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Sample records for polymorphism microarray analyses

  1. [Genomic medicine. Polymorphisms and microarray applications].

    PubMed

    Spalvieri, Mónica P; Rotenberg, Rosa G

    2004-01-01

    This update shows new concepts related to the significance of DNA variations among individuals, as well as to their detection by using a new technology. The sequencing of the human genome is only the beginning of what will enable us to understand genetic diversity. The unit of DNA variability is the polymorphism of a single nucleotide (SNP). At present, studies on SNPs are restricted to basic research but the large number of papers on this subject makes feasible their entrance into clinical practice. We illustrate here the use of SNPs as molecular markers in ethnical genotyping, gene expression in some diseases and as potential targets in pharmacological response, and also introduce the technology of arrays. Microarrays experiments allow the quantification and comparison of gene expression on a large scale, at the same time, by using special chips and array designs. Conventional methods provide data from up to 20 genes, while a single microarray may provide information about thousands of them simultaneously, leading to a more rapid and accurate genotyping. Biotechnology improvements will facilitate our knowledge of each gene sequence, the frequency and exact location of SNPs and their influence on cellular behavior. Although experimental efficiency and validity of results from microarrays are still controversial, the knowledge and characterization of a patient's genetic profile will lead, undoubtedly, to advances in prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:15637833

  2. Bulk segregant analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bulk segregant analysis using microarrays, and extreme array mapping have recently been used to rapidly identify genomic regions associated with phenotypes in multiple species. These experiments, however require the identification of single feature polymorphisms between the cross parents for each ne...

  3. Pipeline for macro- and microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, R; Menossi, M

    2007-05-01

    The pipeline for macro- and microarray analyses (PMmA) is a set of scripts with a web interface developed to analyze DNA array data generated by array image quantification software. PMmA is designed for use with single- or double-color array data and to work as a pipeline in five classes (data format, normalization, data analysis, clustering, and array maps). It can also be used as a plugin in the BioArray Software Environment, an open-source database for array analysis, or used in a local version of the web service. All scripts in PMmA were developed in the PERL programming language and statistical analysis functions were implemented in the R statistical language. Consequently, our package is a platform-independent software. Our algorithms can correctly select almost 90% of the differentially expressed genes, showing a superior performance compared to other methods of analysis. The pipeline software has been applied to 1536 expressed sequence tags macroarray public data of sugarcane exposed to cold for 3 to 48 h. PMmA identified thirty cold-responsive genes previously unidentified in this public dataset. Fourteen genes were up-regulated, two had a variable expression and the other fourteen were down-regulated in the treatments. These new findings certainly were a consequence of using a superior statistical analysis approach, since the original study did not take into account the dependence of data variability on the average signal intensity of each gene. The web interface, supplementary information, and the package source code are available, free, to non-commercial users at http://ipe.cbmeg.unicamp.br/pub/PMmA. PMID:17464422

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping using BeadChip microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Gilliam; Tsinajinnie, Darwin; Duggan, David

    2013-07-01

    The genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has successfully contributed to the study of complex diseases more than any other technology to date. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using 10,000s to >1,000,000 SNPs have identified 1000s of statistically significant SNPs pertaining to 17 different human disease and trait categories. Post-GWAS fine-mapping studies using 10,000s to 100,000s SNPs on a microarray have narrowed the region of interest for many of these GWAS findings; in addition, independent signals within the original GWAS region have been identified. Focused content, SNP-based microarrays such as the human exome, for example, have too been used successfully to identify novel disease associations. Success has come to studies where 100s to 10,000s (mostly) to >100,000 samples were genotyped. For the time being, SNP-based microarrays remain cost-effective especially when studying large numbers of samples compared to other "genotyping" technologies including next generation sequencing. In this unit, protocols for manual (LIMS-free), semi-manual, and automated processing of BeadChip microarrays are presented. Lower throughput studies will find value in the manual and semi-manual protocols, while all types of studies--low-, medium-, and high-throughput--will find value in the semi-manual and automated protocols. PMID:23853082

  5. A microarray system for Y chromosomal and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism analysis in chimpanzee populations.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Olga; Rönn, Ann-Charlotte; Bonhomme, Maxime; Kellermann, Thomas; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Doxiadis, Gaby; Verschoor, Ernst J; Goossens, Benoît; Domingo-Roura, Xavier; Bruford, Michael W; Bosch, Montserrat; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2008-05-01

    Chimpanzee populations are diminishing as a consequence of human activities, and as a result this species is now endangered. In the context of conservation programmes, genetic data can add vital information, for instance on the genetic diversity and structure of threatened populations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are biallelic markers that are widely used in human molecular studies and can be implemented in efficient microarray systems. This technology offers the potential of robust, multiplexed SNP genotyping at low reagent cost in other organisms than humans, but it is not commonly used yet in wild population studies. Here, we describe the characterization of new SNPs in Y-chromosomal intronic regions in chimpanzees and also identify SNPs from mitochondrial genes, with the aim of developing a microarray system that permits the simultaneous study of both paternal and maternal lineages. Our system consists of 42 SNPs for the Y chromosome and 45 SNPs for the mitochondrial genome. We demonstrate the applicability of this microarray in a captive population where genotypes accurately reflected its large pedigree. Two wild-living populations were also analysed and the results show that the microarray will be a useful tool alongside microsatellite markers, since it supplies complementary information about population structure and ecology. SNP genotyping using microarray technology, therefore, is a promising approach and may become an essential tool in conservation genetics to help in the management and study of captive and wild-living populations. Moreover, microarrays that combine SNPs from different genomic regions could replace microsatellite typing in the future. PMID:21585830

  6. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Tintle, Nathan; Best, Aaron; Dejongh, Matthew; VanBruggen, Dirk; Heffron, Fred; Porwollik, Steffen; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2008-11-05

    Background: Recent advances in microarray technology have brought with them the need for enhanced methods of biologically interpreting gene expression data. Recently, methods like Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and variants of Fisher’s exact test have been proposed which utilize a priori biological information. Typically, these methods are demonstrated with a priori biological information from the Gene Ontology. Results: Alternative gene set definitions are presented based on gene sets inferred from the SEED: open-source software environment for comparative genome annotation and analysis of microbial organisms. Many of these gene sets are then shown to provide consistent expression across a series of experiments involving Salmonella Typhimurium. Implementation of the gene sets in an analysis of microarray data is then presented for the Salmonella Typhimurium data. Conclusions: SEED inferred gene sets can be naturally defined based on subsystems in the SEED. The consistent expression values of these SEED inferred gene sets suggest their utility for statistical analyses of gene expression data based on a priori biological information

  7. Quantitative genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization on DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Andreas M; Ballvora, Agim; Matzner, Ulrich; Klemm, Manfred; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2005-08-01

    Genotyping of SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) has challenged the development of several novel techniques. Most of these methods have been introduced to discriminate binary SNPs in diploid species. In the present study, the quantitative genotyping of SNPs in natural DNA pools of a polyploid organism via DNA microarrays was analysed. Three randomly selected SNP loci were genotyped in the tetraploid species potato (Solanum tuberosum). For each SNP, 24 oligomers were designed, 12 with forward and 12 with reverse orientation. They contained the polymorphic site at one of the positions 11, 14 and 17. Several steps of optimizations were performed, including the 'materials' used and the establishment of hybridization conditions. Glass surfaces were either epoxy- or aldehyde-modified, and allele-specific oligonucleotides contained either SH or NH2 groups. Hybridization stringency conditions were established by varying the concentration of formamide in the hybridization buffer. For SNP BA213c14t7/403, the quantitative discrimination between all four different naturally occurring genotypes could be demonstrated. PMID:15847606

  8. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  9. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. PMID:26397421

  10. Environmental microarray analyses of Antarctic soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Schoondermark-Stolk, Sung A; Brodie, Eoin L; Déjean, Sébastien; DeSantis, Todd Z; Gonçalves, Olivier; Piceno, Yvette M; Andersen, Gary L; Kowalchuk, George A

    2009-03-01

    Antarctic ecosystems are fascinating in their limited trophic complexity, with decomposition and nutrient cycling functions being dominated by microbial activities. Not only are Antarctic habitats exposed to extreme environmental conditions, the Antarctic Peninsula is also experiencing unequalled effects of global warming. Owing to their uniqueness and the potential impact of global warming on these pristine systems, there is considerable interest in determining the structure and function of microbial communities in the Antarctic. We therefore utilized a recently designed 16S rRNA gene microarray, the PhyloChip, which targets 8741 bacterial and archaeal taxa, to interrogate microbial communities inhabiting densely vegetated and bare fell-field soils along a latitudinal gradient ranging from 51 degrees S (Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (Coal Nunatak). Results indicated a clear decrease in diversity with increasing latitude, with the two southernmost sites harboring the most distinct Bacterial and Archaeal communities. The microarray approach proved more sensitive in detecting the breadth of microbial diversity than polymerase chain reaction-based bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries of modest size ( approximately 190 clones per library). Furthermore, the relative signal intensities summed for phyla and families on the PhyloChip were significantly correlated with the relative occurrence of these taxa in clone libraries. PhyloChip data were also compared with functional gene microarray data obtained earlier, highlighting numerous significant relationships and providing evidence for a strong link between community composition and functional gene distribution in Antarctic soils. Integration of these PhyloChip data with other complementary methods provides an unprecedented understanding of the microbial diversity and community structure of terrestrial Antarctic habitats. PMID:19020556

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based microarray analysis for the diagnosis of hydatidiform moles

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YINGJUN; PEI, XIAOJUAN; DONG, YU; WU, HUIQUN; WU, JIANZHU; SHI, HUIJUAN; ZHUANG, XUYING; SUN, XIAOFANG; HE, JIALING

    2016-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based microarray analysis enables the detection of copy number variations (CNVs), as well as copy number neutral regions, that are absent of heterozygosity throughout the genome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness and sensitivity of SNP-based microarray analysis in the diagnosis of hydatidiform mole (HM). By using whole-genome SNP microarray analysis, villous genotypes were detected, and the ploidy of villous tissue was determined to identify HMs. A total of 66 villous tissues and two twin tissues were assessed in the present study. Among these samples, 11 were triploid, one was tetraploid, 23 were abnormal aneuploidy, three were complete genome homozygosity, and the remaining ones were normal ploidy. The most noteworthy finding of the present study was the identification of six partial HMs and three complete HMs from those samples that were not identified as being HMs on the basis of the initial diagnosis of experienced obstetricians. This study has demonstrated that the application of an SNP-based microarray analysis was able to increase the sensitivity of diagnosis for HMs with partial and complete HMs, which makes the identification of these diseases at an early gestational age possible. PMID:27151252

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based microarray analysis for the diagnosis of hydatidiform moles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingjun; Pei, Xiaojuan; Dong, Yu; Wu, Huiqun; Wu, Jianzhu; Shi, Huijuan; Zhuang, Xuying; Sun, Xiaofang; He, Jialing

    2016-07-01

    In clinical diagnostics, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based microarray analysis enables the detection of copy number variations (CNVs), as well as copy number neutral regions, that are absent of heterozygosity throughout the genome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness and sensitivity of SNP‑based microarray analysis in the diagnosis of hydatidiform mole (HM). By using whole‑genome SNP microarray analysis, villous genotypes were detected, and the ploidy of villous tissue was determined to identify HMs. A total of 66 villous tissues and two twin tissues were assessed in the present study. Among these samples, 11 were triploid, one was tetraploid, 23 were abnormal aneuploidy, three were complete genome homozygosity, and the remaining ones were normal ploidy. The most noteworthy finding of the present study was the identification of six partial HMs and three complete HMs from those samples that were not identified as being HMs on the basis of the initial diagnosis of experienced obstetricians. This study has demonstrated that the application of an SNP‑based microarray analysis was able to increase the sensitivity of diagnosis for HMs with partial and complete HMs, which makes the identification of these diseases at an early gestational age possible. PMID:27151252

  13. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    B.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt1

    1Department of Reproductiv...

