' is a case in point. In order to study, evaluate and validate such new concepts, the ATM community will have to rely heavily on models and computer-based tools/utilities, covering a wide range of issues and metrics related to safety, capacity and efficiency. The state of the art in such modeling support is adequate in some respects, but clearly deficient in others. It is the objective of this study to assist in: (1) assessing the strengths and weaknesses of existing fast-time models and tools for the study of ATM systems and concepts and (2) identifying and prioritizing the requirements for the development of additional modeling capabilities in the near future. A three-stage process has been followed to this purpose: 1. Through the analysis of two case studies involving future ATM system scenarios, as well as through expert assessment, modeling capabilities and supporting tools needed for testing and validating future ATM systems and concepts were identified and described. 2. Existing fast-time ATM models and support tools were reviewed and assessed with regard to the degree to which they offer the capabilities identified under Step 1. 3 . The findings of 1 and 2 were combined to draw conclusions about (1) the best capabilities currently existing, (2) the types of concept testing and validation that can be carried

  19. Authenticated tracking and monitoring system (ATMS) tracking shipments from an Australian uranium mine

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeneman, J.L.

    1998-08-01

    The Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS) answers the need for global monitoring of the status and location of sensitive items on a worldwide basis, 24 hours a day. ATMS uses wireless sensor packs to monitor the status of the items and environmental conditions. A receiver and processing unit collect a variety of sensor event data. The collected data are transmitted to the INMARSAT satellite communication system, which then sends the data to appropriate ground stations. Authentication and encryption algorithms secure the data during communication activities. A typical ATMS application would be to track and monitor the safety and security of a number of items in transit along a scheduled shipping route. The resulting tracking, timing, and status information could then be processed to ensure compliance with various agreements. Following discussions between the Australian Safeguards Office (ASO), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in early 1995, the parties mutually agreed to conduct and evaluate a field trial prototype ATMS to track and monitor shipments of uranium ore concentrate (UOC) from an operating uranium mine in Australia to a final destination in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, with numerous stops along the way. During the months of February and March 1998, the trial was conducted on a worldwide basis, with tracking and monitoring stations located at sites in both Australia and the US. This paper describes ATMS and the trial.

  20. Activation of the ATM-Snail pathway promotes breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mianen; Guo, Xiaojing; Qian, Xiaolong; Wang, Haibo; Yang, Chunying; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Serrano-Gonzalez, Monica; Jope, Richard S.; Zhou, Binhua; Engler, David A.; Zhan, Ming; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Fu, Li; Xu, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is critical for the maintenance of genetic stability and serves as an anti-cancer barrier during early tumorigenesis. However, the role of the DDR in tumor progression and metastasis is less known. Here, we demonstrate that the ATM kinase, one of the critical DDR elements, is hyperactive in late stage breast tumor tissues with lymph-node metastasis and this hyperactivity correlates with elevated expression of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition marker, Snail. At the molecular level, we demonstrate that ATM regulates Snail stabilization by phosphorylation on Serine-100. Using mass spectrometry, we identified HSP90 as a critical binding protein of Snail in response to DNA damage. HSP90 binds to and stabilizes phosphorylated Snail. We further provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that activation of ATM-mediated Snail phosphorylation promotes tumor invasion and metastasis. Finally, we demonstrate that Snail Serine-100 phosphorylation is elevated in breast cancer tissues with lymph-node metastasis, indicating clinical significance of the ATM-Snail pathway. Together, our findings provide strong evidence that the ATM-Snail pathway promotes tumor metastasis, highlighting a previously undescribed role of the DDR in tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:22923499

  1. Striping noise mitigation in ATMS brightness temperatures and its impact on cloud LWP retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuan; Zou, Xiaolei

    2015-07-01

    Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on board Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite provides global distributions of microwave brightness temperature measurements at 22 temperature and humidity sounding channels twice daily. However, the differences between observations and brightness temperature simulations exhibit a systematic along-track striping noise for all channels. In this study, a set of 22 "optimal" filters is designed to remove the striping noise in different channels. It is shown that the original method for ATMS striping noise mitigation developed by Qin et al. can be simplified and made suitable for use in an operational context. Impacts of striping noise mitigation on small-scale weather features are investigated by comparing ATMS cloud liquid water path (LWP) retrieved before and after striping noise mitigation. It is shown that the optimal filters do not affect small-scale cloud features while smoothing out striping noise in brightness temperatures. It is also shown that the striping noise is present in the LWP retrievals if the striping noise in brightness temperatures of ATMS channels 1 and 2 is not removed. The amplitude of the striping noise in LWP is linearly related to the magnitude of striping noise in ATMS brightness temperature observations.

  2. European project RETAIN: new approach for IBC in teleradiology and PACS based on full ATM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordonnier, Emmanuel; Jensch, Peter F.; Piqueras, Joachim; Gandon, Yves

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the RETAIN project (radiological examination transfer on ATM Integrated Network), which is supported by the European Community, in the frame of the TEN-IBC program (trans-European networks integrated broad band communication). It links together three European sites in France (Rennes), Spain (Barcelona), and Germany (Oldenburg) and involves a partnership between the public national operators France Telecom, Telefonica, and Telekom. One important reason to explicitly consider asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) for medical imaging is that multimedia applications on such networks allow integration of digital data and person-to-person communication. The RETAIN project includes trials of teleworking sessions between radiologists of Rennes and Barcelona within a clinical and/or scientific context based on ATM equipments performing DICOM transfer on examination, digital remote manipulation within a comprehensive dialogue, and high quality visiophony on ATM adaptation layer (AAL) type 1. The project includes also visiophony trials with Oldenburg and preparation of harmonized regional experimentation within an emergency context. The network used is a full 10 Mbits/s ATM network directly connected to local PACSs.

  3. Proteomic profiling of ATM kinase proficient and deficient cell lines upon blockage of proteasome activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, Valeria; Santini, Simonetta; Rossi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Mirco; D'Alessandro, Annamaria; Marchetti, Carlo; Mingardi, Michele; Stagni, Venturina; Barilà, Daniela; Urbani, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) protein kinase is a key effector in the modulation of the functionality of some important stress responses, including DNA damage and oxidative stress response, and its deficiency is the hallmark of Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic disorder. ATM modulates the activity of hundreds of target proteins, essential for the correct balance between proliferation and cell death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the phenotypic adaptation at the protein level both in basal condition and in presence of proteasome blockage in order to identify the molecules whose level and stability are modulated through ATM expression. We pursued a comparative analysis of ATM deficient and proficient lymphoblastoid cells by label-free shotgun proteomic experiments comparing the panel of proteins differentially expressed. Through a non-supervised comparative bioinformatic analysis these data provided an insight on the functional role of ATM deficiency in cellular carbohydrate metabolism's regulation. This hypothesis has been demonstrated by targeted metabolic fingerprint analysis SRM (Selected Reaction Monitoring) on specific thermodynamic checkpoints of glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics. PMID:22641158

  4. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P.

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. A central role of TRAX in the ATM-mediated DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Chen, S-Y; Sun, C-N; Chien, T; Chern, Y

    2016-03-31

    DNA repair is critical for the maintenance of genome stability. Upon genotoxic stress, dysregulated DNA repair may induce apoptosis. Translin-associated factor X (TRAX), which was initially identified as a binding partner of Translin, has been implicated in genome stability. However, the exact role of TRAX in DNA repair remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that TRAX participates in the ATM/H2AX-mediated DNA repair machinery by interacting with ATM and stabilizing the MRN complex at double-strand breaks. The exogenous expression of wild-type (WT) TRAX, but not a TRAX variant lacking the nuclear localization signal (NLS), rescued the vulnerability of TRAX-null mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). This finding confirms the importance of the nuclear localization of TRAX in the repair of DNA damage. Compared with WT MEFs, TRAX-null MEFs exhibited impaired DNA repair (for example, reduced phosphorylation of ATM and H2AX) after treatment with ultra violet-C or γ-ray irradiation and a higher incidence of p53-mediated apoptosis. Our findings demonstrate that TRAX is required for MRN complex-ATM-H2AX signaling, which optimizes DNA repair by interacting with the activated ATM and protects cells from genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:26096928

  6. Supporting HPDC applications over ATM networks with cell-based transport mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Vila-Sallent, J.; Sole-Pareta, J.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we address the problem of supporting High Performance Distributed Computing (HPDC) applications running over ATM networks. For this purpose, we consider a logically separate subnetwork for these applications. After presenting an architectural reference model for the HPDC subnetwork and distinguishing which functions should be installed over the ATM network in order to satisfy the needs of HPDC applications, we propose two mechanisms thatairn at optimizing communications by taking advantage of both the special properties of HPDC traffic and the cell-based nature of ATM. The performance of these mechanisms is evaluated and compared with that achieved by the SSCOP protocol. The results show that when the ATM network experiences high load and the HPDC applications make an intensive use of arrays, cell-based mechanisms become more robust than standard SSCOP and provide low latency and efficient cell loss recovery. Since both situations are very likely to occur in HPDC environments, we conclude that the introduction of cell-based retransmission mechanisms does contribute to enhance performance of HPDC systems over ATM networks.

  7. ATM Deficiency Results in Accumulation of DNA-Topoisomerase I Covalent Intermediates in Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Abhishek; El-Khamisy, Sherif F.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of peptide-linked DNA breaks contributes to neurodegeration in humans. This is typified by defects in tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) and human hereditary ataxia. TDP1 primarily operates at single-strand breaks (SSBs) created by oxidative stress or by collision of transcription machinery with topoisomerase I intermediates (Top1-CCs). Cellular and cell-free studies have shown that Top1 at stalled Top1-CCs is first degraded to a small peptide resulting in Top1-SSBs, which are the primary substrates for TDP1. Here we established an assay to directly compare Top1-SSBs and Top1-CCs. We subsequently employed this assay to reveal an increased steady state level of Top1-CCs in neural cells lacking Atm; the protein mutated in ataxia telangiectasia. Our data suggest that the accumulation of endogenous Top1-CCs in Atm-/- neural cells is primarily due to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species. Biochemical purification of Top1-CCs from neural cell extract and the use of Top1 poisons further confirmed a role for Atm during the formation/resolution of Top1-CCs. Finally, we report that global transcription is reduced in Atm-/- neural cells and fails to recover to normal levels following Top1-mediated DNA damage. Together, these data identify a distinct role for ATM during the formation/resolution of neural Top1-CCs and suggest that their accumulation contributes to the neuropathology of ataxia telangiectasia. PMID:23626666

  8. Mec1/ATR regulates the generation of single-stranded DNA that attenuates Tel1/ATM signaling at DNA ends

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, Michela; Trovesi, Camilla; Galbiati, Alessandro; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Tel1/ATM and Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinases are activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mec1/ATR recruitment to DSBs requires the formation of RPA-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which arises from 5′–3′ nucleolytic degradation (resection) of DNA ends. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mec1 regulates resection of the DSB ends. The lack of Mec1 accelerates resection and reduces the loading to DSBs of the checkpoint protein Rad9, which is known to inhibit ssDNA generation. Extensive resection is instead inhibited by the Mec1-ad mutant variant that increases the recruitment near the DSB of Rad9, which in turn blocks DSB resection by both Rad53-dependent and Rad53-independent mechanisms. The mec1-ad resection defect leads to prolonged persistence at DSBs of the MRX complex that causes unscheduled Tel1 activation, which in turn impairs checkpoint switch off. Thus, Mec1 regulates the generation of ssDNA at DSBs, and this control is important to coordinate Mec1 and Tel1 signaling activities at these breaks. PMID:24357557

  9. Redundant and nonredundant functions of ATM and H2AX in αβ T-lineage lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bu; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Yang-Iott, Katherine S; Sleckman, Barry P; Bassing, Craig H

    2012-08-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and H2AX histone tumor suppressor proteins are each critical for maintenance of cellular genomic stability and suppression of lymphomas harboring clonal translocations. ATM is the predominant kinase that phosphorylates H2AX in chromatin around DNA double-strand breaks, including along lymphocyte Ag receptor loci cleaved during V(D)J recombination. However, combined germline inactivation of Atm and H2ax in mice causes early embryonic lethality associated with substantial cellular genomic instability, indicating that ATM and H2AX exhibit nonredundant functions in embryonic cells. To evaluate potential nonredundant roles of ATM and H2AX in somatic cells, we generated and analyzed Atm-deficient mice with conditional deletion of H2ax in αβ T-lineage lymphocytes. Combined Atm/H2ax inactivation starting in early-stage CD4(-)/CD8(-) thymocytes resulted in lower numbers of later-stage CD4(+)/CD8(+) thymocytes, but led to no discernible V(D)J recombination defect in G1 phase cells beyond that observed in Atm-deficient cells. H2ax deletion in Atm-deficient thymocytes also did not affect the incidence or mortality of mice from thymic lymphomas with clonal chromosome 14 (TCRα/δ) translocations. Yet, in vitro-stimulated Atm/H2ax-deficient splenic αβ T cells exhibited a higher frequency of genomic instability, including radial chromosome translocations and TCRβ translocations, compared with cells lacking Atm or H2ax. Collectively, our data demonstrate that both redundant and nonredundant functions of ATM and H2AX are required for normal recombination of TCR loci, proliferative expansion of developing thymocytes, and maintenance of genomic stability in cycling αβ T-lineage cells. PMID:22730535

  10. Histone H2AX participates the DNA damage-induced ATM activation through interaction with NBS1

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Junya Tauchi, Hiroshi; Chen, Benjamin; Bruma, Sandeep; Tashiro, Satoshi; Matsuura, Shinya; Tanimoto, Keiji; Chen, David J.; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2009-03-20

    Phosphorylated histone H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) functions in the recruitment of DNA damage response proteins to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and facilitates DSB repair. ATM also co-localizes with {gamma}-H2AX at DSB sites following its auto-phosphorylation. However, it is unclear whether {gamma}-H2AX has a role in activation of ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoints. Here, we show that ATM as well as NBS1 is recruited to damaged-chromatin in a {gamma}-H2AX-dependent manner. Foci formation of phosphorylated ATM and ATM-dependent phosphorylation is repressed in H2AX-knockdown cells. Furthermore, anti-{gamma}-H2AX antibody co-immunoprecipitates an ATM-like protein kinase activity in vitro and recombinant H2AX increases in vitro kinase activity of ATM from un-irradiated cells. Moreover, H2AX-deficient cells exhibited a defect in ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoints. Taken together, {gamma}-H2AX has important role for effective DSB-dependent activation of ATM-related damage responses via NBS1.

  11. Functional Proteomics Analysis to Study ATM Dependent Signaling in Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Olga; Zhang, Lihua; Kirilyuk, Alexander; Zandkarimi, Fereshteh; Kaur, Prabhjit; Ressom, Habtom W.; Jung, Mira; Dritschilo, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a human genetic disease characterized by radiation sensitivity, impaired neuronal development and predisposition to cancer. Using a genetically defined model cell system consisting of cells expressing a kinase dead or a kinase proficient ATM gene product, we previously reported systemic alterations in major metabolic pathways that translate at the gene expression, protein and small molecule metabolite levels. Here, we report ionizing radiation induced stress response signaling arising from perturbations in the ATM gene, by employing a functional proteomics approach. Functional pathway analysis shows robust translational and post-translational responses under ATM proficient conditions, which include enrichment of proteins in the Ephrin receptor and axonal guidance signaling pathways. These molecular networks offer a hypothesis generating function for further investigations of cellular stress responses. PMID:23642045

  12. Inter-calibration and validation of observations from SAPHIR and ATMS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, I.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of evaluating observations from microwave instruments aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP, ATMS instrument) and Megha-Tropiques (SAPHIR instrument) satellites. The study includes inter-comparison and inter-calibration of observations of similar channels from the two instruments, evaluation of the satellite data using high-quality radiosonde data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and GPS Radio Occultaion Observations from COSMIC mission, as well as geolocation error correction. The results of this study are valuable for generating climate data records from these instruments as well as for extending current climate data records from similar instruments such as AMSU-B and MHS to the ATMS and SAPHIR instruments. Reference: Moradi et al., Intercalibration and Validation of Observations From ATMS and SAPHIR Microwave Sounders. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. 01/2015; DOI: 10.1109/TGRS.2015.2427165

  13. WIPP Transparency Project - container tracking and monitoring demonstration using the Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS)

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOENEMAN, J. LEE; SMARTT, HEIDI ANNE; HOFER, DENNIS

    2000-01-27

    The Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS) is designed to answer the need for global monitoring of the status and location of proliferation-sensitive items on a worldwide basis, 24 hours a day. ATMS uses wireless sensor packs to monitor the status of the items within the shipment and surrounding environmental conditions. Receiver and processing units collect a variety of sensor event data that is integrated with GPS tracking data. The collected data are transmitted to the International Maritime Satellite (INMARSAT) communication system, which then sends the data to mobile ground stations. Authentication and encryption algorithms secure the data during communication activities. A typical ATMS application would be to track and monitor the stiety and security of a number of items in transit along a scheduled shipping route. The resulting tracking, timing, and status information could then be processed to ensure compliance with various agreements.

  14. Improved virtual queuing and dynamic EPD techniques for TCP over ATM

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Siu, K.Y.; Ren, W.

    1998-11-01

    It is known that TCP throughput can degrade significantly over UBR service in a congested ATM network, and the early packet discard (EPD) technique has been proposed to improve the performance. However, recent studies show that EPD cannot ensure fairness among competing VCs in a congested network, but the degree of fairness can be improved using various forms of fair buffer allocation techniques. The authors propose an improved scheme that utilizes only a single shared FIFO queue for all VCs and admits simple implementation for high speed ATM networks. The scheme achieves nearly perfect fairness and throughput among multiple TCP connections, comparable to the expensive per-VC queuing technique. Analytical and simulation results are presented to show the validity of this new scheme and significant improvement in performance as compared with existing fair buffer allocation techniques for TCP over ATM.

  15. Evaluation of traffic management implementation and testing issues within an ATM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Kenneth R.; Burin, Kay

    1997-10-01

    Data and telecommunications industries are using ATM in a number of applications and in several configurations, enabling companies to re-engineer important functions and effectively distribute the workforce as needed. In this paper, the authors will define and offer solutions to the issues and concerns of telecom/datacom mangers when providing enhanced network access via ATM. We quantify several important traffic management implementation and testing issues within an ATM network. Guidelines are presented for meeting quality of service requirements, for mapping source traffic descriptors into different service classes, and for measuring various traffic management parameters. Abstract test suite development is discussed with respect to performance testing, and guidelines are presented on performance testing in network and in application designs.

  16. An experimental study of VBR video over various ATM switch architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, R.P.; Hsieh, J.; Du, D.H.C.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most important components of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network is the switch. Switch design is not a part of the ATM standards so vendors use a wide variety of techniques to build their switches. In this paper, the authors present experimental results of switching and multiplexing real-time Variable Bit Rate (VBR) video traffic (JPEG, MPEG-1, and MPEG-2) through two different ATM switch architectures. Real-time VBR traffic, such as digital video, is particularly interesting due to its high demands in terms of bandwidth, real-time delivery and processing requirements. The experiments show that the fastest switches, i.e., lowest latencies, do not necessarily perform better when transmitting VBR video. The impact of the high speed network components; characteristics, such as switch fabric architecture, buffering strategies, and higher layer transport protocols (i.e., UDP, TCP/IP), are illustrated through the experimental results.

  17. An ATM-independent S-phase checkpoint response involves CHK1 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Baocheng; Guan, Jun; Iliakis, George; Wang, Ya

    2002-01-01

    After exposure to genotoxic stress, proliferating cells actively slow down the DNA replication through a S-phase checkpoint to provide time for repair. We report that in addition to the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent pathway that controls the fast response, there is an ATM-independent pathway that controls the slow response to regulate the S-phase checkpoint after ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. The slow response of S-phase checkpoint, which is resistant to wortmannin, sensitive to caffeine and UCN-01, and related to cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation, is much stronger in CHK1 overexpressed cells, and it could be abolished by Chk1 antisense oligonucleotides. These results provide evidence that the ATM-independent slow response of S-phase checkpoint involves CHK1 pathway.

  18. Simulation study of World Wide Web traffic over the ATM ABR service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandalore, Bobby; Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar; Jain, Raj; Goyal, Rohit; Fahmy, Sonia

    1998-10-01

    Asynchronous transfer-mode (ATM) is the technology chosen for implementing the broadband integrated services digital network. The performance of internet protocols over ATM is an extremely important research area. As web traffic forms a major portion of the Internet traffic, we model WWW servers and clients running over an ATM network using the available bit rate (ABR) service. The WWW servers are modeled using a variant of the SPECweb96 benchmark, while the WWW clients are based on a model proposed. The traffic generated is typically bursty, having active and idle transmission periods. A timeout occurs after a certain idle interval. During idle periods, the underlying TCP congestion windows remain large until the timer expires. This raises the possibility of large queues at the switches, if the source rates ar not controlled by ABR. We study this problem and show that ABR scales well to a large number of bursty TCP sources in the system.

  19. Sandia`s network for supercomputing `95: Validating the progress of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, T.J.; Vahle, O.; Gossage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Networking Integration Department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past three years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. For Supercomputing `95, Sandia elected: to demonstrate the functionality and capability of an AT&T Globeview 20Gbps Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch, which represents the core of Sandia`s corporate network, to build and utilize a three node 622 megabit per second Paragon network, and to extend the DOD`s ACTS ATM Internet from Sandia, New Mexico to the conference`s show floor in San Diego, California, for video demonstrations. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations supports Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

  20. Differential response of normal and malignant urothelial cells to CHK1 and ATM inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-T; Catto, J W F; Meuth, M

    2015-05-28

    While DNA damage response pathways are well characterized in cancer cells, much less is known about their status in normal cells. These pathways protect tumour cells from DNA damage and replication stress and consequently present potential therapeutic targets. Here we characterize the response of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized normal human urothelial (NHU) and bladder cancer cell lines to agents that disrupt the DNA damage response. Effects of replication and DNA damage response inhibitors on cell cycle progression, checkpoint induction and apoptosis were analysed in hTERT-NHU and bladder cancer cell lines. The primary signalling cascade responding to replication stress in malignant cells (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related-checkpoint kinase 1 (ATR-CHK1)) is not activated in hTERT-NHU cells after treatment with a replication inhibitor and these cells do not depend upon CHK1 for protection from apoptosis during replication stress. Instead, ATM signalling is rapidly activated under these conditions. Intriguingly, an ATM inhibitor suppressed S-phase checkpoint activation after exposure to replication inhibitors and stopped entry of cells into S-phase indicating G1 checkpoint activation. Consistent with this, hTERT-NHU cells treated with the ATM inhibitor showed increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19(INK4D), reduced levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4, and reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein. In contrast, a bladder cancer cell line cotreated with ATM and replication inhibitors progressed more slowly through S phase and showed a marked increase in apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that ATM and CHK1 signalling cascades have different roles in tumour and normal epithelial cells, confirming these as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25043304

  1. Final Report for the Scaled Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Encryption Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.; Witzke, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    This effort studied the integration of innovative methods of key management crypto synchronization, and key agility while scaling encryption speed. Viability of these methods for encryption of ATM cell payloads at the SONET OC- 192 data rate (10 Gb/s), and for operation at OC-48 rates (2.5 Gb/s) was shown. An SNL-Developed pipelined DES design was adapted for the encryption of ATM cells. A proof-of-principle prototype circuit board containing 11 Electronically Programmable Logic Devices (each holding the equivalent of 100,000 gates) was designed, built, and used to prototype a high speed encryptor.

  2. CDF DAQ upgrade and CMS DAQ R and D: event builder tests using an ATM switch

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; Daniels, T.; Kelley, K.

