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Sample records for polymicrobial otitis media

  1. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. PMID:26014114

  2. Otitis media with effusion

    MedlinePlus

    OME; Secretory otitis media; Serous otitis media; Silent otitis media; Silent ear infection; Glue ear ... drains from the tube and is swallowed. Otitis media with effusion (OME) and ear infections are connected ...

  3. Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Bain, John

    1992-01-01

    Otitis media remains one of the least understood conditions seen by a family physician. More attention to follow up instead of widespread use of antibiotics and decongestant mixtures could improve family practice care of children with middle ear disorders. Greater selection in resorting to surgical management would be helpful. Unnecessary interference is unlikely to be of long-term benefit to either children or their families. ImagesFigures 1-3Figures 4-5 PMID:21221314

  4. Otitis media.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Anne G M; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Cripps, Allan W; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Haggard, Mark P; Venekamp, Roderick P

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) or middle ear inflammation is a spectrum of diseases, including acute otitis media (AOM), otitis media with effusion (OME; 'glue ear') and chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). OM is among the most common diseases in young children worldwide. Although OM may resolve spontaneously without complications, it can be associated with hearing loss and life-long sequelae. In developing countries, CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss. OM can be of bacterial or viral origin; during 'colds', viruses can ascend through the Eustachian tube to the middle ear and pave the way for bacterial otopathogens that reside in the nasopharynx. Diagnosis depends on typical signs and symptoms, such as acute ear pain and bulging of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) for AOM and hearing loss for OME; diagnostic modalities include (pneumatic) otoscopy, tympanometry and audiometry. Symptomatic management of ear pain and fever is the mainstay of AOM treatment, reserving antibiotics for children with severe, persistent or recurrent infections. Management of OME largely consists of watchful waiting, with ventilation (tympanostomy) tubes primarily for children with chronic effusions and hearing loss, developmental delays or learning difficulties. The role of hearing aids to alleviate symptoms of hearing loss in the management of OME needs further study. Insertion of ventilation tubes and adenoidectomy are common operations for recurrent AOM to prevent recurrences, but their effectiveness is still debated. Despite reports of a decline in the incidence of OM over the past decade, attributed to the implementation of clinical guidelines that promote accurate diagnosis and judicious use of antibiotics and to pneumococcal conjugate vaccination, OM continues to be a leading cause for medical consultation, antibiotic prescription and surgery in high-income countries. PMID:27604644

  5. Chronic silent otitis media.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Michael M; Schachern, Patricia A; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2002-01-01

    Otitis media occurs along a continuum. For example, otitis media with effusion characterized by fluid pathology can lead to chronic otitis media plus chronic mastoiditis, characterized by the presence of intractable tissue pathology such as cholesteatoma, cholesterol granuloma or granulation tissue. The literature defines chronic otitis media as having a tympanic membrane perforation and otorrhea. Amongst many other sequelae, which can result from the continuum, an important common one is chronic silent otitis media. This overlooked entity which includes pathology beneath an intact tympanic membrane is commonly seen in our human temporal bone laboratory and in patients. The clinical pathological correlates of this important disease are discussed herein. PMID:12021496

  6. Update on Otitis Media in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoem, Scott R.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses otitis media in children. It addresses risk factors for otitis media, pathogenesis, diagnosis, bacteria causing otitis media, and treatment for acute otitis media, recurrent acute otitis media, and persistent otitis media with effusion, including antibiotics, steroids, allergy control, autoinflation, mechanical ventilation,…

  7. Bacterial agents causing chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Obi, C L; Enweani, I B; Giwa, J O

    1995-06-01

    Ear swabs from 350 patients with chronic otitis media attending different orthorhinolaryngological clinics at different hospitals and health centres in Benin City and Ekpoma in Edo State were screened for the presence of bacterial agents of chronic otitis media. Results revealed the presence of 19 different species indicating polymicrobial infections. Species isolated comprised Staphylococcus aureus (33.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.3%), Proteus mirabilis (17%), Alcaligenes faecalis (6.2%) and Klebsiella aerogenes (4.3%). Others included Escherichia coli (3.3%), Proteus rettgeri (2.8%), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (2.2%), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Acinetobacter spp, Proteus morgani, Haemophilus influenzae, Providencia spp, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus faecalis, non-haemolytic streptococci and Diphotheroids, each accounted for less than 2% of isolates. The study also showed a higher prevalence of chronic otitis media among males (55.7%) than females (44.3%). Cases of chronic otitis media were highest among the age groups (0-5 years) with a prevalence rate of 50% and least among the 6-10 year age group with a prevalence rate of 14.9%. Antibiogram of isolates revealed marked sensitivities (over 90% of the isolates) to ciproxin, tarivid, rocephin and fortum whereas over 70% were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin. Results have indicated that Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis are leading bacterial agents of otitis media and highlights the high risk involved in the use of penicillin, ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, cloxacillin and septrin in the management of chronic otitis media in our locality. PMID:7498006

  8. Pediatric otitis media.

    PubMed

    Julien, D K; Gricar, J A; Cave, D G

    1998-12-01

    The pediatric patients with routine, easiest-to-treat otitis media utilize 2.1 office visits during the course of a PTE. This patient group also received 0.13 tests, 0.14 laboratory and pathology services, and 0.05 medical/surgical procedures during the course of a PTE. Though 29.2% of these patients did not produce a claim for prescription drug therapy, this patient group received at least 1.53 prescriptions per PTEs. One prescription drug group was used in 39.8% of all PTEs. Of the PTEs treated with a single drug group, at least 56.4% were treated with amoxicillin. Two prescription drug groups were used in 18.1% of the PTEs. The prescribing patterns of physicians using two drug groups demonstrate a wide variety of switching patterns, some of which may have cost-of-care implications. Though surgical procedures are seldom utilized in SOI-1, approximately one-half of SOI-2 PTEs undergo some type of surgical procedure. The most common surgical procedure was myringotomy with the PE-TM tubes, which represents 82% of procedures performed on SOI-2 patients. The major cost drivers in the treatment of otitis media are clinical visits and antimicrobial drugs. PMID:10338744

  9. Genetics of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Post, J Christopher

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence, both from animal and human studies, that host genetic factors can influence the risk of developing otitis media (OM). The role of genetics in OM has been elucidated through studies with monozygotic and dizygotic twins, analyses linking genetic polymorphisms to OM susceptibility, and genome scans. Several twin studies have shown a strong genetic component to middle ear effusion risk, with the estimate of the role of heredity for the proportion of time with middle ear effusions being around 0.7. Genetic polymorphisms in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, human leukocyte antigen, and mannose-binding lectin have been variously linked with OM and upper respiratory infection susceptibility. Several genome linkage studies have identified chromosomal regions associated with chronic OM, including 3p, 10q, 10q22.3, 17q12 and 19q. A number of candidate genes are associated with these sites. Given the current state of understanding of the role of genetics in OM, a family history of OM should be ascertained for all patients. Children with a strong family history of OM should be considered as candidates for a more aggressive early treatment of OM, particularly if other risk factors are present. These children may be earlier candidates for the placement of tympanostomy tubes and/or adenoidectomy. Existing data do not support routine genetic testing to determine a child's susceptibility to OM; however, given the advances in whole genome sequencing, such testing may someday play a role in the management of the OM patient. PMID:21358196

  10. Otitis Media, Learning and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSwan, David; Clinch, Emma; Store, Ron

    This paper reviews selected literature on otitis media (OM) and its learning consequences in Aboriginal children in rural Australia and reports on a project to develop a community approach to the problem. Aboriginal people are the most disadvantaged group in Australia; have much poorer health and lower life expectancy than other Australians; and…

  11. Subepithelial space in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Paparella, M M; Sipilä, P; Juhn, S K; Jung, T T

    1985-04-01

    The role of the subepithelial space (SES) has not received sufficient attention in assessing pathogenesis, pathology, and therefore, clinical diagnosis and treatment of the various forms of otitis media (OM). Temporal bones from patients with OM were classified as cases of acute purulent (POM), serous (SOM), mucoid or secretory (MOM), or chronic otitis media (COM). Controlled morphometric studies were made of cellular components of the SES, along with studies of the epithelium and middle ear space. Corollary studies of biochemistry, cellular components, and prostaglandins (PGs) were done on fluid from the human middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEE) from animal models of SOM, MOM, and POM were analyzed biochemically. Findings are surprising in that the SES was more actively involved in all forms of OM than had been thought, especially in MOM and COM. Implications are discussed. PMID:2984491

  12. Prevention of early episodes of otitis media by pneumococcal vaccines might reduce progression to complex disease.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Ron; Pelton, Stephen; Bakaletz, Lauren; Cohen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Otitis media is a common childhood infection of the middle ear and a major cause of morbidity. This multifactorial disease manifests as a spectrum of clinical syndromes from uncomplicated acute otitis media to more complex recurrent and chronic cases (frequently polymicrobial), with the major pathogens involved being Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) target only a few serotypes that cause otitis media; however, results from studies suggest that existing PCVs can prevent early episodes of disease associated with vaccine serotypes, resulting in a reduction of subsequent complex cases caused by non-vaccine serotypes and other otopathogens, which contribute considerably to the disease burden. In this Review, we discuss the role of pneumococcus in the disease continuum and assess clinical evidence showing the effect of prevention of early episodes on the complex interplay between bacterial species implicated in otitis media. PMID:27036355

  13. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation and/or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs ... or viral infection of the fluid of the middle ear, which causes production of fluid or pus. ...

  14. Bacteriology of chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis, and paranasal mucopyocele in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Ito, Y; Mizuta, K; Ogawa, H; Suzuki, T; Miyata, H; Kato, N; Watanabe, K; Ueno, K

    1995-06-01

    A bacteriologic study of cases of chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis, and paranasal mucopyocele diagnosed at Gifu University Hospital was performed between 1989 and 1992. Bacteria were isolated from all of 13 samples of discharge from the ears of patients with chronic otitis media, all of 14 mucosal biopsy specimens from patients with chronic sinusitis, 8 of 10 aspirate samples from patients with chronic sinusitis, and 9 of 15 aspirates samples from patients with mucopyocele. Cultures often yielded polymicrobial growth, with an average of 3.1, 3.8, and 4.2 species per positive specimen from chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis, and mucopyocele, respectively. The most commonly encountered anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus, Propionibacterium, and Prevotella species; the most common aerobes were Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. One strain of Prevotella melaninogenica highly resistant to ampicillin and two strains of Peptostreptococcus resistant to cefaclor were found. PMID:7548557

  15. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing ... learning important speech and language skills. Types of hearing loss Conductive hearing loss is a form of hearing ...

  16. [CLINICAL APPROACH TO PEDIATRIC SEROUS OTITIS MEDIA].

    PubMed

    Gruber, Maayan; Honigman, Tal; Cohen-Kerem, Raanan

    2015-06-01

    Serous otitis media (also known as otitis media with effusion) is one of the most prevalent pediatric diagnoses. However, the recommended clinical approach and significance of this entity are controversial. Pathogenesis is usually based upon a combination of factors as overviewed in the body of the article. The cognitive and behavioral effects amongst children suffering serous otitis media were extensively studied and data points to little if any effects during long term follow-ups in otherwise healthy children. The therapeutic approach can be divided into watchful waiting, systemic drugs, topical drugs, mechanical therapies and surgical therapy (i.e. ventilation tube insertion). The reviewed literature mainly supports the effectiveness of the surgical approach in carefully selected cohorts of patients. PMID:26281082

  17. Biochemical pathology of otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Juhn, S K; Sipilä, P; Jung, T T; Edlin, J

    1984-01-01

    The sequential cytologic and biochemical events of middle ear effusion (MEE) were studied in experimental models of serous otitis media (SOM) and purulent otitis media (POM) in chinchilla. In the SOM model, the initial appearance of neutrophils was followed by macrophages. In the POM model, neutrophils were the predominant cells in MEE and the number of neutrophils was about 100-fold higher than in the SOM model. The activity of lysozyme in MEE was higher in POM than in SOM and correlated with the number of neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes. The results of the present study suggest that neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes are one of the main sources for lysozyme levels in MEE during otitis media. PMID:6598270

  18. [The eosinophilic otitis media's research progress].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2015-09-01

    The eosinophilic otitis media(EOM) is an intractable disease characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellow effusion with extensive accumulation of eosinophils in the middle ear; granulation tissue can been discovered in the middle ear cavity; most of patients have association with bronchial asthma; resist to conventional treatment for otitis media; EOM patients show gradual deterioration of hearing and sometimes become deaf suddenly; effective treatment involves use of topical and oral steroids. This article summarizes the progress of the EOM's diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26647553

  19. Otitis media: the chinchilla model.

    PubMed

    Giebink, G S

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection and disease have been modeled in several animal species including infant and adult mice, infant and adult rats, infant Rhesus monkeys, and adolescent and adult chinchillas. Most are models of sepsis arising from intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation of bacteria, and a few were designed to study disease arising from intranasal infection. Chinchillas provide the only animal model of middle ear pneumococcal infection in which the disease can be produced by very small inocula injected into the middle ear (ME) or intranasally, and in which the disease remains localized to the ME in most cases. This model, developed at the University of Minnesota in 1975, has been used to study pneumococcal pathogenesis at a mucosal site, immunogenicity and efficacy of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PS) vaccine antigens, and the kinetics and efficacy of antimicrobial drugs. Pathogenesis experiments in the chinchilla model have revealed variation in ME virulence among different pneumococcal serotypes, enhancement of ME infection during concurrent intranasal influenza A virus infections, and natural resolution of pneumococcal otitis media (OM) without intervention. Research has explored the relative contribution of pneumococcal and host products to ME inflammation. Pneumococcal cell wall components and pneumolysin have been studied in the model. Host inflammatory responses studied in the chinchilla ME include polymorphonuclear leukocyte oxidative products, hydrolytic enzymes, cytokine and eicosanoid metabolites, and ME epithelial cell adhesion and mucous glycoprotein production. Both clinical (tympanic membrane appearance) and histopathology (ME, Eustachian tube, inner ear) endpoints can be quantified. Immunologic and inflammatory studies have been facilitated by the production of affinity-purified antichinchilla immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and secretory IgA polyclonal antibody reagents, and the identification of cross-reactivity between

  20. Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    MacAndie, C; O'Reilly, B F

    1999-06-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated an association between chronic otitis media (COM) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), there still remains disagreement about the relationship. A retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between sensorineural hearing loss and chronic otitis media. Forty-one patients met the following criteria: unilateral COM and no history of head injury, meningitis or previous otological surgery. The differences in preoperative bone conduction threshold between diseased and control (contralateral normal) ear were statistically significant (P < 0.01) and varied from 5.24 to 9.02 dB across the frequency range. The effect of duration of disease on the degree of SNHL was also analysed but no correlation was found. The presence of cholesteatoma and/or ossicular erosion was not associated with a significantly increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:10384849

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Paparella, M M; Morizono, T; Le, C T; Mancini, F; Sipilä, P; Choo, Y B; Lidén, G; Kim, C S

    1984-01-01

    Additional evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that both acute purulent otitis media (POM) and chronic suppurative otitis media (COM) can cause high frequency sensorineural hearing loss. In selected patients and in animals (chinchillas) in a pilot study using electrophysiological methods, both temporary threshold shifts and permanent threshold shifts of basal cochlear turn involvement were demonstrated in POM. Data of cochlear involvement in 475 ears with bilateral COM, 607 ears with unilateral COM, and 607 ears serving as controls were obtained from six centers in five countries. In group 1 (15 dB or greater), 43% of ears with unilateral COM and 42% of ears with bilateral COM showed losses, for a combined odds ratio eight times that in controls. In group 2 (30 dB or greater), 16% of ears with unilateral COM and 17% of ears with bilateral COM demonstrated, respectively, seven and ten times that in controls. These statistically significant findings influence clinical considerations. PMID:6508134

  2. New Insights into Eosinophilic Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiromi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a type of intractable otitis media that occurs mainly in patients with bronchial asthma (BA). In 2011, the diagnostic criteria for EOM were established. EOM is characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellowish effusion containing eosinophils and immunoglobulin E (IgE), eosinophil chemoattractants, such as eosinophil cationic protein, interleukin-5, and eotaxin. Local sensitization against foreign agents such as fungi or bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus) may result in local IgE production in the middle ear and may be responsible for the severity of EOM. The clinical features of EOM closely resemble localized eosinophilic granulomatosis polyangiitis, therefore it is necessary to be vigilant to the symptoms of mononeuritis, polyneuritis, and skin purpura during diagnosis. Standard treatment for EOM is the instillation of triamcinolone acetonide into the mesotympanum. However, severe cases exhibiting strong inflammation and otorrhea are not easily controlled with antibiotics and/or corticosteroids. We proposed the introduction of a severity score to evaluate the severity of EOM. This score correlated with local IgE levels in middle ear effusion. Clinically, the risk factors associated with this severity score were body mass index, and the duration of bronchial asthma (from the onset of BA to the age of the first consultation of otitis media to our hospital). We emphasize that early diagnosis and adequate treatment are vital in preventing progressive and sudden hearing loss resulting from EOM. PMID:26546407

  3. Epidemiology and Management of Otitis Media in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giebink, G. Scott; Daly, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    This article focuses on definitions of middle ear inflammation (otitis media), the epidemiology of this disorder, brief considerations of pathophysiology and management, and possible future therapies. (DB))

  4. Interleukin-8 expression in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, K S; Fitzgerald, J E; Burleson, J A; Leonard, G; Carpenter, R; Kreutzer, D L

    1994-08-01

    Based on recent studies in the authors' laboratory on the correlation of cytokines and inflammation in otitis media (OM), the authors hypothesized that in chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) interleukin-8 (IL-8) is responsible for 1. the accumulation of leukocytes in the middle ear cleft and 2. in situ leukocyte activation with subsequent tissue damage. Additionally, the authors hypothesized that IL-8 expression is at least in part under the control of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). To begin to test this hypothesis, middle ear effusions (MEE) obtained from children ages 2 to 90 months (mean age, 29 months) undergoing tympanostomy tube placement for the presence of these inflammatory cytokines were analyzed. For these studies, IL-8, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF-beta) were measured in MEE by radioimmunoassay (RIA) or enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). IL-8, IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and TNF-beta were present in 92%, 67%, 77%, and 0% of effusions, respectively. The mean (+/- SEM) values for IL-8, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha were 4805 (+/- 913) pg/mg, 4076 (+/- 1510) pg/mg, and 163 (+/- 90) pg/mg. Further analysis indicated that levels of IL-8 correlated with IL-1 beta (R2 = .500, P = .000) and TNF-alpha (R2 = .387, P = .023). Thus the authors' studies clearly demonstrate that IL-8 is consistently present in the MEE of children with COME and is strongly correlated with levels of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, both known inducers of IL-8 production. These results support the authors' hypothesis that IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-8 are intimately involved in the inflammatory cascade in the middle ear and suggest regulation of these cytokines as possible sites of future therapeutic intervention in otitis media with effusion (OME). PMID:8052085

  5. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  6. [Impact of vaccination on acute otitis media].

    PubMed

    Blanchard-Rohner, Geraldine; Gervaix, Alain

    2016-02-17

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is an important reason for medical visits and antibiotic use in children, with possible complications. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) have been developed from 2000, with first the apparition of the 7-valent PCV (PCV7), and from 2013, of the 13-valent PCV (PCV13). First developed to prevent invasive pneumococcal infections, they have been shown to reduce the number of AOM as well. PC13 has allowed to reduce the nasopharyngeal carriage of the majority of pneumococcal serotypes found in AOM, with a reduction of 77% of pneumococcal AOM, according to one study. PMID:27039459

  7. Facial nerve canal dehiscence in chronic otitis media without cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Nomiya, Shigenobu; Kariya, Shin; Nomiya, Rie; Morita, Norimasa; Nishizaki, Kazunori; Paparella, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The information on incidence of the facial nerve canal dehiscence in chronic otitis media is important for surgeons. The purpose of this study is to disclose the histopathologic findings of facial nerve canal dehiscence in human temporal bones with chronic otitis media. We divided the human temporal bones into two groups (age 4 years, and under 4 years of age). We evaluated the incidence and the area of the facial nerve canal dehiscence in chronic otitis media under light microscopy. Age-matched normal control temporal bones were also examined. In the age group of 4 years, 68.9 % of temporal bones with chronic otitis media and 71.9 % of controls had the facial nerve canal dehiscence. There was no significant difference between them (P = 0.61). The area of the dehiscence in temporal bones with chronic otitis media was not statistically different from controls (P = 0.53). In the age group under 4 years, 88.2 % of temporal bones with chronic otitis media and 76.5 % of controls had the dehiscence. No significant difference was found between them (P = 0.66). The area of the dehiscence in temporal bones with chronic otitis media was not statistically different from controls in the age group under 4 years (P = 0.43). In chronic otitis media, the incidence of facial nerve canal dehiscence was high and was not statistically different from controls. These results suggest that there is no association between chronic otitis media and the presence of facial nerve canal dehiscence. PMID:23483192

  8. Otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year

    PubMed Central

    Di Francesco, Renata Cantisani; Barros, Vivian Boschesi; Ramos, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year and its association with the season of the year, artificial feeding, environmental and perinatal factors. Methods: Retrospective study of 184 randomly included medical records from a total of 982 healthy infants evaluated for hearing screening tests. Diagnosis of otitis media with effusion was based on otoscopy (amber-gold color, fluid level, handle of malleus position), type B tympanometric curves and absence of otoacoustic emissions. Incomplete medical records or those describing acute otitis media, upper respiratory tract infections on the assessment day or in the last 3 months, neuropathies and craniofacial anomalies were excluded. Data such as gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, type of feeding and day care attendance were compared between children with and without otitis media with effusion through likelihood tests and multivariate analysis. Results: 25.3% of 184 infants had otitis media with bilateral effusion; 9.2% had unilateral. In infants with otitis media, the following were observed: chronological age of 9.6±1.7 months; gestational age >38 weeks in 43.4% and birth weight >2500g in 48.4%. Otitis media with effusion was associated with winter/fall, artificial feeding, Apgar score <7 and day care attendance. The multivariate analysis showed that artificial feeding is the factor most often associated to otitis media with effusion. Conclusions: Otitis media with effusion was found in about one third of children younger than 1 year and was mainly associated with artificial feeding. PMID:26559603

  9. tuberculous otitis media in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Ihsan; Keven, Kenan; Sengül, Sule; Kutlay, Sim; Sertcelik, Ayse; Ertürk, Sehsuvar; Erbay, Bülent

    2004-06-01

    Tuberculous otitis media is a rare cause of chronic suppurative infection of the middle ear and a very uncommon form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Although there have been several case reports in the nonimmunosuppressive population of tuberculous otitis media, it has never been reported in an immunosuppressed allograft recipient. We present a case of diagnosed tuberculous otitis media after recurrent chronic otitis media treated several times with empiric antibiotic treatment. After the patient developed postauricular fistula and underwent surgical removal of granulation tissue, the diagnosis was made on the basis of histopathology and growth in culture of Ziehl-Neelsen. Clinical response promptly followed institution of antituberculous treatment including isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. PMID:15168420

  10. Mitochondrial DNA deletions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Bozoglu, Ceyda; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Yoruk, Ozgur; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 and 7400 bp deletions of mitochondrial DNA in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media and to indicate the possible association of mitochondrial DNA deletions with chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty-six patients with chronic suppurative otitis media were randomly selected to assess the mitochondrial DNA deletions. Tympanomastoidectomy was applied for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media, and the curettage materials including middle ear tissues were collected. The 4977 and 7400 bp deletion regions and two control regions of mitochondrial DNA were assessed by using the four pair primers. DNA was extracted from middle ear tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients, and then polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed. PCR products were separated in 2 % agarose gel. Seventeen of 36 patients had the heterozygote 4977 bp deletion in the middle ear tissue but not in peripheral blood. There wasn't any patient who had the 7400 bp deletion in mtDNA of their middle ear tissue or peripheral blood tissue. The patients with the 4977 bp deletion had a longer duration of chronic suppurative otitis media and a higher level of hearing loss than the others (p < 0.01). Long time chronic suppurative otitis media and the reactive oxygen species can cause the mitochondrial DNA deletions and this may be a predisposing factor to sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media. An antioxidant drug as a scavenger agent may be used in long-term chronic suppurative otitis media. PMID:26620342

  11. Determining otitis media severity from middle ear fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Juhn, S K; Garvis, W J; Lees, C J; Le, C T; Kim, C S

    1994-05-01

    Otitis media has a complex multifactorial pathogenesis, and the middle ear inflammatory response is typified by the accumulation of cellular and chemical mediators in middle ear effusion. However, specific biochemical and immunochemical factors that may be responsible for the severity or chronicity of otitis media have not been identified. Identification of factors involved in chronicity appears to be an essential step in the treatment and ultimate prevention of chronic otitis media. We analyzed 70 effusion samples from patients 1 to 10 years of age who had chronic otitis media with effusion for two cytokines (interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha) and total collagenase. The highest concentrations of all three inflammatory mediators were found in purulent otitis media, and concentrations were higher in younger than in older patients. Mediator concentrations were similar in samples obtained from patients having their first myringotomy for otitis media with effusion and in those who had had multiple previous myringotomies. The multiresponse star, which incorporates several biochemical parameters in one graphic illustration, may best characterize the complex nature of middle ear inflammation. PMID:8179269

  12. Eosinophilic otitis media: a new middle ear disease entity.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yukiko

    2008-11-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is intractable otitis media characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellow effusion containing eosinophils. It occurs mainly in patients with bronchial asthma and is resistant to conventional treatments for otitis media. Here we discuss the clinical features, pathogenesis, and management of EOM. EOM predominantly affects women and presents most often in patients in their 50s. The clinical features of the middle ear in EOM are roughly divided into the otitis media with effusion type and chronic otitis media type. The latter is further divided into two subtypes: simple perforation and granulation tissue formation. EOM is often complicated by rhinosinusitis (eosinophilic sinusitis). High-tone loss is more frequently found and more severe in EOM patients than in chronic otitis media control patients, and EOM patients sometimes become deaf suddenly. Systemic or topical steroid administration is the most effective treatment for patients with EOM. The instillation of triamcinolone acetonide, a suspension of steroids, into the middle ear is very effective for controlling eosinophilic inflammation. It is very important to explain to patients with EOM that the disease may last for a long period and that progressive and sudden hearing loss may occur. PMID:18940145

  13. Early acute otitis media and siblings' attendance at nursery.

    PubMed Central

    Kvaerner, K J; Nafstad, P; Hagen, J A; Mair, I W; Jaakkola, J J

    1996-01-01

    To assess the relation between early acute otitis media and exposure to respiratory pathogens mediated by siblings and other children, a prospective cohort of 3754 Norwegian children born in 1992-3 was followed up from birth to 12 months. Of these, 25% had one or more episodes of acute otitis media during the first year. Results from multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for confounding showed that siblings' attendance at daycare is the most important risk factor for early acute otitis media (adjusted odds ratio, ORadj = 1.9). The total number of children in the daycare setting is another determinant for early acute otitis media (ORadj = 2.0 in groups of four or more other children and ORadj = 1.3 in groups of one to three other children, as compared to those who are cared for alone). Having siblings in daycare outside the home and the number of children in the daycare setting are the most important determinants for early acute otitis media. PMID:8984924

  14. Participation of mast cells in chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Pajor, Anna; Danilewicz, Marian; Jankowski, Andrzej; Durko, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media (COM), much attention is paid to the molecular mechanisms of local inflammatory reactions in which mast cells (MCs) may be involved due to their role not only in allergic but also inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the density of mast cells in chronic otitis media in relationship to different clinical courses of COM, bacterial infections and types of disease. The MCs expression was measured immunohistochemically in paraffin-embedded granulation tissue specimens taken during surgery, by staining with a monoclonal antibody against tryptase. The density of tryptase-positive mast cells was lower in tissue samples from the group with a good clinical course than in those from the group with poor healing and recurrence (p = 0.006). There were no differences between the groups of patients with granulomatous and cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media (p = 0.66) or between the groups of patients with and without bacterial infection (p = 0.30), although the density of mast cells was lower for those with Pseudomonas aeruginosa/Proteus sp./ /Staphylococcus MRSA infection. In conclusion, the expression of mast cells in chronic otitis media granulation tissue was found to differ depending on the clinical course of the disease, but not on bacterial infection or type of COM. This may suggest that mast cells contribute to the maintenance of the inflammatory process, but not to antibacterial defense in chronic otitis media. PMID:22038229

  15. Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines: Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Su-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu Young; Park, Su Eun; Chun, Young Myung; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Park, Shi-Nae; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) are common infections in children, and their diagnosis and treatment have significant impacts on the health of children and the costs of providing national medical care. In 2009, the Korean Otologic Society organized a committee composed of experts in the field of otolaryngology, pediatrics, and family medicine to develop Korean clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for otitis media in children with the goal of meeting regional medical and social needs in Korea. For this purpose, the committee adapted existing guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2004 to 2009 using medical search engines including data from Korea. A draft was written after a national questionnaire survey and several public audits, and it was editorially supervised by senior advisors before publication of the final report. These evidence-based guidelines for the management of otitis media in children provide recommendations to primary practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of children younger than 15 yr old with uncomplicated AOM and OME. The guidelines include recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment options, prevention and parent education, medical records, referral, and complementary/alternative medicine for treating pediatric otitis media. PMID:22876048

  16. Eosinophilic Otitis Media: CT and MRI Findings and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won Jung; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Cho, Kyung Ja; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a relatively rare, intractable, middle ear disease with extremely viscous mucoid effusion containing eosinophils. EOM is associated with adult bronchial asthma and nasal allergies. Conventional treatments for otitis media with effusion (OME) or for chronic otitis media (COM), like tympanoplasty or mastoidectomy, when performed for the treatment of EOM, can induce severe complications such as deafness. Therefore, it should be differentiated from the usual type of OME or COM. To our knowledge, the clinical and imaging findings of EOM of temporal bone are not well-known to radiologists. We report here the CT and MRI findings of two EOM cases and review the clinical and histopathologic findings of this recently described disease entity. PMID:22563277

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion Executive Summary (Update).

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shin, Jennifer J; Schwartz, Seth R; Coggins, Robyn; Gagnon, Lisa; Hackell, Jesse M; Hoelting, David; Hunter, Lisa L; Kummer, Ann W; Payne, Spencer C; Poe, Dennis S; Veling, Maria; Vila, Peter M; Walsh, Sandra A; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2016-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation has published a supplement to this issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery featuring the updated "Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion." To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 18 recommendations developed emphasize diagnostic accuracy, identification of children who are most susceptible to developmental sequelae from otitis media with effusion, and education of clinicians and patients regarding the favorable natural history of most otitis media with effusion and the lack of efficacy for medical therapy (eg, steroids, antihistamines, decongestants). An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group. PMID:26833645

  18. Otitis Media and Related Complications among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Daniel J.; Susi, Apryl; Erdie-Lalena, Christine R.; Gorman, Gregory; Hisle-Gorman, Elizabeth; Rajnik, Michael; Elrod, Marilisa; Nylund, Cade M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) symptoms can be masked by communication deficits, common to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We sought to evaluate the association between ASD and otitis media. Using ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes, we performed a retrospective case-cohort study comparing AOM, and otitis-related diagnoses among children with and…

  19. Otitis Media in Young Children: Medical, Developmental, and Educational Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E., Ed.; Wallace, Ina F., Ed.; Henderson, Frederick W., Ed.

    The 12 chapters of this book provide a synthesis of what is currently known about otitis media and its sequelae on aspects of child development. Chapters are grouped into four sections: definition, prevalence, and diagnosis; auditory, language, and learning sequelae; medical and surgical management; and international perspectives and future…

  20. Terahertz otoscope and potential for diagnosing otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Moon, In-Seok; Bark, Hyeon Sang; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Huh, Yong-Min; Suh, Jin-Seok; Oh, Seung Jae; Jeon, Tae-In

    2016-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a novel terahertz (THz) otoscope to help physicians to diagnose otitis media (OM) with both THz diagnostics and conventional optical diagnostics. We verified the potential of this tool for diagnosing OM using mouse skin tissue and a human tympanic membrane samples prior to clinical application. PMID:27446647

  1. Role of computed tomography in unsafe chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Berry, S; Gandotra, S C; Saxena, N C

    1998-04-01

    Thirty Patients of Unsafe chronic suppurative otitis media were subjected to pre-operative CT scanning followed by surgical exploration of the middle ear and mastoid, and their scans were compared with the peroperative data. High resolution CT scanning has been advocated for evaluation of unsafe chronic suppurative otitis media as it is capable of delineating detail required to detect Labyrinthine fistulae, Facial canal erosion, Sinus and Dural plate erosion and Ossicular integrity. Our results showed CT scan to be highly sensitive for soft tissue density mass in the middle ear and mastoid. Dural plate exposure, Sinus plate erosion, Facial canal and Stapes integrity, moderately sensitive for Malleus and Incus integrity and least sensitive for Lateral canal fistulae. Both Axial and Coronal scans were done as many important structures are best seen in only one of these planes. The principal merit of CT scan of the Tomporal bone lies in its inherent ability to depict pathology which is not clinically evident. PMID:23119400

  2. Otitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ear infection; Infection - ear ... affect the inner or outer parts of the ear. The condition is classified according to whether it ... long period of time (chronic). Otitis externa (swimmer's ear). Involves the outer ear and ear canal. A ...

  3. Rare A2ML1 variants confer susceptibility to otitis media.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Chiong, Charlotte M; Reyes-Quintos, Ma Rina T; Tantoco, Ma Leah C; Wang, Xin; Acharya, Anushree; Abbe, Izoduwa; Giese, Arnaud P; Smith, Joshua D; Allen, E Kaitlynn; Li, Biao; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Garcia, Marieflor Cristy; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D V; Labra, Patrick John; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa I; Chan, Abner L; Wang, Gao T; Daly, Kathleen A; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Patel, Janak A; Riazuddin, Saima; Sale, Michele M; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ahmed, Zubair M; Abes, Generoso T; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-08-01

    A duplication variant within the middle ear-specific gene A2ML1 cosegregates with otitis media in an indigenous Filipino pedigree (LOD score = 7.5 at reduced penetrance) and lies within a founder haplotype that is also shared by 3 otitis-prone European-American and Hispanic-American children but is absent in non-otitis-prone children and >62,000 next-generation sequences. We identified seven additional A2ML1 variants in six otitis-prone children. Collectively, our studies support a role for A2ML1 in the pathophysiology of otitis media. PMID:26121085

  4. Intraoperative findings in revision chronic otitis media surgery.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Abolhassan; Motasaddi-Zarandy, Masoud; Khorsandi, Mohammad-Taghi

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we reviewed the surgical findings in a series of revision tympanomastoidectomy to determine the most common causes of failure in chronic otitis media surgery. The intraoperative findings at revision mastoidectomy with tympanoplasty of 116 patients were analyzed. The most common sites of pathologic tissue at revision surgery (with cholesteatoma and/ or granulation tissue) were unexenterated cells of the sinodural angle. The most common mechanical cause of retention of debris in canal wall down procedures was facial ridge. PMID:18298298

  5. (Central) Auditory Processing: the impact of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Leticia Reis; Paschoal, Jorge Rizzato; Colella-Santos, Maria Francisca

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze auditory processing test results in children suffering from otitis media in their first five years of age, considering their age. Furthermore, to classify central auditory processing test findings regarding the hearing skills evaluated. METHODS: A total of 109 students between 8 and 12 years old were divided into three groups. The control group consisted of 40 students from public school without a history of otitis media. Experimental group I consisted of 39 students from public schools and experimental group II consisted of 30 students from private schools; students in both groups suffered from secretory otitis media in their first five years of age and underwent surgery for placement of bilateral ventilation tubes. The individuals underwent complete audiological evaluation and assessment by Auditory Processing tests. RESULTS: The left ear showed significantly worse performance when compared to the right ear in the dichotic digits test and pitch pattern sequence test. The students from the experimental groups showed worse performance when compared to the control group in the dichotic digits test and gaps-in-noise. Children from experimental group I had significantly lower results on the dichotic digits and gaps-in-noise tests compared with experimental group II. The hearing skills that were altered were temporal resolution and figure-ground perception. CONCLUSION: Children who suffered from secretory otitis media in their first five years and who underwent surgery for placement of bilateral ventilation tubes showed worse performance in auditory abilities, and children from public schools had worse results on auditory processing tests compared with students from private schools. PMID:23917659

  6. [Acute otitis media and short-term complications].

    PubMed

    Juilland, Naline; Vinckenbosch, Pauline; Richard, Céline

    2016-02-17

    Oral antibiotic have changed the incidence of otitic intracranial complications. In spite of therapeutic progress, these complications remain serious, potentially life-threatening and may result in long-life consequences. Acute otitis media diagnosis and knowledge of intracranial complications' symptoms are required for early and adapted therapeutics. Care strategies evolve with the continuously improvement of medical technologies, development of new vaccines and targeted use of antibiotics. PMID:27039457

  7. Gradenigo's syndrome--a rare complication of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, Padmaja; Madeswaran, K; Thiruppathy, S P; Kalairajan, D; Inbasekaran, V

    2002-11-01

    Petrous apicitis is a rare intracranial complication of otitis media. A 4-year-old female child was presented with persistent ear discharge, retro-orbital pain and lateral rectus palsy (triad of Gradenigo's syndrome). A right temporal burr-hole was placed and tapping was done under antibiotic coverage. Turbid cerebrospinal fluid could be drained. Follow-up could not be done as the patient refused treatment and was discharged against medical advice. PMID:12797641

  8. Ossicular chain status in chronic suppurative otitis media in adults.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Saurabh; Nangia, Ashutosh; Bist, S S; Singh, R K; Gupta, N; Bhagat, S

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to find out the status of the ossicles in cases of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). One hundred and fifty cases of CSOM, who underwent surgery, were included and their intra-operative ossicular chain findings noted. Ossicular erosion was found to be much more common in unsafe CSOM than in safe CSOM. Malleus was found to be the most resistant ossicle to erosion whereas incus was found to be the most susceptible. PMID:22319706

  9. Luc abscess: an extraordinary complication of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Er, Anıl; Erdağ, Taner Kemal; Çağlar, Aykut; Kümüş, Özgür; Duman, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Luc abscess is an uncommon suppurative complication of otitis media. Unfamiliarity of this complication leads to delayed diagnosis and treatment. This abscess is usually benign. Infection in the middle ear spreads via anatomic preexisting pathways, and this process results with subperiosteal pus collection. Conservative treatment with drainage under empirical wide spectrum antibiotic is efficient. Here,we present a 9-year-old boy who had left facial swelling after a period of otalgia, diagnosed as Luc abscess without mastoiditis. PMID:26078258

  10. Immunologic characteristics of cytokines in otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Himi, T; Suzuki, T; Kodama, H; Takezawa, H; Kataura, A

    1992-10-01

    Levels of cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated in samples of the middle ear effusions (MEEs) from 144 ears with otitis media with effusion (OME) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, followed by cytologic analysis. Middle ear effusions of the acute purulent type contained a significantly higher concentration of cytokines compared with normal control sera (p < .001). Cytokines were observed at lower levels in MEE in adults than in children. Tests of children at the chronic stage of MEE showed higher levels of TNF than IL-1 and GM-CSF. Meanwhile, IL-1 beta showed significantly higher concentrations in acute purulent types than in serous and mucoid types (p < .01). In cytologic analysis, the mean level of IL-1 beta was significantly higher in the neutrophil-rich group than in other groups (p < .05). Cytokines possess several biologic properties, some of which are associated not only with acute otitis media but also with chronic otitis media. This study showed that cytokines, especially IL-1 beta, contribute to infiltration into the middle ear by inflammatory cells. This implies that the persistent presence of cytokines in MEE could be a factor in prolonged OME. PMID:1416648

  11. Human evolutionary history: Consequences for the pathogenesis of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Bluestone, Charles D.; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of otitis media is multifactorial, but the role of evolution on its development has not been addressed. We posit that the high prevalence of middle-ear disease is most likely restricted to humans, in contrast to other wild species, because the associated hearing loss would have reduced the fitness of affected individuals as a result of predation. We present here the possible consequences of two human adaptations that may have resulted in ubiquitous otitis media: the interaction of bipedalism and increased brain size, and the loss of facial prognathism resulting from speech or cooking. As consequence of our adaptation for bipedalism, the female pelvic outlet is constricted which in the context of a rapidly enlarging brain, results in humans being born 12 months too soon. Significantly, immature Eustachian tube structure and function in conjunction with an immature immune system, helps to explain the high incidence of otitis media in the first year of life. But, the persistence of middle-ear disease beyond this stage is not explained by “immaturity.” The morphology of the palate changed with the adaptations that produced facial flattening, with concomitant effects on Eustachian tube function. These changes resulted in relatively poor human physiologic tubal function in comparison to the nonhuman primate. PMID:21109071

  12. Tuberculous Otitis Media Leading to Sequentialib Bilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nitin; Dass, Arjun; Goel, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is an uncommon, insidious, and frequently misdiagnosed form of tuberculosis (TB). In particular, TOM is usually secondary to direct transmission from adjacent organs, while the primary form has been rarely reported. The main aim of treatment is to start the patient on an antitubercular regime and early surgical intervention to decompress the facial nerve if involved. Case Report: The case report of a twenty year-old male with bilateral tuberculous otitis media, who presented himself with fever followed by sequential bilateral facial nerve paralysis, bilateral profound hearing loss, and abdominal tuberculosis leading to intestinal perforation, is presented. To the best available knowledge and after researching literature, no such case depicting the extensive otological complications of tuberculosis has been reported till date. Conclusion: Tuberculosis of the ear is a rare entity and in most cases the clinical features resemble that of chronic otitis media. The diagnosis is often delayed due to varied clinical presentations and this can lead to irreversible complications. Early diagnosis is essential for prompt administration of antitubercular therapy and to prevent complications. PMID:26082906

  13. Middle ear fluid bacteriology of acute otitis media in neonates and very young infants.

    PubMed

    Karma, P H; Pukander, J S; Sipilä, M M; Vesikari, T H; Grönroos, P W

    1987-12-01

    The middle ear fluid (MEF) bacteriology of 107 attacks of acute otitis media (AOM) in 101 infants less than 3 months old was analyzed. A total of 108 bacteria were isolated from 85 attacks. Major AOM-pathogens, S. pneumoniae (19%), H. influenzae (9%) or B. catarrhalis (7%) were cultured in approximately one-third of all the attacks. S. aureus (17%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (22%) without the above pathogens were commonly found, whereas gram-negative enteric bacteria were culturable from only 5 attacks. Only 8% of the MEFs were polymicrobial. More than half of all the bacterial strains produced beta-lactamase. The bacteriology of those younger than one month was not different from that of the others. The same was true with attacks of out-patients and in-patients, except for a larger proportion of beta-lactamase producing strains in in-patients. Nasal-nasopharyngeal and MEF samples showed the same bacteriology in only 20% of cases. Two-thirds of AOM attacks were present in infants with perinatal or other concomitant morbidity, but their bacteriology was not different from those without other morbidity. In addition to the examination of ears in infants presenting with any illness before the age of 3 months, the study stresses the importance of bacteriological analysis of MEF in all cases of AOM at this age. PMID:3125118

  14. C-reactive protein in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Karma, P; Sipilä, M; Koskela, M; Peltola, H

    1987-01-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were studied in 79 children with acute otitis media (AOM), aged from 4 months to 5 years. The CRP was less than 10 mg/l in 27 children, greater than or equal to 20 mg/l in 34, and greater than or equal to 40 mg/l in 17 children, 25 of the 41 attacks caused by S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae showed a CRP of greater than or equal to 20 mg/l and 15 CRP greater than or equal to 40 mg/l, in 38 cases without major otitis pathogens, the respective figures were 9 (p less than 0.01) and 2 (p less than 0.001). Although statistically significant correlations between otitis-related clinical parameters and CRP levels were rare, there was a tendency toward higher CRP values among those with a more severe clinical picture. All five attacks with CRP greater than or equal to 100 mg/l were bilateral, caused by major pathogens, and preceded by a respiratory infection. They also tended to have high fever and a large amount of fluid in myringotomy. However, even in these the general course of AOM and other morbidity was not different from the others. PMID:3618166

  15. Pediatricians' Opinions about Otitis Media and Speech-Language-Hearing Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnenschein, Esther; Cascella, Paul W.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five pediatricians responded to a confidential survey about their opinions on the relationship between otitis media and children's speech-language-hearing status. Results found that pediatricians did not necessarily agree that otitis media has an impact on speech-language-hearing development. Pediatricians reported that an early otitis…

  16. New Paradigms in the Pathogenesis of Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Coticchia, James Mark; Chen, Michael; Sachdeva, Livjot; Mutchnick, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a multifactorial disease with a significant socioeconomic impact. The pathogenesis of AOM is attributed to a variety of well-established internal and extrinsic factors. Recent evidence strongly points to bacterial biofilm formation as an important contributor to this disease entity. The nasopharynx is a likely reservoir for infection with subsequent seeding of pathogens to the middle ear via planktonic shedding. Various modalities have been used to directly detect biofilm formation in the middle ear mucosa of children with AOM. Further insights into this disease may lead to new strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:24400296

  17. [Acute otitis media in children: antibiotic therapy or watchful waiting?].

    PubMed

    Amrhein, P; Hospach, A; Sittel, C; Koitschev, A

    2013-05-01

    Acute otitis media is one of the most common infections in childhood and the options of therapy have been examined in numerous studies. Nevertheless, there are controversial opinions regarding the question whether antibiotic therapy makes sense. This is proved through the many different ways that the primary treatment of the middle ear infection is handled throughout the international community. This work gives an overview of the current knowledge and based on these results gives practical recommendations to assist with the diagnosis and treatment of the individual patients. PMID:23247747

  18. Otitis media in a mouse model for Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fengchan; Yu, Heping; Zhang, Jiangping; Tian, Cong; Schmidt, Cecilia; Nava, Casey; Davisson, Muriel T; Zheng, Qing Y

    2009-01-01

    The Ts65Dn mouse shares many phenotypic characteristics of human Down syndrome. Here, we report that otitis media, characterized by effusion in the middle ear and hearing loss, was prevalent in Ts65Dn mice. Of the 53 Ts65Dn mice tested, 81.1% had high auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR) thresholds for at least one of the stimulus frequencies (click, 8 kHz, 16 kHz and 32 kHz), in at least one ear. The ABR thresholds were variable and showed no tendency toward increase with age, from 2 to 7 months of age. Observation of pathology in mice, aged 3–4 months, revealed middle ear effusion in 11 of 15 Ts65Dn mice examined, but only in two of 11 wild-type mice. The effusion in each mouse varied substantially in volume and inflammatory cell content. The middle ear mucosae were generally thickened and goblet cells were distributed with higher density in the epithelium of the middle ear cavity of Ts65Dn mice as compared with those of wild-type controls. Bacteria of pathogenic importance to humans also were identified in the Ts65Dn mice. This is the first report of otitis media in the Ts65Dn mouse as a model characteristic of human Down syndrome. PMID:19765102

  19. Defective immunoregulation in children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, J M; Park, B H

    1986-03-01

    Otitis media and middle ear effusions (MEE) are most common clinical problems in early childhood, for which an estimated one million tympanostomies are performed each year in the United States. Although many factors have been associated with MEE (age, sex, genetics, otitis media, socioeconomic status, feeding style, atopy or hypersensitivity, certain bacteria and viruses), a defective immunoregulatory mechanism in the host may also contribute to the pathogenesis. During the past 2 years, we have evaluated immune function in 90 randomly selected children who underwent repeated tympanostomy for persistent MEE. The T-cell subset ratio (OKT-4/OKT-8) was reduced (below 1.25) in 16%. In 33 children, generation of T-cell growth factor (IL-2) by peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) was evaluated and found to be decreased in 11. The mitogenic response of PBL to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulation was abnormal in almost half of the cases. Imbalance of T-cell subsets and decreased production of IL-2 indicate defective immunoregulatory function in some of these children, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of persistent MEE. PMID:2938056

  20. Middle ear cleft in chronic otitis media: a clinicohistopathological study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Karan; Manjari, Mridu; Salaria, Neha

    2013-12-01

    Chronic mucosal diseases of middle ear cleft or chronic suppurative otitis media has been traditionally defined as a chronic inflammation of the middle ear and mastoid usually associated with perforation of the tympanic membrane and otorrhoea. Understanding the pathology and pathogenesis of chronic suppurative otitis media is important in predicting the management, prognosis and sequelae of the disease. The present prospective study was conducted to evaluate the clinical, intraoperative and histopathological changes in middle ear cleft. 100 patients diagnosed with CSOM who underwent surgery were taken. The mucosa and granulation tissue was removed along with ossicles wherever indicated and sent for histopathological examination. On clinical examination, 72 cases were found to be of tubotympanic type and 28 cases of atticoantral variety. However, intraoperatively, of the tubotympanic cases 8 were found to be of unsafe type which was also proven histologically. Stratified squamous epithelium was revealed in most of the cases accompanied by changes in the submucosa. Ossicular chain was involved in 40 cases with incus being the commonest bone to be eroded. PMID:24427703

  1. Identification of bacteria causing acute otitis media using Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Oscar D.; Wakeman, Catherine A.; Skaar, Eric P.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2016-03-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the leading cause of acute physician visits and prescription of antibiotics for children. Current standard techniques to diagnose acute otitis media (AOM) are limited by their ability to probe only changes in symptoms of the bacterial infection that cause AOM. Furthermore, they are not able to detect the presence of or identify bacteria causing AOM, which is important for diagnosis and proper antibiotic treatment. Our goal is to detect the presence of and identify the pathogens involved in causing AOM based on their biochemical profile using Raman spectroscopy (RS). An inVia confocal Raman microscope (Renishaw) at 785 nm was used to detect bacteria causing AOM in vitro. The three main bacteria that cause AOM, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were cultured in chocolate agar and Mueller-Hinton agar to determine which agar type would minimize Raman signal from the growth agar. Preliminary results identified specific Raman spectral features characteristic of S. pneumoniae. RS has the potential to accurately diagnose AOM, which will help in identifying the antibiotic that will be most beneficial for the patient and ultimately decrease the course of infection.

  2. Xylitol Syrup for the Prevention of Acute Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Michael J.; Vezina, Richard M.; Pelton, Steven I.; Feldman, Henry A.; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common childhood illness and the leading indication for antibiotic prescriptions for US children. Xylitol, a naturally occurring sugar alcohol, can reduce AOM when given 5 times per day as a gum or syrup, but a more convenient dosing regimen is needed for widespread adoption. METHODS: We designed a pragmatic practice-based randomized controlled trial to determine if viscous xylitol solution at a dose of 5 g 3 times per day could reduce the occurrence of clinically diagnosed AOM among otitis-prone children 6 months through 5 years of age. RESULTS: A total of 326 subjects were enrolled, with 160 allocated to xylitol and 166 to placebo. In the primary analysis of time to first clinically diagnosed AOM episode, the hazard ratio for xylitol versus placebo recipients was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61 to 1.3). In secondary analyses, the incidence of AOM was 0.53 episodes per 90 days in the xylitol group versus 0.59 in the placebo group (difference 0.06; 95% CI –0.25 to 0.13); total antibiotic use was 6.8 days per 90 days in the xylitol group versus 6.4 in the placebo group (difference 0.4; 95% CI –1.8 to 2.7). The lack of effectiveness was not explained by nonadherence to treatment, as the hazard ratio for those taking nearly all assigned xylitol compared with those taking none was 0.93 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.57). CONCLUSIONS: Viscous xylitol solution in a dose of 5 g 3 times per day was ineffective in reducing clinically diagnosed AOM among otitis-prone children. PMID:24394686

  3. Otitis Media Diagnosis for Developing Countries Using Tympanic Membrane Image-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Myburgh, Hermanus C.; van Zijl, Willemien H.; Swanepoel, DeWet; Hellström, Sten; Laurent, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Background Otitis media is one of the most common childhood diseases worldwide, but because of lack of doctors and health personnel in developing countries it is often misdiagnosed or not diagnosed at all. This may lead to serious, and life-threatening complications. There is, thus a need for an automated computer based image-analyzing system that could assist in making accurate otitis media diagnoses anywhere. Methods A method for automated diagnosis of otitis media is proposed. The method uses image-processing techniques to classify otitis media. The system is trained using high quality pre-assessed images of tympanic membranes, captured by digital video-otoscopes, and classifies undiagnosed images into five otitis media categories based on predefined signs. Several verification tests analyzed the classification capability of the method. Findings An accuracy of 80.6% was achieved for images taken with commercial video-otoscopes, while an accuracy of 78.7% was achieved for images captured on-site with a low cost custom-made video-otoscope. Interpretation The high accuracy of the proposed otitis media classification system compares well with the classification accuracy of general practitioners and pediatricians (~ 64% to 80%) using traditional otoscopes, and therefore holds promise for the future in making automated diagnosis of otitis media in medically underserved populations. PMID:27077122

  4. Otitis Media and Related Complications Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Adams, Daniel J; Susi, Apryl; Erdie-Lalena, Christine R; Gorman, Gregory; Hisle-Gorman, Elizabeth; Rajnik, Michael; Elrod, Marilisa; Nylund, Cade M

    2016-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) symptoms can be masked by communication deficits, common to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We sought to evaluate the association between ASD and otitis media. Using ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes, we performed a retrospective case-cohort study comparing AOM, and otitis-related diagnoses among children with and without ASD. Children with ASD had a significantly increased rate of AOM, otitis media with effusion, otorrhea, and PE tube placement. Children with ASD were more than twice as likely to develop mastoiditis, and to undergo mastoidectomy and tympanoplasty. Children with ASD are more likely to have middle ear infections and otitis-related complications, highlighting the importance of routine middle ear examinations and close attention to hearing impairment in this population. PMID:26739355

  5. Nasal nitric oxide in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Torretta, S; Marchisio, P; Capaccio, P; Pignataro, L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, reduced Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) nNO levels have been reported in children with adenoidal hypertrophy predisposing to chronic nasosinusal inflammation. Given the strict anatomic and physiopathologic link between the nasopharyngeal and middle ear compartments, and considering the high prevalence of otitis prone children among those affected with chronic adenoiditis, we designed a study aimed to test any possible difference in nNO levels between non-allergic children with and without recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) associated with chronic adenoiditis. The study involved 54 children with RAOM (44.4% males; mean age= 7.5±3.5 years) and 51 children without RAOM (47.4% males; mean age= 7.0±3.8 years). nNO levels were significantly reduced in children with RAOM compared to children without RAOM (676.9±250.7 ppb vs 831.8±320.4 ppb, respectively; p= 0.02). Our results could be related to reduced NO production by the ciliated paranasal, nasopharyngeal and middle ear epithelium and the impaired sinusal ostial and Eustachian tube patency due to chronic inflammation, and seem to confirm the involvement of NO pathway in recurrent upper airway infections related to impaired ciliated respiratory mucosa. PMID:27049104

  6. Rare but numerous serious complications of acute otitis media in a young child

    PubMed Central

    Van Munster, Mariëtte P E; Brus, Frank; Mul, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media is a very common disease in children. Most children recover with symptomatic therapy like potent analgesics, but occasionally serious complications occur. We present a 3-year-old girl who suffered from acute otitis media for already 2 weeks and presented with fever, abducens nerve palsy of her left eye and vomiting. She was finally diagnosed with an acute otitis media complicated by a mastoiditis, sinus thrombosis, meningitis and cerebellar empyema. Fusobacterium necrophorum was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. The girl recovered following appropriate antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment. PMID:23486343

  7. Medical prevention of recurrent acute otitis media: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Paola; Nazzari, Erica; Torretta, Sara; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common pediatric diseases; almost all children experience at least one episode, and a third have two or more episodes in the first three years of life. The disease burden of AOM has important medical, social and economic effects. AOM requires considerable financial assistance due to needing at least one doctor visit and a prescription for antipyretics and/or antibiotics. AOM is also associated with high indirect costs, which are mostly related to lost days of work for one parent. Moreover, due to its acute symptoms and frequent recurrences, AOM considerably impacts both the child and family's quality of life. AOM prevention, particularly recurrent AOM (rAOM), is a primary goal of pediatric practice. In this paper, we review current evidence regarding the efficacy of medical treatments and vaccines for preventing rAOM and suggest the best approaches for AOM-prone children. PMID:24678887

  8. A case of direct intracranial extension of tuberculous otitis media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Kee; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyung-Ho; Yeo, Sang Won

    2014-02-01

    We describe a very rare case of tuberculous otitis media (TOM) with direct intracranial extension. The patient was a 55-year-old man who presented to our ENT clinic for evaluation of severe headaches and right-sided otorrhea. A biopsy of granulation tissue obtained from the right external auditory canal demonstrated chronic inflammation that was suggestive of mycobacterial infection. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated intracranial extension of TOM through a destroyed tegmen mastoideum. After 2 months of antituberculous medication, the headaches and otorrhea were controlled, and the swelling in the external ear canal subsided greatly. Rarely does TOM spread intracranially. In most such cases, intracranial extension of tuberculosis occurs as the result of hematogenous or lymphogenous spread. In rare cases, direct spread through destroyed bone can occur, as it did in our patient. PMID:24526478

  9. Eya4-deficient mice are a model for heritable otitis media.

    PubMed

    Depreux, Frederic F S; Darrow, Keith; Conner, David A; Eavey, Roland D; Liberman, M Charles; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, J G

    2008-02-01

    Otitis media is an extremely common pediatric inflammation of the middle ear that often causes pain and diminishes hearing. Vulnerability to otitis media is due to eustachian tube dysfunction as well as other poorly understood factors, including genetic susceptibility. As EYA4 mutations cause sensorineural hearing loss in humans, we produced and characterized Eya4-deficient (Eya4(-/-)) mice, which had severe hearing deficits. In addition, all Eya4(-/-) mice developed otitis media with effusion. Anatomic studies revealed abnormal middle ear cavity and eustachian tube dysmorphology; thus, Eya4 regulation is critical for the development and function of these structures. We suggest that some human otitis media susceptibility reflects underlying genetic predisposition in genes like EYA4 that regulate middle ear and eustachian tube anatomy. PMID:18219393

  10. Early exposure to otitis media: a preliminary investigation of behavioral outcome.

    PubMed

    Black, M M; Sonnenschein, S

    1993-06-01

    Factors that contribute to developmental vulnerability were examined in a 4-year follow-up of 31 children who, as infants, had participated in an investigation of the relationship between recurrent otitis media and developmental status. The children in this inner-city sample experienced significant decline in their language and developmental status regardless of their history with otitis media. Findings support a threshold model of risk, suggesting that otitis media does not necessarily pose an additional stress to the language and cognitive development of low-income, inner-city children. In keeping with theoretical models by Vygotsky and Rutter, maternal cognitive growth fostering facilitated children's language development by serving as a compensatory factor, counteracting the potential impact of recurrent otitis media. PMID:7688005

  11. Otitis media in the Republic of Palau. A case-series study.

    PubMed

    Chan, K H; Swarts, J D; Rudoy, R; Dever, G J; Mesubed, Y

    1993-04-01

    Race is a known epidemiologic determinant for the development of otitis media. This study assessed the severity of otitis media in a subpopulation (N = 73; mean age, 13.2 years) receiving care from the ear clinic in the Republic of Palau, a US Trust Territory, through a questionnaire and an otologic examination. The mean age of patients with otorrhea (2.5 years) was found to be significantly different from the mean age at which they began to swim (4 years). Otitis media-related sequelae were found to involve more than half of ears or subjects examined. No statistical difference was noted when various patient characteristics were compared with the severity of disease. Our clinical impression is that this subpopulation is severely affected by otitis media and its sequelae. Prospective studies are required to identify risk factors present in the population at large. PMID:8457305

  12. What Does Tympanostomy Tube Placement in Children Teach Us About the Association Between Atopic Conditions and Otitis Media?

    PubMed Central

    Juhn, Young J.; Wi, Chung-Il

    2014-01-01

    Otitis media is the most common infection second only to viral upper respiratory infection in the outpatient setting. Tympanostomy tube insertion (TTI) is the most common ambulatory surgical procedure in the United States. While many risk factors for otitis media have been identified, atopic conditions have been under-recognized as risk factors for recurrent and persistent otitis media. Given that asthma and other atopic conditions are the most common chronic conditions during childhood, it is worth examining the association between atopic conditions and risk of otitis media, which can provide insight into how atopic conditions influence the risk of microbial infections. This paper focuses its discussion on otitis media, however it is important that the association between atopic conditions and risk of otitis media be interpreted in the context of the association of atopic conditions with increased risks of various microbial infections. PMID:24816652

  13. The effect of indoor air pollutants on otitis media and asthma in children

    SciTech Connect

    Daigler, G.E.; Markello, S.J.; Cummings, K.M. )

    1991-03-01

    This case-control study investigated the possible association between home environmental air pollutants and their effect on otitis media and asthma in children. Patients with physician-diagnosed otitis (n = 125, 74% response), with asthma (n = 137, 80% response), and controls (n = 237, 72% response) from a private pediatric practice seen between October 1986 and May 1987 were studied. A questionnaire inquired about housing characteristics (i.e., age, insulation, heating system) and sources of indoor air pollution such as cigarette smoking, use of woodburning stoves, household pets, etc. Analysis of the responses confirmed previous findings of significant relationships between maternal smoking (P = .021), and the presence of pets (P = .034) and the occurrence of asthma. A newly reported relationship between exposure to woodburning stoves and the occurrence of otitis (P less than .05) was reported. This implicates yet another risk factor (wood burning) in the etiology of otitis media.