  14. Microarray study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression of ATP-binding cassette genes in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, M. M.; Ibragimova, M. K.; Karabut, I. V.; Freydin, M. B.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Litvyakov, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Our previous research establishes that changes of expression of the ATP-binding cassette genes family is connected with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. However, the mechanism of regulation of resistance gene expression remains unclear. As many researchers believe, single nucleotide polymorphisms can be involved in this process. Thereupon, microarray analysis is used to study polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette genes. It is thus found that MDR gene expression is connected with 5 polymorphisms, i.e. rs241432, rs241429, rs241430, rs3784867, rs59409230, which participate in the regulation of expression of own genes.

  15. Gene Expression Analyses of Subchondral Bone in Early Experimental Osteoarthritis by Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YuXian; Shen, Jun; Lu, HuaDing; Zeng, Chun; Ren, JianHua; Zeng, Hua; Li, ZhiFu; Chen, ShaoMing; Cai, DaoZhang; Zhao, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that affects both cartilage and bone. A better understanding of the early molecular changes in subchondral bone may help elucidate the pathogenesis of OA. We used microarray technology to investigate the time course of molecular changes in the subchondral bone in the early stages of experimental osteoarthritis in a rat model. We identified 2,234 differentially expressed (DE) genes at 1 week, 1,944 at 2 weeks and 1,517 at 4 weeks post-surgery. Further analyses of the dysregulated genes indicated that the events underlying subchondral bone remodeling occurred sequentially and in a time-dependent manner at the gene expression level. Some of the identified dysregulated genes that were identified have suspected roles in bone development or remodeling; these genes include Alp, Igf1, Tgf β1, Postn, Mmp3, Tnfsf11, Acp5, Bmp5, Aspn and Ihh. The differences in the expression of these genes were confirmed by real-time PCR, and the results indicated that our microarray data accurately reflected gene expression patterns characteristic of early OA. To validate the results of our microarray analysis at the protein level, immunohistochemistry staining was used to investigate the expression of Mmp3 and Aspn protein in tissue sections. These analyses indicate that Mmp3 protein expression completely matched the results of both the microarray and real-time PCR analyses; however, Aspn protein expression was not observed to differ at any time. In summary, our study demonstrated a simple method of separation of subchondral bone sample from the knee joint of rat, which can effectively avoid bone RNA degradation. These findings also revealed the gene expression profiles of subchondral bone in the rat OA model at multiple time points post-surgery and identified important DE genes with known or suspected roles in bone development or remodeling. These genes may be novel diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for OA. PMID:22384228

  16. Pigeons: A Novel GUI Software for Analysing and Parsing High Density Heterologous Oligonucleotide Microarray Probe Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Ming; May, Sean T.; Mayes, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Genomic DNA-based probe selection by using high density oligonucleotide arrays has recently been applied to heterologous species (Xspecies). With the advent of this new approach, researchers are able to study the genome and transcriptome of a non-model or an underutilised crop species through current state-of-the-art microarray platforms. However, a software package with a graphical user interface (GUI) to analyse and parse the oligonucleotide probe pair level data is still lacking when an experiment is designed on the basis of this cross species approach. A novel computer program called Pigeons has been developed for customised array data analysis to allow the user to import and analyse Affymetrix GeneChip® probe level data through XSpecies. One can determine empirical boundaries for removing poor probes based on genomic hybridisation of the test species to the Xspecies array, followed by making a species-specific Chip Description File (CDF) file for transcriptomics in the heterologous species, or Pigeons can be used to examine an experimental design to identify potential Single-Feature Polymorphisms (SFPs) at the DNA or RNA level. Pigeons is also focused around visualization and interactive analysis of the datasets. The software with its manual (the current release number version 1.2.1) is freely available at the website of the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre (NASC).

  17. Double feature selection and cluster analyses in mining of microarray data from cotton

    PubMed Central

    Alabady, Magdy S; Youn, Eunseog; Wilkins, Thea A

    2008-01-01

    Background Cotton fiber is a single-celled seed trichome of major biological and economic importance. In recent years, genomic approaches such as microarray-based expression profiling were used to study fiber growth and development to understand the developmental mechanisms of fiber at the molecular level. The vast volume of microarray expression data generated requires a sophisticated means of data mining in order to extract novel information that addresses fundamental questions of biological interest. One of the ways to approach microarray data mining is to increase the number of dimensions/levels to the analysis, such as comparing independent studies from different genotypes. However, adding dimensions also creates a challenge in finding novel ways for analyzing multi-dimensional microarray data. Results Mining of independent microarray studies from Pima and Upland (TM1) cotton using double feature selection and cluster analyses identified species-specific and stage-specific gene transcripts that argue in favor of discrete genetic mechanisms that govern developmental programming of cotton fiber morphogenesis in these two cultivated species. Double feature selection analysis identified the highest number of differentially expressed genes that distinguish the fiber transcriptomes of developing Pima and TM1 fibers. These results were based on the finding that differences in fibers harvested between 17 and 24 day post-anthesis (dpa) represent the greatest expressional distance between the two species. This powerful selection method identified a subset of genes expressed during primary (PCW) and secondary (SCW) cell wall biogenesis in Pima fibers that exhibits an expression pattern that is generally reversed in TM1 at the same developmental stage. Cluster and functional analyses revealed that this subset of genes are primarily regulated during the transition stage that overlaps the termination of PCW and onset of SCW biogenesis, suggesting that these particular genes

  18. Multiple criteria optimization joint analyses of microarray experiments in lung cancer: from existing microarray data to new knowledge.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Cáceres, Katia I; Acevedo-Díaz, Juan C; Pérez-Marty, Lynn M; Ortiz, Michael; Irizarry, Juan; Cabrera-Ríos, Mauricio; Isaza, Clara E

    2015-12-01

    Microarrays can provide large amounts of data for genetic relative expression in illnesses of interest such as cancer in short time. These data, however, are stored and often times abandoned when new experimental technologies arrive. This work reexamines lung cancer microarray data with a novel multiple criteria optimization-based strategy aiming to detect highly differentially expressed genes. This strategy does not require any adjustment of parameters by the user and is capable to handle multiple and incommensurate units across microarrays. In the analysis, groups of samples from patients with distinct smoking habits (never smoker, current smoker) and different gender are contrasted to elicit sets of highly differentially expressed genes, several of which are already associated to lung cancer and other types of cancer. The list of genes is provided with a discussion of their role in cancer, as well as the possible research directions for each of them. PMID:26471143

  19. Traceback identification of plant components in commercial compound feed through an oligonucleotide microarray based on tubulin intron polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Elena; Morello, Laura; Gianì, Silvia; Breviario, Diego

    2014-11-01

    According to EU Regulations, all components of commercial compound feed need to be declared on the label. Effective protection against fraud requires severe controls based on accurate analytical methods to ascertain what is declared by the producers. The aim of this work was to develop an oligonucleotide microarray for the molecular recognition of multiple plant components in commercial feeds. We tested the potential of the highly polymorphic first intron sequences from members of the plant β-tubulin gene family as a target for plant DNA identification. 23 oligonucleotide capture probes, targeting species-specific intron sequences, were assembled within a low density microarray for the identification of 10 plant species, selected from among those most commonly used in cattle feed formulation. The ability of the array to detect specific components in complex flour blends and in compound feed was evaluated. PMID:24874359

  20. Genome-wide polymorphisms and development of a microarray platform to detect genetic variations in Plasmodium yoelii.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sethu C; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Zilversmit, Martine M; Dommer, Jennifer; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Stephens, Melissa T; Xiao, Wenming; Tan, John C; Su, Xin-Zhuan

    2014-01-01

    The rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii is an important model for studying malaria immunity and pathogenesis. One approach for studying malaria disease phenotypes is genetic mapping, which requires typing a large number of genetic markers from multiple parasite strains and/or progeny from genetic crosses. Hundreds of microsatellite (MS) markers have been developed to genotype the P. yoelii genome; however, typing a large number of MS markers can be labor intensive, time consuming, and expensive. Thus, development of high-throughput genotyping tools such as DNA microarrays that enable rapid and accurate large-scale genotyping of the malaria parasite will be highly desirable. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of two P. yoelii strains (33X and N67) and obtained a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Based on the SNPs obtained, we designed sets of oligonucleotide probes to develop a microarray that could interrogate ∼11,000 SNPs across the 14 chromosomes of the parasite in a single hybridization. Results from hybridizations of DNA samples of five P. yoelii strains or cloned lines (17XNL, YM, 33X, N67 and N67C) and two progeny from a genetic cross (N67×17XNL) to the microarray showed that the array had a high call rate (∼97%) and accuracy (99.9%) in calling SNPs, providing a simple and reliable tool for typing the P. yoelii genome. Our data show that the P. yoelii genome is highly polymorphic, although isogenic pairs of parasites were also detected. Additionally, our results indicate that the 33X parasite is a progeny of 17XNL (or YM) and an unknown parasite. The highly accurate and reliable microarray developed in this study will greatly facilitate our ability to study the genetic basis of important traits and the disease it causes. PMID:24685548

  1. Microarray and cytokine analyses of field cases of pigs with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M; Andersson, M; Lindberg, R; Fossum, C; Jensen-Waern, M

    2011-12-15

    This field study explored the cytokine expression in intestinal tissue and serum from 19 diarrhoeic and 9 healthy pigs in herds with a long-time history of Lawsonia intracellularis-infection. The disease, proliferative enteropathy (PE), is associated with diarrhoea and poor performance in growers and haemorrhagic diarrhoea and sudden death in finisher pigs, but the immunopathology is poorly understood. Histopathology, demonstration of L. intracellularis and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in intestinal tissue by PCR, and detection of serum antibodies to L. intracellularis, were performed. The presence of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β in sera was determined by immunoassays, and intestinal mRNA expression of these cytokines plus IL-12p40 was determined by qPCR. Intestinal specimens from pigs with intestinal adenomatosis (n=2), proliferative haemorrhagic enteropathy or swine dysentery (n=2), and controls (n=2) were analysed by a genome wide porcine microarray. The clinical signs of PE were not always supported by the subsequent analyses, and the presence of PCV2 may have contributed to an increased mRNA expression for IFN-γ in intestinal specimens from some pigs. The limited gene expression in the microarray analyses and the limited expression of cytokines in both sera and intestines, indicate that the immune response is poorly activated in the initial course of an infection with L. intracellularis. However, the gene encoding for insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) was up-regulated in two pigs with prominent mucosal proliferation. PMID:21741782

  2. Microarray Analyses of Gene Expression during Chondrocyte Differentiation Identifies Novel Regulators of Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    James, Claudine G.; Appleton, C. Thomas G.; Ulici, Veronica; Underhill, T. Michael; Beier, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Ordered chondrocyte differentiation and maturation is required for normal skeletal development, but the intracellular pathways regulating this process remain largely unclear. We used Affymetrix microarrays to examine temporal gene expression patterns during chondrogenic differentiation in a mouse micromass culture system. Robust normalization of the data identified 3300 differentially expressed probe sets, which corresponds to 1772, 481, and 249 probe sets exhibiting minimum 2-, 5-, and 10-fold changes over the time period, respectively. GeneOntology annotations for molecular function show changes in the expression of molecules involved in transcriptional regulation and signal transduction among others. The expression of identified markers was confirmed by RT-PCR, and cluster analysis revealed groups of coexpressed transcripts. One gene that was up-regulated at later stages of chondrocyte differentiation was Rgs2. Overexpression of Rgs2 in the chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 resulted in accelerated hypertrophic differentiation, thus providing functional validation of microarray data. Collectively, these analyses provide novel information on the temporal expression of molecules regulating endochondral bone development. PMID:16135533