    1996-12-31

    The present data acquisition system of the CDF experiment has to be upgraded for the higher luminosities expected during the Run 11 (1999+) data-taking period. The core of the system, consisting of a control network based on reflective memories will remain the same. The network used for data transfers, however, will have to be changed. We have investigated ATM as a possible replacement technology for the current Ultranet switch. We present preliminary results on this new ATM-based event builder system.

  3. Thermal control evaluation of a Shuttle Orbiter solar observatory using Skylab ATM backup hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Class, C. R.; Presta, G.; Trucks, H.

    1975-01-01

    A study under the sponsorship of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) established the feasibility to utilize the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) backup hardware for early low cost Shuttle Orbiter solar observation missions. A solar inertial attitude and a seven-day, full sun exposure were baselined. As a portion of the study, a series of thermal control evaluations were performed to resolve the problems caused by the relocation of the ATM to the Shuttle Orbiter bay and resulting configuration changes. Thermal control requirements, problems, the use of solar shields, Spacelab supplied fluid cooling and component placement are discussed.

  4. High-speed connections for storage systems; HIPPI, fibre channel, and ATM: Whats happening?

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.

    1995-04-01

    A group of eight Digital Equipment Corporation Alpha workstations is interconnected with ATM to form a cluster with supercomputer power. For output, each workstation drives a single ``tile`` on an 8-tile high-resolution frame buffer. A special purpose adapter is used to convert the workstation`s ATM format to the frame buffer`s HIPPI format. This paper discusses the rationale behind the workstation farm, and then describes the visualization output path in detail. To provide the system quickly, special emphasis was placed on making the design as simple as possible. The design choices are examined, and the resultant system is described. The oral presentation will include operational experiences.

  5. Experiments at SRT Using the NOAA CrIS/ATMS Proxy Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis; Iredell, Lena

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the talk are: (1) Assess the performance of NGAS Version-1.5.03.00 CrIS/ATMS retrieval algorithm as delivered by LaRC, modified to include the MW and IR tuning coefficients and new CrIS noise model (a) Percent acceptance (b) RMS and mean differences of T(p) vs. ECMWF truth as a function of % yield (2) Compare performance of NGAS retrieval algorithm with an AIRS Science Team Version-6 like retrieval algorithm modified at Sounder Research Team (SRT) for CrIS/ATMS

  6. Leo Satellite Communication through a LEO Constellation using TCP/IP Over ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foore, Lawrence R.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    The simulated performance characteristics for communication between a terrestrial client and a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite server are presented. The client and server nodes consist of a Transmission Control Protocol /Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over ATM configuration. The ATM cells from the client or the server are transmitted to a gateway, packaged with some header information and transferred to a commercial LEO satellite constellation. These cells are then routed through the constellation to a gateway on the globe that allows the client/server communication to take place. Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) is specified as the quality of service (QoS). Various data rates are considered.

  7. The profiles of gamma-H2AX along with ATM/DNA-PKcs activation in the lymphocytes and granulocytes of rat and human blood exposed to gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yin, Lina; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Xuxia; Ding, Defang; Gao, Yun; Li, Qiang; Chen, Honghong

    2016-08-01

    Establishing a rat model suitable for γ-H2AX biodosimeter studies has important implications for dose assessment of internal radionuclide contamination in humans. In this study, γ-H2AX, p-ATM and p-DNA-PKcs foci were enumerated using immunocytofluorescence method, and their protein levels were measured by Western blot in rat blood lymphocytes and granulocytes exposed to γ-rays compared with human blood lymphocytes and granulocytes. It was found that DNA double-strand break repair kinetics and linear dose responses in rat lymphocytes were similar to those observed in the human counterparts. Moreover, radiation induced clear p-ATM and p-DNA-PKcs foci formation and an increase in ratio of co-localization of p-ATM or p-DNA-PKcs with γ-H2AX foci in rat lymphocytes similar to those of human lymphocytes. The level of γ-H2AX protein in irradiated rat and human lymphocytes was significantly reduced by inhibitors of ATM and DNA-PKcs. Surprisingly, unlike human granulocytes, rat granulocytes with DNA-PKcs deficiency displayed a rapid accumulation, but delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci with essentially no change from 10 h to 48 h post-irradiation. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM activity in rat granulocytes also decreased radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci formation. In comparison, human granulocytes showed no response to irradiation regarding γ-H2AX, p-ATM or p-DNA-PKcs foci. Importantly, incidence of γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes after total-body radiation of rats was consistent with that of in vitro irradiation of rat lymphocytes. These findings show that rats are a useful in vivo model for validation of γ-H2AX biodosimetry for dose assessment in humans. ATM and DNA-PKcs participate together in DSB repair in rat lymphocytes similar to that of human lymphocytes. Further, rat granulocytes, which have the characteristic of delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci in response to radiation, may be a useful experimental system for biodosimetry studies. PMID:27260225

  8. Having pancreatic cancer with tumoral loss of ATM and normal TP53 protein expression is associated with a poorer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haeryoung; Saka, Burcu; Knight, Spencer; Borges, Michael; Childs, Erica; Klein, Alison; Wolfgang, Christopher; Herman, Joseph; Adsay, Volkan N.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goggins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine how often loss of ATM protein expression occurs in primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and to determine its prognostic significance. Experimental Design The expression of ATM and TP53 was determined by immunohistochemistry in 397 surgically-resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (Hopkins), a second set of 159 cases (Emory) and 21 cancers after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Expression was correlated with the clinicopathologic parameters, including survival. Results Tumoral ATM loss was observed in one cancer known to have bi-allelic inactivation of ATM and 50 of the first 396 (12.8%) cases, significantly more often in patients with a family history of pancreatic cancer (12/49; 24.5%) than in those without (38/347; 11.0%) (p=0.019). In the Hopkins series, ATM loss was associated with a significantly decreased overall survival in patients whose cancers had normal TP53 expression (p=0.019) and was a significant independent predictor of decreased overall survival (p=0.014). Seventeen (10.7%) of 159 Emory cases had tumoral ATM loss and tumoral ATM loss/normal TP53 was associated with poorer overall survival (p=0.1). Multivariate analysis of the combined Hopkins/Emory cases found tumoral ATM loss/normal TP53 was an independent predictor of decreased overall survival (HR 2.61, CI1.27–5.37, p=0.009). Of 21 cancers examined after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy one had tumoral loss of ATM; it had no histological evidence of tumor response. Conclusions Tumoral loss of ATM protein was detected more often in patients with a family history of pancreatic cancer than in those without. Patients whose pancreatic cancers had loss of ATM but normal TP53 had worse overall survival after pancreatic resection. PMID:24486587

  9. Shallot and licorice constituent isoliquiritigenin arrests cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis through the induction of ATM/p53 and initiation of the mitochondrial system in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chia, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Ping-Jye; Huang, Su-Er; Huang, Soon-Cen; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2009-07-01

    This study is the first to investigate the anticancer effect of isoliquiritigenin (ISL) in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. The results reveal that ISL inhibits HeLa cells by blocking cell cycle progression in the G2/M phase and inducing apoptosis. Blockade of cell cycle is associated with increased activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Activation of ATM by ISL phosphorylated p53 at Serine15, resulting in increased stability of p53 by decreasing p53 and murine double minute-2 (MDM2) interaction. In addition, ISL-mediated G2/M phase arrest was also associated with decreases in the amounts of cyclin B, cyclin A, cdc2, and cdc25C, and increases in the phosphorylation of Chk2, cdc25C, and cdc2. The specific ATM inhibitor caffeine significantly decreased ISL-mediated G2/M arrest by inhibiting the phosphorylation of p53 (Serine15) and Chk2. ISL induced apoptotic cell death is associated with changes in the expression of Bax and Bak, decreasing levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), and subsequently triggering mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In addition, pretreatment of cells with caspase-9 inhibitor blocked ISL-induced apoptosis, indicating that caspase-9 activation is involved in ISL-mediated HeLa cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that ISL may be a promising chemopreventive agent against human uterine cervical cancer. PMID:19536869

  10. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA Damage Checkpoint Promotes Androgen Induced Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Liu, Ji; Tang, Kaidun; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2012-01-01

    The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR) to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:23272087

  11. An evaluation of the ATM man/machine interface. Phase 3: Analysis of SL-3 and SL-4 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathurst, J. R., Jr.; Pain, R. F.; Ludewig, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The functional adequacy of human factored crew operated systems under operational zero-gravity conditions is considered. Skylab ATM experiment operations generated sufficient telemetry and voice transcript data to support such an assessment effort. Discussions are presented pertaining to the methodology and procedures used to evaluate the hardware, training and directive aspects of Skylab 3 and Skylab 4 manned ATM experiment operations.

  12. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Harbort, C J; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Amulic, Borko

    2015-12-24

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  13. Characterization of LWR spent fuel MCC-approved testing material-ATM-101

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J.O.

    1984-06-01

    The characterization data, obtained to date, for Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Materials (ATM)-101, spent fuel from H.B. Robinson, Unit 2, Assembly BO-5, are described. ATM-101 consists of 27 equal-length segments from nine fuel rods. Characterizations provided for ATM-101 include, (1) reactor, assembly, and fuel rod descriptions, (2) Assembly BO-5 irradiation history, (3) a description of unusual incidents that occurred to the rods, (4) fission gas release measurements, (5) results of ceramography/metallography examinations, (6) fuel burnup measurement results and correlations, (7) results of gamma scanning, (8) calculated values of the radionuclide inventory, and (9) results of a radionuclide chemical overcheck. Calculations for and measurement of radial distributions of selected radionuclides are planned. A description of pertinent results from other studies on sibling rods from Assembly BO-5 is also included. The distribution of ATM-101 to date is described along with characterization results on specially processed material. It is intended that this report be revised and updated as additional characterization data become available. 6 references, 23 figures, 19 tables.

  14. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Harbort, C. J.; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M.; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  15. Quantitative proteomics reveal ATM kinase-dependent exchange in DNA damage response complexes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Serah; Srivas, Rohith; Fu, Katherine Y; Hood, Brian L; Dost, Banu; Gibson, Gregory A; Watkins, Simon C; Van Houten, Bennett; Bandeira, Nuno; Conrads, Thomas P; Ideker, Trey; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2012-10-01

    ATM is a protein kinase that initiates a well-characterized signaling cascade in cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the role for ATM in coordinating critical protein interactions and subsequent exchanges within DNA damage response (DDR) complexes is unknown. We combined SILAC-based tandem mass spectrometry and a subcellular fractionation protocol to interrogate the proteome of irradiated cells treated with or without the ATM kinase inhibitor KU55933. We developed an integrative network analysis to identify and prioritize proteins that were responsive to KU55933, specifically in chromatin, and that were also enriched for physical interactions with known DNA repair proteins. This analysis identified 53BP1 and annexin A1 (ANXA1) as strong candidates. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that the exchange of GFP-53BP1 in DDR complexes decreased with KU55933. Further, we found that ANXA1 knockdown sensitized cells to IR via a mechanism that was not potentiated by KU55933. Our study reveals a role for ATM kinase activity in the dynamic exchange of proteins in DDR complexes and identifies a role for ANXA1 in cellular radioprotection. PMID:22909323

  16. Designing a Strategic Plan through an Emerging Knowledge Generation Process: The ATM Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanotti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this contribution is to describe a new methodology for designing strategic plans and how it was implemented by ATM, a public transportation agency based in Milan, Italy. Design/methodology/approach: This methodology is founded on a new system theory, called "quantum systemics". It is based on models and metaphors both of…

  17. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): The First 10 Months On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, C-H Joseph; Blackwell, Willaim; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Kent; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; Gu, Degui; Foo, Alex; Ibrahim, Wael; Robinson, Kris; Chidester, Lynn; Shiue, James

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, especially under cloudy sky conditions. ATMS has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-A1/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). All this is accomplished with approximately 1/4 the volume, 1/2 the mass, and 1/2 the power of the three AMSUs. A description of ATMS cal/val activities will be presented followed by examples of its performance after its first 10 months on orbit.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material: ATM-WV/205 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    The ATM-WV/205 glass was produced in accordance with PNL's QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of this work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-WV/205 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. The ATM-WV/205 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the sponsor's specifications. Visually, the ATM-WV/205 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination and x-ray diffraction revealed low (about 0.5 wt %) concentrations of 3-..mu..m iron chrome spinel crystals and 1-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 20 to 135 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 3 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  19. Very Long Baseline Connected Interferometry via the 2.4-Gbps ATM Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, H.; Kaneko, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Kawaguchi, N.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujisawa, K.; Nakajima, J.; Kondo, T.; Uose, H.; Iwamura, S.; Hoshino, T.; Iguchi, S.; Amagai, J.; Yoshino, T.

    2000-04-01

    The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), the National Astronomical Observatory (NAO), the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), and the Telecommunication Network Laboratory Group of Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) have developed a very long baseline connected interferometry 6-station array with a maximum baseline length of 208km, using a high-speed asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network with an AAL1 that corresponds to the constant bit-rate protocol. The VLBI observed data (256 Mbps/station) is transmitted through a 2.488-Gbps [STM-16/OC-48] ATM network instead of being recorded onto magnetic tape. By combining antennas via a high-speed ATM network, a highly-sensitive connected interferometry system has been realized. The system was composed of two real-time VLBI networks: the Key-Stone Project (KSP) network of CRL (which is used for measuring crustal deformation in the Tokyo metropolitan area), and the OLIVE (Optically LInked VLBI Experiment) network of NAO and ISAS which is used for astronomy (space VLBI). These networks operated in cooperation with NTT. In order to realize connected interferometry, the acquired VLBI data (256 Mbps/station) were corrected via the ATM networks and were synthesized using the VLBI technique. The cross-correlation processing and data observation were done simultaneously.

  20. Implementation of multi-vendor DICOM standard image transfer in hospital wide ATM network.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Tani, S; Baatar, S; Naito, Y; Kanno, T; Sakusabe, T; Aizawa, M

    1998-01-01

    At Hamamatsu University Hospital, an ATM + FDDI network was installed in January 1995, when the hospital information system was upgraded. With its unique 'wheel' shape configuration, FDDI automatically backs up in case of an ATM switch failure. The authors implemented a DICOM image database server and DICOM viewer in the Hamamatsu University Hospital ATM + FDDI network. The DICOM standard worked well between different vendor products. In sending 512 x 512, 2 byte CT images, 40% of the transfer time was spent for the network data transfer, which is 70% of the theoretical value of 10 Mb peripheral transfer rate. Meanwhile, ATM load factor increased less than 0.5%. As we have a very fast data transfer network, we must check display speed, hard disc access time, PC bus speed, and display software, in order to enjoy the high speed network transfer fully. The sequence of image transmission within a study is not stated in the DICOM document and is depending on the server. Therefore, there should be an agreement between server and clients, still more than DICOM, in order to make better PACS. PMID:9804003

  1. Evaluating ATM Technology for Distance Education in Library and Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Serena W.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the impact of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology in an interactive environment providing distance education in library and information science at two San Jose State University (California) sites. The main purpose of the study was to develop a reliable and valid evaluation instrument. Contains 6 tables. (Author/AEF)

  2. Process for immune defect and chromosomal translocation during early thymocyte development lacking ATM.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Takeshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Piao, Jinhua; Nakagama, Shun; Sato, Masaki; Masuda, Kyoko; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Azuma, Miyuki; Morio, Tomohiro; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Shuki

    2012-07-26

    Immune defect in ataxia telangiectasia patients has been attributed to either the failure of V(D)J recombination or class-switch recombination, and the chromosomal translocation in their lymphoma often involves the TCR gene. The ATM-deficient mouse exhibits fewer CD4 and CD8 single-positive T cells because of a failure to develop from the CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive phase to the single-positive phase. Although the occurrence of chromosome 14 translocations involving TCR-δ gene in ATM-deficient lymphomas suggests that these are early events in T-cell development, a thorough analysis focusing on early T-cell development has never been performed. Here we demonstrate that ATM-deficient mouse thymocytes are perturbed in passing through the β- or γδ-selection checkpoint, leading in part to the developmental failure of T cells. Detailed karyotype analysis using the in vitro thymocyte development system revealed that RAG-mediated TCR-α/δ locus breaks occur and are left unrepaired during the troublesome β- or γδ-selection checkpoints. By getting through these selection checkpoints, some of the clones with random or nonrandom chromosomal translocations involving TCR-α/δ locus are selected and accumulate. Thus, our study visualized the first step of multistep evolutions toward lymphomagenesis in ATM-deficient thymocytes associated with T-lymphopenia and immunodeficiency. PMID:22709691

  3. ATM/ATR-mediated phosphorylation of PALB2 promotes RAD51 function.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, Johanna K; Larsen, Brian D; Achanta, Kavya; Sørensen, Claus S

    2016-05-01

    DNA damage activates the ATM and ATR kinases that coordinate checkpoint and DNA repair pathways. An essential step in homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA breaks is the formation of RAD51 nucleofilaments mediated by PALB2-BRCA2; however, roles of ATM and ATR in this critical step of HDR are poorly understood. Here, we show that PALB2 is markedly phosphorylated in response to genotoxic stresses such as ionizing radiation and hydroxyurea. This response is mediated by the ATM and ATR kinases through three N-terminal S/Q-sites in PALB2, the consensus target sites for ATM and ATR Importantly, a phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant is unable to support proper RAD51 foci formation, a key PALB2 regulated repair event, whereas a phospho-mimicking PALB2 version supports RAD51 foci formation. Moreover, phospho-deficient PALB2 is less potent in HDR than wild-type PALB2. Further, this mutation reveals a separation in PALB2 function, as the PALB2-dependent checkpoint response is normal in cells expressing the phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant. Collectively, our findings highlight a critical importance of PALB2 phosphorylation as a novel regulatory step in genome maintenance after genotoxic stress. PMID:27113759

  4. Characterization of LWR spent fuel MCC-approved testing material - ATM-101. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J.O.

    1985-06-01

    The characterization data, obtained to date, for Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Material (ATM)-101, spent fuel from H.B. Robinson, Unit 2, Assembly B0-5, are described. ATM-101 consists of 27 equal-length segments from nine fuel rods. Characterizations provided for ATM-101 include: (1) reactor, assembly, and fuel rod descriptions; (2) Assembly BO-5 irradiation history; (3) a description of unusual incidents that occurred to the rods; (4) fission gas release measurements; (5) results of ceramography/metallography examinations; (6) fuel burnup measurement results and correlations; (7) results of gamma scanning; (8) calculated values of the radionuclide inventory; and (9) results of a radionuclide chemical overcheck. Calculations for and measurement of radial distributions of selected radionuclides are planned, but not scheduled. A description of pertinent results from other studies on sibling rods from Assembly B0-5 is also included. The distribution of ATM-101 to date is described along with characterization results on specially processed material. It is intended that this report be revised and updated as additional characterization data become available. 6 refs., 30 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): First Year On-Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Lyu, C.; Blackwell, W. J.; Leslie, V.; Baker, N.; Mo, T.; Sun, N.; Bi, L.; Anderson, K.; Landrum, M.; De Amici, G.; Gu, D.; Foo, A.; Ibrahim, W.; Robinson, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (S-NPP) satellite and has just finished its first year on orbit. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface. Designed & built by Aerojet Corporation in Azusa, California, (now Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems), ATMS has 22 channels spanning 23—183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-A1 and A2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). It continues their cross-track scanning geometry, but for the first time, provides Nyquist sample spacing. All this is accomplished with approximately one quarter the volume, one half the mass, and one half the power of the three AMSUs. A summary description of the ATMS design will be presented. Post-launch calibration/validation activities include geolocation determination, radiometric calibration using the on-board warm targets and cold space views, simultaneous observations by microwave sounders on other satellites, comparison vs. pre-launch thermovacuum test performance; observations vs. atmospheric model predicted radiances, and comparisons of soundings vs. radiosondes. Brief descriptions of these

  6. Novel tricyclic poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1/2 inhibitors with potent anticancer chemopotentiating activity: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hu, Yan; Wang, Xueyan; He, Guangwei; Xu, Yungen; Zhu, Qihua

    2016-10-01

    8,9-Dihydro-2,4,7,9a-tetraazabenzo[cd]azulen-6(7H)-ones were designed and synthesized as a new class of PARP-1/2 inhibitors. The compounds displayed a variable pattern of PARP-1/2 enzymes inhibition profile that, in part, paralleled the antiproliferative activity in cell lines. Among them, compound 9e exhibited not only the significant IC50 value of 28nM in the PARP-1 and 7.7nM in PARP-2 enzyme assay, but also a profound synergic efficacy combined with temozolomide with PF50 values of 2.6, 2.5, and 6.5 against MDA-MB-468, SW-620 and A549 and cell line, respectively. PMID:27561983

  7. S-NPP ATMS Instrument Prelaunch and On-Orbit Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, Cheng-Hsuan; Anderson, Kent; Leslie, Vincent R.; Blackwell, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The first of a new generation of microwave sounders was launched aboard the Suomi-National Polar-Orbiting Partnership satellite in October 2011. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) combines the capabilities and channel sets of three predecessor sounders into a single package to provide information on the atmospheric vertical temperature and moisture profiles that are the most critical observations needed for numerical weather forecast models. Enhancements include size/mass/power approximately one third of the previous total, three new sounding channels, the first space-based, Nyquist-sampled cross-track microwave temperature soundings for improved fusion with infrared soundings, plus improved temperature control and reliability. This paper describes the ATMS characteristics versus its predecessor, the advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU), and presents the first comprehensive evaluation of key prelaunch and on-orbit performance parameters. Two-year on-orbit performance shows that the ATMS has maintained very stable radiometric sensitivity, in agreement with prelaunch data, meeting requirements for all channels (with margins of 40% for channels 1-15), and improvements over AMSU-A when processed for equivalent spatial resolution. The radiometric accuracy, determined by analysis from ground test measurements, and using on-orbit instrument temperatures, also shows large margins relative to requirements (specified as <1.0K for channels 1, 2, and 16-22 and <0.75 K for channels 3-15). A thorough evaluation of the performance of ATMS is especially important for this first proto-flight model unit of what will eventually be a series of ATMS sensors providing operational sounding capability for the U.S. and its international partners well into the next decade.

  8. p27Kip1 Is Required to Mediate a G1 Cell Cycle Arrest Downstream of ATM following Genotoxic Stress.