  14. Childhood otitis media is associated with dizziness in adulthood: the HUNT cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aarhus, Lisa; Tambs, Kristian; Hoffman, Howard J; Engdahl, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the association between otitis media in childhood and dizziness in adulthood. Longitudinal, population-based cohort study of 21,962 adults (aged 20-59 years, mean 40) who completed a health questionnaire in the Nord-Trøndelag Hearing Loss Study was conducted. At 7, 10 and 13 years of age, the same individuals underwent screening audiometry in a longitudinal school hearing investigation. Children found with hearing loss underwent an ear, nose and throat specialist examination. Adults diagnosed with childhood chronic suppurative otitis media (n = 102) and childhood hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media (n = 590) were significantly more likely to have increased risk of reported dizziness when compared to adults with normal hearing as children at the school investigation and also a negative history of recurrent otitis media (n = 21,270), p < 0.05. After adjusting for adult age, sex and socio-economic status, the odds ratios were 2.1 [95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.4-3.3] and 1.3 (95 % CI: 1.0-1.5), respectively. This longitudinal cohort study suggests that childhood chronic suppurative otitis media and childhood hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media are associated with increased risk of dizziness in adulthood. This might reflect a permanent effect of inflammatory mediators or toxins on the vestibular system. The new finding stresses the importance of treatment and prevention of these otitis media conditions. PMID:26335289

  15. Tympanic membrane perforation descriptors and hearing levels in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Prasansuk, S; Hinchcliffe, R

    1982-01-01

    The air conduction threshold of hearing was determined at 0.5,1 and 2 kHz by manual audiometry on a consecutive series of young Thai adults with bilateral chronic suppurative otitis media. At the same time, after visual inspection of each tympanic membrane, the perforation was drawn, as faithfully as possible in respect of both shape and relative size, on a 40-mm diagram of a tympanic membrane. A study of the shapes of perforations showed that they could be described as elliptical, reniform or cardioid. For the purposes of calculating the area of a perforation, a reniform perforation was considered to be the result of substracting a smaller ellipse from a larger ellipse, which ellipses were in contact at the point of least curvature. The hearing threshold level was found to be a function of the size of the perforation. A power function best described this relationship. The relationship was such that a total perforation would be associated with a hearing loss of about 60 dB HL over the frequency range 0.5-2 kHz. PMID:7055479

  16. Histopathology of Ossicular Grafts and Implants in Chronic Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Bahmad, Fayez; Merchant, Saumil N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We describe the histopathology of ossicular grafts and implants so as to provide insight into factors that may influence functional results after surgery for chronic otitis media. Methods Histopathologic observations were made on 56 cases: 50 surgical specimens and 6 temporal bone cases in which the graft was sectioned in situ. Results and Conclusions Autogenous malleus, incus, and cortical bone grafts behaved in a similar manner and maintained their morphological size, shape, and contour for extended periods of time, at least up to 30 years. These histopathologic observations support the continued use of autograft ossicular and cortical bone grafts for middle ear reconstruction. Cartilage grafts developed chondromalacia with resulting loss of stiffness and showed a tendency to undergo resorption. Synthetic prostheses made of porous plastic (Plastipore, Polycel) elicited foreign body giant cell reactions with various degrees of biodegradation of the implants. Prostheses made of hydroxyapatite and Bioglass were enveloped by a lining of connective tissue and mucosal epithelium. The Bioglass material was broken down into small fragments and partially resorbed by a host response within the middle ear. These results warrant caution in the use of prostheses made of porous plastic or Bioglass. PMID:17419521

  17. Influenza-induced inflammation drives pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed

    Short, Kirsty R; Reading, Patrick C; Brown, Lorena E; Pedersen, John; Gilbertson, Brad; Job, Emma R; Edenborough, Kathryn M; Habets, Marrit N; Zomer, Aldert; Hermans, Peter W M; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Wijburg, Odilia L

    2013-03-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) predisposes individuals to secondary infections with the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). Infections may manifest as pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, or otitis media (OM). It remains controversial as to whether secondary pneumococcal disease is due to the induction of an aberrant immune response or IAV-induced immunosuppression. Moreover, as the majority of studies have been performed in the context of pneumococcal pneumonia, it remains unclear how far these findings can be extrapolated to other pneumococcal disease phenotypes such as OM. Here, we used an infant mouse model, human middle ear epithelial cells, and a series of reverse-engineered influenza viruses to investigate how IAV promotes bacterial OM. Our data suggest that the influenza virus HA facilitates disease by inducing a proinflammatory response in the middle ear cavity in a replication-dependent manner. Importantly, our findings suggest that it is the inflammatory response to IAV infection that mediates pneumococcal replication. This study thus provides the first evidence that inflammation drives pneumococcal replication in the middle ear cavity, which may have important implications for the treatment of pneumococcal OM. PMID:23319557

  18. Inflammatory mediators in chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Skoner, D P; Stillwagon, P K; Casselbrandt, M L; Tanner, E P; Doyle, W J; Fireman, P

    1988-10-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a common middle ear inflammatory disease in the pediatric population. This article determines concentrations of three functionally and metabolically distinct inflammatory mediators in middle ear effusions (MEE) and corresponding plasma of children with OME. One hundred two patients (mean age, 4.9 years) with persistent OME were studied. Middle ear effusions were collected from all subjects and plasma from a subset at the time of tympanostomy tube insertion. Histamine was assayed radioisotopically, 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin F2 alpha (stable PGF2 alpha metabolite) by radioimmunoassay, and neutrophil chemotactic factor of anaphylaxis by modified Boyden chamber. Mean MEE levels of the mediators (39 +/- 13 ng/mL, 462 +/- 179 pg/mL, and 264% +/- 57% positive control, respectively) were markedly higher than those of corresponding plasma (0.5 +/- 0.1 ng/mL, 285 +/- 127 pg/mL, and 47% +/- 5% positive control, respectively). The mean histamine content of mucoid effusions (43.2 +/- 56.9 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that of purulent (22.5 +/- 10.5 ng/mL) and serous (17.9 +/- 16.8 ng/mL) effusions. Higher histamine levels were observed in effusions positive for Haemophilus influenzae when compared with those with other pathogenic isolates. The high concentrations of these mediators in MEE and their potential for inducing or sustaining the inflammatory process supports a role in the pathogenesis of OME. PMID:3046637

  19. Intracranial abscesses associated with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Seven, Huseyin; Coskun, Berna Uslu; Calis, Asli B; Sayin, Ibrahim; Turgut, Suat

    2005-10-01

    Intracranial abscesses are serious complications of chronic suppurative otitis media (COM). This study included 32 patients presenting with intracranial abscesses from 780 patients hospitalized for treatment of COM. The 32 patients had 59 intracranial complications. Perisinus abscess (13 of 32) was the most common intracranial abscess, followed by temporal lobe abscess (8 of 32), epidural abscess (7 of 32), cerebellar abscess (6 of 32) and subdural empyema (2 of 32). Headache (93%), fever (87%) and altered mental status (62%) were the most common presenting symptoms and signs, along with symptoms of COM. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics and canal wall down mastoidectomy. Cholesteatoma with granulation tissue and bony defects at the sinus plate and/or dural plate were seen in most of the patients. Gram negative bacilli and anaerobes were the most common organisms cultured from the abscesses. Three patients had neurological sequels. One patient died. The early diagnosis of these complications requires a high index of suspicion and imaging studies. A multidisciplinary and coordinated approach is important for the management of these patients. PMID:15959795

  20. A case of chronic otitis media caused by Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hisashi; Ito, Makoto; Hatano, Miyako; Nakanishi, Yosuke; Maruyama, Yumiko; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2010-10-01

    Although it appears very uncommon in adult COM, Mycobacterium abscessus should be considered as a possible cause of a chronically draining ear. Multi-antibiotic chemotherapy including high-dose clarithromycin can effectively treat adult COM cased by M. abscessus. The first case report of adult chronic otitis media (COM) caused by M. abscessus is described here. A 61-year-old woman presented persistent otorrhea for 2 months, despite treatment with standard antimicrobial drugs. Physical examination revealed a small perforation of the tympanic membrane and edematous middle ear mucosa. Mycobacterial cultures and PCR yielded non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM); M. abscessus. Intravenous panipenem/betamipron and amikacin and oral clarithromycin were administered for 36 days. Computed tomography of the temporal bone showed improved aeration in the tympanic cavity, but soft tissue shadow remained unchanged in the mastoid 31 days after starting medication. She therefore underwent tympano-mastoidectomy at 36 days. At surgery, inflammation remained in the middle ear, and edematous pale mucosal tissue was noted around the stapes and ossicular chain. Histopathologic examination showed inflammation and granulation tissue, but no caseating necrosis or acid-fast bacilli. After surgery the symptoms resolved and remained well without evidence of infection recurrence 12 months after the operation. PMID:20206453

  1. Elimination diets in the treatment of secretory otitis media.

    PubMed

    Ruokonen, J; Paganus, A; Lehti, H

    1982-03-01

    The significance of elimination diets in the treatment of secretory otitis media (SOM) and the usefulness of the cytotoxic leucocyte test (CLT) in the planning of elimination diets were investigated. Sixty-seven children with SOM were tested with CLT and treated with or without elimination diets in addition to the established SOM-treatment. After two years of observation in patients with multiple CLT-reactions (50) there was an almost significant difference (P less than 0.06) in the cure rates and a significant difference (P less than 0.02) in the percentages of therapeutic failures between those treated with (32) and those treated without (18) elimination diets. No marked difference was found between patients, who did not have multiple CLT-reactions (17) and were treated without diets and patients who were treated with diets for multiple CLT-reactions (32). It was concluded that elimination diets are needed in the treatment of SOM for those patients who have multiple reactions in the CLT and that the CLT is useful in the planning of these elimination diets. PMID:7201458

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated. We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: “CAM” in conjunction with “OM” and “children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies. The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications. The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  3. Xylitol as a prophylaxis for acute otitis media: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L; Johnson, Carole E; Corbin, Nicole E; Bruccheri, Kaitlyn G

    2010-10-01

    A systematic review was conducted to evaluate evidence regarding xylitol, a sugar alcohol, as a prophylaxis for acute otitis media (AOM) in children. The authors searched PubMed and other databases to identify evidence. Criteria for included studies were: appear in English-language, peer-reviewed journals; at least quasi-experimental designs; use xylitol; and present outcome data. The authors completed evaluation forms for the included studies at all phases of the review. The authors reviewed 1479 titles and excluded 1435. Abstracts and full texts were reviewed for the remaining 44; four randomized controlled trials met inclusion criteria. Xylitol was a generally well accepted prophylaxis for AOM with few side effects when administered via chewing gum or syrup at 10 g/day given five times daily. Meta-analysis revealed significant treatment effects (Risk ratio = 0.68; 95% confidence interval = 0.57 to 0.83). Xylitol can be a prophylaxis for AOM, but warrants further study, especially of vehicles other than chewing gum for young children, and information is needed regarding cost, duration of administration required, and expected long-term effects. PMID:20874048

  4. Role of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Kodiyan, Joyson; Gerring, Robert; Mathee, Kalai; Li, Jian-Dong; Grati, M’hamed; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Otitis media (OM) is a public health problem in both developed and developing countries. It is the leading cause of hearing loss and represents a significant healthcare burden. In some cases, acute OM progresses to chronic suppurative OM (CSOM), characterized by effusion and discharge, despite antimicrobial therapy. The emergence of antibiotic resistance and potential ototoxicity of antibiotics has created an urgent need to design non-conventional therapeutic strategies against OM based on modern insights into its pathophysiology. In this article, we review the role of innate immunity as it pertains to OM and discuss recent advances in understanding the role of innate immune cells in protecting the middle ear. We also discuss the mechanisms utilized by pathogens to subvert innate immunity and thereby overcome defensive responses. A better knowledge about bacterial virulence and host resistance promises to reveal novel targets to design effective treatment strategies against OM. The identification and characterization of small natural compounds that can boost innate immunity may provide new avenues for the treatment of OM. There is also a need to design novel methods for targeted delivery of these compounds into the middle ear, allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. PMID:25447732

  5. Radiologic and surgical findings in chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Gül, Aylin; Akdağ, Mehmet; Kiniş, Vefa; Yilmaz, Beyhan; Şengül, Engin; Teke, Memik; Meriç, Faruk

    2014-11-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the efficiency of preoperative temporal bone computed tomography (CT) in detecting pathologic conditions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). The intraoperative findings and temporal bone CT results of 350 patients who were diagnosed with CSOM between September 1, 2010, and June 1, 2013, were compared. Comparison parameters were as follows: the presence of cholesteatoma, erosion of the outer ear bone canal, erosion of the middle ear chain, erosion of the dural plate, erosion of the lateral semicircular canal, erosion of the sigmoid sinus wall, and dehiscence of the facial canal. The contribution of CT was limited in showing the outer ear canal destruction, dural plate destruction, facial canal destruction, lateral semicircular canal destruction, and destruction of the sigmoid sinus wall. However, CT was more sensitive in detecting cholesteatoma and erosion of the ossicular chain. These results indicate that preoperative CT of patients with CSOM serves as an important guide for otolaryngologists, although there are limitations in the evaluation of the CT results. PMID:25377960

  6. The clinical course of bronchiolitis associated with acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Shazberg, G.; Revel-Vilk, S.; Shoseyov, D.; Ben-Ami, A.; Klar, A.; Hurvitz, H.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common bacterial co-infection of viral bronchiolitis.
AIMS—To evaluate the influence of AOM on the clinical course of bronchiolitis.
SUBJECTS—150 children younger than 24 months old, diagnosed with bronchiolitis, hospitalised between December 1997 and May 1999.
METHODS—Body temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and the need for oxygen supplementation were recorded on admission and daily throughout hospitalisation. Complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and assay for respiratory syncytial virus were performed on admission. All children were examined daily for the appearance of AOM. The clinical course of children with bronchiolitis and AOM was compared to those without AOM.
RESULTS—AOM was diagnosed in 79/150 (53%) children with bronchiolitis. Most were diagnosed within the first two days of hospitalisation. No significant difference was found in the clinical and laboratory findings on admission and on daily follow up between children with and without AOM.
CONCLUSIONS—This 2.5 year prospective study showed no difference in the course of bronchiolitis, whether an ear infection was present or not.

 PMID:10999866

  7. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of otitis media with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2014-12-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is histologically characterized by systemic necrotizing vasculitis and is clinically classified into two phases, systemic or localized. Recently, otological symptoms such as otitis media and hearing loss, not previously often associated with AAV, have been reported in AAV cases. In these cases we propose a diagnosis of otitis media with AAV (OMAAV). The ANCA titer is important for the diagnosis of OMAAV, and in most cases rapid progressive hearing loss is observed as localized AAV. Peripheral facial nerve palsy or hypertrophic pachymeningitis are coupled with 25% of cases and 18% of cases respectively. Proteinase 3-ANCA (PR3-ANCA) positive otitis media causes granulomatous formation or middle ear effusion in the middle ear, on the other hand myeloperoxidase-ANCA (MPO-ANCA) positive otitis media predominantly presents as otitis media with effusion. The early diagnosed case and the sensorineural hearing loss not progressed deaf could be recovered by the immunosuppressive therapy. Delayed diagnosis of AAV occasionally leads to progression to the irreversible phase; therefore, diagnosis at the early-localized stage is important for treating AAV. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of this newly proposed concept of OMAAV. PMID:25339433

  8. Sh3pxd2b Mice Are a Model for Craniofacial Dysmorphology and Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Tian, Cong; Zhang, Zhi-guang; Han, Feng-chan; Azem, Rami; Yu, Heping; Zheng, Ye; Jin, Ge; Arnold, James E.; Zheng, Qing Y.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial defects that occur through gene mutation during development increase vulnerability to eustachian tube dysfunction. These defects can lead to an increased incidence of otitis media. We examined the effects of a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2bnee) on the progression of otitis media and hearing impairment at various developmental stages. We found that all mice that had the Sh3pxd2bnee mutation went on to develop craniofacial dysmorphologies and subsequently otitis media, by as early as 11 days of age. We found noteworthy changes in cilia and goblet cells of the middle ear mucosa in Sh3pxd2bnee mutant mice using scanning electronic microscopy. By measuring craniofacial dimensions, we determined for the first time in an animal model that this mouse has altered eustachian tube morphology consistent with a more horizontal position of the eustachian tube. All mutants were found to have hearing impairment. Expression of TNF-α and TLR2, which correlates with inflammation in otitis media, was up-regulated in the ears of mutant mice when examined by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The mouse model with a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2bnee) mirrors craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media in humans. PMID:21818352

  9. Sh3pxd2b mice are a model for craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Tian, Cong; Zhang, Zhi-guang; Han, Feng-chan; Azem, Rami; Yu, Heping; Zheng, Ye; Jin, Ge; Arnold, James E; Zheng, Qing Y

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial defects that occur through gene mutation during development increase vulnerability to eustachian tube dysfunction. These defects can lead to an increased incidence of otitis media. We examined the effects of a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2b(nee)) on the progression of otitis media and hearing impairment at various developmental stages. We found that all mice that had the Sh3pxd2b(nee) mutation went on to develop craniofacial dysmorphologies and subsequently otitis media, by as early as 11 days of age. We found noteworthy changes in cilia and goblet cells of the middle ear mucosa in Sh3pxd2b(nee) mutant mice using scanning electronic microscopy. By measuring craniofacial dimensions, we determined for the first time in an animal model that this mouse has altered eustachian tube morphology consistent with a more horizontal position of the eustachian tube. All mutants were found to have hearing impairment. Expression of TNF-α and TLR2, which correlates with inflammation in otitis media, was up-regulated in the ears of mutant mice when examined by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The mouse model with a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2b(nee)) mirrors craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media in humans. PMID:21818352

  10. TLR4-mediated induction of TLR2 signaling is critical in the pathogenesis and resolution of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Leichtle, Anke; Hernandez, Michelle; Pak, Kwang; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Cheng, Chun-Fang; Webster, Nicholas J; Ryan, Allen F; Wasserman, Stephen I

    2009-08-01

    Otitis media is the most prevalent childhood disease in developed countries. The involvement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in otitis media pathophysiology has been implicated by studies in cell lines and association studies of TLR gene polymorphisms. However, precise functions of TLRs in the etiology of otitis media in vivo have not been examined. We investigated the inflammatory response to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae using a model of otitis media in wild-type, TLR2(- /-) and TLR4(-/ -) mice by gene microarray, qPCR, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis and histopathology. Toll-like receptor-2(- /-) and TLR4(- /-) mice exhibited a more profound, persistent inflammation with impaired bacterial clearance compared to controls. While wild-type mice induced tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF) after non-typeable H. influenzae challenge, TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice lack TNF induction in the early phase of otitis media. Moreover, lack of TLR2 resulted in a late increase in IL-10 expression and prolonged failure to clear bacteria. Toll-like receptor-4(-/- ) mice showed impaired early bacterial clearance and loss of TLR2 induction in early otitis media. Our results demonstrate that both TLR2 and TLR4 signalling are critical to the regulation of infection in non-typeable H. influenzae-induced otitis media. Toll-like receptor-4 signalling appears to induce TLR2 expression, and TLR2 activation is critical for bacterial clearance and timely resolution of otitis media. PMID:19586996

  11. [Evaluation of intensity of angiogenesis in granulation tissue in chronic otitis media--preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Pajor, Anna; Jankowski, Andrzej; Danilewicz, Marian; Durko, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    In chronic otitis media molecular pathogenetic mechanisms are still unknown, however, angiogenesis may play a role. The aim of the study was to determine the intensity of angiogenesis in granulation tissue in chronic otitis media of different clinical course. Twenty six granulation tissue specimens (twenty two--from chronic otitis media, four--from prolongated otitis externa) taken during surgery were analyzed. The angiogenesis (microvessel density) was measured in paraffin-embedded tissue by an immunohistochemical method, by staining for endothelial cells with a monoclonal antibody against CD 34. The presence of CD 34 was found in all specimens. The expression was more intense in tissue samples from the group with good clinical course (good healing and without recurrence) than those in the group with poor healing and recurrence (mean number of dots for mm2 589,2 vs 533,3, respectively) and from the group without bacterial infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa than those with this infection (mean number of dots for mm2 645,5 vs 440,8, respectively), but differences were not significant. In conclusion it is suggested that angiogenesis may contribute to different clinical course of chronic otitis media. PMID:17152811

  12. Complications of chronic suppurative otitis media: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Yorgancılar, E; Yildirim, M; Gun, R; Bakir, S; Tekin, R; Gocmez, C; Meric, F; Topcu, I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review our patients with complications of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and compare with literature. This retrospective study was performed over 10 years in our tertiary referral university hospital. During this period 4,630 patients with CSOM were admitted to the department and 906 patients underwent a surgery. From the records of the 4,630 patients, 121 patients (2.6%) with complications were identified. Of the 906 CSOM patients that underwent a surgery, 511 had cholesteatoma, and 395 had granulation and/or polyp tissue. Ninety-four of 511 (18.4%) patients with cholesteatoma and 27 of 395 (6.8%) patients with granulation and/or polyp tissue had a complication. Of the 121 complicated CSOM patients, 57 extracranial (47.1%) and 37 intracranial (30.6%). Multiple combined complications were occurred in 27 (22.3%) patients. The mastoid abscess was the commonest extracranial complication (28.3%); it was followed by labyrinthitis (9%), facial nerve paralysis (8.4%), and Bezold's abscess (1.3%). The most common intracranial complication was lateral sinus thrombophlebitis (19.5%), followed by perisigmoid sinus abscess (13.5%), meningitis (9%), brain abscess (6.5%), and extradural abscess (4.5%). Most frequent intraoperative finding of complicated CSOM patients was cholesteatoma, with the exception of patients with facial nerve paralysis. There was no mortality in any of our patients. The additional morbidities were recorded in 25 patients (20.6%). In this study, we emphasize the importance of an accurate and early diagnosis, followed by adequate surgical therapy and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:22249835

  13. Laryngopharyngeal Reflux in Children with Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Górecka-Tuteja, Anna; Jastrzębska, Izabela; Składzień, Jacek; Fyderek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the characteristic properties of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) using 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance combined with dual-probe (pharyngeal and esophageal) pH-metry. Methods Children aged 7–10 years of age with OME underwent 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance pH-metry. The upper pH sensor was situated 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter, and the lower pH sensor was placed 3–5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Parents were asked to complete the gastroesophageal reflux assessment of symptoms in a pediatrics questionnaire. Results Twenty-eight children were enrolled; LPR was detected in 19 (67.9%) children. The criteria of the LPR diagnosis was the presence of at least one supraesophageal episode with a pH < 5.0 and a change in the pH value measured from the initial level at the upper sensor of > 0.2. In total, 64 episodes were observed. Assessment of all LPR episodes showed the presence of 246 episodes in the entire study. A considerable predominance of weakly acidic episodes (87.8%) was noted; there were 6.5% acidic episodes, and weakly alkaline episodes reached 5.7%. Pathological GER was noted in 10 (35.7%) subjects. Acid GER was detected in 8 children, 2 of whom demonstrated non-acidic reflux. In the LPR-negative patients, no pathological GER was confirmed with the exception of a single case of non-acidic reflux. Conclusions LPR was frequently noted in the group of children with OME, and it might be an important risk factor in this common disease. PMID:27193974

  14. Childhood Otitis Media: A Cohort Study with 30-year Follow-Up of Hearing (The HUNT study)

    PubMed Central

    Aarhus, Lisa; Tambs, Kristian; Kvestad, Ellen; Engdahl, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To study the extent to which otitis media in childhood is associated with adult hearing thresholds. Furthermore, to study if the effects of otitis media on adult hearing thresholds are moderated by age or noise exposure. Design Population-based cohort study of 32,786 participants who had their hearing tested by pure-tone audiometry in primary school and again at ages ranging from 20–56 years. 3066 children were diagnosed with hearing loss, the remaining sample had normal childhood hearing. Results Compared to participants with normal childhood hearing, those diagnosed with childhood hearing loss caused by otitis media with effusion (n=1255), chronic suppurative otitis media (n=108) or hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media (n=613) had significantly reduced adult hearing thresholds in the whole frequency range (2 dB/17–20 dB/7–10 dB, respectively). The effects were adjusted for age, sex and noise exposure. Children diagnosed with hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media had somewhat improved hearing thresholds as adults. The effects of chronic suppurative otitis media and hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media on adult hearing thresholds were larger in participants tested in middle adulthood (ages 40 to 56 years) than in those tested in young adulthood (ages 20 to 40 years). Eardrum pathology added a marginally increased risk of adult hearing loss (1–3 dB) in children with otitis media with effusion or hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media. Our study could not reveal significant differences in the effect of self-reported noise exposure on adult hearing thresholds between the groups with otitis media and the group with normal childhood hearing. Conclusions This cohort study indicates that chronic suppurative otitis media and recurrent acute otitis media in childhood are associated with adult hearing loss, underlining the importance of optimal treatment in these conditions. It appears that ears with a subsequent

  15. Transcription of genes encoding iron and heme acquisition proteins of Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, P W; Sim, K E; Morton, D J; Patel, J A; Stull, T L

    1997-01-01

    Unencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae is the second most common etiologic agent of otitis media in children. H. influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth in vitro and is able to utilize hemoglobin and complexes of heme-hemopexin, heme-albumin, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin and ferritransferrin as sources of iron and heme in vitro. Several of the acquisition mechanisms have been characterized and been shown to be heme repressible in vitro. However, little is known about the expression of heme and/or iron acquisition mechanisms during infections in the middle ear. This study was performed to determine if the genes encoding heme and iron acquisition proteins are transcribed during in vivo growth and to compare these findings with those for samples grown in vitro. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze total RNA fractions derived from in vitro- and in vivo-grown H. influenzae. Genes encoding the transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB, the 100-kDa hemopexin-binding protein HxuA, and the hemoglobin-binding protein HgpA were transcribed during otitis media. Twelve middle ear fluid samples were analyzed by blind RT-PCR to determine the transcriptional status of these genes in H. influenzae during otitis media. Five isolates had transcripts corresponding to tbpA, tbpB, and hxuA. The presence of hgpA transcripts was variable, depending on the presence of hgpA in the genome of the H. influenzae isolate. Samples without H. influenzae gene transcripts contained other etiologic agents commonly causing otitis media. These data demonstrate that H. influenzae iron and/or heme acquisition genes are transcribed during otitis media and suggest that the microenvironment during acute otitis media starves H. influenzae of heme. PMID:9353052

  16. Spontaneous otitis media in Wistar rats: an overlooked pathology in otological research.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, José María; Trinidad, Almudena; González-García, José Angel; García-Berrocal, José Ramón; Ramírez-Camacho, Rafael

    2006-11-01

    The rat is commonly employed in otological research, but spontaneous ear infections can confound the results of experimental procedures--wasting time, money, and animals. The authors focus on the incidence of spontaneous otitis media in Wistar rats. They compare disease incidence in animals housed in standard cages with those housed in barrier units, showing that 20% of their conventionally housed animals developed spontaneous otitis media, whereas only 5% of their animals housed in isolated units were infected. These results underscore the importance of strict control of the shipping, housing conditions, and manipulation of animals to be used in otological research. PMID:17077834

  17. A case of a temporal bone meningioma presenting as a serous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    De Foer, Bert; Bernaerts, Anja; Van Dinther, Joost; Parizel, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    We report the imaging features of a case of a temporal bone meningioma extending into the middle ear cavity and clinically presenting as a serous otitis media. Temporal bone meningioma extending in the mastoid or the middle ear cavity, however, is very rare. In case of unexplained or therapy-resistant serous otitis media and a nasopharyngeal tumor being ruled out, a temporal bone computed tomography (CT) should be performed. If CT findings are suggestive of a temporal bone meningioma, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination with gadolinium will confirm diagnosis and show the exact extension of the lesion. PMID:25535569

  18. Streptococcus salivarius 24SMB administered by nasal spray for the prevention of acute otitis media in otitis-prone children.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, P; Santagati, M; Scillato, M; Baggi, E; Fattizzo, M; Rosazza, C; Stefani, S; Esposito, S; Principi, N

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the results of the first study in which Streptococcus salivarius 24SMB, a safe α-haemolytic strain capable of producing bacteriocin-like substances with significant activity against acute otitis media (AOM) pathogens, was intranasally administered in an attempt to reduce the risk of new episodes of AOM in otitis-prone children. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 100 children aged 1-5 years with histories of recurrent AOM were randomized 1:1 to receive an intranasal S. salivarius 24SMB or placebo twice daily for 5 days each month for 3 consecutive months. Fifty treated children and 47 who received placebo who were compliant with study protocol were followed monthly for 6 months. The number of children who did not experience any AOM was higher among the children treated with the S. salivarius 24SMB preparation than among those in the placebo group (30.0 vs 14.9%; p = 0.076). Moreover, the number of children who received antibiotics during the study period was lower among the children treated with S. salivarius 24 SMB than among those who received placebo (70 vs 83.0%; p = 0.13). Compared with the children who were not colonized by S. salivarius 24SMB after treatment, the number of colonized children who experienced any AOM was significantly lower (42.8 vs 13.6%; p = 0.03). Similar results were observed when the children treated with antibiotics for AOM were analysed (67.8 vs 95.5%; p = 0.029). This study revealed the ability of intranasally administered S. salivarius 24SMB to reduce the risk of AOM in otitis-prone children. PMID:26385346

  19. The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors and Fibroblast Growth Factors in Angiogenesis during Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Husseman, Jacob; Palacios, Sean D.; Rivkin, Alexander Z.; Oehl, Heinz; Ryan, Allen F.

    2012-01-01

    The middle ear response to otitis media includes transformation and hyperplasia of the mucosal epithelium and subepithelial connective tissue. Significant neovascularization is also noted, which occurs both to support the hypertrophied mucosa and to mediate the increased trafficking of leukocytes. We investigated the role of two known potent angiogenic growth factor families, the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), in middle ear mucosal angiogenesis. DNA microarrays were used to evaluate the expression of FGFs and VEGFs, as well as their receptors and unique signaling proteins, in the middle ears of mice undergoing a complete course of acute bacterial otitis media. In addition, a member of each family was introduced to the middle ear submucosal compartment of the normal middle ears of guinea pigs, by a continuous-release osmotic minipump system over 1 week. During the course of bacterial otitis media, a significant regulation of a number of genes important for angiogenesis was identified. Histologic evaluation of middle ear mucosa following micropump infusion of both FGF1 and VEGF-A showed significant angiogenesis at the site of infusion in comparison to control saline infusion. These results support a role for FGFs and VEGFs in the neovascularization of the middle ear mucosa during otitis media, and offer a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22104377

  20. A Whole Community Approach to Otitis Media--Reducing Its Incidence and Effects. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSwan, David

    Otitis media (OM) is an inflammation of the middle ear that is prevalent in childhood. OM can result in hearing loss, which interferes with learning. In Australia, indigenous children experience OM more often than other populations. Because teachers lack knowledge of OM and its effects on learning, affected children are often mislabeled as problem…

  1. Vestibular Dysfunction in Preschool Children with a History of Otitis Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Jennifer; Mayberry, Wanda

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-five preschoolers, assigned to otitis media (OM) or no OM groups, were administered the Southern California Postrotary Nystagmus Test and the Miller Assessment for Preschoolers (MAP). Children with a history of OM had significantly decreased scores on the Stepping and Vertical Writing MAP tests, indicating vestibulospinal dysfunction. (SK)

  2. The Effects of Early Bilateral Otitis Media with Effusion on Educational Attainment: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Sylvia A. F.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examination of the relationship between educational attainment and long-lasting, bilateral otitis media with effusion (OME) in 270 Dutch children (ages 2 to 4) found that, at age 7, early bilateral OME affected spelling ability but not reading ability. Effects of treatment with ventilation tubes were not found. (DB)

  3. Therapeutic outcomes of canal wall up mastoidectomy in combination with Type I tympanoplasty in otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liansheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects in terms of disease clearance and hearing improvement of canal wall up mastoidectomy in combination with Type I tympanoplasty in otitis media. Methods: A total of 78 patients (81 ears) with otitis media were treated by canal wall up mastoidectomy in combination with Type I tympanoplasty. The postoperative tympanic membrane morphology, average of pure-tone hearing thresholds and average air-bone gap were used as the indices for evaluating therapeutic effects. Results: The patients were followed up for two years in average. All the tympanic membranes recovered, with the ear canals being dry. There were five cases (5 ears) of tympanic membrane retraction and one case of otitis media recurrence. Hearing was effectively recovered by 76.54% (62/81) after surgery. Conclusion: Combining canal wall up mastoidectomy with Type I tympanoplasty can treat otitis media safely and effectively due to high postoperative dry ear canal rate, satisfactory reconstruction of hearing and maintenance of ear morphology. PMID:27375690

  4. The Effects of Otitis Media on the Attention Skills of Day-Care-Attending Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feagans, Lynne V.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated whether otitis media (OM), middle ear disease, affected toddlers' attention to language. Children were studied during a picture book-reading task at high- or low-quality day-care centers. Children with chronic OM in low-quality care showed the most negative effects on attention during episodes of OM; mothers rated children with…

  5. Otitis Media in Young Children with Disabilities--Practical Strategies. FPG Snapshot #16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Studies have shown that some children are at higher risk for otitis media. Those at risk may include children with some developmental disorders such as Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, Apert syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Turner syndrome, cleft palate, and autism; as well as all children attending childcare. It has been hypothesized that the link…

  6. The Effects of an Early History of Otitis Media on Children's Language and Literacy Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winskel, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Background: Otitis media (OM) or middle ear infection is a common childhood illness and is most frequent during the crucial first 3 years of life when speech and language categories are being established, which could potentially have a long-term effect on language and literacy skill development. Aims: The purpose of the current study was to…

  7. [The evolution of otitis media with effusion treated by transtympanic drainage].

    PubMed

    Lacosta, J L; Zabaleta, M; Erdozain, I

    1996-01-01

    One hundred sixty children with effusive otitis media who did not improve with medical treatment were reviewed. The evolution and complications observed in 294 ears treated by myringotomy and ventilation tubes (grommets) over a three-year period were analyzed. Otorrhea occurred during grommet placement in 11.6%. The disease remitted in 84%. Recurrences occurred in 15.3%: 4.8% had different degrees of tympanic atelectasia and 0.7% had perforation. Three per cent of the children were reoperated for bilateral recurrence of otitis. Younger children and those whose had delayed surgery had a worse outcome. Insertion of ear grommets improved hearing. PMID:8991399

  8. Increased susceptibility to otitis media in a Splunc1-deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Naumann, Paul W.; Salzman, Nita H.; McCray, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Otitis media (inflammation of the middle ear) is one of the most common diseases of early childhood. Susceptibility to otitis is influenced by a number of factors, including the actions of innate immune molecules secreted by the epithelia lining the nasopharynx, middle ear and Eustachian tube. The SPLUNC1 (short palate, lung, nasal epithelial clone 1) protein is a highly abundant secretory product of the mammalian nasal, oral and respiratory mucosa that is thought to play a multifunctional role in host defense. In this study we investigated Splunc1 expression in the ear of the mouse, and examined whether this protein contributes to overall host defense in the middle ear and/or Eustachian tube. We found that Splunc1 is highly expressed in both the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands in these regions in wild-type mice. In mice lacking Splunc1, we noted histologically an increased frequency of otitis media, characterized by the accumulation of leukocytes (neutrophils with scattered macrophages), proteinaceous fluid and mucus in the middle ear lumens. Furthermore, many of these mice had extensive remodeling of the middle ear wall, suggesting a chronic course of disease. From these observations, we conclude that loss of Splunc1 predisposes mice to the development of otitis media. The Splunc1−/− mouse model should help investigators to better understand both the biological role of Splunc1 as well as host defense mechanisms in the middle ear. PMID:25765466

  9. Comparison of Local and Systemic Ciprofloxacin Ototoxicity in the Treatment of Chronic Media Otitis

    PubMed Central

    Samarei, R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic media otitis is a common cause of reference to ear, nose and throat clinics and the treatment is one of the health problems among ENT specialists. Ciprofloxacin drop that is of fluoroquinolone drug class due to good treatment effect is now widely used in the treatment of chronic media otitis. Due to the widespread use, it seems proper research on the human population has not been taken to ensure its non-toxicity in the inner ear, therefore comparison of local ciprofloxacin ototoxicity with systemic in chronic media otitis is investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted as a randomized clinical trial. Prospective methods were considered and the number of samples in the study group was 40 patients that were treated with ciprofloxacin drops. And in the control group 32 patients with chronic media otitis who were treated with ciprofloxacin tablets. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Statistical indicators of different frequencies in air conduction (AC) in both groups showed, there was significant improvement in hearing thresholds at frequencies of 250, 8000, 1000 in air conduction for the group receiving drops compared to the group receiving tablet. Based on statistical indicators in different frequencies of bone conduction in the two treated groups, there was significant difference in the two groups receiving tablets and drops only at a frequency of 4000Hz that drop impact improves hearing threshold and in contrast in the group receiving tablet hearing loss was seen in the frequency of 4000. Discussion: Topical ciprofloxacin is a safe and uncomplicated ototoxic drug that is an effective antibiotic used in the treatment of refractory chronic otitis those dregs such as pseudomonas aerogenusa and staphylococci resistant to methicillin are responsible for it, which in the usual doses has not harmful effects on hearing hairy cells. PMID:25363170

  10. Otitis Media in a New Mouse Model for CHARGE Syndrome with a Deletion in the Chd7 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Cong; Yu, Heping; Yang, Bin; Han, Fengchan; Zheng, Ye; Bartels, Cynthia F.; Schelling, Deborah; Arnold, James E.; Scacheri, Peter C.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2012-01-01

    Otitis media is a middle ear disease common in children under three years old. Otitis media can occur in normal individuals with no other symptoms or syndromes, but it is often seen in individuals clinically diagnosed with genetic diseases such as CHARGE syndrome, a complex genetic disease caused by mutation in the Chd7 gene and characterized by multiple birth defects. Although otitis media is common in human CHARGE syndrome patients, it has not been reported in mouse models of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we report a mouse model with a spontaneous deletion mutation in the Chd7 gene and with chronic otitis media of early onset age accompanied by hearing loss. These mice also exhibit morphological alteration in the Eustachian tubes, dysregulation of epithelial proliferation, and decreased density of middle ear cilia. Gene expression profiling revealed up-regulation of Muc5ac, Muc5b and Tgf-β1 transcripts, the products of which are involved in mucin production and TGF pathway regulation. This is the first mouse model of CHARGE syndrome reported to show otitis media with effusion and it will be valuable for studying the etiology of otitis media and other symptoms in CHARGE syndrome. PMID:22539951

  11. Developing a vaccine to prevent otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nadeem; Ren, Dabin; Kaur, Ravinder; Basha, Saleem; Zagursky, Robert; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a predominant organism of the upper respiratory nasopharyngeal microbiota. Its disease spectrum includes otitis media, sinusitis, non-bacteremic pneumonia and invasive infections. Protein-based vaccines to prevent NTHi infections are needed to alleviate these infections in children and vulnerable populations such as the elderly and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One NTHi protein is included in a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and has been shown to provide efficacy. Our lab has been interested in understanding the immunogenicity of NTHi vaccine candidates P6, protein D and OMP26 for preventing acute otitis media in young children. We expect that continued investigation and progress in the development of an efficacious protein based vaccine against NTHi infections is achievable in the near future. PMID:26894630

  12. Indigenous nasopharyngeal, auditory canal, and middle ear bacterial flora of gerbils: animal model for otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, T A; Gardner, D; Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Allen, W E; Worthington, J M; Williams, P P

    1981-01-01

    The indigenous microbial flora of the middle ear cavity of Mongolian gerbils, Meriones unguiculatus, was isolated, characterized, and identified, showing it to be sparse and transitory. Organisms, when found in the middle ear cavity, were most likely to be Staphylococcus epidermidis-like organisms. Cerumen from the external auditory canal of these animals yielded mostly staphylococci, coryneforms, and other gram-positive rods, including some anaerobic species. The nasopharynx supported a flora consisting mainly of staphylococci, lactobacilli, and coryneforms, with a smaller incidence and numbers of many other species. No mycoplasmas were cultured or seen in scanning electron microscope studies. None of the major pathogens of human otitis media were found; therefore, Mongolian gerbils are microbiologically acceptable candidates as a model for induced otitis media, using organisms isolated from human otitic infections. PMID:7251160

  13. The immunoregulatory and allergy-associated cytokines in the aetiology of the otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Marina G; Birchall, John P; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2004-04-01

    Inflammation in the middle ear mucosa, which can be provoked by different primary factors such as bacterial and viral infection, local allergic reactions and reflux, is the crucial event in the pathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME). Unresolved acute inflammatory responses or defective immunoregulation of middle inflammation can promote chronic inflammatory processes and stimulate the chronic condition of OME. Cytokines are the central molecular regulators of middle ear inflammation and can switch the acute phase of inflammation in the chronic stage and induce molecular-pathological processes leading to the histopathological changes accompanying OME. In this review we present cytokines identified in otitis media, immunoregulatory [interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta]) and allergy associated (IL-4, IL-5, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), as crucial molecular regulators, responsible for chronic inflammation in the middle ear and the chronic condition of OME. PMID:15203548

  14. Murine model of otitis media with effusion: immunohistochemical demonstration of IL-1 alpha antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M D; Contrino, A; Contrino, J; Maxwell, K; Leonard, G; Kreutzer, D

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cytokines likely play a central role in the formation and maintenance of otitis media with effusion (OME). Currently, there is no immunologically defined animal model for the study of cytokines as they contribute to the formation of OME. In the present study, a murine model of OME, using eustachian tube blockage via an external surgical approach, was developed. The murine model temporal bone histology appears to mimic the histology found in chronic otitis media with effusion in humans. Additionally, using this murine model, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) expression was detected in the middle ear using standard immunohistochemical techniques. IL-1 alpha seemed localized to the epithelial lining of the middle ear as well as 5% to 10% of inflammatory cells. This model should provide the necessary tool to further study the immunologic aspects of OME. PMID:8072363

  15. The immunoregulatory and allergy-associated cytokines in the aetiology of the otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Marina G; Birchall, John P; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2004-01-01

    Inflammation in the middle ear mucosa, which can be provoked by different primary factors such as bacterial and viral infection, local allergic reactions and reflux, is the crucial event in the pathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME). Unresolved acute inflammatory responses or defective immunoregulation of middle inflammation can promote chronic inflammatory processes and stimulate the chronic condition of OME. Cytokines are the central molecular regulators of middle ear inflammation and can switch the acute phase of inflammation in the chronic stage and induce molecular-pathological processes leading to the histopathological changes accompanying OME. In this review we present cytokines identified in otitis media, immunoregulatory [interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta]) and allergy associated (IL-4, IL-5, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), as crucial molecular regulators, responsible for chronic inflammation in the middle ear and the chronic condition of OME. PMID:15203548

  16. Long-Term Effects of Early-Life Otitis Media on Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumach, Anne; Gerrits, Ellen; Chenault, Michelene; Anteunis, Lucien

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine the long-term consequences of early-life otitis media (OM) and the associated hearing loss (HL) on language skills of school-aged children. Method: In a prospective study, the middle-ear status of 65 Dutch healthy-born children was documented every 3 months during their first 2 years of life;…

  17. Attenuated TLRs in middle ear mucosa contributes to susceptibility of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Si, Yu; Zhang, Zhi Gang; Chen, Sui Jun; Zheng, Yi Qing; Chen, Yu Bin; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Huaili; Feng, Lian Qiang; Huang, Xi

    2014-08-01

    The variability in the recovery of otitis media (OM) is not well understood. Recent data have shown a critical role for toll-like receptors (TLRs) in inflammatory responses to bacteria. It remains unclear whether TLRs-mediated mucosal immunity plays a role in the OM recovery. The etiology, pathological profile, expression levels of TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9 and proinflammatory cytokines were measured in human middle-ear mucosae sampled from three subject groups: non-OM group, chronic otitis-media (COM) group, and chronic suppurative otitis-media (CSOM) group. Of the 72 ears, 86.11% CSOM patients were positive for bacteria. The cellular makeup of the middle ear mucosa differs among the three groups. Mucosae from the CSOM group presented chronic inflammation or suppurative inflammation in the rudimentary stroma, mainly with infiltration of monocytes and macrophages. The mRNA and protein levels of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR5 exhibited no difference between the non-OM and COM groups but were significantly lower in the CSOM group. Conversely, there was no significant difference in the TLR9 level among the three groups. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-6 were up-regulated in the CSOM group. This study provides evidence that the variability in clinical otitis media recovery might be associated with the variability in the expression of mucosal TLRs. Reduced TLR levels in the middle-ear mucosa might cause weak host response to bacteria, persistent inflammation and susceptibility to CSOM. PMID:24882571

  18. Complications of acute otitis media in children: case reports and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Adhami, Maya; Tohme, Souheil

    2010-01-01

    This is a report of three cases of complications of acute otitis media. The first case describes coalescent mastoiditis seen in a ten-month-old infant, the second case is petrositis, sigmoid sinus thrombosis and otitic hydrocephalus seen in a five-year-old child and the third case is an extradural abscess encountered in a three-year-old child. The assessment, diagnosis and treatment of each case are illustrated and discussed. PMID:21409946

  19. Impact of Plant Extracts and Antibiotics on Biofilm Formation of Clinical Isolates From Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Saba; Mujtaba Ghauri, Shahbaz; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Otitis media can lead to severe health consequences, and is the most common reason for antibiotic prescriptions and biofilm-mediated infections. However, the increased pattern of drug resistance in biofilm forming bacteria complicates the treatment of such infections. Objectives: This study was aimed to estimate the biofilm formation potential of the clinical isolates of otitis media, and to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics and plant extracts as alternative therapeutic agents in biofilm eradication. Materials and Methods: The ear swab samples collected from the otitis media patients visiting the Mayo Hospital in Lahore were processed to isolate the bacteria, which were characterized using morphological, biochemical, and molecular (16S rRNA ribotyping) techniques. Then, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the antibiotics and crude plant extracts were measured against the isolates. The cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm formation potential were determined, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with and without antibiotics. Finally, the molecular characterization of the biofilm forming proteins was done by amplifying the ica operon. Results: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KC417303-05), Staphylococcus hemolyticus (KC417306), and Staphylococcus hominis (KC417307) were isolated from the otitis media specimens. Among the crude plant extracts, Acacia arabica showed significant antibacterial characteristics (MIC up to 13 mg/ml), while these isolates exhibited sensitivity towards ciprofloxacin (MIC 0.2 µg/mL). All of the bacterial strains had hydrophobic cellular surfaces that helped in their adherence to abiotic surfaces, leading to strong biofilm formation potential (up to 7 days). Furthermore, the icaC gene encoding polysaccharide intercellular adhesion protein was amplified from S. hemolyticus. Conclusions: The bacterial isolates exhibited strong biofilm formation potential, while the extracts of Acacia arabica significantly inhibited biofilm

  20. Evaluation of replication of variants associated with genetic risk of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Allen, E Kaitlynn; Manichaikul, Ani; Chen, Wei-Min; Rich, Stephen S; Daly, Kathleen A; Sale, Michèle M

    2014-01-01

    The first Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of otitis media (OM) found evidence of association in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) study, but lacked replication in an independent OM population. The aim of this study was to investigate association at these loci in our family-based sample of chronic otitis media with effusion and recurrent otitis media (COME/ROM). Autosomal SNPs were selected from the Raine OM GWAS results. SNPs from the Raine cohort GWAS genotyped in our GWAS of COME/ROM had P-values ranging from P = 0.06-0.80. After removal of SNPs previously genotyped in our GWAS of COME/ROM (N = 21) and those that failed Fluidigm assay design (N = 1), 26 SNPs were successfully genotyped in 716 individuals from our COME/ROM family population. None of the SNP associations replicated in our family-based population (unadjusted P = 0.03-0.93). Replication in an independent sample would confirm that these represent novel OM loci, and that further investigation is warranted. PMID:25089819

  1. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole v. amoxicillin in the treatment of acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, W; Momy, J; Dulberg, C

    1988-01-01

    Although amoxicillin has long been the preferred drug for treatment of acute otitis media, resistant strains of two relatively common causal organisms have emerged, prompting a search for other antibiotics. We performed a randomized double-blind trial comparing amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 221 children in whom acute otitis media was diagnosed in an outpatient setting. Diagnosis was on the basis of symptoms, otoscopic examination and acoustic reflectometry. No culture specimens were taken. A research nurse, using the same methods, evaluated patients in a follow-up home visit at around 14 days and measured compliance by examination of the medicine bottle. Equal proportions of children in the two groups were cured or improved (88% and 87%). Therapeutic efficacy was related to compliance in both groups, and there were few side effects in either group. This study had statistical power of 80% to detect a difference of 15%. We conclude that trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole can be considered a first-line antibiotic in the treatment of acute otitis media. PMID:3052769

  2. Influence of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Acute Otitis Media with Severe Middle Ear Inflammation: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Hirotoshi; Tsumura, Shigeru; Kunimoto, Masaru; Noda, Masuhiro; Chikuie, Daisuke; Noda, Chieko; Yamashita, Mariko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hidemasa; Tashiro, Toru; Iwata, Kazuhiro; Kono, Takashi; Tsumura, Kaoru; Sumiya, Takahiro; Takeno, Sachio; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for acute otitis media in children recommend classifying acute otitis media by age, manifestations and local findings, and also recommend myringotomy for moderate-grade cases with severe local findings, severe-grade cases, and treatment-resistant cases. The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was released in Japan in February 2010. In Hiroshima City, public funding allowing free inoculation with this vaccine was initiated from January 2011, and the number of vaccinated individuals has since increased dramatically. This study investigated changes in the number of myringotomies performed to treat acute otitis media during the 5-year period from January 2008 to December 2012 at two hospitals and five clinics in the Asa Area of Hiroshima City, Japan. A total of 3,165 myringotomies for acute otitis media were performed. The rate of procedures per child-year performed in <5-year-old children decreased by 29.1% in 2011 and by 25.2% in 2012 compared to the mean rate performed in the 3 years prior to the introduction of public funding. A total of 895 myringotomies were performed for 1-year-old infants. The rate of myringotomies per child-year performed for acute otitis media in 1-year-old infants decreased significantly in the 2 years after the introduction of public funding for heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to all years before introduction (p<0.000001). Our results suggest a benefit of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for acute otitis media in reducing the financial burden of myringotomy. In addition, this vaccine may help prevent acute otitis media with severe middle ear inflammation in 1-year-old infants. PMID:26348230

  3. Vernet's syndrome caused by large mycotic aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery after acute otitis media--case report.

    PubMed

    Amano, Mizuki; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Watanabe, Shunji; Ashizawa, Kei; Oguni, Eiichi; Saito, Atsushi; Nakai, Yasunobu; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Abe, Takashi; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Matsumura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    An 85-year-old man presented with a rare large aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) due to acute otitis media manifesting as Vernet's syndrome 2 weeks after the diagnosis of right acute otitis media. Angiography of the right extracranial ICA demonstrated an irregularly shaped large aneurysm with partial thrombosis. The aneurysm was treated by proximal ICA occlusion using endovascular coils. The ICA mycotic aneurysm was triggered by acute otitis media, and induced Vernet's syndrome as a result of direct compression to the jugular foramen. Extracranial ICA aneurysms due to focal infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lower cranial nerve palsy, although the incidence is thought to be very low. PMID:20098025

  4. Otitis media associated polymorphisms in the hemin receptor HemR of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    LaCross, Nathan C.; Marrs, Carl F.; Gilsdorf, Janet R.

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) colonize the human pharynx asymptomatically, and are also an important cause of otitis media (OM). Previous studies have demonstrated that some genes are more prevalent in OM-causing NTHi strains than in commensal strains, suggesting a role in virulence. These studies, however, are unable to investigate the possible associations between gene polymorphisms and disease. This study examined amino acid polymorphisms and sequence diversity in a potential virulence gene, the hemin receptor hemR, from a previously characterized NTHi strain collection containing both commensal and OM organisms to identify possible associations between the polymorphisms and otitis media. The full open reading frame of hemR was sequenced from a total of 146 NTHi isolates, yielding a total of 47 unique HemR amino acid sequences. The predicted structure of HemR showed substantial similarity to a class of monomeric TonB dependent, ligand-gated channels involved in iron acquisition in other gram negative bacteria. Fifteen amino acid polymorphisms were significantly more prevalent at the 90% confidence level among commensal compared to OM isolates. Upon controlling for the confounding effect of population structure, over half of the polymorphism-otitis media relationships lost statistical significance, emphasizing the importance of assessing the effect of population structure in association studies. The seven polymorphisms that retained significance were dispersed throughout the protein in various functional and structural domains, including the signal peptide, N-terminal plug domain, and intra- and extracellular loops. The alternate amino acid of only one of these seven polymorphisms was more common among OM isolates, demonstrating a strong trend toward the consensus sequence among disease causing NTHi. We hypothesize that variability at these positions in HemR may result in a reduced ability to acquire iron, rendering NTHi with such versions of the gene

  5. Dynamic Properties of Tympanic Membrane in a Chinchilla Otitis Media Model Measured With Acoustic Loading.

    PubMed

    Yokell, Zachary; Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2015-08-01

    Otitis media is the most common infectious disease in young children, which results in changes in the thickness and mechanical properties of the tympanic membrane (TM) and induces hearing loss. However, there are no published data for the dynamic properties of the TM in otitis media ears, and it is unclear how the mechanical property changes are related to TM thickness variation. This paper reports a study of the measurement of the dynamic properties of the TM in a chinchilla acute otitis media (AOM) model using acoustic loading and laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). AOM was created through transbullar injection of Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear, and AOM samples were prepared 4 days after inoculation. Vibration of the TM specimen induced by acoustic loading was measured via LDV over a frequency range of 0.1-8 kHz. The experiment was then simulated in a finite element (FE) model, and the inverse-problem solving method was used to determine the complex modulus in the frequency domain. Results from 12 ears (six control and six AOM) show that the storage modulus of the TM from AOM ears was on average 53% higher than that of control ears, while the loss factor was 17.3% higher in control ears than in AOM ears at low-frequency (f < 1 kHz). At high-frequency (e.g., 8000 Hz), there was a mean 40% increase in storage modulus of the TM from AOM compared to control samples. At peak frequency (e.g., 3 kHz), there was a 19.5% increase in loss factor in control samples compared to AOM samples. These findings quantify the changes induced by AOM in the chinchilla TM, namely, a significant increase in both the storage and loss moduli. PMID:25902287

  6. Detoxified lipooligosaccharide from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae conjugated to proteins confers protection against otitis media in chinchillas.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X X; Sun, J; Jin, S; Barenkamp, S J; Lim, D J; Robbins, J B; Battey, J

    1997-01-01

    Detoxified-lipooligosaccharide (dLOS)-protein conjugates from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) elicited a significant rise of anti-LOS antibodies with bactericidal activity in rabbits (X.-X. Gu, C.-M. Tsai, T. Ueyama, S. J. Barenkamp, J. B. Robbins, and D. J. Lim, Infect. Immun. 64:4047-4053, 1996). In this study, we evaluated whether vaccination with the conjugates would protect against NTHi otitis media in chinchillas. Fifty-eight chinchillas received three subcutaneous or intramuscular injections of dLOS-conjugated tetanus toxoid, dLOS-conjugated high-molecular-weight proteins from NTHi, or saline (control) in Freund's adjuvant and then were challenged by intrabullar inoculation with 140 CFU of NTHi. All vaccinated animals responded with elevated serum titers of anti-LOS antibody, and 49% (19 of 39) demonstrated bactericidal activity against the homologous strain. Otitis media with culture-positive NTHi effusions developed in all 19 controls and 56% (22 of 39) of the vaccinated animals during a period of 21 days (P < 0.001). Bacterial counts of the middle ear effusions were lower in the vaccine groups than in the controls (P < 0.01). The incidences of infection in the unchallenged ear or inner ear were 26 or 28% in the vaccine groups and 53 or 58% in the controls (P < 0.05). The signs of infection observed by otoscopy were less severe in the vaccine groups than in the controls. There was no significant difference between the two vaccine groups. These data indicate that active immunization with LOS-based conjugates reduces the incidence of NTHi-induced otitis media. PMID:9353024

  7. Dynamic properties of round window membrane in guinea pig otitis media model measured with electromagnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rong Z; Nakmali, Don; Zhang, Xiangming

    2013-07-01

    The round window, one of two openings into the cochlea from the middle ear, plays an important role in hearing and is known to be structurally altered during otitis media. However, there have been no published studies systematically describing the changes in biomechanical properties of the round window membrane (RWM) that accompany bacterial otitis media. Here we describe the occurrence of significant changes in the dynamic properties of the RWM between normal guinea pigs and those with acute otitis media (AOM) that are detectable by electromagnetic force stimulation and laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) measurements. AOM was induced by transbullar injection of streptococcus pneumoniae into the middle ear, and RWM specimens were prepared three days after challenge. Vibration of the RWM induced by coil-magnet coupling was measured by LDV over frequencies of 0.2-40 kHz. The experiment was then simulated in a finite element model, and the inverse-problem solving method was used to determine the complex modulus in the frequency domain and the relaxation modulus in the time domain. Results from 18 ears (9 control ears and 9 AOM ears) established that both the storage modulus and loss modulus of the RWM from ears with AOM were significantly lower than those of RWM from uninfected ears. The average decrease of the storage modulus in AOM ears ranged from 1.5 to 2.2 MPa and the average decrease of the loss modulus was 0.025-0.48 MPa. Our findings suggest that middle ear infection primarily affects the stiffness of the RWM due to the morphological changes that occur in AOM ears. We also conclude that the coil-magnet coupling method for assessment of RWM function may provide a valuable new approach to characterizing the mechanical response of the RWM when reverse driving is selected for middle ear implantable devices. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012". PMID:23333258

  8. Photodynamic therapy of otitis media in-vitro and in-vivo using gerbil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Kwon, Pil Seung; Ahn, Jin Chul; Chung, Phil Sang; Ge, Ruifeng

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial effects of PDT on common bacteria causing otitis media with effusion (OME). In vitro study was carried out using a hematoporphyrin derivative sensitizer (photogem) and 632 nm diode laser on H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, and S. pneumoniae. One ml of each bacterial suspension was incubated for 3 hours and various concentrations of photogem were administered into the suspension. The suspensions were irradiated with 632 diode laser (15 J/cm2). The presence of colony forming units of the bacteria was examined, microscopic structures of bacteria were examined by TEM, and cytometry of bacteria was performed. The PDT was effective in killing all 3 kinds of bacteria. TEM showed damaged bacterial cell membrane and cytoplasmic structures and the flow cytometry showed lower number of viable bacteria in PDT group comparing to the control group. In vivo PDT study was performed using gerbil. S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae was injected into bullae. Photogem was injected into bullae in 2 days by when OME was developed and transcanal irradiation of 632 nm diode laser (90 J) was performed with a fiber perforated through an ear drum into a middle ear cavity and bulla. Four days after PDT, middle ear and bulla were washed with DPBS and the washed DPBS was cultured. The presence of bacterial colonies was examined. PDT was effective in killing S. pneumoniae in 87 % of the infected bullae with OME while it was effective to eradicate H. influenzae in 50 % of the infected bullae with OME. The results of these studies demonstrated that PDT may be effective to treat otitis media. It may have clinical implication to treat otitis media that is resistant to antibiotic therapy.

  9. A retrospective study on cholesteatoma otitis media coexisting with cholesterol granuloma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Linghui; Gong, Shusheng; Bai, Guangping; Wang, Jibao

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the etiology and pathogenesis of cholesteatoma otitis media accompanied by cholesterol granuloma and the relationship between cholesteatoma and cholesterol granuloma, 63 cases of middle ear cholesterol granuloma treated in our hospital during the period from March 1988 to May 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All cases were surgically and pathologically verified. 15 cases of cholesteatoma coexisting with cholesterol granuloma were found among the 63 patients. All 15 cases had a long-term history of otitis media, such as otorrhea (sanguine purulent otorrhea and bloody otorrhea in 8 cases) and perforation of the eardrum (perforation of pars flaccida in 8 cases). Temporal bone CT scans showed cholesteatoma in 11 cases. All patients were treated surgically, and cholesteatoma and cholesterol granuloma were found coexisting alternately, the latter lying mainly in the tympanic antrum, attic and mastoid air cells. Chocolate-colored mucus was accumulated in well-developed mastoid air cells, and glistening dotty cholesterol crystals were also found. In most cases, enlarged aditus, destruction of lateral attic wall, erosion of ossicular chain, exposure of horizontal segment of facial nerve and tegmen of attic were observed. Occlusion of Eustachian tube was noted in 6 cases, and occlusion of tympanic isthmus was revealed in all cases. A post-operative dry ear was achieved in all patients, and hearing improvement was achieved in all 12 cases following tympanoplasty. Cholesteatoma and cholesterol granuloma in middle ear may share a common pathophysiological etiology: occlusion of ventilation and disturbance of drainage. The diagnosis should be considered when patients presented with chronic otitis media with bloody otorrhea. CT and magnetic resonance imaging are useful for the diagnosis before operation. The surgical approach depends on the location, extension and severity of the lesion. The purpose of surgery is to remove the lesion and create an adequate

  10. Risk Factors for Refractory and Delayed De novo Otitis Media Requiring Pressure Equalization Tube Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, Sarah N.; Jatana, Kris R.; Kang, D. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Limited data exists regarding risk factors for otitis media in older children and specifically those for which surgical intervention is performed. This study investigated potential risk factors in this older age group who required pressure equalization tube (PET) insertion. Study design Retrospective cohort study Setting Tertiary care pediatric academic medical center Subjects and methods Children 6–12 years old undergoing PET insertion between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2011. Data was stratified into two separate age cohorts (6–7 versus 8–12-year-olds) and compared using chi-square analysis. Results A total of 263 patients met study criteria. PET insertion was most common in 6 year-olds (36%, 95/263). Presence of siblings (p=0.03) and history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infection (p<0.01), otalgia (p<0.05), otorrhea (p<0.001), and nasal discharge (p<0.001) were common in the older cohort. No statistical difference was found for history of recurrent acute otitis media, allergy, asthma, or atopy between the two groups (p=0.23–0.92), although the overall prevalence of these conditions was high in both cohorts. Conclusion The 8–12-year-olds had a history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infection and more infectious symptoms than the 6–7-year-olds. Atopy can lead to a heightened susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections and potential increase in the relative risk of otitis media. In our patient population, while there was no statistically significant difference in history of asthma, allergy, or atopy, the overall prevalence within both cohorts was relatively high. Therefore, this study provides insight into many pertinent and potentially modifiable risk factors for older children requiring PET insertion. PMID:27175444

  11. Predominant Bacteria Detected from the Middle Ear Fluid of Children Experiencing Otitis Media: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Chinh C.; Massa, Helen M.; Thornton, Ruth B.; Cripps, Allan W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Otitis media (OM) is amongst the most common childhood diseases and is associated with multiple microbial pathogens within the middle ear. Global and temporal monitoring of predominant bacterial pathogens is important to inform new treatment strategies, vaccine development and to monitor the impact of vaccine implementation to improve progress toward global OM prevention. Methods A systematic review of published reports of microbiology of acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) from January, 1970 to August 2014, was performed using PubMed databases. Results This review confirmed that Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, remain the predominant bacterial pathogens, with S. pneumoniae the predominant bacterium in the majority reports from AOM patients. In contrast, H. influenzae was the predominant bacterium for patients experiencing chronic OME, recurrent AOM and AOM with treatment failure. This result was consistent, even where improved detection sensitivity from the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) rather than bacterial culture was conducted. On average, PCR analyses increased the frequency of detection of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae 3.2 fold compared to culture, whilst Moraxella catarrhalis was 4.5 times more frequently identified by PCR. Molecular methods can also improve monitoring of regional changes in the serotypes and identification frequency of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae over time or after vaccine implementation, such as after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Conclusions Globally, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae remain the predominant otopathogens associated with OM as identified through bacterial culture; however, molecular methods continue to improve the frequency and accuracy of detection of individual serotypes. Ongoing monitoring with appropriate detection methods for OM pathogens can support development of improved vaccines to provide protection from the

  12. Rare clinical presentation of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as otitis media and facial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Siddiahgari, Sirisha Rani; Yerukula, Pallavi; Lingappa, Lokesh; Moodahadu, Latha S.

    2016-01-01

    Extra nodal presentation of Non Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL) is a rare entity, and data available about the NHL that primarily involves of middle ear and mastoid is limited. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), in a 2 year 8 month old boy, who developed otalgia and facial palsy. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the left mastoid. Mastoid exploration and histopathological examination revealed DLBCL. This case highlights the importance of considering malignant lymphoma as one of the differential diagnosis in persistent otitis media and/facial palsy. PMID:27195036

  13. [Pharyngolaryngeal reflux as one of the causes of chronic excretory otitis media].

    PubMed

    Petrova, L G; Chaĭkovskiĭ, V V; Rybak, P R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the relationship between chronic secretory otitis media (CSOM) and pharyngolaryngeal reflux (PLR). A total of 43 patients aged between 3 to 19 years presenting with CSOM were available for the examination. PLR was confirmed in 36 (83.7%) patients. A relapse of CSOM after a course of otorhinolaryngological and gastroenterological treatment developed in 6 (14.0%) patients. It is concluded that antireflux therapy should be a constituent component of CSOM therapy concomitant with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:23528458

  14. A case of lemierre syndrome secondary to otitis media and mastoiditis.

    PubMed

    Turan, Aynur; Cam, Harun; Dadali, Yeliz; Korkmaz, Serdar; Ozdek, Ali; Hekimoğlu, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare clinical condition that generally develops secondary to oropharyngeal infection caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, which is an anaerobic bacteria. A 62-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus presented with internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus-transverse sinus thrombophlebitis, accompanying otitis media and mastoiditis that developed after an upper airway infection. Interestingly, there were air bubbles in both the internal jugular vein and transverse sinus. Vancomycin and meropenem were started and a right radical mastoidectomy was performed. The patient's clinical picture completely resolved in 14 days. High mortality and morbidity may be prevented with a prompt diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome. PMID:25431696

  15. A Case of Lemierre Syndrome Secondary to Otitis Media and Mastoiditis

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Aynur; Cam, Harun; Dadali, Yeliz; Korkmaz, Serdar; Özdek, Ali; Hekimoğlu, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare clinical condition that generally develops secondary to oropharyngeal infection caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, which is an anaerobic bacteria. A 62-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus presented with internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus-transverse sinus thrombophlebitis, accompanying otitis media and mastoiditis that developed after an upper airway infection. Interestingly, there were air bubbles in both the internal jugular vein and transverse sinus. Vancomycin and meropenem were started and a right radical mastoidectomy was performed. The patient's clinical picture completely resolved in 14 days. High mortality and morbidity may be prevented with a prompt diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome. PMID:25431696

  16. An Antihistamine Decongestant in the Prevention of Acute Otitis Media in Children with Colds

    PubMed Central

    Brownoff, R.; Hutchison, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    Most clinical drug trials relating to acute otitis media have evaluated medications in terms of treatment. In this randomized double-blind, cross-over study, the effectiveness of an antihistamine decongestant in the prevention of AOM was investigated, rather than the treatment. The medication/placebo was started at the onset of a cold and continued throughout its duration. No treatment effect was evident in the results obtained with 308 children who completed the eight-month study. However, the results indicated a strong relationship between colds and AOM, and a trend toward higher occurrence of AOM in children under four years of age. PMID:21233997

  17. An Antihistamine Decongestant in the Prevention of Acute Otitis Media in Children with Colds

    PubMed Central

    Brownoff, R.; Hutchison, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    Most clinical drug trials relating to acute otitis media have evaluated medications in terms of treatment. In this randomized double-blind, cross-over study, the effectiveness of an antihistamine decongestant in the prevention of AOM was investigated, rather than the treatment. The medication/placebo was started at the onset of a cold and continued throughout its duration. No treatment effect was evident in the results obtained with 308 children who completed the eight-month study. However, the results indicated a strong relationship between colds and AOM, and a trend toward higher occurrence of AOM in children under four years of age. PMID:21253110

  18. Grisel syndrome, acute otitis media, and temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Martins, J; Almeida, S; Nunes, P; Prata, F; Lobo, M L; Marques, J G

    2015-08-01

    We present a case report of a four-year-old boy with torcicollis and trismus after acute otitis media. Grisel Syndrome diagnosis in association with temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis was admitted, leading to early conservative treatment. GS should be suspected in a child presenting with torticollis after an upper respiratory tract infection or an ENT surgical procedure. The association with temporo-mandibular reactive findings is somehow rarer but not impossible, due to the close vascular communication between retropharyngeal and pterigoid spaces. PMID:26060148

  19. Chronic suppurative otitis media due to nontuberculous mycobacteria: A case of successful treatment with topical boric acid.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Marie-Astrid; Quach, Caroline; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasingly recognized cause of chronic suppurative otitis media in children with tympanostomy tubes. Treatment of this condition is difficult and typically requires a combination of systemic antibiotics and surgical debridement. We present the first case of a 2-year-old male with chronic suppurative otitis media due to NTM who failed systemic antibiotic therapy and was successfully managed with topical boric acid powder. This report highlights the challenges involved in treating this infection, and introduces boric acid as a potentially valuable component of therapy. PMID:26026892

  20. Evaluation of nasopharyngeal microbial flora and antibiogram and its relation to otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Nourizadeh, Navid; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Gharavi, Vahideh; Nourizadeh, Niloufar; Movahed, Rahman

    2016-04-01

    Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion (OME) are the main causes of hearing impairment in children which require proper treatment, mainly antibiotic therapy. Patients whom were appropriate candidates for adenoidectomy were divided into two groups regarding the presence of middle ear effusion. Adenoid tissue specimens were cultured in both groups and the bacterial flora and anti-microbial resistance pattern were determined. 72 patients were studied, 42 % had OME while 58 % did not. The following bacteria were isolated and cultured from both groups with no meaningful difference in prevalence: Streptococcus viridans (p = 0.265), Staphylococcus aureus (p = 0.72), H. influenza (p = 0.806), Entrococcus. spp (0.391), Streptococcus pneumonia (p = 0.391), nonhemolytic Streptococcus (p = 0.230). Bacterial sensitivity was similar for Amoxicillin-clavulanate (p = 0.935), Amoxicillin (p = 0.935), Cephalexin (p = 0.806), Cefixime (p = 0.391) and Azithromycin in both groups. The two groups showed no meaningful difference considering the bacterial flora of nasopharynx and their sensitivity. Bacteria in both groups were sensitive to Amoxicillin and Amoxicillin-clavulanate and resistant to Azithromycin, Cefixime and Cephalexin. PMID:25929414

  1. [Antibiotics and cortisone in the treatment of otitis media with effusion].

    PubMed

    Zocconi, E

    1994-01-01

    Persistent otitis media with effusion (OME) is a pathology very frequent in the first year of life and causes hearing loss which can be a negative factor in language and cognitive development and may result in disturbances in psychological adjustment. Generally OME has spontaneous resolution but if it persist for more than 3 months a medical or surgical treatment is compulsory. OME is frequently a result of recurrent otitis media and bacterial infection is considered to play a definitive causative role in the development of this pathology. A wide variety of medical treatments (antibiotics, aerosolized corticosteroids, oral antihistamine-decongestants, mucolytics) is indicative of lake of success. We have treated 60 children with OME with antibiotics (amoxicillin or cefaclor for 1 month) and oral steroids (prednisone for 7 days). All patients had a history for more than 3 months, without adenoid hypertrophy. Diagnosis of OME was established after pneumatic otoscopy, tympanometry and audiometry. Following the therapeutical association 53 patients showed a complete resolution of the effusion. At the follow-up after 2 months, 4 children had a recurrence of effusion. We consider this treatment with a short course of steroids and antibiotics and effective method before referral for tube placement. PMID:7971452

  2. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Clements, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  3. Evaluation of Iranian pediatric specialists’ attitude and knowledge regarding approach to patients with acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Ghalehbaghi, Babak; Asghari, Alimohamad; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Moradi, Yasaman; Kamrava, Kamran; Motiei, Mir Abolfazl

    2012-01-01

    Background The ministry of health and medical education of Iran and many other countries advice physicians to use this guideline for diagnosis and treatment of acute otitis media (AOM), but there is not any evaluation of effectiveness and obedience of this guideline, so the aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude of pediatricians, the most important group that interfere with these patients in treatment of acute otitis media. Methods A total of 120 anonymous surveys were mailed to 120 pediatrician in Tehran (Iran) to evaluate pattern of diagnosis and treatment of AOM in these physicians. Age, gender, place of work, attitude of diagnosis and treatment were asked by anonymous survey. Results Sixty-two completed surveys were received, for a response rate of 51%. There was no significant difference between responders in these survey and scenarios, according to sex, age, practice setting, graduation year or the number of AOM patients visiting each month. Conclusion Our study seems to add new insights to the previous literature on management of AOM according to guideline. We can assess the impact of guidelines on the usual practice of practitioners in evidenced-based management of AOM. PMID:23483781

  4. New Pneumococcal Carriage Acquired in Association with Acute Respiratory Infection Is Prone to Cause Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi

    2016-01-01

    For considering vaccine-prevention of pneumococcal acute otitis media (PncAOM), relationships between pneumococcal carriage, respiratory infection and PncAOM need to be understood. We analyzed nasopharyngeal samples collected from 329 unvaccinated Finnish children aged 2–24 months at scheduled visits and at visits during respiratory infection in 1994–97. We assessed temporal associations of respiratory infection with pneumococcal acquisition and whether PncAOM hazard depends on the relative timing of acquisition and the infection onset. The data comprised 607 person-years of risk-time for acquisition, 245 person-months of concurrent respiratory infection and carriage, and 119 episodes of PncAOM. The acquisition hazard was 3-fold in the month preceding respiratory sickness (hazard ratio, HR 3.5, 90% credible interval CI 2.9, 4.1) as compared to acquisition in healthy children. Moreover, the PncAOM hazard was markedly higher (HR 3.7, 90% CI 2.4, 5.3) during the first month of carriage acquired around the acute phase of respiratory infection (between 1 month before and 1 week after the sickness onset), as compared to carriage acquired later during sickness. The high proportion (76%) of PncAOM events occurring within 1 month of acquisition was due to frequent acquisition being associated with respiratory infection as well as the susceptibility of such acquisition to cause otitis media. PMID:27257789

  5. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Clements, John D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-08-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  6. [Acute otitis media in children. Comparison between conventional and homeopathic therapy].