  3. Assessment and integration of publicly available SAGE, cDNA microarray, and oligonucleotide microarray expression data for global coexpression analyses.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Pleasance, Erin D; Fulton, Debra L; Oveisi, Mehrdad; Ester, Martin; Siddiqui, Asim S; Jones, Steven J M

    2005-10-01

    Large amounts of gene expression data from several different technologies are becoming available to the scientific community. A common practice is to use these data to calculate global gene coexpression for validation or integration of other "omic" data. To assess the utility of publicly available datasets for this purpose we have analyzed Homo sapiens data from 1202 cDNA microarray experiments, 242 SAGE libraries, and 667 Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray experiments. The three datasets compared demonstrate significant but low levels of global concordance (rc<0.11). Assessment against Gene Ontology (GO) revealed that all three platforms identify more coexpressed gene pairs with common biological processes than expected by chance. As the Pearson correlation for a gene pair increased it was more likely to be confirmed by GO. The Affymetrix dataset performed best individually with gene pairs of correlation 0.9-1.0 confirmed by GO in 74% of cases. However, in all cases, gene pairs confirmed by multiple platforms were more likely to be confirmed by GO. We show that combining results from different expression platforms increases reliability of coexpression. A comparison with other recently published coexpression studies found similar results in terms of performance against GO but with each method producing distinctly different gene pair lists. PMID:16098712

  4. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-01

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines. PMID:26899365

  5. Microarray data analyses of yeast RNA Pol I subunit RPA12 deletion strain.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kamlesh Kumar; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2016-06-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biosynthesis is the most energy consuming process in all living cells and the majority of total transcription activity is dedicated for synthesizing rRNA. The cells may adjust the synthesis of rRNA with the availability of resources. rRNA is mainly synthesized by RNA polymerase I that is composed of 14 subunits. Deletion of RPA12, 14, 39 and 49 are viable. RPA12 is a very small protein (13.6 kDa), and the amount of protein in the cells is very high (12,000 molecules per cell), but the role of this protein is unknown in other cellular metabolic processes (Kulak et al., 2014 [1]). RPA12 consists of two zinc-binding domains and it is required for the termination of rRNA synthesis (Mullem et al., 2002 [2]). Deletions of RPA12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe cause a conditional growth defect (Nogi et al., 1993 [3]). In S. pombe, C-terminal deletion behaves like wild-type (Imazawa et al., 2001 [4]). This prompted us to investigate in detail the physiological role of RPA12 in S. cerevisiae, we performed the microarray of rpa12 ∆ strain and deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under GSE68731. The analysis of microarray data revealed that the expression of major cellular metabolism genes is high. The amino acid biosynthesis, nonpolar lipid biosynthesis and glucose metabolic genes are highly expressed. The analyses also revealed that the rpa12 ∆ cells have an uncontrolled synthesis of cell metabolites, so RPA12 could be a master regulator for whole cellular metabolism. PMID:27222810

  6. Gene microarray analyses for potential biomarkers of single and recurrent venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, WUGANG; ZHANG, KE; CHEN, DONGRUI; GAO, PINGJIN; WANG, QIAO

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with a high recurrence rate. The present study aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms and potential biomarkers of single venous thromboembolism (SVTE) and recurrent venous thromboembolism (RVTE). The microarray dataset GSE19151 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, which contained data from whole blood samples from 63 healthy controls, 32 SVTE and 38 RVTE patients. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the SVTE and RVTE groups compared with those in the controls were identified using the t-test, followed by clustering analysis of DEGs and samples. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed for DEGs in patients with RVTE and SVTE, as well as specific DEGs in patients with RVTE. The identified 42 DEGs in RVTE were mainly enriched in biological processes of cellular protein metabolism, gene expression and translational elongation as well as in pathways associated with ribosomes, Parkinson's disease and oxidative phosphorylation. In SVTE, 20 DEGs were identified, which were mainly involved in biological processes of biopolymer biosynthesis, translational elongation and cellular protein metabolism as well as pathways associated with ribosomes and cardiac muscle contraction. In RVTE, 22 specific DEGs were mainly involved in translational elongation, negative regulation of the force of heart contraction by chemical signals, cell proliferation, ribosomal pathways and protein export. The identified DEGs of SVTE, including COX7C and UQCRQ, may be potential biomarkers for SVTE, and the specific DEGs of RVTE, including ADRBK1, NDUFA5 and ATP5O, may be potential biomarkers for RVTE. PMID:26397997

  7. A Hidden Markov model web application for analysing bacterial genomotyping DNA microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Newton, Richard; Hinds, Jason; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2006-01-01

    Whole genome DNA microarray genomotyping experiments compare the gene content of different species or strains of bacteria. A statistical approach to analysing the results of these experiments was developed, based on a Hidden Markov model (HMM), which takes adjacency of genes along the genome into account when calling genes present or absent. The model was implemented in the statistical language R and applied to three datasets. The method is numerically stable with good convergence properties. Error rates are reduced compared with approaches that ignore spatial information. Moreover, the HMM circumvents a problem encountered in a conventional analysis: determining the cut-off value to use to classify a gene as absent. An Apache Struts web interface for the R script was created for the benefit of users unfamiliar with R. The application may be found at http://hmmgd.cryst.bbk.ac.uk/hmmgd. The source code illustrating how to run R scripts from an Apache Struts-based web application is available from the corresponding author on request. The application is also available for local installation if required. PMID:17140267

  8. Early iron-deficiency-induced transcriptional changes in Arabidopsis roots as revealed by microarray analyses

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J; Yang, Thomas JW; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient in plants and animals, and Fe deficiency results in decreased vitality and performance. Due to limited bio-availability of Fe, plants have evolved sophisticated adaptive alterations in development, biochemistry and metabolism that are mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. We have investigated the early transcriptional response to Fe deficiency in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis, using a hydroponic system that permitted removal of Fe from the nutrient solution within seconds and transferring large numbers of plants with little or no mechanical damage to the root systems. We feel that this experimental approach offers significant advantages over previous and recent DNA microarray investigations of the Fe-deficiency response by increasing the resolution of the temporal response and by decreasing non-Fe deficiency-induced transcriptional changes, which are common in microarray analyses. Results The expression of sixty genes were changed after 6 h of Fe deficiency and 65% of these were found to overlap with a group of seventy-nine genes that were altered after 24 h. A disproportionally high number of transcripts encoding ion transport proteins were found, which function to increase the Fe concentration and decrease the zinc (Zn) concentration in the cytosol. Analysis of global changes in gene expression revealed that changes in Fe availability were associated with the differential expression of genes that encode transporters with presumed function in uptake and distribution of transition metals other than Fe. It appeared that under conditions of Fe deficiency, the capacity for Zn uptake increased, most probably the result of low specificity of the Fe transporter IRT1 that was induced upon Fe deficiency. The transcriptional regulation of several Zn transports under Fe deficiency led presumably to the homeostatic regulation of the cytosolic concentration of Zn and of other transition metal ions such as Mn to

  9. Comparative Analyses of MicroRNA Microarrays during Cardiogenesis: Functional Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bonet, Fernando; Hernandez-Torres, Francisco; Esteban, Franciso J.; Aranega, Amelia; Franco, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular development is a complex process in which several transcriptional pathways are operative, providing instructions to the developing cardiomyocytes, while coping with contraction and morphogenetic movements to shape the mature heart. The discovery of microRNAs has added a new layer of complexity to the molecular mechanisms governing the formation of the heart. Discrete genetic ablation of the microRNAs processing enzymes, such as Dicer and Drosha, has highlighted the functional roles of microRNAs during heart development. Importantly, selective deletion of a single microRNA, miR-1-2, results in an embryonic lethal phenotype in which both morphogenetic, as well as impaired conduction, phenotypes can be observed. In an effort to grasp the variability of microRNA expression during cardiac morphogenesis, we recently reported the dynamic expression profile during ventricular development, highlighting the importance of miR-27 on the regulation of a key cardiac transcription factor, Mef2c. In this review, we compare the microRNA expression profile in distinct models of cardiogenesis, such as ventricular chamber development, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS)-derived cardiomyocytes and the aging heart. Importantly, out of 486 microRNAs assessed in the developing heart, 11% (55) displayed increased expression, many of which are also differentially expressed in distinct cardiogenetic experimental models, including iPS-derived cardiomyocytes. A review on the functional analyses of these differentially expressed microRNAs will be provided in the context of cardiac development, highlighting the resolution and power of microarrays analyses on the quest to decipher the most relevant microRNAs in the developing, aging and diseased heart.

  10. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  11. Macrophage Gene Expression Associated with Remodeling of the Prepartum Rat Cervix: Microarray and Pathway Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dobyns, Abigail E.; Goyal, Ravi; Carpenter, Lauren Grisham; Freeman, Tom C.; Longo, Lawrence D.; Yellon, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    As the critical gatekeeper for birth, prepartum remodeling of the cervix is associated with increased resident macrophages (Mφ), proinflammatory processes, and extracellular matrix degradation. This study tested the hypothesis that expression of genes unique to Mφs characterizes the prepartum from unremodeled nonpregnant cervix. Perfused cervix from prepartum day 21 postbreeding (D21) or nonpregnant (NP) rats, with or without Mφs, had RNA extracted and whole genome microarray analysis performed. By subtractive analyses, expression of 194 and 120 genes related to Mφs in the cervix from D21 rats were increased and decreased, respectively. In both D21 and NP groups, 158 and 57 Mφ genes were also more or less up- or down-regulated, respectively. Mφ gene expression patterns were most strongly correlated within groups and in 5 major clustering patterns. In the cervix from D21 rats, functional categories and canonical pathways of increased expression by Mφ gene related to extracellular matrix, cell proliferation, differentiation, as well as cell signaling. Pathways were characteristic of inflammation and wound healing, e.g., CD163, CD206, and CCR2. Signatures of only inflammation pathways, e.g., CSF1R, EMR1, and MMP12 were common to both D21 and NP groups. Thus, a novel and complex balance of Mφ genes and clusters differentiated the degraded extracellular matrix and cellular genomic activities in the cervix before birth from the unremodeled state. Predicted Mφ activities, pathways, and networks raise the possibility that expression patterns of specific genes characterize and promote prepartum remodeling of the cervix for parturition at term and with preterm labor. PMID:25811906

  12. ArrayWiki: an enabling technology for sharing public microarray data repositories and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Todd H; Torrance, JT; Li, Henry; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background A survey of microarray databases reveals that most of the repository contents and data models are heterogeneous (i.e., data obtained from different chip manufacturers), and that the repositories provide only basic biological keywords linking to PubMed. As a result, it is difficult to find datasets using research context or analysis parameters information beyond a few keywords. For example, to reduce the "curse-of-dimension" problem in microarray analysis, the number of samples is often increased by merging array data from different datasets. Knowing chip data parameters such as pre-processing steps (e.g., normalization, artefact removal, etc), and knowing any previous biological validation of the dataset is essential due to the heterogeneity of the data. However, most of the microarray repositories do not have meta-data information in the first place, and do not have a a mechanism to add or insert this information. Thus, there is a critical need to create "intelligent" microarray repositories that (1) enable update of meta-data with the raw array data, and (2) provide standardized archiving protocols to minimize bias from the raw data sources. Results To address the problems discussed, we have developed a community maintained system called ArrayWiki that unites disparate meta-data of microarray meta-experiments from multiple primary sources with four key features. First, ArrayWiki provides a user-friendly knowledge management interface in addition to a programmable interface using standards developed by Wikipedia. Second, ArrayWiki includes automated quality control processes (caCORRECT) and novel visualization methods (BioPNG, Gel Plots), which provide extra information about data quality unavailable in other microarray repositories. Third, it provides a user-curation capability through the familiar Wiki interface. Fourth, ArrayWiki provides users with simple text-based searches across all experiment meta-data, and exposes data to search engine crawlers