    PubMed

    Cassimere, Erica K; Mauvais, Claire; Denicourt, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a coordinated signaling network that ensures the maintenance of genome stability under DNA damaging stress. In response to DNA lesions, activation of the DDR leads to the establishment of cell cycle checkpoints that delay cell-cycle progression and allow repair of the defects. The tumor suppressor p27Kip1 is a cyclin-CDK inhibitor that plays an important role in regulating quiescence in a variety of tissues. Several studies have suggested that p27Kip1 also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we demonstrate that p27Kip1 is essential for the establishment of a G1 checkpoint arrest after DNA damage. We also uncovered that ATM phosphorylates p27Kip1 on a previously uncharacterized residue (Ser-140), which leads to its stabilization after induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of this stabilization by replacing endogenous p27Kip1 with a Ser-140 phospho-mutant (S140A) significantly sensitized cells to IR treatments. Our findings reveal a novel role for p27Kip1 in the DNA damage response pathway and suggest that part of its tumor suppressing functions relies in its ability to mediate a G1 arrest after the induction of DNA double strand breaks. PMID:27611996

  9. AID-Induced Genotoxic Stress Promotes B Cell Differentiation in the Germinal Center via ATM and LKB1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mara H.; Kuraishy, Ali I.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hong, Jason S.; Cacalano, Nicholas A.; Gatti, Richard A.; Manis, John P.; Damore, Michael A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Teitell, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY During an immune response, B cells undergo rapid proliferation and AID-dependent remodeling of immunoglobulin (IG) genes within germinal centers (GCs) to generate memory B and plasma cells. Unfortunately, the genotoxic stress associated with the GC reaction also promotes most B cell malignancies. Here we report that exogenous- and intrinsic AID-induced DNA strand breaks activate ATM, which signals through an LKB1 intermediate to inactivate CRTC2, a transcriptional coactivator of CREB. Using genome-wide location analysis, we determined that CRTC2 inactivation unexpectedly represses a genetic program that controls GC B cell proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation while opposing lymphomagenesis. Inhibition of this pathway results in increased GC B cell proliferation, reduced antibody secretion, and impaired terminal differentiation. Multiple distinct pathway disruptions were also identified in human GC B cell lymphoma patient samples. Combined, our data show that CRTC2 inactivation, via physiologic DNA damage response signaling, promotes B cell differentiation in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:20864035

  10. Nitric Oxide (NO) Releasing Poly ADP-ribose Polymerase 1 (PARP-1) Inhibitors Targeted to Glutathione S-Transferase P1-Overexpressing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the antitumor effects of nitric oxide (NO) releasing derivatives of the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (1). Compound 5b was prepared by coupling the carboxyl group of 3b and the free amino group of arylated diazeniumdiolated piperazine 4. Analogue 5a has the same structure except that the F is replaced by H. Compound 13 is the same as 5b except that a Me2N–N(O)=NO– group was added para and ortho to the nitro groups of the dinitrophenyl ring. The resulting prodrugs are activated by glutathione in a reaction accelerated by glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), an enzyme frequently overexpressed in cancers. This metabolism generates NO plus a PARP-1 inhibitor simultaneously, consuming reducing equivalents, leading to DNA damage concomitant with inhibition of DNA repair, and in the case of 13 inducing cross-linking glutathionylation of proteins. Compounds 5b and 13 reduced the growth rates of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts with no evidence of systemic toxicity. PMID:24521039

  11. Germline ATM mutational analysis in BRCA1/BRCA2 negative hereditary breast cancer families by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Graña, B; Fachal, L; Darder, E; Balmaña, J; Ramón Y Cajal, T; Blanco, I; Torres, A; Lázaro, C; Diez, O; Alonso, C; Santamariña, M; Velasco, A; Teulé, A; Lasa, A; Blanco, A; Izquierdo, A; Borràs, J; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, S; Vega, A; Brunet, J

    2011-07-01

    Biallelic inactivation of ATM gene causes the rare autosomal recessive disorder Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). Female relatives of A-T patients have a two-fold higher risk of developing breast cancer (BC) compared with the general population. ATM mutation carrier identification is laborious and expensive, therefore, a more rapid and directed strategy for ATM mutation profiling is needed. We designed a case-control study to determine the prevalence of 32 known ATM mutations causing A-T in Spanish population in 323 BRCA1/BRCA2 negative hereditary breast cancer (HBC) cases and 625 matched Spanish controls. For the detection of the 32 ATM mutations we used the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique. We identified one patient carrier of the c.8264_8268delATAAG ATM mutation. This mutation was not found in the 625 controls. These results suggest a low frequency of these 32 A-T causing mutations in the HBC cases in our population. Further case-control studies analyzing the entire coding and flanking sequences of the ATM gene are warranted in Spanish BC patients to know its implication in BC predisposition. PMID:21445571

  12. The acid trehalase, ATM1, contributes to the in vivo growth and virulence of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium acridum.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Peng, Guoxiong; Liu, Yingchun; Xia, Yuxian

    2015-04-01

    For pathogens, the ability to acquire available nutrients in a host is a key to their survival and replication. Entomopathogenic fungi of the genus Metarhizium secrete trehalase, which enables them to use trehalose, the predominant sugar in insects. Here, the roles of the acid trehalase gene (ATM1) in the in vivo growth and virulence of Metarhizium acridum were investigated. Phenotypic analysis showed that disruption of ATM1 severely reduced fungal growth on exogenous trehalose as the sole carbon source. Bioassays showed that ATM1 disruption impaired the virulence of M. acridum against the host insect Locusta migratoria. The ATM1-disruption strain (ΔATM1) grown more slowly than the wild-type strain (WT) and complemented transformant (CP) in locust blood, which was consistent with the activity of acid trehalase in the hemolymph of infected locusts. Correspondingly, the trehalose concentration in locusts infected by ΔATM1 was significantly higher than in those infected by WT or CP. Thus, ATM1 disruption led to a significant reduction in virulence by adversely affecting the fungal growth in insect hemolymph, which resulted from the inability of the mutant strain to use trehalose. PMID:25865794

  13. A novel ATM-dependent checkpoint defect distinct from loss of function mutation promotes genomic instability in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spoerri, Loredana; Brooks, Kelly; Chia, KeeMing; Grossman, Gavriel; Ellis, Jonathan J; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Škalamera, Dubravka; Pavey, Sandra; Burmeister, Bryan; Gabrielli, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Melanomas have high levels of genomic instability that can contribute to poor disease prognosis. Here, we report a novel defect of the ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in melanoma cell lines that promotes genomic instability. In defective cells, ATM signalling to CHK2 is intact, but the cells are unable to maintain the cell cycle arrest due to elevated PLK1 driving recovery from the arrest. Reducing PLK1 activity recovered the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest, and over-expressing PLK1 was sufficient to overcome the checkpoint arrest and increase genomic instability. Loss of the ATM-dependent checkpoint did not affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation demonstrating that this defect is distinct from ATM loss of function mutations. The checkpoint defective melanoma cell lines over-express PLK1, and a significant proportion of melanomas have high levels of PLK1 over-expression suggesting this defect is a common feature of melanomas. The inability of ATM to impose a cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage increases genomic instability. This work also suggests that the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest is likely to be defective in a higher proportion of cancers than previously expected. PMID:26854966

  14. MPEG-2 Over Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Over Satellite Quality of Service (QoS) Experiments: Laboratory Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Frantz, Brian D.; Spells, Marcus J.

    1998-01-01

    Asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) quality of service (QoS) experiments were performed using MPEG-2 (ATM application layer 5, AAL5) over ATM over an emulated satellite link. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the free-space link quality necessary to transmit high-quality multimedia information by using the ATM protocol. The detailed test plan and test configuration are described herein as are the test results. MPEG-2 transport streams were baselined in an errored environment, followed by a series of tests using, MPEG-2 over ATM. Errors were created both digitally as well as in an IF link by using a satellite modem and commercial gaussian noise test set for two different MPEG-2 decoder implementations. The results show that ITU-T Recommendation 1.356 Class 1, stringent ATM applications will require better link quality than currently specified; in particular, cell loss ratios of better than 1.0 x 10(exp -8) and cell error ratios of better than 1.0 x 10(exp -7) are needed. These tests were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of satellite-ATM interoperability research.

  15. ATM sequence variants and risk of radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis after postmastectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreassen, Christian N.; Overgaard, Jens; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Marie; Herskind, Carsten; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Stock, Richard G.; Rosenstein, Barry S. . E-mail: barry.rosenstein@mssm.edu

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the hypothesis that women who are carriers of genetic alterations in the ATM gene are more likely to develop subcutaneous fibrosis after radiotherapy for treatment of breast cancer compared with patients who do not possess DNA sequence variations in this gene. Methods and Materials: DNA samples isolated from fibroblast cell lines established from 41 women treated with postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer were screened for genetic variants in ATM using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). A minimum follow-up of 2 years enabled analysis of late effects to generate dose-response curves and to estimate the dose that resulted in a 50% incidence of Grade 3 fibrosis (ED{sub 5}). Results: A total of 26 genetic alterations in the expressed portions of the ATM gene, or within 10 bases of each exon in regions encompassing putative splice sites, were detected in 22 patients. The ED{sub 5} (95% confidence interval) of 60.2 (55.7-65.1) Gy calculated for patients without a sequence variation did not differ significantly from the ED{sub 5} of 58.4 (54.0-63.1) Gy for the group of patients with any ATM sequence abnormality. The ED{sub 5} of 53.7 (50.2-57.5) Gy for those patients who were either homozygous or heterozygous for the G{sup {yields}}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which results in substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein, was substantially lower than the ED{sub 5} of 60.8 (57.0-64.8) Gy for patients not carriers of this sequence alteration. This resulted in an enhancement ratio (ratio of the ED{sub 5} values) of 1.13 (1.05-1.22), which was significantly greater than unity. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest an association between the ATM codon 1853 Asn/Asp and Asn/Asn genotypes with the development of Grade 3 fibrosis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy.

  16. Association between ATM polymorphisms and cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Yin, Zhi-Hua; Wan, Yan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Kun; Zhou, Bao-Sen

    2012-05-01

    To date, epidemiological studies have assessed the association between Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and cancer risk, including lung cancer, breast cancer, glioma and pancreatic cancer. However, the results of these studies remain controversial. We aimed to examine the associations between two SNPs (rs664143 and rs664677) and cancer risk by conducting a meta-analysis of case-control studies. A total of 12 publications were included in this meta-analysis, 8 for rs664143 and 7 for rs664677. Overall, rs664143 heterozygote carriers turned out to be associated with cancer risk (OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.02-1.36). In the subgroup analysis by cancer type, we observed that the ATM rs664143 polymorphism was significantly associated with lung cancer risk (GA vs. GG: OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.18-1.85, AA vs. GG: OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.18-1.93) and rs664677 polymorphism was associated with decreased lung cancr risk and increased breast cancer risk (for lung cancer: TC vs. TT: OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.62-0.92, CC vs. TT: OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-0.99 and for breast cancer: TC vs. TT: OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.17-1.73, CC vs. TT: OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.21-1.87). In the subgroup analysis by region, we also observed that individuals with ATM rs664143 GA or AA genotype had an obvious increased cancer risk among Asian people (GA vs. GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.20-1.63, AA vs. GG: OR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.16-1.62). In conclusion, ATM rs664143 polymorphism was associated with cancer susceptibility. ATM rs664143 polymorphism was significantly associated with lung cancer risk. ATM rs664677 polymorphism was associated with decreased lung cancer risk as well as increased breast cancer risk. PMID:22203481

  17. Skylab ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer: Instrument description, parameter determination, and analysis example (15 June 1973 1B/M3 flare)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The Skylab ATM/S-056 X-Ray Event Analyzer, part of an X-ray telescope experiment, is described. The techniques employed in the analysis of its data to determine electron temperatures and emission measures are reviewed. The analysis of a sample event - the 15 June 1973 1B/M3 flare - is performed. Comparison of the X-Ray Event Analyzer data with that of the SolRad 9 observations indicates that the X-Ray Event Analyzer accurately monitored the sun's 2.5 to 7.25 A X-ray emission and to a lesser extent the 6.1 to 20 A emission. A mean average peak temperature of 15 million K at 1,412 UT and a mean average peak electron density (assuming a flare volume of 10 to the 13 power cu km) of 27 million/cu mm at 1,416 to 1,417 UT are deduced for the event. The X-Ray Event Analyzer data, having a 2.5 s time resolution, should be invaluable in comparisons with other high-time resolution data (e.g., radio bursts).

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM

  19. Results from CrIS-ATMS Obtained Using the AIRS Science Team Retrieval Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis C.; Iredell, Lena

    2013-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua in May 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB (which subsequently failed early in the mission), to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. AIRS/AMSU had two primary objectives. The first objective was to provide real-time data products available for use by the operational Numerical Weather Prediction Centers in a data assimilation mode to improve the skill of their subsequent forecasts. The second objective was to provide accurate unbiased sounding products with good spatial coverage that are used to generate stable multi-year climate data sets to study the earth's interannual variability, climate processes, and possibly long-term trends. AIRS/AMSU data for all time periods are now being processed using the state of the art AIRS Science Team Version-6 retrieval methodology. The Suomi-NPP mission was launched in October 2011 as part of a sequence of Low Earth Orbiting satellite missions under the "Joint Polar Satellite System" (JPSS). NPP carries CrIS and ATMS, which are advanced infra-red and microwave atmospheric sounders that were designed as follow-ons to the AIRS and AMSU instruments. The main objective of this work is to assess whether CrIS/ATMS will be an adequate replacement for AIRS/AMSU from the perspective of the generation of accurate and consistent long term climate data records, or if improved instruments should be developed for future flight. It is critical for CrIS/ATMS to be processed using an algorithm similar to, or at least comparable to, AIRS Version-6 before such an assessment can be made. We have been conducting research to optimize products derived from CrIS/ATMS observations using a scientific approach analogous to the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm. Our latest research uses Version-5.70 of the CrIS/ATMS retrieval algorithm, which is otherwise analogous to AIRS Version-6, but does not yet contain the benefit of use of a Neural-Net first guess start-up system

  20. Results from CrIS/ATMS Obtained Using an "AIRS Version-6 Like" Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis; Iredell, Lena; Blaisdell, John

    2015-01-01

    AIRS and CrIS Version-6.22 O3(p) and q(p) products are both superior to those of AIRS Version-6.Monthly mean August 2014 Version-6.22 AIRS and CrIS products agree reasonably well with OMPS, CERES, and witheach other. JPL plans to process AIRS and CrIS for many months and compare interannual differences. Updates to thecalibration of both CrIS and ATMS are still being finalized. We are also working with JPL to develop a joint AIRS/CrISlevel-1 to level-3 processing system using a still to be finalized Version-7 retrieval algorithm. The NASA Goddard DISCwill eventually use this system to reprocess all AIRS and recalibrated CrIS/ATMS. .

  1. D-ATM, a working example of health care interoperability: From dirt path to gravel road.

    PubMed

    DeClaris, John-William

    2009-01-01

    For many years, there have been calls for interoperability within health care systems. The technology currently exists and is being used in business areas like banking and commerce, to name a few. Yet the question remains, why has interoperability not been achieved in health care? This paper examines issues encountered and success achieved with interoperability during the development of the Digital Access To Medication (D-ATM) project, sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). D-ATM is the first government funded interoperable patient management system. The goal of this paper is to provide lessons learned and propose one possible road map for health care interoperability within private industry and how government can help. PMID:19963614

  2. Virtual queueing techniques for UBR+ service in ATM with fair access and minimum bandwidth guarantee

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, K.Y.; Wu, Y.; Ren, W.

    1998-11-01

    The ATM Forum is currently discussing the need for a new best-effort service called UBR+, which is an enhancement to the existing UBR service, to support data traffic. The objective of the UBR+ service is to provide each user with a minimum service rate guarantee and a fair access to any excess available bandwidth. In this paper, the authors present a new efficient scheme for supporting this service. The key advantage of the scheme is that it employs only FIFO queueing (instead of per-VC queueing) and admits simple implementation in ATM switches. The ideas involve a simple scheduling mechanism that is based on per-VC queueing and incorporate the virtual queueing technique that can efficiently emulate per-VC queueing on a shared FIFO queue. Simulation results are presented to show that the schemes can deliver almost ideal performance for supporting the new service requirements of UBR+.

  3. Issues in ATM Support of High-Performance, Geographically Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.; Dowd, Patrick W.; Srinidhi, Saragur M.; Blade, Eric D.G

    1995-01-01

    This report experimentally assesses the effect of the underlying network in a cluster-based computing environment. The assessment is quantified by application-level benchmarking, process-level communication, and network file input/output. Two testbeds were considered, one small cluster of Sun workstations and another large cluster composed of 32 high-end IBM RS/6000 platforms. The clusters had Ethernet, fiber distributed data interface (FDDI), Fibre Channel, and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network interface cards installed, providing the same processors and operating system for the entire suite of experiments. The primary goal of this report is to assess the suitability of an ATM-based, local-area network to support interprocess communication and remote file input/output systems for distributed computing.

  4. Film calibration for the Skylab/ATM S-056 X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, W., Jr.; Broussard, R. M.; Underwood, J. H.; Mcguire, J. P.; Reichmann, E. J.; Smith, J. B., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The sensitometry and film calibration effort for the Skylab/ATM S-056 X-ray telescope is summarized. The apparatus and procedures used are described together with the two types of flight film used, Kodak SO-212 and SO-242. The sensitometry and processing of the flight film are discussed, and the results are presented in the form of the characteristic curves and related data. The use of copy films is also discussed.

  5. ATM Coastal Topography - Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 16 (Part 2 of 2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Louisiana coastline beach face within UTM Zone 16, from Grand Isle to the Chandeleur Islands, acquired September 7 and 9, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and

  6. ATM Coastal Topography-Louisiana, 2001: UTM Zone 15 (Part 1 of 2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Louisiana coastline beach face within UTM Zone 15, from Isles Dernieres to Grand Isle, acquired September 7 and 10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last

  7. Functional and molecular defects of hiPSC-derived neurons from patients with ATM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Carlessi, L; Poli, E Fusar; Bechi, G; Mantegazza, M; Pascucci, B; Narciso, L; Dogliotti, E; Sala, C; Verpelli, C; Lecis, D; Delia, D

    2014-01-01

    Loss of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a key factor of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, causes the cancer predisposing and neurodegenerative syndrome ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). To investigate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, we have reprogrammed fibroblasts from ATM-null A-T patients and normal controls to pluripotency (human-induced pluripotent stem cells), and derived from these neural precursor cells able to terminally differentiate into post-mitotic neurons positive to >90% for β-tubulin III+/microtubule-associated protein 2+. We show that A-T neurons display similar voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and discharges of action potentials as control neurons, but defective expression of the maturation and synaptic markers SCG10, SYP and PSD95 (postsynaptic density protein 95). A-T neurons exhibited defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and repressed phosphorylation of ATM substrates (e.g., γH2AX, Smc1-S966, Kap1-S824, Chk2-T68, p53-S15), but normal repair of single-strand breaks, and normal short- and long-patch base excision repair activities. Moreover, A-T neurons were resistant to apoptosis induced by the genotoxic agents camptothecin and trabectedin, but as sensitive as controls to the oxidative agents. Most notably, A-T neurons exhibited abnormal accumulation of topoisomerase 1-DNA covalent complexes (Top1-ccs). These findings reveal that ATM deficiency impairs neuronal maturation, suppresses the response and repair of DNA DSBs, and enhances Top1-cc accumulation. Top1-cc could be a risk factor for neurodegeneration as they may interfere with transcription elongation and promote transcriptional decline. PMID:25032865

  8. Splicing defects in the ataxia-telangiectasia gene, ATM: underlying mutations and consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, S N; Telatar, M; Becker-Catania, S; Liang, T; Onengüt, S; Tolun, A; Chessa, L; Sanal, O; Bernatowska, E; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    1999-01-01

    Mutations resulting in defective splicing constitute a significant proportion (30/62 [48%]) of a new series of mutations in the ATM gene in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) that were detected by the protein-truncation assay followed by sequence analysis of genomic DNA. Fewer than half of the splicing mutations involved the canonical AG splice-acceptor site or GT splice-donor site. A higher percentage of mutations occurred at less stringently conserved sites, including silent mutations of the last nucleotide of exons, mutations in nucleotides other than the conserved AG and GT in the consensus splice sites, and creation of splice-acceptor or splice-donor sites in either introns or exons. These splicing mutations led to a variety of consequences, including exon skipping and, to a lesser degree, intron retention, activation of cryptic splice sites, or creation of new splice sites. In addition, 5 of 12 nonsense mutations and 1 missense mutation were associated with deletion in the cDNA of the exons in which the mutations occurred. No ATM protein was detected by western blotting in any AT cell line in which splicing mutations were identified. Several cases of exon skipping in both normal controls and patients for whom no underlying defect could be found in genomic DNA were also observed, suggesting caution in the interpretation of exon deletions observed in ATM cDNA when there is no accompanying identification of genomic mutations. PMID:10330348

  9. Phenotypic analysis of separation-of-function alleles of MEI-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR.

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Purdy, Amanda; Sekelsky, Jeff; Hawley, R Scott; Su, Tin Tin

    2003-01-01

    ATM/ATR kinases act as signal transducers in eukaryotic DNA damage and replication checkpoints. Mutations in ATM/ATR homologs have pleiotropic effects that range from sterility to increased killing by genotoxins in humans, mice, and Drosophila. Here we report the generation of a null allele of mei-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR homolog, and the use of it to document a semidominant effect on a larval mitotic checkpoint and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity. We also tested the role of mei-41 in a recently characterized checkpoint that delays metaphase/anaphase transition after DNA damage in cellular embryos. We then compare five existing mei-41 alleles to the null with respect to known phenotypes (female sterility, cell cycle checkpoints, and MMS resistance). We find that not all phenotypes are affected equally by each allele, i.e., the functions of MEI-41 in ensuring fertility, cell cycle regulation, and resistance to genotoxins are genetically separable. We propose that MEI-41 acts not in a single rigid signal transduction pathway, but in multiple molecular contexts to carry out its many functions. Sequence analysis identified mutations, which, for most alleles, fall in the poorly characterized region outside the kinase domain; this allowed us to tentatively identify additional functional domains of MEI-41 that could be subjected to future structure-function studies of this key molecule. PMID:12807779

  10. Reprint of "Functional overlaps between XLF and the ATM-dependent DNA double strand break response".

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vipul; Alt, Frederick W; Oksenych, Valentyn

    2014-05-01

    Developing B and T lymphocytes generate programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) during the V(D)J recombination process that assembles exons that encode the antigen-binding variable regions of antibodies. In addition, mature B lymphocytes generate programmed DSBs during the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) process that allows expression of different antibody heavy chain constant regions that provide different effector functions. During both V(D)J recombination and CSR, DSB intermediates are sensed by the ATM-dependent DSB response (DSBR) pathway, which also contributes to their joining via classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ). The precise nature of the interplay between the DSBR and C-NHEJ pathways in the context of DSB repair via C-NHEJ remains under investigation. Recent studies have shown that the XLF C-NHEJ factor has functional redundancy with several members of the ATM-dependent DSBR pathway in C-NHEJ, highlighting unappreciated major roles for both XLF as well as the DSBR in V(D)J recombination, CSR and C-NHEJ in general. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the mechanisms that contribute to the repair of DSBs generated during B lymphocyte development and activation with a focus on potential functionally redundant roles of XLF and ATM-dependent DSBR factors. PMID:24767946

  11. Functional Overlaps Between XLF and The ATM-dependent DNA Double Strand Break Response

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipul; Alt, Frederick W.; Oksenych, Valentyn

    2014-01-01

    Developing B and T lymphocytes generate programmed DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) during the V(D)J recombination process that assembles exons that encode the antigen-binding variable regions of antibodies. In addition, mature B lymphocytes generate programmed DSBs during the Immunoglobulin Heavy chain (IgH) Class Switch Recombination (CSR) process that allows expression of different antibody heavy chain constant regions that provide different effector functions. During both V(D)J recombination and CSR, DSB intermediates are sensed by the ATM-dependent DSB response (DSBR) pathway, which also contributes to their joining via Classical Non-Homologous End-Joining (C-NHEJ). The precise nature of the interplay between the DSBR and C-NHEJ pathways in the context of DSB repair via C-NHEJ remains under investigation. Recent studies have shown that the XLF C-NHEJ factor has functional redundancy with several members of the ATM-dependent DSBR pathway in C-NHEJ, highlighting unappreciated major roles for both XLF as well as the DSBR in V(D)J recombination, CSR and C-NHEJ in general. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the mechanisms that contribute to the repair of DSBs generated during B lymphocyte development and activation with a focus on potential functionally redundant roles of XLF and ATM-dependent DSBR factors. PMID:24674624

  12. Functional overlaps between XLF and the ATM-dependent DNA double strand break response.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vipul; Alt, Frederick W; Oksenych, Valentyn

    2014-04-01

    Developing B and T lymphocytes generate programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) during the V(D)J recombination process that assembles exons that encode the antigen-binding variable regions of antibodies. In addition, mature B lymphocytes generate programmed DSBs during the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) process that allows expression of different antibody heavy chain constant regions that provide different effector functions. During both V(D)J recombination and CSR, DSB intermediates are sensed by the ATM-dependent DSB response (DSBR) pathway, which also contributes to their joining via classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ). The precise nature of the interplay between the DSBR and C-NHEJ pathways in the context of DSB repair via C-NHEJ remains under investigation. Recent studies have shown that the XLF C-NHEJ factor has functional redundancy with several members of the ATM-dependent DSBR pathway in C-NHEJ, highlighting unappreciated major roles for both XLF as well as the DSBR in V(D)J recombination, CSR and C-NHEJ in general. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the mechanisms that contribute to the repair of DSBs generated during B lymphocyte development and activation with a focus on potential functionally redundant roles of XLF and ATM-dependent DSBR factors. PMID:24674624

  13. Experiences with TCP/IP over an ATM OC12 WAN

    SciTech Connect

    Nitzan, Rebecca L.; Tierney, Brian L.