    PubMed

    Friese, K H; Kruse, S; Moeller, H

    1996-08-01

    Within a prospective group study of five practicing otorhinolaryngologists, conventional therapy of acute otitis media in children was compared with homeopathic treatments. Group A (103 children) was primarily treated with homeopathic single remedies (Aconitum napellus, Apis mellifica, Belladonna, Capsicum, Chamomilla, Kalium bichromicum, Lachesis, Lycopodium, Mercurius solubilis, Okoubaka, Pulsatilla, Silicea). Group B (28 children) was treated by decongestant nose-drops, antibiotics, secretolytics and/or antipyretics. Comparisons were done by symptoms, physical findings, duration of therapy and number of relapses. The children of the study were between 1 and 11 years of age. The difference in numbers was explained by the children with otitis media being primarily treated by pediatricians using conventional methods. The median duration of pain in group A was 2 days and in group B 3 days. Median therapy in group A lasted 4 days and in group B 10 days. Antibiotics were given over a period of 8-10 days, while homeopathic treatments were stopped after healing. In group A 70.7% of the patients were free of relapses within 1 years and 29.3% had a maximum of three relapses. Group B had 56.5% without relapses and 43.5% a maximum of six relapses. Five children in group A were given antibiotics and 98 responded solely to homeopathic treatments. No side effects of treatment were found in either group. PMID:8805013

  7. Functional Antibodies Elicited by Two Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines in the Finnish Otitis Media Vaccine Trial▿

    PubMed Central

    Ekström, Nina; Väkeväinen, Merja; Verho, Jouko; Kilpi, Terhi; Käyhty, Helena

    2007-01-01

    In the Finnish Otitis Media Vaccine Trial, the now-licensed pneumococcal conjugate vaccine containing polysaccharides conjugated to protein CRM197 (PncCRM) and the experimental pneumococcal polysaccharide-meningococcal outer membrane protein complex conjugate vaccine (PncOMPC), showed similar efficacy profiles against acute otitis media despite different antibody concentrations in sera. We now report the opsonophagocytic activities (OPA) in these sera. OPA, antibody concentration, and avidity for serotypes 6B, 19F, and 23F were determined in sera of infants who received either pneumococcal conjugate (PCV) or control vaccine at 2, 4, and 6 months of age and either the homologous or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine at 12 months of age. OPA varied by vaccine and serotype. The majority of PCV recipients had positive OPA after the fourth dose, while OPA was undetectable in the control group. Coinciding with the efficacy data, the concentration of antibodies required for 50% killing was low for 6B and high for 19F for both PCVs. Contradictory to the efficacy data, PncOMPC induced lower functional capacity to 23F than PncCRM. OPA correlated with antibody concentration, while avidity and functional capacity of antibodies showed no correlation. The OPA data provide valuable additional information for serotype-specific differences in protection and when evaluating serotype-specific immunogenicity and should thus be considered when defining serological correlates of protection. PMID:17261612

  8. Mental health and quality of life in patients with chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Salih; Kinis, Vefa; Bez, Yasin; Gun, Ramazan; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Ozbay, Musa; Aguloglu, Bülent; Meric, Faruk

    2013-02-01

    The present study focused on the comparison of mental health and quality of life (QoL) between chronic otitis media (COM) patients and the hearing population. The patients with chronic otitis media and healthy control group were enrolled in the study. The duration and severity of the auditory impairment were recorded. In addition to hearing loss (HL), the findings of each patient's other ear disorders (ear discharge and tinnitus) were also recorded. In both the groups, psychological symptom profile and health-related QoL were evaluated and compared using a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Symptom Check List 90-Revised Form (SCL-90-R), and the Short Form-36 (SF-36). According to SCL-90-R, somatization (p < 0.001), interpersonal sensitivity (p < 0.001), depression (p < 0.001), phobic anxiety (p < 0.001), and other subscores, and also global severity index score (p < 0.001) were significantly high in patient group when compared to the control group. The patients with COM reported significantly lower levels of QoL in terms of physical role difficulty (p < 0.001), general health perception (p < 0.004), social functioning (p < 0.001), and mental health (p < 0.017) than those of control subjects. Our results indicated that COM patients with mild or moderate HL have poorer life quality and higher psychological problems. Psychological well being should be also considered in assessment of COM patients in addition to the clinical evaluation and audiological tests. PMID:22566178

  9. Impact of Sulphurous Water Politzer Inhalation on Audiometric Parameters in Children with Otitis Media with Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Mirandola, Prisco; Gobbi, Giuliana; Malinverno, Chiara; Carubbi, Cecilia; Ferné, Filippo M.; Artico, Marco; Vitale, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The positive effects of spa therapy on ear, nose, and throat pathology are known but robust literature in this field, is still lacking. The aim of this study was to assess through a retrospective analysis, the effects on otitis media with effusion of Politzer endotympanic inhalation of sulphurous waters in children aged 5-9 years. Methods A cohort of 95 patients was treated with Politzer insufflations of sulphurous water: 58 patients did a cycle consisting of a treatment of 12 days per year for three consecutive years; 37 patients followed the same procedure for 5 years consecutively. The control population was represented by untreated, age-matched children. A standard audiometric test was used before and after each cycle of treatment. Results One cycle of Politzer inhalation of sulphur-rich water improved the symptoms. Three cycles definitively stabilized the improvement of hearing function. Conclusion Our results show that otitis media with effusion in children can be resolved by an appropriate non-pharmacological treatment of middle ear with sulphur-rich water. PMID:23524467

  10. Preliminary study of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the middle ear of acute otitis media due to Alloiococcus otitidis.

    PubMed

    Harimaya, Atsushi; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Himi, Tetsuo

    2009-05-01

    Alloiococcus otitidis is a newly discovered organism frequently detected in otitis media. However, the association of the organism with the development of otitis media has not been disclosed in detail yet. In the middle ear, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines are released in association with infection by pathogens, and these cytokines contribute to the induction of an inflammatory reaction. To investigate the profile of inflammation-related cytokines in the acute phase of A. otitidis infection, we analyzed the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in middle ear effusions of acute otitis media due to A. otitidis, in comparison with acute otitis media due to the well-known Gram-positive middle ear pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. The amounts of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and CXC chemokines (IP-10, I-TAC) were significantly increased in the A. otitidis group as well as in the S. pneumoniae group. Various inflammation-related cytokines/chemokines were induced in the A. otitidis-infected middle ear, and the profile of cytokines was very similar to that in S. pneumoniae infection. This preliminary study suggests that A. otitidis has the potential to induce these cytokines, contributing to the development of an inflammatory reaction in the middle ear cavity in a similar manner to S. pneumoniae. PMID:19185927

  11. Will Parents Participate in and Comply with Programs and Regimens Using Xylitol for Preventing Acute Otitis Media in Their Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Carole E.; Baker, Jason A.; Ryu, Jung A.; Smith, Rachel A.; Umeda, Claire J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Antiadhesive properties in xylitol, a natural sugar alcohol, can help prevent acute otitis media (AOM) in children by inhibiting harmful bacteria from colonizing and adhering to oral and nasopharyngeal areas and traveling to the Eustachian tube and middle ear. This study investigated parents' willingness to use and comply with a regimen…

  12. Long-Term Effects of Otitis Media a Ten-Year Cohort Study of Alaskan Eskimo Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Gary J.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Histories of ear disease, otoscopic examinations, and audiologic, intelligence, and achievement tests were obtained from a cohort of 489 Alaskan Eskimo children, followed through the first 10 years of life, to determine whether otitis media (middle ear inflammation) deleteriously affected intellectual functioning and achievement in school.…

  13. Otitis Media, the Quality of Child Care, and the Social/Communicative Behavior of Toddlers: A Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Manlove, Elizabeth E.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of otitis media (OM) and the quality of child care on the social and communicative behaviors of toddlers, using a cumulative risk framework that included moderation. The study followed 72 children who began child care in infancy. Both process and structural aspects of the quality of 11 child…

  14. Restricted Consonant Inventories of 2-Year-Old Finnish Children with a History of Recurrent Acute Otitis Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapala, Sini; Niemitalo-Haapola, Elina; Raappana, Antti; Kujala, Tiia; Kujala, Teija; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira

    2015-01-01

    Many children experience recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) in early childhood. In a previous study, 2-year-old children with RAOM were shown to have immature neural patterns for speech sound discrimination. The present study further investigated the consonant inventories of these same children using natural speech samples. The results showed…

  15. Lipopolysaccharide induces proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in experimental otitis media through the prostaglandin D2 receptor (DP)-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, M; Kariya, S; Okano, M; Higaki, T; Makihara, S; Fujiwara, T; Nagata, K; Hirai, H; Narumiya, S; Nakamura, M; Nishizaki, K

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media is one of the most common and intractable ear diseases, and is the major cause of hearing loss, especially in children. Multiple factors affect the onset or development of otitis media. Prostaglandin D2 is the major prostanoid involved in infection and allergy. However, the role of prostaglandin D2 and prostaglandin D2 receptors on the pathogenesis of otitis media remains to be determined. Recent studies show that D prostanoid receptor (DP) and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 (Th2) cells (CRTH2) are major prostaglandin D2 receptors. In this study, homozygous DP single gene-deficient (DP–/–) mice, CRTH2 single gene-deficient (CRTH2–/–) mice and DP/CRTH2 double gene-deficient (DP–/– CRTH2–/–) mice were used to investigate the role of prostaglandin D2 and its receptors in otitis media. We demonstrate that prostaglandin D2 is induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of Gram-negative bacteria, and that transtympanic injection of prostaglandin D2 up-regulates macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the middle ear. We also show that middle ear inflammatory reactions, including infiltration of inflammatory cells and expression of MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 induced by LPS, are reduced significantly in DP–/– mice and DP–/– CRTH2–/– mice. CRTH2–/– mice display inflammatory reactions similar to wild-type mice. These findings indicate that prostaglandin D2 may play significant roles in LPS-induced experimental otitis media via DP. PMID:21166666

  16. Lipopolysaccharide induces proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in experimental otitis media through the prostaglandin D2 receptor (DP)-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, M; Kariya, S; Okano, M; Higaki, T; Makihara, S; Fujiwara, T; Nagata, K; Hirai, H; Narumiya, S; Nakamura, M; Nishizaki, K

    2011-02-01

    Otitis media is one of the most common and intractable ear diseases, and is the major cause of hearing loss, especially in children. Multiple factors affect the onset or development of otitis media. Prostaglandin D₂ is the major prostanoid involved in infection and allergy. However, the role of prostaglandin D₂ and prostaglandin D2 receptors on the pathogenesis of otitis media remains to be determined. Recent studies show that D prostanoid receptor (DP) and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 (Th2) cells (CRTH2) are major prostaglandin D₂ receptors. In this study, homozygous DP single gene-deficient (DP⁻(/)⁻) mice, CRTH2 single gene-deficient (CRTH2⁻(/)⁻) mice and DP/CRTH2 double gene-deficient (DP⁻(/)⁻ CRTH2⁻(/)⁻) mice were used to investigate the role of prostaglandin D₂ and its receptors in otitis media. We demonstrate that prostaglandin D₂ is induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of Gram-negative bacteria, and that transtympanic injection of prostaglandin D₂ up-regulates macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the middle ear. We also show that middle ear inflammatory reactions, including infiltration of inflammatory cells and expression of MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 induced by LPS, are reduced significantly in DP⁻(/)⁻ mice and DP⁻(/)⁻ CRTH2⁻(/)⁻ mice. CRTH2⁻(/)⁻ mice display inflammatory reactions similar to wild-type mice. These findings indicate that prostaglandin D₂ may play significant roles in LPS-induced experimental otitis media via DP. PMID:21166666

  17. A Mouse Model of Otitis Media Identifies HB-EGF as a Mediator of Inflammation-Induced Mucosal Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kwang; Chavez, Eduardo; Kurabi, Arwa; Baird, Andrew; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Otitis media is one of the most common pediatric infections. While it is usually treated without difficulty, up to 20% of children may progress to long-term complications that include hearing loss, impaired speech and language development, academic underachievement, and irreversible disease. Hyperplasia of middle ear mucosa contributes to the sequelae of acute otitis media and is of important clinical significance. Understanding the role of growth factors in the mediation of mucosal hyperplasia could lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for this disease and its sequelae. Methods From a whole genome gene array analysis of mRNA expression during acute otitis media, we identified growth factors with expression kinetics temporally related to hyperplasia. We then tested these factors for their ability to stimulate mucosal epithelial growth in vitro, and determined protein levels and histological distribution in vivo for active factors. Results From the gene array, we identified seven candidate growth factors with upregulation of mRNA expression kinetics related to mucosal hyperplasia. Of the seven, only HB-EGF (heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor) induced significant mucosal epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Subsequent quantification of HB-EGF protein expression in vivo via Western blot analysis confirmed that the protein is highly expressed from 6 hours to 24 hours after bacterial inoculation, while immunohistochemistry revealed production by middle ear epithelial cells and infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusion Our data suggest an active role for HB-EGF in the hyperplasia of the middle ear mucosal epithelium during otitis media. These results imply that therapies targeting HB-EGF could ameliorate mucosal growth during otitis media, and thereby reduce detrimental sequelae of this childhood disease. PMID:25033458

  18. Can you hear me now? A genetic model of otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Evelyn; Saunders, James C

    2008-02-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is characterized by the occurrence of fluid in the middle-ear cavity in the absence of any signs of acute ear infection and occurs most frequently in children with auditory or eustachian tube dysfunction. Its chronic form is an important clinical issue for pediatricians and otologists alike. The study by Depreux et al. in this issue of the JCI shows that absence of the transcriptional activator Eya4 in knockout mice results in abnormal structuring of the eustachian tube, thus predisposing these animals to OME (see the related article beginning on page 651). The development of this genetics-based animal model is an important advance for understanding OME and for exploring new avenues of treatment. PMID:18219392

  19. Nasal Mucociliary Clearance in Adenoid Hypertrophy and Otitis Media with Effusion.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Hasmet

    2015-12-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), which exists in many systems, is the first defensive mechanism of the human body. Nasal MCC has an important role in transporting the secretions of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses along with the trapped inhaled pathogens to the nasopharynx. Physiologic or pathologic situations that effect nasal MCC, such as temperature, humidity, nasal obstruction, allergic rhinitis, chronic infections, etc., lead to impaired MCC and related local or circumjacent system disorders. With this perspective, when a unified airway with a multiple disease principle is considered, investigating the relationship between adenoid hypertrophy (AH), otitis media with effusion (OME) and nasal MCC is logical. In this review, histological and physiologic properties of nasal MCC and its possible role involving pathologic situations such as AH and OME is discussed together with recent literature findings. PMID:26496764

  20. [Middle ear cancer hidden by chronic otitis media--a case report].

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Gawecki, Wojciech; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata; Kopeć, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    The authors would like to present a rare case of the middle ear cancer which has been developed in postoperative cave in 67 years old patient operated for cholesteatoma 50 years earlier. The patient was admitted to the ENT Department of Poznań University of Medical Sciences because of the ear suppuration and headache occurring for 3 months. CT and MR images suggested granulation tissue filling the postoperative spaces with bone destruction, infiltration of the dura and temporal lobe abscess formation. Intraoperative findings allowed excluding the preliminary diagnosis of intracranial complication in the course of chronic otitis media, revealing the tissue masses resembling neoplastic infiltration. The histopathology examination confirmed the final diagnosis of squamous cell cancer. The patient was directed to radiotherapy. The authors report a case of middle ear squamous cell carcinoma and discuss its diagnostic aspect. PMID:19205537

  1. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of otitis media: construction of a phenotype landscape.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mahmood F

    2014-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) represents a complex set of clinically defined disease phenotypes. Epidemiological and pathological data suggest that inflammation of the middle ear occurs on a continuum of disease. Here I review epidemiological data and apply mathematical modelling to better define the interrelation of OM phenotypes, including the relationship of upper respiratory tract infection to acute OM (AOM), of AOM to OM with effusion, and of recurrent OM to chronicity of effusion. I use these mathematical models to represent OM graphically as a 'landscape of disease'. This novel nosology may enable clinicians and researchers to better conceptualise middle ear inflammation in its various forms, although the limits of its application are also discussed. PMID:24819621

  2. Novel type of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing multidrug-resistant acute otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Pichichero, Michael E; Casey, Janet R; Zeng, Mingtao

    2009-04-01

    After our recent discovery of a Streptococcus pneumoniae 19A "superbug" (Legacy strain) that is resistant to all Food and Drug Administration-approved antimicrobial drugs for treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) in children, other S. pneumoniae isolates from children with AOM were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Among 40 isolates studied, 16 (40%) were serotype 19A, and 9 (23%) were resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs. Two others had unreported sequence types (STs) that expressed the 19A capsule, and 8 (88%) of the 9 multidrug-resistant strains were serotype 19A, including the Legacy strain with the new ST-2722. In genetic relatedness, ST-2722 belonged to a cluster of reported strains of S. pneumoniae in which all strains had 6 of the same alleles as ST-156. The multidrug-resistant strains related to ST-156 expressed different capsular serotypes: 9V, 14, 11A, 15C, and 19F. PMID:19331730

  3. Watchful Waiting for Cases of Pediatric Otitis Media: Modeling Parental Response to Physician Advice.

    PubMed

    MacGeorge, Erina L; Smith, Rachel A; Caldes, Emily P; Hackman, Nicole M

    2016-08-01

    Watchful waiting (WW) can reduce unnecessary antibiotic use in the treatment of pediatric otitis media (ear infection), but its utility is impaired by underutilization and noncompliance. Guided by advice response theory, the current study proposes advantage and capacity as factors that predict how caregivers evaluate and respond affectively to WW. Parents (N = 373) of at least 1 child age 5 years or younger completed questionnaires that assessed responses to hypothetical WW advice for their youngest child. Perceptions of advantage from WW and the capacity to monitor and manage symptoms predicted advice quality, physician trust, and future compliance both directly and indirectly through negative affect. The findings suggest the elaboration of advice response theory to include more aspects of advice content evaluation (e.g., advantage) and the influence of negative affect. The study also provides practical guidance for physicians seeking to improve caregiver reception of WW advice. PMID:27409041

  4. Otitis media with effusion: benefits and harms of strategies in use for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Marchisio, Paola; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a common clinical condition that is associated with hearing loss. It can be diagnosed at least once in approximately 80% of preschool children: 30-40% of them have recurrent episodes, and 5-10% have chronic disease. OME, in recurrent and persistent cases, might significantly delay or impair communication skills, resulting in behavioral and educational difficulties. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to avoid these problems. Most, however, have not been adequately studied, and no definitive conclusions can be drawn. Official guidelines do not recommend the use of decongestants, antihistamines, steroids, or antibiotics. The data are too scanty to assess other interventions, although autoinflation, because it incurs neither cost nor adverse events, deserves attention. Surgical procedures (i.e., tympanostomy tube insertion and adenoidectomy as an adjuvant) can be useful in some cases. This review evaluates all the current OME treatments and preventive measures, including their possible adverse events. PMID:26853095

  5. An evidence-based patient information leaflet about otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Kubba, H

    2000-01-01

    Leaflets are a useful resource for information provision. Many otolaryngology patients have poor reading skills, and may have difficulty understanding medical jargon. The aim of this project was to produce a patient information leaflet on otitis media with effusion whose content is based on the best available research evidence, and which is presented in a clear format with simple language. Patients were involved at the planning stage, and in testing the final draft. The leaflet was preferred by the majority compared to existing information material and was felt to be more informative and easier to understand. The leaflet has been given the Crystal Mark for clarity of language by the Plain English Campaign. This study shows that existing guidelines can be used to improve the quality of written information provision. PMID:11184057

  6. Modeling Analysis of Biomechanical Changes of Middle Ear and Cochlea in Otitis Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Rong Z.; Zhang, Xiangming; Guan, Xiying

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive finite element (FE) model of the human ear including the ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea was developed using histological sections of human temporal bone. The cochlea was modeled with three chambers separated by the basilar membrane and Reissner's membrane and filled with perilymphatic fluid. The viscoelastic material behavior was applied to middle ear soft tissues based on dynamic measurements of tissues in our lab. The model was validated using the experimental data obtained in human temporal bones and then used to simulate various stages of otitis media (OM) including the changes of morphology, mechanical properties, pressure, and fluid level in the middle ear. Function alterations of the middle ear and cochlea in OM were derived from the model and compared with the measurements from temporal bones. This study indicates that OM can be simulated in the FE model to predict the hearing loss induced by biomechanical changes of the middle ear and cochlea.

  7. Non typable-Haemophilus influenzae biofilm formation and acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NT-Hi) infection is frequently associated with acute otitis media (AOM) treatment failure, recurrence or chronic otitis media. Persistence of otopathogens in a biofilm-structured community was implicated in these situations. Here, we compared biofilm production by H. influenzae strains obtained by culture of middle ear fluid (MEF) from children with AOM treatment failure and by strains isolated from nasopharyngeal (NP) samples from healthy children or those with AOM (first episode or recurrence). We aimed to evaluate an association of clinical signs and in vitro biofilm formation and establish risk factors of carrying a biofilm-producing strain. Methods We used a modification of the microtiter plate assay with crystal violet staining to compare biofilm production by 216 H. influenzae strains: 41 in MEF from children with AOM treatment failure (group MEF), 43 in NP samples from healthy children (NP group 1), 88 in NP samples from children with a first AOM episode (NP group 2, n = 43) or recurrent (NP group 3, n = 45) and 44 in NP samples from children with AOM associated with conjunctivitis (NP group 4). Results At all, 106/216 (49%) H. influenzae strains produced biofilm as did 26/43 (60.5%) in NP samples from healthy children. Biofilm production in MEF samples and NP samples did not significantly differ (40.5% vs 60.5%, 55.8%, 56.8% and 31.1% for NP groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively). On multivariate analysis, only presence of conjunctivitis was significantly associated with low biofilm production (OR = 0.3, CI [0.16-0.60], p = 0.001). The ampicillin resistance of H. influenzae produced by penicillin-binding protein modification was significantly associated with low biofilm production (p = 0.029). Conclusion We found no association of biofilm production and AOM treatment failure or recurrence. Biofilm production was low from H. influenzae strains associated with conjunctivitis-otitis syndrome

  8. Clinical, functional, and surgical findings in chronic bilateral otitis media with effusion in childhood.

    PubMed

    Diacova, Svetlana; McDonald, Thomas J; Ababii, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a prospective, observational study over a 3-year period to compare the clinical, functional, and surgical findings in children with chronic bilateral otitis media with effusion who underwent one of three different types of treatment. Our study population was made up of 150 patients-79 boys and 71 girls aged 24 to 84 months-who were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups of 50 patients each. One group was treated with myringotomy, tympanostomy tube insertion, and adenoidectomy (T+A group); another with a combination of physical conservative treatment and adenoidectomy (P+A group); and the third with physical conservative treatment alone (P-only group). Hearing levels and tympanogram trends were evaluated during a follow-up of 12 months. In the T+A group, we noted a stable normalization of hearing in 95 of the 100 ears. Treatment with the P+A combination resulted in an improvement of hearing in 79 ears, but the improvement was maintained in only 27 ears during 12 months of follow-up. In the group with the P-only regimen, an amelioration of hearing was registered in 76 ears, but it was unstable in all cases. A type A tympanogram was maintained during the follow-up period for 2 ears in the P+A group and for 4 ears in the P-only group. Myringotomy with a detailed examination of the tympanic cavity in all ears with prolonged abnormal audiologic results revealed that types C and B tympanograms, which were found in most ears in the P+A and P-only groups, corresponded to middle ear chronic inflammatory changes (retraction pockets, granulations, adhesions, etc.) Based on our findings, we conclude that the use of a physical conservative treatment with or without an adenoidectomy does not prevent the development of chronic adhesive and purulent otitis media. PMID:27551851

  9. The Efficacy of Adjuvant Intratympanic Steroid Treatment for Otitis Media with Effusion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Hazem Saeed; El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Elfeky, Alaa Eldin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a leading cause of hearing impairment in children. Therefore, early and proper management is essential. Objectives  The objective of this research is to assess the efficacy of intratympanic (IT) steroids injection for management of otitis media with effusion (OME). Methods  This study involved 42 children (84 ears) with bilateral OME. We used tympanometry to confirm the childreńs middle ear effusion and pure tone audiometry to determine hearing threshold. We performed myringotomy and inserted ventilation tubes (VTs) bilaterally, followed by a steroid injection of 0.4–0.6 mL methylprednisolone (40 mg/mL) into one randomly selected middle ear. This procedure was followed by once-weekly administration of steroids (0.5 mL methylprednisolone at a concentration of 40 mg/mL) into the middle ear for three consecutive weeks. Results  We found recurrent OME after VT alone in nine (21.4%) ears; whereas, after VT combined with steroid administration, we found two (4.76%), with statistically significant difference. We noted tympanosclerosis postoperatively in six (12.9%) ears and in one of the injected ears (2.3%) (p = 0.0484). Otorrhea occurred in eight (19%) ears with VT alone and in three (7.1%) injected ears, with non-significant difference. The duration between VT insertion and its extrusion was 6.6 = 1.1 months for ears with VT alone and 6.95 =1.12 months in injected ears (p = 0.1541 NS). Conclusion  IT Steroids injection for treatment of OME is a safe and simple intervention with lower incidence of symptoms recurrence and postoperative complications. Thus, its use in management of OME is recommended.

  10. HIF-VEGF pathways are critical for chronic otitis media in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Michael T; Tyrer, Hayley E; Williams, Debbie; Hough, Tertius A; Pathak, Paras; Romero, Maria R; Hilton, Helen; Bali, Sulzhan; Parker, Andrew; Vizor, Lucie; Purnell, Tom; Vowell, Kate; Wells, Sara; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Potter, Paul K; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-10-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the commonest cause of hearing loss in children, yet the underlying genetic pathways and mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Ventilation of the middle ear with tympanostomy tubes is the commonest surgical procedure in children and the best treatment for chronic OME, but the mechanism by which they work remains uncertain. As hypoxia is a common feature of inflamed microenvironments, moderation of hypoxia may be a significant contributory mechanism. We have investigated the occurrence of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) mediated responses in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutant models, which develop spontaneous chronic otitis media. We found that Jeff and Junbo mice labeled in vivo with pimonidazole showed cellular hypoxia in inflammatory cells in the bulla lumen, and in Junbo the middle ear mucosa was also hypoxic. The bulla fluid inflammatory cell numbers were greater and the upregulation of inflammatory gene networks were more pronounced in Junbo than Jeff. Hif-1α gene expression was elevated in bulla fluid inflammatory cells, and there was upregulation of its target genes including Vegfa in Junbo and Jeff. We therefore investigated the effects in Junbo of small-molecule inhibitors of VEGFR signaling (PTK787, SU-11248, and BAY 43-9006) and destabilizing HIF by inhibiting its chaperone HSP90 with 17-DMAG. We found that both classes of inhibitor significantly reduced hearing loss and the occurrence of bulla fluid and that VEGFR inhibitors moderated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the inflamed middle ear mucosa. The effectiveness of HSP90 and VEGFR signaling inhibitors in suppressing OM in the Junbo model implicates HIF-mediated VEGF as playing a pivotal role in OM pathogenesis. Our analysis of the Junbo and Jeff mutants highlights the role of hypoxia and HIF-mediated pathways, and we conclude that targeting molecules in HIF-VEGF signaling pathways has therapeutic potential in the treatment of chronic OM. PMID

  11. Altered Expression of Middle and Inner Ear Cytokines in Mouse Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, Carol J.; Pillers, De-Ann M.; Pang, Jiaqing; Kempton, J. Beth; Trune, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The inner ear is at risk for sensorineural hearing loss in both acute and chronic otitis media (OM), but the underlying mechanisms underlying sensorineural hearing loss are unknown. Previous gene expression array studies showed cytokine genes might be upregulated in the cochleas of mice with acute and chronic otitis media. This implies that the inner ear could manifest a direct inflammatory response to OM that may cause sensorineural damage. Therefore, to better understand inner ear cytokine gene expression during OM, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed on mouse models to evaluate middle and inner ear inflammatory and remodeling cytokines. Study Design Basic science experiment. Methods An acute OM model was created in Balb/c mice by a transtympanic injection of S. pneumoniae in one ear; the other ear used as a control. C3H/HeJ mice were screened for unilateral chronic OM with the non-infected ear serving as control. Results Both acute and chronic OM caused both the middle ear and inner tissues in these two mouse models to over express numerous cytokine genes related to tissue remodeling (TNFα, FGF, BMP) and angiogenesis (VEGF), as well as inflammatory cell proliferation (IL-1α,β, IL-2, IL-6). Immunohistochemistry confirmed that both the middle ear and inner ear tissues expressed these cytokines. Conclusion Cochlear tissues are capable of expressing cytokine mRNA that contributes to the inflammation and remodeling that occur in association with middle ear disease. This provides a potential molecular basis for the transient and permanent sensorineural hearing loss often reported with acute and chronic OM. Level of Evidence N/A PMID:21271590

  12. Impact of Educational Program on the Management of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media among Children

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed Yousef, Yousseria; Abo El-Magd, Essam A.; El-Asheer, Osama M.; Kotb, Safaa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) remains one of the most common childhood chronic infectious diseases worldwide, affecting diverse racial and cultural groups in both developing and industrialized countries. Aim of the Study. This study aimed to assess the impact of educational program on the management of children with CSOM. Subjects and Methods. An experimental study design was used. This study included 100 children of both sexes of 2 years and less of age with CSOM. Those children were divided into 3 groups: group I: it involved 50 children with CSOM (naive) who received the designed educational program; control group: it involved 50 children who were under the traditional treatment and failed to respond; group II: those children in the control group were given the educational program and followed up in the same way as group I and considered as group II. Tools of the Study. Tool I is a structured questionnaire interview sheet for mothers. It consists of four parts: (1) personal and sociodemographic characteristics of child and (2) data about risk factors of otitis media (3) assessment of maternal practice about care of children with suppurative otitis medi (4) diagnostic criteria for suppurative otitis media. Tool II is the educational program: an educational program was developed by the researchers based on the knowledge and practices needs. This study was carried out through a period of 9 months starting from September 2013 to May 2014. The educational program was implemented for mothers of children with CSOM in the form of 5 scheduled sessions at the time of diagnosis, after one week, 1, 3, and 6 months. Results. There were significant differences between children who received the educational program and control group regarding the response to treatment after one and 3 months. The percentages of complete cure increased progressively 32%, 60%, and 84% after 1, 3, and 6 months in group I while they were 24%, 44%, and 64% in group II

  13. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid is ineffective at preventing otitis media in children with presumed viral upper respiratory infection: a randomized, double-blind equivalence, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Autret-Leca, Elisabeth; Giraudeau, Bruno; Ployet, Marie Joseph; Jonville-Béra, Annie-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Aims To assess the equivalence of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and placebo in the prevention of acute otitis media in children at high risk of acute otitis media who develop upper respiratory tract infection. Methods This was a multicentre, equivalence, randomized, double-blind trial of two parallel groups comparing 5 days of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 75 mg kg−1 day−1 (i.e. 25 mg kg−1 every 8 h) and placebo. The main outcome measure was acute otitis media occurring within 8–12 days of initiating treatment. Results Two hundred and three infants, aged 3 months−3 years with upper respiratory tract infection over 36 h and a history of recurrent acute otitis media were included over 8.5 months. Two children were lost to follow-up. Patient characteristics were similar in both groups. In the intention to treat analysis the frequency of acute otitis media was 16.2% (16/99) in the placebo group and 9.6% (10/104) in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid group (P= 0.288). The difference between acute otitis media rates was 6.6% (one-sided 95% confidence interval of 14.3%). The occurrence of side-effects was similar in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and placebo groups. Conclusions The difference in effectiveness between antibiotic and placebo was not greater than 14.3%, and we calculated that 94 children would need to be exposed to antibiotics to avoid six cases of acute otitis media. In view of the risk of development of resistance due to frequent exposure to antibiotics, our study supports the need for reduction in the administration of antibiotics in upper respiratory tract infection even in children at high risk of acute otitis media. PMID:12492614

  14. Isolation of Alloiococcus otitidis from Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Ashhurst-Smith, Christopher; Hall, Sharron T; Walker, Paul; Stuart, John; Hansbro, Philip M; Blackwell, C Caroline

    2007-10-01

    During the last decade Alloiococcus otitidis has been identified in specimens from patients with chronic otitis media with effusion. Whereas most of those studies employed molecular techniques, we used minor modifications of conventional microbiological methods to isolate and identify A. otitidis in samples obtained from 20/50 (40%) children referred for myringotomy. Alloiococcus otitidis was isolated from 10/22 (45%) Indigenous and 10/28 (36%) non-Indigenous children. This is the first report of isolation of A. otitidis from Australian children with chronic otitis media. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin, but 14/20 (70%) of the isolates were resistant or partially resistant to erythromycin as assessed by the E-test. PMID:17666076

  15. [Effect of recombinant interleukin-1 beta on microbial flora of the middle ear in patients with chronic purulent otitis media].

    PubMed

    Riazantsev, S V; Chernushevich, I I

    2000-01-01

    Betaleukin was given to 60 patients with various forms of otitis media purulenta chronica (OMPC). Symptoms of the purulent exacerbation were relieved in 43.3% of the patients, the clinical course improved in 18.3%. No response was achieved in 40% of the treated patients. Betaleukin proved highly effective in management of exacerbations of uncomplicated OMPC though it has no direct antimicrobial activity. PMID:10846490

  16. Multiple Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes in Aural Discharge Samples from Children with Acute Otitis Media with Spontaneous Otorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Turner, Katy M. E.; Sikora, Paulina; Gould, Katherine; Hinds, Jason; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Januário, Luís

    2013-01-01

    Among 55 children with cultures positive for acute otitis media with spontaneous otorrhea, 28 (51%) had cultures positive for aural Streptococcus pneumoniae, and in 10 of these, two distinct strains were detected, in which 5 had pairs of strains that were both capsule-bearing serotypes. Such cases were more likely to have cultures positive for other otopathogens than those with only one pneumococcus present. PMID:23885003

  17. OTO-201: Nonclinical Assessment of a Sustained-Release Ciprofloxacin Hydrogel for the Treatment of Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobo; Fernandez, Rayne; Tsivkovskaia, Natalia; Harrop-Jones, Anne; Hou, Huiying J.; Dellamary, Luis; Dolan, David F.; Altschuler, Richard A.; LeBel, Carl; Piu, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis OTO-201 can provide sustained release to the middle ear and effectively treat otitis media, when compared with FDA-approved ciprofloxacin otic drop formulations. Background There is an unmet medical need for antibiotic therapy that can provide a full course of treatment from a single administration by an otolaryngologist at the time of tympanostomy tube placement, obviating the need for twice daily multiday treatment with short-acting otic drops. Methods Studies in guinea pigs and chinchillas were conducted. OTO-201 was administered as a single intratympanic injection and compared with the twice daily multi-day treatment with Ciprodex or Cetraxal otic drops. Results OTO-201 demonstrated sustained release of ciprofloxacin in the middle ear compartment for days to approximately 2 weeks depending on the dose. The substantial Cmax values and steady drug exposure yielded by OTO-201 were in contrast to the pulsatile short lasting exposure seen with Ciprodex and Cetraxal. OTO-201 was also effective in a preclinical chinchilla model of Streptococcus pneumoniae–induced otitis media. The degree of cure was comparable to that afforded by Ciprodex and Cetraxal. There was no evidence of middle or inner ear pathology in guinea pigs treated with OTO-201, unlike Ciprodex and Cetraxal, which both demonstrated mild cochlear ototoxicity. No adverse effects of the poloxamer 407 vehicle were noted. Conclusion Intratympanic injection of OTO-201 constitutes an attractive treatment option to twice daily multiday dosing with ciprofloxacin ear drops for the treatment of otitis media, as evidenced by superior middle ear drug exposure, efficacy in an acute otitis media model, safety of administration, and convenience of a single dose regimen. PMID:24518407

  18. Use of Transrenal DNA for the Diagnosis of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis in Children: a Case of Tubercular Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Petrucci, Roberta; Corsini, Ilaria; Visciotti, Francesca; Pirodda, Antonio; Cazzato, Salvatore; Landini, Maria Paola; Dal Monte, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is difficult in children, especially for smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB, which are common at this age. We report an 11-year-old girl with TB otitis media with negative smear microscopy and Xpert MTB/RIF but positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific transrenal DNA (Tr-MTB-DNA) test results and culture for M. tuberculosis. PMID:25339389

  19. Determinants of Change in Air-Bone Gap and Bone Conduction in Patients Operated on for Chronic Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Wiatr, Maciej; Wiatr, Agnieszka; Składzień, Jacek; Stręk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Background Middle ear surgery aims to eliminate pathology from the middle ear, improve drainage and ventilation of the postoperative cavity, and reconstruct the tympanic membrane and ossicles. The aim of this work is to define the factors that affect ABG (air-bone gap) and bone conduction in the patients operated on due to chronic otitis media. Material/Methods A prospective analysis of patients operated on due to diseases of the middle ear during 2009–2012 was carried out. The cases of patients operated on for the first time due to chronic otitis media were analyzed. The analysis encompassed patients who had undergone middle ear surgery. The patients were divided into several groups taking into account the abnormalities of the middle ear mucous and damage of the ossicular chain observed during otosurgery. Results A significant hearing improvement was observed in patients with type 2 tympanoplasty in the course of chronic cholesteatoma otitis media and in patients with simple chronic inflammatory process in whom a PORP was used in the reconstruction. Granulation tissue was an unfavorable factor of hearing improvement following tympanoplasty. A significant improvement of bone conduction was observed in the patients with dry perforation without other lesions in the middle ear. The elimination of granulation lesions was a positive factor for the future improvement of the function of the inner ear. Conclusions The presence of granuloma-related lesions in the middle ear spaces is likely to impede hearing improvement. Damage to the ossicular chain rules out the possibility of bone conduction improvement after surgery. The prognosis on tube-related simple chronic otitis media after myringoplasty, with the preserved continuity of the ossicular chain, consists of closing the ABG and leads to significant improvement of bone conduction. PMID:26259623

  20. Formulation of Thermosensitive in situ Otic Gel for Topical Management of Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Shau, P. A.; Dangre, P. V.; Potnis, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics and antiinflammatory agents are the primary and main therapeutic categories in the treatment of otitis media. One of the simpler and feasible approaches of minimizing the problem of repeated use and subsequent resistance is development of sustained release formulation. Therefore, the present investigation aimed to develop a sustained release in situ gel formulation containing combination of broad spectrum antibiotic and antiinflammatory agents for the management of otits media. The prolonged release is achieved by phase transition of Poloxamer 407 (in situ) from sol to gel at a physiological temperature in combination with viscosity imparting agent Natrasol 250 and Klucel HF. The formulation P3N3 (19% w/v Poloxamer 407, 1.5% w/v Natrasol 250) and P3K3 (19% w/v Poloxamer 407, 1.5% w/v Klucel HF) showed mucoadhesive strength 37.17±0.32×103 and 38.12±0.13×103 dyne/cm2, respectively, and gel strength 2.1 and 2 cm, respectively. Both these formulations indicated good drug content and viscosity besides a good gelling ability. The in vitro diffusion has demonstrated prolongation of release of both the drugs over a period of 8 h. PMID:26997706

  1. Otitis media in a population of black American and white American infants, 0-2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Casselbrant, M L; Mandel, E M; Kurs-Lasky, M; Rockette, H E; Bluestone, C D

    1995-08-01

    To determine the incidence of otitis media (OM) and the bacteriology of acute otitis media (AOM) in a clinic population of young children in Pittsburgh, 138 black infants and 60 white infants were followed from birth to 2 years of age, examined at monthly intervals and whenever an upper respiratory tract infection (URI) or OM intervened. By 24 months of age the cumulative incidence of episodes of AOM was 43% and 42%, and of episodes of middle-ear effusion (MEE) was 86% and 85% in black and white infants, respectively. The average rate of episodes of AOM was 0.41 and 0.39 and of episodes of MEE was 1.68 and 1.70 in black and white infants, respectively. Tympanocentesis was performed for episodes of AOM and the following organisms were isolated from black and white infants, respectively: Streptococcus pneumoniae 43% and 43% of episodes; Moraxella catarrhalis 24% and 24%; non-typable Haemophilus influenzae 18% and 24%; and Haemophilus influenzae type b 5% and 0%. In both black and white infants first born children had less ear disease. We found no difference in the incidence of otitis media during the first 2 years of life between black and white infants. PMID:7558637

  2. Surgical approaches to treating otitis media in the only hearing ear of patients with contralateral hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jun; Chen, Wenwen; Deng, Yaxin; Cai, Xunhua; Shan, Liang; Du, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the surgical procedures used to treat the only hearing ears of two patient cohorts diagnosed with otitis media in the last twenty years. Clinical, surgical, and follow-up data of 15 patients with otitis media in the only hearing ear who underwent middle ear surgery prior to 2000 (Cohort A) and 13 patients with a similar condition (Cohort B) who underwent middle ear surgery between 2000 and 2013 were retrospectively collected, analyzed, and compared. Mean preoperative air conduction (AC) and bone conduction of the patients in Cohort B was 61 ± 18.7 and 20 ± 15.7 dBHL, respectively. Mean preoperative and postoperative air bone gap was 43.21 ± 13.2 dBHL and 12.66 ± 3.93 dBHL, respectively. The success rate of the surgical procedures in this patient cohort was 85%. Surgery of the only hearing ear in patients with otitis media is safe and effective if performed carefully. PMID:26309687

  3. Can trained nurses exclude acute otitis media with tympanometry or acoustic reflectometry in symptomatic children?

    PubMed Central

    Tähtinen, Paula A.; Ruuskanen, Olli; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Ruohola, Aino

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since acute otitis media (AOM) is the most prevalent bacterial infection in young children, the reliable exclusion of AOM by nurses might save physicians’ time for other duties. The study aim was to determine whether nurses without otoscopic experience can reliably use tympanometry or spectral gradient acoustic reflectometry (SG-AR) to exclude AOM. Design Three nurses were trained, who performed examinations with tympanometry and SG-AR. Pneumatic otoscopy by the study physician served as the diagnostic standard. Setting Study clinic at primary health care level. Patients. 281 children 6–35 months of age. Main outcome measures Predictive values (with 95% confidence interval) for tympanometry and SG-AR, and the clinical usefulness, i.e. the proportion of visits where nurses obtained the exclusive test result from both ears of the child. Results At 459 visits, the negative predictive value of type A and C1 tympanograms (tympanometric peak pressure >–200 daPa) was 94% (91–97%). Based on type A and C1 tympanograms, the nurse could exclude AOM at 94/459 (20%) of visits. The negative predictive value of SG-AR level 1 result (>95°) was 94% (89–97%). Based on the SG-AR level 1 result, the nurse could exclude AOM at 36/459 (8%) of visits. Conclusion Type A and C1 tympanograms and SG-AR level 1 results obtained by nurses are reliable test results in excluding AOM. However, the clinical usefulness of these test results is limited by their rarity. Type A and C1 tympanograms were obtained by nurses from both ears of the child only at one-fifth of the symptomatic visits.Key PointsAcute otitis media (AOM) is the most prevalent bacterial infection in young children. Nurses’ role in excluding AOM is unknown.Type A and C1 tympanograms (tympanometric peak pressure >–200 daPa) obtained by nurses are reliable test results in excluding AOM.With type A and C1 tympanograms, nurses could exclude AOM only at one-fifth of the symptomatic visits.The clinical usefulness

  4. Unraveling the genetics of otitis media: from mouse to human and back again.

    PubMed

    Rye, Marie S; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Cheeseman, Michael T; Burgner, David; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Brown, Steve D M; Jamieson, Sarra E

    2011-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is among the most common illnesses of early childhood, characterised by the presence of inflammation in the middle ear cavity. Acute OM and chronic OM with effusion (COME) affect the majority of children by school age and have heritability estimates of 40-70%. However, the majority of genes underlying this susceptibility are, as yet, unidentified. One method of identifying genes and pathways that may contribute to OM susceptibility is to look at mouse mutants displaying a comparable phenotype. Single-gene mouse mutants with OM have identified a number of genes, namely, Eya4, Tlr4, p73, MyD88, Fas, E2f4, Plg, Fbxo11, and Evi1, as potential and biologically relevant candidates for human disease. Recent studies suggest that this "mouse-to-human" approach is likely to yield relevant data, with significant associations reported between polymorphisms at the FBXO11, TLR4, and PAI1 genes and disease in humans. An association between TP73 and chronic rhinosinusitis has also been reported. In addition, the biobanks of available mouse mutants provide a powerful resource for functional studies of loci identified by future genome-wide association studies of OM in humans. Mouse models of OM therefore are an important component of current approaches attempting to understand the complex genetic susceptibility to OM in humans, and which aim to facilitate the development of preventative and therapeutic interventions for this important and common disease. PMID:21107580

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatment Options for Otitis Media: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Marom, Tal; Marchisio, Paola; Tamir, Sharon Ovnat; Torretta, Sara; Gavriel, Haim; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) has numerous presentations in children. Together with conventional medical therapies aimed to prevent and/or treat OM, a rising number of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment options can be offered. Since OM is common in children, parents may ask healthcare professionals about possible CAM therapies. Many physicians feel that their knowledge is limited regarding these therapies, and that they desire some information. Therefore, we conducted a literature review of CAM therapies for OM, taking into account that many of these treatments, their validity and efficacy and have not been scientifically demonstrated.We performed a search in MEDLINE (accessed via PubMed) using the following terms: "CAM" in conjunction with "OM" and "children. Retrieved publications regarding treatment of OM in children which included these terms included randomized controlled trials, prospective/retrospective studies, and case studies.The following CAM options for OM treatment in children were considered: acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine/phytotherapy, osteopathy, chiropractic, xylitol, ear candling, vitamin D supplement, and systemic and topical probiotics. We reviewed each treatment and described the level of scientific evidence of the relevant publications.The therapeutic approaches commonly associated with CAM are usually conservative, and do not include drugs or surgery. Currently, CAM is not considered by physicians a potential treatment of OM, as there is limited supporting evidence. Further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the potential value of CAM therapies for OM. PMID:26871802

  6. The Efficacy of Nasal Steroids in Treatment of Otitis Media with Effusion: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Khazbak, Alaa Omar; Sayed, Ahmad Ebrahim El; Hassan, Mohammad Ramadan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Otitis media with effusion (OME) continues to be an important pediatric clinical problem, and more studies are needed to decide the proper treatment for it. Objective To assess the efficacy of nasal steroids in the management of OME by comparing its results with that of oral steroid and that of nasal saline spray as placebo. Methods This study was carried on 60 patients with OME who were divided into three groups: in group 1, 20 patients received mometasone furoate spray, one puff in each nostril daily, for 3 months; in group 2, 20 patients received oral prednisolone, 5 mg three times per day for the first 3 weeks; in group 3, 20 patients received nasal saline spray, one puff in each nostril daily for 3 months. Results A highly significant difference between systemic or topical (nasal spray) steroid therapy and saline nasal spray was detected (p < 0.001), and the difference between systemic and topical steroid was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Nasal steroid spray can be used as an effective treatment for OME, giving a significant result similar to systemic steroid. Further studies are needed to investigate its use for longer duration and in recurrent cases. PMID:26491474

  7. Volumetric Changes in the Bony External Auditory Canal in Unilateral Chronic Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Noh, MinHo; Park, Seung Bum; Park, Kye Hoon; Han, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hyun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Pneumatization of air cells in the mastoid bone is decreased in chronic otitis media (COM). A decrease in the size of the external auditory canal (EAC) is also found frequently in patients with COM, but this has been little studied. We compared the size of affected bony EACs and the contralateral side in patients with single-side COM using high-resolution computed tomography. Subjects and Methods In total, 99 patients with single-side COM were included. Four indicators related to the size of the bony EAC and IAC were measured using high-resolution computed tomography: the axial and coronal lengths of the tympanic membrane, the length of the isthmus, and the area of the bony ear canal. We also compared both internal auditory canals as negative controls. These assessments were made by radiologists who were blinded to the objective of this study. Results In patients with single-side COM, the axial length of the tympanic membrane was significantly shorter than normal, and the volume of the EAC was also significantly smaller. The length of the isthmus of the EAC was shorter on the affected side, but the difference was not significant. The IAC volume showed no difference between the two sides. Conclusions COM affects general temporal bony development, including the bony EAC and mastoid bone. Therefore, whether to correct this should be considered when preparing for COM surgery. PMID:27144233

  8. Ten-Year Study of Acute Otitis Media in Rochester, NY.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    This review summarizes a prospective, longitudinal 10-year study in Rochester, NY, involving 760 children where virtually all clinically diagnosed acute otitis media (AOM) was confirmed by bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. This review describes detection of otopathogens in middle ear fluid, nasopharyngeal (NP) otopathogen colonization patterns, AOM risk factor analysis, biomarkers of AOM and antibody responses to NP colonization by otopathogens. After licensure of PCV13, there was an immediate drop in AOM caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) vaccine serotypes and shortly thereafer an increase in nonvaccine types 16, 21 and 35B. When NP co-colonization occurred, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) predominated over Spn to cause AOM, and NTHi and Spn both predominated over Moraxella catarrhalis. Transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells identified unique signatures for NTHi AOM compared with Spn AOM. Elevation of 3 cytokines in serum (S100A12, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and interleukin 10) accurately predicted the presence and recovery from AOM and the likely otopathogen. NP colonization was an immunizing event. PMID:27182898

  9. Microbiology of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media in a Tertiary Care Setup of Uttarakhand State, India

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Rajat; Juyal, Deepak; Negi, Vikrant; Pal, Shekhar; Adekhandi, Shamanth; Sharma, Munesh; Sharma, Neelam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a notorious infection and a major health problem in developing countries causing serious local damage and threatening complications. Early and effective treatment based on the knowledge of causative micro-organisms and their antimicrobial sensitivity ensures prompt clinical recovery and possible complications can thus be avoided. Aims: The aim of this study was to isolate the organisms associated with CSOM and to detect the antibiogram of the aerobic isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 204 patients clinically diagnosed of CSOM were enrolled in the study and the samples were obtained from each patient using sterile cotton swabs and cultured for microbial flora. Drug susceptibility testing for aerobic isolates was conducted using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: The most common causative organisms isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (48.69%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.89%) amongst the 191 aerobic isolates. Anaerobes accounted for 29.41% of the isolates while 12.25% were fungi. Antimicrobial profile of aerobic isolates revealed maximum sensitivity to amikacin (95.5%), ceftriaxone (83.4%) and gentamicin (82.7%). Conclusion: Knowing the etiological agents of CSOM and their antimicrobial susceptibility is of essential importance for an efficient treatment, prevention of both complications and development of antibiotic resistance and finally, the reduction of the treatment costs. PMID:23724403

  10. Chronic Otitis Media Resulting in Aortic Valve Replacement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Guler, Adem; Sahin, Mehmet Ali; Gurkan Yesil, Fahri; Yildizoglu, Uzeyir; Demirkol, Sait; Arslan, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve is known to be the most common congenital cardiac malformation, with an approximate incidence rate of 1-2% in the general population. Most patients are unaware of the disease until the onset of infective endocarditis, which is a life-threatening complication that may affect a heart valve or other cardiac structures at the site of endothelial damage. A 22-year-old man presented to our internal medicine clinic with a complaint of acute onset dyspnea and fatigue. His body temperature was 38 (°)C. A diastolic murmur was detected at the right sternal border. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography revealed severe aortic insufficiency, and two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography showed that the aortic valve was bicuspid. There was also a flail lesion extending the left ventricular outflow tract, resulting in pathological coaptation and severe aortic insufficiency. The patient was referred to our cardiovascular department for surgery. We herein present this case of a bicuspid aortic valve complicated by infective endocarditis due to the underlying disease of chronic otitis media related to a rare pathogen: Alloiococcus otitidis. The patient underwent a successful aortic valve replacement surgery due to aortic insufficiency following infective endocarditis. He was discharged on the 16(th) postoperative day in good condition. PMID:26110009

  11. The inflammasome adaptor ASC contributes to multiple innate immune processes in the resolution of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Kurabi, Arwa; Lee, Jasmine; Wong, Chelsea; Pak, Kwang; Hoffman, Hal M; Ryan, Allen F; Wasserman, Stephen I

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to understand the contribution of the inflammasome and IL-1β activation in otitis media (OM). We examined the middle ear (ME) response to non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) in wild type (WT) mice using gene microarrays and a murine model of acute OM. Expression of members of the NOD domain-like receptor family of inflammasome genes was significantly up-regulated early in NTHi infection of the ME, potentially activating specific downstream regulatory cascades that contribute to the proliferative inflammatory response observed during OM. Expression of the pro-forms of the inflammasome targets IL-1β and IL-18 were also up-regulated. To evaluate the role of inflammasome-mediated cytokine maturation, NTHi-induced OM was examined in Asc(-/-)-deficient mice and compared with that seen in WT mice. Mice lacking the Asc gene showed near absence of IL-1β maturation in the ME and a reduction in leukocyte recruitment and infiltration to the cavity, and their macrophages exhibited reduced phagocytosis of NTHi. These inflammatory defects were linked to an increase in the degree and duration of mucosal epithelial hyperplasia in the ME of Asc(-/-) mice, as well as a delay in bacterial clearance from their MEs. These data demonstrate an important role for the inflammasome and cytokine processing in the course and resolution of OM. PMID:24652041

  12. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children. PMID:24889648

  13. Expression of inflammatory mediators in the otitis media induced by Helicobacter pylori antigen in mice.

    PubMed

    Kariya, S; Okano, M; Fukushima, K; Nomiya, S; Kataoka, Y; Nomiya, R; Akagi, H; Nishizaki, K

    2008-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that is recognized as one of the key factors in gastric diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Recent studies have shown relationships between H. pylori and extra-digestive diseases, and the presence of H. pylori in the middle ear and upper respiratory tract has been reported. However, the role of H. pylori in middle ear disease remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that H. pylori whole-cell protein directly induces macrophage migration inhibitory factor, macrophage inflammatory protein 2, interleukin 1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha in middle ear epithelium in mice, and severe proliferation of inflammatory cells was observed in middle ear cavity inoculated with H. pylori whole-cell protein. In addition, trans-tympanic injection of macrophage migration inhibitory factor up-regulated expression of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 in the middle ear. These findings indicate that H. pylori infection causes immunological inflammation in middle ear epithelium, and H. pylori may play a significant role in otitis media. PMID:18727622

  14. Polymorphisms of Immunity Genes and Susceptibility to Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Jennings, Kristofer; Matalon, Reuben; Block, Stan; Patel, Janak A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute otitis media (OM) is a common disease which often develops through complex interactions between the host, the pathogen and environmental factors. We studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity, and other host and environmental factors for their role in OM. Methods Using Sequenom Massarray platform, 21 SNPs were studied in 653 children from prospective (n = 202) and retrospective (n = 451) cohorts. Data were analyzed for the relationship between SNPs and upper respiratory infection (URI) frequency, risk of acute OM during URI episodes, and proneness to recurrent OM. Results Increased risk for OM proneness was associated with CX3CR1 (Thr280Met) SNP and with a jointly interactive group of IL-10 (−1082) SNP, IL-1β (−511) wild type genotype and white race. Family history of OM proneness independently increased the risk for frequent URIs, OM occurrence during URI, and OM proneness. Additionally, IL-1β (−31) SNP was associated with increased risk for frequent URIs, but IL-10 (−592), IL-1β (−511), IL-5 (−746) and IL-8 (−251) SNPs were associated with decreased risk of URI. Conclusion IL-1β (−31), CX3CR1 (Thr280Met), IL-10 (−1082) and IL-1β (−511) SNPs were associated with increased risk for frequent URIs or OM proneness. PMID:24718616

  15. Shepard grommet tympanostomy tube complications in children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Huseyin; Yilmaz, Suleyman; Alkan, Nihal; Subasi, Bugra; Guclu, Ender; Ozturk, Ozcan

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine tympanostomy tube complications in children with chronic otitis media with effusion who were treated with Shepard grommet tympanostomy tube insertion. This tube type was selected as it is the most commonly used one in our clinic. The medical records of 162 ears of 87 children (52 male and 35 female) were reviewed retrospectively. The children were between 3 to 16 years old (mean age = 8.1 +/- 3.1). The patients were followed up 6-66 months (mean 23.3 +/- 14.9 months) after tympanostomy tube insertion. We reviewed age, sex, time to tube extrusion and complications. In all patients the indication for surgery was chronic middle ear effusion. Otorrhea occurred in nine ears (5.6%). Granulation tissue was seen in two ears (1.2%). Complications after tympanostomy tube extrusion included myringosclerosis (34.6%), persistent perforation (5.6%), atrophy (23.5%), retraction (16.7%) and medial displacement of tubes (1.2%). The average extrusion time was 8.5 +/- 4.6 months (range 1-24) for Shepard grommet tympanostomy tubes. Complications of tympanostomy tube insertion are common. Myringosclerosis, tympanic membrane atrophy and otorrhea are the most frequently appearing complications. But they are generally insignificant and cosmetic. Consequently, in the majority of these complications there is no need for any management. PMID:20204390

  16. Adoption of Electronic Medical Record-Based Decision Support for Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Fiks, Alexander G; Zhang, Peixin; Localio, A Russell; Khan, Saira; Grundmeier, Robert W; Karavite, Dean J; Bailey, Charles; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Forrest, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    Objective Substantial investment in electronic health records (EHRs) has provided an unprecedented opportunity to use clinical decision support (CDS) to increase guideline adherence. To inform efforts to maximize adoption, we characterized the adoption of an otitis media (OM) CDS system, the impact of performance feedback on adoption, and the effects of adoption on guideline adherence. Study Setting A total of 41,391 OM visits with 108 clinicians at 16 pediatric practices between February 2009 and August 2010. Study Design Prospective cohort study of EHR-based CDS adoption during OM visits, comparing clinicians receiving performance feedback to none. CDS was available to all physicians; use was voluntary. Data Collection Extraction from a common EHR. Principal Findings Clinicians and practices used the CDS system for a mean of 21 percent (range: 0–85 percent) and 17 percent (0–51 percent) of eligible OM visits, respectively. Clinicians who received performance feedback reports summarizing CDS use and guideline adherence had a relative increase in CDS use of 9.0 percentage points compared to others (p = .001). CDS adoption was associated with increased OM guideline adherence. Effects were greatest among clinicians with the lowest adherence prior to the study. Conclusions Performance feedback increased CDS adoption, but additional strategies are needed to integrate CDS into primary care workflows. PMID:25287670

  17. Current concepts in the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Lisi, Christopher V; Gerring, Robert; Mittal, Jeenu; Mathee, Kalai; Narasimhan, Giri; Azad, Rajeev K; Yao, Qi; Grati, M'hamed; Yan, Denise; Eshraghi, Adrien A; Angeli, Simon I; Telischi, Fred F; Liu, Xue-Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Otitis media (OM) is an inflammation of the middle ear associated with infection. Despite appropriate therapy, acute OM (AOM) can progress to chronic suppurative OM (CSOM) associated with ear drum perforation and purulent discharge. The effusion prevents the middle ear ossicles from properly relaying sound vibrations from the ear drum to the oval window of the inner ear, causing conductive hearing loss. In addition, the inflammatory mediators generated during CSOM can penetrate into the inner ear through the round window. This can cause the loss of hair cells in the cochlea, leading to sensorineural hearing loss. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are the most predominant pathogens that cause CSOM. Although the pathogenesis of AOM is well studied, very limited research is available in relation to CSOM. With the emergence of antibiotic resistance as well as the ototoxicity of antibiotics and the potential risks of surgery, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutic strategies against CSOM. This warrants understanding the role of host immunity in CSOM and how the bacteria evade these potent immune responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to CSOM will help in designing novel treatment modalities against the disease and hence preventing the hearing loss. PMID:26248613

  18. Characterization of the T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    WANG, BING; CHENG, YING; XU, MIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential involvement of specific T-cell subpopulations in granulation tissue formation in chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Fifteen patients with CSOM were enrolled in this study. Granulation tissues were obtained from the middle ear cavity. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histopathological observation, and different T-cell subpopulations were characterized by immunohistochemistry. No evident association was identified between granulation tissue formation and disease course. The number of cluster of differentiation 8+ (CD8+) T cells, forkhead box P3+ (FOXP3+) regulatory T (Treg) cells and OX40+ T cells were significantly higher in granulation tissues from patients with ear discharge within the last 6 months compared to those without (P<0.05). Fresh granulation tissues had more CD8+ T cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells compared to the mature granulation tissues (P<0.05). There was a differential abundance of specific T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues in CSOM with different disease courses or with ear discharge, suggesting that T cell-mediated cellular immunity is involved in lesion formation of CSOM. PMID:27313854

  19. Nystagmus in patients with unilateral acute otitis media complicated by serous labyrinthitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hee; Yang, Young Soo; Im, Donghyuk; Shin, Jung Eun

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion The patients with serous labyrinthitis caused by acute otitis media (AOM) exhibited various patterns of nystagmus in which direction-fixed irritative-type nystagmus was the most common pattern. Differential effects on inner ear function by toxic or inflammatory mediators may be responsible for the various manifestation of nystagmus. Objective This study aimed to investigate nystagmus patterns in patients with serous labyrinthitis, and discuss possible mechanisms. Methods From October 2011 to March 2014, 13 consecutive patients with serous labyrinthitis were included. Eye movements of the patients were serially examined using video-nystagmography, and patterns of nystagmus were investigated. Results The most commonly observed pattern was direction-fixed nystagmus (nine of 13 patients). Of these, eight showed irritative-type, and one showed paretic-type. Direction of nystagmus, although the intensity gradually decreased, was not changed during the course of treatment. One patient showed direction-changing spontaneous nystagmus, which changed into paretic-type direction-fixed nystagmus 1 day after myringotomy. Three patients exhibited persistent direction-changing positional nystagmus in a supine head-roll test. Of them, two showed apogeotropic and one showed geotropic type. In all 13 patients, vertigo and hearing loss were improved after the treatment. PMID:26797398

  20. Evolution and Otitis Media: A Review, and a Model to Explain High Prevalence in Indigenous Populations.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mahmood F

    2015-04-01

    Otitis media (OM; inflammation of the middle ear) comprises a group of disorders that are among the most common disorders of childhood. OM is also heritable and has effects on fecundity. This means that OM is subject to evolution, yet the evolutionary forces that may determine susceptibility to OM have not been adequately explored. Here I analyze evolutionary forces that may determine susceptibility to middle ear inflammation. These forces include those affecting function of the middle ear, host immunity, or colonization by and pathogenicity of bacteria. I review existing evolutionary models of host-pathogen interaction and coevolution and apply these to better understand the complex evolutionary landscape of middle ear infection and inflammation in humans, including factors determining transition between stable evolutionary strategies for host and bacteria. This understanding is then applied to an analysis of OM in indigenous populations to devise a new theory for OM prevalence in Australian Aborigine, Native American, Inuit, and Maori populations. I suggest that high prevalence in such groups may have resulted from encounters of these previously isolated populations with European immigrants in the 15th and 16th centuries. This exposed them to new strains of bacteria to which their immune system had not evolved immunity, perturbing a previously stable host-pathogen coevolutionary state. PMID:26829293

  1. Payment analysis of two diagnosis and management approaches of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Casey, Janet R; Pichichero, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    We determined the cost of care for 2 diagnosis and management approaches for acute otitis media (AOM) among children 6 to 30 months old. A case-control design was used. Cases included 208 children diagnosed with AOM based on a bulging tympanic membrane (TM) and treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate. Controls (5:1 ratio) included 1020 children with AOM diagnosed not requiring bulging of the TM and treated with amoxicillin. Fewer cases (49%) than controls (69%) were diagnosed with AOM (P < .001), fewer were diagnosed with recurrent AOM or AOM treatment failure (0.34 vs 1.6/child; P < .0001), and fewer had insertion of tympanostomy tubes (6.3% vs 14.8%) due to recurrent AOM (P < .0001). The combined direct payments and indirect costs for management of AOM were $539/case versus $1,023/control. Using Rochester NY payments generalized to the US birth cohort, this case diagnosis and treatment strategy could save $1.008 billion per year. PMID:24817077

  2. Management of acute otitis media in children six months of age and older.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Nicole; Robinson, Joan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) continues to be a common infection in young children. Milder disease, usually due to viruses or less virulent bacteria, resolves equally quickly with or without antibiotics. A bulging tympanic membrane, especially if yellow or hemorrhagic, has a high sensitivity for AOM that is likely to be bacterial in origin and is a major diagnostic criterion for AOM. Perforation of the tympanic membrane with purulent discharge similarly indicates a bacterial cause. Immediate antibiotic treatment is recommended for children who are highly febrile (≥39°C), moderately to severely systemically ill or who have very severe otalgia, or have already been significantly ill for 48 h. For all other cases, parents can be provided with a prescription for antibiotics to fill if the child does not improve in 48 h or the child can be reassessed if this occurs. Amoxicillin remains the clear drug of choice. Ten days of therapy is appropriate for children <2 years of age, whereas older children can be treated for five days. PMID:26941560

  3. Mouse Models for the Study of Mucosal Vaccination Against Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Sabirov, Albert; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2008-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common infectious diseases in humans. The pathogenesis of OM involves nasopharyngeal colonization (NP) and retrograde ascension of the pathogen up the Eustachian tube into the middle ear (ME). Due to increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need for vaccines to prevent infections caused by the most common causes of bacterial OM, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Current vaccine strategies aim to diminish bacterial NP carriage, thereby reducing the likelihood of developing acute OM. To be effective, vaccination should induce local mucosal mmunity both in the ME and in the NP. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that the intranasal route of vaccination is particularly effective at inducing immune responses in the nasal passage and ME for protection against OM. The mouse is increasingly used in these models, because of the availability of murine reagents and the existence of technology to manipulate murine models of disease immunologically and genetically. Previous studies confirmed the suitability of the mouse as a model for inflammatory processes in acute OM. Here, we discuss various murine models of OM and review the applicability of these models to assess the efficacy of mucosal vaccination and the mechanisms responsible for protection. In addition, we discuss various mucosal vaccine antigens, mucosal adjuvants and mucosal delivery systems. PMID:18295938