  13. Differential gene expression in recombinant Pichia pastoris analysed by heterologous DNA microarray hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Michael; Branduardi, Paola; Gasser, Brigitte; Valli, Minoska; Maurer, Michael; Porro, Danilo; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2004-01-01

    Background Pichia pastoris is a well established yeast host for heterologous protein expression, however, the physiological and genetic information about this yeast remains scanty. The lack of a published genome sequence renders DNA arrays unavailable, thereby hampering more global investigations of P. pastoris from the beginning. Here, we examine the suitability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA microarrays for heterologous hybridisation with P. pastoris cDNA. Results We could show that it is possible to obtain new and valuable information about transcriptomic regulation in P. pastoris by probing S. cerevisiae DNA microarrays. The number of positive signals was about 66 % as compared to homologous S. cerevisiae hybridisation, and both the signal intensities and gene regulations correlated with high significance between data obtained from P. pastoris and S. cerevisiae samples. The differential gene expression patterns upon shift from glycerol to methanol as carbon source were investigated in more detail. Downregulation of TCA cycle genes and a decrease of genes related to ribonucleotide and ribosome synthesis were among the major effects identified. Conclusions We could successfully demonstrate that heterologous microarray hybridisations allow deep insights into the transcriptomic regulation processes of P. pastoris. The observed downregulation of TCA cycle and ribosomal synthesis genes correlates to a significantly lower specific growth rate during the methanol feed phase. PMID:15610561

  14. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  15. Meta-analyses of 10 polymorphisms associated with the risk of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dai, Dongjun; Wang, Yunliang; Yuan, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Xingyu; Jiang, Danjie; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yuzheng; Yin, Honglei; Duan, Shiwei

    2014-09-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe complex psychiatric disorder that generates problems for the associated family and society and causes disability with regards to work for patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the contribution of 10 genetic polymorphisms to SCZ susceptibility. Meta-analyses were conducted using the data without a limitation for time or language. A total of 27 studies with 7 genes and 10 polymorphisms were selected for the meta-analyses. Two polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with SCZ. SNAP25 rs3746544 was shown to increase the SCZ risk by 18% [P=0.01; odds ratio (OR), 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-1.34] and GRIK3 rs6691840 was found to increase the risk by 30% (P=0.008; OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.07-1.58). Significant results were found under the dominant (P=0.001; OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.65) and additive (P=0.02; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.06-1.98) model for the SNAP25 rs3746544 polymorphism and under the additive model for the GRIK3 rs6691840 polymorphism (P=0.03; OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.04-2.85). There were no significant results observed for the other eight polymorphisms, which were CCKAR rs1800857, CHRNA7 rs904952, CHRNA7 rs6494223, CHRNA7 rs2337506, DBH Ins>Del, FEZ1 rs559668, FEZ1 rs597570 and GCLM rs2301022. In conclusion, the present meta-analyses indicated that the SNAP25 rs3746544 and GRIK3 rs6691840 polymorphisms were risk factors of SCZ, which may provide valuable information for the clinical diagnosis of SCZ. PMID:25054019

  16. Microarray and bioinformatic analyses suggest models for carbon metabolism in the autotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    C. Appia-ayme; R. Quatrini; Y. Denis; F. Denizot; S. Silver; F. Roberto; F. Veloso; J. Valdes; J. P. Cardenas; M. Esparza; O. Orellana; E. Jedlicki; V. Bonnefoy; D. Holmes

    2006-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that uses iron or sulfur as an energy and electron source. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify putative genes and potential metabolic pathways involved in CO2 fixation, 2P-glycolate detoxification, carboxysome formation and glycogen utilization in At. ferrooxidans. Microarray transcript profiling was carried out to compare the relative expression of the predicted genes of these pathways when the microorganism was grown in the presence of iron versus sulfur. Several gene expression patterns were confirmed by real-time PCR. Genes for each of the above predicted pathways were found to be organized into discrete clusters. Clusters exhibited differential gene expression depending on the presence of iron or sulfur in the medium. Concordance of gene expression within each cluster, suggested that they are operons Most notably, clusters of genes predicted to be involved in CO2 fixation, carboxysome formation, 2P-glycolate detoxification and glycogen biosynthesis were up-regulated in sulfur medium, whereas genes involved in glycogen utilization were preferentially expressed in iron medium. These results can be explained in terms of models of gene regulation that suggest how A. ferrooxidans can adjust its central carbon management to respond to changing environmental conditions.

  17. Microarray Analyses of Xylella fastidiosa Provide Evidence of Coordinated Transcription Control of Laterally Transferred Elements

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Luiz R.; Rosato, Yoko B.; Muto, Nair H.; Yanai, Giane M.; da Silva, Vivian S.; Leite, Daniela B.; Gonçalves, Edmilson R.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D.; Machado, Marcos A.; Lopes, Silvio A.; de Oliveira, Regina Costa

    2003-01-01

    Genetically distinct strains of the plant bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) are responsible for a variety of plant diseases, accounting for severe economic damage throughout the world. Using as a reference the genome of Xf 9a5c strain, associated with citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), we developed a microarray-based comparison involving 12 Xf isolates, providing a thorough assessment of the variation in genomic composition across the group. Our results demonstrate that Xf displays one of the largest flexible gene pools characterized to date, with several horizontally acquired elements, such as prophages, plasmids, and genomic islands (GIs), which contribute up to 18% of the final genome. Transcriptome analysis of bacteria grown under different conditions shows that most of these elements are transcriptionally active, and their expression can be influenced in a coordinated manner by environmental stimuli. Finally, evaluation of the genetic composition of these laterally transferred elements identified differences that may help to explain the adaptability of Xf strains to infect such a wide range of plant species. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12670998

  18. Comparative microarray analyses of adult female midgut tissues from feeding Rhipicephalus species.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Willem A; Stutzer, Christian; Olivier, Nicholas A; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, has a debilitating effect on the livestock industry worldwide, owing to its being a vector of the causative agents of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. In South Africa, co-infestation with R. microplus and R. decoloratus, a common vector species on local livestock, occurs widely in the northern and eastern parts of the country. An alternative to chemical control methods is sought in the form of a tick vaccine to control these tick species. However, sequence information and transcriptional data for R. decoloratus is currently lacking. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying genes that are shared between midgut tissues of feeding adult female R. microplus and R. decoloratus ticks. In this regard, a custom oligonucleotide microarray comprising of 13,477 R. microplus sequences was used for transcriptional profiling and 2476 genes were found to be shared between these Rhipicephalus species. In addition, 136 transcripts were found to be more abundantly expressed in R. decoloratus and 1084 in R. microplus. Chi-square analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism are significantly overrepresented in R. microplus and R. decoloratus. This study is the first transcriptional profiling of R. decoloratus and is an additional resource that can be evaluated further in future studies for possible tick control. PMID:25448423

  19. Microarray analyses reveal that plant mutagenesis may induce more transcriptomic changes than transgene insertion

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Rita; Saibo, Nelson; Lourenço, Tiago; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2008-01-01

    Controversy regarding genetically modified (GM) plants and their potential impact on human health contrasts with the tacit acceptance of other plants that were also modified, but not considered as GM products (e.g., varieties raised through conventional breeding such as mutagenesis). What is beyond the phenotype of these improved plants? Should mutagenized plants be treated differently from transgenics? We have evaluated the extent of transcriptome modification occurring during rice improvement through transgenesis versus mutation breeding. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze gene expression in four different pools of four types of rice plants and respective controls: (i) a γ-irradiated stable mutant, (ii) the M1 generation of a 100-Gy γ-irradiated plant, (iii) a stable transgenic plant obtained for production of an anticancer antibody, and (iv) the T1 generation of a transgenic plant produced aiming for abiotic stress improvement, and all of the unmodified original genotypes as controls. We found that the improvement of a plant variety through the acquisition of a new desired trait, using either mutagenesis or transgenesis, may cause stress and thus lead to an altered expression of untargeted genes. In all of the cases studied, the observed alteration was more extensive in mutagenized than in transgenic plants. We propose that the safety assessment of improved plant varieties should be carried out on a case-by-case basis and not simply restricted to foods obtained through genetic engineering. PMID:18303117

  20. Microarray analyses reveal that plant mutagenesis may induce more transcriptomic changes than transgene insertion.

    PubMed

    Batista, Rita; Saibo, Nelson; Lourenço, Tiago; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2008-03-01

    Controversy regarding genetically modified (GM) plants and their potential impact on human health contrasts with the tacit acceptance of other plants that were also modified, but not considered as GM products (e.g., varieties raised through conventional breeding such as mutagenesis). What is beyond the phenotype of these improved plants? Should mutagenized plants be treated differently from transgenics? We have evaluated the extent of transcriptome modification occurring during rice improvement through transgenesis versus mutation breeding. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze gene expression in four different pools of four types of rice plants and respective controls: (i) a gamma-irradiated stable mutant, (ii) the M1 generation of a 100-Gy gamma-irradiated plant, (iii) a stable transgenic plant obtained for production of an anticancer antibody, and (iv) the T1 generation of a transgenic plant produced aiming for abiotic stress improvement, and all of the unmodified original genotypes as controls. We found that the improvement of a plant variety through the acquisition of a new desired trait, using either mutagenesis or transgenesis, may cause stress and thus lead to an altered expression of untargeted genes. In all of the cases studied, the observed alteration was more extensive in mutagenized than in transgenic plants. We propose that the safety assessment of improved plant varieties should be carried out on a case-by-case basis and not simply restricted to foods obtained through genetic engineering. PMID:18303117

  1. Microarray analyses and molecular profiling of steatosis induction in immortalized human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    De Gottardi, Andrea; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Sgroi, Antonino; Moukil, Moulay; Ravier-Dall'Antonia, Florence; Pazienza, Valerio; Pugnale, Paolo; Foti, Michelangelo; Hadengue, Antoine

    2007-08-01

    Hepatic steatosis is an important risk factor for the development of inflammation, fibrosis and impaired liver regeneration. The factors regulating lipid accumulation and driving hepatic steatosis toward inflammation, fibrosis and impaired regeneration are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify major alterations in gene expression occurring in steatotic hepatocytes, and to analyze how these changes impact cellular processes associated with steatosis. Microarray gene chips and RT-PCR were performed to analyze changes in gene expression induced in fatty human immortalized hepatocytes after treatment with 50 muM oleic acid for 7 days. Lipid metabolism and triglyceride accumulation in these cells was examined by Oil-Red-O staining, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and immunofluorescence. Caspase 3 activity, BrdU incorporation and trypan blue exclusion were used to study apoptosis, proliferation and cell viability. Finally, quantitative analysis of signalling induced by insulin was performed by Western blot. Characterization of steatosis in three hepatocyte-derived cell lines indicated that the immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) line was the most appropriate cell line for this study. Gene expression analysis showed significant alterations in the transcription of two major classes of genes involved either in cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as lipid export, or in apoptosis and cell proliferation. Such changes were functionally relevant, since TLC indicated that synthesis and accumulation of triglycerides were increased in steatotic cells, while synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids were decreased. Lipid accumulation in IHH was associated with an increased apoptosis and an inhibition of cell proliferation and viability. No detectable changes in genes associated with insulin resistance were observed in steatotic cells, but signalling induced by insulin was more efficient in steatotic IHH as compared to control cells. We conclude that IHH

  2. Microarray analyses for identifying genes conferring resistance to pepper leaf curl virus in chilli pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Rai, Ved Prakash; Rai, Ashutosh; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Sanjay; Kumar, Sanjeet; Singh, Major; Singh, Sheo Pratap