    1999-12-23

    This paper discusses the performance testing experiences of a 622.08 Mbps OC12 link. The link will be used for large bulk data transfer, and as such, of interest are both the ATM level throughput rates and end-to-end TCP/IP throughput rates. Tests were done to evaluate the ATM switches, the IP routers, the end hosts, as well as the underlying ATM service provided by the carrier. A low level of cell loss, (resulting in <.01 % packet loss), decreased the TCP throughput rate considerably when one TCP flow was trying to use the entire OC12 bandwidth. Identifying and correcting cell loss in the network proved to be extremely difficult. TCP Selective Acknowledgement (SACK) improved performance dramatically, and the maximum throughput rate increased from 300 Mbps to 400 Mbps. The effects of TCP slow start on performance at OC12 rates are also examined, and found to be insignificant for very large file transfers (e.g., for a 10 GB file). Finally, a history of TCP performance over high-speed networks is presented.

  14. ATM and MET kinases are synthetic lethal with non-genotoxic activation of p53

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D.; Padilla-Just, Nuria; Henry, Ryan E.; Porter, Christopher C.; Kim, Jihye; Tentler, John J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Tan, Aik Choon; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor orchestrates alternative stress responses including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but the mechanisms defining cell fate upon p53 activation are poorly understood. Several small molecule activators of p53 have been developed, including Nutlin-3, but their therapeutic potential is limited by the fact that they induce reversible cell cycle arrest in most cancer cell types. We report here the results of a ‘Synthetic Lethal with Nutlin-3’ genome-wide shRNA screen, which revealed that the ATM and MET kinases govern cell fate choice upon p53 activation. Genetic or pharmacological interference with ATM or MET activity converts the cellular response from cell cycle arrest into apoptosis in diverse cancer cell types without affecting expression of key p53 target genes. ATM and MET inhibitors enable Nutlin-3 to kill tumor spheroids. These results identify novel pathways controlling the cellular response to p53 activation and aid in the design of p53-based therapies. PMID:22660439

  15. The core spliceosome as target and effector of non-canonical ATM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tresini, Maria; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Kolovos, Petros; Snijder, Loes; Vrouwe, Mischa G.; Demmers, Jeroen A.A.; van IJcken, Wilfred F.J.; Grosveld, Frank G.; Medema, René H.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Mullenders, Leon H.F.; Vermeulen, Wim; Marteijn, Jurgen A.

    2015-01-01

    In response to DNA damage tissue homoeostasis is ensured by protein networks promoting DNA repair, cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. DNA damage response signaling pathways coordinate these processes, partly by propagating gene expression-modulating signals. DNA damage influences not only abundance of mRNAs, but also their coding information through alternative splicing. Here we show that transcription-blocking DNA lesions promote chromatin displacement of late-stage spliceosomes and initiate a positive feedback loop centered on the signaling kinase ATM. We propose that initial spliceosome displacement and subsequent R-loop formation is triggered by pausing of RNA polymerase at DNA lesions. In turn, R-loops activate ATM which signals to further impede spliceosome organization and augment UV-triggered alternative splicing at genome-wide level. Our findings define the R-loop-dependent ATM activation by transcription-blocking lesions as an important event in the DNA damage response of non-replicating cells and highlight a key role for spliceosome displacement in this process. PMID:26106861

  16. Genetic algorithm-based neural fuzzy decision tree for mixed scheduling in ATM networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Chung, I-Fang; Pu, Her-Chang; Lee', Tsern-Huei; Chang, Jyh-Yeong

    2002-01-01

    Future broadband integrated services networks based on asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology are expected to support multiple types of multimedia information with diverse statistical characteristics and quality of service (QoS) requirements. To meet these requirements, efficient scheduling methods are important for traffic control in ATM networks. Among general scheduling schemes, the rate monotonic algorithm is simple enough to be used in high-speed networks, but does not attain the high system utilization of the deadline driven algorithm. However, the deadline driven scheme is computationally complex and hard to implement in hardware. The mixed scheduling algorithm is a combination of the rate monotonic algorithm and the deadline driven algorithm; thus it can provide most of the benefits of these two algorithms. In this paper, we use the mixed scheduling algorithm to achieve high system utilization under the hardware constraint. Because there is no analytic method for schedulability testing of mixed scheduling, we propose a genetic algorithm-based neural fuzzy decision tree (GANFDT) to realize it in a real-time environment. The GANFDT combines a GA and a neural fuzzy network into a binary classification tree. This approach also exploits the power of the classification tree. Simulation results show that the GANFDT provides an efficient way of carrying out mixed scheduling in ATM networks. PMID:18244889

  17. Missense Variants in ATM in 26,101 Breast Cancer Cases and 29,842 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Orr, Nick; Ashworth, Alan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Burwinkel, Barbara; Bartram, Claus R.; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Southey, Melissa C.; Smith, Letitia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Hopper, John L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Schürmann, Peter; Waltes, Regina; Bremer, Michael; Dörk, Thilo; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Ahmed, Shahana; Dunning, Alison M.; Maranian, Melanie; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Zalutsky, Iosif V.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Hamann, Ute; Fasching, Peter A.; Strick, Reiner; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Arias, José Ignacio; Pita, Guillermo; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong Young; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang- Gohrke, Shan; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Morrison, Jonathan; Platte, Radka; Easton, Douglas F.; Peto, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Background Truncating mutations in ATM have been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer but the effect of missense variants remains contentious. Methods We have genotyped five polymorphic (MAF 0.9% to 2.6%) missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ATM (S49C, S707P, F858L, P1054R, L1420F) in 26,101 breast cancer cases and 29,842 controls from 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Results Combining data from all five SNPs, the OR was 1.05 for being a heterozygote for any of the SNPs and 1.51 for being a rare homozygote for any of the SNPs with an overall trend OR=1.06 (Ptrend=0.04). The trend OR among bilateral and familial cases was 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.23; Ptrend=0.02). Conclusions In this large combined analysis, these 5 missense ATM SNPs were associated with a small increased risk of breast cancer, explaining an estimated 0.03% of the excess familial risk of breast cancer. Impact Testing the combined effects of rare missense variants in known breast cancer genes in large collaborative studies should clarify their overall contribution to breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:20826828

  18. ATM Release at Resected Double-Strand Breaks Provides Heterochromatin Reconstitution to Facilitate Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Löbrich, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) represent the two main pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). During the G2 phase of the mammalian cell cycle, both processes can operate and chromatin structure is one important factor which determines DSB repair pathway choice. ATM facilitates the repair of heterochromatic DSBs by phosphorylating and inactivating the heterochromatin building factor KAP-1, leading to local chromatin relaxation. Here, we show that ATM accumulation and activity is strongly diminished at DSBs undergoing end-resection during HR. Such DSBs remain unrepaired in cells devoid of the HR factors BRCA2, XRCC3 or RAD51. Strikingly, depletion of KAP-1 or expression of phospho-mimic KAP-1 allows repair of resected DSBs in the absence of BRCA2, XRCC3 or RAD51 by an erroneous PARP-dependent alt-NHEJ process. We suggest that DSBs in heterochromatin elicit initial local heterochromatin relaxation which is reversed during HR due to the release of ATM from resection break ends. The restored heterochromatic structure facilitates HR and prevents usage of error-prone alternative processes. PMID:23935532

  19. Does Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) protect testicular and germ cell DNA integrity by regulating the redox status?

    PubMed

    Godschalk, Roger W L; Vanhees, Kimberly; Maas, Lou; Drittij, Marie-Jose; Pachen, Daniëlle; van Doorn-Khosrovani, Sahar van Waalwijk; van Schooten, Frederik J; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2016-08-01

    A balanced redox homeostasis in the testis is essential for genetic integrity of sperm. Reactive oxygen species can disturb this balance by oxidation of glutathione, which is regenerated using NADPH, formed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). G6PDH is regulated by the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (Atm) protein. Therefore, we studied the redox status and DNA damage in testes and sperm of mice that carried a deletion in Atm. The redox status in heterozygote mice, reflected by glutathione levels and antioxidant capacity, was lower than in wild type mice, and in homozygotes the redox status was even lower. The redox status correlated with oxidative DNA damage that was highest in mice that carried Atm deletions. Surprisingly, G6PDH activity was highest in homozygotes carrying the deletion. These data indicate that defective Atm reduces the redox homeostasis of the testis and genetic integrity of sperm by regulating glutathione levels independently from G6PDH activity. PMID:27318254

  20. Mice heterozygous for the ATM gene are more sensitive to heavy ions exposure than are wildtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worgul, B.; Smilenov, L.; Brenner, D.; Vazquez, M.; Hall, E.

    Previous studies have shown that the eyes of atm heterozygous mice exposed to Low LET radiation (X-rays) are more susceptible to the development of cataracts than are those of wildtype mice. The findings, as well as others, run counter to the assumption underpinning current radiation safety guidelines, that individuals are all equally sensitive to the biological effects of radiation. A question, highly relevant to human space activities is whether or not, in similar fashion there may exist a genetic predisposition to High LET radiation damage. Again the lens and, its primary radiopathy, cataract, were used to assay for the effects of ATM deficiency in a late-responding tissue. Together with those of wildtypes, the eyes of AT heterozygous knockout mice were exposed to 325 mGy of 1 GEV/amu 56Fe ions at the AGS facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The fluence was equivalent to 1 ion per nuclear area. As was the case in the earlier X-ray studies all irradiations were done on the 28th day after birth. Controls consisted of wildtype irradiated as well as unirradiated wildtype and heterozygotes. Ten mice from each group were examined weekly by conventional slitlamp biomicroscopy for a total of 35 weeks. The time required for prevalence to reach 50% (T50) as an endpoint for each stage indicated that not only cataract onset but also progression were accelerated in the mice haplo-deficient for the atm gene. For example the T50 for definitive cataract onset (stage 1) in the atm heterozygotes was 10 weeks whereas 17 weeks were required for the wildtypes. Similarly at the conclusion of the experiment (35 weeks), 40% of the lenses of allele-deficient mice had progressed to stage 3 (near fully opaque and obviously visually debilitating), while only one lens (5%) from the wildtype irradiated eyes achieved that stage. The data show that heterozygosity for the atm gene predisposes the eye to the cataractogenic influence of heavy ions and suggest that AT heterozygotes in the

  1. The ATM Signaling Cascade Promotes Recombination-Dependent Pachytene Arrest in Mouse Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Julian; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Roig, Ignasi

    2015-01-01

    Most mutations that compromise meiotic recombination or synapsis in mouse spermatocytes result in arrest and apoptosis at the pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase. Two main mechanisms are thought to trigger arrest: one independent of the double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination, and another activated by persistent recombination intermediates. Mechanisms underlying the recombination-dependent arrest response are not well understood, so we sought to identify factors involved by examining mutants deficient for TRIP13, a conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the completion of meiotic DSB repair. We find that spermatocytes with a hypomorphic Trip13 mutation (Trip13mod/mod) arrest with features characteristic of early pachynema in wild type, namely, fully synapsed chromosomes without incorporation of the histone variant H1t into chromatin. These cells then undergo apoptosis, possibly in response to the arrest or in response to a defect in sex body formation. However, TRIP13-deficient cells that additionally lack the DSB-responsive kinase ATM progress further, reaching an H1t-positive stage (i.e., similar to mid/late pachynema in wild type) despite the presence of unrepaired DSBs. TRIP13-deficient spermatocytes also progress to an H1t-positive stage if ATM activity is attenuated by hypomorphic mutations in Mre11 or Nbs1 or by elimination of the ATM-effector kinase CHK2. These mutant backgrounds nonetheless experience an apoptotic block to further spermatogenic progression, most likely caused by failure to form a sex body. DSB numbers are elevated in Mre11 and Nbs1 hypomorphs but not Chk2 mutants, thus delineating genetic requirements for the ATM-dependent negative feedback loop that regulates DSB numbers. The findings demonstrate for the first time that ATM-dependent signaling enforces the normal pachytene response to persistent recombination intermediates. Our work supports the conclusion that recombination defects trigger spermatocyte arrest

  2. Results from CrIS/ATMS Obtained Using an "AIRS Version-6 Like Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susskind, J.

    2015-12-01

    A main objective of AIRS/AMSU on EOS is to provide accurate sounding products that are used to generate climate data sets. Suomi NPP carries CrIS/ATMS that were designed as follow-ons to AIRS/AMSU. Our objective is to generate a long term climate data set of products derived from CrIS/ATMS to serve as a continuation of the AIRS/AMSU products. The Goddard DISC has generated AIRS/AMSU retrieval products, extending from September 2002 through real time, using the AIRS Science Team Version-6 retrieval algorithm. Level-3 gridded monthly mean values of these products, generated using AIRS Version-6, form a state of the art multi-year set of Climate Data Records (CDRs), which is expected to continue through 2022 and possibly beyond, as the AIRS instrument is extremely stable. The goal of this research is to develop and implement a CrIS/ATMS retrieval system to generate CDRs that are compatible with, and are of comparable quality to, those generated operationally using AIRS/AMSU data. The AIRS Science Team has made considerable improvements in AIRS Science Team retrieval methodology and is working on the development of an improved AIRS Science Team Version-7 retrieval methodology to be used to reprocess all AIRS data in the relatively near future. Research is underway by Dr. Susskind and co-workers at the NASA GSFC Sounder Research Team (SRT) towards the finalization of the AIRS Version-7 retrieval algorithm, the current version of which is called SRT AIRS Version-6.22. Dr. Susskind and co-workers have developed analogous retrieval methodology for analysis of CrIS/ATMS data, called SRT CrIS Version-6.22. Results will be presented that show that AIRS and CrIS products derived using a common further improved retrieval algorithm agree closely with each other and are both superior to AIRS Version 6. The goal of the AIRS Science Team is to continue to improve both AIRS and CrIS retrieval products and then use the improved retrieval methodology for the processing of past and

  3. Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their wild-type counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worgul, Basil V.; Smilenov, Lubomir; Brenner, David J.; Junk, Anna; Zhou, Wei; Hall, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    It is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. In vitro studies have shown that cells from individuals homozygous for ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) are much more radiosensitive than cells from unaffected individuals. Although cells heterozygous for the ATM gene (ATM(+/-)) may be slightly more radiosensitive in vitro, it remained to be determined whether the greater susceptibility of ATM(+/-) cells translates into an increased sensitivity for late effects in vivo, though there is a suggestion that radiotherapy patients that are heterozygous for the ATM gene may be more at risk of developing late normal tissue damage. We chose cataractogenesis in the lens as a means to assay for the effects of ATM deficiency in a late-responding tissue. One eye of wild-type, Atm heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice was exposed to 0.5-, 1.0-, 2.0-, or 4.0-Gy x rays. The animals were followed weekly for cataract development by conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Cataract development in the animals of all three groups was strongly dependent on dose. The lenses of homozygous mice were the first to opacify at any given dose. Most important in the present context is that cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals. The data suggest that ATM heterozygotes in the human population may also be radiosensitive. This may influence the choice of individuals destined to be exposed to higher than normal doses of radiation, such as astronauts, and may also suggest that radiotherapy patients who are ATM heterozygotes could be predisposed to increased late normal tissue damage.

  4. Performance measurements of mixed data acquisition and LAN traffic on a credit-based flow-controlled ATM network

    SciTech Connect

    Nomachi, M.; Sugaya, Y.; Togawa, H.; Yasuda, K.; Mandjavidze, I.

    1998-08-01

    The high speed network is a key component in networked data acquisition systems. An ATM switch is a candidate for the network system in DAQ (data acquisition system). The authors have studied the DAQ performance of the ATM network at RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University. Data traffic on DAQ system has a very much different traffic pattern from the other network traffic. It may slow down the network performance. The authors have studied the network performance on several traffic patterns.

  5. Induction of ATM/ATR pathway combined with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells enhance cytotoxicity of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingwei; Das, Manjusri; Kanji, Suman; Aggarwal, Reeva; Joseph, Matthew; Ray, Alo; Shapiro, Charles L.; Pompili, Vincent J.; Das, Hiranmoy

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many ovarian cancer cells express stress-related molecule MICA/B on their surface that is recognized by Vγ2Vδ2 T cells through their NKG2D receptor, which is transmitted to downstream stress-signaling pathway. However, it is yet to be established how Vγ2Vδ2 T cells-mediated recognition of MICA/B signal is transmitted to downstream stress-related molecules. Identifying targeted molecules would be critical to develop a better therapy for ovarian cancer cells. It is well established that ATM/ATR signal transduction pathways, which is modulated by DNA damage, replication stress, and oxidative stress play central role in stress signaling pathway regulating cell cycle checkpoint and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATM/ATR and its down stream molecules affect Vγ2Vδ2 T cells-mediated cytotoxicity. Herein, we show that ATM/ATR pathway is modulated in ovarian cancer cells in presence of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Furthermore, downregulation of ATM pathway resulted downregulation of MICA, and reduced Vγ2Vδ2 T cells-mediated cytotoxicity. Alternately, stimulating ATM pathway enhanced expression of MICA, and sensitized ovarian cancer cells for cytotoxic lysis by Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. We further show that combining currently approved chemotherapeutic drugs, which induced ATM signal transduction, along with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells enhanced cytotoxicity of resistant ovarian cancer cells. These findings indicate that ATM/ATR pathway plays an important role in tumor recognition, and drugs promoting ATM signaling pathway might be considered as a combination therapy together with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for effectively treating resistant ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24726882

  6. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-05-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C region genes. DSBs are necessary for CSR, but improper regulation of DSBs can lead to chromosomal translocations that can result in B cell lymphoma. The protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important proximal regulator of the DNA damage response (DDR), and translocations involving S regions are increased in its absence. ATM phosphorylates H2AX, which recruits other DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, including mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DNA damage. As these DDR proteins all function to promote repair and recombination of DSBs during CSR, we examined whether mouse splenic B cells deficient in these proteins would show alterations in S region DSBs when undergoing CSR. We find that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs are increased, whereas DSBs in downstream Sγ regions are decreased. We also find that mutations in the unrearranged Sγ3 segment are reduced in atm(-/-) cells. Our data suggest that ATM increases AID targeting and activity at downstream acceptor S regions during CSR and that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs accumulate as they lack a recombination partner. PMID:24729610

  7. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MRE11 controls extent of resection during homology directed repair by signalling through Exonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, Amanda W.; Lim, Yi Chieh; Bolderson, Emma; Cerosaletti, Karen; Gatei, Magtouf; Jakob, Burkhard; Tobias, Frank; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Gueven, Nuri; Oakley, Greg; Concannon, Patrick; Wolvetang, Ernst; Khanna, Kum Kum; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Lavin, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex plays a central role as a sensor of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and is responsible for the efficient activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Once activated ATM in turn phosphorylates RAD50 and NBS1, important for cell cycle control, DNA repair and cell survival. We report here that MRE11 is also phosphorylated by ATM at S676 and S678 in response to agents that induce DNA DSB, is dependent on the presence of NBS1, and does not affect the association of members of the complex or ATM activation. A phosphosite mutant (MRE11S676AS678A) cell line showed decreased cell survival and increased chromosomal aberrations after radiation exposure indicating a defect in DNA repair. Use of GFP-based DNA repair reporter substrates in MRE11S676AS678A cells revealed a defect in homology directed repair (HDR) but single strand annealing was not affected. More detailed investigation revealed that MRE11S676AS678A cells resected DNA ends to a greater extent at sites undergoing HDR. Furthermore, while ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Kap1 and SMC1 was normal in MRE11S676AS678A cells, there was no phosphorylation of Exonuclease 1 consistent with the defect in HDR. These results describe a novel role for ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MRE11 in limiting the extent of resection mediated through Exonuclease 1. PMID:26240375

  8. Effects of Camphorquinone on Cytotoxicity, Cell Cycle Regulation and Prostaglandin E2 Production of Dental Pulp Cells: Role of ROS, ATM/Chk2, MEK/ERK and Hemeoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Lin, Li-Deh; Wu, Min-Tsz; Chan, Chiu-Po; Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Lee, Ming-Shu; Sun, Tzu-Ying; Jeng, Po-Yuan; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Lin, Hsueh-Jen; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Camphorquinone (CQ) is a popularly-used photosensitizer in composite resin restoration. In this study, the effects of CQ on cytotoxicity and inflammation-related genes and proteins expression of pulp cells were investigated. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATM/Chk2/p53 and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and MEK/ERK signaling was also evaluated. We found that ROS and free radicals may play important role in CQ toxicity. CQ (1 and 2 mM) decreased the viability of pulp cells to about 70% and 50% of control, respectively. CQ also induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of pulp cells. The expression of type I collagen, cdc2, cyclin B, and cdc25C was inhibited, while p21, HO-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were stimulated by CQ. CQ also activated ATM, Chk2, and p53 phosphorylation and GADD45α expression. Besides, exposure to CQ increased cellular ROS level and 8-isoprostane production. CQ also stimulated COX-2 expression and PGE2 production of pulp cells. The reduction of cell viability caused by CQ can be attenuated by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), but can be promoted by Zinc protoporphyin (ZnPP). CQ stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and U0126 prevented the CQ-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. These results indicate that CQ may cause cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and PGE2 production of pulp cells. These events could be due to stimulation of ROS and 8-isoprostane production, ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling, HO-1, COX-2 and p21 expression, as well as the inhibition of cdc2, cdc25C and cyclin B1. These results are important for understanding the role of ROS in pathogenesis of pulp necrosis and pulpal inflammation after clinical composite resin filling. PMID:26658076

  9. Effects of Camphorquinone on Cytotoxicity, Cell Cycle Regulation and Prostaglandin E2 Production of Dental Pulp Cells: Role of ROS, ATM/Chk2, MEK/ERK and Hemeoxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Lin, Li-Deh; Wu, Min-Tsz; Chan, Chiu-Po; Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Lee, Ming-Shu; Sun, Tzu-Ying; Jeng, Po-Yuan; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Lin, Hsueh-Jen; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Camphorquinone (CQ) is a popularly-used photosensitizer in composite resin restoration. In this study, the effects of CQ on cytotoxicity and inflammation-related genes and proteins expression of pulp cells were investigated. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATM/Chk2/p53 and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and MEK/ERK signaling was also evaluated. We found that ROS and free radicals may play important role in CQ toxicity. CQ (1 and 2 mM) decreased the viability of pulp cells to about 70% and 50% of control, respectively. CQ also induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of pulp cells. The expression of type I collagen, cdc2, cyclin B, and cdc25C was inhibited, while p21, HO-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were stimulated by CQ. CQ also activated ATM, Chk2, and p53 phosphorylation and GADD45α expression. Besides, exposure to CQ increased cellular ROS level and 8-isoprostane production. CQ also stimulated COX-2 expression and PGE2 production of pulp cells. The reduction of cell viability caused by CQ can be attenuated by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), but can be promoted by Zinc protoporphyin (ZnPP). CQ stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and U0126 prevented the CQ-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. These results indicate that CQ may cause cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and PGE2 production of pulp cells. These events could be due to stimulation of ROS and 8-isoprostane production, ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling, HO-1, COX-2 and p21 expression, as well as the inhibition of cdc2, cdc25C and cyclin B1. These results are important for understanding the role of ROS in pathogenesis of pulp necrosis and pulpal inflammation after clinical composite resin filling. PMID:26658076

  10. Retrieving Atmospheric Temperature and Moisture Profiles from NPP CRIS/ATMS Sensors Using Crimss EDR Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Kizer, S.; Barnet, C.; Dvakarla, M.; Zhou, D. K.; Larar, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) mission in collaboration with the U.S. National Aeronautical Space Administration (NASA) and international partners. The NPP Cross-track Infrared Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS) consists of the infrared (IR) Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the microwave (MW) Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). The CrIS instrument is hyperspectral interferometer, which measures high spectral and spatial resolution upwelling infrared radiances. The ATMS is a 22-channel radiometer similar to Advanced Microwave Sounding Units (AMSU) A and B. It measures top of atmosphere MW upwelling radiation and provides capability of sounding below clouds. The CrIMSS Environmental Data Record (EDR) algorithm provides three EDRs, namely the atmospheric vertical temperature, moisture and pressure profiles (AVTP, AVMP and AVPP, respectively), with the lower tropospheric AVTP and the AVMP being JPSS Key Performance Parameters (KPPs). The operational CrIMSS EDR an algorithm was originally designed to run on large IBM computers with dedicated data management subsystem (DMS). We have ported the operational code to simple Linux systems by replacing DMS with appropriate interfaces. We also changed the interface of the operational code so that we can read data from both the CrIMSS science code and the operational code and be able to compare lookup tables, parameter files, and output results. The detail of the CrIMSS EDR algorithm is described in reference [1]. We will present results of testing the CrIMSS EDR operational algorithm using proxy data generated from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) satellite data and from the NPP CrIS/ATMS data.