  4. Auditory processing abilities in children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Khavarghazalani, Bahare; Farahani, Farhad; Emadi, Maryam; Hosseni Dastgerdi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion The study results indicate that children with a history of otitis media with effusion (OME) suffer from auditory processing disorder to some degree. The findings support the hypothesis that fluctuating hearing loss may affect central auditory processing during critical periods. Objectives Evidence suggests that prolonged OME in children can result in an auditory processing disorder, presumably because hearing has been disrupted during an important developmental period. A lack of auditory stimulation leads to the abnormal development of the hearing pathways in the brain. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of OME on binaural auditory function and auditory temporal processing. Method In the present study, the dichotic digit test (DDT) was used for binaural hearing, and the gap in noise (GIN) test was used to evaluate temporal hearing processing. Results The average values of GIN differed significantly between children with a history of OME and normal controls (p < 0.001). The mean values of the DDT score were significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.002). PMID:26881324

  5. Management of acute otitis media in children six months of age and older

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Nicole; Robinson, Joan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) continues to be a common infection in young children. Milder disease, usually due to viruses or less virulent bacteria, resolves equally quickly with or without antibiotics. A bulging tympanic membrane, especially if yellow or hemorrhagic, has a high sensitivity for AOM that is likely to be bacterial in origin and is a major diagnostic criterion for AOM. Perforation of the tympanic membrane with purulent discharge similarly indicates a bacterial cause. Immediate antibiotic treatment is recommended for children who are highly febrile (≥39°C), moderately to severely systemically ill or who have very severe otalgia, or have already been significantly ill for 48 h. For all other cases, parents can be provided with a prescription for antibiotics to fill if the child does not improve in 48 h or the child can be reassessed if this occurs. Amoxicillin remains the clear drug of choice. Ten days of therapy is appropriate for children <2 years of age, whereas older children can be treated for five days. PMID:26941560

  6. An evaluation of preoperative computed tomography on patients with chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Yildirim-Baylan, Muzeyyen; Ozmen, Cihan Akgul; Gun, Ramazan; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Akkuş, Zeki; Topcu, Ismail

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the veracity of computed tomography findings on patients undergoing surgery for chronic otitis media (COM) with the surgical findings, and to determine to what extent the preoperative computerized tomography (CT) findings are useful to the surgeon. A series of 56 patients with COM undergoing preoperative CT scanning followed by surgical exploration of the middle ear and mastoid. Operative notes were recorded and data collected on the nature of soft tissue masses, the status of the ossicles, presence or absence of facial canal dehiscence and semicircular canal (SCC) dehiscence and the presence or absence of dural plate erosion, and sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Fifty-six patients were recruited in the study, 30 males and 26 females. The age range was from 16 to 67 years with a mean of 26.51 ± 1.4 years. The preoperative CT scan imaging in cases of cholesteatoma, ossicular chain erosion and SCC dehiscence have good correlation with the intraoperative findings. The specificity of preoperative CT scan in detecting facial canal dehiscence, dural plate erosion and sigmoid sinus thrombosis in patient of COM were weak. Preoperative computed tomography evaluation is fairly useful especially in cases of cholesteatoma. According to the results of this study, CT is of value particularly in the definition of cholesteatoma, and in determining ossicular chain erosion and semicircular canal fistula. PMID:23449285

  7. Homeopathic Ear Drops as an Adjunct in Reducing Antibiotic Usage in Children With Acute Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine if use of a homeopathic ear drop preparation reduces antibiotic use in children diagnosed with acute otitis media (AOM). Methods. Children 6 months to 11 years old, diagnosed with AOM and managed with a delayed antibiotic approach, were randomized to standard therapy alone or standard therapy plus a homeopathic ear drop preparation. The primary outcome was whether or not the antibiotic prescription given at the index visit was filled during a 12- to 15-day follow-up period. Results. Among 210 enrolled children, follow-up antibiotic data were collected on 206. During the 12- to 15-day follow-up period, fewer parents of children randomized to the homeopathic ear drops group filled the antibiotic prescription compared with those of children receiving standard therapy alone (26.9% and 41.2%, respectively, P = .032). Conclusion. Homeopathic ear drops may be effective in reducing the use of antibiotics in children with AOM managed with a delayed antibiotic approach. PMID:27335917

  8. Otitis media in the Tgif knockout mouse implicates TGFβ signalling in chronic middle ear inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Tateossian, Hilda; Morse, Susan; Parker, Andrew; Mburu, Philomena; Warr, Nick; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Cheeseman, Michael; Wells, Sara; Brown, Steve D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of hearing loss in children and tympanostomy to alleviate the condition remains the commonest surgical intervention in children in the developed world. Chronic and recurrent forms of OM are known to have a very significant genetic component, however, until recently little was known of the underlying genes involved. The identification of mouse models of chronic OM has indicated a role of transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling and its impact on responses to hypoxia in the inflamed middle ear. We have, therefore, investigated the role of TGFβ signalling and identified and characterized a new model of chronic OM carrying a mutation in the gene for transforming growth interacting factor 1 (Tgif1). Tgif1 homozygous mutant mice have significantly raised auditory thresholds due to a conductive deafness arising from a chronic effusion starting at around 3 weeks of age. The OM is accompanied by a significant thickening of the middle ear mucosa lining, expansion of mucin-secreting goblet cell populations and raised levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, TNF-α and IL-1β in ear fluids. We also identified downstream effects on TGFβ signalling in middle ear epithelia at the time of development of chronic OM. Both phosphorylated SMAD2 and p21 levels were lowered in the homozygous mutant, demonstrating a suppression of the TGFβ pathway. The identification and characterization of the Tgif mutant supports the role of TGFβ signalling in the development of chronic OM and provides an important candidate gene for genetic studies in the human population. PMID:23459932

  9. Determinants of non-healing ear discharge in chronic suppurative otitis media in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Orji, Foster Tochukwu; Dike, Benjamin O; Oji, Onuoha

    2015-10-01

    The major burden of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is the embarrassing ear discharge which may last for few months to many years or even a lifetime with increasing risks of complications. We conducted this study to determine the risk factors for protracted non-healing ear discharge among CSOM patients. We carried out a retrospective analysis of non-cholesteatomatous CSOM patients treated in a tertiary hospital in a developing country. Comparison was made between 128 patients with ear discharge persisting beyond 24 months and 58 patients whose otorrhoea resolved within 6 months in terms of socio-demographic and other potential risk factors. Major risk factors identified by logistic regression analysis were rural residence, multidrug-resistant bacteria, and bilateral CSOM (P = <0.001, 0.001, and 0.008, respectively). Others were onset of ear discharge before the age of 10 years, diabetes mellitus, persistent rhinorrhoea, home >10 miles away from hospital, and >7 persons in a family (P = 0.012, 0.041, 0.013, 0.010, and 0.043, respectively). Age, sex, nasal allergy, and self-medication were not significant risk factors for non-healing ear discharge. Protracted non-healing ear discharge still remains a prominent feature of CSOM in our experience. Rural residence, multidrug resistance, bilateral CSOM, and long distance to health facilities are prime risk factors. Measures to address these risk factors to bring about a decline in the number of non-healing ear discharge among CSOM patients, especially in our rural communities, are urgently needed. PMID:25178414

  10. Otitis Media in Sperm-Associated Antigen 6 (Spag6)-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Boqin; Bai, Xiaohui; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing; Wang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian SPAG6 protein is localized to the axoneme central apparatus, and it is required for normal flagella and cilia motility. Recent studies demonstrated that the protein also regulates ciliogenesis and cilia polarity in the epithelial cells of brain ventricles and trachea. Motile cilia are also present in the epithelial cells of the middle ear and Eustachian tubes, where the ciliary system participates in the movement of serous fluid and mucus in the middle ear. Cilia defects are associated with otitis media (OM), presumably due to an inability to efficiently transport fluid, mucus and particles including microorganisms. We investigated the potential role of SPAG6 in the middle ear and Eustachian tubes by studying mice with a targeted mutation in the Spag6 gene. SPAG6 is expressed in the ciliated cells of middle ear epithelial cells. The orientation of the ciliary basal feet was random in the middle ear epithelial cells of Spag6-deficient mice, and there was an associated disrupted localization of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein, FZD6. These features are associated with disordered cilia orientation, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, which leads to uncoordinated cilia beating. The Spag6 mutant mice were also prone to develop OM. However, there were no significant differences in bacterial populations, epithelial goblet cell density, mucin expression and Eustachian tube angle between the mutant and wild-type mice, suggesting that OM was due to accumulation of fluid and mucus secondary to the ciliary dysfunction. Our studies demonstrate a role for Spag6 in the pathogenesis of OM in mice, possibly through its role in the regulation of cilia/basal body polarity through the PCP-dependent mechanisms in the middle ear and Eustachian tubes. PMID:25393619

  11. Is Cholesteatoma a Risk Factor for Graft Success Rate in Chronic Otitis Media Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Mohammad; Dehbozorgi, Mohammad Mehdi; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In developing countries, chronic otitis media (COM) and cholesteatoma are relatively prevalent. Within the field of otology, COM surgery remains one of the most common surgical treatments. Most recent studies evaluating the potential prognostic factors in COM surgery have addressed graft success rate and types of middle ear and mastoid pathology. There has been much controversy about this issue until the present time. This study evaluated the effect of cholesteatoma on the GSR in COM surgery. Materials and Methods: The present retrospective, case-controlled study investigated 422 ears undergoing COM surgery. The minimum and maximum postoperative follow-up periods were 6 and 48 months, respectively. The study group consisted of patients with cholesteatomatous COM, while the control group included patients with non-cholesteatomatous COM, who had undergone ear surgery. Postoperative graft success rate and audiological test results were recorded and the effect of cholesteatoma on graft success rate was investigated. Results: The overall GSR was 92.4%. In the study group (COM with cholesteatoma),the postoperative GSR, mean speech reception threshold improvement, and mean air-bone gap gain were 95.3%, 2.1 dB, and 3.2 dB, respectively. In the control group (COM without cholesteatoma), however, these measurements were 90.9%, 9.4 dB, and 9.1 dB, respectively. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The study results suggest that cholesteatoma is not a significant prognostic factor in graft success rate. PMID:26788485

  12. Comparative Study of Two Different Myringoplasty Techniques in Mucosal Type of Chronic Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Murugendrappa, Mallikarjunappa Ajjampura; Siddappa, Prakash Naganahalli; Basavaraj, Girish Pattanada

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Myringoplasty is a surgical procedure used to close the perforation of pars tensa of the tympanic membrane and to improve the hearing loss. Aim To compare the two different techniques of myringoplasty- circumferential subannular grafting technique and conventional underlay technique in cases of chronic otitis media with inactive mucosal disease. Materials and Methods This is a prospective study of 12 months (July 2014 to June 2015) duration conducted in Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, JJM Medical College, Davanagere and data was collected from the 50 patients admitted for myringoplasty, 25 in each group. Results were calculated in terms of graft success rate and improvement in hearing after 3 months postoperatively. Results A total of 50 cases are included in this study, out of which 21 were males and 29 were females with male to female ratio of 0.72:1. The success rate of graft take up by circumferential subannular grafting technique is 96% and by conventional underlay technique is 76% respectively. In circumferential subannular grafting technique, the pre-op mean PTA was 36.92db, and the post-op mean PTA after 3 months was 25.87 db with a mean difference in PTA (dB) was 11.05 with t value of 7.74. In case of conventional underlay technique, the pre-op mean PTA was 38.24 db, and the post-op mean PTA after 3 months was 30.28 db with a mean difference in PTA (dB) was 7.96 with t-value of 14.39. Conclusion The study showed that circumferential grafting technique is superior in graft success rate and postoperative hearing improvement when compared to conventional underlay technique. PMID:27042491

  13. Development of a non-invasive murine infection model for acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Stol, K; van Selm, S; van den Berg, S; Bootsma, H J; Blokx, W A M; Graamans, K; Tonnaer, E L G M; Hermans, P W M

    2009-12-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most frequent diseases in childhood, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is among the main causative bacterial agents. Since current experimental models used to study the bacterial pathogenesis of OM have several limitations, such as the invasiveness of the experimental procedures, we developed a non-invasive murine OM model. In our model, adapted from a previously developed rat OM model, a pressure cabin is used in which a 40 kPa pressure increase is applied to translocate pneumococci from the nasopharyngeal cavity into both mouse middle ears. Wild-type pneumococci were found to persist in the middle ear cavity for 144 h after infection, with a maximum bacterial load at 96 h. Inflammation was confirmed at 96 and 144 h post-infection by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha cytokine analysis and histopathology. Subsequently, we investigated the contribution of two surface-associated pneumococcal proteins, the streptococcal lipoprotein rotamase A (SlrA) and the putative proteinase maturation protein A (PpmA), to experimental OM in our model. Pneumococci lacking the slrA gene, but not those lacking the ppmA gene, were significantly reduced in virulence in the OM model. Importantly, pneumococci lacking both genes were significantly more attenuated than the DeltaslrA single mutant. This additive effect suggests that SlrA and PpmA exert complementary functions during experimental OM. In conclusion, we have developed a highly reproducible and non-invasive murine infection model for pneumococcal OM using a pressure cabin, which is very suitable to study pneumococcal pathogenesis and virulence in vivo. PMID:19762437

  14. Reduced iNOS expression in adenoids from children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Granath, Anna; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Uddman, Rolf; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2010-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key mediator in the local immune response of human airways. Inducible NO-synthases (iNOS), and endothelial NO-synthases (eNOS) are two enzymes known to regulate its production. The role of NO in middle ear disease is not fully known. Previous studies suggest that NO might have a dual role, both promoting and suppressing middle ear inflammation. The aim of the present study was to compare the eNOS and iNOS expression in adenoids obtained from children with otitis media with effusion (OME) with the expression seen in adenoids derived from children without middle ear disease. In addition, the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α were analyzed, because of their role in the iNOS-induction pathway. The iNOS and eNOS expression were analyzed with real-time PCR in 8 OME and 11 control adenoids. The corresponding proteins were demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining of adenoid tissue. A Luminex(®) assay was performed to analyze IL-1β and TNF-α in nasopharyngeal secretion in 10 OME and 8 controls, and immunohistochemistry was performed on adenoid tissue and imprints from the adenoid surface. Children with OME exhibited lower levels of iNOS than controls without middle ear disease. No such difference was seen for eNOS. The corresponding proteins were found mainly in conjunction with surface epithelium. No significant changes were seen among the cytokines tested. The present results indicate that local induction of iNOS in adenoids might be of importance for preventing development of OME. PMID:21073541

  15. High cytokine levels in perforated acute otitis media exudates containing live bacteria.

    PubMed

    Skovbjerg, S; Roos, K; Nowrouzian, F; Lindh, M; Holm, S E; Adlerberth, I; Olofsson, S; Wold, A E

    2010-09-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is an inflammatory response to microbes in the middle ear, sometimes associated with rupture of the tympanic membrane. Human leukocytes produce different patterns of inflammatory mediators in vitro when stimulated with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Here, we investigated the cytokine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) responses in middle ear fluids (MEFs) from children with spontaneously perforated AOM, and related the mediator levels to the presence of pathogens detected by culture (live) or PCR (live or dead). Furthermore, the in vivo cytokine pattern was compared with that induced in leukocytes stimulated by dead bacteria in vitro. MEFs with culturable pathogenic bacteria contained more interleukin (IL)-1β (median: 110 μg/L vs. <7.5 μg/L), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) (6.3 μg/L vs. <2.5 μg/L), IL-8 (410 μg/L vs. 38 μg/L) and IL-10 (0.48 μg/L vs. <0.30 μg/L) than culture-negative fluids, irrespective of PCR findings. IL-6 and PGE2 were equally abundant (69-110 μg/L) in effusions with live, dead or undetectable bacteria. Cytokine levels were unrelated to bacterial species and to the presence or absence of virus. Similar levels of TNF and IL-6 as found in the MEFs were obtained by in vitro stimulation of leukocytes, whereas 11 times more IL-1β and 3.5 times more IL-8 were produced in vivo, and 22 times more IL-10 was produced in vitro. Vigorous production of proinflammatory cytokines accompanies AOM with membrane rupture, regardless of the causative agent, but the production seems to cease rapidly once the bacteria are killed and fragmented. IL-6 and PGE2, however, remain after bacterial disintegration, and may play a role in the resolution phase. PMID:19832705

  16. Parental acceptability of the watchful waiting approach in pediatric acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Broides, Arnon; Bereza, Olga; Lavi-Givon, Noga; Fruchtman, Yariv; Gazala, Eli; Leibovitz, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine parental knowledge about acute otitis media (AOM) and its antibiotic therapy, antibiotic resistance and the willingness to comply with the watchful waiting (WW) approach in primary care settings in southern Israel. METHODS: The study was conducted in 3 primary care clinics and the pediatric emergency room of Soroka University Medical Center. Questionnaires (20 questions on education background, previous AOM experience, knowledge on antimicrobial resistance and attitude vs the WW approach) were filled by 600 parents (150 at each centers) of children < 6 years of age. RESULTS: Mothers represented 69% of parents; 2% had an education of < 10 school years, 46% had high-school education and 17% had an academic degree. 69% parents reported previous experience with AOM and 56% thought that antibiotics represent the only treatment for AOM. Knowledge on bacterial resistance to antibiotics was reported by 57% of the parents; 86% parents were willing to accept/probably accept the WW approach for their children. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between parental education and knowledge about bacterial resistance to antibiotics and that previous experience with AOM was significantly associated with reluctance to accept the WW approach. More parents with knowledge on bacterial resistance were willing to accept the WW approach compared with parents without such knowledge. No correlation was found between the education level and willingness to accept the WW approach. CONCLUSION: A significant correlation was found between previous parental education and experience with AOM and the knowledge about antibiotic use, bacterial resistance and acceptance of the WW approach. PMID:27170930

  17. Prevalence and characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux in children with otitis media in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Seyed Hamidreza; Kazerooni, Azadeh; Brejis, Nezamodin; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Saneian, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Otitis media (OM) is the most common cause of childhood hearing loss and reason to visit the pediatrician. Furthermore, gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been associated with a variety of upper aerodigestive tract symptoms or diseases, such as sinusitis, laryngitis, and otits. The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of GER in children, aged 3 months to 7 years, with OM. Materials and Methods: This retrospective case-control study was conducted on 50 children with OM and 50 healthy children. Presence of GER as the main variables was diagnosed by clinical examination in all studied children using the questionnaires with 2 age-stratified versions of the pediatric GER disease symptoms for children 2 years old and younger, and children 3–7 years old. Results: The prevalence of GER in children with OM and controls was 58% and 22% respectively (P = 0.0005). The frequency of irritability, congestion, and feeding complex in children with OM were significantly more than in control groups. Among children with recurrent acute OM (AOM), and chronic serous OM (CSOM) the prevalence of GER was significantly more than controls (61.1%, vs. 22% for AOM, P = 0.004, and 72.7% vs. 22%, P= 0.003). In children with AOM, regurgitation, vomiting, irritability and congestion were significantly higher than controls included. In children with CSOM, regurgitation, vomiting, and congestion were significantly higher than controls. Conclusion: Results show a significant association between GER and OM, AOM and CSOM in children with OM compares to healthy children. This shows that looking for GER in children with OM may help improving treatments outcomes. PMID:27274496

  18. In vitro efficacy of N-acetylcysteine on bacteria associated with chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The safety and efficacy of Ciprodex® has been demonstrated for treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). However, symptoms fail to resolve in 9-15% of patients. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on S. aureus, and planktonic and sessile (biofilm forming) P. aeruginosa in vitro using clinical isolates from patients with CSOM. Methods 1) Stability was assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for each component in a prepared mixture of Ciprodex® and NAC over 15 days. Sterility was assessed by measuring bacterial growth on a blood agar plate. Efficacy was assessed using a disc diffusion method by inoculating plates with S. aureus ATCC 29513 and P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and measuring the clearance zone. 2) Fifteen P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients with CSOM and tested in vitro using the bioFILM PA™ antimicrobial susceptibility assay. Treatment solutions included Ciprodex® & ciprofloxacin +/- NAC, and NAC alone (0.25%, 0.5% & 1.25%). Results 1) NAC combined with Ciprodex® demonstrated stability, sterility, and efficacy over a two-week period 2) P. aeruginosa strains in the sessile (33%-40%) and planktonic (13%) state demonstrated resistance to Ciprodex® and ciprofloxacin. When NAC ≥0.5% was used in isolation or as an adjunct to either of these medications, no resistance was found in the sessile or planktonic state among all 15 strains. Conclusion 1) Ciprodex® combined with NAC has a shelf life of at least two weeks given the documented preservation of stability, sterility, and clinical efficacy of the mixed compounds. 2) P. aeruginosa strains demonstrated resistance to both Ciprodex® and ciprofloxacin. NAC ≥0.5% overcomes issues with resistance and shows promise in the treatment of CSOM. PMID:25001062

  19. Observations on the Current Bacteriological Profile of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media in South Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Orji, FT; Dike, BO

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a disease well-known for its recurrence and persistence despite treatment. The situation is compounded by the increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents by bacteria these days. Aim: This study was carried out to examine the current local bacteriological profile of CSOM and to compare the profile of either ear in bilaterally discharging ears. Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of ear swab cultures from 133 unilateral and 73 bilateral consecutive tubotympanic CSOM cases seen at the Ear-Nose-Throat clinics of a referral health institution during a 4 year period ending 2013. Sensitivities to eight locally available antibiotics were analyzed. Aerobic bacterial isolates were analyzed separately for the unilateral and bilateral cases. Comparison was made between the ears in the bilateral cases. Results: We analyzed 279 ear swab culture results from 206 patients with age ranging from 5 months to 86 years and a mean of 21.3 (19.5) years. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common isolated bacteria (44% [109/250]) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (17% [42/250]), and Proteus Mirabilis (15% [38/250]). The most and least sensitive bacteria were Klebsiella Spp and Escherichia Coli, respectively. The most effective antibiotics were gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. The two ears differ significantly in the rates of isolation of S. aureus and E. coli (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: Pseudomonas is the most common bacteria involved in CSOM in this part of the country. Ciprofloxacin as ear drops is recommended as first-line drug in the management of active CSOM as it is cheap, less ototoxic, and locally available. Separate ear swab culture should be obtained in bilateral CSOM. PMID:25861532

  20. The homoeopathic treatment of otitis media in children--comparisons with conventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Friese, K H; Kruse, S; Lüdtke, R; Moeller, H

    1997-07-01

    In a prospective observational study carried out by 1 homoeopathic and 4 conventional ENT practitioners, the 2 methods of treating acute pediatric otitis media were compared. Group A received treatment with homoeopathic single remedies (Aconitum napellus, Apis mellifica, Belladonna, Capsicum, Chamomilla, Kalium bichromicum, Lachesis, Lycopodium, Mercurius solubilis, Okoubaka, Pulsatilla, Silicea), whereas group B received nasal drops, antibiotics, secretolytics and/or antipyretics. The main outcome measures were duration of pain, duration of fever, and the number of recurrences after 1 year, whereby alpha < 0.05 was taken as significance level. The secondary measures were improvement after 3 hours, results of audiometry and tympanometry, and necessity for additional therapy. These parameters were only considered descriptively. The study involved 103 children in group A and 28 children in group B, aged between 6 months and 11 years in both groups. For duration of pain, the median was 2 days in group A and 3 days in group B. For duration of therapy, the median was 4 days in group A and 10 days in group B: this is due to the fact that antibiotics are usually administered over a period of 8-10 days, whereas homoeopathics can be discontinued at an earlier stage once healing has started. Of the children treated, 70.7% were free of recurrence within a year in group A and 29.3% were found to have a maximum of 3 recurrences. In group B, 56.5% were free of recurrence, and 43.5% had a maximum of 6 recurrences. Out of the 103 children in group A, 5 subsequently received antibiotics, though homoeopathic treatment was carried through to the healing stage in the remaining 98. No permanent sequels were observed in either group. PMID:9247843

  1. Tolerability of Oral Xylitol Solution in Young Children: Implications for Otitis Media Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Vernacchio, Louis; Vezina, Richard M.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Xylitol, given as two grams orally five times-a-day, significantly reduces the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM) in children. A less frequent dosing schedule, if tolerable and efficacious, would promote the more widespread use of this treatment. We sought to determine the tolerability and acceptability in young children of oral xylitol solution at doses of 5 grams three times-a-day (TID) and 7.5 grams once daily (QD). Methods. The study was a three-month randomized placebo-controlled trial of the tolerability and acceptability of oral xylitol solution in 120 children 6-36 months of age performed in the SCOR Network. Results. Study withdrawals and unscheduled medical visits for gastrointestinal complaints did not differ significantly among the study groups. The proportions of subjects in the xylitol TID group who experienced excessive gas or diarrhea at months one, two, and three were 22.7%, 10.0%, and 14.3%, respectively, and in the xylitol QD group were 27.3%, 17.4%, and 14.3%, respectively, and these did not differ from the placebo groups. The proportions who accepted the study solution easily or with only minor difficulty at one, two, and three months in the xylitol TID group were 77.3%, 90.0%, and 90.5% and in the xylitol QD group, 77.3%, 82.6%, and 90.5%, respectively. Conclusions. Oral xylitol solution at dosages of 5 grams TID and 7.5 grams QD is well-tolerated by young children. Given the potential for xylitol as a safe, inexpensive option for AOM prophylaxis, clinical trials using these dosages of xylitol can be conducted. PMID:17097152

  2. Quality Measures for the Care of Children With Otitis Media With Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Laura E.; Goudie, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current national efforts provide an opportunity to integrate performance measures into clinical practice and improve outcomes for children. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to explore issues in developing and testing measures of care for children with otitis media with effusion (OME). METHODS: We assessed compliance with diagnostic, evaluation, and treatment measures for OME adapted from preliminary work of the Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement, using chart data in a convenience sample of practices from 2 primary care networks (Cincinnati Pediatric Research Group and the American Academy of Pediatrics Quality Improvement Innovation Network). Children aged 2 months to 12 years with at least 1 visit with a specified OME code during a 1-year period were included. RESULTS: Of 23 practices, 4 could not locate eligible visits. Nineteen practices submitted 378 abstractions (range: 3–37 per practice) with 15 identifying <30 eligible visits. Performance on diagnosis (33%) and hearing evaluation (29%) measures was low but high on measures of appropriate medication use (97% decongestant/antihistamine, 87% antibiotics, and 95% corticosteroids). Thirty-five percent of records documented antibiotic use concurrent with OME; only 16% of the 94 cases that cited reason for prescribing were appropriate. Using methods that consider appropriate clinical action, a more accurate rate for appropriate use of antibiotics was 68%. CONCLUSIONS: Coding, case finding, and evaluating appropriateness of treatment are some of the issues that will need to be considered to assess the care of children with OME. This study emphasizes the importance of testing proposed quality of care measures in “real-world” settings. PMID:21606146

  3. The rationale for preventive treatments for early post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea in persistent otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mohammad; Roosta, Sareh; Shishegar, Mahmood; Abbasi, Rohollah; Atighechi, Saeid

    2016-06-01

    Some studies have shown that post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea (PTTO) is a common complication after tympanostomy tube insertion. There are wide range of controversies about the incidence of PTTO and different methods of preventive treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of early PTTO in persistent otitis media with effusion in our centers. We also investigated the effect of preventive treatments on the incidence of early PTTO in children with persistent otitis media with effusion. This multi-central study comprised 536 ears belonging to children with otitis media and effusion for at least 3 months, referred for complications arising from post-tympanostomy tube insertion. The patients were randomly divided into three treatment and control groups. In the first group of patients, the middle ear cavity was irrigated with isotonic saline after myringotomy. The second group received oral amoxicillin three times a day for 7 days postoperatively. The third group had similar treatment as the second group, in addition to topical ciprofloxacin drop, 4 drops three times a day for 3 days after operation. The control group did not undergo any treatment. Early post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea was detected in 6 ears (1.1 %), including 3 (2.2 %) from the control group and 3 (2.3 %) from the first group. There was no statistically significant difference in early PTTO between integrated treatment groups and control group (P = 0.111). As the total rate of early post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea was very low, there was no significant difference between the 3 treatment groups and control group. Our study did not support the routine use of preventive therapy. A period of at least 3 months watchful waiting before tympanostomy tube insertion may help reduce the incidence of PTTO. PMID:26153378

  4. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis and bilateral lateral rectus palsy as an uncommon complication of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Anusha; Mohamad, Irfan; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2013-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis, especially of the sigmoid sinus, is a known but uncommon intracranial extradural complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. Even rarer is the simultaneous occurrence of bilateral abducens palsy in the same patient. We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure, diplopia and bilateral lateral rectus palsy associated with a history of left ear discharge and neck swelling. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis extending right up to the left internal jugular vein was confirmed on CT imaging. The patient was successfully treated with thrombolytic agents and antibiotic therapy. The pathophysiology of the concurrent complications is discussed. PMID:23355565

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 3 among Costa Rican Children with Otitis Media: clinical, epidemiological characteristics and antimicrobial resistance patterns

    PubMed Central

    Abdelnour, Arturo; Soley, Carolina; Guevara, Silvia; Porat, Nurith; Dagan, Ron; Arguedas, Adriano

    2009-01-01

    Background After the introduction of the seven valent-pneumococcal conjugated vaccine into our National Immunization Program, it is important to establish and track local serotype distribution in order to evaluate its impact specially because serotype replacement phenomena has been described. To describe the clinical, epidemiological and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Costa Rican children with otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3. Methods Middle ear fluid samples were obtained from Costa Rican children with otitis media who participated in various antimicrobial clinical trials between 1992 and 2007. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified according to laboratory standard procedures. Strains were serotyped and antimicrobial susceptibility to penicillin, amoxicillin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, azithromycin and levofloxacin was determined by E-test. Results Throughout 1992–2007 a total of 1919 tympanocentesis were performed in children with otitis media (median age: 19 months) and yielded a total of 1208 middle ear isolates. The most common pathogens were: Streptococcus pneumoniae, 511 isolates (49%); Non-Typable Haemophilus influenzae, 386 isolates (37%); Moraxella catarrahalis, 100 isolates (9.5%); and Streptococcus pyogenes, 54 isolates (5%). Streptococcus pneumoniae serotyping was performed in 346/511 isolates (68%) recovered during years 1999–2006. The most common serotypes were 19F (101/30.0%), 14 (46/13.7%), 3 (34/10.1%), 6B (30/8.9%) and 23F (23/6.8%). Analysis performed per years showed a higher prevalence of serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae during the study period 2004 and 2005. During the entire study period (1999–2006) serotype 3 was most commonly isolated in children older than 24 months (61.2% vs 40.6%;P = 0.05) and showed a lower rate of penicillin non-susceptibility (4.0% vs 18%; P = 0.003). Conclusion Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 is an important pathogen in Costa Rican children with otitis media, especially in

  6. Two cases of severe head-banging parasomnias in peripubertal males resulting from otitis media in toddlerhood.

    PubMed

    Bramble, D

    1995-07-01

    The author presents two case reports of peripubertal boys with severe and chronic head-banging parasomnias, or rhythmic movement disorders (RMDs), which started de novo whilst they were suffering from recurrent and severe otitis media in toddlerhood. Treatment consisting of straightforward behaviour modification techniques and advice concerning healthy sleeping habits proved highly successful. It is proposed that these late-onset or 'acquired' forms of RMD might be distinct from those which continue from infancy which have a stronger developmental aetiology. PMID:7554105

  7. Efficacy of single-dose ceftriaxone in experimental otitis media induced by penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, B; Muffat-Joly, M; Bauchet, J; Faurisson, F; Gehanno, P; Pocidalo, J J; Carbon, C

    1996-01-01

    We used a gerbil model of otitis media to assess the efficacy of single-dose ceftriaxone against three Streptococcus pneumoniae strains highly resistant to penicillin (MICs, 4 to 8 micrograms/ml) and with various susceptibilities to ceftriaxone (MICs, 0.5, 4, and 8 micrograms/ml). Middle ear infection was induced by bilateral transbullar challenge with 10(7) bacteria per ear. Antibiotic treatment was administered subcutaneously at 2 h postinfection. Infection status was checked 2 days later by counting the bacteria in middle ear and cerebrospinal fluid samples. With the cefriaxone-susceptible strain (MIC, 0.5 microgram/ml), we tested doses of 5 to 100 mg/kg of body weight. With a dose of 50 mg/kg, treatment outcome was equivalent to that with amoxicillin, which was used as a reference (25 mg/kg, two injections); no bacteria were recovered from 82% of the middle ear samples, and the rate of cerebrospinal fluid culture positivity was significantly reduced to 6%, relative to 59% for the untreated controls. Similar efficacy was obtained with a dose of 100 mg/kg against the two ceftriaxone-resistant strains. Pharmacokinetic study indicates that the values of the parameters in plasma after the administration of a dose of 100 mg/kg (peak level of total drug, 268 +/- 33 micrograms/ml; elimination half-life, 0.8 h; area under concentration-time curve, 488 micrograms.h.ml-1) were still suboptimal compared with the values of the parameters measured in pediatric patients after intravenous or intramuscular administration of a dose of 50 mg/kg. Our results indicate the efficacy of ceftriaxone against experimental cephalosporin-resistant pneumococcal otitis and provide a basis for the clinical use of single-dose ceftriaxone against pneumococcal otitis media. PMID:8878566

  8. Relationship of endotoxin to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Willett, D N; Rezaee, R P; Billy, J M; Tighe, M B; DeMaria, T F

    1998-01-01

    Sixty-five middle ear effusions and paired sera from 41 children with chronic otitis media with effusion were assayed for endotoxin and for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) in order to establish whether a correlation exists between the concentrations of endotoxin and of these cytokines. Endotoxin concentration was determined by means of a chromogenic limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and the cytokine concentration by means of a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Forty percent of the effusions had detectable levels of endotoxin, with a mean concentration of 2.9 +/- 7.8 endotoxin units per milligram of total protein. The mean concentration of TNF-alpha was 1.24 +/- 3.1 pg/mg total protein, and that of IL-1 beta was 18.79 pg/mg total protein. A strong, statistically significant correlation exists between the concentrations of endotoxin and TNF-alpha (r = .89) and IL-1 beta (r = .72). The data indicate that endotoxin may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media with effusion by stimulating the sustained production of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta in the middle ear. PMID:9439385

  9. Gradenigo’s syndrome secondary to chronic otitis media on a background of previous radical mastoidectomy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gradenigo’s syndrome is nowadays a rare condition characterized by a triad of otorrhea, facial pain with trigeminal nerve involvement and abducens nerve palsy. Most cases are caused by medial extension of acute otitis media into a pneumatized petrous apex and surgical drainage is usually the treatment of choice. We present a case highlighting the pathological mechanism of this disease, demonstrate rare radiological findings associated with this patient, and showcase successful medical treatment without surgical intervention. Case presentation A 63-year-old Thai man presented with complete Gradenigo triad as a complication of chronic otomastoiditis in spite of clinical history of previous radical mastoidectomy and a nonpneumatization of the petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal prominent enhancement at the roof of his right temporal bone, and the dura overlying the floor of right middle cranial fossa and right cavernous sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging also detected right petrous apicitis. With the use of intravenous antibiotics and topical antibiotic eardrops, recovery was observed within 5 days with complete resolution within 2 months. Conclusions Although there is little evidence to support the use of medical therapy in the treatment of Gradenigo’s syndrome resulting from chronic ear disease, we here demonstrate successful conservative treatment of Gradenigo’s syndrome following chronic otitis media in a patient who underwent previous radical mastoidectomy. PMID:24957520

  10. Oral use of Streptococcus salivarius K12 in children with secretory otitis media: preliminary results of a pilot, uncontrolled study.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Di Pasquale, Daniele; Di Cicco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Secretory otitis media (SOM) remains a common disease among children. Although its cause is not yet perfectly established, the pathology, often a sequel of acute otitis media (AOM), is mainly characterized by persistent fluid in the middle ear cavity. Twenty-two children with a diagnosis of SOM were treated daily for 90 days with an oral formulation containing the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 (Bactoblis(®)). After treatment, the children were evaluated for AOM episodes and subjected to tone audiometry, tympanometry, endonasal endoscopy, otoscopy, and tonsillar examination. Subject compliance and probiotic tolerability and side effects have also been evaluated. Our results indicate a good safety profile, a substantial reduction of AOM episodes, and a positive outcome from the treatment for all of the clinical outcomes tested. We conclude that strain K12 may have a role in reducing the occurrence and/or severity of SOM in children. From our perspective, this study constitutes a starting point toward the organization of a more extensive placebo-controlled study aimed at critically appraising our preliminary observations. PMID:26396541

  11. Oral use of Streptococcus salivarius K12 in children with secretory otitis media: preliminary results of a pilot, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Di Pasquale, Daniele; Di Cicco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Secretory otitis media (SOM) remains a common disease among children. Although its cause is not yet perfectly established, the pathology, often a sequel of acute otitis media (AOM), is mainly characterized by persistent fluid in the middle ear cavity. Twenty-two children with a diagnosis of SOM were treated daily for 90 days with an oral formulation containing the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®). After treatment, the children were evaluated for AOM episodes and subjected to tone audiometry, tympanometry, endonasal endoscopy, otoscopy, and tonsillar examination. Subject compliance and probiotic tolerability and side effects have also been evaluated. Our results indicate a good safety profile, a substantial reduction of AOM episodes, and a positive outcome from the treatment for all of the clinical outcomes tested. We conclude that strain K12 may have a role in reducing the occurrence and/or severity of SOM in children. From our perspective, this study constitutes a starting point toward the organization of a more extensive placebo-controlled study aimed at critically appraising our preliminary observations. PMID:26396541

  12. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  13. A defect in early myogenesis causes Otitis media in two mouse models of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jennifer C.; Linden, Jennifer F.; Baldini, Antonio; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    Otitis media (OM), the inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common disease and cause for surgery in infants worldwide. Chronic Otitis media with effusion (OME) often leads to conductive hearing loss and is a common feature of a number of craniofacial syndromes, such as 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS). OM is more common in children because the more horizontal position of the Eustachian tube (ET) in infants limits or delays clearance of middle ear effusions. Some mouse models with OM have shown alterations in the morphology and angle of the ET. Here, we present a novel mechanism in which OM is caused not by a defect in the ET itself but in the muscles that control its function. Our results show that in two mouse models of 22q11.2DS (Df1/+ and Tbx1+/−) presenting with bi- or unilateral OME, the fourth pharyngeal arch-derived levator veli palatini muscles were hypoplastic, which was associated with an earlier altered pattern of MyoD expression. Importantly, in mice with unilateral OME, the side with the inflammation was associated with significantly smaller muscles than the contralateral unaffected ear. Functional tests examining ET patency confirmed a reduced clearing ability in the heterozygous mice. Our findings are also of clinical relevance as targeting hypoplastic muscles might present a novel preventative measure for reducing the high rates of OM in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:25452432

  14. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lima, Svetlana F; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V; Higgins, Catherine H; Lima, Fabio S; Bicalho, Rodrigo C

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  15. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  16. Blocking macrophage migration inhibitory factor activity alleviates mouse acute otitis media in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Xu, Min; Zheng, Qingyin; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weijun; Zhang, Zhaoqiang

    2014-11-01

    This study was to investigate the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in mouse acute otitis media (AOM), we hypothesize that blocking MIF activity will relieve mouse AOM. A mouse AOM model was constructed by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the middle ear of C57BL/6 mice through the tympanic membrane (TM). MIF levels were measured by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and ELISA after LPS application. Normal or AOM mice were given PBS or ISO-1 (MIF antagonist) every day for 10 days and the hearing levels were determined by measuring auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold. After the ABR test finished, H&E staining was conducted and the inflammation was also measured by detecting interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels with RT-PCR and ELISA. TLR-4 expression was determined by western blotting and NF-κB activation was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Compared with the normal control, MIF levels in the middle ear of LPS-induced AOM mice were significant increased. The ABR results showed that mean ABR thresholds in ISO-1 treated AOM mice were significantly reduced compared with PBS treated AOM mice since day 7, indicating that ISO-1 treatment potentially improved the hearing levels of AOM mice. H&E staining showed that ISO-1 treatment could reduce the mucosal thickness of AOM mice. In ISO-1 treated mice, TLR-4 expression and levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and VEGF were significantly lower compared with PBS treated AOM mice. ISO-1 treatment also significantly inhibited NF-κB activation in AOM mice compared with PBS treated AOM mice. These results suggested that blocking the activity of MIF by ISO-1 could reduce the inflammation in AOM mice in which process TLR-4 and NF-κB were involved. The reduction in MIF activity is conducive to alleviate mouse AOM, which may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of AOM. PMID:25108100

  17. Evidence of T-helper cell 2 cytokine regulation of chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Marina G; Birchall, John P; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2005-10-01

    Cytokine and cellular patterns of effusions may reflect stages of middle ear inflammation. The local interplay between IL-2 and -4 is likely to play a crucial role in the switching of inflammation in the chronic stage. The T-helper cell 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4, -5 and -13 and the Th2/Th1 cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) regulate the cellular and molecular processes of chronic inflammation in the middle ear and therefore the chronic condition of otitis media with effusion (OME). Early identification of the cytokine and cellular patterns of effusions can be helpful in directing the clinical treatment of OME.We hypothesized that IL-2 and the group of Th2 cytokines regulate chronic inflammation in the middle ear and chronic OME. Effusions from children with persistent OME were analysed to determine the presence of cytokines (the Th1 cytokine IL-2, the Th2 cytokines IL-4, -5 and -13 and the Th1/Th2 cytokine GM-CSF), inflammatory cells (CD4+ T cells, eosinophils, macrophages and neutrophils) and mucin. Cytokines were evaluated by means of a quantitative "sandwich"-type ELISA, inflammatory cells by means of alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase immunocytostaining and mucin by means of a modified periodic acid-Schiff method based on a slot-blot technique. The cytokine pattern in effusions varied from patient to patient. GM-CSF correlated positively and IL-4 inversely with IL-2 and the increased level of IL-4 may have had an inhibitory effect on IL-2. IL-5 and -13 correlated with IL-4. Inflammatory cells correlated with cytokines as follows: CD4+ T cells with IL-2 and -4; macrophages and neutrophils with GM-CSF; and eosinophils with IL-5. Some cytokine-cellular correlations in effusions were reflected at the clinical level. The mucin content of effusions correlated with the concentrations of IL-4 (>10 pg/ml) and -13, suggesting involvement of IL-4 and -13 in upregulation of the middle ear mucin metabolism. PMID:16298784

  18. Role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells during experimental otitis media in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang Gun; Gong, Sung Ho; Kim, Hee-Bok; Song, Jae-Jun; Park, Joo Hyun; Lim, Yun-Sung; Park, Seok-Won

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) in the middle ear (ME) mucosal response to bacterial infection in a rat model. To confirm the role of ILC3 in bacterially induced otitis media (OM), the serum concentrations of IL-17 and IL-22 were determined by ELISA, and the tissue expression of IL-17 and IL-22 in infected ME mucosa was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Immunohistochemical staining of specific cell surface markers was also assessed to confirm the origin of the cells expressing IL-17 and IL-22. Twenty Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the surgically-induced animal model of OM. OM was induced by inoculation of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae into the ME cavity of the rats. The rats were divided into four experimental groups: three infected groups and one control group. Infected groups were subdivided into sets of 5 rats, one for each of the three time points (1, 4 and 7 days post-inoculation). For determination of rat IL-17 and IL-22 levels in infected rats and control rats, infected or control ME mucosa sections were analyzed by immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies directed against IL-17 and IL-22. Immunohistochemical staining for CD3, RORγt, and NKp46 were also conducted on the samples to confirm the origin of cells expressing IL-17 and IL-22. IL-17 and IL-22 serum concentrations were significantly increased in the infected rats compared to control rats. Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased IL-17 and IL-22 expressions in all infected ME mucosae from the first day after inoculation. In addition, the results of tissue staining for the specific surface markers were negative for CD3 and NKp46, but were highly positive for RORγt. IL-17 and IL-22 revealed their association with the bacterially induced proliferative and hyperplastic responses of ME mucosa, which are characteristic features in pathogenesis of OM. Surface marker examination showed that the source cells for IL-17

  19. Incidence of Otitis Media in a Contemporary Danish National Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Todberg, Tanja; Koch, Anders; Andersson, Mikael; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Lous, Jørgen; Homøe, Preben

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In recent years welfare in Denmark has increased which might be expected to reduce otitis media (OM) incidence. We examined the age-specific incidence of OM in a nation-wide cohort of children aged 0–7 years born in 1996–2003 (Danish National Birth Cohort, DNBC). Only selection was ability to understand and speak Danish. Methods Information of OM and ventilation tubes (VT) was collected through three maternal interviews at 6-month, 18-month and 7-years of age and based on this age-specific and cumulative incidence of OM was calculated. As different numbers of the total population answered the different interviews, the calculations are done with different denominators. The information in DNBC was validated against two population based registries containing information of VT insertions. Results Cumulative incidence of OM at 7 years was 60.6% (31,982/52,755). For children with OM, 16.2% (7143/44194) had their first OM episodes between 0–6 months of age, 44.3% (19579/44194) between 7–18 months, and 39.5% (17472/44194) between 19 months and 7 years. Four or more OM episodes before 7 years were reported by 39.5% (12620/31982) and by 64.0% (2482/3881) of those who had their OM debut between 0–6 months; by 48.2% (4998/10378) with debut between 7–18 months; and by 28.7% (4996/17344) with debut between 19 months and 7 years. These figures are essentially unchanged from earlier figures from Denmark. VT insertion at least once was reported by 26,1% in the 7-year interview. Assuming recordings in the Danish National Patient Registry to be gold standard, maternal self-reportings in DNBC of insertion of VT showed high sensitivity (96.4%), specificity (98.2%), and positive (94.8%) and negative predictive values (98.8%). Conclusion OM affects nearly 2/3 of preschool children in Denmark despite reduction in known OM risk factors. PMID:25545891

  20. Endoscopic Adenoidectomy in Children With Otitis Media With Effusion and Mild Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Capaccio, Pasquale; Torretta, Sara; Marciante, Givlia Anna; Marchisio, Paola; Forti, Stella; Pignataro, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Surgical management of children with chronic otitis media with effusion (OME) includes tympanostomy tube insertion or adenoidectomy, alone or with myringotomy and tube insertion. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of transoral microdebrider endoscopic-assisted adenoidectomy (TOMEA) and traditional adenoidectomy in the management of children with mild hearing loss due to OME and chronic adenoiditis. Methods This prospective, double-blind and controlled study involved 120 consecutive patients aged 4–12 years, who were randomised 1:1 to undergo TOMEA or traditional adenoidectomy under general anesthesia. All the patients underwent a complete otolaryngological examination, including nasopharyngeal fibre endoscopy (NFE), pneumatic otoscopy, otomicroscopy, tympanometry and supraliminar tonal audiometry, upon enrolment, and three and nine months postoperatively. Results There were no statistically significant differences in age or gender distribution between the TOMEA group (mean age, 4.9±1.1 years; 53.3% males) and the traditional adenoidectomy group (mean age, 5.3±0.9 years; 56.7% males). Both procedures led to a significant improvement in choanal patency (P<0.01) and all of the otological and audiological parameters (P<0.01) 3 and 9 months postoperatively, although postoperative NFE showed that the mean percentage of residual choanal obstruction was significantly less in the TOMEA group (P=0.02). There was no significant between-group difference in the percentage of children with tympanic membrane changes, but the postoperative prevalence of children with a type B tympanogram was significantly lower in the TOMEA group after 3 (15.0% vs. 31.7%, P=0.05) and 9 months (18.3% vs. 38.3%, P=0.02), as was the percentage of children with mild conductive hearing loss (3.3% vs. 23.3%, P<0.01; and 8.3% vs. 28.3%, P<0.01). Conclusion Although both TOMEA and traditional adenoidectomy are effective in treating children with mild hearing loss due to

  1. Oral Inoculation of Young Dairy Calves with Mycoplasma bovis Results in Colonization of Tonsils, Development of Otitis Media and Local Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Maunsell, Fiona; Brown, Mary B.; Powe, Joshua; Ivey, James; Woolard, Matthew; Love, Wees; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2012-01-01

    Because M. bovis otitis media is an economically important problem, there is a need to understand the pathogenesis of disease, not only to improve our understanding of the factors contributing to the development of this disease but also to inform the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapy. Oral ingestion of M. bovis-contaminated milk is linked, but not definitively proven, to development of otitis media. In the current study, we demonstrate that oral ingestion of M. bovis infected colostrum can result in an ascending infection and development of otitis media. Importantly, M. bovis was found to have a previously unrecognized tendency for colonization of the tonsils of calves, which most likely contributed to the subsequent development of otitis media. In contrast, transtracheal inoculation failed to produce clinically significant upper respiratory tract disease, although did induce lower respiratory tract disease. The upper respiratory tract was the major site of M. bovis-specific B cell and mucosal IgA responses in calves inoculated by the oral route. The oral inoculation route of infection presented here is particularly suited to the study of host-pathogen interactions during initial colonization of the tonsils, expansion of infection and dissemination to the lower respiratory tract and middle ear. In addition, it could be used to investigate potential new preventative or control strategies, especially those aimed at limiting colonization of the tonsils and/or spread to the middle ear. PMID:22970240

  2. A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Verbal Short-Term Memory and Phonological Processing in 8-Year-Olds with a History of Repetitive Otitis Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majerus, Steve; Amand, Pierre; Boniver, Vincent; Demanez, Jean-Pierre; Demanez, Laurent; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Language outcome in children experiencing fluctuant hearing loss due to otitis media (OME) remains highly equivocal. In the current study, we assessed performance on highly sensitive verbal short-term memory (STM), new word learning and phonological processing tasks in 8-year-old children who had suffered from recurrent OME before the age of 3.…

  3. Otitis Media with Effusion in Young Children. Clinical Practice Guideline, Quick Reference Guide for Clinicians, [and] Parent Guide, Consumer Version, Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Otitis media with effusion and its related hearing loss have been associated with delayed language development, particularly if the disease is recurrent or of long duration, although available data are insufficient to establish a causal linkage. This guide presents recommendations based on extensive reviews of the relevant medical and…

  4. Parent Versus Professional Views of the Developmental Impact of a Multi-Faceted Condition at School Age: Otitis Media with Effusion ("Glue Ear")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Josephine; Haggard, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Background: Several aspects of children's health and development are known from empirical studies to be associated with otitis media with effusion (OME; "glue ear"'). The "diffuse image" has been an obstacle to defining a core set of impacts about which inter-profession and parent-professional communication can be effective. Aims: The study…

  5. [The experience with the topical application of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of otitis media].

    PubMed

    Razvozzhaev, A A; Starodumova, T A; Nemstsveridze, E Ia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the topically applied otinum ear drops. The authors present the results of the combined treatment of acute catarrhal otitis in the children with the use of choline salicilate (otinum). The study included 50 patients randomized into two identical groups. The children of group 1 received systemic therapy supplemented by the topical application of otinum, those in group 2 were prescribed a 3% alcoholic solution of boric acid. The study has demonstrated a significantly more pronounced positive dynamics of clinical conditions in the patients of group 1 compared with those of the control group. The total duration of therapy in the first group was 37.5% shorter than in the second. The results of the study confirmed the strong anti-inflammatory and analgesic action of choline salicilate. The pain was relieved within 7 minutes on the average after the application of this agent. It is concluded that otinum can be recommended for the introduction into combined therapy of acute catarrhal otitis media as an efficacious anti-inflammatory and analgetic drug. PMID:22810643

  6. Increased percentage of T cells with the expression of CD127 and CD132 in hypertrophic adenoid in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Żelazowska-Rutkowska, Beata; Wysocka, Jolanta; Ratomski, Karol; Kasprzycka, Edwina; Skotnicka, Bożena

    2012-07-01

    The hypertrophic adenoid may promote chronic suppurative otitis media in children as it fulfills its immune function. The number of lymphocytes in the adenoid and their cooperation in the immune response depend of on their proliferation and migration to the effector sites. Interleukin 7 (IL-7) is essential for the normal development and function lymphocytes. IL-7 plays pivotal role for activation and proliferation of T and B cells. The heterodimeric interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) is composed of the IL-7Rα (127) and the common cytokine receptor γc (CD132). The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentage of lymphocytes T (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) with IL-7R (CD127 and CD132) expression in hypertrophic adenoid in children suffering with otitis media with effusion for a duration of 3 months. Adenoid excised due to hypertrophy with or without chronic otitis media with effusion was used as study material. CD4(+) CD127(+), CD4(+)132(+), CD8(+)CD127(+) and CD8(+)CD132(+) cell subpopulations were identified using monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. The percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with CD127 receptor expression in hypertrophic adenoid of children with otitis media with effusion was statistically significantly higher than in hypertrophic adenoid group. The percentage of CD4(+) T cells with CD132 expression in the study group was statistically significantly higher than in the reference group. The percentage of CD8(+) T cells with CD132(+) expression was not statistically different in both groups. The increased percentage of T lymphocytes with IL-7R expression (CD127 and CD132) in hypertrophic adenoid seems to influence the quantity of lymphocytes and upset the immunological function of tonsils which can influence the course of otitis media with effusion. PMID:22382400

  7. Diet as a Risk Factor for Pneumococcal Carriage and Otitis Media: A Cross-Sectional Study among Children in Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tapiainen, Terhi; Paalanne, Niko; Arkkola, Tuula; Renko, Marjo; Pokka, Tytti; Kaijalainen, Tarja; Uhari, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharyngeal bacteria are exposed to different sugar conditions depending on the diet of the child. We hypothesized that dietary factors such as daily intake of carbohydrates could be associated with pneumococcal carriage and the occurrence of otitis media in children. Methods Our study design was a cross-sectional study among 1006 children attending child day care centers. Parents filled in a food frequency questionnaire. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from each child. The primary outcome was the occurrence of pneumococcal carriage and the secondary outcome the number of acute otitis media episodes during life. Principal component analysis was used to group dietary intake into nine factors. The models were adjusted for age, gender of the child and educational level of the mother. Results The dietary factor which included high consumption of sweet pastries and jam was associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal carriage (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.36, P-value 0.04). The factor including frequent consumption of fruit and berries was associated with a decreased risk of acute otitis (regression coefficient −0.51, 95% CI −0.98 to −0.03, P = 0.04). A high intake of consumption of sweets and snacks (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.80, P = 0.03) was associated with an increased risk of caries. Conclusions Diet was associated with a risk of pneumococcal carriage and the occurrence of otitis media. Diet may thus be a modifiable risk factor for the occurrence of acute otitis media. PMID:24599395

  8. Cytokine profile of nasal and middle ear polyps in a patient with Woakes' syndrome and eosinophilic otitis media.

    PubMed

    De Loof, Marie; De Leenheer, Els; Holtappels, Gabriële; Bachert, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Woakes' syndrome is characterised by severe recurrent nasal polyps in early childhood with broadening of the nose, nasal dyscrinia, frontal sinus aplasia and bronchiectasis. Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is an intractable condition that can cause gradual or sudden deterioration of hearing and is associated with comorbid asthma. For these reasons, both diseases must be recognised and treated appropriately. We present a case of a 20-year-old man with Woakes' syndrome complicated by EOM, with polyps in both middle ears; this condition has so far not been described as an entity of eosinophilic disease in the literature. We have, from reviewing the literature, learned that this is the first time that results of tissue examination on nasal polyposis with respect to tissue IgE, eosinophil-cationic protein, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-5 in a patient with Woakes' syndrome and EOM, has been reported and discussed. PMID:27143164

  9. Optical-fiber-coupled inferometric measurement of tympanic membrane temperature: a new diagnostic tool for acute otitis media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRowe, Ari; Ophir, Eyal; Sade, Sharon; Fishman, Gadi; Ophir, Dov; Grankin, Mila; Katzir, Abraham

    1998-07-01

    A novel infrared (IR) transparent optical fiber coupled to a hand held otoscope and a radiometer was constructed and used to measure the temperatures of the tympanic membrane (TM) and to distinguish between diseased and healthy middle ears. A greater temperature difference between TM readings was found when Acute Otitis Media (AOM) existed in one of the ears examined. This supports the hypothesis that acute inflammation of the middle ear will result in elevated local temperature when measured in such a way that the reading is taken only from the TM without interference of the external canal. The use of an optical fiber enabled temperature measurements of the TM with high spatial resolution eliminating the external ear canal interference. A small patient population was examined and the initial results were statistically significant. In the hands of the primary care physician, this tool would prevent misdiagnosis of AOM preventing indiscriminate use of antibiotics and avoiding complications by early diagnosis.

  10. ModA2 Phasevarion Switching in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Increases the Severity of Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Kenneth L; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Atack, John M; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Jennings, Michael P; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2016-09-01

    Several human-adapted bacterial pathogens use a phasevarion (ie, a phase-variable regulon) to rapidly and reversibly regulate the expression of many genes, which include known virulence factors, yet the influence of phasevarion-mediated regulation in pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Here we examine the impact of the nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) ModA2 phasevarion on pathogenesis and disease severity in a chinchilla model of experimental otitis media. Chinchillas were challenged with NTHI variant populations that were either inoculated ON and remained ON, inoculated OFF and shifted ON, or inoculated OFF and remained OFF, within the middle ear. We show that populations that shift from OFF to ON within the middle ear induce significantly greater disease severity than populations that are unable to shift. These observations support the importance of phasevarion switching in NTHI pathogenesis and the necessity to considered phasevarion regulation when developing methods to treat and prevent infection. PMID:27288538

  11. Passage of albumin from the middle ear to the inner ear in otitis media in the chinchilla

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.; Goycoolea, M.V.; Schleivert, P.M.; Shea, D.; Schachern, P.; Paparella, M.M.; Carpenter, A.M.

    1981-08-01

    A study of the permeability of the middle ear-inner ear interface for macromolecules was carried out in chinchillas with open and obstructed eustachian tubes utilizing tritiated human serum albumin and immunoelectrophoresis. Tritiated albumin was placed in the round window niche area or normal animals and animals in which the eustachian tubes had been obstructed for 24 hours or 14 days. The tritiated albumin was allowed to remain in the middle ear cavity for 24 hours, Samples of middle ear effusion, perilymph, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and measured for radioactivity. Radioactivity was demonstrated in the perilymph. Samples of middle ear effusions and perilymph were also studied by immunoelectrophoresis with goat antihuman albumin. Albumin placed in the round window niche of an experimental animal could be recovered unchanged in the perilymph. The results suggest a pathophysiologic explanation for the association of otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss or endolymphatic hydrops.

  12. Complicated coexisting pyogenic and tuberculous otitis media affecting the temporozygomatic, infratemporal, and parotid areas: report of a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Brar, Tripti; Mrig, Sumit; Passey, J C; Agarwal, A K; Jain, Shayma

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case in which a 28-year-old woman presented with a long-standing history of ear discharge, hearing loss, facial weakness with ipsilateral facial swelling and cellulitis, a postauricular fistula, and an abscess of the temporozygomatic, infratemporal, and parotid areas. The pus stained positive for bacteria and acid-fast bacilli, and culture was positive for Proteus vulgaris and mycobacteria. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of tuberculous otitis media with complications was made. Computed tomography showed extensive destruction of the tympanic and mastoid part of the temporal bone, as well as lytic lesions in the skull. The patient was placed on antituberculosis drug therapy. Although her facial nerve palsy and hearing loss persisted, she otherwise responded well and did not require surgery. PMID:23354894

  13. Comparison of cefuroxime axetil and amoxicillin-clavulanate suspensions in treatment of acute otitis media with effusion in children.

    PubMed

    McLinn, S E; Moskal, M; Goldfarb, J; Bodor, F; Aronovitz, G; Schwartz, R; Self, P; Ossi, M J

    1994-02-01

    Two hundred sixty-three pediatric patients from the ages of 3 months to 11 years were enrolled in a randomized, investigator-blinded, multicenter study comparing the clinical and bacteriological efficacies and safety of cefuroxime axetil suspension (CAE) with those of amoxicillin-clavulanate suspension (AMX-CL) in the treatment of acute otitis media with effusion. Patients received CAE at 30 mg/kg of body weight per day (n = 165) in two divided doses or AMX-CL at 40 mg/kg/day (n = 98) in three divided doses for 10 days. The primary pathogens among 200 isolates from pretreatment cultures of middle ear fluid were identified as follows: Haemophilus influenzae (39%), over a third of which were beta-lactamase positive; Streptococcus pneumoniae (34%); and Moraxella catarrhalis (16%). Pathogens were eradicated or presumed to be eradicated from 81% (95 of 118) and 76% (50 of 66) of bacteriologically evaluable patients in the CAE and AMX-CL groups, respectively. A satisfactory clinical response (cure or improvement with or without resolution of effusion) occurred in 113 (77%) of 146 clinically evaluable patients in the CAE group and in 66 (74%) of 89 evaluable patients in the AMX-CL group. Clinical failure or recurrence (within 2 weeks following the completion of treatment) occurred in 22 and 26% of CAE- and AMX-CL-treated patients, respectively. Drug-related adverse events occurred in 18% of CAE-treated patients, whereas they occurred in 39% of AMX-CL-treated patients (P < 0.001); diarrhea or loose stools was the most commonly reported adverse event (CAE, 12%; AMX-CL, 31%; P < 0.001). These results indicate that CAE given twice daily is as effective as AMX-CL given three times daily in the treatment of acute otitis media with effusion in pediatric patients, but CAE was associated with significantly fewer drug-related adverse events. PMID:8192458

  14. Comparison of cefuroxime axetil and amoxicillin-clavulanate suspensions in treatment of acute otitis media with effusion in children.