    2016-09-01

    Pepper leaf curl virus (PepLCV) is a serious threat to pepper (Capsicum spp.) production worldwide. Molecular mechanism underlying pepper plants response to PepLCV infection is key to develop PepLCV resistant varieties. In this study, we generated transcriptome profiles of PepLCV resistant genotype (BS-35) and susceptible genotype (IVPBC-535) after artificial viral inoculation using microarray technology and detail experimental procedures and analyses are described. A total of 319 genes differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible genotypes were identified, out of that 234 unique genes were found to be up-regulated > 2-fold in resistant line BS-35 when compared to susceptible, IVPBC-535. The data set we generated has been analyzed to identify genes that are involved in the regulation of resistance against PepLCV. The raw data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE41131. PMID:27556012

  3. Conceptual Aspects of Large Meta-Analyses with Publicly Available Microarray Data: A Case Study in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Schmidberger, Markus; Lennert, Sabine; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Large public repositories of microarray experiments offer an abundance of biological data. It is of interest to use and to combine the available material to create new biological information and to develop a broader view on biological phenomena. Meta-analyses recombine similar information over a series of experiments to sketch scientific aspects which were not accessible by each of the single experiments. Meta-analysis of high-throughput experiments has to handle methodological as well as technical challenges. Methodological aspects concern the identification of homogeneous material which can be combined by appropriate statistical procedures. Technical challenges come from the data management of large amounts of high-dimensional data, long computation time, as well as the handling of the stored phenotype data. This paper compares in a meta-analysis of a large series of microarray experiments the interaction structure within selected pathways between different tumour entities. The feasibility of such a study is explored and a technical as well as a statistical framework for its completion is presented. Multiple obstacles were met during completion of this project. They are mainly related to the quality of the available data and influence the biological interpretation of the results derived. The sobering experience of our study asks for combined efforts to improve the data quality in public repositories of high-throughput data. The exploration of the available data in large meta-analyses is limited by incomplete documentation of essential aspects of experiments and studies, by technical deficiencies in the data stored, and by careless duplications of data. PMID:21423405

  4. Microarray Analyses Reveal Marked Differences in Growth Factor and Receptor Expression Between 8-Cell Human Embryos and Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlismas, Antonis; Bletsa, Ritsa; Mavrogianni, Despina; Mamali, Georgina; Pergamali, Maria; Dinopoulou, Vasiliki; Partsinevelos, George; Drakakis, Peter; Loutradis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Previous microarray analyses of RNAs from 8-cell (8C) human embryos revealed a lack of cell cycle checkpoints and overexpression of core circadian oscillators and cell cycle drivers relative to pluripotent human stem cells [human embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem (hES/iPS)] and fibroblasts, suggesting growth factor independence during early cleavage stages. To explore this possibility, we queried our combined microarray database for expression of 487 growth factors and receptors. Fifty-one gene elements were overdetected on the 8C arrays relative to hES/iPS cells, including 14 detected at least 80-fold higher, which annotated to multiple pathways: six cytokine family (CSF1R, IL2RG, IL3RA, IL4, IL17B, IL23R), four transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family (BMP6, BMP15, GDF9, ENG), one fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family [FGF14(FH4)], one epidermal growth factor member (GAB1), plus CD36, and CLEC10A. 8C-specific gene elements were enriched (73%) for reported circadian-controlled genes in mouse tissues. High-level detection of CSF1R, ENG, IL23R, and IL3RA specifically on the 8C arrays suggests the embryo plays an active role in blocking immune rejection and is poised for trophectoderm development; robust detection of NRG1, GAB1, -2, GRB7, and FGF14(FHF4) indicates novel roles in early development in addition to their known roles in later development. Forty-four gene elements were underdetected on the 8C arrays, including 11 at least 80-fold under the pluripotent cells: two cytokines (IFITM1, TNFRSF8), five TGFBs (BMP7, LEFTY1, LEFTY2, TDGF1, TDGF3), two FGFs (FGF2, FGF receptor 1), plus ING5, and WNT6. The microarray detection patterns suggest that hES/iPS cells exhibit suppressed circadian competence, underexpression of early differentiation markers, and more robust expression of generic pluripotency genes, in keeping with an artificial state of continual uncommitted cell division. In contrast, gene expression patterns of the 8C embryo suggest that

  5. Microarray Analyses Reveal Marked Differences in Growth Factor and Receptor Expression Between 8-Cell Human Embryos and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Vlismas, Antonis; Bletsa, Ritsa; Mavrogianni, Despina; Mamali, Georgina; Pergamali, Maria; Dinopoulou, Vasiliki; Partsinevelos, George; Drakakis, Peter; Loutradis, Dimitris; Kiessling, Ann A

    2016-01-15

    Previous microarray analyses of RNAs from 8-cell (8C) human embryos revealed a lack of cell cycle checkpoints and overexpression of core circadian oscillators and cell cycle drivers relative to pluripotent human stem cells [human embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem (hES/iPS)] and fibroblasts, suggesting growth factor independence during early cleavage stages. To explore this possibility, we queried our combined microarray database for expression of 487 growth factors and receptors. Fifty-one gene elements were overdetected on the 8C arrays relative to hES/iPS cells, including 14 detected at least 80-fold higher, which annotated to multiple pathways: six cytokine family (CSF1R, IL2RG, IL3RA, IL4, IL17B, IL23R), four transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family (BMP6, BMP15, GDF9, ENG), one fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family [FGF14(FH4)], one epidermal growth factor member (GAB1), plus CD36, and CLEC10A. 8C-specific gene elements were enriched (73%) for reported circadian-controlled genes in mouse tissues. High-level detection of CSF1R, ENG, IL23R, and IL3RA specifically on the 8C arrays suggests the embryo plays an active role in blocking immune rejection and is poised for trophectoderm development; robust detection of NRG1, GAB1, -2, GRB7, and FGF14(FHF4) indicates novel roles in early development in addition to their known roles in later development. Forty-four gene elements were underdetected on the 8C arrays, including 11 at least 80-fold under the pluripotent cells: two cytokines (IFITM1, TNFRSF8), five TGFBs (BMP7, LEFTY1, LEFTY2, TDGF1, TDGF3), two FGFs (FGF2, FGF receptor 1), plus ING5, and WNT6. The microarray detection patterns suggest that hES/iPS cells exhibit suppressed circadian competence, underexpression of early differentiation markers, and more robust expression of generic pluripotency genes, in keeping with an artificial state of continual uncommitted cell division. In contrast, gene expression patterns of the 8C embryo suggest that

  6. Gene Microarray Analyses of Daboia russelli russelli Daboiatoxin Treatment of THP-1 Human Macrophages Infected with Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Perumal Samy, R; Manikandan, J; Pachiappan, A; Ooi, E E; Aw, L T; Stiles, B G; Franco, O L; Kandasamy, M; Mathi, K M; Rane, G; Siveen, K S; Arunachalam, C; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, S A; Kumar, A P; Sethi, G; Lim, L H K; Chow, V T

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and represents a potential bioterrorism threat. In this study, the transcriptomic responses of B. pseudomallei infection of a human macrophage cell model were investigated using whole-genome microarrays. Gene expression profiles were compared between infected THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells with or without treatment with Daboia russelli russelli daboiatoxin (DRRDbTx) or ceftazidime (antibiotic control). Microarray analyses of infected and treated cells revealed differential upregulation of various inflammatory genes such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 4 (CXCL4), transcription factor p65 (NF-kB); and several genes involved in immune and stress responses, cell cycle, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, following DRR-DbTx treatment of infected cells, there was enhanced expression of the tolllike receptor 2 (TLR-2) mediated signaling pathway involved in recognition and initiation of acute inflammatory responses. Importantly, we observed that highly inflammatory cytokine gene responses were similar in infected cells exposed to DRR-DbTx or ceftazidime after 24 h. Additionally, there were increased transcripts associated with cell death by caspase activation that can promote host tissue injury. In summary, the transcriptional responses during B. pseudomallei infection of macrophages highlight a broad range of innate immune mechanisms that are activated within 24 h post-infection. These data provide insights into the transcriptomic kinetics following DRR-DbTx treatment of human macrophages infected with B. pseudomallei. PMID:26592245

  7. Preoperative overnight parenteral nutrition (TPN) improves skeletal muscle protein metabolism indicated by microarray algorithm analyses in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Engström, Cecilia; Lundholm, Kent

    2016-06-01

    Loss of muscle mass is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Uncertainties of treatment efficiency by short-term artificial nutrition remain, specifically improvement of protein balance in skeletal muscles. In this study, algorithmic microarray analysis was applied to map cellular changes related to muscle protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle tissue during provision of overnight preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Twenty-two patients (11/group) scheduled for upper GI surgery due to malignant or benign disease received a continuous peripheral all-in-one TPN infusion (30 kcal/kg/day, 0.16 gN/kg/day) or saline infusion for 12 h prior operation. Biopsies from the rectus abdominis muscle were taken at the start of operation for isolation of muscle RNA RNA expression microarray analyses were performed with Agilent Sureprint G3, 8 × 60K arrays using one-color labeling. 447 mRNAs were differently expressed between study and control patients (P < 0.1). mRNAs related to ribosomal biogenesis, mRNA processing, and translation were upregulated during overnight nutrition; particularly anabolic signaling S6K1 (P < 0.01-0.1). Transcripts of genes associated with lysosomal degradation showed consistently lower expression during TPN while mRNAs for ubiquitin-mediated degradation of proteins as well as transcripts related to intracellular signaling pathways, PI3 kinase/MAPkinase, were either increased or decreased. In conclusion, muscle mRNA alterations during overnight standard TPN infusions at constant rate altered mRNAs associated with mTOR signaling; increased initiation of protein translation; and suppressed autophagy/lysosomal degradation of proteins. This indicates that overnight preoperative parenteral nutrition is effective to promote muscle protein metabolism. PMID:27273879

  8. Microarray and Proteomic Analyses of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with a Highlight on the mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Čokić, Vladan P.; Mossuz, Pascal; Han, Jing; Socoro, Nuria; Beleslin-Čokić, Bojana B.; Mitrović, Olivera; Subotički, Tijana; Diklić, Miloš; Leković, Danijela; Gotić, Mirjana; Puri, Raj K.; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The gene and protein expression profiles in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) may reveal gene and protein markers of a potential clinical relevance in diagnosis, treatment and prediction of response to therapy. Using cDNA microarray analysis of 25,100 unique genes, we studied the gene expression profile of CD34+ cells and granulocytes obtained from peripheral blood of subjects with essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). The microarray analyses of the CD34+ cells and granulocytes were performed from 20 de novo MPN subjects: JAK2 positive ET, PV, PMF subjects, and JAK2 negative ET/PMF subjects. The granulocytes for proteomic studies were pooled in 4 groups: PV with JAK2 mutant allele burden above 80%, ET with JAK2 mutation, PMF with JAK2 mutation and ET/PMF with no JAK2 mutation. The number of differentially regulated genes was about two fold larger in CD34+ cells compared to granulocytes. Thirty-six genes (including RUNX1, TNFRSF19) were persistently highly expressed, while 42 genes (including FOXD4, PDE4A) were underexpressed both in CD34+ cells and granulocytes. Using proteomic studies, significant up-regulation was observed for MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling regulators that control myeloid cell apoptosis and proliferation: RAC2, MNDA, S100A8/9, CORO1A, and GNAI2. When the status of the mTOR signaling pathway related genes was analyzed, PI3K/AKT regulators were preferentially up-regulated in CD34+ cells of MPNs, with down-regulated major components of the protein complex EIF4F. Molecular profiling of CD34+ cells and granulocytes of MPN determined gene expression patterns beyond their recognized function in disease pathogenesis that included dominant up-regulation of PI3K/AKT signaling. PMID:26275051