  11. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhongli; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen; Xiao, Zefen; Tan, Wen; and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  12. Elevated Ornithine Decarboxylase Levels Activate ATM - DNA Damage Signaling in Normal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Gang; DeFeo, Karen; Hayes, Candace S.; Woster, Patrick M.; Mandik-Nayak, Laura; Gilmour, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the effect of increased expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a key rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, on cell survival in primary cultures of keratinocytes isolated from the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice (Ker/ODC) and their normal littermates (Ker/Norm). Although elevated levels of ODC and polyamines stimulate proliferation of keratinocytes, Ker/ODC undergo apoptotic cell death within days of primary culture unlike Ker/Norm that continue to proliferate. Phosphorylation of ATM and its substrate p53 are significantly induced both in Ker/ODC and in K6/ODC transgenic skin. ChIP analyses show that the increased level of p53 in Ker/ODC is accompanied by increased recruitment of p53 to the Bax proximal promoter. ATM activation is polyamine-dependent since DFMO, a specific inhibitor of ODC activity, blocks its phosphorylation. Ker/ODC also display increased generation of H2O2, acrolein-lysine conjugates, and protein oxidation products as well as polyamine-dependent DNA damage, as measured by the comet assay and the expression of the phosphorylated form of the histone variant γH2AX. Both ROS generation and apoptotic cell death of Ker/ODC may, at least in part, be due to induction of a polyamine catabolic pathway that generates both H2O2 and cytotoxic aldehydes, since spermine oxidase (SMO) levels are induced in Ker/ODC. In addition, treatment with MDL 72,527, an inhibitor of SMO, blocks the production of H2O2 and increases the survival of Ker/ODC. These results demonstrate a novel activation of the ATM/DNA damage signaling pathway in response to increased ODC activity in nontumorigenic keratinocytes. PMID:18381427

  13. Lessons learned on reliable transmission of real-time MPEG-2 streams over ATM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Andrea; Civanlar, Mehmet R.; Cash, Glenn L.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes a system that has been designed and built at AT&T Bell Labs for studying transmission of real- time MPEG-2 video over ATM networks for multi-cast applications. The set-up comprises a hardware real-time MPEG-2 video, audio and system encoder, an ATM network adaptation module for MPEG-2 transport over AAL-5, and ATM switch, a software system decoder and a hardware elementary stream decoder. The MPEG-2 transport stream has been characterized in terms of robustness to errors. This preliminary study showed the higher importance of the structural information of the stream (PES packet headers TS headers, sequence, picture headers, etc.) with respect to the coded video data (motion vectors, DCT coefficients, etc.). A brief study of the current MPEG-2 hardware decoding architectures allowed us to better understand the effects of bit-stream errors on the resulting video quality. In our experiments, while the loss of some structural data such as picture start codes led the hardware decoder to loose synchronization or to freeze, the loss of video data only affected the image quality. Furthermore the recovery times from a loss of synchronization were orders of magnitude higher than the recovery from some video data loss. An error-resilient real-time software transport stream decoder has been developed. In multiplex-wide operations (i.e. operations on the entire transport stream) it takes advantage of ring buffers and manages the timing information appropriately. In video-stream specific operations it uses resynchronization mechanisms at the picture level which exploit the redundancy of the PES and transport stream syntax. Furthermore time data transfers between the system decoder and the elementary stream decoder are employed. Experiments show that proper use of these methods can significantly improve the system performance.

  14. DNA damage-induced regulatory interplay between DAXX, p53, ATM kinase and Wip1 phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Brazina, Jan; Svadlenka, Jan; Macurek, Libor; Andera, Ladislav; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartek, Jiri; Hanzlikova, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Death domain-associated protein 6 (DAXX) is a histone chaperone, putative regulator of apoptosis and transcription, and candidate modulator of p53-mediated gene expression following DNA damage. DAXX becomes phosphorylated upon DNA damage, however regulation of this modification, and its relationship to p53 remain unclear. Here we show that in human cells exposed to ionizing radiation or genotoxic drugs etoposide and neocarzinostatin, DAXX became rapidly phosphorylated in an ATM kinase-dependent manner. Our deletion and site-directed mutagenesis experiments identified Serine 564 (S564) as the dominant ATM-targeted site of DAXX, and immunofluorescence experiments revealed localization of S564-phosphorylated DAXX to PML nuclear bodies. Furthermore, using a panel of human cell types, we identified the p53-regulated Wip1 protein phosphatase as a key negative regulator of DAXX phosphorylation at S564, both in vitro and in cells. Consistent with the emerging oncogenic role of Wip1, its DAXX-dephosphorylating impact was most apparent in cancer cell lines harboring gain-of-function mutant and/or overexpressed Wip1. Unexpectedly, while Wip1 depletion increased DAXX phosphorylation both before and after DNA damage and increased p53 stability and transcriptional activity, knock-down of DAXX impacted neither p53 stabilization nor p53-mediated expression of Gadd45a, Noxa, Mdm2, p21, Puma, Sesn2, Tigar or Wip1. Consistently, analyses of cells with genetic, TALEN-mediated DAXX deletion corroborated the notion that neither phosphorylated nor non-phosphorylated DAXX is required for p53-mediated gene expression upon DNA damage. Overall, we identify ATM kinase and Wip1 phosphatase as opposing regulators of DAXX-S564 phosphorylation, and propose that the role of DAXX phosphorylation and DAXX itself are independent of p53-mediated gene expression. PMID:25659035

  15. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material: ATM-9 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-9 glass is designed to be representative of glass to be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. ATM-9 glass contains all of the major components of the DWPF glass and corresponds to a waste loading of 29 wt %. The feedstock material for this glass was supplied by Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC, as SRL-165 Black Frit to which was added Ba, Cs, Md, Nd, Zr, as well as /sup 99/Tc, depleted U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 243/Am. The glass was produced under reducing conditions by the addition of 0.7 wt % graphite during the final melting process. Three kilograms of the glass were produced from April to May of 1984. On final melting, the glass was formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars of two sizes: 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm and 1.3 x 1.3 x 10 cm. Seventeen bars of each size were made. The analyzed composition of ATM-9 glass is listed. Examination by optical microscopy of a single transverse section from one bar showed random porosity estimated at 0.36 vol % with nominal pore diameters ranging from approx. 5 ..mu..m to 200 ..mu..m. Only one distinct second phase was observed and it was at a low concentraction level in the glass matrix. The phase appeared as spherical metallic particles. X-ray diffraction analysis of this same sample did not show any diffraction peaks from crystalline components, indicating that the glass contained less than 5 wt % of crystalline devitrification products. The even shading on the radiograph exposure indicated a generally uniform distribution of radioactivity throughout the glass matrix, with no distinct high-concentration regions.

  16. Possession of ATM Sequence Variants as Predictor for Late Normal Tissue Responses in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Fan, Grace; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Iyengar, Preetha B.A.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The ATM gene product is a central component of cell cycle regulation and genomic surveillance. We hypothesized that DNA sequence alterations in ATM predict for adverse effects after external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 patients with a minimum of 2 years follow-up who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were screened for sequence alterations in ATM using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Genetic variants were identified using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring schemes for skin and subcutaneous tissues were applied to quantify the radiation-induced effects. Results: Of the 131 patients, 51 possessed ATM sequence alterations located within exons or in short intron regions flanking each exon that encompass putative splice site regions. Of these 51 patients, 21 (41%) exhibited a minimum of a Grade 2 late radiation response. In contrast, of the 80 patients without an ATM sequence variation, only 18 (23%) had radiation-induced adverse responses, for an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2). Fifteen patients were heterozygous for the G{yields}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which causes substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein. Of these 15 patients, 8 (53%) exhibited a Grade 2-4 late response compared with 31 (27%) of the 116 patients without this alteration, for an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). Conclusion: Sequence variants located in the ATM gene, in particular the 5557 G{yields}A polymorphism, may predict for late adverse radiation responses in breast cancer patients.

  17. Loss of INPP4B causes a DNA repair defect through loss of BRCA1, ATM and ATR and can be targeted with PARP inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Ip, Laura R H; Poulogiannis, George; Viciano, Felipe Cia; Sasaki, Junko; Kofuji, Satoshi; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hochhauser, Daniel; Hartley, John A; Sasaki, Takehiko; Gewinner, Christina A

    2015-04-30

    Treatment options for ovarian cancer patients remain limited and overall survival is less than 50% despite recent clinical advances. The lipid phosphatase inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) has been described as a tumor suppressor in the PI3K/Akt pathway with loss of expression found most pronounced in breast, ovarian cancer and melanoma. Using microarray technology we identified a DNA repair defect in INPP4B-deficient cells, which we further characterized by comet assays and quantification of γH2AX, RAD51 and 53BP1 foci formation. INPP4B loss resulted in significantly increased sensitivity towards PARP inhibition, comparable to loss of BRCA1 in two- and three-dimensional in vitro models, as well as in in vivo xenograft models. Mechanistically, we discovered that INPP4B forms a protein complex with the key players of DNA repair, ATR and BRCA1, in GST pulldown and 293T overexpression assays, and INPP4B loss affects BRCA1, ATM and ATR protein stability resulting in the observed DNA repair defect. Given that INPP4B loss has been found in 40% of ovarian cancer patients, this study provides the rationale for establishing INPP4B as a biomarker of PARP inhibitor response, and consequently offers novel therapeutic options for a significant subset of patients. Loss of the tumor suppressor inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) results in a DNA repair defect due to concomitant loss of BRCA1, ATR and ATM and can be therapeutically targeted with PARP inhibitors. PMID:25868852

  18. ATM C and D panel/EREP cooling system contamination problem. [on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    This report presents the history of a preflight contamination problem that occurred in the ATM C and D panel/EREP cooling system on the Skylab, the studies that were made to determine the cause of the problem, and corrective actions that were made prior to lift-off. The results of all the observations, analyses and laboratory testing indicated that the contamination came from one or more of the EREP tape recorder coldplates and was caused by some abnormal electrolytic action, either during bench testing or in the spacecraft. Studies indicate that no such electrolytic action is likely to occur under normal operating conditions.

  19. A Rapid Prototyping Capability Experiment to Evaluate CrIS / ATMS Observations for Urban Modeling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. M.; Fitzpatrick, P. J.; Anantharaj, V. G.; Riishojgaard, L.

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this project is to evaluate the potential for data from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) to impact forecasting of a significant mesoscale weather event over a major urban center along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The ATMS and the CrIS will be deployed as part of a suite of atmospheric sensors aboard the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) and the preceding NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, scheduled to be launched in 2009. An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) methodology is adopted to characterize the uncertainties associated with instrument measurement and retrieval processes. The methodology will be based on the procedures adopted by NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) and NOAA Environmental Modeling Center (EMC). Within the OSSE framework, a nature run (NR) is a proxy for real atmospheric and land surface conditions; it is based on a "free run" of a global-scale forecast model. For an OSSE, it is very important that different data-assimilating models be used to generate the NR and subsequent sensitivity tests. Otherwise, a "fraternal twin" problem may result, in which a low error bias between models does not realistically portray the error bias expected with assimilation of the candidate sensor data. A regional-scale NR (RSNR) will be produced using the MM5, and will serve as "truth" for our modeling experiments. The RSNR will be a nest simulation within one of the larger scale NRs produced from the ECMWF model. To simulate observations from the candidate sensors, error and bias characteristics may be adopted from the NPOESS Aircraft Sounder Testbed (NAST), in which prototypes of the ATMS and the CrIS were tested aboard aircraft. The WRF model is in conjunction with the MM5 to perform the sensitivity experiments involving the assimilation of existing sensor data and synthesized data representing candidate

  20. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate-induced apoptosis through the ATM- and p53-dependent intrinsic mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Schweikl, Helmut; Petzel, Christine; Bolay, Carola; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Krifka, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Resin monomers of dental composites like 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) disturb cell functions including responses of the innate immune system, mineralization and differentiation of dental pulp-derived cells, or induce cell death via apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis is related to the availability of the antioxidant glutathione, although a detailed understanding of the signaling pathways is still unknown. The present study provides insight into the causal relationship between oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and the specific signaling pathway leading to HEMA-induced apoptosis in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. The differential expression of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in HEMA-exposed cells indicated oxidative stress, which was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspase 3 as a critical apoptosis executioner. A 2-fold increase in the amount of mitochondrial superoxide anions after a 24 h exposure to HEMA (6-8 mM) was paralleled by a considerable decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Additionally, expression of proteins critical for the signaling of apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway was detected. Transcription-dependent and transcription-independent mechanisms of p53-regulated apoptosis were activated, and p53 was translocated from the cytosol to mitochondria. HEMA-induced transcriptional activity of p53 was indicated by increased levels of PUMA localized to mitochondria as a potent inducer of apoptosis. The expression of Bcl-xL and Bax suggested that cells responded to stress caused by HEMA via the activation of a complicated and antagonistic machinery of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. A HEMA-induced and oxidative stress-sensitive delay of the cell cycle, indicating a DNA damage response, occurred independent of the influence of KU55399, a potent inhibitor of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) activity. However, ATM, a protein kinase which

  1. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  2. Profiling of Biomarkers for the Exposure of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Lamin-A/C Isoform 3, Poly[ADP-ribose] Polymerase 1, and Mitochondria Copy Number Are Identified as Universal Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, Hye-Ran; Trang, Nguyen Thi Dai; Baek, Hee-Jo; Moon, Jae-Dong; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Kook, Hoon; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the profiling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- (PAH-) induced genotoxicity in cell lines and zebrafish. Each type of cells displayed different proportionality of apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number was dramatically elevated after 5-day treatment of fluoranthene and pyrene. The notable deregulated proteins for PAHs exposure were displayed as follows: lamin-A/C isoform 3 and annexin A1 for benzopyrene; lamin-A/C isoform 3 and DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha for pentacene; poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1) for fluoranthene; and talin-1 and DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha for pyrene. Among them, lamin-A/C isoform 3 and PARP-1 were further confirmed using mRNA and protein expression study. Obvious morphological abnormalities including curved backbone and cardiomegaly in zebrafish were observed in the 54 hpf with more than 400 nM of benzopyrene. In conclusion, the change of mitochondrial genome (increased mtDNA copy number) was closely associated with PAH exposure in cell lines and mesenchymal stem cells. Lamin-A/C isoform 3, talin-1, and annexin A1 were identified as universal biomarkers for PAHs exposure. Zebrafish, specifically at embryo stage, showed suitable in vivo model for monitoring PAHs exposure to hematopoietic tissue and other organs. PMID:25114913

  3. The Guanine-Quadruplex Structure in the Human c-myc Gene's Promoter Is Converted into B-DNA Form by the Human Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase-1

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Anna; Kenesi, Erzsebet; Hunyadi-Gulyas, Eva; Durgo, Hajnalka; Berko, Barbara; Dunai, Zsuzsanna A.; Bauer, Pal I.

    2012-01-01

    The important regulatory role of the guanine-quadruplex (GQ) structure, present in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 region of the human c-myc (h c-myc) gene's promoter, in the regulation of the transcription of that gene has been documented. Here we present evidences, that the human nuclear poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (h PARP-1) protein participates in the regulation of the h c-myc gene expression through its interaction with this GQ structure, characterized by binding assays, fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) experiments and by affinity pull-down experiments in vitro, and by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-qPCR analysis and h c-myc-promoter-luciferase reporter determinations in vivo. We surmise that h PARP-1 binds to the GQ structure and participates in the conversion of that structure into the transcriptionally more active B-DNA form. The first Zn-finger structure present in h PARP-1 participates in this interaction. PARP-1 might be a new member of the group of proteins participating in the regulation of transcription through their interactions with GQ structures present in the promoters of different genes. PMID:22880082

  4. Txk, a member of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tec family, forms a complex with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and elongation factor 1α and regulates interferon-γ gene transcription in Th1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, T; Nara, K; Yoshikawa, H; Suzuki, N

    2007-01-01

    We have found previously that Txk, a member of the Tec family tyrosine kinases, is involved importantly in T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine production. However, how Txk regulates interferon (IFN)-γ gene transcription in human T lymphocytes was not fully elucidated. In this study, we identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) as Txk-associated molecules that bound to the Txk responsive element of the IFN-γ gene promoter. Txk phosphorylated EF-1α and PARP1 formed a complex with them, and bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter in vitro. In particular, the N terminal region containing the DNA binding domain of PARP1 was important for the trimolecular complex formation involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1. Several mutant Txk which lacked kinase activity were unable to form the trimolecular complex. A PARP1 inhibitor, PJ34, suppressed IFN-γ but not interleukin (IL)-4 production by normal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Multi-colour confocal analysis revealed that Txk and EF-1α located in the cytoplasm in the resting condition. Upon activation, a complex involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1 was formed and was located in the nucleus. Collectively, Txk in combination with EF-1α and PARP1 bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter, and exerted transcriptional activity on the IFN-γ gene. PMID:17177976

  5. Active site fingerprinting and pharmacophore screening strategies for the identification of dual inhibitors of protein kinase C [Formula: see text] and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1).

    PubMed

    Chadha, Navriti; Silakari, Om

    2016-08-01

    Current clinical studies have revealed that diabetic complications are multifactorial disorders that target two or more pathways. The majority of drugs in clinical trial target aldose reductase and protein kinase C ([Formula: see text]), while recent studies disclosed a significant role played by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). In light of this, the current study was aimed to identify novel dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 using a pharmaco-informatics methodology. Pharmacophore-based 3D QSAR models for these two targets were generated using HypoGen and used to screen three commercially available chemical databases to identify dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1. Overall, 18 hits were obtained from the screening process; the hits were filtered based on their drug-like properties and predicted binding affinities (docking analysis). Important amino acid residues were predicted by developing a fingerprint of the active site using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. The stability of the complexes (18 hits with both proteins) and their final binding orientations were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, novel hits have been predicted to have good binding affinities for [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 proteins, which could be further investigated for in vitro/in vivo activity. PMID:27216445

  6. Spontaneous ATM Gene Reversion in A-T iPSC to Produce an Isogenic Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lucy; Swerdel, Mavis R.; Lazaropoulos, Michael P.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Toro-Ramos, Alana J.; Wright, Jennifer; Lederman, Howard; Chen, Jianmin; Moore, Jennifer C.; Hart, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A spontaneously reverted iPSC line was identified from an A-T subject with heterozygous ATM truncation mutations. The reverted iPSC line expressed ATM protein and was capable of radiation-induced phosphorylation of CHK2 and H2A.X. Genome-wide SNP analysis confirmed a match to source T cells and also to a distinct, non-reverted iPSC line from the same subject. Rearranged T cell receptor sequences predict that the iPSC culture originated as several independently reprogrammed cells that resolved into a single major clone, suggesting that gene correction likely occurred early in the reprogramming process. Gene expression analysis comparing ATM−/− iPSC lines to unrelated ATM+/− cells identifies a large number of differences, but comparing only the isogenic pair of A-T iPSC lines reveals that the primary pathway affected by loss of ATM is a diminished expression of p53-related mRNAs. Gene reversion in culture, although likely a rare event, provided a novel, reverted cell line for studying ATM function. PMID:26677768

  7. Exon-centric regulation of ATM expression is population-dependent and amenable to antisense modification by pseudoexon targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Knut, Marcin; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    ATM is an important cancer susceptibility gene that encodes a critical apical kinase of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. We show that a key nonsense-mediated RNA decay switch exon (NSE) in ATM is repressed by U2AF, PUF60 and hnRNPA1. The NSE activation was haplotype-specific and was most promoted by cytosine at rs609621 in the NSE 3′ splice-site (3′ss), which is predominant in high cancer risk populations. NSE levels were deregulated in leukemias and were influenced by the identity of U2AF35 residue 34. We also identify splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) that exploit competition of adjacent pseudoexons to modulate NSE levels. The U2AF-regulated exon usage in the ATM signalling pathway was centred on the MRN/ATM-CHEK2-CDC25-cdc2/cyclin-B axis and preferentially involved transcripts implicated in cancer-associated gene fusions and chromosomal translocations. These results reveal important links between 3′ss control and ATM-dependent responses to double-strand DNA breaks, demonstrate functional plasticity of intronic variants and illustrate versatility of intronic SSOs that target pseudo-3′ss to modify gene expression. PMID:26732650

  8. Expression of AtMed15 of Arabidopsis in yeast causes flocculation and increases ethanol production in yeast culture

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Pradeep; Bhat, Divya S.; Thakur, Jitendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator, a multiprotein complex involved in transcription of class II genes, was first discovered in yeast and then characterized in many metazoans revealing a striking structural conservation of the complex. However, sequences of Mediator subunits are not well conserved raising a question on the functional conservation of these individual subunits. In this study, expression of Med15 of Arabidopsis (AtMed15) in gal11∆ yeast could not complement the function of ScGal11 in galactose metabolism and resistance against cycloheximide. Surprisingly, AtMed15 changed the morphology of the yeast cells. The cells adhered strongly on the surface of the agar media, and showed robust flocculation in the liquid media without affecting the growth. The AtMed15-induced adhesion and flocculation were observed in different carbon sources. Calcium-assisted cell wall-bound mannan-binding proteins were found to be involved in this flocculation, which was unaffected by wide fluctuation of pH or temperatures revealing its constitutive robust nature. Expression of few flocculation related Flo genes was up-regulated in these cells. Interestingly, there was significant increase in ethanol production by the yeast expressing AtMed15. Robust and constitutive flocculation and increased ethanol production by yeast cells harbouring AtMed15 indicate an opportunity of its important usage in biotechnology industries. PMID:27306498