    PubMed Central

    McLinn, S E; Moskal, M; Goldfarb, J; Bodor, F; Aronovitz, G; Schwartz, R; Self, P; Ossi, M J

    1994-01-01

    Two hundred sixty-three pediatric patients from the ages of 3 months to 11 years were enrolled in a randomized, investigator-blinded, multicenter study comparing the clinical and bacteriological efficacies and safety of cefuroxime axetil suspension (CAE) with those of amoxicillin-clavulanate suspension (AMX-CL) in the treatment of acute otitis media with effusion. Patients received CAE at 30 mg/kg of body weight per day (n = 165) in two divided doses or AMX-CL at 40 mg/kg/day (n = 98) in three divided doses for 10 days. The primary pathogens among 200 isolates from pretreatment cultures of middle ear fluid were identified as follows: Haemophilus influenzae (39%), over a third of which were beta-lactamase positive; Streptococcus pneumoniae (34%); and Moraxella catarrhalis (16%). Pathogens were eradicated or presumed to be eradicated from 81% (95 of 118) and 76% (50 of 66) of bacteriologically evaluable patients in the CAE and AMX-CL groups, respectively. A satisfactory clinical response (cure or improvement with or without resolution of effusion) occurred in 113 (77%) of 146 clinically evaluable patients in the CAE group and in 66 (74%) of 89 evaluable patients in the AMX-CL group. Clinical failure or recurrence (within 2 weeks following the completion of treatment) occurred in 22 and 26% of CAE- and AMX-CL-treated patients, respectively. Drug-related adverse events occurred in 18% of CAE-treated patients, whereas they occurred in 39% of AMX-CL-treated patients (P < 0.001); diarrhea or loose stools was the most commonly reported adverse event (CAE, 12%; AMX-CL, 31%; P < 0.001). These results indicate that CAE given twice daily is as effective as AMX-CL given three times daily in the treatment of acute otitis media with effusion in pediatric patients, but CAE was associated with significantly fewer drug-related adverse events. PMID:8192458

  15. Role for Toll-like receptor 2 in the immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mouse otitis media.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengchan; Yu, Heping; Tian, Cong; Li, Shengli; Jacobs, Michael R; Benedict-Alderfer, Cindy; Zheng, Qing Y

    2009-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common pathogen associated with otitis media. To examine the role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in host defense against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in the middle ear, wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice were inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae (1 x 10(6) CFU) through the tympanic membrane. Nineteen of 37 TLR2(-/-) mice showed bacteremia and died within 3 days after the challenge, compared to only 4 of 32 WT mice that died. Of those that survived, more severe hearing loss in the TLR2(-/-) mice than in the WT mice was indicated by an elevation in auditory-evoked brain stem response thresholds at 3 or 7 days postinoculation. The histological pathology was characterized by effusion and tissue damage in the middle ear, and in the TLR2(-/-) mice, the outcome of infection became more severe at 7 days. At both 3 and 7 days postchallenge, the TLR2(-/-) mice had higher blood bacterial titers than the WT mice (P < 0.05), and typical bacteria were identified in the effusion from both ears of both mouse groups by acridine orange staining. Moreover, by 3 days postchallenge, the mRNA accumulation levels of NF-kappaB, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1beta, MIP1alpha, Muc5ac, and Muc5b were significantly lower in the ears of TLR2(-/-) mice than in WT mice. In summary, TLR2(-/-) mice may produce relatively low levels of proinflammatory cytokines following pneumococcal challenge, thus hindering the clearance of bacteria from the middle ear and leading to sepsis and a high mortality rate. This study provides evidence that TLR2 is important in the molecular pathogenesis and host response to otitis media. PMID:19414550

  16. The Evaluation of Oxidative Stress in the Serum and Tissue Specimens of Patients With Chronic Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Mahfuz; Avşar, Barış; Kalkan, Ferhat; Demir, Halit; Kozan, Ahmet; Bozan, Nazım

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To underline the effect of oxidative stress in chronic otitis media with and without cholesteatoma and to compare the oxidative stress values in the serum and tissue specimens in these two forms. Methods The study included a total of 75 individuals, 35 cases with chronic otitis media (COM; 16 females and 19 males) and a healthy control group of 40 cases (20 females and 20 males). The COM patient group was comprised of 18 patients with cholesteatoma and 17 patients without cholesteatoma. All patients underwent mastoidectomy. Serum specimens were taken prior to surgery and diseased tissue specimens from the ear were obtained during surgery from all patients. Only serum specimens were taken from the healthy control cases. The malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GHPx) were measured in the serum and tissue samples of the patient group and in the serum specimens of the control group. Results The age ranged from 14 to 48 years in the patient group (mean age, 20.4±12.2 years) and from 19 to 40 years in the control group (mean age, 26.4±4.64 years). When the serum values of all COM patients were compared with those of the control group, in the patient group MDA, which reflects lipid peroxidation, was found to be significantly higher (P<0.01) whereas the antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, and GHPx were found to be significantly lower (P<0.01). When the serum and tissue MDA, SOD, CAT, and GHPx values in patients with and without cholesteatoma were compared, no significant difference was found these parameters (P>0.01). Conclusion Although oxidative stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of COM with or without cholesteatoma, it may not reflect the severity of the disease. In patients with COM, the evaluation of only serum oxidative stress values without tissue evaluation may be sufficient for assessing oxidative stress. PMID:26045906

  17. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Bacteriologic Detection and Antibiogram of Bacteria Isolated from Otitis Media with Effusion in Children, Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shishegar, Mahmood; Faramarzi, Abolhasan; Kazemi, Tayyebe; Bayat, Akbar; Motamedifar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Otitis media with effusion is one of the leading causes of hearing loss in children. Effective treatment of effusion in the middle ear requires appropriate empirical treatment and characterization of responsible pathogens. Objective of the present study was to detect pathogens in clinical samples from patients with otitis media with effusion in our area and to determine the sensitivity profile of isolated organisms to commonly used antibiotics. Methods: Sixty three samples of middle ear effusion were aseptically obtained from 36 children, who had been treated up to at least two weeks before sampling. They were analyzed using standard bacteriological and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were also performed. Results: PCR analysis showed that DNA of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis were present in 60 (95.2%) of the samples. The culture-positive effusion for Streptococcus Pneumoniae, HaemophilusInfluenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis was 34.9%. Almost all isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniaee were sensitive to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, and none of them was sensitive to co-trimoxazole. None of H. Influenzae isolates was sensitive to erythromycin, cefixim, co-trimoxazole, ampicillin and amoxicillin. None of M. Catarrhalis isolates was sensitive to ceftriaxone, co-trimoxazole, ampicillin and amoxicillin. Conclusion: Compared with other studies using PCR method, the number of H. influenza isolates was in higher in the present study (95.2%). Antibiotic sensitivity profiles of pathogens isolated in this study were different from others. Thus, we can determine empirical antibiotic therapy based on sensitivity profile in our geographic area. PMID:23115412

  18. Cholesterol granuloma associated with otitis media and destruction of the tympanic bulla in a dog.

    PubMed

    Fliegner, R A; Jubb, K V F; Lording, P M

    2007-07-01

    An 8-year-old, male neutered Irish Setter was presented with a 2-week history of pain upon opening the mouth and chronic otitis externa. Computed tomography examination revealed destruction of the left tympanic bulla with a soft-tissue density within the remains of the tympanic cavity. Cytology of aspirates collected from tissue adjacent to the tympanic bulla revealed suppurative inflammation and bacteria. A ventral bulla osteotomy was performed. Histopathology of granulation tissue within the remains of the tympanic cavity was diagnostic of cholesterol granuloma. PMID:17606522

  19. Mucosal immunization with PsaA protein, using chitosan as a delivery system, increases protection against acute otitis media and invasive infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xu, J-H; Dai, W-J; Chen, B; Fan, X-Y

    2015-03-01

    As infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly via the mucosal route) is a leading cause of acute otitis media, sinus and bacterial pneumonia, the mucosal immunity plays an important role in the prevention of pneumococcal diseases. Therefore, intranasal vaccination may be an effective immunization strategy, but requires appropriate mucosal vaccine delivery systems. In this work, chitosan was used as a mucosal delivery system to form chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles based on ionotropic gelation methods and used to immunize BALB/c mice intranasally. Compared to mice immunized with naked PsaA, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-4 in spleen lymphocytes, the systemic (IgG in serum) and mucosal (IgA in mucosal lavage) specific antibodies were enhanced significantly in mice inoculated with chitosan-PsaA. Furthermore, increased protection against acute otitis media following middle ear challenge with pneumococcus serotype 14, and improved survival following intraperitoneal challenge with pneumococcus serotype 3 or serotype 14, was found in the mice immunized with chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles. Thus, intranasal immunization with chitosan-PsaA can successfully induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and increase protection against pneumococcal acute otitis media and invasive infections. Hence, intranasal immunization with PsaA protein, based on chitosan as a delivery system, is an efficient immunization strategy for preventing pneumococcal infections. PMID:25565478

  20. Preliminary results of a novel quorum sensing inhibitor against pneumococcal infection and biofilm formation with special interest to otitis media and cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Cevizci, Raşit; Düzlü, Mehmet; Dündar, Yasemin; Noyanalpan, Ningur; Sultan, Nedim; Tutar, Hakan; Bayazıt, Yıldırım A

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of a novel quorum sensing inhibitor (QSI), coded as 'yd 47', against otitis media and biofilm formation on Cochlear implants (CIs). Small pieces cut from cochlear implant were implanted under the skin in the retroauricular area on both sides of four guinea pigs. The implant pieces in the study and control sides were implanted in Streptococcus pneumoniae strain solution and saline, respectively. The right and left middle ears were also instilled with a solution containing pneumococci and saline, respectively. The animals were only given an intraperitoneal 'yd 47' twice daily for three months to be assessed later with electron microscopy. Clinical examination with palpation, inspection and otoscopy did not reveal any sign of implant infection or otitis media. In the study and control implant materials, soft tissues around the implant and tympanic membranes, there was no biofilm formation by pneumococci. Contamination by various cells and some rod-shaped bacteria (not diplococcic) were seen in some of the materials. In conclusion, the novel QSI seems promising in the prevention of otitis media and biofilm formation on CIs by pneumococci. PMID:24570174

  1. Bacterial profile and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of otitis media in Ayder Teaching and Referral Hospital, Mekelle University, Northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wasihun, Araya Gebereyesus; Zemene, Yilikal

    2015-01-01

    Middle Ear infection is a common problem for both children and adults particularly in resource limited countries. Nevertheless, in Ethiopia and particularly in the study area, there is scarcity of recent data that indicate the magnitude of the problem. Thus this study aimed to identify bacterial isolates and determine their drug susceptibility patterns from patients who had ear infection. Cross sectional study was carried out on patients with ear infection and who visited the Ear, Nose and Throat clinic of Ayder referral and teaching hospital from November 2014 to June 2015. Middle ear discharges were collected and processed for bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard bacteriological techniques. Clinical and demographic data were collected using standard questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20 software and p value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the total of 162 patients with ear discharges, 68.5 % were from rural areas, 71 % with chronic infection, 54.9 % referred cases and 67.3 % of them had decreased hearing status. Pathogens were isolated from 157 (98.2 %) of the patients with a total of 216 isolates. Staphylococcus aureus 46 (28.4 %), Proteus mirabilis 39 (24.1 %), Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27 (16.7 %), Klebsiella spp. and Haemophilus influenzae 18 (11.1 % each) were the dominant bacteria. Out of the individuals with ear infection, single and mixed bacterial infection was seen among 185 (90.7 %) and 59 (39.5 %) respectively. Age group of 0-5 years (p = 0.02), chronic patients (p = 0.042) and referred cases (p = 0.045) showed high bacterial isolates. High resistance was seen to most antibiotics. Ciprofloxacin, Gentamicin Norfloxacin and Erythromycin were effective against isolated bacteria. The overall multi drug resistance rate of bacteria in this study was 74.5 %. Prevalence of bacteria associated with otitis media and multidrug resistance was very high in

  2. Is there a relationship between proximity to industry and the occurrence of otitis media with effusion in school entrant children?

    PubMed

    Holtby, I; Elliott, K; Kumar, U

    1997-03-01

    In a study of the relationship between the prevalence of persistent otitis media with effusion (OME) in school entrant children in Redcar and Cleveland and the distance of the homes of these children from known industrial emission points, 1156 school entrant children were screened for the presence of persistent OME. The social disadvantage scores and map references were determined from the postcode area of each of the study entrants and map references were also obtained of known industrial emission points in the locality. Analyses were conducted on the association between the presence of OME and distance from emission sources and between the presence of OME and disadvantage score. A significantly greater proportion of study entrants with OME lived within 1000 meters of an industrial emission point than further away. However, there was no trend established between the proportion of study entrants with OME and increasing distance from an emissions source, nor was there any significant relationship established between the social disadvantage score of the areas of residence of the study entrants and the presence of OME. Further research is required to establish the effect of confounding variables on this relationship. PMID:9090283

  3. Usefulness of a ventilation tube as a partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP) in ossiculoplasty in patients with chronic otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Wiatr, Maciej; Składzień, Jacek; Tomik, Jerzy; Stręk, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Background The principal objective of ossiculoplasty is to reconstruct the sound-conducting system in the ear to the best possible degree after the elimination of pathological lesions from the middle ear. The ossicular chain is reconstructed with the use of the patient’s own properly modelled ossicles and synthetic prostheses. The objective of the study was to assess the degree of hearing improvement after tympanoplasty in patients for whom a ventilation tube was used as a partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP). Material/Method Between 2009 and 2012, 387 patients underwent ear surgery at the Otolaryngological Teaching Hospital of the Collegium Medicum at the Jagiellonian University of Cracow. We focussed on the patients in whom a vibrating element in the form of a properly modelled anvil or a ventilation tube was attached to the preserved and normally mobile stapes. Results A significant hearing improvement was observed in patients with type 2 tympanoplasty in the course of chronic cholesteatoma otitis media and in patients with simple chronic inflammatory process in whom a ventilation tube was used as a PORP in the reconstruction. Granulation tissue was determined to be an unfavorable factor in the prognosis of hearing improvement following tympanoplasty. Conclusions Significant hearing improvement was observed after type 2 tympanoplasty in patients with cholesteatoma whose ossicular chain was not appreciably damaged. A ventilation tube used as a PORP is an effective alternative in the reconstruction of the ossicular chain. PMID:24935173

  4. In vitro inflammatory responses elicited by isolates of Alloiococcus otitidis obtained from children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Ashhurst-Smith, Christopher; Hall, Sharron T; Burns, Christine J; Stuart, John; Blackwell, C Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Alloiococcus otitidis is usually detected in children with otitis media (OM) by PCR as it is not often detected by routine culture. Our improved method for its isolation obtained A. otitidis from nearly 50% of 78 children with OM with effusion. The role of A. otitidis in pathogenesis of OM is unclear. This study tested two hypothesis: (1) that fresh isolates of A. otitidis would elicit pro-inflammatory cytokines from THP-1 monocytic cells equivalent to those induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae; (2) priming THP-1 cells with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) a surrogate for virus infection, would enhance pro-inflammatory responses. Recent clinical isolates of A. otitidis, S. pneumoniae (ATCC 49619) and a blood culture isolate of S. pneumoniae (SP2) were used in the assays. Cytokines were quantified by BioRad bead assay and Luminex 200. IFN-γ priming enhanced cytokine responses. S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619 induced lower responses than SP2 for IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α. A. otitidis LW 27 elicited higher IL-1β and TNF-α responses than either pneumococcal isolate. Small green colony types of A. otitidis induced higher responses than large white colony types for IL-8 and IL-1β. The hypothesis that A. otitidis elicits cytokines observed in middle ear effusions was supported; the need to use recent clinical isolates in studies of pathogenesis was highlighted. PMID:23812253

  5. Effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kanako; Hirano, Takashi; Noda, Kenji; Kodama, Satoru; Ichimiya, Issei; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    We hypothesized that low-intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) increases vessel permeability and antibacterial drug activity in the mouse middle ear. We determined appropriate settings by applying LIFU to mouse ears with the external auditory canal filled with normal saline and performed histologic and immunohistologic examination. Acute otitis media was induced in mice with nontypable Haemophilus influenzae, and they were given ampicillin (50, 10, or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days with or without LIFU (1.0 W/cm(2), 20% duty cycle, 30 s). In the LIFU(+) groups receiving the 2- and 10-mg/kg doses, viable bacteria counts, number of inflammatory cells and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in middle ear effusion were significantly lower than in the LIFU(-) groups on the same doses. Severity of AOM also tended to be reduced more in the LIFU(+) groups than in the LIFU(-) groups. LIFU application with antibiotics may be effective for middle ear infection. PMID:23312959

  6. Mastoid antral ventilation tube; new treatment modality for reccurent otitis media with effusion and its long term results

    PubMed Central

    Kutluhan, Ahmet; Tarlak, Behcet; Cetin, Huseyin; Callioglu, Elif Ersoy; Bozdemir, Kazim; Demir, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of mastoid antral ventilation tube (MAVT) treatment in recurrent/chronic otitis media with effusion (OME). Methods: 20 OME patients who were unsuccessfully treated with ventilation tube (VT) at least twice, who consented to MAVT and who were followed up at least three years were included in the study group. Control group comprised 10 patients who had the same characteristics and refused to undergo MAVT and underwent VT placement again. Pre-operative and post-operative otomicroscopic, hearing tests, and CT findings were compared between the groups statistically. Results: MAVT was placed into 24 ears of 20 patients. In the control group, VT was placed in 13 ears of 10 patients. Postoperatively, in the study group, one tympanic membrane with adhesion and nine membranes with retraction returned to their anatomic positions after MAVT. In the control group, 2 retracted tympanic membranes returned to normal position. There was significant difference between groups in terms of mastoid aeration (P = 0.006). Post-operative pure tone threshold values and mastoid aeration findings were statistically different from preoperative conditions. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrates that MAVT may be effective in the surgical treatment of recurrent/chronic OME. However, further studies with larger patient series should be carried out. PMID:26131164

  7. Tympanomastoidectomy: Comparison between canal wall-down and canal wall-up techniques in surgery for chronic otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Alexandre Fernandes de; Soares, Anna Bárbara de Castro; Garchet, Henrique Queiroz Correa; Sousa, Nicodemos José Alves de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Chronic otitis media (COM) is an inflammatory condition associated with otorrhea as well as large and persistent perforations of the tympanic membrane in some cases. COM can also lead to cholesteatoma. Surgical treatment with canal wall-down and canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy is considered for both types of illness. The choice of technique is controversial and is dependent on several factors, including the extent of disease. Objective: We aimed to evaluate surgical outcomes in COM patients with and without cholesteatoma treated with canal wall-down and canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy. Disease eradication and post-operative auditory thresholds were assessed. Method: Patient records from the otorhinolaryngology department of a tertiary hospital were assessed retrospectively. Results: Patients who underwent canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy had a higher rate of revision surgery, especially those with cholesteatoma. However, there were no statistically significant differences in post-operative hearing thresholds between the two techniques. Conclusion: The canal wall-down technique is superior to the canal wall-up technique, especially for patients with cholesteatoma. PMID:25992020

  8. Recovery of a unique bacterial organism in human middle ear fluid and its possible role in chronic otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Faden, H; Dryja, D

    1989-01-01

    The middle ear fluids of 10 children with persistent otitis media with effusion (OME) were found to contain an unclassified, slow-growing, gram-positive organism. Large gram-positive cocci, often present as diplococci or tetrads, were readily seen in each effusion. Culture of the fluid on a blood agar plate required 2 to 5 days of incubation at 37 degrees C and yielded a slow-growing coccus in pure culture in 70% of cases and in mixed culture in 30% of cases. The organism in question was unique and could be distinguished from aerococci, gemellas, enterococci, and micrococci. It grew in 6.5% saline and on bile esculin agar. It did not grow at 45 degrees C or anaerobically. It was uniformly catalase and hippurate positive. It gave negative reactions with tellurite, tetrazolium, and pyruvate and did not utilize any of the carbohydrates tested. Reactions to bile esculin were variable. The episodes of OME associated with the bacterium in question were asymptomatic, had been present from 1 to 8 months, and occurred in children who had previously experienced OME. The middle ear fluids were typically serous or seromucinous and contained inflammatory cells. The data suggest that the gram-positive coccus is a newly described middle ear pathogen and may be responsible, in part, for persistent middle ear effusion. The characteristically slow growth of the organism in vitro could hinder recovery of the organism from clinical specimens and may therefore have prevented its earlier recognition. Images PMID:2808673

  9. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  10. Proteomic Characterization of Middle Ear Fluid Confirms Neutrophil Extracellular Traps as a Predominant Innate Immune Response in Chronic Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Val, Stephanie; Poley, Marian; Brown, Kristy; Choi, Rachel; Jeong, Stephanie; Colberg-Poley, Annie; Rose, Mary C.; Panchapakesan, Karuna C.; Devaney, Joe C.; Perez-Losada, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Otitis Media (COM) is characterized by middle ear effusion (MEE) and conductive hearing loss. MEE reflect mucus hypersecretion, but global proteomic profiling of the mucosal components are limited. Objective This study aimed at characterizing the proteome of MEEs from children with COM with the goal of elucidating important innate immune responses. Method MEEs were collected from children (n = 49) with COM undergoing myringotomy. Mass spectrometry was employed for proteomic profiling in nine samples. Independent samples were further analyzed by cytokine multiplex assay, immunoblotting, neutrophil elastase activity, next generation DNA sequencing, and/or immunofluorescence analysis. Results 109 unique and common proteins were identified by MS. A majority were innate immune molecules, along with typically intracellular proteins such as histones and actin. 19.5% percent of all mapped peptide counts were from proteins known to be released by neutrophils. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in every MEE, along with MUC5B colocalization. DNA found in effusions revealed unfragmented DNA of human origin. Conclusion Proteomic analysis of MEEs revealed a predominantly neutrophilic innate mucosal response in which MUC5B is associated with NET DNA. NETs are a primary macromolecular constituent of human COM middle ear effusions. PMID:27078692

  11. The evaluation of eustachian tube paratubal structures using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Suat; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma; Özgür, Abdulkadir; Çeliker, Metin; Beyazal, Mehmet; Demirci, Münir; Dursun, Engin

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion Eustachian tube (ET) dysfunction, which plays a role in the pathogenesis chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), does not seem to be due to differences in paratubal structures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the paratubal structures of the ET between normal ears and ears in patients with CSOM. Methods The MRI records of 40 patients who underwent tympanomastoidectomy for a diagnosis of CSOM were reviewed retrospectively. The healthy ears served as the control group. The length, diameter, surface area and volume of the tensor veli palatini muscle (TVPM) and levator veli palatini muscle (LVPM) were measured, in addition to the diameter of the pharyngeal orifice of the ET, volume of the Ostmann fat pad, bimucosal thickness of the lumen of the ET, and mucosal thickness. Results In the pathological ears, the mean length of the TVPM and LVPM was 22.6 mm and 19.3 mm, the mean diameter was 3.2 and 5.3 mm, and the mean volume was 1.75 and 3.2 cm(3), respectively. In addition, the mean diameter of the pharyngeal orifice of the ET was 1.9 mm. There were no significant between-group differences in the paratubal structures (p > 0.05). PMID:27008280

  12. Antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis in middle ear effusion during early phase of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, H; Koskela, M; Luotonen, J; Herva, E; Sipilä, P

    1990-01-01

    Serum type (IgG, IgM and IgA-class) and secretory type antibodies specific to Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn), Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Branhamella catarrhalis (Br) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 46 serum and 114 middle ear effusion (MEE) samples from 85 children with acute otitis media (AOM). The samples were obtained within 12 h from the onset of the ear symptoms. Serum (but not secretory) type antibodies to the infecting Pn serotype were found in 24% of the MEE samples of the patients with Pn AOM and, correspondingly, serum and/or secretory type antibodies to Hi and Br were seen in 54% and 63% of the MEE samples of the patients with Hi or Br AOM, respectively. Moreover, antibodies against bacteria other than the causative one could also be found in the MEE. The occurrence of the serum type antibodies against these bacteria in the MEE was closely correlated with their serum levels. The findings of this study indicate that during the very early phase of AOM, the MEE contains both serum type antibodies originating from the serum, and secretory antibodies of middle ear origin. Among them there are antibodies specific to the three most common bacteria causing AOM (Pn, Hi, and Br) regardless of the bacterial etiology of the AOM attack in question. PMID:2106760

  13. Prevalence of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) and Associated Hearing Impairment Among School-aged Children in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Muftah, Salem; Mackenzie, Ian; Faragher, Brian; Brabin, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is one of the leading causes of preventable disabling hearing impairment (DHI) in developing countries. Early detection and management complements advances made in other survival programs, improves work capacity, and enhances learning opportunities for school children. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CSOM and associated DHI among school children aged six to 16 years in Socotra Island, Yemen. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional community-based survey, from 20 April 2011 to 20 June 2011. The study procedures involved completing a questionnaire, an otoscopic ear examination, an audiometric test of hearing, and tuning fork tests for the type of DHI. Results A total of 686 children were interviewed and examined for CSOM and associated DHI of CSOM cases. The prevalence of CSOM was 7.4%, (95% CI 5.5–9.4). CSOM status was significantly associated with DHI (p=0.001), but no significant associations were found between demographic characteristics and CSOM status. Logistic regression identified four significant independent contributing factors: history of ear discharge in the last 12 months (odds ratio (OR) 7.8, 95% CI 3.9–15.6); swimming in local pools (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.4–25.4); recurrent respiratory tract infection more than three times per year (OR 5.3, 95% CI 2.5–11.0); and overcrowding with more than three families per house (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.7–11.5). . Conclusion The burden of CSOM in the children studied indicates a high level of DHI in these communities within Yemen. A history of ear discharge, swimming in local pools, recurrent respiratory infections, and overcrowded housing were the strongest predictors for CSOM. There is a need for better ear care and screening programs for early detection and management of this disease. PMID:26421117

  14. Predisposition to Childhood Otitis Media and Genetic Polymorphisms within the Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Kentala, Erna; Hammarén-Malmi, Sari; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; MacArthur, Carol J.; Wilmot, Beth; Casselbrant, Margaretha; Conley, Yvette P.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Mandel, Ellen M.; Vaarala, Outi; Kallio, Anna; Melin, Merit; Nieminen, Janne K.; Leinonen, Eira; Kere, Juha; Mattila, Petri S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Predisposition to childhood otitis media (OM) has a strong genetic component, with polymorphisms in innate immunity genes suspected to contribute to risk. Studies on several genes have been conducted, but most associations have failed to replicate in independent cohorts. Methods We investigated 53 gene polymorphisms in a Finnish cohort of 624 cases and 778 controls. A positive association signal was followed up in a tagging approach and tested in an independent Finnish cohort of 205 cases, in a British cohort of 1269 trios, as well as in two cohorts from the United States (US); one with 403 families and the other with 100 cases and 104 controls. Results In the initial Finnish cohort, the SNP rs5030717 in the TLR4 gene region showed significant association (OR 1.33, P = .003) to OM. Tagging SNP analysis of the gene found rs1329060 (OR 1.33, P = .002) and rs1329057 (OR 1.29, P = .003) also to be associated. In the more severe phenotype the association was stronger. This finding was supported by an independent Finnish case cohort, but the associations failed to replicate in the British and US cohorts. In studies on TLR4 signaling in 20 study subjects, the three-marker risk haplotype correlated with a decreased TNFα secretion in myeloid dendritic cells. Conclusions The TLR4 gene locus, regulating the innate immune response, influences the genetic predisposition to childhood OM in a subpopulation of patients. Environmental factors likely modulate the genetic components contributing to the risk of OM. PMID:26177520

  15. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  16. Genetic Polymorphisms of Functional Candidate Genes and Recurrent Acute Otitis Media With or Without Tympanic Membrane Perforation.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Marchisio, Paola; Orenti, Annalisa; Spena, Silvia; Bianchini, Sonia; Nazzari, Erica; Rosazza, Chiara; Zampiero, Alberto; Biganzoli, Elia; Principi, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of the genetic contribution to the development of recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) remains challenging. This study aimed to evaluate the potential association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in selected genes and rAOM and to analyze whether genetic variations might predispose to the development of complicated recurrent cases, such as those with tympanic membrane perforation (TMP).A total of 33 candidate genes and 47 SNPs were genotyped in 200 children with rAOM (116 with a history of TMP) and in 200 healthy controls.INFγ rs 12369470CT was significantly less common in the children with rAOM than in healthy controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25-1, P = 0.04). Although not significant, interleukin (IL)-1β rs 1143627G and toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 rs2737191AG were less frequently detected in the children with rAOM than in controls. The opposite was true for IL-8 rs2227306CT, which was found more frequently in the children with rAOM than in healthy controls. The IL-10 rs1800896TC SNP and the IL-1α rs6746923A and AG SNPs were significantly more and less common, respectively, among children without a history of TMP than among those who suffered from this complication (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.09-4.41, P = 0.02, and OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21-0.84, P = 0.01).This study is the first report suggesting an association between variants in genes encoding for factors of innate or adaptive immunity and the occurrence of rAOM with or without TMP, which confirms the role of genetics in conditioning susceptibility to AOM. PMID:26496338

  17. Genetic Polymorphisms of Functional Candidate Genes and Recurrent Acute Otitis Media With or Without Tympanic Membrane Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Marchisio, Paola; Orenti, Annalisa; Spena, Silvia; Bianchini, Sonia; Nazzari, Erica; Rosazza, Chiara; Zampiero, Alberto; Biganzoli, Elia; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of the genetic contribution to the development of recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) remains challenging. This study aimed to evaluate the potential association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in selected genes and rAOM and to analyze whether genetic variations might predispose to the development of complicated recurrent cases, such as those with tympanic membrane perforation (TMP). A total of 33 candidate genes and 47 SNPs were genotyped in 200 children with rAOM (116 with a history of TMP) and in 200 healthy controls. INFγ rs 12369470CT was significantly less common in the children with rAOM than in healthy controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25–1, P = 0.04). Although not significant, interleukin (IL)-1β rs 1143627G and toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 rs2737191AG were less frequently detected in the children with rAOM than in controls. The opposite was true for IL-8 rs2227306CT, which was found more frequently in the children with rAOM than in healthy controls. The IL-10 rs1800896TC SNP and the IL-1α rs6746923A and AG SNPs were significantly more and less common, respectively, among children without a history of TMP than among those who suffered from this complication (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.09–4.41, P = 0.02, and OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21–0.84, P = 0.01). This study is the first report suggesting an association between variants in genes encoding for factors of innate or adaptive immunity and the occurrence of rAOM with or without TMP, which confirms the role of genetics in conditioning susceptibility to AOM. PMID:26496338

  18. Air Pollution and Emergency Department Visits for Otitis Media: A Case-Crossover Study in Edmonton, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Zemek, Roger; Szyszkowicz, Mieczysław; Rowe, Brian H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common early childhood infections, resulting in an enormous economic burden to the health care system through unscheduled doctor visits and antibiotic prescriptions. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the potential association between ambient air pollution exposure and emergency department (ED) visits for OM. Materials and Methods Ten years of ED data were obtained from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and linked to levels of air pollution: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter (PM) of median aerometric diameter ≤ 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5 respectively). A time-stratified case-crossover technique was applied to analyze the associations between ambient air pollution and health outcomes. Conditional logistic regression analysis with the subject’s identification number as a stratum variable was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals after adjustment for meteorological factors. Results We based the analysis on 14,527 ED visits for OM over 10 years in children 1–3 years of age. We observed statistically significant positive associations between ED visits for OM and interquartile increases in CO and NO2 levels after adjusting for ambient temperature and relative humidity. We observed the strongest associations (expressed by ORs) in the warmer months (April–September) in girls and all patients for exposure to CO and NO2, and in boys for exposure to CO, for 2 days before an OM ED visit. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that ED visits for OM are associated with ambient air pollution. PMID:20663739

  19. Association of Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal colonization and other risk factors with acute otitis media in an unvaccinated Indian birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Rupa, V; Isaac, R; Rebekah, G; Manoharan, A

    2016-07-01

    In order to study the epidemiology of acute otitis media (AOM) and Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal colonization in the first 2 years of life, we followed up an unvaccinated birth cohort monthly and at visits when sick, with otoscopy to detect AOM and performed nasopharyngeal swabbing to detect S. pneumoniae. Serotyping of positive cultures was also performed. Of 210 babies who were enrolled at birth, 61 (29·05%) experienced 128 episodes of AOM [relative risk 2·63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·21-5·75] with maximum incidence in the second half of the first year of life. Episodes ranged from 1 to 7 (mean 2·1 episodes). Most (86·9%) babies with AOM had a positive culture swab giving an odds ratio (OR) of 1·93 (95% CI 1·03-3·62, P = 0·041) for this association. Other risk factors identified for AOM were winter season (OR 3·46, 95% CI 1·56-7·30, P = 0·001), upper respiratory infection (OR 2·43, 95% CI 1·43-4·51, P = 0·005); residents of small households were less likely to develop AOM (OR 0·32, 95% CI 0·17-0·57, P < 0·01). Common S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated during episodes were 19, 6, 15, 35, 7, 23, 9 and 10 which indicated a theoretical coverage for pneumococcal vaccines PCV10 and PCV13 constituent serotypes of 62·8%. We conclude that AOM in Indian infants is often associated with S. pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx as well as other risk factors. PMID:26931207

  20. Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Respiratory Viral Infections in the First Year of Life: Association With Acute Otitis Media Development

    PubMed Central

    Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Alvarez-Fernandez, Pedro; Jennings, Kristofer; Trujillo, Rocio; Marom, Tal; Loeffelholz, Michael J.; Miller, Aaron L.; McCormick, David P.; Patel, Janak A.; Pyles, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Sensitive diagnostic assays have increased the detection of viruses in asymptomatic individuals. The clinical significance of asymptomatic respiratory viral infection in infants is unknown. Methods. High-throughput, quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were used to detect 13 common respiratory viruses from nasopharyngeal specimens collected during 2028 visits from 362 infants followed from near birth up to 12 months of age. Specimens were collected at monthly interval (months 1–6 and month 9) and during upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) episodes. Subjects were followed closely for acute otitis media (AOM) development. Results. Viruses were detected in 76% of 394 URTI specimens and 27% of asymptomatic monthly specimens. Rhinovirus was detected most often; multiple viruses were detected in 29% of the specimens. Generalized mixed-model analyses associated symptoms with increasing age and female sex; detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, rhinovirus, metapneumovirus, and adenovirus was highly associated with symptoms. Increasing age was also associated with multiple virus detection. Overall, 403 asymptomatic viral infections in 237 infants were identified. Viral load was significantly higher in URTI specimens than asymptomatic specimens but did not differentiate cases of URTI with and without AOM complication. The rate of AOM complicating URTI was 27%; no AOM occurred following asymptomatic viral infections. AOM development was associated with increasing age and infection with RSV, rhinovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus, and bocavirus. Conclusions. Compared to symptomatic infection, asymptomatic viral infection in infants is associated with young age, male sex, low viral load, specific viruses, and single virus detection. Asymptomatic viral infection did not result in AOM. PMID:25205769

  1. Otitis media with effusion: Accuracy of tympanometry in detecting fluid in the middle ears of children at myringotomies

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khurshid; Khan, Saeed; Rehman, Habib ur; Javaid, Mohammad; Shahabi, Isteraj

    2016-01-01

    Objective: (1) The diagnostic accuracy of tympanometry in detecting fluid in the middle ear space in children with otitis media with effusion by comparing its findings with those of myringotomies. (2) Identify the age group most commonly affected by OME. Methods: This prospective study was conducted at the Department of ENT& Head and Neck Surgery, Postgraduate Medical Institute Hayatabad Medical complex, Peshawar from July 1, 2012 to April 30, 2015. Patients with suspicion of OME underwent tympanometry and later myringotomies. Using Jerger’s classification, Type B tympanogram with normal canal volume was considered as conclusive evidence of fluid in the middle ear space. Its findings were compared with those of the respective myringotomies. From the data collected, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values were calculated. Results: A total 117 ears of 63 patients were operated. The age range was 3 to 12 years. The commonest age group (58.7%) affected by OME was 6-8 years. Type B tympanogram with flat curve and normal canal volume was obtained in 71.4% of the ears. Comparison with myringotomy findings showed TP 85, TN 13, FP 5 and FN 14. The diagnostic value of tympanometry was; Sensitivity 85.85%, Specificity 72.22%, PPV 94.44%, NPV 48.14% and Accuracy of 83.76%. P value calculated using chi square test showed that there was significant difference between tympanometry and myringotomy findings in OME (p < 0.05). Conclusions: OME is common in age group 6-8 years. Tympanogram Type B with normal canal volume is fairly sensitive in diagnosing this condition. However for occurrence of false positive results, final decision regarding management should be made on clinical findings and other supportive audiological tests. PMID:27182263

  2. The relationship of otitis media in early childhood to attention dimensions during the early elementary school years.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stephen R; Ashley, Timothy A; Roberts, Joanne E; Zeisel, Susan A; Poe, Michele D

    2006-08-01

    This study examined the impact of otitis media with effusion (OME) and associated hearing loss between 6 and 48 months of age on attention dimensions (i.e., selective/focus, sustained) during the elementary school years. A prospective cohort design in which 74 African American infants were recruited between ages 6 and 12 months. Ear examinations were done repeatedly using both otoscopy and tympanometry, and hearing was assessed using standard audiometric procedures between 6 and 48 months. Multiple measures of attention (i.e., direct assessment, behavioral observations, parent/teacher ratings) were administered from kindergarten through second grade to assess two theoretical dimensions of attention: selective/focused and sustained. The home environment was assessed annually. Results indicated that neither early childhood OME nor hearing loss showed significant correlations with any of the longitudinal or cross-sectional measures of selective/focused attention and sustained attention. In contrast, children with mothers who had fewer years of education and who lived in less responsive and supportive home environments scored higher on both parent and teacher ratings of sustained attention (i.e., hyperactivity) through the second grade of elementary school. For NEPSY Auditory Attention in second grade, a significant interaction between the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment and hearing loss was uncovered. This interaction showed that children with hearing loss from poor home environments experienced greater difficulties on the NEPSY Auditory Attention task than those with hearing loss from good home environments. These findings do not support a direct linkage of a history of OME and associated hearing loss to difficulties in selective/focused attention or sustained attention in early elementary school children. Relationships between sociodemographic variables and attention-related functions appear stronger and should be considered as mediators in any

  3. The Importance of Integration of Stakeholder Views in Core Outcome Set Development: Otitis Media with Effusion in Children with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Nicola L.; Bruce, Iain A.; Kirkham, Jamie J.; Tierney, Stephanie; Callery, Peter; O'Brien, Kevin; Williamson, Paula R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 75% of children with cleft palate (CP) have Otitis Media with Effusion (OME) histories. Evidence for the effective management of OME in these children is lacking. The inconsistency in outcome measurement in previous studies has led to a call for the development of a Core Outcome Set (COS). Despite the increase in the number of published COS, involvement of patients in the COS development process, and methods to integrate the views of patients and health professionals, to date have been limited. Methods and Findings A list of outcomes measured in previous research was identified through reviewing the literature. Opinion on the importance of each of these outcomes was then sought from key stakeholders: Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) surgeons, audiologists, cleft surgeons, speech and language therapists, specialist cleft nurses, psychologists, parents and children. The opinion of health professionals was sought in a three round Delphi survey where participants were asked to score each outcome using a bespoke online system. Parents and children were also asked to score outcomes in a survey and provided an in-depth insight into having OME through semi-structured interviews. The results of the Delphi survey, interviews and parent/patient survey were brought together in a final consensus meeting with representation from all stakeholders. A final set of eleven outcomes reached the definition of “consensus in” to form the recommended COS: hearing; chronic otitis media (COM); OME; receptive language skills; speech development; psycho social development; acute otitis media (AOM); cholesteatoma; side effects of treatment; listening skills; otalgia. Conclusions We have produced a recommendation about the outcomes that should be measured, as a minimum, in studies of the management of OME in children with CP. The development process included input from key stakeholders and used novel methodology to integrate the opinion of healthcare professionals

  4. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in chronic otitis media with bone osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Jerzy; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Iżycka-Świeszewska, Ewa; Mikaszewski, Bogusław; Pawełczyk, Tadeusz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines in chronic otitis media. The expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6 and IL-10 were determined by Western blot analysis of tissue samples obtained during ear surgery. The expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-6 in cholesteatoma tissues were substantially higher compared to those determined in the granulation tissue. The highest levels of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6 proteins were observed in patients with bone destruction. There were no significant differences in the expression of IL-10 levels in cholesteatoma and normal skin, but in the granulation tissue its level was substantially higher. The level of IL-10 in cholesteatoma tissues inversely correlated with the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, the degree of bone destruction and cholesteatoma invasion. Increased expressions of TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-6 in chronic otitis media and a strong positive correlation between these cytokine levels and the degree of bone destruction indicate the destructive behavior of cholesteatoma or granulation tissue. PMID:21311206

  5. Hospitalisation with otitis media in early childhood and cognitive function in young adult life: a prevalence study among Danish conscripts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Otitis media (OM) is a very common condition in children and occurs during years that are critical to the development of learning, literacy, and math skills. Therefore, among a large cohort of Danish conscripts, we aimed to examine the association between hospitalisation with OM in early childhood and cognitive function and educational level in early adulthood. Methods We conducted a population-based prevalence study using linked data from healthcare databases and conscription records of Danish men born between 1977 and 1983. We identified all hospitalisations with OM before 8 years of age. Cognitive function was measured by the Boerge Prien validated group intelligence test (Danish Børge Prien Prøve, BPP). We adjusted for potential confounders with and without stratification by hearing impairment. Furthermore, we examined the association between hospitalisation with OM and the prevalence of having achieved a General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), stratified by quartiles of BPP scores. Results Of the 18 412 eligible conscripts aged 18–25 years, 1000 (5.5%) had been hospitalised with OM before age 8. Compared with conscripts without such a record, the adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) for a BPP score in the bottom quartile was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09–1.33). There was no major difference in the proportion of men with a GCSE and those without among those hospitalised with OM in early childhood. For men in the bottom and upper quartiles of BPP scores, the PRs for early childhood hospitalisation with OM were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.59–1.33) and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.88–1.05), respectively. Among men with severe hearing impairment, the proportion with a BPP score in the bottom quartile did not differ between those with and without an OM hospitalisation [PR = 1.01 (95% CI: 0.78–1.34)]. Conclusions Overall, we found that hospitalisation with OM in early childhood was associated with a slightly lower cognitive function in early

  6. The changing epidemiological and complications profile of chronic suppurative otitis media in a developing country after two decades.

    PubMed

    Orji, Foster T; Ukaegbe, Onyinyechi; Alex-Okoro, Jideofor; Ofoegbu, Vincent C; Okorafor, Ijeoma J

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the shift in epidemiological and complication profiles of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) over two decades in a resource-limited economy. A retrospective analysis of the prevalence of CSOM and its complications in tertiary health institution a over a period of 2 years were compared between 203 cases seen in 2009 and December 2010 (present era); and 343 cases seen in 1990 and 1991 (previous era). Data were collected on the demographic characteristics of the patients, age of onset of otorrhoea, the disease type, laterality and complications of CSOM. The prevalence of CSOM significantly reduced from 9 % in the previous era to 5.1 % in the present era (P < 0.0001). The mean age of the recent group was 27.6 ± 19.3 years, and was 21.6 ± 18.2 years in the previous group. (P = 0.009). Although both group had peak age prevalence at 11-20 years, recent group saw more significant adult population >20 years of age (P ≤ 0.001). More significant cases of cholesteatoma were documented in the recent group (3.4 %) than previous era (0.9 %) (P = 0.02). Although no significant change was noted regarding the rates of complication of CSOM in the two eras (P = 0.18), there was a notable shift toward predominant extracranial pattern of complication in the recent group (P = 0.04). The prevalence of CSOM has shown a significant reduction after two decades and it appears that there has been a shift in the epidemiology of CSOM towards a predominantly adult population in the recent years. Despite an overall reduction in the incidence of intracranial complications of CSOM in our series, its complication rates have not changed remarkably after 20 years. PMID:26611685

  7. Economic evaluation of surgical insertion of ventilation tubes for the management of persistent bilateral otitis media with effusion in children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The surgical insertion of Ventilation Tubes (VTs) for the management of persistent bilateral Otitis Media with Effusion (OME) in children remains a contentious issue due to the varying opinions regarding the risks and benefits of this procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of VTs insertion for the management of persistent bilateral OME in children, providing an additional perspective on the management of one of the commonest medical conditions of childhood. Methods A decision-tree model was constructed to assess the cost-effectiveness of VTs strategy compared with the Hearing Aids (HAs) alone and HAs plus VTs strategies. The model used data from published sources, and assumed a 2-year time horizon and UK NHS perspective for costs. Outcomes were computed as Quality-Adjusted Life-Years (QALYs) by attaching a utility value to the total potential gains in Hearing Level in decibels (dBHL) over 12 and 24 months. Modelling uncertainty in the specification of decision-tree probabilities and QALYs was performed through Monte Carlo simulation. Expected Value of Perfect Information (EVPI) and partial EVPI (EVPPI) analyses were conducted to estimate the potential value of future research and uncertainty associated with the key parameters. Results The VTs strategy was more effective and less costly when compared with the HAs plus VTs strategy, while the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the VTs strategy compared with the HAs strategy was £5,086 per QALY gained. At the willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000 per QALY, the probability that the VTs strategy is likely to be more cost-effective was 0.58. The EVPI value at population level of around £9.5 million at the willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000 indicated that future research in this area is potentially worthwhile, while the EVPPI analysis indicated considerable uncertainty surrounding the parameters used for computing the QALYs for which more precise estimates would be

  8. Study of Effect of Household Parental Smoking on Development of Acute Otitis Media in Children Under 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Soroush; Yarmohammadi, Parastoo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: High prevalence of acute otitis media (AOM) in children represents a combination of the factors developing eustachian tube dysfunction and higher susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections in children. This disease is relatively prevalent in Iran and much cost is spent annually to treat it. This study investigated the effect of household parental smoking on development of AOM in children under 12 years. Methods: In this case-control study all patients under the age of 12 years with AOM referring an ENT clinic in Shahrekord, southwest Iran between April 2014 and August 2014 were enrolled by convenience sampling. This study included two groups. Group 1 (G1) was exposed to parental smoking at home and group 2 (G2) was not. For the patients, a questionnaire of demographic data such as age and gender, the disease symptoms, parents’ education level, history of respiratory diseases, allergy, surgery (adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy, and tympanostomy), and household smoking was filled out by a specialist through interview. Results: In this study, 250 children 1-12 years with AOM, 145 in G1 and 105 in G2, were investigated. Clinical symptoms including fever (p=0.001) and hearing loss (p=0.014) were significantly more frequent in the children of G1 than G2, and otalgia, discharge, and tinnitus were similarly frequent in the two groups (p>0.05). Also, eardrum inflammation was more frequent in G1 than G2, with no significant difference (p>0.05). AOM was reported 70.3% in G1, which was higher than 26.7% reported in G2 (p=0.001). Also, asthma, recurrent ear pain, enlargement of the tonsils, and respiratory problems were more frequent in G1 than G2 (p<0.05). Conclusions: Parental smoking was a risk factor for AOM and respiratory problems and therefore the parents are recommended to avoid smoking near children to reduce the likelihood of AOM development and exacerbation in children. PMID:26652088

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Chronic Otitis Media: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mina; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha; Park, Moo Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background The performance of nationwide studies of chronic otitis media (COM) in adults has been insufficient in Korea. We evaluated the prevalence and risk factors of COM in Korea. Methods This study was conducted using data from the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 23,621). After excluding the subjects under 20 year old and suffered from cancers, 16,063 patients were evaluated for COM. Participants underwent a medical interview, physical examination, endoscopic examination, and blood and urine test. COM was diagnosed by trained residents in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology using an ear, nose, and throat questionnaire and otoendoscopy findings. Data on the presence and absence of COM were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify its risk factors. Results Of the 16,063 participants aged above 20 year old, the weighted prevalence of COM was 3.8%. In the multivariate analyses, the following factors showed high odds ratios (ORs) for COM: pulmonary tuberculosis (adjusted OR, 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-3.01), chronic rhinosinusitis (adjusted OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.17-2.98), mild hearing impairment (adjusted OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.34-2.85), moderate hearing impairment (adjusted OR, 4.00; 95% CI, 2.21-7.22), tinnitus (adjusted OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.34-2.49), increased hearing thresholds in pure tone audiometry in the right ear (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03), and left ear (adjusted OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02-1.04). The following factors showed low odds ratios for COM: hepatitis B (adjusted OR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.08-0.94) and rhinitis (adjusted OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.42-0.88). In addition, high levels of vitamin D, lead, and cadmium, EQ-5D index; and low red blood cell counts were associated with development of COM (Student’s t-test, P < 0.01). Conclusions Our population-based study showed that COM is not rare in Korea, and its development may be associated with various host and

  10. Surface Proteins and Pneumolysin of Encapsulated and Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Mediate Virulence in a Chinchilla Model of Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lance E.; Bradshaw, Jessica L.; Pipkins, Haley; McDaniel, Larry S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (NESp) make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surface proteins unique to NESp. A chinchilla model of otitis media (OM) was used to determine the effect various pneumococcal mutations have on pathogenesis in both NESp and encapsulated pneumococci. Epithelial cell adhesion and invasion assays were used to examine the effects in relation to deletion of intrinsic genes or expression of novel genes. A mouse model of colonization was also utilized for comparison of various pneumococcal mutants. It was determined that pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK) and pneumolysin (Ply) affect NESp middle ear pathogenesis, but only PspK affected epithelial cell adhesion. Experiments in an OM model were done with encapsulated strains testing the importance of native virulence factors and treatment of OM. First, a triple deletion of the common virulence factors PspA, PspC, and Ply, (ΔPAC), from an encapsulated background abolished virulence in an OM model while a PspC mutant had detectable, but reduced amounts of recoverable bacteria compared to wildtype. Next, treatment of OM was effective when starting antibiotic treatment within 24 h with resolution by 48 h post-treatment. Expression of NESp-specific virulence factor PspK in an encapsulated strain has not been previously studied, and we showed significantly increased adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells by pneumococci. Murine colonization was not significantly increased when an encapsulated strain expressed PspK, but colonization was increased when a capsule mutant expressed PspK. The

  11. Surface Proteins and Pneumolysin of Encapsulated and Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Mediate Virulence in a Chinchilla Model of Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Keller, Lance E; Bradshaw, Jessica L; Pipkins, Haley; McDaniel, Larry S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections result in a range of human diseases and are responsible for almost one million deaths annually. Pneumococcal disease is mediated in part through surface structures and an anti-phagocytic capsule. Recent studies have shown that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (NESp) make up a significant portion of the pneumococcal population and are able to cause disease. NESp lack some common surface proteins expressed by encapsulated pneumococci, but express surface proteins unique to NESp. A chinchilla model of otitis media (OM) was used to determine the effect various pneumococcal mutations have on pathogenesis in both NESp and encapsulated pneumococci. Epithelial cell adhesion and invasion assays were used to examine the effects in relation to deletion of intrinsic genes or expression of novel genes. A mouse model of colonization was also utilized for comparison of various pneumococcal mutants. It was determined that pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK) and pneumolysin (Ply) affect NESp middle ear pathogenesis, but only PspK affected epithelial cell adhesion. Experiments in an OM model were done with encapsulated strains testing the importance of native virulence factors and treatment of OM. First, a triple deletion of the common virulence factors PspA, PspC, and Ply, (ΔPAC), from an encapsulated background abolished virulence in an OM model while a PspC mutant had detectable, but reduced amounts of recoverable bacteria compared to wildtype. Next, treatment of OM was effective when starting antibiotic treatment within 24 h with resolution by 48 h post-treatment. Expression of NESp-specific virulence factor PspK in an encapsulated strain has not been previously studied, and we showed significantly increased adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells by pneumococci. Murine colonization was not significantly increased when an encapsulated strain expressed PspK, but colonization was increased when a capsule mutant expressed PspK. The

  12. Comparison of Conventional Versus Spiral Computed Tomography with Three Dimensional Reconstruction in Chronic Otitis Media with Ossicular Chain Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Naghibi, Saeed; Seifirad, Sirous; Adami Dehkordi, Mahboobeh; Einolghozati, Sasan; Ghaffarian Eidgahi Moghadam, Nafiseh; Akhavan Rezayat, Amir; Seifirad, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic otitis media (COM) can be treated with tympanoplasty with or without mastoidectomy. In patients who have undergone middle ear surgery, three-dimensional spiral computed tomography (CT) scan plays an important role in optimizing surgical planning. Objectives: This study was performed to compare the findings of three-dimensional reconstructed spiral and conventional CT scan of ossicular chain study in patients with COM. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients enrolled in the study underwent plane and three dimensional CT scan (PHILIPS-MX 8000). Ossicles changes, mastoid cavity, tympanic cavity, and presence of cholesteatoma were evaluated. Results of the two methods were then compared and interpreted by a radiologist, recorded in questionnaires, and analyzed. Logistic regression test and Kappa coefficient of agreement were used for statistical analyses. Results: Sixty two ears with COM were found in physical examination. A significant difference was observed between the findings of the two methods in ossicle erosion (11.3% in conventional CT vs. 37.1% in spiral CT, P = 0.0001), decrease of mastoid air cells (82.3% in conventional CT vs. 93.5% in spiral CT, P = 0.001), and tympanic cavity opacity (12.9% in conventional CT vs. 40.3% in spiral CT, P=0.0001). No significant difference was observed between the findings of the two methods in ossicle destruction (6.5% conventional CT vs. 56.4% in spiral CT, P = 0.125), and presence of cholesteatoma (3.2% in conventional CT vs. 42% in spiral CT, P = 0.172). In this study, spiral CT scan demonstrated ossicle dislocation in 9.6%, decrease of mastoid air cells in 4.8%, and decrease of volume in the tympanic cavity in 1.6%; whereas, none of these findings were reported in the patients' conventional CT scans. Conclusion: Spiral-CT scan is superior to conventional CT in the diagnosis of lesions in COM before operation. It can be used for detailed evaluation of ossicular chain in such patients. PMID:27127583

  13. Burden of acute otitis media in primary care pediatrics in Italy: a secondary data analysis from the Pedianet database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of acute otitis media (AOM) vary from country to country. Geographical variations together with differences in study designs, reporting and settings play a role. We assessed the incidence of AOM in Italian children seen by primary care paediatricians (PCPs), and described the methods used to diagnose the disease. Methods This secondary data analysis from the Pedianet database considered children aged 0 – 6 years between 01/2003 and 12/2007. The AOM episodes were identified and validated by means of patient diaries. Incidence rates/100 person-years (PY) were calculated for total AOM and for single or recurrent AOM. Results The 92,373 children (52.1% males) were followed up for a total of 227,361 PY: 23,039 (24.9%) presented 38,241 episodes of AOM (94.6% single episodes and 5.4% recurrent episodes). The total incidence rate of AOM in the 5-year period was 16.8 episodes per 100 PY (95% CI: 16.7-16.9), including single AOM (15.9 episodes per 100 PY; 95% CI: 15.7-16.1) and recurrent AOM (0.9 episodes per 100 PY; 95% CI: 0.9-0.9). There was a slight and continuously negative trend decrease over time (annual percent change −4.6%; 95%CI: -5.3, -3.9%). The AOM incidence rate varied with age, peaking in children aged 3 to 4 years (22.2 episodes per 100 PY; 95% CI 21.8-22.7). The vast majority of the AOM episodes (36,842/38,241, 96.3%) were diagnosed using a static otoscope; a pneumatic otoscope was used in only 3.7%. Conclusions Our data fill a gap in our knowledge of the incidence of AOM in Italy, and indicate that AOM represents a considerable burden for the Italian PCP system. Educational programmes concerning the diagnosis of AOM are needed, as are further studies to monitor the incidence in relation to the introduction of wider pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. PMID:23190626

  14. Nasopharyngeal flora in children with acute otitis media before and after implementation of 7 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have investigated the impact of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on pneumococcal (Sp) and staphylococcal (Sa) nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage. Few have investigated the impact on Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc) carriage. We aimed to compare the NP carriage rates in young children with acute otitis media (AOM) before and after PCV7 implementation in France. Methods Prior to PCV7 implementation, we performed 4 successive randomized trials with NP samples. These studies compared several antibiotic regimens for treating AOM in young children (6 to 30 months). After PCV7 implementation, to assess the impact of the vaccination program on NP flora, young children with AOM were enrolled in a prospective surveillance study. In each study, we obtained an NP sample to analyze the carriage rates of Sp, Hi, Mc and Sa and the factors influencing the carriage. Standardized history and physical examination findings were recorded; the methods used for NP swabs (sampling and cultures) were the same in all studies. Results We enrolled 4,405 children (mean age 13.9 months, median 12.8). Among the 2,598 children enrolled after PCV7 implementation, 98.3% were vaccinated with PCV7. In comparing the pre- and post-PCV7 periods, we found a slight but non-significant decrease in carriage rates of pneumococcus (AOR = 0.85 [0.69;1.05]), H. influenzae (AOR = 0.89 [0.73;1.09]) and S. aureus (AOR = 0.92 [0.70;1.19]). By contrast, the carriage rate of M. catarrhalis increased slightly but not significantly between the 2 periods (AOR = 1.08 [0.95;1.2]). Among Sp carriers, the proportion of PCV7 vaccine types decreased from 66.6% to 10.7% (P < 0.001), penicillin intermediate-resistant strains increased from 30.3% to 43.4% (P < 0.001), and penicillin-resistant strains decreased greatly from 22.8% to 3.8% (P < 0.001). The proportion of Hi ß-lactamase-producing strains decreased from 38.6% to 17.1% (P < 0.001). Conclusion The carriage

  15. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Weimer, Kristin E.; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C.; Jayaprakash, C.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Swords, W. Edward; Das, Jayajit

    2015-02-01

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host-microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species.

  16. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Weimer, Kristin E.; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C.; Jayaprakash, C.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Swords, W. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host-microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species. PMID:25473880

  17. Otitis media with effusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections may receive a small, daily dose of antibiotics to prevent new infections. You can make the following changes to help clear up the fluid behind the eardrum: Avoid cigarette smoke Encourage infants to breastfeed Treat allergies by staying away from ...

  18. Efficacy of Solithromycin (CEM-101) for Experimental Otitis Media Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Figueira, M; Fernandes, P; Pelton, S I

    2016-09-01

    Solithromycin (CEM-101) is a "fourth-generation" macrolide, as it has three binding site and is acid stable. The three binding sites confer activity against bacteria resistant to the older macrolides and ketolides, including multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The objective of this study was to evaluate solithromycin pharmacokinetics (PK), middle ear fluid (MEF) concentrations, and microbiologic efficacy in a chinchilla model of experimental otitis media (EOM) due to strains of S. pneumoniae or NTHi. Plasma PK (maximum concentration of drug in serum [Cmax] and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [AUC0-24]) and middle ear fluid (MEF) concentrations were determined. Isolates with specified antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were inoculated directly into the middle ear (ME). Plasma and MEF were collected for PK and MEF cultures performed to determine efficacy. Solithromycin administered at 150 mg/kg of body weight/day resulted in Cmax and AUC0-24 values of 2.2 μg/ml and 27.4 μg · h/ml in plasma and 1.7 μg/ml and 28.2 μg · h/ml in extracellular MEF on day 1. By day 3, Cmax and AUC0-24 values had increased to 4.5 μg/ml and 54 μg · h/ml in plasma and 4.8 μg/ml and 98.6 μg · h/ml in extracellular MEF. For NTHi EOM, three isolates with MIC/minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) ratios of 0.5/1 μg/ml (isolate BCH1), 2/2 μg/ml (isolate BMC1247C), and 4/4 μg/ml (isolate BMC1213C) were selected. The MEF of >85% of animals infected with BCH1 and BMC1247C was sterilized. For NTHi BMC1213, >85% of MEF cultures remained positive. For S. pneumoniae EOM, 3 isolates with MIC/MBC ratios of 0.06/0.125 μg/ml (S. pneumoniae 331), 0.125/1 μg/ml (S. pneumoniae CP-645 [MLSB phenotype]), and 0.5/2 μg/ml (CP-712 [mefA subclass mefA resistance]) were selected. Solithromycin sterilized MEF in 100% of animals infected with S. pneumoniae 331 and S. pneumoniae CP-645. ME infection persisted in 60% of

  19. Genetic and functional evidence for a locus controlling otitis media at chromosome 10q26.3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Otitis media (OM) is a common childhood disease characterised by middle ear effusion and inflammation. Susceptibility to recurrent acute OM and chronic OM with effusion is 40-70% heritable. Linkage studies provide evidence for multiple putative OM susceptibility loci. This study attempts to replicate these linkages in a Western Australian (WA) population, and to identify the etiological gene(s) in a replicated region. Methods Microsatellites were genotyped in 468 individuals from 101 multicase families (208 OM cases) from the WA Family Study of OM (WAFSOM) and non-parametric linkage analysis carried out in ALLEGRO. Association mapping utilized dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data extracted from Illumina 660 W-Quad analysis of 256 OM cases and 575 controls from the WA Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken in ProbABEL. RT-PCR was used to compare gene expression in paired adenoid and tonsil samples, and in epithelial and macrophage cell lines. Comparative genomics methods were used to identify putative regulatory elements and transcription factor binding sites potentially affected by associated SNPs. Results Evidence for linkage was observed at 10q26.3 (Zlr = 2.69; P = 0.0036; D10S1770) with borderline evidence for linkage at 10q22.3 (Zlr = 1.64; P = 0.05; D10S206). No evidence for linkage was seen at 3p25.3, 17q12, or 19q13.43. Peak association at 10q26.3 was in the intergenic region between TCERG1L and PPP2R2D (rs7922424; P = 9.47 × 10-6), immediately under the peak of linkage. Independent associations were observed at DOCK1 (rs9418832; P = 7.48 × 10-5) and ADAM12 (rs7902734; P = 8.04 × 10-4). RT-PCR analysis confirmed expression of all 4 genes in adenoid samples. ADAM12, DOCK1 and PPP2R2D, but not TCERG1L, were expressed in respiratory epithelial and macrophage cell lines. A significantly associated polymorphism (rs7087384) in strong LD with the top SNP (rs

  20. Prospective study about the incidence of B lactamase producing bacteriae in otitis media in the population of the emergency room of the University Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Colón, I; García, H

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the incidence of beta-lactamase producing pathogens causing otitis media (O.M.) in the Emergency Room population of the University Pediatric Hospital. In our first four months of study, 22 patients, between the ages of 6 months to 13 y/o have been evaluated. Middle ear secretion cultures were obtained by tympanocentesis. The organisms recovered from cultures were S. epidermidis 3 (14%), S. pneumoniae 2 (9%) H. influenzae 1 (5%), mix flora 1 (5%) and 13 (59%) with no growth. None of these organisms were beta-lactamase producers. Up to 64% of the patients had history of 2 to 5 OM episodes during the last six months. Interesting is the association of bronchial asthma, sinusitis and allergy history with OM. Final study results will be presented in a near future. PMID:2375816

  1. Rationale behind high-dose amoxicillin therapy for acute otitis media due to penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococci: support from in vitro pharmacodynamic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Lister, P D; Pong, A; Chartrand, S A; Sanders, C C

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether increased doses of amoxicillin should be used to treat acute pneumococcal otitis media, an in vitro pharmacokinetic model was used to evaluate the killing of pneumococci by amoxicillin when middle ear pharmacokinetics were simulated. Logarithmic-phase cultures were exposed to peak concentrations of 3, 6, and 9 microg of amoxicillin per ml every 12 h, and an elimination half-life of 1.6 h was simulated. Changes in viable bacterial counts were measured over 36 h. All three doses rapidly decreased the viable bacterial counts of penicillin-susceptible strains below the 10-CFU/ml limit of detection by 6 to 10 h and maintained counts below this limit through 36 h. The 3-microg/ml peak dose was much less effective against two of three strains with intermediate penicillin resistance and all three penicillin-resistant strains, with bacterial counts approaching those in drug-free control cultures by 12 h. The 6-microg/ml peak dose completely eliminated two of three strains with intermediate penicillin resistance and maintained viable counts of the other nonsusceptible strains at 1.5 to 2 logs below the initial inoculum through 36 h. The 9-microg/ml peak dose was most effective, completely eliminating all three strains with intermediate penicillin resistance and maintaining the viable counts of the resistant strains at 3 to 4 logs below the original inoculum. The pharmacodynamics observed in this study suggest that peak concentrations of amoxicillin of 6 to 9 microg/ml may be sufficient for the elimination of penicillin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal strains causing otitis media, especially those with intermediate resistance to amoxicillin. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies are needed to determine if these levels can be achieved in middle ear fluid with amoxicillin at 70 to 90 mg/kg/day divided into two daily doses. If these levels are reliably achieved, then clinical studies are warranted. PMID:9303386

  2. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  3. Pro-inflammatory interleukins in middle ear effusions from atopic and non-atopic children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Stankiewicz-Szymczak, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    Chronic otitis media with effusion (OME) is associated with irreversible changes in the middle ear, sometimes leading to hearing loss and abnormal language development in children. While the pathogenesis of OME is not fully understood, inflammatory and allergic factors are thought to be involved. The study aimed to investigate the role of cytokines in the local development of chronic OME, and assess differences in the cytokine profiles between atopic and non-atopic children. 84 atopic and non-atopic children with chronic OME (mean age of 6 years 7 months) were studied. Age-matched children with hypertrophy of the adenoids and Eustachian tube dysfunction served as the control group. The number of past acute otitis media (AOM) episodes, their age, and the type of effusion were recorded for all children. Pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8) were determined and the presence of pathogenic bacteria in the patients' effusions was examined. High concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were found in the effusions in all children with chronic OME, with the highest levels observed in the non-atopic group. The atopic group showed persistently high IL-1β levels, while in the non-atopic children, IL-1β and TNF-α levels positively correlated with the patient's age and the number of past AOM episodes. Pathogenic bacteria were more frequently isolated from effusions in non-atopic children. In both atopic and non-atopic children, pro-inflammatory cytokines are found at high concentrations. This argues in favor of instituting anti-inflammatory management for treating OME, regardless of atopy. PMID:26078091

  4. Preliminary pediatric clinical evaluation of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 in preventing recurrent pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and recurrent acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Donato, Guido; Fomia, Federico; Adami, Teresa; Careddu, Domenico; Cassandro, Claudia; Albera, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Background The oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 has been shown clearly to antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans, by releasing two bacteriocins named salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B. Unpublished observations indicate that it can also antagonize the growth of other bacteria involved in acute otitis media. Because of its ability to colonize the oral cavity and its safety profile, we have tested its efficacy in reducing the incidence of streptococcal pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis and episodes of acute otitis media. Methods We enrolled 82 children, including 65 with and 17 without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology. Of those with recurrent pathology, 45 were treated daily for 90 days with an oral slow-release tablet containing five billion colony-forming units of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®), and the remaining 20 served as an untreated control group. The 17 children without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral pathology were used as an additional control group. After 90 days of treatment, a 6-month follow-up period without treatment was included to evaluate a possible persistent protective role for the previously administered product. Results The 41 children who completed the 90-day course of Bactoblis showed a reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (about 90%) and/or acute otitis media (about 40%), calculated by comparing infection rates in the previous year. The 90-day treatment also reduced the reported incidence of pharyngeal and ear infections by about 65% in the 6-month follow-up period during which the product was not administered. Subjects tolerated the product well, with no side effects or dropouts reported. Conclusion Prophylactic administration of S. salivarius K12 to children with a history of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology reduced episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infections and/or tonsillitis as

  5. Vinpocetine Inhibits Streptococcus pneumoniae–Induced Upregulation of Mucin MUC5AC Expression via Induction of MKP-1 Phosphatase in the Pathogenesis of Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yun; Komatsu, Kensei; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Miyata, Masanori; O’Neill Bohn, Ashley; Xu, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common bacterial pathogens causing OM. Mucin MUC5AC plays an important role in mucociliary clearance of bacterial pathogens. However, if uncontrolled, excessive mucus contributes significantly to conductive hearing loss. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapeutic agents that suppress mucus overproduction. In this study, we show that a currently existing antistroke drug, vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, inhibited S. pneumoniae–induced mucin MUC5AC upregulation in cultured middle ear epithelial cells and in the middle ear of mice. Moreover, vinpocetine inhibited MUC5AC upregulation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK pathway in an MKP-1–dependent manner. Importantly, ototopical administration of vinpocetine postinfection inhibited MUC5AC expression and middle ear inflammation induced by S. pneumoniae and reduced hearing loss and pneumococcal loads in a well-established mouse model of OM. Thus, these studies identified vinpocetine as a potential therapeutic agent for inhibiting mucus production in the pathogenesis of OM. PMID:25972475

  6. Interleukin 17A promotes pneumococcal clearance by recruiting neutrophils and inducing apoptosis through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Aie; Zhang, Xuemei; Xiang, Yun; Huang, Yifei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Yusi; Yin, Yibing; He, Yujuan

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive and human-restricted pathogen colonizing the nasopharynx with an absence of clinical symptoms as well as a major pathogen causing otitis media (OM), one of the most common childhood infections. Upon bacterial infection, neutrophils are rapidly activated and recruited to the infected site, acting as the frontline defender against emerging microbial pathogens via different ways. Evidence shows that interleukin 17A (IL-17A), a neutrophil-inducing factor, plays important roles in the immune responses in several diseases. However, its function in response to S. pneumoniae OM remains unclear. In this study, the function of IL-17A in response to S. pneumoniae OM was examined using an in vivo model. We developed a model of acute OM (AOM) in C57BL/6 mice and found that neutrophils were the dominant immune cells that infiltrated to the middle ear cavity (MEC) and contributed to bacterial clearance. Using IL-17A knockout (KO) mice, we found that IL-17A boosted neutrophil recruitment to the MEC and afterwards induced apoptosis, which was identified to be conducive to bacterial clearance. In addition, our observation suggested that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was involved in the recruitment and apoptosis of neutrophils mediated by IL-17A. These data support the conclusion that IL-17A contributes to the host immune response against S. pneumoniae by promoting neutrophil recruitment and apoptosis through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:24664502

  7. Bone destruction mechanisms in chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma: specific production by cholesteatoma tissue in culture of bone-resorbing activity attributable to interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, A; Toshima, M; Yuasa, R; Takasaka, T

    1991-12-01

    To clarify specific mechanisms underlying cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction, surgical specimens of middle ear inflammatory granulation tissue with or without cholesteatoma were maintained in vitro and the bone-resorbing activity in their culture supernatants was analyzed by means of calcium release from mouse calvaria. Almost the same levels of bone-resorbing activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 were found in the supernatants of both types of tissue. By contrast, aural polyp tissue yielded hardly any such activity or PGE2. Under the influence of indomethacin, however, only tissue with cholesteatoma produced considerable bone resorption activity, whereas PGE2 production was suppressed completely. Such activity in the cholesteatoma culture supernatant was not due to contamination of endotoxin and proved to be blocked by the introduction of anti-interleukin (IL)-1 alpha antibody into the calvarial assay system. Anti-IL-1 beta antibody had no effect on such activity. Interleukin-1 alpha was detected only in cholesteatoma tissue culture supernatants by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by bioassay. These data suggest that the bone destruction in otitis media with cholesteatoma may be attributed to IL-1 alpha in addition to PGE2. PMID:1746847

  8. Evaluation of the Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist and Immunoregulatory Interleukin-10 in the Middle Ear in Chronic Otitis Media With Effusion in Children With and Without Atopy

    PubMed Central

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Stankiewicz-Szymczak, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the course of chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) has been documented. However, there are fewer studies on the action of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the middle ear. We sought determine whether there is an association between COME and anti-inflammatory cytokines and whether there are any differences in the cytokine profile in COME children with and without atopy. Methods Eighty-four children were divided into 3 groups: 32 nonatopic children with COME (group NA), 31 atopic children with COME (group A), and 21 children without COME and without atopy (control group C). Specimens from the middle ear were collected and evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the cytokines interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and immunoregulatory IL-10. Results Significantly higher IL-10 concentrations were found in both nonatopic and atopic children with COME compared to controls. No significant differences in IL-1Ra levels were found between atopic and nonatopic children with COME and the control group. Conclusion We found no differences in the levels of IL-1Ra in atopic and nonatopic children with COME compared to controls. However, we found elevated IL-10 levels in the middle ear effusions from children with COME, with or without atopy. These elevated immunoregulatory cytokine levels suggest a role for new immunomodulatory treatments to prevent disease progression in COME, regardless of atopy. PMID:27090281

  9. Detection of respiratory pathogens in pediatric acute otitis media by PCR and comparison of findings in the middle ear and nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshina, Svetlana; Mayanskiy, Nikolay; Shipulina, Olga; Kulichenko, Tatiana; Alyabieva, Natalia; Katosova, Lyubovj; Lazareva, Anna; Skachkova, Tatyana; Elkina, Maria; Matosova, Svetlana; Shipulin, German

    2016-05-01

    We conducted a series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) in order to detect bacteria (7 species) and viruses (17 species) in middle ear fluid (MEF) and nasopharynx (Nph) of children with acute otitis media (AOM; n=179). Bacterial and viral nucleic acids were detected in MEF of 78.8% and 14.5% patients, respectively. The prevalence was as follows: Streptococcus pneumoniae, 70.4%; Haemophilus influenzae, 17.9%; Staphylococcus aureus, 16.8%; Streptococcus pyogenes, 12.3%; Moraxella catarrhalis, 9.5%; rhinovirus, 9.5%; and adenovirus, 3.4%. The overall rate of PCR-positive specimens for bacterial pathogens was 2.6 times higher, compared to culture results. The rate of PCR-positive results and the distribution of pathogens in the Nph were similar to those in the MEF. Nph PCR results had variable positive predictive values and high negative predictive values in predicting MEF findings. Our results indicate that Nph PCR could be a practical tool for examining respiratory pathogens in children with acute infections. PMID:26971180

  10. Comparison of the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin in acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media: A randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arijit; Jana, Utpal; Khaowas, Ajoy; Das, Saumik; Mandal, Ananya; Das, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin for the treatment of mild to moderate cases of acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media (AECSOM). Materials and Methods: Adult patients diagnosed with AECSOM were screened and patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were randomized to receive either cefpodoxime 200 mg twice daily or ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily orally for 7 days. The primary outcome of this randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial (Registration Number - CTRI/2011/10/002079) was clinical success rate at day 14 visit and the secondary outcome was incidence of adverse events (AEs). Forty-six patients were enrolled: 23 in the cefpodoxime group and 23 in the ciprofloxacin group. Results: The clinical success rates were 95.6% in the cefpodoxime group versus 90.9% in the ciprofloxacin group. These rates are comparable, but no statistically significant difference was observed between the groups. Few mild and self-limiting AEs were observed and the tolerability of both the drugs was also good. Conclusion: The results of this randomized, open-labeled phase IV clinical trial showed that a 7-day course of cefpodoxime is therapeutically comparable to ciprofloxacin in terms of both clinical effectiveness and safety for the treatment of patients with AECSOM. PMID:23326103

  11. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Are Major Threats of Otitis Media in Wollo Area, Northeastern Ethiopia: A Ten-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Argaw-Denboba, Ayele; Abejew, Asrat Agalu; Mekonnen, Alemayehu Gashaw

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious threat to human health that needs an urgent action. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of bacteria isolated from patient ear discharges suspected of otitis media. A retrospective analysis was performed using culture and antibiotic susceptibility test results of 1225 patients who visited Dessie Regional Health Research Laboratory from 2001 to 2011. Results showed a strong association (P < 0.001) between age and the risk of acquiring middle ear infection. The predominant bacterial isolates were Proteus spp. (28.8%), Staphylococcus aureus (23.7%), and Pseudomonas spp. (17.2%). Most of the isolated bacteria showed high resistance to ampicillin (88.5%), ceftriaxone (84.5%), amoxicillin (81.9%), and tetracycline (74.5%). About 72.5% of Proteus spp. and 62.2% of Pseudomonas spp. have developed resistance to one and more antibiotics used to treat them. This retrospective study also revealed the overall antibiotic resistance rate of bacterial isolates was increased nearly twofold (P = 0.001) over the last decade. Relatively, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin were the most effective antibiotics against all the isolates. In conclusion, antibiotic-resistant bacteria are alarmingly increasing in Wollo area, northeastern Ethiopia, and becoming a major public health problem in the management of patients with middle ear infection. PMID:26904125

  12. Increased Biofilm Formation by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Isolates from Patients with Invasive Disease or Otitis Media versus Strains Recovered from Cases of Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Domenech, Arnau; Garmendia, Junkal; Langereis, Jeroen D.; Mayer, Pascal; Calatayud, Laura; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation by nontypeable (NT) Haemophilus influenzae remains a controversial topic. Nevertheless, biofilm-like structures have been observed in the middle-ear mucosa of experimental chinchilla models of otitis media (OM). To date, there have been no studies of biofilm formation in large collections of clinical isolates. This study aimed to investigate the initial adhesion to a solid surface and biofilm formation by NT H. influenzae by comparing isolates from healthy carriers, those with noninvasive respiratory disease, and those with invasive respiratory disease. We used 352 isolates from patients with nonbacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (NB-CAP), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), OM, and invasive disease and a group of healthy colonized children. We then determined the speed of initial adhesion to a solid surface by the BioFilm ring test and quantified biofilm formation by crystal violet staining. Isolates from different clinical sources displayed high levels of biofilm formation on a static solid support after growth for 24 h. We observed clear differences in initial attachment and biofilm formation depending on the pathology associated with NT H. influenzae isolation, with significantly increased biofilm formation for NT H. influenzae isolates collected from patients with invasive disease and OM compared with NT H. influenzae isolates from patients with NB-CAP or COPD and healthy colonized subjects. In all cases, biofilm structures were detached by proteinase K treatment, suggesting an important role for proteins in the initial adhesion and static biofilm formation measured by crystal violet staining. PMID:25192997

  13. Vinpocetine inhibits Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced upregulation of mucin MUC5AC expression via induction of MKP-1 phosphatase in the pathogenesis of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Yun; Komatsu, Kensei; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Miyata, Masanori; O'Neill Bohn, Ashley; Xu, Haidong; Yan, Chen; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-06-15

    Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common bacterial pathogens causing OM. Mucin MUC5AC plays an important role in mucociliary clearance of bacterial pathogens. However, if uncontrolled, excessive mucus contributes significantly to conductive hearing loss. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapeutic agents that suppress mucus overproduction. In this study, we show that a currently existing antistroke drug, vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, inhibited S. pneumoniae-induced mucin MUC5AC upregulation in cultured middle ear epithelial cells and in the middle ear of mice. Moreover, vinpocetine inhibited MUC5AC upregulation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK pathway in an MKP-1-dependent manner. Importantly, ototopical administration of vinpocetine postinfection inhibited MUC5AC expression and middle ear inflammation induced by S. pneumoniae and reduced hearing loss and pneumococcal loads in a well-established mouse model of OM. Thus, these studies identified vinpocetine as a potential therapeutic agent for inhibiting mucus production in the pathogenesis of OM. PMID:25972475

  14. Low cord blood type 14 pneumococcal IgG1 but not IgG2 antibody predicts early infant otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, N J; Daly, K A; Lindgren, B R; Meland, M; Le, C T; Giebink, G S

    2000-06-01

    Type-specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides 14 and 19F were measured in cord blood samples from 425 neonates, to determine which antibody subclass was most strongly associated with otitis media (OM) during the first 6 months of life (early OM). Early OM was significantly associated with type 14 IgG1 antibody in the lowest antibody quartile (P=.055) but not with type 19F IgG1 antibody or with either IgG2 antibody. IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were significantly intercorrelated for type 14 (r=.52, P<.001) and type 19F (r=.38, P<.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that having type 14 IgG1 antibody in the lowest quartile, child care attendance, and sibling and maternal OM history were independent risk factors for early OM. Although type-specific pneumococcal IgG2 antibody concentrations were significantly higher than IgG1 concentrations, IgG2 antibodies apparently are not protective against OM during early infancy. PMID:10837178

  15. Lemon-flavored cod liver oil and a multivitamin-mineral supplement for the secondary prevention of otitis media in young children: pilot research.