  9. Modeling Oncogenic Signaling in Colon Tumors by Multidirectional Analyses of Microarray Data Directed for Maximization of Analytical Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, Tymon; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Mikula, Michal; Jarosz, Dorota; Pachlewski, Jacek; Oledzki, Janusz; Ostrowsk, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinical progression of colorectal cancers (CRC) may occur in parallel with distinctive signaling alterations. We designed multidirectional analyses integrating microarray-based data with biostatistics and bioinformatics to elucidate the signaling and metabolic alterations underlying CRC development in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Methodology/Principal Findings Studies were performed on normal mucosa, adenoma, and carcinoma samples obtained during surgery or colonoscopy. Collections of cryostat sections prepared from the tissue samples were evaluated by a pathologist to control the relative cell type content. The measurements were done using Affymetrix GeneChip HG-U133plus2, and probe set data was generated using two normalization algorithms: MAS5.0 and GCRMA with least-variant set (LVS). The data was evaluated using pair-wise comparisons and data decomposition into singular value decomposition (SVD) modes. The method selected for the functional analysis used the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Expressional profiles obtained in 105 samples of whole tissue sections were used to establish oncogenic signaling alterations in progression of CRC, while those representing 40 microdissected specimens were used to select differences in KEGG pathways between epithelium and mucosa. Based on a consensus of the results obtained by two normalization algorithms, and two probe set sorting criteria, we identified 14 and 17 KEGG signaling and metabolic pathways that are significantly altered between normal and tumor samples and between benign and malignant tumors, respectively. Several of them were also selected from the raw microarray data of 2 recently published studies (GSE4183 and GSE8671). Conclusion/Significance Although the proposed strategy is computationally complex and labor–intensive, it may reduce the number of false results. PMID:20957034

  10. Nitric oxide is required for determining root architecture and lignin composition in sunflower. Supporting evidence from microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Corti Monzón, Georgina; Pinedo, Marcela; Di Rienzo, Julio; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Pomar, Federico; Lamattina, Lorenzo; de la Canal, Laura

    2014-05-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signal molecule involved in several physiological processes in plants, including root development. Despite the importance of NO as a root growth regulator, the knowledge about the genes and metabolic pathways modulated by NO in this process is still limited. A constraint to unravel these pathways has been the use of exogenous applications of NO donors that may produce toxic effects. We have analyzed the role of NO in root architecture through the depletion of endogenous NO using the scavenger cPTIO. Sunflower seedlings growing in liquid medium supplemented with cPTIO showed unaltered primary root length while the number of lateral roots was deeply reduced; indicating that endogenous NO participates in determining root branching in sunflower. The transcriptional changes induced by NO depletion have been analyzed using a large-scale approach. A microarray analysis showed 330 genes regulated in the roots (p≤0.001) upon endogenous NO depletion. A general cPTIO-induced up-regulation of genes involved in the lignin biosynthetic pathway was observed. Even if no detectable changes in total lignin content could be detected, cell walls analyses revealed that the ratio G/S lignin increased in roots treated with cPTIO. This means that endogenous NO may control lignin composition in planta. Our results suggest that a fine tuning regulation of NO levels could be used by plants to regulate root architecture and lignin composition. The functional implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:24747108

  11. Distinct Signal Transduction Pathways Downstream of the (P)RR Revealed by Microarray and ChIP-chip Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zaade, Daniela; Schmitz, Jennifer; Benke, Eileen; Klare, Sabrina; Seidel, Kerstin; Kirsch, Sebastian; Goldin-Lang, Petra; Zollmann, Frank S.; Unger, Thomas; Funke-Kaiser, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) signaling is involved in different pathophysiologies ranging from cardiorenal end-organ damage via diabetic retinopathy to tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is an adaptor protein of the (P)RR. Furthermore, recent publications suggest that major functions of the (P)RR are mediated ligand-independently by its transmembrane and intracellular part, which acts as an accessory protein of V-ATPases. The transcriptome and recruitmentome downstream of the V-ATPase function and PLZF in the context of the (P)RR are currently unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of microarray and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip experiments using siRNA against the (P)RR, stable overexpression of PLZF, the PLZF translocation inhibitor genistein and the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin to dissect transcriptional pathways downstream of the (P)RR. We were able to identify distinct and overlapping genetic signatures as well as novel real-time PCR-validated target genes of the different molecular functions of the (P)RR. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses of our data confirm the role of (P)RŔs signal transduction pathways in cardiovascular disease and tumorigenesis. PMID:23469216

  12. Computational deconvolution of gene expression by individual host cellular subsets from microarray analyses of complex, parasite-infected whole tissues.

    PubMed

    Banskota, Nirad; Odegaard, Justin I; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Hsieh, Michael H

    2016-06-01

    Analyses of whole organs from parasite-infected animals can reveal the entirety of the host tissue transcriptome, but conventional approaches make it difficult to dissect out the contributions of individual cellular subsets to observed gene expression. Computational deconvolution of gene expression data may be one solution to this problem. We tested this potential solution by deconvoluting whole bladder gene expression microarray data derived from a model of experimental urogenital schistosomiasis. A supervised technique was used to group B-cell and T-cell related genes based on their cell types, with a semi-supervised technique to calculate the proportions of urothelial cells. We demonstrate that the deconvolution technique was able to group genes into their correct cell types with good accuracy. A clustering-based methodology was also used to improve prediction. However, incorrectly predicted genes could not be discriminated using this methodology. The incorrect predictions were primarily IgH- and IgK-related genes. To our knowledge, this is the first application of computational deconvolution to complex, parasite-infected whole tissues. Other computational techniques such as neural networks may need to be used to improve prediction. PMID:27025770

  13. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  14. Three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray method effectively identifies UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene polymorphisms for the correct diagnosis of Gilbert's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinyun; Sun, Mei; Li, Jiayan; Zhou, Dongrui; Wu, Xuping

    2016-03-01

    Gilbert's syndrome is a mild genetic liver disorder characterized by unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia due to defects in the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene. The T-3279G mutation in the phenobarbital responsive enhancer module (PBREM), the TA-insertion in the TATA box, creating the A(TA)7TAA motif instead of A(TA)6TAA and the G211A mutation in coding exon 1, particularly in Asian populations, of the human UGT1A1 gene are the three common genotypes found in patients with Gilbert's syndrome. Different approaches for detecting the T-3279G, A(TA)6/7TAA and G211A mutations of the UGT1A1 gene have been described. In this study, to the best of our knowledge, we established a three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray method for the first time, in order to study UGT1A1 gene polymorphisms. This method, based on a step-by-step three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray protocol, successfully identified all possible genotypes of T-3279G, A(TA)6/7TAA and G211A in 20 patients with hyperbilirubinemia. In addition, sequencing was performed to confirm these results. The data from the current study demonstrate that the three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel microarray method has the potential to be applied as a useful, reliable and cost-effective tool to detect the T-3279G, the A(TA)6/7TAA and the G211A mutations of the UGT1A1 gene in patients with hyperbilirubinemia and thereby aid in the diagnosis of Gilbert's syndrome. PMID:26781906

  15. Three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray method effectively identifies UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene polymorphisms for the correct diagnosis of Gilbert's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    SONG, JINYUN; SUN, MEI; LI, JIAYAN; ZHOU, DONGRUI; WU, XUPING

    2016-01-01

    Gilbert's syndrome is a mild genetic liver disorder characterized by unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia due to defects in the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene. The T-3279G mutation in the phenobarbital responsive enhancer module (PBREM), the TA-insertion in the TATA box, creating the A(TA)7TAA motif instead of A(TA)6TAA and the G211A mutation in coding exon 1, particularly in Asian populations, of the human UGT1A1 gene are the three common genotypes found in patients with Gilbert's syndrome. Different approaches for detecting the T-3279G, A(TA)6/7TAA and G211A mutations of the UGT1A1 gene have been described. In this study, to the best of our knowledge, we established a three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray method for the first time, in order to study UGT1A1 gene polymorphisms. This method, based on a step-by-step three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray protocol, successfully identified all possible genotypes of T-3279G, A(TA)6/7TAA and G211A in 20 patients with hyperbilirubinemia. In addition, sequencing was performed to confirm these results. The data from the current study demonstrate that the three-dimensional polyacrylamide gel microarray method has the potential to be applied as a useful, reliable and cost-effective tool to detect the T-3279G, the A(TA)6/7TAA and the G211A mutations of the UGT1A1 gene in patients with hyperbilirubinemia and thereby aid in the diagnosis of Gilbert's syndrome. PMID:26781906

  16. Massive Collection of Full-Length Complementary DNA Clones and Microarray Analyses:. Keys to Rice Transcriptome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2009-02-01

    Completion of the high-precision genome sequence analysis of rice led to the collection of about 35,000 full-length cDNA clones and the determination of their complete sequences. Mapping of these full-length cDNA sequences has given us information on (1) the number of genes expressed in the rice genome; (2) the start and end positions and exon-intron structures of rice genes; (3) alternative transcripts; (4) possible encoded proteins; (5) non-protein-coding (np) RNAs; (6) the density of gene localization on the chromosome; (7) setting the parameters of gene prediction programs; and (8) the construction of a microarray system that monitors global gene expression. Manual curation for rice gene annotation by using mapping information on full-length cDNA and EST assemblies has revealed about 32,000 expressed genes in the rice genome. Analysis of major gene families, such as those encoding membrane transport proteins (pumps, ion channels, and secondary transporters), along with the evolution from bacteria to higher animals and plants, reveals how gene numbers have increased through adaptation to circumstances. Family-based gene annotation also gives us a new way of comparing organisms. Massive amounts of data on gene expression under many kinds of physiological conditions are being accumulated in rice oligoarrays (22K and 44K) based on full-length cDNA sequences. Cluster analyses of genes that have the same promoter cis-elements, that have similar expression profiles, or that encode enzymes in the same metabolic pathways or signal transduction cascades give us clues to understanding the networks of gene expression in rice. As a tool for that purpose, we recently developed "RiCES", a tool for searching for cis-elements in the promoter regions of clustered genes.

  17. Prediction Formulas for Individual Opioid Analgesic Requirements Based on Genetic Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaori; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Ichinomiya, Takashi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Hayashida, Masakazu; Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background The analgesic efficacy of opioids is well known to vary widely among individuals, and various factors related to individual differences in opioid sensitivity have been identified. However, a prediction model to calculate appropriate opioid analgesic requirements has not yet been established. The present study sought to construct prediction formulas for individual opioid analgesic requirements based on genetic polymorphisms and clinical data from patients who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery and validate the utility of the prediction formulas in patients who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Methods To construct the prediction formulas, we performed multiple linear regression analyses using data from subjects who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery. The dependent variable was 24-h postoperative or perioperative fentanyl use, and the independent variables were age, gender, height, weight, pain perception latencies (PPL), and genotype data of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To examine the utility of the prediction formulas, we performed simple linear regression analyses using subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Actual 24-h postoperative or perioperative analgesic use and the predicted values that were calculated using the multiple regression equations were incorporated as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Results Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the four SNPs, PPL, and weight were retained as independent predictors of 24-h postoperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.145, P = 5.66 × 10-10) and the two SNPs and weight were retained as independent predictors of perioperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.185, P = 1.99 × 10-15). Simple linear regression analyses showed that the predicted values were retained as an independent predictor of actual 24-h postoperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.033, P = 0.030) and perioperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.100, P = 1.09 × 10-4), respectively. Conclusions We

  18. Meta-Analyses of Microarray Datasets Identifies ANO1 and FADD as Prognostic Markers of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ram Bhupal; Bhat, Anupama Rajan; James, Bonney Lee; Govindan, Sindhu Valiyaveedan; Mathew, Rohit; Ravindra, D R; Hedne, Naveen; Illiayaraja, Jeyaram; Kekatpure, Vikram; Khora, Samanta S; Hicks, Wesley; Tata, Pramila; Kuriakose, Moni A; Suresh, Amritha