  9. Constitutive activation of the ATM/BRCA1 pathway prevents DNA damage-induced apoptosis in 5-azacytidine-resistant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Satoshi; Umezu, Tomohiro; Ohtsuki, Kazushige; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Ohyashiki, Junko H

    2014-06-01

    5-Azacytidine (AZA) exerts its anti-tumor effects by exerting cytotoxicity via its incorporation into RNA and DNA, which causes the reactivation of aberrantly silenced growth-regulatory genes by promoter demethylation, as well as DNA damage. AZA is used for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. However, some patients demonstrate resistance to AZA, the mechanisms of which are not fully elucidated. We therefore sought to better characterize the molecular mechanism of AZA resistance using an in vitro model of AZA resistance. We established AZA-resistant cell lines by exposing the human leukemia cell lines U937 and HL-60 to clinical concentrations of AZA, and characterized these cells. AZA-resistant cells showed a down-regulation of the DNMT3A protein, in correlation with their marked genome-wide DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, genes involved in pyrimidine metabolism were down-regulated in both AZA-resistant cell lines; AZA sensitivity was restored by inhibition of CTP synthase. Of note is that the DNA damage response pathway is constitutively activated in the AZA-resistant cell lines, but not in the parental cell lines. Inhibition of the DNA damage response pathway canceled the AZA resistance, in association with an increase in apoptotic cells. We found that the molecular mechanism underlying AZA resistance involves pyrimidine metabolism and the DNA damage response through ATM kinase. This study therefore sheds light on the mechanisms underlying AZA resistance, and will enable better understanding of AZA resistance in patients undergoing AZA treatment. PMID:24680865

  10. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated that ATR and ATM recruitment and H2AX phosphorylation are dependent on NER proteins in G1 phase, but not in S phase. We reasoned that in G1 the UVR-induced ssDNA gaps or processed ssDNA, and the bound NER complex promote ATR and ATM recruitment. In S phase, when the UV lesions result in stalled replication forks with long single-stranded DNA, ATR and ATM recruitment to these sites is regulated by different sets of proteins. Taken together, these results provide evidence that UVR-induced ATR and ATM recruitment and activation differ in G1 and S phases due to the existence of distinct types of DNA lesions, which promote assembly of different proteins involved in the process of DNA repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:27442013

  11. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated that ATR and ATM recruitment and H2AX phosphorylation are dependent on NER proteins in G1 phase, but not in S phase. We reasoned that in G1 the UVR-induced ssDNA gaps or processed ssDNA, and the bound NER complex promote ATR and ATM recruitment. In S phase, when the UV lesions result in stalled replication forks with long single-stranded DNA, ATR and ATM recruitment to these sites is regulated by different sets of proteins. Taken together, these results provide evidence that UVR-induced ATR and ATM recruitment and activation differ in G1 and S phases due to the existence of distinct types of DNA lesions, which promote assembly of different proteins involved in the process of DNA repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:27442013

  12. Technologies for developing an advanced intelligent ATM with self-defence capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed several technologies for protecting automated teller machines. These technologies are based mainly on pattern recognition and are used to implement various self-defence functions. They include (i) banknote recognition and information retrieval for preventing machines from accepting counterfeit and damaged banknotes and for retrieving information about detected counterfeits from a relational database, (ii) form processing and character recognition for preventing machines from accepting remittance forms without due dates and/or insufficient payment, (iii) person identification to prevent machines from transacting with non-customers, and (iv) object recognition to guard machines against foreign objects such as spy cams that might be surreptitiously attached to them and to protect users against someone attempting to peek at their user information such as their personal identification number. The person identification technology has been implemented in most ATMs in Japan, and field tests have demonstrated that the banknote recognition technology can recognise more then 200 types of banknote from 30 different countries. We are developing an "advanced intelligent ATM" that incorporates all of these technologies.

  13. Association of ATM activation and DNA repair with induced radioresistance after low-dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Enns, L; Rasouli-Nia, A; Hendzel, M; Marples, B; Weinfeld, M

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian cells often exhibit a hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) to radiation doses <20 cGy, followed by increased radioresistance (IRR) at slightly higher doses (∼20-30 cGy). Here, the influence of DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) on IRR was examined. The failure of Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells to undergo IRR reported by others was confirmed. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that normal cells fail to show a measurable increase in serine 1981 phosphorylated AT-mutated (ATM) protein after 10 cGy up to 4 h post irradiation, but a two- to fourfold increase after 25 cGy. Similarly, more proficient reduction of phosphorylated histone H2AX was observed 24 h after 25 cGy than after 10 cGy, suggesting that DSBR is more efficient during IRR than HRS. A direct examination of the consequences of inefficient DNA repair per se (as opposed to ATM-mediated signal transduction/cell cycle responses), by determining the clonogenic survival of cells lacking the DNA repair enzyme polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase, indicated that these cells have a response similar to AT cells, i.e. HRS but no IRR, strongly linking IRR to DSBR. PMID:25904696

  14. An Operational Tool for Global Monitoring of Inundation Using NPP ATMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfagiorgis, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study is to introduce an operational microwave-based tool for the detection and monitoring of inundation across the globe using passive microwave observations from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) sensor onboard SUOMI NPP. ATMS surface sensitive channels, namely, the 23 GHz and the 89 GHz are used in this study. The inundation detection approach is based on the analysis of the standardized anomalies of a soil wetness index that is determined from the gradient between 89 and 23 GHz brightness temperatures. The dimensionless index is sensitive to extreme wetness conditions. Appropriate threshold-based techniques were implemented in the developed tool to detect and eliminate rainy pixels as well as snow and ice covered pixels. An automated tool was developed to process, analyze the data, develop the inundation product, and disseminate the detected inundated area through a web-based interface. The outputs of the developed algorithm were verified against records from the Darthmouth Flood Observatory data archive. The agreement was acceptable with POD reaching 80 % globally for flood with durations longer than 5 days. The analysis of the flood records showed that the most frequent flood events have a duration of 3 days. The flood detection and mapping system was able to reports more short duration events that lasted 1 day or less than what is in the flood observatory records. The inundation global mapping tool was deployed operationally using real time readouts from NOAA-CREST satellite receiving station in New York, USA.

  15. Fast packet switching algorithms for dynamic resource control over ATM networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, R.P.; Keattihananant, P.; Chang, T.; Heieh, J.; Du, D.

    1996-12-01

    Real-time continuous media traffic, such as digital video and audio, is expected to comprise a large percentage of the network load on future high speed packet switch networks such as ATM. A major feature which distinguishes high speed networks from traditional slower speed networks is the large amount of data the network must process very quickly. For efficient network usage, traffic control mechanisms are essential. Currently, most mechanisms for traffic control (such as flow control) have centered on the support of Available Bit Rate (ABR), i.e., non real-time, traffic. With regard to ATM, for ABR traffic, two major types of schemes which have been proposed are rate- control and credit-control schemes. Neither of these schemes are directly applicable to Real-time Variable Bit Rate (VBR) traffic such as continuous media traffic. Traffic control for continuous media traffic is an inherently difficult problem due to the time- sensitive nature of the traffic and its unpredictable burstiness. In this study, we present a scheme which controls traffic by dynamically allocating/de- allocating resources among competing VCs based upon their real-time requirements. This scheme incorporates a form of rate- control, real-time burst-level scheduling and link-link flow control. We show analytically potential performance improvements of our rate- control scheme and present a scheme for buffer dimensioning. We also present simulation results of our schemes and discuss the tradeoffs inherent in maintaining high network utilization and statistically guaranteeing many users` Quality of Service.

  16. RNA structure is a key regulatory element in pathological ATM and CFTR pseudoexon inclusion events

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Emanuele; Dhir, Ashish; Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Baralle, Francisco E.

    2007-01-01

    Genomic variations deep in the intronic regions of pre-mRNA molecules are increasingly reported to affect splicing events. However, there is no general explanation why apparently similar variations may have either no effect on splicing or cause significant splicing alterations. In this work we have examined the structural architecture of pseudoexons previously described in ATM and CFTR patients. The ATM case derives from the deletion of a repressor element and is characterized by an aberrant 5′ss selection despite the presence of better alternatives. The CFTR pseudoexon instead derives from the creation of a new 5′ss that is used while a nearby pre-existing donor-like sequence is never selected. Our results indicate that RNA structure is a major splicing regulatory factor in both cases. Furthermore, manipulation of the original RNA structures can lead to pseudoexon inclusion following the exposure of unused 5′ss already present in their wild-type intronic sequences and prevented to be recognized because of their location in RNA stem structures. Our data show that intrinsic structural features of introns must be taken into account to understand the mechanism of pseudoexon activation in genetic diseases. Our observations may help to improve diagnostics prediction programmes and eventual therapeutic targeting. PMID:17580311

  17. Mre11 Nuclease Activity has Essential Roles in DNA Repair and Genomic Stability Distinct from ATM Activation

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Jeffrey; Wu, Yipin; Deng, Yibin; Leddon, Jennifer; Westfield, Gerwin; Eckersdorff, Mark; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.; Chang, Sandy; Ferguson, David O.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Mre11/Rad50/NBS1 complex (MRN) maintains genomic stability by bridging DNA ends and initiating DNA damage signaling through activation of the ATM kinase. Mre11 possesses DNA nuclease activities that are highly conserved in evolution, but play unknown roles in mammals. To define functions of Mre11 we engineered targeted mouse alleles which either abrogate nuclease activities or inactivate the entire MRN complex. Mre11 nuclease deficiency causes a striking array of phenotypes indistinguishable from absence of MRN, including early embryonic lethality and dramatic genomic instability. We identify a crucial role for the nuclease activities in homology directed double strand break repair, and a contributing role in activating the ATR kinase. However, nuclease activities are not required to activate ATM after DNA damage or telomere deprotection. Therefore, nucleolytic processing by Mre11 is an essential function of fundamental importance in DNA repair distinct from MRN control of ATM signaling. PMID:18854157

  18. Effect of self-similar traffic on the performance and buffer requirements of ATM ABR edge devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dastangoo, S.; Miller, G.J.; Chen, H.; Brandt, J.

    1996-02-05

    Previous studies demonstrated that Ethemet local area network traffic is statistically self-similar and that the commonly used Poisson models are not able to capture the fractal characteristics of Ethemet traffic. This contribution uses simulated self-similar traffic traces from the MITRE Corporation and Sandia`s simulation software to evaluate the ABR performance of an ATM backbone. The ATM backbone interconnects Ethemet LANs via edge devices such as routers and bridges. We evaluate the overall network performance in terms of throughput, response time, fairness, and buffer requirements. Because typical edge devices perform simple forwarding functions, their usual mechanism for signaling network congestion is packet dropping. Therefore, we believe that the proper provisioning of buffer resources in ATM edge devices is crucial to the overall network performance.

  19. PTEN enhances G2/M arrest in etoposide-treated MCF‑7 cells through activation of the ATM pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruopeng; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Lirong; Xu, Anli; Li, Zhengwei; Xu, Yijuan; He, Pei; Wu, Maoqing; Wei, Fengxiang; Wang, Chenhong

    2016-05-01

    As an effective tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) has attracted the increased attention of scientists. Recent studies have shown that PTEN plays unique roles in the DNA damage response (DDR) and can interact with the Chk1 pathway. However, little is known about how PTEN contributes to DDR through the ATM-Chk2 pathway. It is well-known that etoposide induces G2/M arrest in a variety of cell lines, including MCF-7 cells. The DNA damage-induced G2/M arrest results from the activation of protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), followed by the activation of Chk2 that subsequently inactivates CDC25C, resulting in G2/M arrest. In the present study, we assessed the contribution of PTEN to the etoposide-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. PTEN was knocked down in MCF-7 cells by specific shRNA, and the effects of PTEN on the ATM-Chk2 pathway were investigated through various approaches. The results showed that knockdown of PTEN strongly antagonized ATM activation in response to etoposide treatment, and thereby reduced the phosphorylation level of ATM substrates, including H2AX, P53 and Chk2. Furthermore, depletion of PTEN reduced the etoposide-induced phosphorylation of CDC25C and strikingly compromised etoposide-induced G2/M arrest in the MCF-7 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that PTEN plays a unique role in etoposide-induced G2/M arrest by facilitating the activation of the ATM pathway, and PTEN was required for the proper activation of checkpoints in response to DNA damage in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26986476

  20. Investigation of the functional link between ATM and NBS1 in the DNA damage response in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dar, Inbal; Yosha, Galit; Elfassy, Ronen; Galron, Ronit; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Shiloh, Yosef; Barzilai, Ari

    2011-04-29

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) are related genomic instability syndromes characterized by neurological deficits. The NBS1 protein that is defective in NBS is a component of the Mre11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex, which plays a major role in the early phase of the complex cellular response to double strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA. Among others, Mre11/RAD50/NBS1 is required for timely activation of the protein kinase ATM (A-T, mutated), which is missing or inactivated in patients with A-T. Understanding the molecular pathology of A-T, primarily its cardinal symptom, cerebellar degeneration, requires investigation of the DSB response in cerebellar neurons, particularly Purkinje cells, which are the first to be lost in A-T patients. Cerebellar cultures derived from mice with different mutations in DNA damage response genes is a useful experimental system to study malfunctioning of the damage response in the nervous system. To clarify the interrelations between murine Nbs1 and Atm, we generated a mouse strain with specific disruption of the Nbs1 gene in the central nervous system on the background of general Atm deficiency (Nbs1-CNS-Δ//Atm(-/-)). This genotype exacerbated several features of both conditions and led to a markedly reduced life span, dramatic decline in the number of cerebellar granule neurons with considerable cerebellar disorganization, abolishment of the white matter, severe reduction in glial cell proliferation, and delayed DSB repair in cerebellar tissue. Combined loss of Nbs1 and Atm in the CNS significantly abrogated the DSB response compared with the single mutation genotypes. Importantly, the data indicate that Atm has cellular roles not regulated by Nbs1 in the murine cerebellum. PMID:21300797

  1. Converting multiple OC-3c ATM streams to HIPPI to drive an HDTV frame buffer from a workstation cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.; Dornhoff, A.G.; DuBois, A.J.

    1994-12-01

    A group of eight Digital Equipment Corporation Alpha workstations is interconnected with ATM to form a cluster with supercomputer power. For output, each workstation drives a single ``tile`` on an 8-tile high-resolution frame buffer. A special purpose adapter is used to convert the workstation`s ATM format to the frame buffer`s HIPPI format. This paper discusses the rationale behind the workstation farm, and then describes the visualization output path in detail. To provide the system quickly, special emphasis was placed on making the design as simple as possible. The design choices are examined, and the resultant system is described.

  2. Research and implement on the high speed network system with CIINS based on ATM for aero manufacturing enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi-qiang; Feng, Xi-lan; Zong, Xue-wen; Ding, Yu-cheng

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, the design and implementation on the high-speed network system of the Computer Integrated and Information Network System (CIINS) for aeronautical manufacturing enterprise based on ATM is explained. And designing the high-speed network, choosing the devices, network administration, and developing the network application are discussed. And also, the key technology of the network design is analyzed. The system safety is ensured, when the ATM with QoS in the main backbone network and the work team with network layer in intelligent Ethernet equipment are adapted, and a kind of firewall based on Hard-wall technology is implemented.

  3. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): First Year On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first flight unit was launched a year ago in October, 2011 aboard the Suomi-National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, part of the new Joint Polar-Orbiting Satellite System (JPSS). Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction models; and A TMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface. ATMS was designed & built by Aerojet Corporation in Azusa, California, (now Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems). It has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-AI/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). It continues their cross-track scanning geometry, but for the first time, provides Nyquist sample spacing. All this is accomplished with approximately V. the volume, Y, the mass, and Y, the power of the three AMSUs. A description will be given of its performance from its first year of operation as determined by post-launch calibration activities. These activities include radiometric calibration using the on-board warm targets and cold space views, and geolocation determination. Example imagery and zooms of specific weather events will be shown. The second ATMS flight model is currently under construction and planned for launch on the "Jl" satellite of the JPSS program in

  4. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material: ATM-11 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, J.W.; Daniel, J.L.

    1986-08-01

    ATM-11 glass is designed to be representative of defense high-level waste glasses that will be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. It is representative of a 300-year-old nuclear waste glass and was intended as a conservative compromise between 10-year-old waste and 1000-year-old waste. The feedstock material for this glass was supplied by Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC, as SRL-165 black frit to which was added Ba, Cs, Mo, Nd, Ni, Pd, Rb, Ru, Sr, Te, Y, and Zr, as well as /sup 241/Am, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239+240/Pu, /sup 151/Sm, /sup 99/Tc, and depleted U. The glass was melted under the reducing conditions that resulted from the addition of 0.7 wt% graphite during the final melting process. Nearly 3 kg of ATM-11 glass were produced from a feedstock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1250/sup 0/C in Denver Fire Clay crucibles. After final melting, the glass was formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm nominal size. Twenty-six bars were cast with a nominal weight of about 100 g each. The analyzed composition of ATM-11 glass is tabulated. Examination of a single transverse section from one bar by reflected light microscopy showed random porosity estimated at 0.4 vol% with nominal pore diameters ranging from approx.5 ..mu..m to 175 ..mu..m. A distinct randomly distributed second phase was observed at a very low concentration in the glass matrix as agglomerated, metallic-like clusters. One form of the aggregates contained mainly a high concentration of iron, while a second form had regions of high nickel concentration, and of high palladium concentration. All aggregates also contained a low concentration of technetium and/or ruthenium. An autoradiograph of the sample provided an indication of the total radionuclide ditribution. X-ray diffraction analysis of this same sample indicates that the glass probably contained 5 wt% crystalline material.

  5. NRL-ATM extreme ultraviolet solar image TV monitor flown on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, W. R.; Purcell, J. D.; Schumacher, R. J.; Tousey, R.; Patterson, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    An instrument for recording extreme ultraviolet television images of the sun was flown in the Apollo Telescope Mount on Skylab. Solar radiation in the 171-630 A wavelength range, defined by the transmission band of three thin-film aluminum filters, was focused onto a p-quaterphenyl photon conversion layer by a platinum-coated mirror at normal incidence. The conversion layer was attached to the faceplate of a low light level SEC vidicon. An onboard video monitor enabled the Skylab crews to observe the images in real-time and to identify and follow the development of solar features. Images were also transmitted to the mission control center, where they were used in planning the ATM observing schedule.

  6. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  7. Cris-atms Retrievals Using an AIRS Science Team Version 6-like Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis C.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    CrIS is the infrared high spectral resolution atmospheric sounder launched on Suomi-NPP in 2011. CrISATMS comprise the IRMW Sounding Suite on Suomi-NPP. CrIS is functionally equivalent to AIRS, the high spectral resolution IR sounder launched on EOS Aqua in 2002 and ATMS is functionally equivalent to AMSU on EOS Aqua. CrIS is an interferometer and AIRS is a grating spectrometer. Spectral coverage, spectral resolution, and channel noise of CrIS is similar to AIRS. CrIS spectral sampling is roughly twice as coarse as AIRSAIRS has 2378 channels between 650 cm-1 and 2665 cm-1. CrIS has 1305 channels between 650 cm-1 and 2550 cm-1. Spatial resolution of CrIS is comparable to AIRS.

  8. End-to-End QoS for Differentiated Services and ATM Internetworking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Hongjun; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    2001-01-01

    The Internet was initially design for non real-time data communications and hence does not provide any Quality of Service (QoS). The next generation Internet will be characterized by high speed and QoS guarantee. The aim of this paper is to develop a prioritized early packet discard (PEPD) scheme for ATM switches to provide service differentiation and QoS guarantee to end applications running over next generation Internet. The proposed PEPD scheme differs from previous schemes by taking into account the priority of packets generated from different application. We develop a Markov chain model for the proposed scheme and verify the model with simulation. Numerical results show that the results from the model and computer simulation are in close agreement. Our PEPD scheme provides service differentiation to the end-to-end applications.

  9. Measuring skill acquisition and retention with an ATM simulator: the need for age-specific training.

    PubMed

    Mead, S; Fisk, A D

    1998-09-01

    The present study focused on the type of information presented during training and its effects on initial and retention performance of older and younger adults interacting with computerized, new technology. The effects of emphasizing concepts versus actions during training on performance immediately after training and after a 1-month retention interval were examined. Younger and older adults completed either action or concept training for operating a virtual automatic teller machine (ATM). Overall, action training was associated with faster and more accurate performance immediately after training and better retention performance for older adults. For older adults, value of type of training interacted with type of task component. These findings are applicable to the development of age-specific training materials for computerized tasks. PMID:9849109

  10. Reduced Synchronization Persistence in Neural Networks Derived from Atm-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Levine-Small, Noah; Yekutieli, Ziv; Aljadeff, Jonathan; Boccaletti, Stefano; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by malfunction of the DNA damage response. Therefore, it is important to understand the connection between system level neural network behavior and DNA. Neural networks drawn from genetically engineered animals, interfaced with micro-electrode arrays allowed us to unveil connections between networks’ system level activity properties and such genome instability. We discovered that Atm protein deficiency, which in humans leads to progressive motor impairment, leads to a reduced synchronization persistence compared to wild type synchronization, after chemically imposed DNA damage. Not only do these results suggest a role for DNA stability in neural network activity, they also establish an experimental paradigm for empirically determining the role a gene plays on the behavior of a neural network. PMID:21519382

  11. TCP performance in ATM networks: ABR parameter tuning and ABR/UBR comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Chien Fang; Lin, A.

    1996-02-27

    This paper explores two issues on TOP performance over ATM networks: ABR parameter tuning and performance comparison of binary mode ABR with enhanced UBR services. Of the fifteen parameters defined for ABR, two parameters dominate binary mode ABR performance: Rate Increase Factor (RIF) and Rate Decrease Factor (RDF). Using simulations, we study the effects of these two parameters on TOP over ABR performance. We compare TOP performance with different ABR parameter settings in terms of through-puts and fairness. The effects of different buffer sizes and LAN/WAN distances are also examined. We then compare TOP performance with the best ABR parameter setting with corresponding UBR service enhanced with Early Packet Discard and also with a fair buffer allocation scheme. The results show that TOP performance over binary mode ABR is very sensitive to parameter value settings, and that a poor choice of parameters can result in ABR performance worse than that of the much less expensive UBR-EPD scheme.

  12. Antennas Designed for Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is to enable a communications infrastructure that provides the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize a mature free-flight environment. The technical thrust of the AC/ATM Project is targeted at the design, development, integration, test, and demonstration of enabling technologies for global broadband aeronautical communications. Since Ku-band facilities and equipment are readily available, one of the near-term demonstrations involves a link through a Kuband communications satellite. Two conformally mounted antennas will support the initial AC/ATM communications links. Both of these are steered electronically through monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers and phase shifters. This link will be asymmetrical with the downlink to the aircraft (mobile vehicle) at a throughput rate of greater than 1.5 megabits per second (Mbps), whereas the throughput rate of the uplink from the aircraft will be greater than 100 kilobits per second (kbps). The data on the downlink can be narrow-band, wide-band, or a combination of both, depending on the requirements of the experiment. The AC/ATM project is purchasing a phased-array Ku-band transmitting antenna for the uplink from the test vehicle. Many Ku-band receiving antennas have been built, and one will be borrowed for a short time to perform the initial experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The Ku-band transmitting antenna is a 254-element MMIC phased-array antenna being built by Boeing Phantom Works. Each element can radiate 100 mW. The antenna is approximately 43-cm high by 24-cm wide by 3.3-cm thick. It can be steered beyond 60 from broadside. The beamwidth varies from 6 at broadside to 12 degrees at 60 degrees, which is typical of phased-array antennas. When the antenna is steered to 60 degrees, the beamwidth will illuminate

  13. Modular and Stochastic Approaches to Molecular Pathway Models of ATM, TGF beta, and WNT Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; O'Neill, Peter; Ponomarev, Artem; Carra, Claudio; Whalen, Mary; Pluth, Janice M.