    PubMed

    Linday, Linda A; Dolitsky, Jay N; Shindledecker, Richard D; Pippenger, C E

    2002-07-01

    We measured blood levels of fatty acids, vitamin A, and trace metals in children undergoing ambulatory surgery for placement of tympanostomy tubes and a comparison group having other ambulatory surgical procedures. We then performed a small, outpatient, secondary prevention study using nutritional supplements chosen on the basis of those blood levels. The study subjects had lower levels of red blood cell eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) than did adult controls. Consistent with previous reports, the levels of vitamin A were < or = 40 microg/dL for 69% of our subjects, and the plasma selenium levels for children were lower than published values for adults. We then studied one otitis media (OM) season; 8 children (0.8 to 4.4 years of age) received 1 teaspoon of lemon-flavored cod liver oil (containing both EPA and vitamin A) and 1 half-tablet of a selenium-containing children's chewable multivitamin-mineral tablet per day. During this OM season, study subjects received antibiotics for OM for 12.3% +/- 13.4% (SD; p < .05) fewer days during supplementation than before supplementation. Larger, controlled trials are warranted to assess the utility of cod liver oil (of acceptable purity and taste) and a children's multivitamin-mineral preparation containing selenium, both for the prevention of OM and for the acceptance of delayed prescription of antibiotics for this disorder. PMID:12126022

  16. Diagnostic Performance of Endoscopic and Microscopic Procedures for Identifying Different Middle Ear Structures and Remaining Disease in Patients with Chronic Otitis Media: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Farhad; Shariatpanahi, Elnaz; Jahanshahi, Javane; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnostic performance of endoscopic and microscopic procedures for detecting diseases of the middle ear in patients with chronic otitis media (COM) has rarely been investigated. This study was conducted to compare the performance of these procedures for identifying middle ear structures and their associated diseases in COM patients. Methods In this prospective cohort study, 58 patients with chronic COM, who were candidates for tympanoplasty with or without a mastoidectomy, were enrolled. Before the surgical intervention, the middle ear was examined via an operating microscope and then through an endoscope to identify the middle ear structures as well as diseases associated with the middle ear. Results The patients were 15 years of age or older. The anatomical parts of the middle ear – the epitympanic, posterior mesotympanic, and hypotympanic structures – were more visible through an endoscope than through a microscope. In addition, the various segments of the mesotympanum, oval window, round window, and Eustachian tube were more visible via endoscopy. The post-operative endoscopic reevaluation of the middle ear revealed that a cholesteatoma had remained in four of 13 patients after surgery. Conclusion According to the results of this study, in cases in which there is poor visibility with the operating microscope or the surgeon suspects remaining disease within the middle ear, endoscopy could be utilized to improve the evaluation of more hidden middle ear pits and structures, particularly if there is a potentially recrudescent pathology. PMID:26167935

  17. Phylogenetic relatedness and diversity of non-typable Haemophilus influenzae in the nasopharynx and middle ear fluid of children with acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ravinder; Chang, Arthur; Xu, Qingfu; Casey, Janet R.

    2011-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) strains prospectively isolated from healthy children and children with acute otitis media (AOM) were analysed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 165 NTHi isolates were collected over a 3.5 year time frame during 2006 through 2009. The strains were tested for β-lactamase production; 28.5 % were positive. Seventy different NTHi sequence types (STs) were identified of which 29 (41.4 %) were novel. NTHi strains did not show any phylogenetic grouping or clustering among asymptomatic colonizing strains or strains that caused AOM, or based on β-lactamase enzyme production. Evaluation of triplets and other siblings over time demonstrated relatively frequent genetic exchanges in NTHi isolates in vivo in a short time frame and subsequent transfer among children in a family. Comparison of the MLST STs isolated at different time points showed that in ~85 % of the nasopharynx (NP) colonizations, NTHi strains cleared from the host within 3 months, that sequential colonization in the same child involved different strains in all cases except one, and that NP and middle ear isolates were identical STs in 84 % of cases. In this first study of its type to our knowledge, we could not identify predominant MLST types among strains colonizing the NP versus those causing AOM or expressing a β-lactamase enzyme conferring penicillin resistance in children. PMID:21799196

  18. The biogeography of polymicrobial infection.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Apollo; McNally, Luke; Darch, Sophie E; Brown, Sam P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2016-02-01

    Microbial communities are spatially organized in both the environment and the human body. Although patterns exhibited by these communities are described by microbial biogeography, this discipline has previously only considered large-scale, global patterns. By contrast, the fine-scale positioning of a pathogen within an infection site can greatly alter its virulence potential. In this Review, we highlight the importance of considering spatial positioning in the study of polymicrobial infections and discuss targeting biogeography as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26714431

  19. Distribution of Pneumococcal Surface Protein A Families 1 and 2 among Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Children in Finland Who Had Acute Otitis Media or Were Nasopharyngeal Carriers▿

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Merit M.; Hollingshead, Susan K.; Briles, David E.; Hanage, William P.; Lahdenkari, Mika; Kaijalainen, Tarja; Kilpi, Terhi M.; Käyhty, Helena M.

    2008-01-01

    PspA is a structurally variable surface protein important to the virulence of pneumococci. PspAs are serologically cross-reactive and exist as two major families. In this study, we determined the distribution of PspA families 1 and 2 among pneumococcal strains isolated from the middle ear fluid (MEF) of children with acute otitis media and from nasopharyngeal specimens of children with pneumococcal carriage. We characterized the association between the two PspA families, capsular serotypes, and multilocus sequence types (STs) of the pneumococcal isolates. MEF isolates (n = 201) of 109 patients and nasopharyngeal isolates (n = 173) of 49 children were PspA family typed by whole-cell enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Genetic typing (PCR) of PspA family was done for 60 isolates to confirm EIA typing results. The prevalences of PspA families 1 and 2 were similar among pneumococci isolated from MEF (51% and 45%, respectively) and nasopharyngeal specimens (48% each). Isolates of certain capsule types as well as isolates of certain STs showed statistical associations with either family 1 or family 2 PspA. Pneumococci from seven children with multiple pneumococcal isolates appeared to express serologically different PspA families in different isolates of the same serotype; in three of the children the STs of the isolates were the same, suggesting that antigenic changes in the PspA expressed may have taken place. The majority of the isolates (97%) belonged to either PspA family 1 or family 2, suggesting that a combination including the two main PspA families would make a good vaccine candidate. PMID:18753340

  20. Kinetic analysis and evaluation of the mechanisms involved in the resolution of experimental nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced otitis media after transcutaneous immunization.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Clements, John D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2013-07-25

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a simple and needle-free method with which to induce protective immune responses. Using a chinchilla model of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI)-induced otitis media (OM), we examined the efficacy afforded by TCI with a novel chimeric immunogen called 'chimV4' which targets two critical adhesins expressed by NTHI, outer membrane protein P5 and the majority subunit of NTHI Type IV pilus, PilA. Experimental OM was first established in cohorts of animals, and then TCI performed via a therapeutic immunization regime by rubbing vaccine formulations on hydrated pinnae. The kinetics of resolution of established experimental disease was evaluated by clinically-relevant assessments of OM, bacterial culture of planktonic and adherent NTHI within the middle ear and gross examination of the relative amount of NTHI mucosal biofilms within the middle ear space. Within seven days after primary TCI, a significant reduction in the signs of OM, significantly fewer NTHI adherent to the middle ear mucosa and significant resolution of mucosal biofilms was detected in animals that received chimV4+ the adjuvant LT(R192G-L211A), compared to animals administered LT(R192G-L211A) alone or saline by TCI (p<0.05) with eradication of NTHI within an additional seven days. The mechanism for rapid disease resolution involved efflux of activated dermal dendritic cells from the pinnae after TCI, secretion of factors chemotactic for CD4(+) T-cells, induction of polyfunctional IFNγ- and IL-17-producing CD4(+) T-cells and secretion of host defense peptide within the middle ear. These data support TCI as a therapeutic intervention against experimental NTHI-induced OM and begin to elucidate the host response to immunization by this noninvasive regimen. PMID:23092856

  1. In vitro study of IL-8 and goblet cells: possible role of IL-8 in the aetiology of otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Marina G; Birchall, John P; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2002-03-01

    One of the main characteristics of otitis media with effusion (OME) is the differentiation of basal cells into goblet cells with subsequent proliferation in a modified respiratory epithelium leading to the formation of mucin-rich effusion in the middle ear cleft. In order to determine the effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines identified in OME, e.g. IL-1beta, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-6 and IL-8, on goblet cells, and to clarify the role of IL-8 in particular, we used the human goblet cell line HT29-MTX, which secretes two OME-related mucins: MUC5AC and MUC5B. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha stimulated the secretion of IL-8 in HT29-MTX goblet cells. Dose- (2-200 ng/ml) and time- (0-5 days) response studies of IL-8-induced mucin secretion were carried out. IL-8 upregulated the secretion of MUC5AC and MUC5B mucins in a concentration-dependent manner, with a maximum response at an IL-8 concentration of 20 ng/ml. IL-8 (20 ng/ml)-mediated mucin secretion persisted for up to 5 days, with a peak response 72 h after the addition of cytokine. These results suggest that: (i) goblet cells are target cells for the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-8 and can contribute to the pathogenesis of OME by increasing both the concentration of IL-8 and the secretion of mucin; and (ii) IL-8 stimulates prolonged mucin secretion from goblet cells and may be involved in the maintenance of the disease in the chronic stage. PMID:11936905

  2. Targeting of Slc25a21 Is Associated with Orofacial Defects and Otitis Media Due to Disrupted Expression of a Neighbouring Gene

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Simon; Estabel, Jeanne; Ingham, Neil; Pearson, Selina; Ryder, Edward; Carragher, Damian M.; Walker, Nicolas; Bussell, James; Chan, Wai-In; Keane, Thomas M.; Adams, David J.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Lelliott, Christopher J.; Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Karp, Natasha A.; Steel, Karen P.; White, Jacqueline K.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin

    2014-01-01

    Homozygosity for Slc25a21tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi results in mice exhibiting orofacial abnormalities, alterations in carpal and rugae structures, hearing impairment and inflammation in the middle ear. In humans it has been hypothesised that the 2-oxoadipate mitochondrial carrier coded by SLC25A21 may be involved in the disease 2-oxoadipate acidaemia. Unexpectedly, no 2-oxoadipate acidaemia-like symptoms were observed in animals homozygous for Slc25a21tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi despite confirmation that this allele reduces Slc25a21 expression by 71.3%. To study the complete knockout, an allelic series was generated using the loxP and FRT sites typical of a Knockout Mouse Project allele. After removal of the critical exon and neomycin selection cassette, Slc25a21 knockout mice homozygous for the Slc25a21tm1b(KOMP)Wtsi and Slc25a21tm1d(KOMP)Wtsi alleles were phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type. This led us to explore the genomic environment of Slc25a21 and to discover that expression of Pax9, located 3′ of the target gene, was reduced in homozygous Slc25a21tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi mice. We hypothesize that the presence of the selection cassette is the cause of the down regulation of Pax9 observed. The phenotypes we observed in homozygous Slc25a21tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi mice were broadly consistent with a hypomorphic Pax9 allele with the exception of otitis media and hearing impairment which may be a novel consequence of Pax9 down regulation. We explore the ramifications associated with this particular targeted mutation and emphasise the need to interpret phenotypes taking into consideration all potential underlying genetic mechanisms. PMID:24642684

  3. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis of a grommets-led care pathway for children with cleft palate affected by otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, Syed; Payne, Katherine; Fenwick, Elisabeth; O'Brien, Kevin; Bruce, Iain

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of evidence to guide the management of otitis media with effusion (OME), which is a common problem causing significant hearing impairment in children with cleft palate. The insertion of grommets is currently being used to correct hearing impairment and prevent complications of unmanaged OME, but there is ongoing discussion about whether the benefits of grommets outweigh the costs and risks. A decision-tree model was developed to assess the surgical insertion of grommets with two non-surgical alternatives (hearing-aids and do-nothing strategies) in cleft palate children with persistent bilateral OME. The model assumed a 2-year time horizon and a UK National Health Service perspective. Outcomes were valued using quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) estimated by linking utility values with potential hearing gains measured in decibels. Multiple data sources were used, including reviews of the clinical effectiveness, resource use and utility literature, and supplemented with expert opinion. Uncertainty in the model parameters was assessed using probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Expected value of perfect information analysis was used to calculate the potential value of future research. The results from the probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicated that the grommets strategy was associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £9,065 per QALY gained compared with the do-nothing strategy, and the hearing-aids strategy was extended dominated by the grommets strategy. The population expected value of perfect information was £5,194,030 at a willingness to pay threshold of £20,000 per QALY, implying that future research could be potentially worthwhile. This study found some evidence that the insertion of grommets to manage cleft palate children with bilateral OME is likely to be cost-effective, but further research is required to inform this treatment choice. PMID:24906214

  4. A Questionnaire-Based Survey of Indian ENT Surgeons to Estimate Clinic Prevalence of Acute Otitis Media, Diagnostic Practices, and Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    D'silva, Liesel; Parikh, Raunak; Nanivadekar, Arun; Joglekar, Sadhna

    2013-12-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is common in Indian children, but there is limited published information on its clinic prevalence, clinicians' diagnostic practices, and their management strategies. We approached 649 ear-nose-throat (ENT) surgeons to assess these aspects of AOM. We conducted the survey between May 2010 and February 2011 with the same set of ENT surgeons practising across India, once each during summer, monsoon and winter, using a validated 36-item questionnaire to record their reflective recall. 78 % (506/649) of approached ENT surgeons responded. The clinic prevalence of AOM was 43 % with peaks reported in July and December. 96 % (486/506) of the surgeons used otoscopy to diagnose AOM. 86 % (435/506) prescribed analgesics, and 89 % (449/506) prescribed decongestants. 98 % (495/506) treated AOM with an antibiotic at initial consultation: amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 78 % (395/506), amoxicillin 29 % (144/506), cefpodoxime 29 % (149/506), cefixime 28 % (141/506) and azithromycin 27 % (134/506). Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 32 % (162/506) and cefpodoxime 27% (137/506) were mostly prescribed for relapse. The average reported duration of initial antibiotic therapy was 7 days and for relapse was 9 days. The reported clinic prevalence of AOM was higher (43 %) than anticipated (about 10 %) in ENT practice. Almost all the ENT surgeons used an otoscope to diagnose AOM. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was the preferred antibiotic for treating AOM either initially or for relapse. Most surgeons also used analgesics and decongestants for symptomatic relief. PMID:24427717

  5. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment. PMID:26340928

  6. Polymicrobial-Host Interactions during Infection.

    PubMed

    Tay, Wei Hong; Chong, Kelvin Kian Long; Kline, Kimberly A

    2016-08-28

    Microbial pathogenesis research has, historically, focused on the study of infections as monomicrobial events. However, the advent of next generation sequencing and culture-independent identification methods has revealed that many, if not most, infections are polymicrobial either in origin or in manifestation. Polymicrobial infections are often associated with increased infection severity and poorer patient outcome. Multiple infecting microbes can interact synergistically to induce virulence traits, alter the infected niche, or modulate the host immune response, all of which can promote polymicrobial infection. Importantly, a polymicrobial environment at the time of inoculation, consisting of multiple pathogens or pathogens in combination with the native microbiota, can contribute to the pathogenic progression of a single predominant organism at the time of diagnosis. Hence, in order to completely understand and elucidate the impact of these polymicrobial interactions on infection outcomes, a thorough examination of the entire microbial community present throughout the pathogenic cascade is required: from the time of inoculation to symptomology to resolution. In this review, we highlight the themes of metabolite exploitation, immune modulation, niche optimization, and virulence induction that contribute to polymicrobial infections. We focus on recent literature about microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions that promote polymicrobial infections with an emphasis on understanding these interactions to identify better interventions for these sometimes complex infections. PMID:27170548

  7. Controlled multicenter study on chronic suppurative otitis media treated with topical applications of ciprofloxacin 0.2% solution in single-dose containers or combination of polymyxin B, neomycin, and hydrocortisone suspension.

    PubMed

    Miró, N

    2000-11-01

    Otic drops of either ciprofloxacin 0.2% solution (CIP) or a combination of polymyxin B, neomycin, and hydrocortisone suspension (PNH) were administered for 6 to 12 days to patients (14-71 years old) with chronic suppurative otitis media in a randomized, nonblinded, multicenter clinical trial. Two hundred thirty-two enrolled patients were analyzed for efficacy on a "per protocol" basis. The most frequently identified causal agents were Staphylococcus aureus (28% of the patients), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19%), and Staphylococcus sp (9%). Clinical success was observed in 91% and 87% of the CIP-and PNH-treated patients, respectively. At 1-month follow-up, 4% of CIP and 6% of PNH patients showed a relapse of otorrhea. Bacteriologic eradication was seen in 89% and 85% of patients in the CIP and PNH groups, respectively. At 1-month follow-up, reinfection or recurrence of infection appeared in 3 patients in the PNH group and in 1 patient in the CIP group. Both treatments were well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events were pruritus, stinging, and earache. Audiometric tests did not show changes attributable to study drugs in any but 1 patient in the PNH group. This clinical trial shows that topical 0.2% ciprofloxacin solution in single-dose containers is effective and well tolerated in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media. PMID:11077352

  8. Diarrheagenic Pathogens in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Brianna; Ramamurthy, T.; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Rajendran, Krishnan; Nair, G. Balakrish

    2011-01-01

    During systematic active surveillance of the causes of diarrhea in patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases and Beliaghata General Hospital in Kolkata, India, we looked for 26 known gastrointestinal pathogens in fecal samples from 2,748 patients. Samples from about one-third (29%) of the patients contained multiple pathogens. Polymicrobial infections frequently contained Vibrio cholerae O1 and rotavirus. When these agents were present, some co-infecting agents were found significantly less often (p = 10–5 to 10–33), some were detected significantly more often (p = 10–5 to 10–26), and others were detected equally as often as when V. cholerae O1 or rotavirus was absent. When data were stratified by patient age and season, many nonrandom associations remained statistically significant. The causes and effects of these nonrandom associations remain unknown. PMID:21470448

  9. Toxic inner ear lesion following otitis media with effusion: a comparative CT-study regarding the morphology of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Stelzer, Tim; Wiegand, Susanne; Güldner, Christian; Teymoortash, Afshin; Günzel, Thomas; Hagen, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory airways can lead to a delayed viral otitis media (VOM) caused by a diffusion of viruses/virus particles through the round window membrane and resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. The treatment of choice is immediate paracentesis, evacuation of all fluids from the middle ear cavity, and haemorrheological infusions. However, in some cases, persistent symptoms may be an indication for a surgical approach using mastoidectomy. In high-resolution computed tomography, an extended small-sized pneumatisation of the mastoid cells with complete shading was found in these non-responsive cases. Therefore, a direct means of inner ear affliction through weak parts of the labyrinthine bone may be hypothesised. Patients suffering from a toxic inner ear lesion (TIEL) following a common cold, treated over a 10-year period in a Tertiary Care Centre (N = 52, 57 ears), were identified and the morphological characteristics of the temporal bones of affected patients were examined by means of high-resolution computed tomography (hrCT). The findings were compared with a matched control group of 64 normal ears (CONT). Measurements included the grade of pneumatisation, distances within the temporal bones and Hounsfield units (HU) at defined anatomical structures. In the TIEL group, we found a small-sized pneumatisation in 79.4 % and a medium-sized pneumatisation in 10.9 %, thus differing from the CONT group and the literature data. Thickness of the bone wall of the lateral semicircular canal (LSC) and distances within the aditus ad antrum were significantly reduced in the TIEL group. HU's were markedly lower in the TIEL group at the precochlea, the LSC, and dorsolateral to the promentia of the LSC. There was a correlation between the HU's at the prominentia of the LSC and the hearing loss (p = 0.002). Persisting interosseous globuli, as described in 1897 by Paul Manasse, form an osseochondral network within the otic capsule and may be responsible

  10. Absent otoacoustic emissions predict otitis media in young Aboriginal children: A birth cohort study in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in an arid zone of Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Deborah; Weeks, Sharon; Jacoby, Peter; Elsbury, Dimity; Finucane, Janine; Stokes, Annette; Monck, Ruth; Coates, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Background Otitis media (OM) is the most common paediatric illness for which antibiotics are prescribed. In Australian Aboriginal children OM is frequently asymptomatic and starts at a younger age, is more common and more likely to result in hearing loss than in non-Aboriginal children. Absent transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) may predict subsequent risk of OM. Methods 100 Aboriginal and 180 non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid zone of Western Australia were followed regularly from birth to age 2 years. Tympanometry was conducted at routine field follow-up from age 3 months. Routine clinical examination by an ENT specialist was to be done 3 times and hearing assessment by an audiologist twice. TEOAEs were measured at ages <1 and 1–2 months. Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate the association between absent TEOAEs and subsequent risk of OM. Results At routine ENT specialist clinics, OM was detected in 55% of 184 examinations in Aboriginal children and 26% of 392 examinations in non-Aboriginal children; peak prevalence was 72% at age 5–9 months in Aboriginal children and 40% at 10–14 months in non-Aboriginal children. Moderate-severe hearing loss was present in 32% of 47 Aboriginal children and 7% of 120 non-Aboriginal children aged 12 months or more. TEOAE responses were present in 90% (46/51) of Aboriginal children and 99% (120/121) of non-Aboriginal children aged <1 month and in 62% (21/34) and 93% (108/116), respectively, in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children at age 1–2 months. Aboriginal children who failed TEOAE at age 1–2 months were 2.6 times more likely to develop OM subsequently than those who passed. Overall prevalence of type B tympanograms at field follow-up was 50% (n = 78) in Aboriginal children and 20% (n = 95) in non-Aboriginal children. Conclusion The burden of middle ear disease is high in all children, but particularly in Aboriginal children, one-third of whom suffer from moderate-severe hearing

  11. Association between early bacterial carriage and otitis media in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pnc), nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat) are the most important bacterial pathogens associated with otitis media (OM). Previous studies have suggested that early upper respiratory tract (URT) bacterial carriage may increase risk of subsequent OM. We investigated associations between early onset of URT bacterial carriage and subsequent diagnosis of OM in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children living in the Kalgoorlie-Boulder region located in a semi-arid zone of Western Australia. Methods Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children who had nasopharyngeal aspirates collected at age 1- < 3 months and at least one clinical examination for OM by an ear, nose and throat specialist before age 2 years were included in this analysis. Tympanometry to detect middle ear effusion was also performed at 2- to 6-monthly scheduled field visits from age 3 months. Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the relationship between early carriage and subsequent diagnosis of OM controlling for environmental factors. Results Carriage rates of Pnc, NTHi and Mcat at age 1- < 3 months were 45%, 29% and 48%, respectively, in 66 Aboriginal children and 14%, 5% and 18% in 146 non-Aboriginal children. OM was diagnosed at least once in 71% of Aboriginal children and 43% of non-Aboriginal children. After controlling for age, sex, presence of other bacteria and environmental factors, early nasopharyngeal carriage of NTHi increased the risk of subsequent OM (odds ratio = 3.70, 95% CI 1.22-11.23) in Aboriginal children, while Mcat increased the risk of OM in non-Aboriginal children (odds ratio = 2.63, 95% CI 1.32-5.23). Early carriage of Pnc was not associated with increased risk of OM. Conclusion Early NTHi carriage in Aboriginal children and Mcat in non-Aboriginal children is associated with increased risk of OM independent of environmental factors. In addition to addressing environmental risk

  12. Otitis media and linguistic incompetence.

    PubMed

    Lewis, N

    1976-07-01

    In the examination of some effects of chronic middle ear disorders on the development of auditory processing skills in socioculturally disadvantaged children, three groups of children received a battery of tests assessing speech hearing in quiet, speech hearing in noise, auditory discrimination, phonemic synthesis, dichotic listening, verbal intelligence, and nonverbal intelligence. The experimental group consisted of 14 Australian aboriginal children with histories of chronic middle disorder, whereas two control groups, one European and the other aboriginal, each contained 18 children with normal middle ear function. The results demonstrated that chronic middle ear impairment not only restricts the development of some auditory processing skills, but distorts their integrational pattern. PMID:938317

  13. An open randomised study of autoinflation in 4- to 11-year-old school children with otitis media with effusion in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ian; Vennik, Jane; Harnden, Anthony; Voysey, Merryn; Perera, Rafael; Breen, Maria; Bradley, Brendan; Kelly, Sadie; Yao, Guiqing; Raftery, James; Mant, David; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a very common problem in primary care, but one that lacks an evidence-based non-surgical treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine the clinical effectiveness of nasal balloon autoinflation for the treatment of OME in children. DESIGN A pragmatic, two-arm, open randomised controlled trial. SETTING Forty-three general practices from 17 UK primary care trusts recruited between January 2012 and February 2013. PARTICIPANTS School children aged 4-11 years with a history of OME symptoms or related concerns in the previous 3 months, and a type B tympanogram, diagnostic of a middle ear effusion, in one or both ears. INTERVENTION Three hundred and twenty children were randomised, 160 to each group, using independent web-based computer-generated randomisation (with minimisation based on age, sex and baseline severity of OME) to either nasal balloon autoinflation performed three times per day for 1-3 months plus usual care, or usual care alone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The proportion of children demonstrating clearance of middle ear fluid in at least one ear (with normal tympanograms) at 1 and 3 months, assessed blind to treatment. An ear-related measure of quality of life (QoL) [a 14-point questionnaire on the impact of OME (OMQ-14)], weekly diary recorded symptoms, compliance and adverse events were all secondary outcomes. RESULTS At 1 month, the proportion of children with normal tympanograms was 47.3% (62/131) in those allocated to autoinflation and 35.6% (47/132) in those receiving usual care [adjusted relative risk (RR) 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.88]. At 3 months, the proportions were 49.6% (62/125) and 38.3% (46/120), respectively (adjusted RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.83; number needed to treat = 9). The change in OMQ-14 also favoured the intervention arm (adjusted global score difference -0.42; p = 0.001). Reported compliance was good: 89% in the first month and 80% in months 2 and 3. Adverse events included

  14. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drops, keeping water out of the ear, and pain relievers are the most common forms of treatment. External otitis may involve the entire canal, as ... does not allow fungus to grow as well. Treatment of boils depends on ... relievers, such as oxycodone with acetaminophen , can be given ...

  15. Polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Richard J.; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation of the periodontal area may arise when complex microbial communities transition from a commensal to a pathogenic entity. Communication among constituent species leads to polymicrobial synergy among metabolically compatible organisms that acquire functional specialization within the developing community. Keystone pathogens, even at low abundance, elevate community virulence and the resulting dysbiotic community targets specific aspects of host immunity to further disable immune surveillance while promoting an overall inflammatory response. Inflammophilic organisms benefit from proteinaceous substrates derived from inflammatory tissue breakdown. Inflammation and dysbiosis reinforce each other and the escalating environmental changes further select for a pathobiotic community. We have synthesized the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiotic components of the process into a new model for inflammatory diseases. PMID:25498392

  16. Polymicrobial Infective Endocarditis: Clinical Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    García-Granja, Pablo Elpidio; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Olmos, Carmen; Sarriá, Cristina; Ferrera, Carlos; Gómez, Itziar; Román, José Alberto San

    2015-12-01

    To describe the profile of left-sided polymicrobial endocarditis (PE) and to compare it with monomicrobial endocarditis (ME).Among 1011 episodes of left-sided endocarditis consecutively diagnosed in 3 tertiary centers, between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2014, 60 were polymicrobial (5.9%), 821 monomicrobial (81.7%), and in 123 no microorganism was detected (12.2%). Seven patients (0.7%) were excluded from the analysis because contamination of biologic tissue could not be discarded. The authors described the clinical, microbiologic, echocardiographic, and outcome of patients with PE and compared it with ME.Mean age was 64 years SD 16 years, 67% were men and 30% nosocomial. Diabetes mellitus (35%) were the most frequent comorbidities, fever (67%) and heart failure (43%) the most common symptoms at admission. Prosthetic valves (50%) were the most frequent infection location and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (48%) and enterococci (37%) the leading etiologies. The most repeated combination was coagulase-negative Staphylococci with enterococci (n = 9). Polymicrobial endocarditis appeared more frequently in patients with underlying disease (70% versus 56%, P = 0.036), mostly diabetics (35% versus 24%, P = 0.044) with previous cardiac surgery (15% versus 8% P = 0.049) and prosthetic valves (50% versus 37%, P = 0.038). Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, enterococci, Gram-negative bacilli, anaerobes, and fungi were more frequent in PE. No differences on age, sex, symptoms, need of surgery, and in-hospital mortality were detected.Polymicrobial endocarditis represents 5.9% of episodes of left-sided endocarditis in our series. Despite relevant demographic and microbiologic differences between PE and ME, short-term outcome is similar. PMID:26656328

  17. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (10(7) CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  18. Antibodies against the majority subunit of Type IV pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Ward, Michael O.; Jordan, Zachary B.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual ‘top-down’ dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT, and delivered via a non-invasive transcutaneous immunization route, induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization, and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  19. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  20. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (107 CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  1. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  2. Decline in antibiotic resistance and changes in the serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with acute otitis media; a 2001-2011 survey by the French Pneumococcal Network.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M; Varon, E; Lepoutre, A; Gravet, A; Baraduc, R; Brun, M; Chardon, H; Cremniter, J; Croizé, J; Dalmay, F; Demachy, M-C; Fosse, T; Grelaud, C; Hadou, T; Hamdad, F; Koeck, J-L; Luce, S; Mermond, S; Patry, I; Péchinot, A; Raymond, J; Ros, A; Segonds, C; Soullié, B; Tandé, D; Vergnaud, M; Vernet-Garnier, V; Wallet, F; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Lanotte, P

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in antibiotic resistance and circulating serotypes of pneumococci isolated from middle ear fluid of French children with AOM during the period 2001-2011, before and after the introduction of the PCV-7 (2003) and PCV-13 (2010) vaccines. Between 2001 and 2011 the French pneumococcal surveillance network analysed the antibiotic susceptibility of 6683 S. pneumoniae isolated from children with AOM, of which 1569 were serotyped. We observed a significant overall increase in antibiotic susceptibility. Respective resistance (I+R) rates in 2001 and 2011 were 76.9% and 57.3% for penicillin, 43.0% and 29.8% for amoxicillin, and 28.6% and 13.0% for cefotaxime. We also found a marked reduction in vaccine serotypes after PCV-7 implementation, from 63.0% in 2001 to 13.2% in 2011, while the incidence of the additional six serotypes included in PCV-13 increased during the same period, with a particularly high proportion of 19A isolates. The proportion of some non-PCV-13 serotypes also increased between 2001 and 2011, especially 15A and 23A. Before PCV-7 implementation, most (70.8%) penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to PCV-7 serotypes, whereas in 2011, 56.8% of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to serotype 19A. Between 2001 and 2011, antibiotic resistance among pneumococci responsible for AOM in France fell markedly, and PCV-7 serotypes were replaced by non-PCV-7 serotypes, especially 19A. We are continuing to assess the impact of PCV-13, introduced in France in 2010, on pneumococcal serotype circulation and antibiotic resistance. PMID:25636925

  3. Polymicrobial community-acquired pneumonia: An emerging entity.

    PubMed

    Cillóniz, Catia; Civljak, Rok; Nicolini, Antonello; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is more common than previously recognized. This growing new entity can influence inflammation, host immunity and disease outcomes in CAP patients. However, the true incidence is complicated to determine and probably underestimated due mainly to many cases going undetected, particularly in the outpatient setting, as the diagnostic yield is restricted by the sensitivity of currently available microbiologic tests and the ability to get certain types of clinical specimens. The observed rate of polymicrobial cases may also lead to new antibiotic therapy considerations. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis, microbial interactions in pneumonia, epidemiology, biomarkers and antibiotic therapy for polymicrobial CAP. PMID:26494527

  4. Polymicrobial Interactions: Impact on Pathogenesis and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian M.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; O'May, Graeme A.; Costerton, J. William

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Microorganisms coexist in a complex milieu of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses on or within the human body, often as multifaceted polymicrobial biofilm communities at mucosal sites and on abiotic surfaces. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the complicated biofilm phenotype during infection; moreover, even less is known about the interactions that occur between microorganisms during polymicrobial growth and their implications in human disease. Therefore, this review focuses on polymicrobial biofilm-mediated infections and examines the contribution of bacterial-bacterial, bacterial-fungal, and bacterial-viral interactions during human infection and potential strategies for protection against such diseases. PMID:22232376

  5. [Recovery of facultatives and anaerobes from frozen specimens with a polymicrobial nature].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Chizuko; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2003-01-01

    Microbiological examination of frozen specimens is sometimes carried out in clinical microbiology and the result is used as an aid of diagnosis and/or treatment of polymicrobial infections. The study was carried out to reevaluate the merit of freezing specimens in clinical microbiology. A total of 10 specimens with a polymicrobial nature were included in this study. Before and after freezing specimens, we isolated facultative and anaerobic bacteria using a set of primary isolation media, consisting of three aerobic agar plates (MacConkey agar, blood agar and chocolate agar) and four pre-reduced anaerobic agar plates (HK Blood agar, HK blood agar with paromomycin (PM) and vancomycin (VM), phenyl ethyl-alcohol (PEA) agar and Bacteroides bile esculin (BBE) agar). All the procedures were done in a properly controlled anaerobic chamber. The number of isolates before and after freezing was 79 and 70, respectively. Among the strains isolated before freezing, 33 strains were recovered on the same kin of media artery freezing, without a remarkable decrease in the quantity. But 26 strains were not recovered and 2 strains were recovered with a remarkable decrease. Among 26 strains, 15 strains could be successfully backed up on the different kind of media. In conclusion, an anaerobic technique with an anaerobic chamber and a set of isolatin plates including blood agar, chocolate agar, HK blood agar, PEA blood agar, HK blood agar with PM and VM enable us to estimate the bacteriology before freezing from frozen specimens. PMID:14984303

  6. Bone scanning in severe external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, W.J.; Shary, J.H. 3d.; Nichols, L.T.; Lucente, F.E.

    1986-11-01

    Technetium99 Methylene Diphosphate bone scanning has been considered an early valuable tool to diagnose necrotizing progressive malignant external otitis. However, to our knowledge, no formal studies have actually compared bone scans of otherwise young, healthy patients with severe external otitis to scans of patients with clinical presentation of malignant external otitis. Twelve patients with only severe external otitis were studied with Technetium99 Diphosphate and were compared to known cases of malignant otitis. All scans were evaluated by two neuroradiologists with no prior knowledge of the clinical status of the patients. Nine of the 12 patients had positive bone scans with many scans resembling those reported with malignant external otitis. Interestingly, there was no consistent correlation between the severity of clinical presentation and the amount of Technetium uptake. These findings suggest that a positive bone scan alone should not be interpreted as indicative of malignant external otitis.

  7. Etiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Middle Ear Fluid Pathogens in Costa Rican Children With Otitis Media Before and After the Introduction of the 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in the National Immunization Program

    PubMed Central

    Abdelnour, Arturo; Arguedas, Adriano; Dagan, Ron; Soley, Carolina; Porat, Nurith; Mercedes Castrejon, Maria; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Colindres, Romulo; Pirçon, Jean-Yves; DeAntonio, Rodrigo; Van Dyke, Melissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute otitis media (AOM) microbiology was evaluated in children after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction in Costa Rica (private sector, 2004; National Immunization Program, 2009). This was a combined prospective and retrospective study conducted in a routine clinical setting in San José, Costa Rica. In the prospective part of the study, which was conducted post-PCV7 introduction (2010–2012), standard bacteriological procedures were used to evaluate the etiology and serotype distribution of middle ear fluid samples collected by tympanocentesis or otorrhea from children aged 3–59 months diagnosed with AOM. E-tests were used to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in culture-positive samples. Retrospective data recorded between 1999 and 2004 were used for comparison of bacterial etiology and serotype distribution before and after PCV7 introduction. Statistical significance was evaluated in bivariate analyses at the P-value < 0.05 level (without multiplicity correction). Post-PCV7 introduction, Haemophilus influenzae was detected in 118/456 and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 87/456 AOM episodes. Most H. influenzae isolates (113/118) were non-typeable. H. influenzae was more (27.4% vs 20.8%) and S. pneumoniae less (17.1% vs 25.5%) frequently observed in vaccinated (≥2 PCV7 doses or ≥1 PCV7 dose at >1 year of age) versus unvaccinated children. S. pneumoniae non-susceptibility rates were 1.1%, 34.5%, 31.7%, and 50.6% for penicillin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), respectively. H. influenzae non-susceptibility rate was 66.9% for TMP-SMX. Between pre- and post-PCV7 introduction, H. influenzae became more (20.5% vs 25.9%; P-value < 0.001) and S. pneumoniae less (27.7% vs 19.1%; P-value = 0.002) prevalent, and PCV7 serotype proportions decreased among pneumococcal isolates (65.8% vs 43.7%; P-value = 0.0005). Frequently identified pneumococcal serotypes were 19F (34.2%), 3 (9

  8. Extracranial complications of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M M; Kundu, S C; Haque, M R; Shamsuzzaman, A K; Khan, M K; Halder, K K

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of extracranial complications of CSOM cases who attended to the department of ENTD, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital during the period from July'1999 to June' 2001. Different types of extracranial complications of CSOM were presented here. A total of 100 cases, diagnosed clinically and radiologically were included in the study of which 66 were male and 34 were female giving a male to female ratio of 1.94 : 1 (p < 0.05). Majority cases (53) were in the age group of 11- 20 years followed by the age group of below 10 years where there were 30 cases. Majority (64) cases came from low socio-economic class. The number of different types of extracranial complications of CSOM were as follows: mastoid abscess 57, discharging sinuses 28, purulent labyrinthitis 07, Bezold's abscess 04, fascial nerve paralysis 03 and zygomatic abscess 01. In all cases of CSOM Cholesteatoma were detected. In 14 cases, Cholesteatoma were associated with granulation tissue/polyp. Modified radical mastoidectomy were performed in all cases. On analyzing the findings of the present study it was observed that mastoid abscess were the predominant extracranial complications of CSOM, affecting mostly the male population of 11 - 20 years age group coming from low socio-economic class. PMID:16467754

  9. Phialemonium infection complicating chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Pong, Dan L.; Marom, Tal; Makishima, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Phialemonium infection in humans is rare. We report a 7-year-old healthy boy who presented with chronic otorrhea, which persisted despite adequate antibiotic therapy and four preservative tympanomastoidectomy operations. Following 3 years of intermittent topical antibiotic therapy, cultures eventually grew Phialemonium, which necessitated a more extensive operation, combined with systemic/topical anti-fungal agent to achieve clinical cure. PMID:24596671

  10. Polymicrobial abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis after cesarean section.

    PubMed

    DeMuro, Jp; Hanna, Af; Chalas, E; Cunha, Ba

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy woman after an uneventful caesarean section who developed polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. She was given a non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drug (NSAID) after her delivery. Her post-delivery course was complicated by septic shock, and required multiple debridements before abdominal reconstruction. This case describes the increased risk of necrotizing fasciitis with NSAID use. Unusual were the organisms causing the polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter agglomerans, Acinetobacter baumannii, and two strains of Enterobacter cloacae. PMID:24960796

  11. Cyanide Toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia Is Modulated by Polymicrobial Communities and Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Steve P; Workentine, Matthew L; Li, Xiang; Magarvey, Nathan A; O'Toole, George A; Surette, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behavior of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e., culture medium), long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM), that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community. PMID:27242743

  12. Cyanide Toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia Is Modulated by Polymicrobial Communities and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Steve P.; Workentine, Matthew L.; Li, Xiang; Magarvey, Nathan A.; O'Toole, George A.; Surette, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behavior of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e., culture medium), long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM), that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community. PMID:27242743

  13. Fusobacterium necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis in infants and young toddlers.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulou, T; Walsh, T J

    2016-05-01

    There is an increased recovery of Fusobacterium necrophorum from cases of otitis media and mastoiditis in the pediatric population. These infections may be highly severe, causing local osteomyelitis, bacteremia, and Lemierre's syndrome. The severity and difficulties in providing optimal treatment for these infections may be especially difficult in this age group due to immunological immaturity and delayed presentation. In this review of literature, we present and analyze the clinical presentation, management, and outcome of otic infections caused by F. necrophorum in infants and young toddlers less than 2 years old. Search in Pubmed was conducted for reported cases in the English literature for the time period of the last 50 years. Twelve well-described cases were retrieved with F. necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis and complications reported in all cases. Treatment included both intravenously with antimicrobial agents (beta lactams plus metronidazole) and mastoidectomy. Lemierre's syndrome and Lemierre's syndrome variants developed in 60 % of the patients. Dissemination of the infection as distal osteomyelitis and septic shock were also reported. The outcome was favorable in all the cases. Otitis and mastoiditis infections in children less then 2 years old are invasive infections, and severe complications can occur. PMID:26951264

  14. Impact of Staphylococcus aureus on Pathogenesis in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Nisha; Biswas, Raja; Götz, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections involving Staphylococcus aureus exhibit enhanced disease severity and morbidity. We reviewed the nature of polymicrobial interactions between S. aureus and other bacterial, fungal, and viral cocolonizers. Microbes that were frequently recovered from the infection site with S. aureus are Haemophilus influenzae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Corynebacterium sp., Lactobacillus sp., Candida albicans, and influenza virus. Detailed analyses of several in vitro and in vivo observations demonstrate that S. aureus exhibits cooperative relations with C. albicans, E. faecalis, H. influenzae, and influenza virus and competitive relations with P. aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Lactobacillus sp., and Corynebacterium sp. Interactions of both types influence changes in S. aureus that alter its characteristics in terms of colony formation, protein expression, pathogenicity, and antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:24643542

  15. Importance of Candida-bacterial polymicrobial biofilms in disease

    PubMed Central

    Harriott, Melphine M.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, with an ability to inhabit diverse host niches and cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. C. albicans also readily forms biofilms on indwelling medical devices and mucosal tissues, which serve as an infectious reservoir that is difficult to eradicate, and can lead to lethal systemic infections. Biofilm formation occurs within a complex milieu of host factors and other members of the human microbiota. Polymicrobial interactions will likely dictate the cellular and biochemical composition of the biofilm, as well as influence clinically relevant outcomes such as drug and host resistance and virulence. In this manuscript, we review C. albicans infections in the context of in vivo polymicrobial biofilms and implications for pathogenesis. PMID:21855346

  16. Polymicrobial endophthalmitis: prevalence, causative organisms, and visual outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence, causative organisms, and visual acuity outcome in patients with culture-proven polymicrobial endophthalmitis. The method used in this study is the non-comparative, consecutive case series using a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with polymicrobial endophthalmitis for the period 2000 to 2010. Results Polymicrobial endophthalmitis was identified in 43/1,107 (3.88%) patients. Forty-two patients had two isolates, and one patient had grown three isolates, yielding a total of 87 isolates. Gram-positive cocci were the most common isolate (n = 53; 60.9%) including Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 14/53; 16.1%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 13/53; 13.8%). The etiologies included posttraumatic (n = 31/43; 72.1%) and postoperative (n = 9/43; 20.9%) endophthalmitis. Antibiotic susceptibilities among Gram-positive bacteria were vancomycin (100%) and chloramphenicol (96%). Susceptibilities among Gram-negative bacteria were ciprofloxacin (86.4%) and ofloxacin (81.2%). A maximum number of secondary interventions were done in traumatic cases (38.7%) and cases having coinfection with Gram-negative bacteria and fungus (66.7%). Visual acuity (VA) < 20/200 was more frequently observed in posttraumatic cases (n = 27/31; 87.1%) as compared with postoperative cases (n = 4/9; 44.4%). Of the 43 patients, only 9 patients (20.9%) achieved a VA ≥ 20/200 on final follow-up. Four out of twelve patients (33.3%), with fungus as one of the isolates, had a VA ≥ 20/200. Conclusions Although polymicrobial infection in endophthalmitis is uncommon, it is generally associated with poor visual acuity outcomes especially in eyes with open-globe injuries. Coinfection with Gram-negative bacteria or fungi was associated with most unfavorable visual outcome. PMID:23514425

  17. 76 FR 39883 - Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs... workshop regarding the design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of... of clinical trials of antibacterial agents for the treatment of acute otitis media (middle...

  18. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Shah, Mahek; Codolosa, J Nicolas; Climaco, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors. PMID:27051571

  19. Ten-Year Study of the Stringently Defined Otitis-prone Child in Rochester, NY.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    This review summarizes a prospective, longitudinal 10-year study in Rochester, NY, with virtually every clinically diagnosed acute otitis media (AOM) confirmed by bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. Children experiencing 3 episodes within 6 months or 4 episodes in 12 months were considered stringently defined otitis prone (sOP). We found stringent diagnosis compared with clinical diagnosis reduced the frequency of children meeting the OP definition from 27% to 6% resulting in 14.8% and 2.4% receiving tympanostomy tubes, respectively. Significantly more often respiratory syncytial virus infection led to AOM in sOP than non-otitis-prone children that correlated with diminished total respiratory syncytial virus-specific serum IgG. sOP children produced low levels of antibody to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae candidate vaccine protein antigens and to routine pediatric vaccines. sOP children generated significantly fewer memory B cells, functional and memory T cells to otopathogens following nasopharyngeal colonization and AOM than non-otitis-prone children and they had defects in antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27273691

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Can Be Detected in a Polymicrobial Competition Model Using Impedance Spectroscopy with a Novel Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew C.; Connolly, Patricia; Tucker, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a powerful technique that can be used to elicit information about an electrode interface. In this article, we highlight six principal processes by which the presence of microorganisms can affect impedance and show how one of these - the production of electroactive metabolites - changes the impedance signature of culture media containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EIS, was used in conjunction with a low cost screen printed carbon sensor to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa when grown in isolation or as part of a polymicrobial infection with Staphylococcus aureus. By comparing the electrode to a starting measurement, we were able to identify an impedance signature characteristic of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, we are able to show that one of the changes in the impedance signature is due to pyocyanin and associated phenazine compounds. The findings of this study indicate that it might be possible to develop a low cost sensor for the detection of P. aeruginosa in important point of care diagnostic applications. In particular, we suggest that a development of the device described here could be used in a polymicrobial clinical sample such as sputum from a CF patient to detect P. aeruginosa. PMID:24614411

  1. Heterotopic ossification in chronic fibrosing otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, Elizabeth F.; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Lavy, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Acquired external auditory canal atresia is a rare complication of chronic inflammatory otitis, and is generally fibrous or soft tissue in nature. Here, we present the first reported case of heterotopic ossification within chronic fibrosing otitis externa in a 25-year-old male patient with a childhood history of granular myringitis and failed tympanoplasty. A calcified mass was demonstrated adjacent to the tympanic membrane on CT imaging, and surgical exploration revealed a cohesive bar of bone traversing the medial external auditory canal. Drill canaloplasty and split-thickness skin graft coverage of the lateral tympanic membrane resulted in an improvement in the pure tone average from 79 to 55 dB. As the treatment for chronic fibrosing otitis externa involves the surgical widening of the external auditory canal, we alert surgeons to the possibility of cohesive bone formation as a potential cause of navigational confusion and inadvertent over- or under-drilling of the canal stenosis. PMID:26429555

  2. Malignant external otitis: early scintigraphic detection

    SciTech Connect

    Strashun, A.M.; Nejatheim, M.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    Pseudomonas otitis externa in elderly diabetics may extend aggressively to adjacent bone, cranial nerves, meninges, and vessels, leading to a clinical diagnosis of ''malignant'' external otitis. Early diagnosis is necessary for successful treatment. This study compares the findings of initial radiographs, thin-section tomography of temporal bone, CT scans of head and neck, technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP) and gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for detection of temporal bone osteomylitis in ten patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria of malignant external otitis. Skull radiographs were negative in all of the eight patients studied. Thin-section tomography was positive in one of the seven patients studied using this modality. CT scanning suggested osteomyelitis in three of nine patients. Both Tc-99m and Ga-67 citrate scintigraphy were positive in 10 of 10 patients. These results suggest that technetium and gallium scintigraphy are more sensitive than radiographs and CT scans for early detection of malignant external otitis.

  3. Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lee E., Ed.

    1974-01-01

    Intended for secondary English teachers, the materials and ideas presented here suggest ways to use media in the classroom in teaching visual and auditory discrimination while enlivening classes and motivating students. Contents include "Media Specialists Need Not Apply," which discusses the need for preparation of media educators with…

  4. Noisy neighbourhoods: quorum sensing in fungal–polymicrobial infections

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing was once considered a way in which a species was able to sense its cell density and regulate gene expression accordingly. However, it is now becoming apparent that multiple microbes can sense particular quorum‐sensing molecules, enabling them to sense and respond to other microbes in their neighbourhood. Such interactions are significant within the context of polymicrobial disease, in which the competition or cooperation of microbes can alter disease progression. Fungi comprise a small but important component of the human microbiome and are in constant contact with bacteria and viruses. The discovery of quorum‐sensing pathways in fungi has led to the characterization of a number of interkingdom quorum‐sensing interactions. Here, we review the recent developments in quorum sensing in medically important fungi, and the implications these interactions have on the host's innate immune response. PMID:26243526

  5. Experimental treatment of recurrent otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Mileva, M H; Pencheva, D V; Bryaskova, R G; Genova-Kalou, P D; Kantardjiev, T V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the effect of the hybrid material based on polyvinyl alcohol and silver nanoparticles (PVA/AgNps) in the treatment of the otitis externa as an additional component in the commercial product "Betazon Trio". It was established that the experimental creamy formula with silver concentration 600 mg/L is suitable for recovery of the microbial homeostasis when it is administrated once daily in dose 1 ml over a period of 14 days. PMID:26623362

  6. Viable Compositional Analysis of an Eleven Species Oral Polymicrobial Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Leighann; Lappin, Gillian; O'Donnell, Lindsay E.; Millhouse, Emma; Millington, Owain R.; Bradshaw, David J.; Axe, Alyson S.; Williams, Craig; Nile, Christopher J.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Polymicrobial biofilms are abundant in clinical disease, particularly within the oral cavity. Creating complex biofilm models that recapitulate the polymicrobiality of oral disease are important in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In order to do this accurately we require the ability to undertake compositional analysis, in addition to determine individual cell viability, which is difficult using conventional microbiology. The aim of this study was to develop a defined multispecies denture biofilm model in vitro, and to assess viable compositional analysis following defined oral hygiene regimens. Methods: An in vitro multispecies denture biofilm containing various oral commensal and pathogenic bacteria and yeast was created on poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Denture hygiene regimens tested against the biofilm model included brushing only, denture cleansing only and combinational brushing and denture cleansing. Biofilm composition and viability were assessed by culture (CFU) and molecular (qPCR) methodologies. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were also employed to visualize changes in denture biofilms following treatment. Results: Combinational treatment of brushing and denture cleansing had the greatest impact on multispecies denture biofilms, reducing the number of live cells by more than 2 logs, and altering the overall composition in favor of streptococci. This was even more evident during the sequential testing, whereby daily sequential treatment reduced the total and live number of bacteria and yeast more than those treated intermittently. Bacteria and yeast remaining following treatment tended to aggregate in the pores of the PMMA, proving more difficult to fully eradicate the biofilm. Conclusions: Overall, we are the first to develop a method to enable viable compositional analysis of an 11 species denture biofilm following chemotherapeutic challenge. We were able to demonstrate viable cell

  7. Oxygen as a Virulence Determinant in Polymicrobial Infections.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Elizabeth M; Gilmore, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by multiple organisms, or polymicrobial infections, are likely more common than is broadly appreciated. Interaction among microbial communities (and with their host) can change the infection landscape by subverting immunity, providing nutrients and inhibiting competing microbes. Stacy et al. (A. Stacy, D. Fleming, R. J. Lamont, K. P. Rumbaugh, and M. Whiteley, mBio 7:e00782-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00782-16) described a novel mechanism that results in synergistic growth of oral microbes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus gordonii The authors used whole-genome fitness profiling by transposon sequencing (Tn-seq) to identify genes differentially required for growth in vitro versus in a mono- or coinfection in a thigh abscess model. They found that coinfection with S. gordonii allowed A. actinomycetemcomitans to shift from an anaerobic to an aerobic mode of growth. This shift involved the production of a terminal electron acceptor H2O2 by S. gordonii and increased A. actinomycetemcomitans persistence-an interaction termed "cross-respiration." PMID:27531913

  8. Oxygen as a Virulence Determinant in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infections caused by multiple organisms, or polymicrobial infections, are likely more common than is broadly appreciated. Interaction among microbial communities (and with their host) can change the infection landscape by subverting immunity, providing nutrients and inhibiting competing microbes. Stacy et al. (A. Stacy, D. Fleming, R. J. Lamont, K. P. Rumbaugh, and M. Whiteley, mBio 7:e00782-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00782-16) described a novel mechanism that results in synergistic growth of oral microbes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus gordonii. The authors used whole-genome fitness profiling by transposon sequencing (Tn-seq) to identify genes differentially required for growth in vitro versus in a mono- or coinfection in a thigh abscess model. They found that coinfection with S. gordonii allowed A. actinomycetemcomitans to shift from an anaerobic to an aerobic mode of growth. This shift involved the production of a terminal electron acceptor H2O2 by S. gordonii and increased A. actinomycetemcomitans persistence—an interaction termed “cross-respiration.” PMID:27531913

  9. Oxantel Disrupts Polymicrobial Biofilm Development of Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, Stuart; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil; Liu, Sze Wei; Paolini, Rita; Mitchell, Helen; Walsh, Katrina; D'Cruze, Tanya; Hoffmann, Brigitte; Catmull, Deanne; Zhu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens commonly associated with chronic periodontitis are the spirochete Treponema denticola and the Gram-negative, proteolytic species Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia. These species rely on complex anaerobic respiration of amino acids, and the anthelmintic drug oxantel has been shown to inhibit fumarate reductase (Frd) activity in some pathogenic bacteria and inhibit P. gingivalis homotypic biofilm formation. Here, we demonstrate that oxantel inhibited P. gingivalis Frd activity with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.2 μM and planktonic growth of T. forsythia with a MIC of 295 μM, but it had no effect on the growth of T. denticola. Oxantel treatment caused the downregulation of six P. gingivalis gene products and the upregulation of 22 gene products. All of these genes are part of a regulon controlled by heme availability. There was no large-scale change in the expression of genes encoding metabolic enzymes, indicating that P. gingivalis may be unable to overcome Frd inhibition. Oxantel disrupted the development of polymicrobial biofilms composed of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola in a concentration-dependent manner. In these biofilms, all three species were inhibited to a similar degree, demonstrating the synergistic nature of biofilm formation by these species and the dependence of T. denticola on the other two species. In a murine alveolar bone loss model of periodontitis oxantel addition to the drinking water of P. gingivalis-infected mice reduced bone loss to the same level as the uninfected control. PMID:24165189

  10. Control of mucosal polymicrobial populations by innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Mason, Katie L; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2009-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract carries out the complex process of localizing the polymicrobial populations of the indigenous microbiota to the lumenal side of the GI mucosa while absorbing nutrients from the lumen and preventing damage to the mucosa. This process is accomplished through a combination of physical, innate and adaptive host defences and a 'strategic alliance' with members of the microbiota. To cope with the constant exposure to a diverse microbial community, the GI tract, through the actions of a number of specialized cells in the epithelium and lamina propria, has layers of humoral, physical and cellular defences that limit attachment, invasion and dissemination of the indigenous microbiota. However, the role of the microbiota in this dynamic balance is vital and serves as another level of 'innate' defence. We are just beginning to understand how bacterial metabolites aid in the control of potential pathogens within the microbiota and limit inflammatory responses to the microbiota, concepts that will impact our understanding of the biological effects of antibiotics, diet and probiotics on mucosal inflammatory responses. PMID:19558617

  11. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Jugoslav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs. PMID:27366173

  12. Efficacy of dental unit waterlines disinfectants on a polymicrobial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Costa, Damien; Girardot, Marion; Bertaux, Joanne; Verdon, Julien; Imbert, Christine

    2016-03-15

    Due to their high surface-volume ratio, their laminar flow and frequent stagnation periods, dental unit waterlines (DUWL) foster the attachment of microorganisms and the development of biofilm, resulting in the continuous contamination of the outlet water from dental units; this contamination may be responsible for a potential risk of infection due to the exposure of patients and medical staff to droplet inhalation or splashed water. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of three disinfectants recommended by dental unit manufacturers -Calbenium(©), Oxygenal 6(©) and Sterispray(©) - was evaluated. A dynamic model simulating DUWL conditions was developed and polymicrobial biofilms containing bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), fungi (Candida albicans) and Free Living Amoeba (FLA: Vermamoeba vermiformis) were allowed to form. The ability of disinfectants to reduce biofilm formation or to eradicate an already formed biofilm was evaluated. Results showed the various effects of the tested disinfectants according to their composition, concentration and the targeted species. V. vermiformis was resistant to disinfectants, regardless of the tested concentrations and the concentrations recommended by manufacturers were not the most appropriate. Results also showed that Calbenium(©) was the most effective disinfectant to reduce already formed biofilms; its maximum efficiency was observed from 0.5% on both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans compared to 2 and 3% respectively for Sterispray(©). The maximum efficiency of Oxygenal(©) was observed from 3% on P. aeruginosa but Oxygenal(©) was unable to totally eliminate C. albicans in the tested conditions, contrary to other disinfectants. Calbenium(©) was able to prevent biofilm formation efficiently even if it displayed no prophylactic activity against V. vermiformis. Overall, the FLA survival may contribute to maintaining other species. Finally the tested disinfectants were partially active against sessile microorganisms

  13. Neuropathological Correlates of Hyperglycemia During Prolonged Polymicrobial Sepsis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Romain; Derese, Inge; Marques, Mirna Bastos; Langouche, Lies; Derde, Sarah; Chatre, Laurent; Chrétien, Fabrice; Annane, Djillali; Sharshar, Tarek; Van den Berghe, Greet; Vanhorebeek, Ilse

    2015-09-01

    Glucose toxicity may play a crucial role in evoking neurologic complications of critical illness. We studied whether the neuropathological alterations in fatal human critical illness observed under hyperglycemia are present and can be attenuated by maintaining normoglycemia in a mouse model of prolonged sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Mice were randomized to moderate hyperglycemia (>8.3 mmol/L, n = 8) or normoglycemia (4.4-6.7 mmol/L, n = 8). After 5 days, hippocampus and frontal cortex from septic mice were compared with those from healthy controls (n = 8). Blood glucose was 7.8 ± 1.3 mmol/L in hyperglycemic and 6.1 ± 0.7 mmol/L in normoglycemic critically ill mice (P = 0.007). The percentage of damaged neurons was twofold higher in frontal cortex (P = 0.01) and hippocampus (P = 0.06) of hyperglycemic ill mice than that of healthy mice. In frontal cortex, neuronal damage was attenuated under normoglycemia (P = 0.04). Critical illness reduced astrocyte density and activation status fourfold in hippocampus (P ≤ 0.02), but not in frontal cortex, irrespective of glycemic control. Microglia were twofold to fourfold more abundant in both brain areas of hyperglycemic critically ill mice (P ≤ 0.002), but only in frontal cortex were they reduced in number with normoglycemia (P = 0.0008). The density of apoptotic cells and abundance of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher than normal in frontal cortex of hyperglycemic ill mice only (P = 0.05). In a mouse model of prolonged polymicrobial sepsis, remarkable neuropathological changes develop with neuronal damage, impaired astrocyte activation, increased microglia, apoptosis, and accumulation of carbonylated proteins. These changes were partially prevented or attenuated when hyperglycemia was prevented with insulin. Frontal cortex appeared more vulnerable to hyperglycemic insults than hippocampus. PMID:26009823

  14. Experimental treatment of recurrent otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Mileva, M.H.; Pencheva, D.V.; Bryaskova, R.G.; Genova-Kalou, P.D.; Kantardjiev, T.V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the effect of the hybrid material based on polyvinyl alcohol and silver nanoparticles (PVA/AgNps) in the treatment of the otitis externa as an additional component in the commercial product “Betazon Trio”. It was established that the experimental creamy formula with silver concentration 600 mg/L is suitable for recovery of the microbial homeostasis when it is administrated once daily in dose 1 ml over a period of 14 days. PMID:26623362

  15. Interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus during co-cultivations and polymicrobial infections.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are versatile bacterial pathogens and common etiological agents in polymicrobial infections. Microbial communities containing both of these pathogens are shaped by interactions ranging from parasitic to mutualistic, with the net impact of these interactions in many cases resulting in enhanced virulence. Polymicrobial communities of these organisms are further defined by multiple aspects of the host environment, with important implications for disease progression and therapeutic outcomes. This mini-review highlights the impact of these interactions on the host and individual pathogens, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these interactions, and host-specific factors that drive interactions between these two important pathogens. PMID:27236810

  16. Synergistic Effects of Honey and Propolis toward Drug Multi-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, Escherichia Coli and Candida Albicans Isolates in Single and Polymicrobial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Y.; Salom, Khelod

    2012-01-01

    Background: Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. The study investigated antimicrobial activity of ethyl alcohol extraction of propolis collected from Saudi Arabia (EEPS) and from Egypt (EEPE), and their synergistic effect when used with honey. Single and polymicrobial cultures of antibiotic resistant human pathogens were tested. Material and methods; Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus),), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Candida albicans (C.albicans) were cultured in 10-100% (v/v) honey diluted in broth, or 0.08-1.0% (weight/volume) EEPS and EEPE diluted in broth. Four types of polymicrobial cultures were prepared by culturing the isolates with each other in broth (control) and broth containing various concentrations of honey or propolis. Microbial growth was assessed on solid plate media after 24 h incubation. Results; EEPS and EEPE inhibited antibiotic resistant E.coli, and S.aureus, and C.albicans in single and polymicrobial cultures. S.aureus became more susceptible when it was cultured with E.coli or C.albicans or when all cultured together. C.albicans became more susceptible when it was cultured with S.aureus or with E.coli and S. aureus together. The presence of ethyl alcohol or honey potentiated antimicrobial effect of propolis toward entire microbes tested in single or polymicrobial cultures. EEPS had lower MIC toward E.coli and C.albicans than EEPE. When propolis was mixed with honey, EEPS showed lower MIC than EEPE. In addition, honey showed lower MIC toward entire microbes when mixed with EEPS than when it was mixed with EEPE. Conclusion; 1) propolis prevents the growth of the microorganisms in single and mixed microbial cultures, and has synergistic effect when used with honey or ethyl alcohol, 2) the antimicrobial property of propolis varies with geographical origin, and 3) this study will pave the way to isolate active ingredients from honey and propolis to be further tested individually or

  17. Tuberculous Otitis with Proteus mirabilis Co-Infection: An Unsuspected Presentation Encountered in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Moumita; Jadhav, Savita Vivek; Vyawahare, Chanda; Misra, Rabindranath

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a contagious bacterial disease which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily involves the lungs.Though Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is the commonest clinical presentation, there is a need for alertness towards uncommon presentations which involve other organs. Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is one such rare presentation seen in paediatric practice. It is characterized by painless otorrhoea which fails to respond to the routine antibacterial treatment. TOM usually occurs secondary to PTB. Here is a case of tuberculous otitis media with Proteus mirabilis co-infection, with no evidence of PTB. In the sample of ear discharge obtained from the patient, acid fast bacilli were demonstrated on direct microscopy after Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Culture done on Lowenstein-Jensen medium demonstrated slow-growing Mycobacterium. Bacteriological culture and identification helped in isolating Proteus mirabilis. PCR, followed by Line- Probe Assay for early identification and susceptibility testing to primary drugs, was done. Further, patient tested negative for the Mantoux test. Patient was enrolled in National Tuberculosis programme- RNTCP. This case emphasizes on one of the less common presentations of a common disease. A high clinical suspicion and laboratory confirmation are required for appropriate patient management. PMID:24995225

  18. Peripheral blood antigen presenting cell responses in otitis-prone and non-otitis-prone infants.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Naveen; Nicolosi, Ted; Kaur, Ravinder; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Stringently defined otitis-prone (sOP) children represent a new classification of the otitis-prone condition. Previous studies showed dysfunction in Ab, B-cell memory and T-cell memory responses. We sought to determine whether there are defects in numbers, phenotype and/or function of professional APC in the peripheral blood of sOP infants. APC phenotypic counts, MHC II expression and intracellular cytokine levels were determined in response to TLR7/8 (R848) stimulation by flow cytometry. Innate immune mRNA expression was measured using RT-PCR and cytokines were measured using Luminex technology. Significant (P < 0.05) increases in the phenotypic counts of monocytes and conventional dendritic cells but not plasmacytoid DCs were observed in sOP compared with non-otitis-prone (NOP) age-matched infants. No significant differences in APC activation or function were observed. Expression of various TLRs, intracellular signaling molecules and downstream cytokines was also not found to be significantly different between sOP and NOP infants. Higher numbers of APCs in sOP infants suggest the possibility of a persistent mucosal inflammatory status. Transcriptional and cytokine profiles of PBMCs among sOP infants suggest their systemic innate responses are not different compared to NOP infants. PMID:26566651

  19. Mycotic otitis media in a harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Seibel, H; Beineke, A; Siebert, U

    2010-11-01

    A 9-year-old by-caught harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) was subject to routine post-mortem examination. Major findings included parasitic infection (Stenurus minor) of the left middle ear and severe mycotic infection of the right middle ear. The morphological appearance of the causative organism was consistent with Aspergillus fumigatus. These pathological findings were likely to have impaired echolocation in this animal and this may have contributed to the by-catch. The ears of marine mammals should be examined routinely during post-mortem investigations. PMID:20643415

  20. Biofilm's Role in Chronic Cholesteatomatous Otitis Media: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Galli, Jacopo; Calò, Lea; Giuliani, Monica; Sergi, Bruno; Lucidi, Daniela; Meucci, Duino; Bassotti, Ezio; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2016-05-01

    Cholesteatoma is a destructive lesion involving the temporal bone, which may induce severe complications due to its expansion and erosion of adjacent structures. Bacterial biofilm plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many otolaryngologic inflammatory/infectious chronic diseases. In this pilot study, we investigated, by means of cultural examination and with scanning electron microscope, the presence of bacterial biofilm in a series of samples from the epitympanic and mastoid region in patients affected by cholesteatoma and from the promontory region in patients with healthy mucosa who were undergoing to stapes surgery. The preliminary data support the association between biofilm and cholesteatoma (81.3% of the cases) and allow us to hypothesize that keratinized matrix of cholesteatoma may represent the ideal substrate for biofilm colonization and survival; this finding is consistent with the clinical course of aural cholesteatoma, characterized by recurrent exacerbations and recalcitrant course. PMID:26932953

  1. Cytokines in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Skotnicka, B; Hassmann, E

    2000-01-01

    We assayed 38 middle ear effusions from 23 children aged 4-13 years (mean 7) undergoing tympanostomy tube placements. All fluid was assayed for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-8, and IL-10. Cytokine concentrations were measured by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Detectable levels of IL-1beta, IL-8, and IL-10 were found in all of the effusions. TNF-alpha was detected in 18 of the middle ear effusions (47.4%). The mean concentration of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta , IL-8, and IL-10 was, respectively, 0.423 +/- 1.39, 30.58 +/- 68.7, 7001.9 +/- 6743, and 56 +/- 58.7 pg/ml. There was a strong, statistically significant correlation between the concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta (r = 0.87, P = 0.001) and between IL-1beta and IL-8 (r = 0.53, P = 0.001). There was no correlation between the concentrations of IL-10 and other cytokines examined or between tympanic membrane pathology and the concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta , IL-8, or IL-10. The presence of IL-10 in middle ear effusions may be one of the causes of a lack of clinical features of acute inflammation and may lead to a chronic inflammatory state. PMID:10993552

  2. Hypertrophic chronic pachymeningitis associated with chronic otitis media and mastoiditis.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Sho; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Watabe, Takahisa; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2004-06-01

    We describe the case history of a 70-year-old female patient presenting with bilateral hearing disturbance, facial paralysis, and vertigo. Radiological tests of temporal bone revealed soft tissue in the mastoid and tympanic cavities, and T1 weighted MRI revealed prominent Gd enhancement of the middle skull basal meninges. Middle ear inflammation appeared to induce pachymeningitis and to exacerbate associated symptoms, leading to a decline in the patient's overall condition. Bilateral mastoidectomies were effective in improving her general condition. Her hearing improved only on the right side because ossiculoplasty was performed only on that side. Her facial movement progressively improved and pachymeningitis diminished over time. We speculate that removal of the infectious granulation within the middle ears and mastoids ameliorated the acute inflammation. The etiology remains unknown in this case. PMID:15121225

  3. [Tuberculous Otitis media - a rare differential diagnosis in Germany].