    2016-01-01

    The head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) transcriptome has been profiled extensively, nevertheless, identifying biomarkers that are clinically relevant and thereby with translational benefit, has been a major challenge. The objective of this study was to use a meta-analysis based approach to catalog candidate biomarkers with high potential for clinical application in HNSCC. Data from publically available microarray series (N = 20) profiled using Agilent (4X44K G4112F) and Affymetrix (HGU133A, U133A_2, U133Plus 2) platforms was downloaded and analyzed in a platform/chip-specific manner (GeneSpring software v12.5, Agilent, USA). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and clustering analysis was carried out iteratively for segregating outliers; 140 normal and 277 tumor samples from 15 series were included in the final analysis. The analyses identified 181 differentially expressed, concordant and statistically significant genes; STRING analysis revealed interactions between 122 of them, with two major gene clusters connected by multiple nodes (MYC, FOS and HSPA4). Validation in the HNSCC-specific database (N = 528) in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) identified a panel (ECT2, ANO1, TP63, FADD, EXT1, NCBP2) that was altered in 30% of the samples. Validation in treatment naïve (Group I; N = 12) and post treatment (Group II; N = 12) patients identified 8 genes significantly associated with the disease (Area under curve>0.6). Correlation with recurrence/re-recurrence showed ANO1 had highest efficacy (sensitivity: 0.8, specificity: 0.6) to predict failure in Group I. UBE2V2, PLAC8, FADD and TTK showed high sensitivity (1.00) in Group I while UBE2V2 and CRYM were highly sensitive (>0.8) in predicting re-recurrence in Group II. Further, TCGA analysis showed that ANO1 and FADD, located at 11q13, were co-expressed at transcript level and significantly associated with overall and disease-free survival (p<0.05). The meta-analysis approach adopted in this study has identified

  19. Meta-Analyses of Microarray Datasets Identifies ANO1 and FADD as Prognostic Markers of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ram Bhupal; Bhat, Anupama Rajan; James, Bonney Lee; Govindan, Sindhu Valiyaveedan; Mathew, Rohit; DR, Ravindra; Hedne, Naveen; Illiayaraja, Jeyaram; Kekatpure, Vikram; Khora, Samanta S.; Hicks, Wesley; Tata, Pramila; Kuriakose, Moni A.; Suresh, Amritha

    2016-01-01

    The head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) transcriptome has been profiled extensively, nevertheless, identifying biomarkers that are clinically relevant and thereby with translational benefit, has been a major challenge. The objective of this study was to use a meta-analysis based approach to catalog candidate biomarkers with high potential for clinical application in HNSCC. Data from publically available microarray series (N = 20) profiled using Agilent (4X44K G4112F) and Affymetrix (HGU133A, U133A_2, U133Plus 2) platforms was downloaded and analyzed in a platform/chip-specific manner (GeneSpring software v12.5, Agilent, USA). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and clustering analysis was carried out iteratively for segregating outliers; 140 normal and 277 tumor samples from 15 series were included in the final analysis. The analyses identified 181 differentially expressed, concordant and statistically significant genes; STRING analysis revealed interactions between 122 of them, with two major gene clusters connected by multiple nodes (MYC, FOS and HSPA4). Validation in the HNSCC-specific database (N = 528) in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) identified a panel (ECT2, ANO1, TP63, FADD, EXT1, NCBP2) that was altered in 30% of the samples. Validation in treatment naïve (Group I; N = 12) and post treatment (Group II; N = 12) patients identified 8 genes significantly associated with the disease (Area under curve>0.6). Correlation with recurrence/re-recurrence showed ANO1 had highest efficacy (sensitivity: 0.8, specificity: 0.6) to predict failure in Group I. UBE2V2, PLAC8, FADD and TTK showed high sensitivity (1.00) in Group I while UBE2V2 and CRYM were highly sensitive (>0.8) in predicting re-recurrence in Group II. Further, TCGA analysis showed that ANO1 and FADD, located at 11q13, were co-expressed at transcript level and significantly associated with overall and disease-free survival (p<0.05). The meta-analysis approach adopted in this study has identified

  20. Meta-Analyses of the 5-HTTLPR Polymorphisms and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Escámez, Teresa; Koenen, Karestan C.; Alonso, Jordi; Sánchez-Meca, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Objective To conduct a meta-analysis of all published genetic association studies of 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms performed in PTSD cases Methods Data Sources Potential studies were identified through PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science databases (Web of Knowledge, WoK), PsychINFO, PsychArticles and HuGeNet (Human Genome Epidemiology Network) up until December 2011. Study Selection: Published observational studies reporting genotype or allele frequencies of this genetic factor in PTSD cases and in non-PTSD controls were all considered eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. Data Extraction: Two reviewers selected studies for possible inclusion and extracted data independently following a standardized protocol. Statistical analysis: A biallelic and a triallelic meta-analysis, including the total S and S' frequencies, the dominant (S+/LL and S'+/L'L') and the recessive model (SS/L+ and S'S'/L'+), was performed with a random-effect model to calculate the pooled OR and its corresponding 95% CI. Forest plots and Cochran's Q-Statistic and I2 index were calculated to check for heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression were carried out to analyze potential moderators. Publication bias and quality of reporting were also analyzed. Results 13 studies met our inclusion criteria, providing a total sample of 1874 patients with PTSD and 7785 controls in the biallelic meta-analyses and 627 and 3524, respectively, in the triallelic. None of the meta-analyses showed evidence of an association between 5-HTTLPR and PTSD but several characteristics (exposure to the same principal stressor for PTSD cases and controls, adjustment for potential confounding variables, blind assessment, study design, type of PTSD, ethnic distribution and Total Quality Score) influenced the results in subgroup analyses and meta-regression. There was no evidence of potential publication bias. Conclusions Current evidence does not support a direct effect of 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms on PTSD

  1. The Application and Performance of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Population Genetic Analyses of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Brad Steven; Bayles, Darrell O.; Wanner, Kevin W.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Hellmich, Richard L.; Sappington, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite markers are difficult to apply within lepidopteran studies due to the lack of locus-specific PCR amplification and the high proportion of “null” alleles, such that erroneous estimations of population genetic parameters often result. Herein single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are developed from Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) using next generation expressed sequence tag (EST) data. A total of 2742 SNPs were predicted within a reference assembly of 7414 EST contigs, and a subset of 763 were incorporated into 24 multiplex PCR reactions. To validate this pipeline, 5 European and North American sample sites were genotyped at 178 SNP loci, which indicated 84 (47.2%) were in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Locus-by-locus FST, analysis of molecular variance, and STRUCTURE analyses indicate significant genetic differentiation may exist between European and North American O. nubilalis. The observed genetic diversity was significantly lower among European sites, which may result from genetic drift, natural selection, a genetic bottleneck, or ascertainment bias due to North American origin of EST sequence data. SNPs are an abundant source of mutation data for molecular genetic marker development in non-model species, with shared ancestral SNPs showing application within closely related species. These markers offer advantages over microsatellite markers for genetic and genomic analyses of Lepidoptera, but the source of mutation data may affect the estimation of population parameters and likely need to be considered in the interpretation of empirical data. PMID:22303334

  2. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations. PMID:26865278

  3. Polymorphisms in the XPC gene affect urinary bladder cancer risk: a case-control study, meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sankhwar, Monica; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Bansal, Sandeep Kumar; Gupta, Gopal; Rajender, Singh

    2016-01-01

    Compromised activity of the DNA repair enzymes may raise the risk of a number of cancers. We analyzed polymorphisms in the Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group C (XPC) gene for their correlation with urinary bladder cancer. Ala499Val and Lys939Gln polymorphisms were genotyped in 234 urinary bladder cancer cases and 258 control samples. A significant association between Ala499Val polymorphism and bladder cancer was observed (OR = 1.78, CI = 1.19–2.66, p = 0.005); however, Lys939Gln was unrelated (OR = 0.97, CI = 0.65–1.45, P = 0.89). Further analysis revealed that Ala499Val was a significant risk factor only in the presence of smoking (OR = 2.23, CI = 1.28–3.87, p < 0.004) or tobacco chewing (OR = 2.40, CI = 1.43–4.04, p = 0.0008). To further appraise the association, we undertook meta-analyses on seven studies (2893 cases and 3056 controls) on Ala499Val polymorphism and eleven studies (5064 cases and 5208 controls) on Lys939Gln polymorphism. Meta-analyses corroborated the above results, showing strong association of Ala499Val (OR = 1.54, CI = 1.21–1.97, p = 0.001) but not that of Lys939Gln (OR = 1.13, CI = 0.95–1.34, p = 0.171) with urinary bladder cancer risk. In conclusion, XPC Ala499Val substitution increases urinary bladder cancer risk, but Lys939Gln appears to be neutral. PMID:27246180

  4. Polymorphisms in the XPC gene affect urinary bladder cancer risk: a case-control study, meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    PubMed

    Sankhwar, Monica; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Bansal, Sandeep Kumar; Gupta, Gopal; Rajender, Singh

    2016-01-01

    Compromised activity of the DNA repair enzymes may raise the risk of a number of cancers. We analyzed polymorphisms in the Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group C (XPC) gene for their correlation with urinary bladder cancer. Ala499Val and Lys939Gln polymorphisms were genotyped in 234 urinary bladder cancer cases and 258 control samples. A significant association between Ala499Val polymorphism and bladder cancer was observed (OR = 1.78, CI = 1.19-2.66, p = 0.005); however, Lys939Gln was unrelated (OR = 0.97, CI = 0.65-1.45, P = 0.89). Further analysis revealed that Ala499Val was a significant risk factor only in the presence of smoking (OR = 2.23, CI = 1.28-3.87, p < 0.004) or tobacco chewing (OR = 2.40, CI = 1.43-4.04, p = 0.0008). To further appraise the association, we undertook meta-analyses on seven studies (2893 cases and 3056 controls) on Ala499Val polymorphism and eleven studies (5064 cases and 5208 controls) on Lys939Gln polymorphism. Meta-analyses corroborated the above results, showing strong association of Ala499Val (OR = 1.54, CI = 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001) but not that of Lys939Gln (OR = 1.13, CI = 0.95-1.34, p = 0.171) with urinary bladder cancer risk. In conclusion, XPC Ala499Val substitution increases urinary bladder cancer risk, but Lys939Gln appears to be neutral. PMID:27246180

  5. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance

    PubMed Central

    D’Ursi, Pasqualina; Milanesi, Luciano; Di Canito, Alessandra; Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Fedi, Stefano; Presentato, Alessandro; Zannoni, Davide; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and environmental decontamination

  6. DNA microarray analyses of the long-term adaptive response of Escherichia coli to acetate and propionate.

    PubMed

    Polen, T; Rittmann, D; Wendisch, V F; Sahm, H

    2003-03-01

    In its natural environment, Escherichia coli is exposed to short-chain fatty acids, such as acetic acid or propionic acid, which can be utilized as carbon sources but which inhibit growth at higher concentrations. DNA microarray experiments revealed expression changes during exponential growth on complex medium due to the presence of sodium acetate or sodium propionate at a neutral external pH. The adaptive responses to acetate and propionate were similar and involved genes in three categories. First, the RNA levels for chemotaxis and flagellum genes increased. Accordingly, the expression of chromosomal fliC'-'lacZ and flhDC'-'lacZ fusions and swimming motility increased after adaptation to acetate or propionate. Second, the expression of many genes that are involved in the uptake and utilization of carbon sources decreased, indicating some kind of catabolite repression by acetate and propionate. Third, the expression of some genes of the general stress response increased, but the increases were more pronounced after short-term exposure for this response than for the adaptive response. Adaptation to propionate but not to acetate involved increased expression of threonine and isoleucine biosynthetic genes. The gene expression changes after adaptation to acetate or propionate were not caused solely by uncoupling or osmotic effects but represented specific characteristics of the long-term response of E. coli to either compound. PMID:12620868