    2009-01-01

    Deterministic pathway models that describe the biochemical interactions of a group of related proteins, their complexes, activation through kinase, etc. are often the basis for many systems biology models. Low dose radiation effects present a unique set of challenges to these models including the importance of stochastic effects due to the nature of radiation tracks and small number of molecules activated, and the search for infrequent events that contribute to cancer risks. We have been studying models of the ATM, TGF -Smad and WNT signaling pathways with the goal of applying pathway models to the investigation of low dose radiation cancer risks. Modeling challenges include introduction of stochastic models of radiation tracks, their relationships to more than one substrate species that perturb pathways, and the identification of a representative set of enzymes that act on the dominant substrates. Because several pathways are activated concurrently by radiation the development of modular pathway approach is of interest.

  14. ATM traffic experiments: A laboratory study of service interaction, loss fairness and loss characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helvik, B. E.; Stol, N.

    1995-04-01

    A reference measurement scenario is defined, where an ATM switch (OCTOPUS) is offered traffic from three source types representing the traffic resulting from typical services to be carried by an ATM network. These are high quality video (HQTV), high speed data (HSD) and constant bitrate transfer (CBR). In addition to be typical, these have widely different characteristics. Detailed definitions for these, and other actual source types, are made and entered into the Synthetic Traffic Generator (STG) database. Recommended traffic mixes of these sources are also made. Based on the above, laboratory measurements are carried out to study how the various kinds of traffic influence each other, how fairly the loss is distributed over services and connections, and what are the loss characteristics experienced. (Due to a software error detected in the measurement equipment after the work was concluded, the measurements are carried out with a HSD source with a load less 'aggressive' than intended.) The main findings are: Cell loss is very unfairly distributed among the various connections. During a loss burst, which occurs less frequently than the duration of a typical connection, affects mainly one or a few connections; Cell loss is unfairly distributed among the services. The ratios in the range from HSD: HQTV: CBR = 5 : 1 : 0.85 are observed, and unfairness increases with decreasing load burstiness; The loss characteristics vary during a loss burst, from one burst to the next and between services. Hence, it does not seem feasible to use 'typical-loss-statistics' to study the impairments on various services. In addition some supplementing work is reported.

  15. Selenite activates the ATM kinase-dependent DNA repair pathway in human osteosarcoma cells with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wojewoda, Marta; Walczak, Jarosław; Duszyński, Jerzy; Szczepanowska, Joanna

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced oxidative damage are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. Based on our previous findings that ROS level was higher in human osteosarcoma cybrids--Neuropathy, Ataxia and Retinitis Pigmentosa (NARP) and was reduced by selenite treatment, this study was designed to elucidate the effects of selenite administration on oxidative and nitrosative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. Oxidative and nitrosative damage to lipids and proteins was not increased in NARP cybrids or mitochondrial DNA-lacking Rho0 cells (displaying mitochondrial dysfunction) when compared with control WT cells. However, we found the enhanced formation of DNA double-strand breaks based on the level of histone γH2AX (phosphorylated at Ser 139), which is known to be phosphorylated by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) kinase in response to DNA damage. Selenite increased the activity of ATM kinase in NARP cybrids and Rho0 cells without concomitant increase in levels of histone γH2AX. Activation of the ATM kinase-dependent DNA repair pathway triggered by selenite could not be associated with enhanced DNA damage but might rather result from selenite-induced activation of ATM-dependent DNA repair mechanisms which could account for protective effects of this agent. PMID:25862479

  16. Aberrant TCRδ rearrangement underlies the T-cell lymphocytopenia and t(12;14) translocation associated with ATM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenxia; Lee, Brian J.; Li, Chen; Dubois, Richard L.; Gostissa, Monica; Alt, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a protein kinase and a master regulator of DNA-damage responses. Germline ATM inactivation causes ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) syndrome with severe lymphocytopenia and greatly increased risk for T-cell lymphomas/leukemia. Both A-T and T-cell prolymphoblastic leukemia patients with somatic mutations of ATM frequently carry inv(14;14) between the T-cell receptor α/δ (TCRα/δ) and immunoglobulin H loci, but the molecular origin of this translocation remains elusive. ATM−/− mice recapitulate lymphocytopenia of A-T patients and routinely succumb to thymic lymphomas with t(12;14) translocation, syntenic to inv(14;14) in humans. Here we report that deletion of the TCRδ enhancer (Eδ), which initiates TCRδ rearrangement, significantly improves αβ T cell output and effectively prevents t(12;14) translocations in ATM−/− mice. These findings identify the genomic instability associated with V(D)J recombination at the TCRδ locus as the molecular origin of both lymphocytopenia and the signature t(12;14) translocations associated with ATM deficiency. PMID:25721125

  17. Novel Smad proteins localize to IR-induced double-strand breaks: interplay between TGFβ and ATM pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minli; Saha, Janapriya; Hada, Megumi; Anderson, Jennifer A.; Pluth, Janice M.; O’Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular damage from ionizing radiation (IR) is in part due to DNA damage and reactive oxygen species, which activate DNA damage response (DDR) and cytokine signaling pathways, including the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and transforming growth factor (TGF)β/Smad pathways. Using classic double-strand breaks (DSBs) markers, we studied the roles of Smad proteins in DDR and the crosstalk between TGFβ and ATM pathways. We observed co-localization of phospho-Smad2 (pSmad2) and Smad7 with DSB repair proteins following low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in human fibroblasts and epithelial cells. The decays of both foci were similar to that of γH2AX foci. Irradiation with high LET particles induced pSmad2 and Smad7 foci tracks indicating the particle trajectory through cells. pSmad2 foci were absent in S phase cells, while Smad7 foci were present in all phases of cell cycle. pSmad2 (but not Smad7) foci were completely abolished when ATM was depleted or inactivated. In contrast, a TGFβ receptor 1 (TGFβR1) inhibitor abrogated Smad7, but not pSmad2 foci at DSBs sites. In summary, we suggest that Smad2 and Smad7 contribute to IR-induced DSB signaling in an ATM or TGFβR1-dependent manner, respectively. PMID:23221633

  18. Non-redundant Functions of ATM and DNA-PKcs in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Pierre; Choudjaye, Jonathan; Clouaire, Thomas; Bugler, Béatrix; Daburon, Virginie; Aguirrebengoa, Marion; Mangeat, Thomas; Iacovoni, Jason S.; Álvarez-Quilón, Alejandro; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Legube, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicit the so-called DNA damage response (DDR), largely relying on ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), two members of the PI3K-like kinase family, whose respective functions during the sequential steps of the DDR remains controversial. Using the DIvA system (DSB inducible via AsiSI) combined with high-resolution mapping and advanced microscopy, we uncovered that both ATM and DNA-PKcs spread in cis on a confined region surrounding DSBs, independently of the pathway used for repair. However, once recruited, these kinases exhibit non-overlapping functions on end joining and γH2AX domain establishment. More specifically, we found that ATM is required to ensure the association of multiple DSBs within “repair foci.” Our results suggest that ATM acts not only on chromatin marks but also on higher-order chromatin organization to ensure repair accuracy and survival. PMID:26586426

  19. Performance analysis of ATM ABR service under self-similar traffic in the presence of background VBR traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Benke, G. |; Brandt, J.; Chen, H.; Dastangoo, S.; Miller, G.J.

    1996-05-01

    Recent empirical studies of traffic measurements of packet switched networks have demonstrated that actual network traffic is self-similar, or long range dependent, in nature. That is, the measured traffic is bursty over a wide range of time intervals. Furthermore, the emergence of high-speed network backbones demands the study of accurate models of aggregated traffic to assess network performance. This paper provides a method for generation of self-similar traffic, which can be used to drive network simulation models. The authors present the results of a simulation study of a two-node ATM network configuration that supports the ATM Forum`s Available Bit Rate (ABR) service. In this study, the authors compare the state of the queue at the source router at the edge of the ATM network under both Poisson and self-similar traffic loading. These findings indicate an order of magnitude increase in queue length for self-similar traffic loading as compared to Poisson loading. Moreover, when background VBR traffic is present, self-similar ABR traffic causes more congestion at the ATM switches than does Poisson traffic.

  20. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  1. Hazards of high altitude decompression sickness during falls in barometric pressure from 1 atm to a fraction thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genin, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    Various tests related to studies concerning the effects of decompression sicknesses at varying pressure levels and physical activity are described. The tests indicate that there are no guarantees of freedom from decompression sicknesses when man transitions from a normally oxygenated normobaric nitrogen-oxygen atmosphere into an environment having a 0.4 atm or lower pressure and he is performing physical work.

  2. Training of Evaluators in the Third World: Implementation of the Action Training Model (ATM) in Kenya and Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhola, H. S.

    The Action Training Model (ATM) was developed for the delivery of evaluation training to development workers in Kenya and Botswana and implemented under the aegis of the German Foundation for International Development. Training of evaluators is a challenge in any context, but in the Third World environment, evaluation training offers special…

  3. Concurrent Mutations in ATM and Genes Associated with Common γ Chain Signaling in Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Haley M.; Khan, Rashid Z.; Song, Chang; Sharma, Deva; Sadashivaiah, Kavitha; Furusawa, Aki; Liu, Xinyue; Nagaraj, Sushma; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J.; Chen, Qing C.; Livak, Ferenc; Rapoport, Aaron P.; Kimball, Amy; Banerjee, Arnob

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous malignancy with poor response to current therapeutic strategies and incompletely characterized genetics. We conducted whole exome sequencing of matched PTCL and non-malignant samples from 12 patients, spanning 8 subtypes, to identify potential oncogenic mutations in PTCL. Analysis of the mutations identified using computational algorithms, CHASM, PolyPhen2, PROVEAN, and MutationAssessor to predict the impact of these mutations on protein function and PTCL tumorigenesis, revealed 104 somatic mutations that were selected as high impact by all four algorithms. Our analysis identified recurrent somatic missense or nonsense mutations in 70 genes, 9 of which contained mutations predicted significant by all 4 algorithms: ATM, RUNX1T1, WDR17, NTRK3, TP53, TRMT12, CACNA2D1, INTS8, and KCNH8. We observed somatic mutations in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) in 5 out of the 12 samples and mutations in the common gamma chain (γc) signaling pathway (JAK3, IL2RG, STAT5B) in 3 samples, all of which also harbored mutations in ATM. Our findings contribute insights into the genetics of PTCL and suggest a relationship between γc signaling and ATM in T cell malignancy. PMID:26536348

  4. Concurrent Mutations in ATM and Genes Associated with Common γ Chain Signaling in Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Haley M; Khan, Rashid Z; Song, Chang; Sharma, Deva; Sadashivaiah, Kavitha; Furusawa, Aki; Liu, Xinyue; Nagaraj, Sushma; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J; Chen, Qing C; Livak, Ferenc; Rapoport, Aaron P; Kimball, Amy; Banerjee, Arnob

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous malignancy with poor response to current therapeutic strategies and incompletely characterized genetics. We conducted whole exome sequencing of matched PTCL and non-malignant samples from 12 patients, spanning 8 subtypes, to identify potential oncogenic mutations in PTCL. Analysis of the mutations identified using computational algorithms, CHASM, PolyPhen2, PROVEAN, and MutationAssessor to predict the impact of these mutations on protein function and PTCL tumorigenesis, revealed 104 somatic mutations that were selected as high impact by all four algorithms. Our analysis identified recurrent somatic missense or nonsense mutations in 70 genes, 9 of which contained mutations predicted significant by all 4 algorithms: ATM, RUNX1T1, WDR17, NTRK3, TP53, TRMT12, CACNA2D1, INTS8, and KCNH8. We observed somatic mutations in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) in 5 out of the 12 samples and mutations in the common gamma chain (γc) signaling pathway (JAK3, IL2RG, STAT5B) in 3 samples, all of which also harbored mutations in ATM. Our findings contribute insights into the genetics of PTCL and suggest a relationship between γc signaling and ATM in T cell malignancy. PMID:26536348

  5. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  6. Differential Processing of Low and High LET Radiation Induced DNA Damage: Investigation of Switch from ATM to ATR Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The members of the phosphatidylinositol kinase-like kinase family of proteins namely ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) are directly responsible for the maintenance of genomic integrity by mounting DDR through signaling and facilitating the recruitment of repair factors at the sites of DNA damage along with coordinating the deployment of cell cycle checkpoints to permit repair by phosphorylating Checkpoint kinase Chk1, Chk2 and p53. High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of protons and high energy and charged (HZE) particles from SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk for astronauts on their space flight missions. The determination of these risks and the design of potential safeguards require sound knowledge of the biological consequences of lesion induction and the capability of the cells to counter them. We here strive to determine the coordination of ATM and ATR kinases at the break sites directly affecting checkpoint signaling and DNA repair and whether differential processing of breaks induced by low and high LET radiation leads to possible augmentation of swap of these damage sensors at the sites of DNA damage. Exposure of cells to IR triggers rapid autophosphorylation of serine-1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates monomer formation of ATM. ATM kinase activity depends on the disruption of the dimer, which allows access and phosphorylation of downstream ATM substrates like Chk2. Evidence suggests that ATM is activated by the alterations in higher-order chromatin structure although direct binding of ATM to DSB ends may be a crucial step in its activation. On the other hand, in case of ATR, RPA (replication protein A)-coated ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) generated as a result of stalled DNA replication or during processing of chromosomal lesions is crucial for the localization of ATR to sites of DNA damage in association with ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP). Although the

  7. A minimally invasive assay for individual assessment of the ATM/CHEK2/p53 pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Kabacik, Sylwia; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Efeyan, Alejo; Finnon, Paul; Bouffler, Simon; Serrano, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs), which activate the ATM/CHEK2/p53 pathway leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through transcription of genes including CDKN1A (p21) and BBC3 (PUMA). This pathway prevents genomic instability and tumorigenesis as demonstrated in heritable syndromes [e.g., Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT); Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS)]. Here, a simple assay based on gene expression in peripheral blood to measure accurately ATM/CHEK2/p53 pathway activity is described. The expression of p21, Puma and Sesn2 was determined in blood from mice with different gene copy numbers of Atm, Trp53 (p53), Chek2 or Arf and in human blood and mitogen stimulated T-lymphocyte (MSTL) cultures from AT, AT carriers, LFS patients and controls, both before and after ex vivo ionizing irradiation. Mouse Atm/Chek2/p53 activity was highly dependent on the copy number of each gene except Arf. In human MSTL, an AT case, AT carriers and LFS patients showed responses distinct from healthy donors. The relationship between gene copy number and transcriptional induction upon radiation was linear for p21 and Puma and correlated well with cancer incidence in p53 variant mice. This reliable blood test provides an assay to determine ATM/CHEK2/p53 pathway activity and demonstrates the feasibility of assessing the activity of this essential cancer protection pathway in simple assays. These findings may have implications for the individualized prediction of cancer susceptibility. PMID:21389785

  8. First six months of clinical usage of an ATM network link between two Veterans Affairs Medical Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Gentili, Amilcare; El-Saden, Suzie; Harmon, Craig; Kenagy, John J.; Grant, Edward G.

    1998-07-01

    Purpose/Background: Asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network technology has recently been used for high speed transmission of radiological images between hospitals and inside hospitals. However, the number of clinical sites which routinely use this technology is limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the very early impact of an ATM link between a large tertiary referral center and small peripheral clinic on cost and clinical practice. Methodology: An ATM link using 155 bps (OC3) technology was installed between the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center and the Sepulveda VA, a large outpatient facility which provides full service radiological services. The West Los Angeles VA Medical Center is a large tertiary referral center with sub-specialist radiologist. The clinical impact of this ATM link between a large full-scale DICOM-3 compliant PACS system at the West LA VA on a smaller PACS system at the Sepulveda VA was evaluated. Results: The ability to freely exchange complicated MRI and CT studies between a tertiary referral center and a clinic could have a direct impact on patient care. Over the last six months, all and CT studies from Sepulveda VA were readily available via the ATM connection to all radiologists at the West LA VA. On average the workload at the Sepulveda VA in CT and MRI was about one tenth of the same workload at West LA VA, thus creating interesting possibilities for sharing or radiologist resources. Conclusions: Although our preliminary data and work loads have been too limited to draw any final conclusions yet, we feel that future results will show that the ability to provide immediate and fast interactive consultation between general radiologists in a large outpatient facility and sub- specialists at a tertiary referral center can have an impact upon the quality of patient care.

  9. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Huihua; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Zhensheng; Xu, Ting; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  10. The SAGA Deubiquitination Module Promotes DNA Repair and Class Switch Recombination through ATM and DNAPK-Mediated γH2AX Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Shaliny; Haddad, Dania; Li, Conglei; Le, Michael X; Ling, Alexanda K; So, Clare C; Nepal, Rajeev M; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Yu, Kefei; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason; Martin, Alberto

    2016-05-17

    Class switch recombination (CSR) requires activation-induced deaminase (AID) to instigate double-stranded DNA breaks at the immunoglobulin locus. DNA breaks activate the DNA damage response (DDR) by inducing phosphorylation of histone H2AX followed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair. We carried out a genome-wide screen to identify CSR factors. We found that Usp22, Eny2, and Atxn7, members of the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) deubiquitination module, are required for deubiquitination of H2BK120ub following DNA damage, are critical for CSR, and function downstream of AID. The SAGA deubiquitinase activity was required for optimal irradiation-induced γH2AX formation, and failure to remove H2BK120ub inhibits ATM- and DNAPK-induced γH2AX formation. Consistent with this effect, these proteins were found to function upstream of various double-stranded DNA repair pathways. This report demonstrates that deubiquitination of histone H2B impacts the early stages of the DDR and is required for the DNA repair phase of CSR. PMID:27160905

  11. Genistein Sensitizes Bladder Cancer Cells to HCPT Treatment In Vitro and In Vivo via ATM/NF-κB/IKK Pathway-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chen; Xu, Peng; Shi, Chang Hong; Shi, Jian Guo; Li, Yu Mei; Fu, Qiang; Xue, Wei; Lei, Yong Hua; Gao, Jing Yu; Wang, Juan Ying; Gao, Xiao Ping; Li, Jin Qing; Yuan, Jian Lin; Zhang, Yun Tao

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignant urological disease in China. Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) is a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor, which has been utilized in chemotherapy for bladder cancer for nearly 40 years. Previous research has demonstrated that the isoflavone, genistein, can sensitize multiple cancer cell lines to HCPT treatment, such as prostate and cervical cancer. In this study, we investigated whether genistein could sensitize bladder cancer cell lines and bladder epithelial cell BDEC cells to HCPT treatment, and investigated the possible underlying molecular mechanisms. Genistein could significantly and dose-dependently sensitize multiple bladder cancer cell lines and BDEC cells to HCPT-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Genistein and HCPT synergistically inhibited bladder cell growth and proliferation, and induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in TCCSUP bladder cancer cell and BDEC cell. Pretreatment with genistein sensitized BDEC and bladder cancer cell lines to HCPT-induced DNA damage by the synergistic activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Genistein significantly attenuated the ability of HCPT to induce activation of the anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway both in vitro and in vivo in a bladder cancer xenograft model, and thus counteracted the anti-apoptotic effect of the NF-κB pathway. This study indicates that genistein could act as a promising non-toxic agent to improve efficacy of HCPT bladder cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23365634

  12. Nuclear lamina defects cause ATM-dependent NF-κB activation and link accelerated aging to a systemic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Fernando G.; Bárcena, Clea; Soria-Valles, Clara; Ramsay, Andrew J.; de Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Fueyo, Antonio; Freije, José M.P.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in the architecture and dynamics of the nuclear lamina have a causal role in normal and accelerated aging through both cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms. However, the precise nature of the molecular cues involved in this process remains incompletely defined. Here we report that the accumulation of prelamin A isoforms at the nuclear lamina triggers an ATM- and NEMO-dependent signaling pathway that leads to NF-κB activation and secretion of high levels of proinflammatory cytokines in two different mouse models of accelerated aging (Zmpste24−/− and LmnaG609G/G609G mice). Causal involvement of NF-κB in accelerated aging was demonstrated by the fact that both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB signaling prevents age-associated features in these animal models, significantly extending their longevity. Our findings provide in vivo proof of principle for the feasibility of pharmacological modulation of the NF-κB pathway to slow down the progression of physiological and pathological aging. PMID:23019125

  13. Metformin and the ATM DNA damage response (DDR): accelerating the onset of stress-induced senescence to boost protection against cancer.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Vellon, Luciano; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2011-11-01

    By activating the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA Damage Response (DDR), the AMPK agonist metformin might sensitize cells against further damage, thus mimicking the precancerous stimulus that induces an intrinsic barrier against carcinogenesis. Herein, we present the new hypothesis that metformin might function as a tissue sweeper of pre-malignant cells before they gain stem cell/tumor initiating properties. Because enhanced glycolysis (the Warburg effect) plays a causal role in the gain of stem-like properties of tumor-initiating cells by protecting them from the pro-senescent effects of mitochondrial respiration-induced oxidative stress, metformin's ability to disrupt the glycolytic metabotype may generate a cellular phenotype that is metabolically protected against immortalization. The bioenergetic crisis imposed by metformin, which may involve enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress, can lower the threshold for cellular senescence by pre-activating an ATM-dependent pseudo-DDR. This allows an accelerated onset of cellular senescence in response to additional oncogenic stresses. By pushing cancer cells to use oxidative phosphorylation instead of glycolysis, metformin can rescue cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression that is downregulated by oncogenic transformation, a crucial adaptation of tumor cells to avoid the adaptive immune response by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). Aside from restoration of tumor immunosurveillance at the cell-autonomous level, metformin can activate a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) to reinforce senescence growth arrest, which might trigger an immune-mediated clearance of the senescent cells in a non-cell-autonomous manner. By diminishing the probability of escape from the senescence anti-tumor barrier, the net effect of metformin should be a significant decrease in the accumulation of dysfunctional, pre-malignant cells in tissues, including those with the

  14. Radiation Exposure, the ATM Gene, and Contralateral Breast Cancer in the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Haile, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Boice, John D.; Shore, Roy E.; Langholz, Bryan; Thomas, Duncan C.; Lynch, Charles F.; Olsen, Jorgen H.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Teraoka, Sharon N.; Diep, Anh T.; Smith, Susan A.; Capanu, Marinela; Reiner, Anne S.; Liang, Xiaolin; Gatti, Richard A.; Concannon, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation is a known mutagen and an established breast carcinogen. The ATM gene is a key regulator of cellular responses to the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. We investigated whether genetic variants in ATM play a clinically significant role in radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in women. Methods The Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology Study is an international population-based case–control study nested within a cohort of 52 536 survivors of unilateral breast cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2000. The 708 case subjects were women with contralateral breast cancer, and the 1397 control subjects were women with unilateral breast cancer matched to the case subjects on age, follow-up time, registry reporting region, and race and/or ethnicity. All women were interviewed and underwent full mutation screening of the entire ATM gene. Complete medical treatment history information was collected, and for all women who received radiotherapy, the radiation dose to the contralateral breast was reconstructed using radiotherapy records and radiation measurements. Rate ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using multivariable conditional logistic regression. All P values are two-sided. Results Among women who carried a rare ATM missense variant (ie, one carried by <1% of the study participants) that was predicted to be deleterious, those who were exposed to radiation (mean radiation exposure = 1.2 Gy, SD = 0.7) had a statistically significantly higher risk of contralateral breast cancer compared with unexposed women who carried the wild-type genotype (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2 to 6.5; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.4 to 8.0) or compared with unexposed women who carried the same predicted deleterious missense variant (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 17.3; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 5.8, 95% CI = 1.8 to 19.0; Ptrend = .044). Conclusions Women who carry rare

  15. Alterations of ATM and CADM1 in chromosomal 11q22.3-23.2 region are associated with the development of invasive cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mazumder Indra, Dipanjana; Mitra, Sraboni; Roy, Anup; Mondal, Ranajit Kumar; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Chakravarty, Runu; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2011-12-01

    To understand the importance of chr11q22.3-23.2 region in the development of cervical cancer, we have studied the genetic and epigenetic alterations of the candidate genes ATM, PPP2R1B, SDHD and CADM1 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical carcinoma (CACX) samples. Our study revealed low expression and high alterations (methylation/deletion) (55-59%) of ATM and CADM1 genes along with poor patient outcome. The alterations of ATM and CADM1 are associated with the progression of tumor from CIN to Stage I/II, thus implying their role in early invasiveness. The two genes, PPP2R1B and SDHD, lying in between ATM and CADM1, have low frequency of alterations, and majority of the alterations are in CACX samples, indicating that their alterations might be associated with disease progression. Expressions (mRNA/protein) of the genes showed concordance with their molecular alterations. Significant co-alteration of ATM and CADM1 points to their synergic action for the development of CACX. Mutation is, however, a rare phenomenon for inactivation of ATM. Association between the alteration of ATM and CHEK1 and poor survival of the patients having co-alterations of ATM and CHEK1 points to the DNA damage response pathway disruption in development of CACX. Thus, our data suggest that inactivation of ATM-CHEK1-associated DNA damage response pathway and CADM1-associated signaling network might have an important role in the development of CACX. PMID:21643982

  16. Buffer allocation in an ATM switch with output buffer and speed constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Georganas, N. D.