    PubMed

    Teschner, M; Kramer, S; Donnerstag, F; Länger, F; Lenarz, Th; Schwab, B

    2008-07-01

    A 28-year-old female patient with a migrant background presented for surgery with a suspected cholesteatoma in the left ear. The patient reported having had an aural discharge for several months; otoscopic examination revealed a runny ear, and discrete granulation tissue was seen. Pure-tone audiometry showed conduction hearing loss of 30-40 dB across all frequencies in the left ear; high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone revealed that the mastoid and tympanic cavity were completely obscured. The intraoperative finding showed a caseous space-occupying mass that completely filled the tympanic cavity. The suspected diagnosis of tuberculosis was corroborated by pathohistological, microbiological and molecular biological tests. Tuberculostatic therapy was initiated at a different location. Although tuberculosis of the middle ear is a rare condition in Germany, it should nevertheless be considered when making a differential diagnosis, especially in high-risk patients where cholesteatoma is suspected on clinical and radiological evidence or in patients with a chronic middle ear process. PMID:18688924

  4. Effect of experimentally induced otitis media on cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Franz, B K; Clark, G M; Bloom, D M

    1987-01-01

    Cat cochleas implanted with scala tympani prostheses were investigated histologically after inoculating the bullae with a suspension of group A streptococci. The prosthesis was passed through the round window membrane in one ear. In the other the prosthesis bypassed the round window via an opening anteroinferior to the round window niche. Before death, horseradish peroxidase was administered as a tracer for possible pathways of infection. Results showed that group A streptococci were pathogenic to the cat and caused inflammation in the bulla. The unimplanted round window membrane and the seals around the electrode entry points prevented infection from entering the cochlea. The seals around electrodes inserted either through the round window membrane or an opening drilled anteroinferior to the niche were equally effective. The horseradish peroxidase tracer studies showed, however, that a gap existed between the electrode and membranous seal, and this could be a potentially vulnerable site under certain conditions. Drilling an anteroinferior opening into the cochlea resulted in bony sequestra entering the cochlea. This can be avoided by blue-lining the opening and removing bone with picks before making an opening through the endosteum. PMID:3551743

  5. The role of myeloid differentiation factor 88 on mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes during polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lin; Chen, Dunjin; Chao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) on mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes during polymicrobial sepsis. Material and methods Polymicrobial peritonitis, a clinically relevant mouse model of sepsis, was generated by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP) in both male C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and MyD88 knockout (MyD88–/–) mice. Twenty-four hours after surgeries, peritoneal leukocytes were collected and four parameters of mitochondrial function, including total intracellular and mitochondrial ROS burst, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ATP depletion, were measured by flow cytometry or ATP assay, and then compared. Results Polymicrobial sepsis led to a marked mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes with total intracellular and mitochondrial ROS overproduction, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced intracellular ATP production. In comparison, there was no significant difference in the extent of mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes between WT and MyD88–/– septic mice. Conclusions MyD88 may be not sufficient to regulate mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes during polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:27536200

  6. A comparison of monomicrobial versus polymicrobial Enterococcus faecalis bacteriuria in a French University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, C; Canini, L; Lavigne, J-P; Sotto, A

    2015-08-01

    Enterococci are of considerable relevance in the hospital setting. Their most common location is the urinary tract, where they may be responsible for both colonization and infections. They are often associated with the presence of other microorganisms. The aim was to compare monomicrobial and polymicrobial Enterococcus faecalis bacteriuria. A retrospective study was performed on the demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of 299 patients who had presented with E. faecalis bacteriuria in 2012 at a University Hospital. The bacteriuria was polymicrobial in 46.1 % of cases and in 36.4 % of cases was responsible for a urinary tract infection. Infections appeared to be more prevalent in the polymicrobial than the monomicrobial group (42 % vs 32 %, p = 0.06). Half of the patients who presented with urinary tract colonization received antibiotic treatment (54/ out of 10). A multivariate analysis adjusted for age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.02 per year, p = 0.006), gender (AOR = 2.2, p = 0.007), and clinical classification (colonization or infection, AOR = 1.6, p = 0.091), showed that diabetes mellitus (AOR = 2.0, p = 0.04), hospital length of stay exceeding 28 days (AOR = 2.0, p = 0.03), and presence of a urinary catheter (AOR = 2.4, p = 0.001) were all factors associated with polymicrobial E. faecalis bacteriuria. A reduction in the length of hospital stay and the use of urinary catheters would appear to be required to decrease the incidence of urinary tract colonization and infections by polymicrobial E. faecalis. Improper use of antibiotics to treat urinary tract colonization remains a major concern. PMID:25987245

  7. Treatmnent Patterns for Pediatric Acute CHUs Media: A Gap in Evidence-Based Theory and Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Boatright, Courtney; Holcomb, Lygia; Replogle, William

    2015-01-01

    Unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics is costly, leads to serious unintended side effects, and increases the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. Children are at high risk of receiving unnecessary antibiotics because they consume more antibiotics than any other age group, likely due to inaccurate prescribing by health care providers. Treatment of acute otitis media is the most common reason children are prescribed antibiotics. Evidence-based guidelines regarding the appropriate treatment of nonsevere acute otitis media in children have been established. A retrospective, descriptive, chart review project was completed comparing the diagnosis and treatment of acute otitis media in children six months to 12 years of age in clinics and the emergency department of a large academic medical center with the American Academy of Pediatrics' treatment guidelines. Findings of the chart review included 100 patient encounters. Documentation indicated that although none of these children with acute otitis media met the guideline criteria for antibiotics, 92 of the 100 children were prescribed antibiotics. PMID:26837096

  8. CLOCK modulates survival and acute lung injury in mice with polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Hsieh, I-Chang; Shie, Shian-Sen; Ho, Ming-Yun; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2016-09-16

    Polymicrobial sepsis is a potentially fatal condition and a significant burden on health care systems. Acute lung injury is the most common complication of sepsis and results in high mortality. However, there has been no recent significant progress in the treatment of sepsis or acute lung injury induced by sepsis. Here we show that mice deficient in the circadian protein CLOCK had better survival than wild-type mice after induction of polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture. Inflammatory cytokine production was attenuated and bacterial clearance was improved in CLOCK-deficient mice. Moreover, acute lung injury after induction of sepsis was significantly decreased in CLOCK-deficient mice. Genome-wide profiling analysis showed that inhibin signaling was reduced in CLOCK-deficient mice. These data establish the importance of circadian CLOCK-inhibin signaling in sepsis, which may have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27520377

  9. A novel natural compound from garlic (Allium sativum L.) with therapeutic effects against experimental polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kyun; Park, Yoo Jung; Ko, Min Jung; Wang, Ziyu; Lee, Ha Young; Choi, Young Whan; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-28

    Sepsis is a serious, life-threatening, infectious disease. In this study, we demonstrate that sucrose methyl 3-formyl-4-methylpentanoate (SMFM), a novel natural compound isolated from garlic (Allium sativum L.), markedly enhances survival rates by inhibiting lung inflammation in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) experimental polymicrobial sepsis model. SMFM strongly reduced bacterial colony units from peritoneal fluid in CLP mice by stimulating the generation of reactive oxygen species. Lymphocyte apoptosis in spleens from CLP mice was also markedly decreased by SMFM administration. SMFM also significantly inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, in CLP mice. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of TNF-α and IL-6 were also strongly inhibited by SMFM in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that SMFM has therapeutic effects against polymicrobial sepsis that are mediated by enhanced microbial killing and blockage of cytokine storm. PMID:26166823

  10. [The current views of the treatment of diffuse external otitis].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, O V; Shadrin, G B

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of the local application of triderm for the treatment of diffuse external otitis. The study included 68 patients presenting with bacterial and fungal diffuse external otitis. The treatment in the form of local empiric therapy was continued till the results of microbiological treatment became apparent. The beneficial outcome achieved in 91.2% of the patients was clinically manifest as the regression of the inflammatory process in the external auditory meatus. No complications, such as ototoxic events, either local or systemic allergic reactions, were documented. The authors substantiate the possibility of the application of the medication under consideration for the treatment of diffuse external otitis based on the knowledge of the mechanism of the actin of its constituent components, viz. betamethasone, dipropionate, gentamicin sulfate, and clotrimazole, taking into account the occurrence of the most common causative agents of diffuse external otitis. It is concluded that triderm is a safe medication for the local application and, probably, for the initial empiric therapy of diffuse external otitis to be continued till the results of the microbiological treatment become apparent. PMID:27367351

  11. Risk Factors for Chronic and Recurrent Otitis Media–A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Xu, Min; Zhang, Jin; Zeng, Lingxia; Wang, Yanfei; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors associated with chronic otitis media (COM) and recurrent otitis media (ROM) have been investigated in previous studies. The objective of this study was to integrate the findings and determine the possible risk factors for COM/ROM based on our meta-analysis. A comprehensive search of electronic bibliographic databases (PubMed, Embase, CNKI and Wanfang database) from 1964 to Dec 2012, as well as a manual search of references of articles, was performed. A total of 2971 articles were searched, and 198 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility; 24 studies were eligible for this meta-analysis. Regarding risk factors for COM/ROM, there were two to nine different studies from which the odds ratios (ORs) could be pooled. The presence of allergy or atopy increased the risk of COM/ROM (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13–1.64; P = 0.001). An upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) significantly increased the risk of COM/ROM (OR, 6.59; 95% CI, 3.13–13.89; P<0.00001). Snoring appeared to be a significant risk factor for COM/ROM (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.78–2.16; P<0.00001). A patient history of acute otitis media (AOM)/ROM increased the risk of COM/ROM (OR, 11.13; 95% CI, 1.06–116.44; P = 0.04). Passive smoke significantly increased the risk of COM/ROM (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.02–1.89 P = 0.04). Low social status appeared to be a risk factor for COM/ROM (OR, 3.82; 95% CI, 1.11–13.15; P = 0.03). Our meta-analysis identified reliable conclusions that allergy/atopy, URTI, snoring, previous history of AOM/ROM, Second-hand smoke and low social status are important risk factors for COM/ROM. Other unidentified risk factors need to be identified in further studies with critical criteria. PMID:24466073

  12. Comparative genome analysis and identification of competitive and cooperative interactions in a polymicrobial disease

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Akiko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Ogata, Nachiko; Nozawa, Takashi; Aikawa, Chihiro; Arakawa, Shinichi; Maruyama, Fumito; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Polymicrobial diseases are caused by combinations of multiple bacteria, which can lead to not only mild but also life-threatening illnesses. Periodontitis represents a polymicrobial disease; Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, called ‘the red complex', have been recognized as the causative agents of periodontitis. Although molecular interactions among the three species could be responsible for progression of periodontitis, the relevant genetic mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we uncovered novel interactions in comparative genome analysis among the red complex species. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) of T. forsythia might attack the restriction modification system of P. gingivalis, and possibly work as a defense system against DNA invasion from P. gingivalis. On the other hand, gene deficiencies were mutually compensated in metabolic pathways when the genes of all the three species were taken into account, suggesting that there are cooperative relationships among the three species. This notion was supported by the observation that each of the three species had its own virulence factors, which might facilitate persistence and manifestations of virulence of the three species. Here, we propose new mechanisms of bacterial symbiosis in periodontitis; these mechanisms consist of competitive and cooperative interactions. Our results might shed light on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and of other polymicrobial diseases. PMID:25171331

  13. Interactions of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Polymicrobial Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B.; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections. PMID:23451098

  14. Sheltering Effect and Indirect Pathogenesis of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Polymicrobial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chen, Chien-Pei; Lin, Shu-Wen; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2014-01-01

    The role of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) in polymicrobial infection remains elusive. Having observed the ability of CRAb to shelter other susceptible bacteria from carbapenem killing, we sought to determine the factors contributing to this sheltering effect by transforming different recombinant plasmids into recipient A. baumannii cells. The sheltering effects of CRAb were reproduced in recipient A. baumannii cells that highly expressed carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases (CHDLs) through their associated strong promoter. With the use of Western blot analysis and a bioassay, the highly expressed CHDLs were found to be extracellularly released and led to hydrolysis of carbapenem. The level of extracellular CHDLs increased after challenge with a higher concentration of CHDL substrates, such as carbapenem and ticarcillin. This increased CHDL may, in part, be attributed to cell lysis, as indicated by the presence of extracellular gyrase. In the planktonic condition, the sheltering effect for the cocultured susceptible bacteria might represent an indirect and passive effect of the CRAb self-defense mechanism, because coculture with the susceptible pathogen did not augment the amount of the extracellular CHDLs. Polymicrobial infection caused by CRAb and a susceptible counterpart exerted higher pathogenicity than monomicrobial infection caused by either pathogen alone in mice receiving carbapenem therapy. This study demonstrated that CHDL-producing CRAb appears to provide a sheltering effect for carbapenem-susceptible pathogens via the extracellular release of CHDLs and, by this mechanism, can enhance the pathogenesis of polymicrobial infection in the presence of carbapenem therapy. PMID:24798276

  15. Quantitative bone and 67Ga scintigraphy in the differentiation of necrotizing external otitis from severe external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Uri, N.; Gips, S.; Front, A.; Meyer, S.W.; Hardoff, R. )

    1991-06-01

    Qualitative technetium Tc 99m bone scintigraphy using phosphate compounds and gallium 67 scintigraphy were described as a helpful means in diagnosing necrotizing external otitis (NEO). They were, however, claimed to be nonspecific. Quantitative Tc 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy and gallium 67 scintigraphy were performed in eight patients with NEO and in 20 patients with severe external otitis, in order to prove usefulness of scintigraphy in the diagnosis of NEO. Ratios of lesion to nonlesion for bone scintigraphy were 1.67 {plus minus} 0.16 in patients with NEO and 1.08 {plus minus} 0.09 in patients with severe external otitis, and for gallium 67 scintigraphy they were 1.35 {plus minus} 0.24 in NEO patients and 1.05 {plus minus} 0.03 in patients with severe external otitis. There was no difference in uptake between diabetic patients with severe external otitis and nondiabetic patients. The scintigraphic studies were also evaluated using a qualitative scoring method (scores 0 to +4), according to the intensity of the radiopharmaceutical uptake. This method was found to be inferior in the diagnosis of NEO compared with the quantitative method. We conclude that lesion-to-nonlesion ratios greater than 1.5 and 1.3 on bone and gallium 67 scintigraphy, respectively, are indicative of NEO. Quantitative bone scintigraphy, which is quicker to perform, may be used as a single imaging modality for the diagnosis of NEO.

  16. Experimentally induced otitis and audiogenic seizure in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Niaussat, M M

    1977-04-15

    Audiogenic seizures can be induced in genetically non-susceptible 17-day-old mice (Rb/3 strain) with various results. Priming only induces 9% of seizures, auditory insulation 3,8%, while experimental otitis leads to 79%. The hypothesis concerning disuse supersensitivity subsequent to acoustic deprivation was not confirmed by the experiment. However, modification of acoustic transmission at middle ear level induced by otitis or ear physical damage during the maturation period, exposes the upper nervous centers to intense stimulation to which the reaction is a recruiting response. PMID:862735

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Polymicrobial Culture of Naked (N-Type) Emiliania huxleyi CCMP1516.

    PubMed

    Orata, Fabini D; Rosana, Albert Remus R; Xu, Yue; Simkus, Danielle N; Bramucci, Anna R; Boucher, Yan; Case, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Strains of Sulfitobacter spp., Erythrobacter sp., and Marinobacter sp. were isolated from a polymicrobial culture of the naked (N-type) haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP1516. The genomes encode genes for the production of phytohormones, vitamins, and the consumption of their hosts' metabolic by-products, suggesting symbiotic interactions within this polymicrobial culture. PMID:27417846

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Polymicrobial Culture of Naked (N-Type) Emiliania huxleyi CCMP1516

    PubMed Central

    Orata, Fabini D.; Rosana, Albert Remus R.; Xu, Yue; Simkus, Danielle N.; Bramucci, Anna R.; Boucher, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Strains of Sulfitobacter spp., Erythrobacter sp., and Marinobacter sp. were isolated from a polymicrobial culture of the naked (N-type) haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP1516. The genomes encode genes for the production of phytohormones, vitamins, and the consumption of their hosts’ metabolic by-products, suggesting symbiotic interactions within this polymicrobial culture. PMID:27417846

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Polymicrobial Culture of Coccolith-Bearing (C-Type) Emiliania huxleyi M217

    PubMed Central

    Rosana, Albert Remus R.; Orata, Fabini D.; Xu, Yue; Simkus, Danielle N.; Bramucci, Anna R.; Boucher, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Strains of Rhodobacteraceae, Sphingomonadales, Alteromonadales, and Bacteroidetes were isolated from a polymicrobial culture of the coccolith-forming (C-type) haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi strain M217. The genomes encode genes for the production of algal growth factors and the consumption of their hosts’ metabolic by-products, suggesting that the polymicrobial culture harbors many symbiotic interactions. PMID:27417845

  20. NOS3 protects against systemic inflammation and myocardial dysfunction in murine polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bougaki, Masahiko; Searles, Robert J.; Kida, Kotaro; De Yu, Jia; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of septic shock. However, the role of NO synthase 3 (NOS3) during sepsis remains incompletely understood. Here, we examined impact of NOS3 deficiency on systemic inflammation and myocardial dysfunction during peritonitis-induced polymicrobial sepsis. Severe polymicrobial sepsis was induced by colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP) in wild-type (WT) and NOS3-deficient (NOS3KO) mice. NOS3KO mice exhibited shorter survival time than did WT mice after CASP. NOS3 deficiency worsened systemic inflammation assessed by the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the lung, liver, and heart. CASP markedly increased the number of leukocyte infiltrating the liver and heart in NOS3KO but not in WT mice. The exaggerated systemic inflammation in septic NOS3KO mice was associated with more marked myocardial dysfunction than in WT mice 22h after CASP. The detrimental effects of NOS3-deficiency on myocardial function after CASP appear to be caused by impaired Ca2+ handling of cardiomyocytes. The impaired Ca2+ handling of cardiomyocytes isolated from NOS3KO mice subjected to CASP was associated with depressed mitochondrial ATP production, a determinant of the Ca2+ cycling capacity of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase. The NOS3-deficiency-induced impairment of the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP after CASP was at least in part attributable to reduction in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity. These observations suggest that NOS3 protects against systemic inflammation and myocardial dysfunction after peritonitis-induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice. PMID:19997049

  1. Morphology-Independent Virulence of Candida Species during Polymicrobial Intra-abdominal Infections with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal polymicrobial infections cause significant morbidity and mortality. An experimental mouse model of Candida albicans-Staphylococcus aureus intra-abdominal infection (IAI) results in 100% mortality by 48 to 72 h postinoculation, while monomicrobial infections are avirulent. Mortality is associated with robust local and systemic inflammation without a requirement for C. albicans morphogenesis. However, the contribution of virulence factors coregulated during the yeast-to-hypha transition is unknown. This also raised the question of whether other Candida species that are unable to form hyphae are as virulent as C. albicans during polymicrobial IAI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of non-albicans Candida (NAC) species with various morphologies and C. albicans transcription factor mutants (efg1/efg1 and cph1/cph1) to induce synergistic mortality and the accompanying inflammation. Results showed that S. aureus coinoculated with C. krusei or C. tropicalis was highly lethal, similar to C. albicans, while S. aureus-C. dubliniensis, S. aureus-C. parapsilosis, and S. aureus-C. glabrata coinoculations resulted in little to no mortality. Local and systemic interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels were significantly elevated during symptomatic and/or lethal coinfections, and hypothermia strongly correlated with mortality. Coinoculation with C. albicans strains deficient in the transcription factor Efg1 but not Cph1 reversed the lethal outcome. These results support previous findings and demonstrate that select Candida species, without reference to any morphological requirement, induce synergistic mortality, with IL-6 and PGE2 acting as key inflammatory factors. Mechanistically, signaling pathways controlled by Efg1 are critical for the ability of C. albicans to induce mortality from an intra-abdominal polymicrobial infection. PMID:26483410

  2. Clinical-scintigraphy discordance in a case of malignant external otitis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Avellaneda, T; González-Ramírez, A I; Rodríguez-Alfonso, B; Mucientes-Rasilla, J; García-Berrocal, J R; De Diego, B

    2012-09-01

    We report the case of an immunocompromised female patient with external otitis, who developed a picture of external otitis with poor response to conventional treatment and subsequent isolation of Pseudomona Aeruginosa in the ear secretion culture. The final diagnosis was malignant external otitis. Our objective is to describe the scintigraphic findings as well as to analyze their correlation with the clinical pattern and to evaluate the possible causes of the discordance found. PMID:23067529

  3. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Norman; Medina-Garcia, Luis; Al Mohajer, Mayar; Zangeneh, Tirdad T

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation. PMID:27006841

  4. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Norman; Medina-Garcia, Luis; Al Mohajer, Mayar; Zangeneh, Tirdad T.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation. PMID:27006841

  5. Candida albicans-Staphylococcus aureus Polymicrobial Peritonitis Modulates Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in medical device fabrication and antimicrobial treatment therapies, fungal-bacterial polymicrobial peritonitis remains a serious complication for surgery patients, those on peritoneal dialysis, and the critically ill. Using a murine model of peritonitis, we have demonstrated that monomicrobial infection with Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus is nonlethal. However, coinfection with these same doses leads to a 40% mortality rate and increased microbial burden in the spleen and kidney by day 1 postinfection. Using a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we have also identified a unique subset of innate proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, keratinocyte chemoattractant, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α) that are significantly increased during polymicrobial versus monomicrobial peritonitis, leading to increased inflammatory infiltrate into the peritoneum and target organs. Treatment of coinfected mice with the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin reduces the infectious burden, proinflammatory cytokine production, and inflammatory infiltrate while simultaneously preventing any mortality. Further experiments demonstrated that the immunomodulatory eicosanoid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is synergistically increased during coinfection compared to monomicrobial infection; indomethacin treatment also decreased elevated PGE2 levels. Furthermore, addition of exogenous PGE2 into the peritoneal cavity during infection overrode the protection provided by indomethacin and restored the increased mortality and microbial burden. Importantly, these studies highlight the ability of fungal-bacterial coinfection to modulate innate inflammatory events with devastating consequences to the host. PMID:23545303

  6. Coronal microleakage of two root-end filling materials using a polymicrobial marker.

    PubMed

    Ferk Luketić, Suzana; Malcić, Ana; Jukić, Silvana; Anić, Ivica; Segović, Sanja; Kalenić, Smilja

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymicrobial coronal leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and amalgam. There were 108 single-rooted teeth randomly divided into 3 groups of 32 teeth each and positive and negative control groups of 6 teeth and obturated with gutta percha and either Diaket (3M/ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), AH Plus (Dentsply, De Trey, Konstanz, Germany), or Ketac Endo (3M/ESPE). These groups were further divided into 2 subgroups of 16 teeth in which root ends were resected and obturated with either MTA or zinc-free amalgam. The samples have been incorporated in a dual-chamber leakage model with a polymicrobial marker of five facultative anaerobes on the coronal part. Leakage was observing during a period of 90 days. The least leakage was found in a combination of Diaket and MTA (76.9 +/-14.8 days) followed by AH Plus and MTA (66.1 +/- 18.7), Diaket and amalgam (60.0 +/- 23.1), AH Plus and amalgam (56.9 +/- 22.1), and Ketac Endo and MTA (42.1 +/- 17.8), whereas the greatest leakage was observed in the Ketac Endo and amalgam group (40.0 +/- 17.24). Samples filled with MTA showed significantly better sealing than samples filled with amalgam (p < 0.05). PMID:18215682

  7. [Severe forms of cholesteatomatous chronic otitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fleury, P; Basset, J M; Aben-Moha, G; François, M; Royer, P

    1982-01-01

    Eighty further case-reports of patients, hospitalized for particularly severe forms of cholesteatomatous chronic otitis since 1977, are analyzed. -Cholesteatomas were associated with spontaneous atticotomy and atrial invasion in 37 cases, while in 8 patients the cholesteatoma was revealed by the presence of premalleal and anterior subligamental perforations. -New features were observed in 7 cases of cholesteatomatous and osteomatous chronic otitis. -Giant cholesteatoma was present in 12 cases, and unilateral tumors in 6 patients. -Four rarer types of lesion, obviously of a serious nature, were observed, including: -polypoid and hemorrhagic tumors (6 cases), -persistently highly fetid cholesteatomas (6 cases), and those that appeared to be "under pressure" (13 cases). -Finally, 7 cases were unusual and disturbing, demonstrating early extensive osteitic recurrence less than 6 months after initial excision. Widespread evidement is necessary for the majority of these cases. PMID:7103344

  8. Malignant otitis externa in a healthy non-diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Peng, Hong; Mo, Ting-Ting; Liang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    A healthy 60-year-old male was initially treated for external otitis, and subsequently received multiple surgeries including abscess drainage, temporal bone debridement, canaloplasty of the external auditory meatus, and fistula excision and was treated with numerous antibiotics at another hospital over a 1-year period. He was seen at our hospital on February 14, 2014 with a complaint of a non-healing wound behind the left ear and drainage of purulent fluid. He had no history of diabetes mellitus or compromised immune function. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies at our hospital showed osteomyelitis involving the left temporal, occipital, and sphenoid bones, the mandible, and an epidural abscess. Routine blood testing and tests of immune function were normal, and no evidence of other infectious processes was found. He was diagnosed with malignant otitis externa (MOE). Bone debridement and incision and drainage of the epidural abscess were performed, and vancomycin was administered because culture results revealed Corynebacterium jeikeium, Corynebacterium xerosis, and Enterococcus faecalis. MOE should be considered in healthy patients with external otitis who fail initial treatment. PMID:26233245

  9. Polymicrobial Infection with Major Periodontal Pathogens Induced Periodontal Disease and Aortic Atherosclerosis in Hyperlipidemic ApoEnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Mercedes F.; Lee, Ju-Youn; Aneja, Monika; Goswami, Vishalkant; Liu, Liying; Velsko, Irina M.; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Chen, Hao; Lucas, Alexandra R.; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya N.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerosis are both polymicrobial and multifactorial and although observational studies supported the association, the causative relationship between these two diseases is not yet established. Polymicrobial infection-induced periodontal disease is postulated to accelerate atherosclerotic plaque growth by enhancing atherosclerotic risk factors of orally infected Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoEnull) mice. At 16 weeks of infection, samples of blood, mandible, maxilla, aorta, heart, spleen, and liver were collected, analyzed for bacterial genomic DNA, immune response, inflammation, alveolar bone loss, serum inflammatory marker, atherosclerosis risk factors, and aortic atherosclerosis. PCR analysis of polymicrobial-infected (Porphyromonas gingivalis [P. gingivalis], Treponema denticola [T. denticola], and Tannerella forsythia [T. forsythia]) mice resulted in detection of bacterial genomic DNA in oral plaque samples indicating colonization of the oral cavity by all three species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected P. gingivalis and T. denticola within gingival tissues of infected mice and morphometric analysis showed an increase in palatal alveolar bone loss (p<0.0001) and intrabony defects suggesting development of periodontal disease in this model. Polymicrobial-infected mice also showed an increase in aortic plaque area (p<0.05) with macrophage accumulation, enhanced serum amyloid A, and increased serum cholesterol and triglycerides. A systemic infection was indicated by the detection of bacterial genomic DNA in the aorta and liver of infected mice and elevated levels of bacterial specific IgG antibodies (p<0.0001). This study was a unique effort to understand the effects of a polymicrobial infection with P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia on periodontal disease and associated atherosclerosis in ApoEnull mice. PMID:23451182

  10. Evaluation of the likelihood of reflux developing in patients with recurrent upper respiratory infections, recurrent sinusitis or recurrent otitis seen in ear-nose-throat outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Önal, Zerrin; Çullu-Çokuğraş, Fügen; Işıldak, Hüseyin; Kaytaz, Asım; Kutlu, Tufan; Erkan, Tülay; Doğusoy, Gülen

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is considered a risk factor for recurrent or persistent upper and lower respiratory tract conditions including asthma, chronic cough, sinusitis, laryngitis, serous otitis and paroxysmal laryngospasm. Fifty-one subjects with recurrent (more than three) episodes of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), serous otitis or sinusitis who had been admitted to an earnose- throat (ENT) outpatient clinic during the previous year were enrolled in the present study to evaluate the presence of laryngeal and/or esophageal reflux. The participants, who were randomly selected, were questioned about symptoms of reflux, including vomiting, abdominal pain, failure to thrive, halitosis, bitter taste in the mouth, chronic cough, heartburn, constipation and hoarseness. All subjects had an endoscopic examination, an otoscopic examination, a tympanogram and upper GI system endoscopy. Esophagitis was diagnosed endoscopically and histologically. The likelihood of occurrence of esophagitis was found to be higher only among subjects with postglottic edema/erythema as determined by pathological laryngeal examination. The reflux complaints reported did not predict the development of esophagitis, but the odds of esophagitis occurring were ninefold greater among subjects with recurrent otitis. Of the subjects, 45.1% were Helicobacter pylori-positive. However, no association was found between esophagitis and Helicobacter pylori positivity. The likelihood of the occurrence of esophagitis was found to be increased in the presence of recurrent otitis media and/or postglottic edema, irrespective of the presence of reflux symptoms. We concluded that, in contrast to the situation where adults are concerned, the boundaries for discriminating laryngopharyngeal reflux from gastroesophageal reflux are somewhat blurred in pediatric patients. PMID:26701945

  11. Treatment of Polymicrobial Osteomyelitis with Ceftolozane-Tazobactam: Case Report and Sensitivity Testing of Isolates.

    PubMed

    Jolliff, Jeffrey C; Ho, Jackie; Joson, Jeremiah; Heidari, Arash; Johnson, Royce

    2016-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an inherently multidrug resistant (MDR) opportunistic pathogen with many mechanisms of resistance. SENTRY studies reveal decreasing sensitivities of S. maltophilia to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones. Ceftolozane-tazobactam (Zerbaxa, Merck & Co., Inc.) a novel intravenous combination agent of a third-generation cephalosporin and β-lactamase inhibitor was demonstrated to have in vitro activity against many Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and MDR organisms. Data for ceftolozane-tazobactam's use outside of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved indications has been limited thus far to two case reports which demonstrated its efficacy in pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Herein, we describe the first published case of treatment of MDR S. maltophilia in polymicrobial osteomyelitis with long-term (>14 days) ceftolozane-tazobactam and metronidazole. Ceftolozane-tazobactam may offer a possible alternative for clinicians faced with limited options in the treatment of resistant pathogens including MDR S. maltophilia. PMID:27437155

  12. Treatment of Polymicrobial Osteomyelitis with Ceftolozane-Tazobactam: Case Report and Sensitivity Testing of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jolliff, Jeffrey C.; Joson, Jeremiah; Heidari, Arash; Johnson, Royce

    2016-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an inherently multidrug resistant (MDR) opportunistic pathogen with many mechanisms of resistance. SENTRY studies reveal decreasing sensitivities of S. maltophilia to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones. Ceftolozane-tazobactam (Zerbaxa, Merck & Co., Inc.) a novel intravenous combination agent of a third-generation cephalosporin and β-lactamase inhibitor was demonstrated to have in vitro activity against many Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and MDR organisms. Data for ceftolozane-tazobactam's use outside of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved indications has been limited thus far to two case reports which demonstrated its efficacy in pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Herein, we describe the first published case of treatment of MDR S. maltophilia in polymicrobial osteomyelitis with long-term (>14 days) ceftolozane-tazobactam and metronidazole. Ceftolozane-tazobactam may offer a possible alternative for clinicians faced with limited options in the treatment of resistant pathogens including MDR S. maltophilia. PMID:27437155

  13. Individual growth detection of bacterial species in an in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Tabenski, L; Maisch, T; Santarelli, F; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G

    2014-11-01

    Most in vitro studies on the antibacterial effects of antiseptics have used planktonic bacteria in monocultures. However, this study design does not reflect the in vivo situation in oral cavities harboring different bacterial species that live in symbiotic relationships in biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a simple in vitro polymicrobial model consisting of only three bacterial strains of different phases of oral biofilm formation to simulate in vivo oral conditions. Therefore, we studied the biofilm formation of Actinomyces naeslundii (An), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) on 96-well tissue culture plates under static anaerobic conditions using artificial saliva according to the method established by Pratten et al. that was supplemented with 1 g l(-1) sucrose. Growth was separately determined for each bacterial strain after incubation periods of up to 72 h by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and live/dead staining. Presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was visualized by Concanavalin A staining. Increasing incubation times of up to 72 h showed adhesion and propagation of the bacterial strains with artificial saliva formulation. An and Ef had significantly higher growth rates than Fn. Live/dead staining showed a median of 49.9 % (range 46.0-53.0 %) of living bacteria after 72 h of incubation, and 3D fluorescence microscopy showed a three-dimensional structure containing EPS. An in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model was established to better simulate oral conditions and had the advantage of providing the well-controlled experimental conditions of in vitro testing. PMID:25119373

  14. Microbial protection and virulence in periodontal tissue as a function of polymicrobial communities: symbiosis and dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Frank A; Darveau, Richard P

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses polymicrobial interactions with the host in both health and disease. As our ability to identify specific bacterial clonal types, with respect to their abundance and location in the oral biofilm, improves, we will learn more concerning their contribution to both oral health and disease. Recent studies examining host- bacteria interactions have revealed that commensal bacteria not only protect the host simply by niche occupation, but that bacterial interactions with host tissue can promote the development of proper tissue structure and function. These data indicate that our host-associated polymicrobial communities, such as those found in the oral cavity, co-evolved with us and have become an integral part of who we are. Understanding the microbial community factors that underpin the associations with host tissue that contribute to periodontal health may also reveal how dysbiotic periodontopathic oral communities disrupt normal periodontal tissue functions in disease. A disruption of the oral microbial community creates dysbiosis, either by overgrowth of specific or nonspecific microorganisms or by changes in the local host response where the community can now support a disease state. Dysbiosis provides the link between systemic changes (e.g. diabetes) and exogenous risk factors (e.g. smoking), and the dysbiotic community, and can drive the destruction of periodontal tissue. Many other risk factors associated with periodontal disease, such as stress, aging and genetics, are also likely to affect the microbial community, and more research is needed, utilizing sophisticated bacterial taxonomic techniques, to elucidate these effects on the microbiome and to develop strategies to target the dysbiotic mechanisms and improve periodontal health. PMID:26252399

  15. Temporal sequence of pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to graded polymicrobial peritonitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Stamme, C; Bundschuh, D S; Hartung, T; Gebert, U; Wollin, L; Nüsing, R; Wendel, A; Uhlig, S

    1999-11-01

    The lungs are the remote organ most commonly affected in human peritonitis. The major goals of this study were to define the dose- and time-dependent relationship between graded septic peritonitis and systemic and pulmonary inflammatory responses in mice. BALB/c mice were treated with intraperitoneal polymicrobial inoculi and sacrificed at 3, 12, and 24 h. The treatment protocol resulted in distinct groups of animals with respect to mortality rate, kinetics, and concentrations of a broad spectrum of pro- and anti-inflammatory endogenous mediators, intrapulmonary bacterial accumulation, and static lung compliance. In sublethally infected mice, pulmonary bacterial proliferation was controlled. Levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-10, interleukin-6, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in plasma were elevated 3 h after infection exclusively. At 3 h, MCP-1, gamma interferon, and TNF were detected in extracts of pulmonary tissue or in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Static lung compliance (C(st)) was transiently decreased at 12 h. In contrast, in lethally infected mice pulmonary bacterial proliferation was not contained. Concentrations of MCP-1, G-CSF, and TNF in plasma were maximal at 24 h, as were pulmonary MCP-1 levels. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was increased at 3, 12, and 24 h. C(st) was reduced after 3 h and did not reach control values at 24 h. Pulmonary cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and eicosanoids in BAL fluid and plasma were elevated at 3 and 24 h. This study shows that polymicrobial peritonitis in mice leads to dose-dependent systemic and pulmonary inflammation accompanied by a decrease in lung compliance. PMID:10531211

  16. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The growth of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods was reported among 35% and 41% of the IFI and non-IFI wounds with SSTIs, respectively. Among the IFI wounds, times to wound closure were significantly longer for wounds with Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P < 0.01). When wounds with Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. PMID:25972413

  17. Preferential Use of Central Metabolism In Vivo Reveals a Nutritional Basis for Polymicrobial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2015-01-01

    The human genitourinary tract is a common anatomical niche for polymicrobial infection and a leading site for the development of bacteremia and sepsis. Most uncomplicated, community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) are caused by Escherichia coli, while another bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, is more often associated with complicated UTI. Here, we report that uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis have divergent requirements for specific central pathways in vivo despite colonizing and occupying the same host environment. Using mutants of specific central metabolism enzymes, we determined glycolysis mutants lacking pgi, tpiA, pfkA, or pykA all have fitness defects in vivo for P. mirabilis but do not affect colonization of E. coli during UTI. Similarly, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway is required only for P. mirabilis in vivo. In contrast, gluconeogenesis is required only for E. coli fitness in vivo. The remarkable difference in central pathway utilization between E. coli and P. mirabilis during experimental UTI was also observed for TCA cycle mutants in sdhB, fumC, and frdA. The distinct in vivo requirements between these pathogens suggest E. coli and P. mirabilis are not direct competitors within host urinary tract nutritional niche. In support of this, we found that co-infection with E. coli and P. mirabilis wild-type strains enhanced bacterial colonization and persistence of both pathogens during UTI. Our results reveal that complementary utilization of central carbon metabolism facilitates polymicrobial disease and suggests microbial activity in vivo alters the host urinary tract nutritional niche. PMID:25568946

  18. Neonatal endotoxin exposure changes neuroendocrine, cardiovascular function and mortality during polymicrobial sepsis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Oliveira-Pelegrin, Gabriela Ravanelli; da Silva, Maria Emília Nadaletto Bonifácio; Aguila, Fábio Alves; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Rocha, Maria José Alves; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether neonatal LPS challenge may improve hormonal, cardiovascular response and mortality, this being a beneficial adaptation when adult rats are submitted to polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Fourteen days after birth, pups received an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100μg/kg) or saline. After 8-12 weeks, they were submitted to CLP, decapitated 4, 6 or 24h after surgery and blood was collected for vasopressin (AVP), corticosterone and nitrate measurement, while AVP contents were measured in neurohypophysis, supra-optic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. Moreover, rats had their mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evaluated, and mortality and bacteremia were determined at 24h. Septic animals with neonatal LPS exposure had higher plasma AVP and corticosterone levels, and higher c-Fos expression in SON and PVN at 24h after surgery when compared to saline treated rats. The LPS pretreated group showed increased AVP content in SON and PVN at 6h, while we did not observe any change in neurohypophyseal AVP content. The nitrate levels were significantly reduced in plasma at 6 and 24h after surgery, and in both hypothalamic nuclei only at 6h. Septic animals with neonatal LPS exposure showed increase in MAP during the initial phase of sepsis, but HR was not different from the neonatal saline group. Furthermore, neonatally LPS exposed rats showed a significant decrease in mortality rate as well as in bacteremia. These data suggest that neonatal LPS challenge is able to promote beneficial effects on neuroendocrine and cardiovascular responses to polymicrobial sepsis in adulthood. PMID:21549159

  19. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  20. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  1. Malignant external otitis: The diagnostic value of bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ostfeld, E.; Aviel, A.; Pelet, D.

    1981-06-01

    Technetium99m Methylene Diphosphate bone scintigraphy (BS) of the skull was performed in three patients with malignant external otitis (MEO). Pathological uptake of the radioisotope in the mastoid region was found during the early stages of MEO updating radiologic findings. The extent of the radioisotope accumulation during the early stages of MEO indicates that the actual tissue damage exceeds the clinical estimation. The follow-up BS findings correlate well with the clinical course of MEO indicating either healing or extension to the base of skull.

  2. Nuclear scanning in necrotizing progressive ''malignant'' external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Parisier, S.C.; Lucente, F.E.; Som, P.M.; Hirschman, S.Z.; Arnold, L.M.; Roffman, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    The usefulness of radionuclear scanning in the treatment of 18 patients with necrotizing progressive ''malignant'' external otitis is discussed. A Tc 99-m bone scan, a valuable test since results are positive in early cases of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and base of skull, showed increased uptake in all 18 patients. In 6 patients, Ga-67 citrate scans were obtained at the start of therapy and at 5-6 week intervals thereafter. The serial gallium scans were useful in evaluating the effectiveness of therapy since the uptake decrease with control of infection.

  3. The polymicrobial Actinomyces naeslundii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in a patient with ulcerative colitis 2 months after colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Topić, Mirjana Balen; Desnica, Boško; Vicković, Ninoslava; Skuhala, Tomislava; Bayer, Kristijan; Bukovski, Suzana

    2014-02-01

    We describe a case of an abrupt onset of polymicrobial Actinomyces naeslundii/Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in a patient with a previously silent abdominal actinomycosis, developed 2 months after colonoscopy when the diagnosis of a left-sided ulcerative colitis was established. Prolonged high-dose ceftriaxone therapy was clinically effective, albeit accompanied by the development of a reversible pseudocholelithiasis that persisted for 5 months. PMID:24297267

  4. Distinct interacting core taxa in co-occurrence networks enable discrimination of polymicrobial oral diseases with similar symptoms.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Takahiko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Kachi, Hirokazu; Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Maruyama, Noriko; Murase, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial diseases, which can be life threatening, are caused by the presence and interactions of multiple microbes. Peri-implantitis and periodontitis are representative polymicrobial diseases that show similar clinical symptoms. To establish a means of differentiating between them, we compared microbial species and functional genes in situ by performing metatranscriptomic analyses of peri-implantitis and periodontitis samples obtained from the same subjects (n = 12 each). Although the two diseases differed in terms of 16S rRNA-based taxonomic profiles, they showed similarities with respect to functional genes and taxonomic and virulence factor mRNA profiles. The latter-defined as microbial virulence types-differed from those of healthy periodontal sites. We also showed that networks based on co-occurrence relationships of taxonomic mRNA abundance (co-occurrence networks) were dissimilar between the two diseases. Remarkably, these networks consisted mainly of taxa with a high relative mRNA-to-rRNA ratio, with some showing significant co-occurrence defined as interacting core taxa, highlighting differences between the two groups. Thus, peri-implantitis and periodontitis have shared as well as distinct microbiological characteristics. Our findings provide insight into microbial interactions in polymicrobial diseases with unknown etiologies. PMID:27499042

  5. Distinct interacting core taxa in co-occurrence networks enable discrimination of polymicrobial oral diseases with similar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Takahiko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Kachi, Hirokazu; Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Maruyama, Noriko; Murase, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial diseases, which can be life threatening, are caused by the presence and interactions of multiple microbes. Peri-implantitis and periodontitis are representative polymicrobial diseases that show similar clinical symptoms. To establish a means of differentiating between them, we compared microbial species and functional genes in situ by performing metatranscriptomic analyses of peri-implantitis and periodontitis samples obtained from the same subjects (n = 12 each). Although the two diseases differed in terms of 16S rRNA-based taxonomic profiles, they showed similarities with respect to functional genes and taxonomic and virulence factor mRNA profiles. The latter—defined as microbial virulence types—differed from those of healthy periodontal sites. We also showed that networks based on co-occurrence relationships of taxonomic mRNA abundance (co-occurrence networks) were dissimilar between the two diseases. Remarkably, these networks consisted mainly of taxa with a high relative mRNA-to-rRNA ratio, with some showing significant co-occurrence defined as interacting core taxa, highlighting differences between the two groups. Thus, peri-implantitis and periodontitis have shared as well as distinct microbiological characteristics. Our findings provide insight into microbial interactions in polymicrobial diseases with unknown etiologies. PMID:27499042

  6. Scedosporium apiospermum: a rare cause of malignant otitis externa.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Oliver; Potter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man, with a history of well-controlled diabetes mellitus, presented with left-sided otalgia. With an initial diagnosis of simple otitis externa, he was discharged on topical drops. He represented 2 months later with worsening otalgia and discharge. A diagnosis of malignant otitis externa was made based on clinical and radiological findings. Intravenous Tazocin and Gentamicin were given based on previous bacterial culture from ear swabs. The patient failed to improve and developed left-sided facial nerve palsy. His condition stabilised following a change in antimicrobial therapy and his management continued in the community on intravenous Meropenem with twice weekly aural toilet. Repeated nuclear medicine imaging failed to demonstrate resolution. A bony sequestration was removed from the external auditory canal in the outpatient clinic, which following extended culture grew Scedosporium apiospermum; his management was subsequently changed to oral Voriconazole. This led to rapid clinical improvement and disease resolution over a 6 -week period. PMID:27613266

  7. Polymicrobial infection alter inflammatory microRNA in rat salivary glands during periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Gautam; Gauna, Adrienne; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Velsko, Irina; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Cha, Seunghee

    2016-04-01

    Periodontal disease initiated by subgingival pathogens is linked with diminished secretion of saliva, and implies pathogenic bacteria dissemination to or affects secondary sites such as the salivary glands. MicroRNAs activated in response to bacteria may modulate immune responses against pathogens. Therefore, Sprague-Dawley rats were infected by oral lavage consisting of polymicrobial inocula, namely Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, or sham-infected for 12 weeks (n = 6). We quantified inflammatory miRNA expression levels of miRNA-132, miR-146a, and miR-155 at secondary sites to the primary infection of the gingiva, including submandibular salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and pancreas. The presence of bacteria was detected in situ at secondary sites. Infected rat gingiva showed increased relative expression of miR-155. In contrast, miRNA-155 expression was decreased in submandibular salivary glands, along with positive identification of P. gingivalis in 2/6 and T. denticola in 1/6 rat salivary glands. Furthermore, miRNA-132 and miRNA-146a were significantly decreased in the pancreas of infected rats. This study is the first to show primary periodontal infections can alter miRNA profiles in secondary sites such as the salivary gland and pancreas. Whether these alterations contribute to pathologies of salivary glands in Sjögren's syndrome or of pancreas in diabetes warrants further investigation. PMID:26481834

  8. Evaluation and identification of poly-microbial biofilms on natural green Gordal table olives.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Cabello, Antonio; Romero-Gil, Verónica; Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé

    2015-09-01

    This work examines the formation of poly-microbial communities adhered to the epidermis of natural green Gordal olives and the application of different methodologies for recovery and counting of the microorganisms embedded in olive biofilms. The fermentation process was physicochemical and microbiologically monitored for 90 days, at which, formation of true biofilms on the skin of fermented fruits was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Then, samples of olives were taken and treated with sonication, enzymes, mechanical homogenization with stomacher and ultrasonic bath for biofilm disaggregation. The use of the stomacher for 1 min was the most effective treatment to release the lactic acid bacteria (6.6 log10 cfu g(-1)), whereas sonication for 5 min was the most efficient method for quantification of yeasts (up to 3.5 log10 cfu g(-1)). Molecular identification of isolates obtained from natural Gordal olive biofilms revealed that Lactobacillus pentosus was the only species found among lactic acid bacteria, while Pichia membranifaciens was the dominant yeast species, with higher counts obtained for the bacteria. PMID:26115883

  9. CETP Lowers TLR4 Expression Which Attenuates the Inflammatory Response Induced by LPS and Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Angela; Amano, Mariane Tami; Nunes, Valeria Sutti; Quintao, Eder Carlos Rocha; Cazita, Patrícia Miralda

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection eliciting high mortality rate which is a serious health problem. Despite numerous studies seeking for therapeutic alternatives, the mechanisms involved in this disease remain elusive. In this study we evaluated the influence of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), a glycoprotein that promotes the transfer of lipids between lipoproteins, on the inflammatory response in mice. Human CETP transgenic mice were compared to control mice (wild type, WT) after polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), aiming at investigating their survival rate and inflammatory profiles. Macrophages from the peritoneal cavity were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of recombinant CETP for phenotypic and functional studies. In comparison to WT mice, CETP mice showed higher survival rate, lower IL-6 plasma concentration, and decreased liver toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH) protein. Moreover, macrophages from WT mice to which recombinant human CETP was added decreased LPS uptake, TLR4 expression, NF-κB activation and IL-6 secretion. This raises the possibility for new therapeutic tools in sepsis while suggesting that lowering CETP by pharmacological inhibitors should be inconvenient in the context of sepsis and infectious diseases. PMID:27293313

  10. Development and Application of a Polymicrobial in vitro Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Jeremy; Boegli, Laura; Kirker, Kelly R.; Agostinho, Alessandra M.; Durch, Amanda M.; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Stewart, Philip S.; James, Garth A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims The goal of this investigation was to develop an in vitro, polymicrobial, wound biofilm capable of supporting the growth of bacteria with variable oxygen requirements. Methods and Results The strict anaerobe Clostridium perfringens was isolated by cultivating wound homogenates using the drip-flow reactor, and a three-species biofilm model was established using methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and C. perfringens in the colony-drip-flow reactor model. Plate counts revealed that MRSA, P. aeruginosa, and C. perfringens grew to 7.39±0.45, 10.22±0.22, and 7.13±0.77 log CFU per membrane, respectively. The three-species model was employed to evaluate the efficacy of two antimicrobial dressings, Curity™ AMD and Acticoat™, compared to sterile gauze controls. Microbial growth on Curity™ AMD and gauze were not significantly different, for any species, whereas Acticoat™ was found to significantly reduce growth for all three species. Conclusions Using the Colony-DFR, a three-species biofilm was successfully grown, and the biofilms displayed a unique structure consisting of distinct layers that appeared to be inhabited exclusively or predominantly by a single species. Significance and Impact of Study The primary accomplishment of this study was the isolation and growth of an obligate anaerobe in an in vitro model without establishing an artificially anaerobic environment. PMID:22353049

  11. Polymicrobial Biofilm Inhibition Effects of Acetate-Buffered Chitosan Sponge Delivery Device.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Jessica Amber; Beenken, Karen E; Parker, Ashley C; Smith, James Keaton; Courtney, Harry S; Smeltzer, Mark S; Haggard, Warren O

    2016-04-01

    Polymicrobial biofilm-associated implant infections present a challenging clinical problem. Through modifications of lyophilized chitosan sponges, degradable drug delivery devices for antibiotic solution have been fabricated for prevention and treatment of contaminated musculoskeletal wounds. Elution of amikacin, vancomycin, or a combination of both follows a burst release pattern with vancomycin released above minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus for 72 h and amikacin released above inhibitory concentrations for Pseudomonas aeruginosa for 3 h. Delivery of a vancomycin, amikacin, or a combination of both reduces biofilm formation on polytetrafluoroethylene catheters in an in vivo model of contamination. Release of dual antibiotics from sponges is more effective at preventing biofilm formation than single-loaded chitosan sponges. Treatment of pre-formed biofilm with high-dose antibiotic release from chitosan sponges shows minimal reduction after 48 h. These results demonstrate infection-preventive efficacy for antibiotic-loaded sponges, as well as the need for modifications in the development of advanced materials to enhance treatment efficacy in removing established biofilm. PMID:26756211

  12. Aerococcus christensenii as Part of Severe Polymicrobial Chorioamnionitis in a Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Carlstein, Catrine; Marie Søes, Lillian; Jørgen Christensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a potentially life threatening infection of the fetal membranes, commonly caused by ascending bacteria from the vagina and cervix. In our case, a healthy nullipara with a term pregnancy presented clinical signs of infection after induced labour with an intracervical balloon. Thick green and foul smelling amniotic fluid was observed and culture showed massive growth of Aerococcus christensenii, a facultative anaerob species found in the human vagina, previously only rarely alleged to cause invasive infection. Additional testing with 16S rRNA gene analysis also identified the presence of Gemella asaccharolytica, Snethia sanguinegens, Parvimonas micra and Streptobacillus moniliformis. The patient was treated with cefuroxime and metronidazole and recovered quickly. The newborn showed no signs of infection. This case points at the possible role of these pathogens in female genital tract infections. The case also underlines the importance of the combination of culture and culture independent diagnostic approaches to reveal possible polymicrobial natures of selected infections, in this case chorioamnionitis. PMID:27014376

  13. In vitro efficacy of different irrigating solutions against polymicrobial human root canal bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Fráter, Márk; Braunitzer, Gábor; Urbán, Edit; Bereczki, László; Antal, Márk; Nagy, Katalin

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of five different irrigating solutions against complex polymicrobial bacterial biofilms harvested from root canals to model actual endodontic irrigation as closely as possible, and to test the efficacy of these irrigants in these conditions. Two multi-species in vitro biofilms were generated from bacterial samples taken from patients presenting with acute pulpitis. The microbial composition of these samples was characteristic of the disease. The biofilms were incubated with 1000 p.p.m. Solumium Dental (ClO(2)), 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX), 5.25% sodium-hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% Neomagnol, 10% iodine and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) as control. After the microbiological preparation of the samples, colony forming units (CFU) were counted. NaOCl, iodine and Neomagnol were the most effective, whilst CHXand Solumium appeared to be less effective against these specific biofilms. The efficacy of the most effective agents differed according to biofilm and application time. All irrigants were efficient to some extent, but NaOCl proved to be the most efficient, while chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) yielded the poorest results in these circumstances. The efficacy of NaOCl was already well-known, but our results also point out that iodine could have an important role in endodontic irrigation. PMID:23827750

  14. A rare and sinister variant of a common ailment: Fungal malignant otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Lilic, N; Mowjood, MT; Wong, MHW

    2012-01-01

    A recent case report in this journal highlighted the pathophysiology and management of bacterial malignant otitis externa (MOE) (1). We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who had a delayed diagnosis of fungal MOE with advanced diseased at time of diagnosis. This case highlights the changing microbiology of this serious disease and the difficulty in diagnosis given the rarity of this form of otitis externa relative to its uncomplicated form. PMID:24960790

  15. Children with recurrent otitis show defective IFN gamma-producing cells in adenoids.

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Antonietta M; Castellazzi, Anna Maria; Marconi, Massimo; Valsecchi, Chiara; Marseglia, Alessia; Ciprandi, Giorgio; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2008-09-01

    Infectious diseases are frequently observed in children and their recurrence represents a demanding challenge for the paediatrician. It has been hypothesized that a defective immune response may occur in these patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether children presenting with recurrent otitis have a defective interferon (IFN)gamma production by the lymphocytes of peripheral blood and of adenoid tissue, in comparison with children without recurrent otitis. Our study group was represented by 58 children undergoing adenoidectomy for adenoidal hypertrophy. They were subdivided into two groups according to the recurrence of otitis (>or=3 per year) or not (<3 per year). Intracellular cytokine profile of lymphocyte subsets in adenoids and peripheral blood was evaluated by flow cytometry analysis. Children with recurrent otitis showed a significantly lower percentage of CD8+-producing IFN gamma cells in adenoids than children with <3 otitis per year (p = 0.003). The reduced capability of the adenoid cells to produce INF-gamma may induce a high susceptibility to the recurrence of otitis in children. PMID:18266836

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography in malignant external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gherini, S.G.; Brackmann, D.E.; Bradley, W.G.

    1986-05-01

    In malignant external otitis (MEO), determining the anatomic extent of disease and evaluating the physiologic response to therapy remain a problem. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently become available in limited clinical settings. Four patients with MEO were evaluated using MRI, computerized tomography (CT), technetium-99 (Tc-99) bone scanning, and gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67 citrate) scanning. MRI is superior to CT, Tc-99 bone scanning, and Ga-67 citrate scanning in evaluating the anatomic extent of soft tissue changes in MEO. MRI alone cannot be relied upon to determine the physiologic response to therapy. MRI can, however, serve as a valuable guide to the interpretation of Tc-99 bone and Ga-67 citrate scans, and in this respect, MRI is extremely useful in the treatment of MEO.

  17. CXCL1 Contributes to Host Defense in Polymicrobial Sepsis via Modulating T cell and Neutrophil Functions

    PubMed Central

    Liliang, Jin; Batra, Sanjay; Douda, David Nobuhiro; Palaniyar, Nades; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-01-01

    Severe bacterial sepsis leads to a pro-inflammatory condition that can manifest as septic shock, multiple organ failure, and death. Neutrophils are critical for the rapid elimination of bacteria, however, the role of neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 in bacterial clearance during sepsis remains elusive. To test the hypothesis that CXCL1 is critical to host defense during sepsis. We used CXCL1-deficient mice and bone marrow chimeras to demonstrate the importance of this molecule in sepsis. We demonstrate that CXCL1 plays a pivotal role in mediating host defense to polymicrobial sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in gene-deficient mice. CXCL1 appears to be essential for restricting bacterial outgrowth and death in mice. CXCL1 derived from both hematopoietic and resident cells contributed to bacterial clearance. Moreover, CXCL1 is essential for neutrophil migration, expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, activation of Nuclear-Factor-κ-B (NF-κB) and Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinases and upregulation of adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Recombinant interleukin 17 (IL-17) rescued impaired host defenses in cxcl1−/− mice. CXCL1 is important for IL-17A production via Th17 differentiation. CXCL1 is essential for Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. This study reveals a novel role for CXCL1 in neutrophil recruitment via modulating T cell function and neutrophil-related bactericidal functions. These studies suggest that modulation of CXCL1 levels in tissues and blood could reduce bacterial burden in sepsis. PMID:25172493

  18. Exploring Preterm Birth as a Polymicrobial Disease: An Overview of the Uterine Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Matthew S.; Bayatibojakhi, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Infection is a leading cause of preterm birth (PTB). A focus of many studies over the past decade has been to characterize microorganisms present in the uterine cavity and document any association with negative pregnancy outcome. A range of techniques have been used to achieve this, including microbiological culture and targeted polymerase chain reaction assays, and more recently, microbiome-level analyses involving either conserved, phylogenetically informative genes such as the bacterial 16S rRNA gene or whole shotgun metagenomic sequencing. These studies have contributed vast amounts of data toward characterization of the uterine microbiome, specifically that present in the amniotic fluid, fetal membranes, and placenta. However, an overwhelming emphasis has been placed on the bacterial microbiome, with far less data produced on the viral and fungal/yeast microbiomes. With numerous studies now referring to PTB as a polymicrobial condition, there is the need to investigate the role of viruses and fungi/yeasts in more detail and in particular, look for associations between colonization with these microorganisms and bacteria in the same samples. Although the major pathway by which microorganisms are believed to colonize the uterine cavity is vertical ascension from the vagina, numerous studies are now emerging suggesting hematogenous transfer of oral microbiota to the uterine cavity. Evidence of this has been produced in mouse models and although DNA-based evidence in humans appears convincing in some aspects, use of methodologies that only detect viable cells as opposed to lysed cells and extracellular DNA are needed to clarify this. Such techniques as RNA analyses and viability polymerase chain reaction are likely to play key roles in the clinical translation of future microbiome-based data, particularly in confined environments such as the uterus, as detection of viable cells plays a key role in diagnosis and treatment of infection. PMID:25505898

  19. Complement Destabilizes Cardiomyocyte Function In Vivo after Polymicrobial Sepsis and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kalbitz, Miriam; Fattahi, Fatemeh; Herron, Todd J; Grailer, Jamison J; Jajou, Lawrence; Lu, Hope; Huber-Lang, Markus; Zetoune, Firas S; Sarma, J Vidya; Day, Sharlene M; Russell, Mark W; Jalife, José; Ward, Peter A

    2016-09-15

    There is accumulating evidence during sepsis that cardiomyocyte (CM) homeostasis is compromised, resulting in cardiac dysfunction. An important role for complement in these outcomes is now demonstrated. Addition of C5a to electrically paced CMs caused prolonged elevations of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations during diastole, together with the appearance of spontaneous Ca(2+) transients. In polymicrobial sepsis in mice, we found that three key homeostasis-regulating proteins in CMs were reduced: Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, which is vital for effective action potentials in CMs, and two intracellular Ca(2+) concentration regulatory proteins, that is, sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Sepsis caused reduced mRNA levels and reductions in protein concentrations in CMs for all three proteins. The absence of either C5a receptor mitigated sepsis-induced reductions in the three regulatory proteins. Absence of either C5a receptor (C5aR1 or C5aR2) diminished development of defective systolic and diastolic echocardiographic/Doppler parameters developing in the heart (cardiac output, left ventricular stroke volume, isovolumic relaxation, E' septal annulus, E/E' septal annulus, left ventricular diastolic volume). We also found in CMs from septic mice the presence of defective current densities for Ik1, l-type calcium channel, and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. These defects were accentuated in the copresence of C5a. These data suggest complement-related mechanisms responsible for development of cardiac dysfunction during sepsis. PMID:27521340

  20. Diversity in a Polymicrobial Community Revealed by Analysis of Viromes, Endolysins and CRISPR Spacers.

    PubMed

    Davison, Michelle; Treangen, Todd J; Koren, Sergey; Pop, Mihai; Bhaya, Devaki

    2016-01-01

    The polymicrobial biofilm communities in Mushroom and Octopus Spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are well characterized, yet little is known about the phage populations. Dominant species, Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2-13), Synechococcus sp. JA-3-3Ab, Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl, and Roseiflexus sp. RS-1, contain multiple CRISPR-Cas arrays, suggesting complex interactions with phage predators. To analyze phage populations from Octopus Spring biofilms, we sequenced a viral enriched fraction. To assemble and analyze phage metagenomic data, we developed a custom module, VIRITAS, implemented within the MetAMOS framework. This module bins contigs into groups based on tetranucleotide frequencies and CRISPR spacer-protospacer matching and ORF calling. Using this pipeline we were able to assemble phage sequences into contigs and bin them into three clusters that corroborated with their potential host range. The virome contained 52,348 predicted ORFs; some were clearly phage-like; 9319 ORFs had a recognizable Pfam domain while the rest were hypothetical. Of the recognized domains with CRISPR spacer matches, was the phage endolysin used by lytic phage to disrupt cells. Analysis of the endolysins present in the thermophilic cyanophage contigs revealed a subset of characterized endolysins as well as a Glyco_hydro_108 (PF05838) domain not previously associated with sequenced cyanophages. A search for CRISPR spacer matches to all identified phage endolysins demonstrated that a majority of endolysin domains were targets. This strategy provides a general way to link host and phage as endolysins are known to be widely distributed in bacteriophage. Endolysins can also provide information about host cell wall composition and have the additional potential to be used as targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:27611571

  1. Nonredundant protective properties of FPR2/ALX in polymicrobial murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Gobbetti, Thomas; Coldewey, Sina M.; Chen, Jianmin; McArthur, Simon; le Faouder, Pauline; Cenac, Nicolas; Flower, Roderick J.; Thiemermann, Christoph; Perretti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by overlapping phases of excessive inflammation temporally aligned with an immunosuppressed state, defining a complex clinical scenario that explains the lack of successful therapeutic options. Here we tested whether the formyl-peptide receptor 2/3 (Fpr2/3)—ortholog to human FPR2/ALX (receptor for lipoxin A4)—exerted regulatory and organ-protective functions in experimental sepsis. Coecal ligature and puncture was performed to obtain nonlethal polymicrobial sepsis, with animals receiving antibiotics and analgesics. Clinical symptoms, temperature, and heart function were monitored up to 24 h. Peritoneal lavage and plasma samples were analyzed for proinflammatory and proresolving markers of inflammation and organ dysfunction. Compared with wild-type mice, Fpr2/3−/− animals exhibited exacerbation of disease severity, including hypothermia and cardiac dysfunction. This scenario was paralleled by higher levels of cytokines [CXCL1 (CXC receptor ligand 1), CCL2 (CC receptor ligand 2), and TNFα] as quantified in cell-free biological fluids. Reduced monocyte recruitment in peritoneal lavages of Fpr2/3−/− animals was reflected by a higher granulocyte/monocyte ratio. Monitoring Fpr2/3−/− gene promoter activity with a GFP proxy marker revealed an over threefold increase in granulocyte and monocyte signals at 24 h post-coecal ligature and puncture, a response mediated by TNFα. Treatment with a receptor peptido-agonist conferred protection against myocardial dysfunction in wild-type, but not Fpr2/3−/−, animals. Therefore, coordinated physio-pharmacological analyses indicate nonredundant modulatory functions for Fpr2/3 in experimental sepsis, opening new opportunities to manipulate the host response for therapeutic development. PMID:25512512

  2. Trichinella spiralis Excretory-Secretory Products Protect against Polymicrobial Sepsis by Suppressing MyD88 via Mannose Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Du, Linlin; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Yang; Shan, Hui; Li, Leiqing

    2014-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) or its excretory-secretory products (TsES) protect hosts from autoimmune diseases, which depend on inducing host T helper (Th) 2 immune response and inhibiting inflammatory factors. Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) evoked by infection. Little is known about the effects of helminths or their excretory-secretory products on sepsis. Here, we investigated the effects of TsES in a mice model of polymicrobial sepsis. TsES improved survival, reduced organ injury, and enhanced bacterial clearance in septic mice. To investigate the molecular mechanism, macrophages from septic patients or the control group were incubated with TsES. TsES reduced sepsis-inducing inflammatory cytokines mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR) in vitro by suppressing TLR adaptor-transducer myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and nuclear factor- (NF-)-κB. Furthermore, TsES upregulated mannose receptor (MR) expression during sepsis. MR blocking attenuated the effects of TsES on MyD88 and NF-κB expression. In vivo, MR RNAi reduced the survival rate of septic mice treated with TsES, suggesting that TsES-mediated protection against polymicrobial sepsis is dependent on MR. Thus, TsES administration might be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating sepsis. PMID:25054155

  3. Regulation of chemokine receptor by Toll-like receptor 2 is critical to neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Filho, Jose C.; Freitas, Andressa; Souto, Fabricio O.; Spiller, Fernando; Paula-Neto, Heitor; Silva, Joao S.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with sepsis have a marked defect in neutrophil migration. Here we identify a key role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the regulation of neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. We found that the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was dramatically down-regulated in circulating neutrophils from WT mice with severe sepsis, which correlates with reduced chemotaxis to CXCL2 in vitro and impaired migration into an infectious focus in vivo. TLR2 deficiency prevented the down-regulation of CXCR2 and failure of neutrophil migration. Moreover, TLR2−/− mice exhibited higher bacterial clearance, lower serum inflammatory cytokines, and improved survival rate during severe sepsis compared with WT mice. In vitro, the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA) down-regulated CXCR2 expression and markedly inhibited the neutrophil chemotaxis and actin polymerization induced by CXCL2. Moreover, neutrophils activated ex vivo by LTA and adoptively transferred into naïve WT recipient mice displayed a significantly reduced competence to migrate toward thioglycolate-induced peritonitis. Finally, LTA enhanced the expression of G protein–coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2) in neutrophils; increased expression of GRK2 was seen in blood neutrophils from WT mice, but not TLR2−/− mice, with severe sepsis. Our findings identify an unexpected detrimental role of TLR2 in polymicrobial sepsis and suggest that inhibition of TLR2 signaling may improve survival from sepsis. PMID:19234125

  4. Malignant external otitis: long-term (months) antimicrobial therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.; Aber, R.C.; Conner, G.H.; Baum, S.

    1982-04-01

    Since Chandler's initial report in 1968 on malignant external otitis (MEO), this entity has been recognized in its earlier stages with increasing frequency. As a result of this, the availability of new antimicrobial agents, and the judicious use of surgery, there has been an improvement in the results of therapy. There remains, however, a subgroup of patients who continue to experience a significant mortality from this infection. A review and selected discussion of our experience with MEO from 1976 to 1979 is presented. Six patients have been diagnosed and successfully treated for MEO. They presented with problems ranging from severe otalgia to multiple cranial neuropathy. For the most part, therapy consisted of the now standard aminoglycoside and carbenicillin combination. Two of the patients were in the high mortality risk group. One of these patients developed an osteomyelitis which extended across the skull base resulting in bilateral cranial neuropathies. His therapy included surgery as well as long-term (months) outpatient treatment with tobramycin and carbenicillin with an excellent result. The second patient was treated similarly. The efficacy of this approach is discussed as well as the usefulness of radionuclide bone scanning in assessing the course and therapy of patients with MEO.

  5. Fatal Case of Polymicrobial Meningitis Caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodas-Rodríguez, Lia; Díaz-Paz, Manuel; Palacios-Rivera, Hilda; Firacative, Carolina; Meyer, Wieland; Alcázar-Castillo, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    We describe a fatal case of polymicrobial meningitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient from Guatemala caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Central nervous system infections caused concurrently by these species are extremely rare. This is also the first report of disseminated disease caused by C. liquefaciens. PMID:26019205

  6. Desquamated epithelial cells covered with a polymicrobial biofilm typical for bacterial vaginosis are present in randomly selected cryopreserved donor semen.

    PubMed

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Dörffel, Yvonne; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Mendling, Werner; Verstraelen, Hans; Dieterle, Stefan; Schilling, Johannes

    2010-08-01

    We tested whether the bacterial biofilm typical for bacterial vaginosis (BV) can be found on desquamated epithelial cells in cryopreserved donor semen. Bacteria were detected with FISH. Bacterial biofilm, covering the epithelial layer in vaginal biopsies of 20 women with BV, was evaluated on desquamated epithelial cells found in the urine of these same women and their male partners (N=20) and compared with the bacterial biofilm found on desquamated epithelial cells in randomly selected cryopreserved semen samples (N=20). Urine from 20 healthy women of laboratory and clinic personnel and urine from their partners were used as controls. Desquamated epithelial cells covered with a polymicrobial Gardnerella biofilm were identified in urine samples from all women with BV and 13 of their male partners and in none of the female controls and their partners. Gardnerella biofilm, typical for BV, was found in the semen of three of the 20 donors. Donor semen might be a vector for BV. PMID:20497224

  7. Quorum sensing signal production and microbial interactions in a polymicrobial disease of corals and the coral surface mucopolysaccharide layer.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Beth L; May, Amanda L; Bhedi, Chinmayee D; Dearth, Stephen P; Prevatte, Carson W; Pratte, Zoe; Campagna, Shawn R; Richardson, Laurie L

    2014-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) of corals is a complex polymicrobial disease considered to be a threat to coral reef health, as it can lead to mortality of massive reef-building corals. The BBD community is dominated by gliding, filamentous cyanobacteria with a highly diverse population of heterotrophic bacteria. Microbial interactions such as quorum sensing (QS) and antimicrobial production may be involved in BBD disease pathogenesis. In this study, BBD (whole community) samples, as well as 199 bacterial isolates from BBD, the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML) of apparently healthy corals, and SML of apparently healthy areas of BBD-infected corals were screened for the production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and for autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity using three bacterial reporter strains. AHLs were detected in all BBD (intact community) samples tested and in cultures of 5.5% of BBD bacterial isolates. Over half of a subset (153) of the isolates were positive for AI-2 activity. AHL-producing isolates were further analyzed using LC-MS/MS to determine AHL chemical structure and the concentration of (S)-4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), the biosynthetic precursor of AI-2. C6-HSL was the most common AHL variant detected, followed by 3OC4-HSL. In addition to QS assays, 342 growth challenges were conducted among a subset of the isolates, with 27% of isolates eliciting growth inhibition and 2% growth stimulation. 24% of BBD isolates elicited growth inhibition as compared to 26% and 32% of the bacteria from the two SML sources. With one exception, only isolates that exhibited AI-2 activity or produced DPD inhibited growth of test strains. These findings demonstrate for the first time that AHLs are present in an active coral disease. It is possible that AI-2 production among BBD and coral SML bacteria may structure the microbial communities of both a polymicrobial infection and the healthy coral microbiome. PMID:25268348

  8. Quorum Sensing Signal Production and Microbial Interactions in a Polymicrobial Disease of Corals and the Coral Surface Mucopolysaccharide Layer

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Beth L.; May, Amanda L.; Bhedi, Chinmayee D.; Dearth, Stephen P.; Prevatte, Carson W.; Pratte, Zoe; Campagna, Shawn R.; Richardson, Laurie L.

    2014-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) of corals is a complex polymicrobial disease considered to be a threat to coral reef health, as it can lead to mortality of massive reef-building corals. The BBD community is dominated by gliding, filamentous cyanobacteria with a highly diverse population of heterotrophic bacteria. Microbial interactions such as quorum sensing (QS) and antimicrobial production may be involved in BBD disease pathogenesis. In this study, BBD (whole community) samples, as well as 199 bacterial isolates from BBD, the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML) of apparently healthy corals, and SML of apparently healthy areas of BBD-infected corals were screened for the production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and for autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity using three bacterial reporter strains. AHLs were detected in all BBD (intact community) samples tested and in cultures of 5.5% of BBD bacterial isolates. Over half of a subset (153) of the isolates were positive for AI-2 activity. AHL-producing isolates were further analyzed using LC-MS/MS to determine AHL chemical structure and the concentration of (S)-4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), the biosynthetic precursor of AI-2. C6-HSL was the most common AHL variant detected, followed by 3OC4-HSL. In addition to QS assays, 342 growth challenges were conducted among a subset of the isolates, with 27% of isolates eliciting growth inhibition and 2% growth stimulation. 24% of BBD isolates elicited growth inhibition as compared to 26% and 32% of the bacteria from the two SML sources. With one exception, only isolates that exhibited AI-2 activity or produced DPD inhibited growth of test strains. These findings demonstrate for the first time that AHLs are present in an active coral disease. It is possible that AI-2 production among BBD and coral SML bacteria may structure the microbial communities of both a polymicrobial infection and the healthy coral microbiome. PMID:25268348

  9. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in a child with Crohn’s disease, otitis media, and meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Selvitop, Omer; Poretti, Andrea; Huisman, Thierry AGM

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Severe long-term sequelae are reported in up to 48% of children. The most frequent location of CSVT in children is the superficial venous system. We present the neuroimaging findings using both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a 10-year-old child with extensive superficial CSVT. Our report aims to stress the importance of awareness of risk factors in suspecting and rapidly diagnosing CSVT. The application of targeted conventional and advanced MRI sequences is the diagnostic tool of choice in children at risk of or with clinically suspected CSVT. PMID:26246095

  10. Cochlear implantation and management of chronic suppurative otitis media: single stage procedure?

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, S; Shanks, M; Sivaji, N; Allen, Agnes A

    2005-10-01

    In a series of 360 patients who underwent cochlear implantation at our center, four patients (five procedures) had cochlear implantation with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and management of cholesteatoma as a single-staged procedure. Three patients were bilaterally deaf secondary to CSOM and had bilateral mastoid cavities, and in one patient congenital cholesteatoma was identified during cochlear implantation. A mastoidectomy or revision mastoidectomy with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and cochlear implantation was performed as a single stage procedure. Cholesteatoma reoccurred in one patient 9 years after cochlear implantation. Surgical procedures, complications, follow-up and outcomes are discussed. PMID:15756568

  11. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in a child with Crohn's disease, otitis media, and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Selvitop, Omer; Poretti, Andrea; Huisman, Thierry Agm; Wagner, Matthias W

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Severe long-term sequelae are reported in up to 48% of children. The most frequent location of CSVT in children is the superficial venous system. We present the neuroimaging findings using both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a 10-year-old child with extensive superficial CSVT. Our report aims to stress the importance of awareness of risk factors in suspecting and rapidly diagnosing CSVT. The application of targeted conventional and advanced MRI sequences is the diagnostic tool of choice in children at risk of or with clinically suspected CSVT. PMID:26246095

  12. Hyper immunoglobulin-E syndrome: a case with chronic ear draining mimicking polypoid otitis media.

    PubMed

    Görür, Kemal; Ozcan, Cengiz; Unal, Murat; Akbaş, Yücel; Vayisoğlu, Yusuf

    2003-04-01

    The hyper-IgE syndrome is a rare, complex immunoregulatory disorder characterized by pruritic dermatitis, recurrent staphylococcus skin abscesses and extremely elevated levels of IgE in serum. In this report, an 8-year-old girl with hyper-IgE syndrome is presented. She had pruritic dermatitis and skin abscesses on her extremities and scalp. Discharge and granulation tissue in right external ear canal were recognized in otorhinolaryngologic examination. Cultures of the suppuration of the external ear canal yielded S. aureus. Biopsy of the lesion was reported as granulation tissue. Local treatment of the ear canal was performed with ear wick soaked with steroid and antibiotic solutions two times per day. PMID:12663115

  13. Characterization of ear fluid isolates of Alloiococcus otitidis from patients with recurrent otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Bosley, G S; Whitney, A M; Pruckler, J M; Moss, C W; Daneshvar, M; Sih, T; Talkington, D F

    1995-01-01

    Nineteen isolates of Alloiococcus otitidis from ear fluid samples collected by tympanostomy from patients at four geographic locations were identified by phenotypic characterization and genetic relatedness. Initial growth of A. otitidis isolates occurred after 3 days at 37 degrees C on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar with 5% rabbit blood. Heavy growth occurred in BHI broth supplemented with 0.07% lecithin and 0.5% Tween 80 after 4 days of incubation. The isolates were gram-positive cocci that divided on an irregular plane and produced metabolic lactic acid, pyrrolidonyl arylamidase, and leucine aminopeptidase. These cocci grew sparsely in 6.5% NaCl-BHI broth, were asaccharolytic on both fermentative and oxidative bases, and were cytochrome negative by the iron-porphyrin test. The cellular fatty acid profile of A. otitidis was distinguished from those of related genera and characterized by major amounts ( > or = 14%) of 16:0, 18:2, 18:1 omega 9c, and 18:0 and smaller amounts of 14:0, 16:1 omega 7c, 17:0, and 18:1 omega 7c. Fifteen isolates demonstrated > 69% relatedness by DNA-DNA hybridization. Four isolates plus the original 15 were confirmed as A. otitidis by dot blot hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled nucleotide probe specific for this species. The intergenic space between the genes coding for the 16S and 23S rRNAs of alloiococci was amplified by PCR, analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and determined to consist of three different genetic types. Although beta-lactamase negative, A. otitidis demonstrated intermediate levels of resistance to beta-lactams, including expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, and were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin. PMID:8576338

  14. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... overall development program and clinical trial designs for drugs to support an indication for the... information referred to in the guidance for clinical trial sponsors entitled ``Establishment and Operation of Clinical Trial Data Monitoring Committees'' have been approved under 0910-0581. III. Comments...

  15. A class IIa peptide from Enterococcus mundtii inhibits bacteria associated with otitis media.

    PubMed

    Knoetze, H; Todorov, S D; Dicks, L M T

    2008-03-01

    Peptide ST4SA, produced by Enterococcus mundtii ST4SA, inhibits the growth of Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Gram-positive bacteria isolated from patients diagnosed with middle ear infections. The peptide adsorbed at a level of 94% to S. pneumoniae 40, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25 and E. faecium HKLHS. Low concentrations of peptide ST4SA (51200 arbitrary units (AU)/mL) caused DNA and enzyme leakage from target cells, whilst 1638400AU/mL caused cell lysis. No decrease in antimicrobial activity was observed when tested on solid medium with human blood as base. Peptide ST4SA revealed a similar level of activity compared with tetracycline (30 microg), but much higher activity compared with nasal sprays, aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, lincosamides, macrolides, nitroimidazole, penicillin, quinolones, sulphonamides, chloramphenicol, furazolidone, fusidic acid, rifampicin, trimethoprim, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin when tested in vitro. Peptide ST4SA dissipates the proton-motive force and may be used in the treatment of multidrug-resistant strains where antibiotics are excluded from cells by efflux pumps dependent on the membrane proton gradient. PMID:18155886

  16. 77 FR 24716 - Scientific Information Request on Medical Devices To Treat Otitis Media With Effusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... applicable (preferably an electronic PDF file). Information identifying published randomized controlled... citations and reprints if possible. Information identifying unpublished randomized controlled trials...

  17. Cytokine levels in groups of patients with different duration of chronic secretory otitis.

    PubMed

    Matković, Svjetlana; Vojvodić, Danilo; Baljosevic, Ivan

    2007-11-01

    Chronic secretory otitis relates to the permanent presence of secretion in the middle ear for more than 3 months. The reason why applied therapy is often ineffective is that, for now, etiopathogenic molecular mechanisms responsible for the cause and the course of the secretory process in the mucus of the middle ear have not been precisely defined. Cytokines are the key mediators in middle ear inflammation with secretory otitis and regulating different inflammation states can add to the cause of the molecular processes that lead to hystopathological changes in mucus and submucus characteristically for the chronic state of secretory otitis. The aim of our work was to define the pro-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and allergy-associated cytokine levels in middle ear secretion samples of diseased children and to compare the defined values with the secretory process continuance in groups of patients who were diseased for more or less than 3 months. According to the results that have showed higher concentration of all ten examined cytokines in the secretion samples of the children who had secretory otitis for a longer time, it can be concluded that the disturbance expression regulation of the pro-inflammatory TNFalpha, TNFbeta, IL1beta, IFNgamma, IL-6 and IL-8, as well as immunoregulatory IL-2 and IL-10, and allergy associated cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 relating to the hyper production can add to the conversion of the inflammatory process to the chronic state, which has been maintained for longer than 3 months. PMID:17643258

  18. First isolation of the Stephanoascus ciferrii in feline otitis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Angelita dos Reis; Cabana, Ângela Leitzke; Osório, Luiza da Gama; Santin, Rosema; Schuch, Isabel Duarte; Serra, Emanoele Figueiredo; Nascente, Patrícia Silva; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Ear infections in cats are uncommon, especially involving yeasts. This report describes the first isolation of the Stephanoascus ciferrii, teleomorph of the Candida genus, in a case of feline otitis in Brazil. The identification and characterization of Stephanoascus ciferrii were confirmed by the Vitek2 System (BioMerieux ®). PMID:25477949

  19. SPECT imaging in evaluating extent of malignant external otitis: case report

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Tu'Meh, S.S.; Piwnica-Worms, D.; Holman, B.L.

    1987-03-01

    Otitis externa, a benign inflammatory process of the external auditory canal, is general responsive to local therapy. Some patients however, develop a less controllable disease leading to chondritis and osteomyelitis of the base of the skull. The direct invasive characteristic of the disease has led to the descriptive term malignant external otitis (MEO), more appropriately called necrotizing or invasive external otitis. Malignant external otitis is caused by an aggressive pseudomonas or proteus infection that almost exclusively occurs in elderly diabetic patients. The primary imaging modalities previously used in the diagnosis and evaluation of MEO were standard planar scintigraphic techniques with technetium-99M (/sup 99m/Tc) bone agents and gallium-67 (/sup 67/Ga), and pluridirectional tomography. The advent of high resolution computed tomography (CT) effectively allowed demonstration of the soft tissue extension and bone destruction associated with MEO, but still suffered from the low sensitivity constraints of all radiographic techniques in determining early inflammatory bone involvement. Recent work suggests that scintigraphic detection of MEO with /sup 99m/Tc-MDP and /sup 67/Ga, combined with the cross-sectional resolution of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) may be of value in planning treatment of this inflammatory condition.

  20. Scedosporium apiospermum Otitis Complicated by a Temporomandibular Arthritis: A Case Report and Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Huguenin, A; Noel, V; Rogez, A; Chemla, C; Villena, I; Toubas, D

    2015-10-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is an ubiquitous fungus responsible for various infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Ear infections are infrequent. We report an exceptional case of S. apiospermum external otitis complicated by temporomandibular joint arthritis. After 6 months of antibiotherapy, diagnosis was established by mycological analysis of external auditory canal and infratemporal fossae needle sampling. A satisfactory outcome was obtained after 2 months of voriconazole alone. We have reviewed 15 cases of S. apiospermum otitis. Seven of these patients were immunocompromised. Most common clinical presentation included a chronic external otitis lasting months or years before complication stage. Most common clinical features included recurrent unilateral otalgia (11/15) and purulent otorrhea (13/15). Diagnosis was often made at later stage (12/15) with local extension to bones and/or soft tissues (9/15) or cerebral lethal dissemination (3/15).The extremely low incidence of S. apiospermum otomycosis and its non-specific presentation results in a frequent diagnosis delay. A mycological investigation should be performed in case of persistent external otitis and/or osteolysis despite prolonged antibiotic treatment to prevent further extension of the disease. PMID:26105580

  1. Risk of otitis externa after swimming in recreational fresh water lakes containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    van Asperen, I. A.; de Rover, C. M.; Schijven, J. F.; Oetomo, S. B.; Schellekens, J. F.; van Leeuwen, N. J.; Collé, C.; Havelaar, A. H.; Kromhout, D.; Sprenger, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether an outbreak of otitis externa was due to bathing in recreational fresh water lakes and to establish whether the outbreak was caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the water. DESIGN--Matched case-control study. SETTING--The Achterhoek area, the Netherlands. SUBJECTS--98 cases with otitis externa and 149 controls matched for age, sex, and place of residence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratios for type of swimming water and frequency of swimming; presence of P aeruginosa in ear swabs and fresh water lakes. RESULTS--Otitis externa was strongly associated with swimming in recreational fresh water lakes in the previous two weeks (odds ratio 15.5 (95% confidence interval) 4.9 to 49.2) compared with non-swimming). The risk increased with the number of days of swimming, and subjects with recurrent ear disease had a greatly increased risk. The lakes met the Dutch bathing water standards and those set by the European Commission for faecal pollution in the summer of 1994, but P aeruginosa was isolated from all of them, as well as from the ear swabs of 78 (83%) of the cases and 3 (4%) of the controls. CONCLUSIONS--Even when current bathing water standards are met, swimming can be associated with a substantial risk of otitis externa because of exposure to P aeruginosa. People with recurrent ear disease should take special care when swimming in waters containing P aeruginosa. PMID:8520277

  2. First isolation of the Stephanoascus ciferrii in feline otitis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Angelita dos Reis; Cabana, Ângela Leitzke; Osório, Luiza da Gama; Santin, Rosema; Schuch, Isabel Duarte; Serra, Emanoele Figueiredo; Nascente, Patrícia Silva; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Ear infections in cats are uncommon, especially involving yeasts. This report describes the first isolation of the Stephanoascus ciferrii, teleomorph of the Candida genus, in a case of feline otitis in Brazil. The identification and characterization of Stephanoascus ciferrii were confirmed by the Vitek2 System (BioMerieux ®). PMID:25477949

  3. Antibiotic plasma levels in dogs with otitis externa treated routinely with various topical preparations.

    PubMed

    Voget, Michael; Armbruster, Martin; Meyer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether, and at what levels, topical antibiotics applied to treat Otitis externa in dogs are absorbed systemically, leading to an increased risk of antibiotic resistance. 75 dogs brought to a veterinarian for Otitis externa were recruited for a non-interventional study. Selection criteria included diagnosis of Otitis externa and owner consent.The animals were divided into five groups of 15 dogs each. Each group received one of five commonly prescribed topical medications for up to 14 days according to the labeled instructions. Development and validation of low residue detection methods (HPLC-MS/MS) for all active substances studied was performed. Plasma concentrations were evaluated for gentamicin (Otomax, Easotic), marbofloxacin (Aurizon), orbifloxacin (Posatex) and polymyxin B (Surolan). Low-level plasma concentrations of the topically applied antibiotics were detected after multiple administrations. In several samples, the concentrations detected were less than the limit of detection (LOD) of the corresponding analytical method. However, at the end of the treatment period, mean plasma concentrations were in the low pmol/ml range and exceeded the LOD for gentamicin, marbofloxacin and orbifloxacin. None of the plasma samples examined for polymyxin showed levels above the LOD. After routine topical antibiotic use in the treatment of Otitis externa in dogs, low systemic plasma concentrations are likely to develop.This low-level exposure may facilitate cellular changes that lead to an increased possibility for antibiotic resistance. These findings should provoke veterinary clinicians to optimise therapy for Otitis externa in light of minimising the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23227759

  4. Blockade of Thrombopoietin Reduces Organ Damage in Experimental Endotoxemia and Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    De Giuli, Paolo; Bosco, Ornella; Martin-Conte, Erica; Spatola, Tiziana; Turco, Emilia; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    .13±0.13 (P<0.001), respectively, in the CLP model. Similarly, the number of hepatic microabscesses was decreased from 14.14±1.41 to 3.64±0.56 in the LPS model at 3 hours (P<0.001), and from 1.71±0.29 to 0.13±0.13 in the CLP model (P<0.001). Finally, the diameter of intestinal villi decreased from 90.69±3.95 μm to 70.74±3.60 μm in the LPS model at 3 hours (P<0.01), and from 74.29±4.29 μm to 57.50±1.89 μm in the CLP model (P<0.01). This protective effect was associated with the blunting of the increase in platelet-monocyte adhesion, and, on the contrary, with increased platelet-neutrophil aggregates in the circulation, which may be related to decreased neutrophil sequestration into the inflamed tissues. Conversely, circulating cytokine levels were not significantly changed, in both models, by mTPOR-MBP administration. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that TPO participates in the development of organ damage induced by experimental endotoxemia or polymicrobial sepsis via a mechanism involving increased platelet-leukocyte adhesion, but not cytokine release, and suggest that blocking TPO may be useful in preventing organ damage in patients affected by systemic inflammatory response or sepsis. PMID:26963510

  5. Effect of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan and adoptive transfer of dendritic cells on polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal content injection.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hong Soon; Choi, Kyung Min; Kim, Byoungjae; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kang, Yoon Kyu; Lee, Min-Goo

    2013-09-01

    A mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal content injection (CCI) was developed with the aim of gaining a better understanding of the mechanism of sepsis. This model has a similar survival pattern to the conventional model with the added benefits of ability to vary the severity of sepsis and greater consistency. Administration of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT) to inhibit indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in mice with CCI-induced sepsis increased the survival rate and tended to up-regulate IL-10/IL-12 serum concentrations. The effectiveness of 1-MT was confirmed by increases in IL-10 over IL-12 in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) treated with LPS and 1-MT and a superior survival rate 24 hr after injection of these double treated BMDCs in the CCI-induced sepsis model. Therefore, CCI is both a useful and reliable technique for investigating polymicrobial sepsis. The present findings using this newly developed model suggest that inhibition of IDO alleviates the severity of polymicrobial sepsis and modulates the immune response even in cases of severe systemic septic inflammation. PMID:23841524

  6. Plasma and ear tissue concentrations of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in dogs with chronic end-stage otitis externa after intravenous administration of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lynette K; Papich, Mark G; Kwochka, Kenneth W; Hillier, Andrew; Smeak, Daniel D; Lehman, Amy M

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the concentrations of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin following intravenous administration of enrofloxacin in the plasma and ear tissue of dogs with chronic end-stage otitis undergoing a total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy. The goals were to determine the relationship between the dose of enrofloxacin and the concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and determine appropriate doses of enrofloxacin for treatment of chronic otitis externa and media. Thirty dogs were randomized to an enrofloxacin-treatment group (5, 10, 15 or 20 mg kg(-1)) or control group (no enrofloxacin). After surgical removal, ear tissue samples (skin, vertical ear canal, horizontal ear canal, middle ear) and a blood sample were collected. Concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in the plasma and ear tissue were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Repeated measures models were applied to log-transformed data to assess dosing trends and Pearson correlations were calculated to assess concentration associations. Ear tissue concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than plasma concentrations. Each 5 mg kg(-1 )increase in the dose of enrofloxacin resulted in a 72% and 37% increase in enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin concentrations, respectively. For bacteria with an minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.12-0.15 or less, 0.19-0.24, 0.31-0.39 and 0.51-0.64 microg mL(-1), enrofloxacin should be dosed at 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg kg(-1), respectively. Treatment with enrofloxacin would not be recommended for a bacterial organism intermediate or resistant in susceptibility to enrofloxacin since appropriate levels of enrofloxacin would not be attained. PMID:19152587

  7. Gentamicin iontophoresis in the treatment of bacterial otitis externa in the guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    King, D M; Estrem, S A

    1990-10-01

    Pseudomonas otitis externa is one of the most common infections treated by otolaryngologists. Infections induced in 30 guinea pigs appeared similar to that seen in humans. The ears were then placed into four treatment groups: group A, which received a single cleaning; group B, which received a single cleaning followed by gentamicin drops 4 times daily; group C, which received a single cleaning followed by a single gentamicin iontophoresis treatment; and group D, the control group, which received no treatment. Infections were analyzed by grading edema, purulence, and erythema. An average of 10.2 days was required for control group to return to normal appearance. Groups A, B, and C had mean resolution times of 5.9, 4.7, and 4.3 days, respectively. Gentamicin iontophoresis appears to be promising, with results as good as drop therapy in otitis externa in the guinea pig model. PMID:2215045

  8. Effects of Storage in an Anaerobic Transport System on Bacteria in Known Polymicrobial Mixtures and in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Gale B.

    1978-01-01

    An anaerobic transport system (ATS) which provides for catalytic removal of oxygen was evaluated by using in vitro-prepared polymicrobial mixtures of logphase bacteria and clinical specimens. Inoculated swabs were stored at room temperature in (i) aerobic, (ii) anaerobic glove box, and (iii) ATS environments, and bacteria were quantitated after 2, 24, 48, and 72 h. Bacteria in a three-part mixture of Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Escherichia coli and in a five-part mixture of B. fragilis, P. anaerobius, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa survived 72 h of storage in the ATS and anaerobic glove box environments, but the anaerobic species were inactivated in the aerobic storage except for B. fragilis in pure culture or in the three-part mixture. Changes in relative proportions among the species in a mixture were least in the ATS and anaerobic glove box environments and greatest during the aerobic storage, particularly in the five-part mixture. Bacteria present in pure or mixed culture in clinical specimens generally survived 72 h of storage in the ATS. These data indicate that changes in relative proportions occur with prolonged storage even under anaerobic conditions, but that the ATS would be most effective for preserving anaerobic bacteria and preventing drastic concentration changes and overgrowth of facultative and aerobic bacteria. Images PMID:370142

  9. Therapeutic Effects of Treatment with Anti-TLR2 and Anti-TLR4 Monoclonal Antibodies in Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cristiano Xavier; Souza, Danielle Gloria; Amaral, Flavio Almeida; Fagundes, Caio Tavares; Rodrigues, Irla Paula Stopa; Alves-Filho, Jose Carlos; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Ferlin, Walter; Shang, Limin; Elson, Greg; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the recognition of microbial products and in host defense against infection. However, the massive release of inflammatory mediators into the bloodstream following TLR activation following sepsis is thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Here, we evaluated the effects of preventive or therapeutic administration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting either TLR2 or TLR4 in a model of severe polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture in mice. Results Pre-treatment with anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 mAb alone showed significant protection from sepsis-associated death. Protective effects were observed even when the administration of either anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 alone was delayed (i.e., 3 h after sepsis induction). Delayed administration of either mAb in combination with antibiotics resulted in additive protection. Conclusion Although attempts to translate preclinical findings to clinical sepsis have failed so far, our preclinical experiments strongly suggest that there is a sufficient therapeutic window within which patients with ongoing sepsis could benefit from combined antibiotic plus anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 mAb treatment. PMID:26147469

  10. Betulinic acid attenuates lung injury by modulation of inflammatory cytokine response in experimentally-induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lingaraju, Madhu Cholenahalli; Pathak, Nitya Nand; Begum, Jubeda; Balaganur, Venkanna; Bhat, Rafia Ahmad; Ramachandra, Harish Darasaguppe; Ayanur, Anjaneya; Ram, Mahendra; Singh, Vishakha; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis commonly progresses to acute lung injury (ALI), an inflammatory lung disease with high morbidity and mortality. Septic ALI is characterized by excessive production of proinflammatory mediators. It remained refractory to present therapies and new therapies need to be developed to improve further clinical outcomes. Betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic lupane group triterpenoid has been shown to have anti-inflammatory activities in many studies. However, its therapeutic efficacy in polymicrobial septic ALI is yet unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of BA on septic ALI using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model in mice. Vehicle or BA (3, 10, and 30mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 3 times (0, 24 and 48h) before CLP and CLP was done on 49(th)h of the study. Survival rate was observed till 120h post CLP. Lung tissues were collected for analysis by sacrificing mice 18h post CLP. BA at 10 and 30mg/kg dose significantly reduced sepsis-induced mortality and lung injury as implied by attenuated lung histopathological changes, decreased protein and neutrophils infiltration. BA also decreased lung NF-κB expression, cytokine, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels. These evidences suggest that, the protective effects of BA on lungs are associated with defending action against inflammatory response and BA could be a potential modulatory agent of inflammation in sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:25277468

  11. Annexin A2 Modulates ROS and Impacts Inflammatory Response via IL-17 Signaling in Polymicrobial Sepsis Mice.

    PubMed

    He, Sisi; Li, Xuefeng; Li, Rongpeng; Fang, Lizhu; Sun, Lingyun; Wang, Yongsheng; Wu, Min

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis is a progressive disease manifesting excessive inflammatory responses, severe tissue injury, organ dysfunction, and, ultimately, mortality. Since currently, there are limited therapeutic options for this disease, further understanding the molecular pathogenesis of sepsis may help develop effective treatments. Here we identify a novel role for Annexin A2 (AnxA2), a multi-compartmental protein, in inhibiting pro-inflammatory response by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-17 signaling during sepsis. In cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis models, anxa2-/- mice manifested increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration, but decreased bacterial clearance and animal survival. In addition, AnxA2 deficiency led to intensified ROS and IL-17A. Using site directed mutagenesis, we uncovered that cysteine 9 of AnxA2 was the most important aa (site) for regulation of ROS levels. Furthermore, ROS appears to be responsible for elevated IL-17A levels and subsequently exaggerated inflammatory response. Depletion of IL-17 via CRISPR/Cas9 KO strategy down-regulated inflammation and conferred protection against sepsis in anxa2-/- mice. Our findings reveal a previously undemonstrated function for AnxA2 in inflammatory response in polymicrobial sepsis models via an AnxA2-ROS-IL-17 axis, providing insight into the regulation of pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27389701

  12. Immunoproliferative Small Intestinal Disease Associated with Overwhelming Polymicrobial Gastrointestinal Infection with Transformation to Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Evan C; Sheffler, Robert L; Wang, James; Ngauy, Viseth

    2016-05-01

    Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID) is an extra-nodal B-cell lymphoma most commonly described in the Mediterranean, Africa, and Asia. It is associated with poverty and poor sanitation, and is rarely encountered in developed countries. A 26-year-old previously healthy, Marshallese male was transferred to our facility with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea, weakness, and cachexia refractory to multiple short courses of oral antibiotics. Stool cultures grew Campylobacter jejuni and Vibrio fluvialis. Endoscopic evaluation showed histologic evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gross evidence of whipworm infection found in the colon. Mesenteric lymph node biopsy cultures grew Escherichia coli. Histopathology and immunohistochemical stains of the small intestine were consistent with IPSID. He subsequently transformed to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with tonsillar involvement despite treatment with rituximab and an extended course of antibiotics. Systemic chemotherapy with six cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisone, and lenalidomide, resulted in remission of his diffuse B cell lymphoma. This case is illustrative of IPSID developing in a previously healthy individual due to overwhelming polymicrobial gastrointestinal infection by C. jejuni and other enteric pathogens with subsequent transformation to an aggressive DLBCL. IPSID should be considered in residents of developing countries presenting with refractory chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. PMID:26903604

  13. Annexin A2 Modulates ROS and Impacts Inflammatory Response via IL-17 Signaling in Polymicrobial Sepsis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lizhu; Wang, Yongsheng; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a progressive disease manifesting excessive inflammatory responses, severe tissue injury, organ dysfunction, and, ultimately, mortality. Since currently, there are limited therapeutic options for this disease, further understanding the molecular pathogenesis of sepsis may help develop effective treatments. Here we identify a novel role for Annexin A2 (AnxA2), a multi-compartmental protein, in inhibiting pro-inflammatory response by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-17 signaling during sepsis. In cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis models, anxa2-/- mice manifested increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration, but decreased bacterial clearance and animal survival. In addition, AnxA2 deficiency led to intensified ROS and IL-17A. Using site directed mutagenesis, we uncovered that cysteine 9 of AnxA2 was the most important aa (site) for regulation of ROS levels. Furthermore, ROS appears to be responsible for elevated IL-17A levels and subsequently exaggerated inflammatory response. Depletion of IL-17 via CRISPR/Cas9 KO strategy down-regulated inflammation and conferred protection against sepsis in anxa2-/- mice. Our findings reveal a previously undemonstrated function for AnxA2 in inflammatory response in polymicrobial sepsis models via an AnxA2-ROS-IL-17 axis, providing insight into the regulation of pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27389701

  14. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype.

    PubMed

    Heckenberg, S G B; Brouwer, M C; van der Ende, A; Hensen, E F; van de Beek, D

    2012-09-01

    We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in two prospective nationwide cohort studies performed from April 1998 through to October 2002 and March 2006 through to January 2009. Hearing loss was evaluated on admission and discharge for all patients. Severe hearing loss was assessed by pure tone average on audiology and corrected for age, or by the combination of hearing loss on discharge and a score on the Glasgow Outcome Scale below 5, which could not be explained by other neurological sequelae. A total of 531 episodes of pneumococcal meningitis with non-lethal outcome were included. Predisposing conditions for pneumococcal meningitis were present in the majority of patients (64%), most commonly otitis (36%). Hearing loss was present at discharge in 116 patients (22%) and was classified as mild in 53% and severe in 47%. Hearing loss was related to otitis (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-4.02; p < 0.001) and inversely related to serotype 23 F infection (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13-0.98; p = 0.025), but not with parameters of disease severity or indicators of cerebrospinal fluid inflammation severity. Meningitis due to pneumococcal serotype 3 was associated with the highest rate of hearing loss. Hearing loss frequently complicates pneumococcal meningitis. Risk factors for hearing loss were infection with pneumococcal serotype 23 F and otitis, but not disease severity. Otitis and resulting perilympathic inflammation contribute to meningitis-associated hearing loss. PMID:21958295

  15. One third of middle ear effusions from children undergoing tympanostomy tube placement had multiple bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because previous studies have indicated that otitis media may be a polymicrobial disease, we prospectively analyzed middle ear effusions of children undergoing tympanostomy tube placement with multiplex polymerase chain reaction for four otopathogens. Methods Middle ear effusions from 207 children undergoing routine tympanostomy tube placement were collected and were classified by the surgeon as acute otitis media (AOM) for purulent effusions and as otitis media with effusion (OME) for non-purulent effusions. DNA was isolated from these samples and analyzed with multiplex polymerase chain reaction for Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Alloiococcus otitidis, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Results 119 (57%) of 207 patients were PCR positive for at least one of these four organisms. 36 (30%) of the positive samples indicated the presence of more than one bacterial species. Patient samples were further separated into 2 groups based on clinical presentation at the time of surgery. Samples were categorized as acute otitis media (AOM) if pus was observed behind the tympanic membrane. If no pus was present, samples were categorized as otitis media with effusion (OME). Bacteria were identified in most of the children with AOM (87%) and half the children with OME (51%, p < 0.001). A single bacterial organism was detected in middle ear effusions from children with AOM more often than those with OME (74% versus 33%, p < 0.001). Haemophilus influenzae was the predominant single organism and caused 58% of all AOM in this study. Alloiococcus otitidis and Moraxella catarrhalis were more frequently identified in middle ear effusions than Streptococcus pneumoniae. Conclusions Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Alloiococcus otitidis, and Moraxella catarrhalis were identified in the middle ear effusions of some patients with otitis media. Overall, we found AOM is predominantly a single organism infection and most commonly from Haemophilus

  16. Media Clips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vennebush, G. Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Media Clips aims to offer readers contemporary, authentic applications of quantitative reasoning based on print or electronic media. Clips may be in text or graphic format, and clip sources may be either print or electronic media.

  17. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  18. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  19. Polymicrobial Infection with Periodontal Pathogens Specifically Enhances MicroRNA miR-146a in ApoE−/− Mice during Experimental Periodontal Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, Md A.; Rivera, Mercedes; Lucas, Alexandra; Chan, Edward K. L.; Kesavalu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia are periodontal pathogens associated with the etiology of adult periodontitis as polymicrobial infections. Recent studies demonstrated that oral infection with P. gingivalis induces both periodontal disease and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic and proatherogenic ApoE−/− mice. In this study, we explored the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in maxillas (periodontium) and spleens isolated from ApoE−/− mice infected with P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia as a polymicrobial infection. miRNA expression levels, including miRNA miR-146a, and associated mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured in the maxillas and spleens from mice infected with periodontal pathogens and compared to those in the maxillas and spleens from sham-infected controls. Furthermore, in response to these periodontal pathogens (as mono- and polymicrobial heat-killed and live bacteria), human THP-1 monocytes demonstrated similar miRNA expression patterns, including that of miR-146a, in vitro. Strikingly, miR-146a had a negative correlation with TNF-α secretion in vitro, reducing levels of the adaptor kinases IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1) and TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). Thus, our studies revealed a persistent association of miR-146a expression with these periodontal pathogens, suggesting that miR-146a may directly or indirectly modulate or alter the chronic periodontal pathology induced by these microorganisms. PMID:21263019

  20. Fungal Malignant Otitis Externa with Facial Nerve Palsy: Tissue Biopsy Aids Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Fungal malignant otitis externa (FMOE) is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that is challenging to manage. Diagnosis is often delayed due to the low sensitivity of aural swabs and many antifungal drugs have significant side effects. We present a case of FMOE, where formal tissue sampling revealed the diagnosis and the patient was successfully treated with voriconazole, in addition to an up to date review of the current literature. We would recommend tissue biopsy of the external auditory canal in all patients with suspected FMOE in addition to routine microbiology swabs. PMID:24649388

  1. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents. PMID:20876180

  2. Social Media and Mobile Apps for Health Promotion in Australian Indigenous Populations: Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Brusse, Carl; McAullay, Daniel; Dowden, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Background Health promotion organizations are increasingly embracing social media technologies to engage end users in a more interactive way and to widely disseminate their messages with the aim of improving health outcomes. However, such technologies are still in their early stages of development and, thus, evidence of their efficacy is limited. Objective The study aimed to provide a current overview of the evidence surrounding consumer-use social media and mobile software apps for health promotion interventions, with a particular focus on the Australian context and on health promotion targeted toward an Indigenous audience. Specifically, our research questions were: (1) What is the peer-reviewed evidence of benefit for social media and mobile technologies used in health promotion, intervention, self-management, and health service delivery, with regard to smoking cessation, sexual health, and otitis media? and (2) What social media and mobile software have been used in Indigenous-focused health promotion interventions in Australia with respect to smoking cessation, sexual health, or otitis media, and what is the evidence of their effectiveness and benefit? Methods We conducted a scoping study of peer-reviewed evidence for the effectiveness of social media and mobile technologies in health promotion (globally) with respect to smoking cessation, sexual health, and otitis media. A scoping review was also conducted for Australian uses of social media to reach Indigenous Australians and mobile apps produced by Australian health bodies, again with respect to these three areas. Results The review identified 17 intervention studies and seven systematic reviews that met inclusion criteria, which showed limited evidence of benefit from these interventions. We also found five Australian projects with significant social media health components targeting the Indigenous Australian population for health promotion purposes, and four mobile software apps that met inclusion

  3. Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma as a polymicrobial disease: new insights on the interaction between Plasmodium falciparum and Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Chene, Arnaud; Donati, Daria; Orem, Jackson; Mbidde, E R; Kironde, Fred; Wahlgren, Mats; Bejarano, Maria Teresa

    2009-12-01

    Despite the well-established relationship between endemic Plasmodium falciparum malaria and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the genesis of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL), very little research has examined the interaction between these two pathogens. eBL, the most prevalent childhood cancer in equatorial Africa where malaria is holoendemic, is a high-grade B cell lymphoma characterized by a c-myc translocation and the consistent presence of EBV. After primary infection, EBV establishes a life-long persistent infection characterized by virus shedding into saliva. African children are infected early in life and most have sero-converted by 3 years of age while sero-conversion tends to occur later in developed countries. Acute and chronic malaria infections profoundly affect the B cell compartment, inducing polyclonal activation, hyper-gammaglobulinemia and a dramatic increase in the levels of circulating EBV. In this review we present and discuss recent data suggesting a molecular link between the parasite, the B cell and EBV and provide evidence that adds to the concept of polymicrobial disease pathogenesis in eBL. Following the observation of EBV reactivation in children living in malaria endemic areas and its relationship with acute malaria infection, we identified the cystein-rich inter-domain region 1 alpha (CIDR1 alpha) of the Plasmodium falciparum membrane protein 1 as a polyclonal B cell activator. CIDR1 alpha increases B cell survival and preferentially activates the memory compartment where EBV is known to persist. Analysis of the mechanisms of interaction between CIDR1 alpha and EBV in the context of B cells demonstrated that CIDR1 alpha induces virus production in the EBV-infected B cell line Akata and in latently infected primary B cells derived from the peripheral blood of healthy carriers and children with eBL. This is the first demonstration that EBV can be reactivated directly by another pathogen. Our results suggest that P. falciparum antigens

  4. Polymicrobial Nature of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcer Biofilm Infections Determined Using Bacterial Tag Encoded FLX Amplicon Pyrosequencing (bTEFAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Scot E.; Wolcott, Randall D.; Sun, Yan; McKeehan, Trevor; Smith, Ethan; Rhoads, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background Diabetic extremity ulcers are associated with chronic infections. Such ulcer infections are too often followed by amputation because there is little or no understanding of the ecology of such infections or how to control or eliminate this type of chronic infection. A primary impediment to the healing of chronic wounds is biofilm phenotype infections. Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common, disabling, and costly complications of diabetes. Here we seek to derive a better understanding of the polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic extremity ulcer infections. Methods and Findings Using a new bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) approach we have evaluated the bacterial diversity of 40 chronic diabetic foot ulcers from different patients. The most prevalent bacterial genus associated with diabetic chronic wounds was Corynebacterium spp. Findings also show that obligate anaerobes including Bacteroides, Peptoniphilus, Fingoldia, Anaerococcus, and Peptostreptococcus spp. are ubiquitous in diabetic ulcers, comprising a significant portion of the wound biofilm communities. Other major components of the bacterial communities included commonly cultured genera such as Streptococcus, Serratia, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. Conclusions In this article, we highlight the patterns of population diversity observed in the samples and introduce preliminary evidence to support the concept of functional equivalent pathogroups (FEP). Here we introduce FEP as consortia of genotypically distinct bacteria that symbiotically produce a pathogenic community. According to this hypothesis, individual members of these communities when they occur alone may not cause disease but when they coaggregate or consort together into a FEP the synergistic effect provides the functional equivalence of well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, giving the biofilm community the factors necessary to maintain chronic biofilm infections. Further work is

  5. Treatment of acute otitis externa with ciprofloxacin otic 0.2% antibiotic ear solution

    PubMed Central

    Mösges, R; Nematian-Samani, M; Eichel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective An inflammation of the cutis and subcutis of the external auditory canal is a primary symptom in cases of acute otitis externa. It is usually treated locally, since this type of therapy ensures a high concentration of the drug and interacts at the site of inflammation with no systemic effects. This systematic review compares the efficacy of treatment using a ciprofloxacin 0.2% solution with other therapeutic options. Methods After compiling a catalog of search terms, medical databases were searched systematically for randomized, controlled studies. This search initially yielded a total of 38 studies which were then evaluated by three independent reviewers. The number of studies was subsequently reduced to 14: six studies using a ciprofloxacin 0.2% solution, and eight studies using both 0.2% and 0.3% solutions. Results The studies included in the review demonstrate the statistical equivalence between the ciprofloxacin solution (0.2%) and the reference products PNH (a combination of polymyxin B, neomycin sulfate and hydrocortisone), auriculum powder, and a ciprofloxacin foam with respect to the cure rate. The research groups consistently observed high in vitro activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion This systematic review confirms the hypothesis of ciprofloxacin’s noninferiority in the treatment of otitis externa, in terms of the cure rate and microbiological eradication. PMID:21845055

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Mekić, S; Matanović, K; Šeol, B

    2011-07-30

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of otitis externa in dogs, and treatment of these infections is becoming problematic because of the increasing number of multiresistant strains. The aim of the present study was to compare the in vitro activities of cefepime, ceftazidime, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and ticarcillin/clavulanic acid against 104 strains of P aeruginosa isolated from dogs with otitis externa. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentrations, in µg/ml, were evaluated by the E test (bioMérieux). The most active compound was ceftazidime, with 100 per cent efficiency. The majority of tested strains were susceptible to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid (89.4 per cent), followed by ciprofloxacin (88.5 per cent) and cefepime (60.6 per cent). The highest resistance was observed to enrofloxacin (51.9 per cent) and gentamicin (43.3 per cent). Large numbers of strains were intermediately susceptible to antibiotics registered for use in veterinary medicine in Croatia--enrofloxacin (47.1 per cent) and gentamicin (41.3 per cent). PMID:21742683

  7. Temporal Bone Osteomyelitis: The Relationship with Malignant Otitis Externa, the Diagnostic Dilemma, and Changing Trends

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Cheng; Yeh, Chien-Fu; Shiao, An-Suey; Tu, Tzong-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Fifty-five patients hospitalized for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone between 1990 and 2011 were divided into two study groups: group 1 was patients collected from 1990 to 2001 and group 2 was composed of patients between 2002 and 2011. Clinical diagnostic criteria and epidemiologic data were analyzed to illustrate the altering features of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone. Group 1 patients were characterized by high prevalence of diabetes and more commonly suffered from otalgia, otitis externa and granulation tissue in the external auditory canal and higher positive culture for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Noticeable changing trends were found between both groups, including declining prevalence of diabetes, fewer patients complaining of pain or presenting with otitis externa, and canal granulation, and increased variety of pathogens in group 2. We should highlight the index of clinical suspicion for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone, even in nondiabetic or immunocompetent patients. Painless otorrhea patients were also at risk of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone, especially patients with previous otologic operation. Increased multiplicity of pathogens amplified the difficulty of diagnosis for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone. PMID:24963511

  8. Assessment of the Antimicrobial Activity of Algae Extracts on Bacteria Responsible of External Otitis

    PubMed Central

    Pane, Gianluca; Cacciola, Gabriele; Giacco, Elisabetta; Mariottini, Gian Luigi; Coppo, Erika

    2015-01-01

    External otitis is a diffuse inflammation around the external auditory canal and auricle, which is often occurred by microbial infection. This disease is generally treated using antibiotics, but the frequent occurrence of antibiotic resistance requires the development of new antibiotic agents. In this context, unexplored bioactive natural candidates could be a chance for the production of targeted drugs provided with antimicrobial activity. In this paper, microbial pathogens were isolated from patients with external otitis using ear swabs for over one year, and the antimicrobial activity of the two methanol extracts from selected marine (Dunaliella salina) and freshwater (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) microalgae was tested on the isolated pathogens. Totally, 114 bacterial and 11 fungal strains were isolated, of which Staphylococcus spp. (28.8%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (24.8%) were the major pathogens. Only three Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains and 11 coagulase-negative Staphylococci showed resistance to methicillin. The two algal extracts showed interesting antimicrobial properties, which mostly inhibited the growth of isolated S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella spp. with MICs range of 1.4 × 109 to 2.2 × 1010 cells/mL. These results suggest that the two algae have potential as resources for the development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:26492256

  9. In vitro evaluation of the synergistic activity of neomycin-polymyxin B association against pathogens responsible for otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Tempera, G; Mangiafico, A; Genovese, C; Giudice, E; Mastrojeni, S; Nicolosi, D; Ferneri, P M

    2009-01-01

    The most recent guidelines recommend, for otitis externa antibiotic therapy, the use of topical formulations in that they are very safe, have a quicker effect and do not induce bacterial resistance compared to systemic therapy. The choice of the class of antibiotics in empiric therapy of otitis externa must take into consideration the polymicrobic nature of the infection that includes both bacteria (Grampositive and Gram-negative) and mycetes. For this reason, in this study we evaluated the synergic activity of neomycin in association with polymyxin B against the pathogens commonly responsible for otitis externa, compared to that of a single antibiotic (ciprofloxacin). The polymyxinB/neomycin association shows clear synergic effects with values of both Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) reduced by 3-4 times with respect to the single antibiotic; and in P. aeruginosa the synergistic effect of the neomycin/polymyxin B association with respect to neomycin was more evident (5-6 times), with an intrinsic in vitro activity constantly higher than that of ciprofloxacin alone or in association with hydrocortisone. From the analysis of the data obtained in vitro, we can conclude that the possibility of using a topical formulation containing a synergistic association of antibiotics, such as neomycin-polymyxin B, in such a way as to obtain the maximum effect in the minimum time with an increase in the spectrum of action of non-bacterial pathogens, is an optimal choice for the clinician for the empiric therapy of otitis externa. PMID:19505383

  10. Clinical evaluation of an antiinflammatory and antioxidant diet effect in 30 dogs affected by chronic otitis externa: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Centenaro, Sara; Beribè, Francesca; Laus, Fulvio; Cerquetella, Matteo; Spaterna, Andrea; Guidetti, Gianandrea; Canello, Sergio; Terrazzano, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this evaluation study was to assess the possible role of a specific nutraceutical diet in relieving main clinical symptoms of chronic bilateral otitis externa (occlusion of ear canal, erythema, discharge quantity, and odor) in 30 adult dogs. Thirty dogs of different breeds (mean age ± SEM; 6.03 ± 0.15 years and mean weight ± SEM; 32.01 ± 1.17 Kg; 53.3% males, 46.6% females) with evident chronic clinical otitis symptoms were equally divided and randomly assigned to receive either the nutraceutical diet (ND group) or a standard diet (SD group) over a period of 90 days. In all cases a topical pharmacological treatment was given. The nutraceutical diet, also endowed with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, significantly decreased the mean score intensity of all symptoms after 90 days of intervention (P < 0.0001) with the exception of Malassezia pachydermatis infection which was only slightly reduced. Our investigation is one of the few evidence-based results where a commercial nutraceutical diet has been proven effective, in combination with drugs, in relieving otitis externa-related symptoms. This study opens new insights into otitis externa clinical management providing evidence of efficacy of a combined therapy with drugs and a specific nutraceutical diet. PMID:26743397

  11. Scavenger Receptor Class A Plays a Central Role in Mediating Mortality and the Development of the Pro-Inflammatory Phenotype in Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ozment, Tammy R.; Ha, Tuanzhu; Breuel, Kevin F.; Ford, Tiffany R.; Ferguson, Donald A.; Kalbfleisch, John; Schweitzer, John B.; Kelley, Jim L.; Li, Chuanfu; Williams, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a frequent complication in critical illness. The mechanisms that are involved in initiation and propagation of the disease are not well understood. Scavenger receptor A (SRA) is a membrane receptor that binds multiple polyanions such as oxidized LDL and endotoxin. Recent studies suggest that SRA acts as a pattern recognition receptor in the innate immune response. The goal of the present study was to determine the role of SRA in polymicrobial sepsis. SRA deficient (SRA−/−) and C57BL/6JB/6J (WT) male mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce polymicrobial sepsis. NFκB activity, myeloperoxidase activity, and co-association of SRA with toll like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR2 was analyzed in the lungs. Spleens were analyzed for apoptosis. Serum cytokines and chemokines were assayed. Blood and peritoneal fluid were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial burdens. Long term survival was significantly increased in SRA−/− septic mice (53.6% vs. 3.6%, p<0.05) when compared to WT mice. NFκB activity was 45.5% lower in the lungs of SRA−/− septic mice versus WT septic mice (p<0.05). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-10 and monocyte chemoattractant protein −1 were significantly lower in septic SRA−/− mice when compared to septic WT mice (p<0.05). We found that SRA immuno-precipitated with TLR4, but not TLR2, in the lungs of WT septic mice. We also found that septic SRA−/− mice had lower bacterial burdens than WT septic mice. SRA deficiency had no effect on pulmonary neutrophil infiltration or splenocyte apoptosis during sepsis. We conclude that SRA plays a pivotal, and previously unknown, role in mediating the pathophysiology of sepsis/septic shock in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Mechanistically, SRA interacts with TLR4 to enhance the development of the pro-inflammatory phenotype and mediate the morbidity and mortality of sepsis/septic shock. PMID:23071440

  12. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study: Hiring @ Dynamid" (John…

  13. Media Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish Media Panel is a research program about children and young persons and their use of mass media. The aim of the ten-year (1975-1985) project is to explain how media habits originate, how they change as children grow older, what factors on the part of children themselves and in their surroundings may be connected with a certain use of…

  14. Antimicrobial testing of selected fluoroquinolones against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis.

    PubMed

    McKay, Lindsay; Rose, Crystal D Schuman; Matousek, Jennifer L; Schmeitzel, Lynn S; Gibson, Nicole M; Gaskin, Jack M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates were collected over a 1.5-year period from cases of canine otitis. Sensitivities to enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, and orbifloxacin were determined using minimum inhibitory concentration testing (MICT). Isolates were also tested for sensitivities to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin using disk-diffusion susceptibility testing (DDST). Isolates were significantly more sensitive to marbofloxacin than to enrofloxacin (z = -4.57; P<0.05) or orbifloxacin (z = -5.02; P<0.05). Agreement was 87% between MICT and DDST for marbofloxacin, with approximately equal numbers of overestimation and underestimation errors. Agreement was 74% between MICT and DDST for enrofloxacin, but DDST tended to overestimate the number of enrofloxacin-susceptible strains. These results suggest that marbofloxacin is more effective against P. aeruginosa than either enrofloxacin or orbifloxacin and that relying on DDST may lead to ineffective enrofloxacin treatment. PMID:17975212

  15. Aspergillus spp. invasive external otitis: favourable outcome with a medical approach.

    PubMed

    Marchionni, E; Parize, P; Lefevre, A; Vironneau, P; Bougnoux, M E; Poiree, S; Coignard-Biehler, H; DeWolf, S E; Amazzough, K; Barchiesi, F; Jullien, V; Alanio, A; Garcia-Hermoso, D; Wassef, M; Kania, R; Lortholary, O; Lanternier, F

    2016-05-01

    Aspergillus spp. invasive external otitis (IEO) is a rare infection. We performed a seven-year, single-centre retrospective study from 2007 to 2014 including all patients with proven Aspergillus spp. IEO. Twelve patients were identified. All patients had a poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and one underwent solid organ transplant. The most frequently isolated species was Aspergillus flavus (n = 10) and voriconazole was the first-line therapy in all cases, with a median length of treatment of 338.5 days (158-804 days). None of the patients underwent extensive surgery. The clinical outcome was excellent. However, otological sequelae were reported, including hearing impairment (n = 7) and facial palsy (n = 3). PMID:26802213

  16. Malignant external otitis: the role of computed tomography and radionuclides in evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Som, P.M.; Mendelson, M.H.; Parisier, S.C.

    1983-12-01

    Nine patients with malignant external otitis (MEO) were evaluated with Tc-99m bone scans, Ga-67 citrate scans, pluridirectional tomography, and computed tomographic (CT) scans in order to assess the role of each in the diagnosis and management of MEO. The Tc-99m and Ga-67 citrate scans were the most accurate studies in the initial identification of disease activity, while the return to normal or improvement of the Ga-67 citrate scan has been shown to correlate best with clinical resolution of MEO. CT demonstrated soft-tissue disease and central skull base osteomyelitis better than pluridirectional tomography. CT is excellent for localizing and following the progression of bone disease; however, because reossification of the skull base is a very slow process, CT cannot be used to follow accurately regression or inactivity of MEO affecting this area. CT is the best modality for following soft-tissue extension of MEO.

  17. Activity of Faropenem against Middle Ear Fluid Pathogens from Children with Acute Otitis Media in Costa Rica and Israel▿

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Kimberley Clawson; Dagan, Ron; Arguedas, Adriano; Leibovitz, Eugene; Wang, Elaine; Echols, Roger M.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Critchley, Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    Faropenem was tested against 1,188 middle ear fluid pathogens from children in Israel and Costa Rica. Against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, faropenem was the most active β-lactam, with activity that was similar to or greater than of the other oral antimicrobial classes studied. Faropenem was also active against Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:17387157

  18. Activity of faropenem against middle ear fluid pathogens from children with acute otitis media in Costa Rica and Israel.

    PubMed

    Stone, Kimberley Clawson; Dagan, Ron; Arguedas, Adriano; Leibovitz, Eugene; Wang, Elaine; Echols, Roger M; Janjic, Nebojsa; Critchley, Ian A

    2007-06-01

    Faropenem was tested against 1,188 middle ear fluid pathogens from children in Israel and Costa Rica. Against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, faropenem was the most active beta-lactam, with activity that was similar to or greater than of the other oral antimicrobial classes studied. Faropenem was also active against Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:17387157

  19. Bacteriology of spontaneously draining acute otitis media in children before and after the introduction of pneumococcal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak; Gober, Alan E

    2009-07-01

    Bacterial growth from spontaneously draining middle ear fluid was compared for periods before (1993-1998) and after (2001-2006) introduction of routine pneumococcal vaccination Staphylococcus aureus, including MRSA, was more common (P < .05) in the latter period. PMID:19561428

  20. A Novel Mycobacterium cosmeticum-Like Bacterium Isolated from the Ear Swab of a Patient with Otitis Externa

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Jeanette W. P.; Cheng, Janet W. S.; Jureen, Roland; Lin, Raymond T. P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the identification and characterization of a novel nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM), isolated from an ear swab of an adult male patient with chronic otitis externa. Genetically, the bacterium is most closely related to Mycobacterium cosmeticum; however, growth and biochemical features indicate that it is distinctly different. Here, we highlight for the first time an unusual NTM that is a probable cause of ear infection. PMID:25866687