    A synchronous nonblocking N times N switch for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks or high speed packet switching networks transporting fixed length packets called cells is considered. Such a switch with output queuing achieves the optimal performance, however it requires the switch fabric to work at the speed of N. In practice the switch may operate L times faster than the input/output trunk. It is assumed that queues at each output port have a limited buffer space and whenever an output queue is full, the back-pressure is applied and the packets are retained at the head of the input queues. The upper bound on the packet loss probability at the input queues in such a switch are computed. To achieve a given packet loss rate, the switch with L equals 2 requires almost the same amount of input and output buffers as with L equals 4 up to 70 percent input load, but as the load increases beyond 70 percent the switch with L equals 4 would require more output buffers and less input buffers in comparison with a switch operating at L equals 2. The performance of a switch with L equals 3 is very similar to that for L equals 4 and is not considered.

  17. Distributed medical services within the ATM-based Berlin regional test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Andreas; Bernarding, Johannes; Krauss, Manfred; Schulz, Sandra; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    1996-05-01

    The ATM-based Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) of Berlin connects two university hospitals (Benjamin Franklin University Hospital and Charite) with the computer resources of the Technical University of Berlin (TUB). Distributed new medical services have been implemented and will be evaluated within the highspeed MAN of Berlin. The network with its data transmission rates of up to 155 Mbit/s renders these medical services externally available to practicing physicians. Resource and application sharing is demonstrated by the use of two software systems. The first software system is an interactive 3D reconstruction tool (3D- Medbild), based on a client-server mechanism. This structure allows the use of high- performance computers at the TUB from the low-level workstations in the hospitals. A second software system, RAMSES, utilizes a tissue database of Magnetic Resonance Images. For the remote control of the software, the developed applications use standards such as DICOM 3.0 and features of the World Wide Web. Data security concepts are being tested and integrated for the needs of the sensitive medical data. The highspeed network is the necessary prerequisite for the clinical evaluation of data in a joint teleconference. The transmission of digitized real-time sequences such as video and ultrasound and the interactive manipulation of data are made possible by Multi Media tools.

  18. Results from CrIS/ATMS Obtained Using an AIRS "Version-6 like" Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    We tested and evaluated Version-6.22 AIRS and Version-6.22 CrIS products on a single day, December 4, 2013, and compared results to those derived using AIRS Version-6. AIRS and CrIS Version-6.22 O3(p) and q(p) products are both superior to those of AIRS Version-6All AIRS and CrIS products agree reasonably well with each other. CrIS Version-6.22 T(p) and q(p) results are slightly poorer than AIRS over land, especially under very cloudy conditions. Both AIRS and CrIS Version-6.22 run now at JPL. Our short term plans are to analyze many common months at JPL in the near future using Version-6.22 or a further improved algorithm to assess the compatibility of AIRS and CrIS monthly mean products and their interannual differences. Updates to the calibration of both CrIS and ATMS are still being finalized. JPL plans, in collaboration with the Goddard DISC, to reprocess all AIRS data using a still to be finalized Version-7 retrieval algorithm, and to reprocess all recalibrated CrISATMS data using Version-7 as well.

  19. Results from CrIS/ATMS Obtained Using an AIRS "Version-6 Like" Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    We have tested and evaluated Version-6.22 AIRS and Version-6.22 CrIS products on a single day, December 4, 2013, and compared results to those derived using AIRS Version-6. AIRS and CrIS Version-6.22 O3(p) and q(p) products are both superior to those of AIRS Version-6All AIRS and CrIS products agree reasonably well with each other CrIS Version-6.22 T(p) and q(p) results are slightly poorer than AIRS under very cloudy conditions. Both AIRS and CrIS Version-6.22 run now at JPL. Our short term plans are to analyze many common months at JPL in the near future using Version-6.22 or a further improved algorithm to assess the compatibility of AIRS and CrIS monthly mean products and their interannual differencesUpdates to the calibration of both CrIS and ATMS are still being finalized. JPL plans, in collaboration with the Goddard DISC, to reprocess all AIRS data using a still to be finalized Version-7 retrieval algorithm, and to reprocess all recalibrated CrISATMS data using Version-7 as well.

  20. Use of FEC coding to improve statistical multiplexing performance for video transport over ATM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurceren, Ragip; Modestino, James W.

    1998-12-01

    The use of forward error-control (FEC) coding, possibly in conjunction with ARQ techniques, has emerged as a promising approach for video transport over ATM networks for cell-loss recovery and/or bit error correction, such as might be required for wireless links. Although FEC provides cell-loss recovery capabilities it also introduces transmission overhead which can possibly cause additional cell losses. A methodology is described to maximize the number of video sources multiplexed at a given quality of service (QoS), measured in terms of decoded cell loss probability, using interlaced FEC codes. The transport channel is modelled as a block interference channel (BIC) and the multiplexer as single server, deterministic service, finite buffer supporting N users. Based upon an information-theoretic characterization of the BIC and large deviation bounds on the buffer overflow probability, the described methodology provides theoretically achievable upper limits on the number of sources multiplexed. Performance of specific coding techniques using interlaced nonbinary Reed-Solomon (RS) codes and binary rate-compatible punctured convolutional (RCPC) codes is illustrated.

  1. Orientation and Dynamics of Synthetic Transbilayer Polypeptides Containing GpATM Dimerization Motifs

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Mark C.; Booth, Valerie; Morrow, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy was used to study how the positioning of a dimerization motif within a transbilayer polypeptide influences its orientation and dynamics in bilayers. Three polypeptide variants comprising glycophorin A transmembrane (GpATM) dimerization motifs incorporated into lysine-terminated poly-leucine-alanine helices were mixed into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine multilamellar vesicles. The variants differed in orientation of the motif segment around the helix axis with respect to the peptide ends. Polypeptides were labeled with methyl-deuterated alanines at positions that were identically situated relative to the peptide ends (Ala-20 and Ala-22) and at two positions within the motif. An analysis of quadrupole splittings revealed similar tilts and orientations of the peptide ends for all three variants, suggesting that average orientations were dominated by interactions at the bilayer surface. For one variant, however, fast orientational fluctuations about the helix axis were significantly smaller. This may indicate some perturbation of peptide dynamics and conformation by interactions that are sensitive to the motif orientation relative to the peptide ends. For the variant that displayed distinct dynamics, one orientation consistent with observed splittings corresponded to the motif being situated such that its two glycines were particularly accessible to adjacent peptides. PMID:21281580

  2. Reduced cost alternatives to premise wiring using ATM and microcellular technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra R.

    1993-01-01

    The cost of premises wiring keeps increasing due to personnel moves, new equipment, capacity upgrades etc. It would be desirable to have a wireless interface from the workstations to the fixed network, so as to minimize the wiring changes needed. New technologies such as microcellular personal communication systems are promising to bring down the cost of wireless communication. Another promising technology is Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), which could dramatically increase the bandwidth available for wireless connections. In addition, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology is emerging as a technique for integrated management of voice, data, and video traffic on a single network. The focus of this investigation will be to assess the future utility of these new technologies for reducing the premise wiring cost at KSC. One of the issues to be studied is the cost comparison of 'old' versus 'new,' especially as time and technology progress. An additional issue for closer study is a feasible time-line for progress in technological capability.

  3. An Alu-derived intronic splicing enhancer facilitates intronic processing and modulates aberrant splicing in ATM

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Tibor; Talotti, Gabriele; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported a natural GTAA deletion within an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene that disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates the excision of the upstream portion of the intron. The resulting pre-mRNA splicing intermediate is then processed to a cryptic exon, whose aberrant inclusion in the final mRNA is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia. We show here that the last 40 bases of a downstream intronic antisense Alu repeat are required for the activation of the cryptic exon by the ISPE deletion. Evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediate by a hybrid minigene assay indicates that the identified intronic splicing enhancer represents a novel class of enhancers that facilitates processing of splicing intermediates possibly by recruiting U1 snRNP to defective donor sites. In the absence of this element, the splicing intermediate accumulates and is not further processed to generate the cryptic exon. Our results indicate that Alu-derived sequences can provide intronic splicing regulatory elements that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and potentially affect the severity of disease-causing splicing mutations. PMID:19773425

  4. Simulated Microgravity Promotes Cell Apoptosis Through Suppressing Uev1A/TICAM/TRAF/NF-κB-Regulated Anti-Apoptosis and p53/PCNA- and ATM/ATR-Chk1/2-Controlled DNA-Damage Response Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tuo; Tang, Xin; Umeshappa, Channakeshava Sokke; Ma, Hong; Gao, Haijun; Deng, Yulin; Freywald, Andrew; Xiang, Jim

    2016-09-01

    Microgravity has been known to induce cell death. However, its underlying mechanism is less studied. In this study, BL6-10 melanoma cells were cultured in flasks under simulated microgravity (SMG). We examined cell apoptosis, and assessed expression of genes associated with apoptosis and genes regulating apoptosis in cells under SMG. We demonstrate that SMG induces cell morphological changes and microtubule alterations by confocal microscopy, and enhances apoptosis by flow cytometry, which was associated with up- and down-regulation of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes, respectively. Moreover, up- and down-regulation of pro-apoptotic (Caspases 3, 7, 8) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2 and Bnip3) molecules was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. Western blot analysis also indicates that SMG causes inhibition of an apoptosis suppressor, pNF-κB-p65, which is complemented by the predominant localization of NF-κB-p65 in the cytoplasm. SMG also reduces expression of molecules regulating the NF-κB pathway including Uev1A, TICAM, TRAF2, and TRAF6. Interestingly, 10 DNA repair genes are down-regulated in cells exposed to SMG, among which down-regulation of Parp, Ercc8, Rad23, Rad51, and Ku70 was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. In addition, we demonstrate a significant inhibition of molecules involved in the DNA-damage response, such as p53, PCNA, ATM/ATR, and Chk1/2. Taken together, our work reveals that SMG promotes the apoptotic response through a combined modulation of the Uev1A/TICAM/TRAF/NF-κB-regulated apoptosis and the p53/PCNA- and ATM/ATR-Chk1/2-controlled DNA-damage response pathways. Thus, our investigation provides novel information, which may help us to determine the cause of negative alterations in human physiology occurring at spaceflight environment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2138-2148, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26887372

  5. Sandia`s network for Supercomputer `96: Linking supercomputers in a wide area Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, T.J.; Martinez, L.G.; Vahle, M.O.

    1997-04-01

    The advanced networking department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past several years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. At Supercomputing 96, for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combined their Supercomputing 96 activities within a single research booth under the ASO banner. Sandia provided the network design and coordinated the networking activities within the booth. At Supercomputing 96, Sandia elected: to demonstrate wide area network connected Massively Parallel Processors, to demonstrate the functionality and capability of Sandia`s new edge architecture, to demonstrate inter-continental collaboration tools, and to demonstrate ATM video capabilities. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations support Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

  6. ATMS_Phase_II: a standalone code for counting non-overlapping high-density nuclear tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Omid

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we focus on counting and density measurements of non-overlapping high-density nuclear track images. This paper is a continuum of another paper of the author introducing ATMS software which has been particularly developed for overlapping nuclear tracks. Here, as the second phase of the ATMS software, a hybrid algorithm is presented for counting the tracks according to user parameter initialization, template inserting and correlation estimation to initially detect nuclear track candidates, then to evaluate geometrical and contextual features of track candidates and finally a decision-making process according to the user's sensitivity considerations. The presented hybrid algorithm is verified and validated by a database containing 100 randomly selected Alpha track images captured from the surface of CR-39 polycarbonate detectors irradiated by environmental Alpha particles emitted from Rn-222 near a copper mine around Anarak city.

  7. WWOX, the common fragile site FRA16D gene product, regulates ATM activation and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Herbel, Christoph; Hofmann, Thomas G.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is a tumor suppressor spanning the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D. Here, we report a direct role of WWOX in DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. We show that Wwox deficiency results in reduced activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) checkpoint kinase, inefficient induction and maintenance of γ-H2AX foci, and impaired DNA repair. Mechanistically, we show that, upon DNA damage, WWOX accumulates in the cell nucleus, where it interacts with ATM and enhances its activation. Nuclear accumulation of WWOX is regulated by its K63-linked ubiquitination at lysine residue 274, which is mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH. These findings identify a novel role for the tumor suppressor WWOX and show that loss of WWOX expression may drive genomic instability and provide an advantage for clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. PMID:25331887

  8. Penetrance of ATM Gene Mutations in Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Different Measures of Risk.

    PubMed

    Marabelli, Monica; Cheng, Su-Chun; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The gene responsible for ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome, ATM, is also an intermediate-risk breast cancer (BC) susceptibility gene. Numerous studies have been carried out to determine the contribution of ATM gene mutations to BC risk. Epidemiological cohorts, segregation analyses, and case-control studies reported BC risk in different forms, including penetrance, relative risk, standardized incidence ratio, and odds ratio. Because the reported estimates vary both qualitatively and quantitatively, we developed a general model allowing the integration of the different types of cancer risk available in the literature. We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis identifying 19 studies, and used our model to obtain a consensus estimate of BC penetrance. We estimated the cumulative risk of BC in heterozygous ATM mutation carriers to be 6.02% by 50 years of age (95% credible interval: 4.58-7.42%) and 32.83% by 80 years of age (95% credible interval: 24.55-40.43%). An accurate assessment of cancer penetrance is crucial to help mutation carriers make medical and lifestyle decisions that can reduce their chances of developing the disease. PMID:27112364

  9. Radiosensitivity to high energy iron ions is influenced by heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2010-09-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1 GeV/ n56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation.

  10. RADIOSENSITIVITY TO HIGH ENERGY IRON IONS IS INFLUENCED BY HETEROZYGOSITY for ATM, RAD9 and BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G; Smilenov, L B; Lieberman, H B; Ludwig, T; Hall, E J

    2010-09-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1GeV/n (56)Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy Iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation. PMID:24431481

  11. RADIOSENSITIVITY TO HIGH ENERGY IRON IONS IS INFLUENCED BY HETEROZYGOSITY for ATM, RAD9 and BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1GeV/n 56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy Iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation. PMID:24431481

  12. Asperlin induces G{sub 2}/M arrest through ROS generation and ATM pathway in human cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    He, Long; Nan, Mei-Hua; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Young Ho; Jang, Jae Hyuk; Erikson, Raymond Leo; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Bo Yeon

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} A new anti-cancer effect of an antibiotics, asperlin, is exploited. {yields} Asperlin induced human cervical cancer cell apoptosis through ROS generation. {yields} Asperlin activated DNA-damage related ATM protein and cell cycle associated proteins. {yields} Asperlin could be developed as a new anti-cancer therapeutics. -- Abstract: We exploited the biological activity of an antibiotic agent asperlin isolated from Aspergillus nidulans against human cervical carcinoma cells. We found that asperlin dramatically increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation accompanied by a significant reduction in cell proliferation. Cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and reduction of Bcl-2 could also be detected after asperlin treatment to the cells. An anti-oxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), however, blocked all the apoptotic effects of asperlin. The involvement of oxidative stress in asperlin induced apoptosis could be supported by the findings that ROS- and DNA damage-associated G2/M phase arrest and ATM phosphorylation were increased by asperlin. In addition, expression and phosphorylation of cell cycle proteins as well as G2/M phase arrest in response to asperlin were significantly blocked by NAC or an ATM inhibitor KU-55933 pretreatment. Collectively, our study proved for the first time that asperlin could be developed as a potential anti-cancer therapeutics through ROS generation in HeLa cells.

  13. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  14. Research Data Acquired in World-Class, 60-atm Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Wey, Changlie

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's new, world-class, 60-atmosphere (atm) combustor research facility, the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR), is in operation and producing highly unique research data. Specifically, data were acquired at high pressures and temperatures representative of future subsonic engines from a fundamental flametube configuration with an advanced fuel injector. The data acquired include exhaust emissions as well as pressure and temperature distributions. Results to date represent an improved understanding of nitrous oxide (NOx) formation at high pressures and temperatures and include an NOx emissions reduction greater than 70 percent with an advanced fuel injector at operating pressures to 800 pounds per square inch absolute (psia). ASCR research is an integral part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Propulsion Program. This program is developing critical low-emission combustion technology that will result in the next generation of gas turbine engines producing 50 to 70 percent less NOx emissions in comparison to 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) limits. The results to date indicate that the AST low-emission combustor goals of reducing NOx emissions by 50 to 70 percent are feasible. U.S. gas turbine manufacturers have started testing the low-emissions combustors at the ASCR. This collaborative testing will enable the industry to develop low-emission combustors at the high pressure and temperature conditions of future subsonic engines. The first stage of the flametube testing has been implemented. Four GE Aircraft Engines low-emissions fuel injector concepts, three Pratt & Whitney concepts, and two Allison concepts have been tested at Lewis ASCR facility. Subsequently, the flametube was removed from the test stand, and the sector combustor was installed. The testing of low emissions sector has begun. Low-emission combustors developed as a result of ASCR research will enable U.S. engine manufacturers to compete on a

  15. High LET Radiation Can Enhance TGF(Beta) Induced EMT and Cross-Talk with ATM Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Huff, Janice; Pluth, Janice M.; Anderson, Janniffer; ONeill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The TGF(Beta) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation in mammary epithelial cells. We investigated possible interactions between the TGF(Beta) and ATM pathways following simulated space radiation using hTERT immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC-hTERT), mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1lu), and several human fibroblast cell lines. TGF(Beta) is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis. The implication of EMT by radiation also has several lines of developing evidence, however is poorly understood. The identification of TGF(Beta) induced EMT can be shown in changes to morphology, related gene over expression or down regulation, which can be detected by RT-PCR, and immunostaining and western blotting. In this study, we have observed morphologic and molecular alternations consistent with EMT after Mv1lu cells were treated with TGF(Beta) High LET radiation enhanced TGF(Beta) mediated EMT with a dose as low as 0.1Gy. In order to consider the TGF(Beta) interaction with ATM we used a potent ATM inhibitor Ku55933 and investigated gene expression changes and Smad signaling kinetics. Ku559933 was observed to reverse TGF(Beta) induced EMT, while this was not observed in dual treated cells (radiation+TGF(Beta)). In EPC-hTERT cells, TGF(Beta) alone was not able to induce EMT after 3 days of application. A combined treatment with high LET, however, significantly caused the alteration of EMT markers. To study the function of p53 in the process of EMT, we knocked down P53 through RNA interference. Morphology changes associated with EMT were observed in epithelial cells with silenced p53. Our study indicates: high LET radiation can enhance TGF(Beta) induced EMT; while ATM is triggering the process of TGF(Beta)-induced EMT, p53 might be an essential repressor for EMT phenotypes.

  16. Elevated Expression of Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein Inhibits γ-Irradiation-Induced Apoptosis of Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed; El Khattouti, Abdelouahid; Ejaeidi, Ahmed; Ma, Tangeng; Day, William A; Espinoza, Ingrid; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Gomez, Christian R

    2016-06-01

    Despite progression in diagnosis and treatment, prostate cancer (PCa) still represents the main cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity in men. Although radiation therapy offers clinical benefit over other therapeutic modalities, the success of this therapeutic modality is commonly hampered by the resistance of advanced tumors. So far, the mechanisms governing tumor resistance to radiotherapy are not discussed in detail. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the resistance of PCa to radiation therapy is attributed to elevated expression of Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein (HURP). In PCa cells, the induction of HURP expression suppresses γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis. γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis of PCa cells is associated with expression of E2F1, p53, p21 proteins together with the phosphorylation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase1 (ASK1), c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and histone family member X (H2AX). Whereas, the induction of HURP expression is able to suppress γ-irradiation-induced effects on E2F1, p53, p21, ATM, ASK1, JNK and ATM, and H2AX. Also, inhibition of γ-irradiation-induced- cytochrome c release, cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, PARP, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were noted in PCa cells induced for HURP expression. The observed radio-resistance of PCa is thought to be the consequence of HURP-mediated destabilization of p53 and ATM proteins that are essential for the modulation of γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis. Thus, based on our findings, PCa resistance to radiation therapy results from the deregulation of ASK1/ JNK; ATM/ H2AX; ATM/p53 and checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2)/ E2F-1 in response to the elevated expression of HURP. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1308-1318, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26505164

  17. A Hypomorphic Mutation Reveals a Stringent Requirement for the ATM Checkpoint Protein in Telomere Protection During Early Cell Division in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Morciano, Patrizia; Zhang, Yi; Cenci, Giovanni; Rong, Yikang S.

    2013-01-01

    Using Drosophila as a model system, we identified a stringent requirement for the conserved function of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) in telomere protection during early embryonic development. Animals homozygous for a hypomorphic mutation in atm develop normally with minimal telomere dysfunction. However, mutant females produce inviable embryos that succumb to mitotic failure caused by covalent fusions of telomeric DNA. Interestingly, although the atm mutation encodes a premature stop codon, it must not have eliminated the production of the mutant protein, and the mutant protein retains kinase activity upon DNA damage. Moreover, although the embryonic phenotype of this mutation resembles that of hypomorphic mutations in the MRN complex, the function of MRN appears normal in the atm embryos. In contrast, there is a prominent reduction of the level of HipHop, an essential member of the Drosophila capping complex. How ATM functions in telomere protection remains poorly understood. The amenability of Drosophila embryos to molecular and biochemical investigations ensures that this newly identified mutation will facilitate future studies of ATM in telomere maintenance. PMID:23604076

  18. A hypomorphic mutation reveals a stringent requirement for the ATM</