  7. Transcriptional response of Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01 to growth on alkanes: insights from RT-qPCR and microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Herath, Anjumala; Wawrik, Boris; Qin, Yujia; Zhou, Jizhong; Callaghan, Amy V

    2016-05-01

    Microbial transformation of n-alkanes in anaerobic ecosystems plays a pivotal role in biogeochemical carbon cycling and bioremediation, but the requisite genetic machinery is not well elucidated.Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01 utilizes n-alkanes (C13 to C18) and contains two genomic loci encoding alkylsuccinate synthase (ASS) gene clusters. ASS catalyzes alkane addition to fumarate to form methylalkylsuccinic acids. We hypothesized that the genes in the two clusters would be differentially expressed depending on the alkane substrate utilized for growth. RT-qPCR was used to investigate ass-gene expression across AK-01's known substrate range, and microarray-based transcriptomic analysis served to investigate whole-cell responses to growth on n-hexadecane versus hexadecanoate. RT-qPCR revealed induction of ass gene cluster 1 during growth on all tested alkane substrates, and the transcriptional start sites in cluster 1 were determined via 5'RACE. Induction of ass gene cluster 2 was not observed under the tested conditions. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that the upregulation of genes potentially involved in methylalkylsuccinate metabolism, including methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and a putative carboxyl transferase. These findings provide new directions for studying the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in alkane addition to fumarate, fumarate recycling and the processing of methylalkylsuccinates with regard to isolates, enrichment cultures and ecological datasets. PMID:27009900

  8. Differential Gene Expression from Genome-Wide Microarray Analyses Distinguishes Lohmann Selected Leghorn and Lohmann Brown Layers

    PubMed Central

    Habig, Christin; Geffers, Robert; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    The Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB) layer lines have been selected for high egg production since more than 50 years and belong to the worldwide leading commercial layer lines. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the molecular processes that are different among these two layer lines using whole genome RNA expression profiles. The hens were kept in the newly developed small group housing system Eurovent German with two different group sizes. Differential expression was observed for 6,276 microarray probes (FDR adjusted P-value <0.05) among the two layer lines LSL and LB. A 2-fold or greater change in gene expression was identified on 151 probe sets. In LSL, 72 of the 151 probe sets were up- and 79 of them were down-regulated. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis accounting for biological processes evinced 18 GO-terms for the 72 probe sets with higher expression in LSL, especially those taking part in immune system processes and membrane organization. A total of 32 enriched GO-terms were determined among the 79 down-regulated probe sets of LSL. Particularly, these terms included phosphorus metabolic processes and signaling pathways. In conclusion, the phenotypic differences among the two layer lines LSL and LB are clearly reflected in their gene expression profiles of the cerebrum. These novel findings provide clues for genes involved in economically important line characteristics of commercial laying hens. PMID:23056453

  9. Genetic Associations with Diabetes: Meta-Analyses of 10 Candidate Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinwen; Xu, Leiting; Bu, Shizhong; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Cheng; Ye, Huadan; Xu, Xuting; Liu, Qiong; Ye, Meng; Mai, Yifeng; Duan, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    Aims The goal of our study is to investigate the combined contribution of 10 genetic variants to diabetes susceptibility. Methods Bibliographic databases were searched from 1970 to Dec 2012 for studies that reported on genetic association study of diabetes. After a comprehensive filtering procedure, 10 candidate gene variants with informative genotype information were collected for the current meta-anlayses. Using the REVMAN software, odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the combined contribution of the selected genetic variants to diabetes. Results A total of 37 articles among 37,033 cases and 54,716 controls were involved in the present meta-analyses of 10 genetic variants. Three variants were found to be significantly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D): NLRP1 rs12150220 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.55–0.92, P = 0.01), IL2RA rs11594656 (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.82–0.91, P<0.00001), and CLEC16A rs725613 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.55–0.92, P = 0.01). APOA5 −1131T/C polymorphism was shown to be significantly associated with of type 2 diabetes (T2D, OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.03–1.57, P = 0.03). No association with diabetes was showed in the meta-analyses of other six genetic variants, including SLC2A10 rs2335491, ATF6 rs2070150, KLF11 rs35927125, CASQ1 rs2275703, GNB3 C825T, and IL12B 1188A/C. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that IL2RA rs11594656 and CLEC16A rs725613 are protective factors of T1D, while NLRP1 rs12150220 and APOA5 −1131T/C are risky factors of T1D and T2D, respectively. PMID:23922971

  10. Discovery of Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide-Regulated Genes through Microarray Analyses in Cell Culture and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, Lee E.; Samal, Babru; Gerdin, Matthew J.; Mustafa, Tomris; Vaudry, David; Stroth, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an evolutionarily well conserved neuropeptide with multiple functions in the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. PACAP provides neuroprotection from ischemia and toxin exposure, is anti-inflammatory in gastric inflammatory disease and sepsis, controls proliferative signaling pathways involved in neural cell transformation, and modulates glucohomeostasis. PACAP-based, disease-targeted therapeutics might thus be both effective and benign, enhancing homeostatic responses to behavioral, metabolic, oncogenic, and inflammatory stressors. PACAP signal transduction employs synergistic regulation of calcium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and noncanonical activation of both calcium- and cAMP-dependent processes. Pharmacological activation of PACAP signaling should consequently have highly specific effects even in vivo. Here, a combined cellular biochemical, pharmacologic, transcriptomic, and bioinformatic approach to understanding PACAP signal transduction by identifying PACAP target genes with oligonucleotide- and cDNA-based microarray is described. Calcium- and cAMP-dependent PACAP signaling pathways for regulation of genes encoding proteins required for neuritogenesis, changes in cell morphology, and cell survival have been traced in PC12 cells. Pharmacological experiments have linked gene expression to cell physiological responses in this system, in which gene silencing can also be employed to confirm the functional significance of induction of specific transcripts. Differential transcriptional responses to metabolic, ischemic, and other stressors in wild type compared to PACAP-deficient mice establish in principle which PACAP-responsive transcripts in culture are PACAP-dependent in vivo. Bioinformatic approaches aid in creating a pipeline for identifying neuropeptide-regulated genes, validating their cellular functions, and defining their expression in the context of neuropeptide signaling

  11. Studies on the molecular pathogenesis of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma-cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and cDNA microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Helene; Meis-Kindblom, Jeanne M; Orndal, Charlotte; Bergh, Peter; Ptaszynski, Konrad; Aman, Pierre; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Stenman, Göran

    2003-03-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas (EMCs) are characterized by recurrent chromosome translocations resulting in fusions of the nuclear receptor TEC to various NH(2)-terminal partners. Here we describe the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic characteristics of a series of 10 EMCs. Using spectral karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization, clonal chromosome abnormalities were detected in all but one tumor. A t(9;22)(q22;q12) translocation was found in three cases; a del(22)(q12-13)in one case; and variant translocations, including t(9;17)(q22;q11-12), t(7;9;17)(q32;q22;q11), and t(9;15)(q22;q21), were detected in one case each. Recurrent, secondary abnormalities, including trisomy 1q, 7, 8, 12, and 19, were found in seven tumors. All tumors contained translocation-generated or cryptic gene fusions, including EWS-TEC (five cases, of which one was a novel fusion), TAF2N-TEC (four cases), and TCF12-TEC (one case). cDNA microarray analysis of the gene expression patterns of two EMCs and a myxoid liposarcoma reference tumor revealed a remarkably distinct and uniform expression profile in both EMCs despite the fact that they had different histologies and expressed different fusion transcripts. The most differentially expressed gene in both tumors was CHI3L1, which encodes a secreted glycoprotein (YKL-40) previously implicated in various pathological conditions of extracellular matrix degradation as well as in cancer. Our findings suggests that EMC exhibits a tumor-specific gene expression profile, including overexpression of several cancer-related genes as well as genes implicated in chondrogenesis and neural-neuroendocrine differentiation, thus distinguishing it from other soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:12598313

  12. [Kohonen network study of the results of RAPD and ISSR analyses of genomic polymorphism in the genus Capsicum L].

    PubMed

    Ruanet, V V; Kochieva, E Z; Ryzhova, N N

    2005-02-01

    The results of studies based on multilocus molecular analyses, including random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses, are usually presented in the form of images (electrophoregrams, photographs, etc.). The interpretation of this information is complicated, labor-consuming, and subjective. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), which are ideal "image processors," may be useful when solving such tasks. The possibility of using ANNs for the treatment of the results of RAPD and ISSR analyses has been studied. The RAPD and ISSR spectra have been studied in fragments of DNA of plants from the genus Capsicum L. (peppers). The results of clustering the accessions studied by means of the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA), which is often used for phylogenetic constructions based on RAPD and ISSR data, serve as expert estimates. Fundamentally new methods of genetic polymorphism estimation using ANN technologies, namely, self-organizing feature maps (SOFMs) have been developed. The results show that the clusters obtained with the use of UPGMA and SOFM coincide by more than 90%; taking into account that ANNs can deal with high noise levels and incomplete or contradictory data, the approach proposed may prove to be efficient. PMID:15810617

  13. Selecting a Maximally Informative Set of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms for Association Analyses Using Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Christopher S.; Eberle, Michael A.; Rieder, Mark J.; Yi, Qian; Kruglyak, Leonid; Nickerson, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Common genetic polymorphisms may explain a portion of the heritable risk for common diseases. Within candidate genes, the number of common polymorphisms is finite, but direct assay of all existing common polymorphism is inefficient, because genotypes at many of these sites are strongly correlated. Thus, it is not necessary to assay all common variants if the patterns of allelic association between common variants can be described. We have developed an algorithm to select the maximally informative set of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) to assay in candidate-gene association studies, such that all known common polymorphisms either are directly assayed or exceed a threshold level of association with a tagSNP. The algorithm is based on the r2 linkage disequilibrium (LD) statistic, because r2 is directly related to statistical power to detect disease associations with unassayed sites. We show that, at a relatively stringent r2 threshold (r2>0.8), the LD-selected tagSNPs resolve >80% of all haplotypes across a set of 100 candidate genes, regardless of recombination, and tag specific haplotypes and clades of related haplotypes in nonrecombinant regions. Thus, if the patterns of common variation are described for a candidate gene, analysis of the tagSNP set can comprehensively interrogate for main effects from common functional variation. We demonstrate that, although common variation tends to be shared between populations, tagSNPs should be selected separately for populations with different ancestries. PMID:14681826

  14. Association analyses of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms on reproductive traits in swine.

    PubMed

    Rempel, L A; Nonneman, D J; Wise, T H; Erkens, T; Peelman, L J; Rohrer, G A

    2010-01-01

    The ability to identify young females with superior reproduction would have a large economic impact on commercial swine production. Previous studies have discovered SNP associated with economically important traits such as litter size, growth rate, and feed intake. The objective of this study was to test for association of candidate SNP with sow prolificacy reproductive traits in gilts of a Landrace-Duroc-Yorkshire composite population. Association analyses regressed additive (A), dominant (D), and imprinting (I) SNP effects on each trait with an animal model. A carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A SNP and a glycogen synthase 1 SNP were associated with age at puberty (AP; D = 10 d; P = 0. 0037 and A = 3.8 d; P = 0.0078, respectively). Four IGF2 SNP were associated with AP as well, having additive or dominant effects (3.2 to 5.8 d; P < or = 0.0052). Two mannosidase 2B2 SNP and 2 prolactin receptor (PRLR) SNP were also associated with AP. Solute carrier 22, subfamily member 5 SNP was weakly associated with AP (D = 3.9 d; P < 0.10). Polymorphisms within glycogen synthase 1 and protein kinase AMP-activated, gamma 3 noncatalytic subunit had associations with ovulation rate. Estrogen receptor (ESR) 1, ESR2, PPAR gamma coactivator 1, and IGFBP3 SNP were significantly associated with weaning-to-estrus interval. Two PRLR SNP were associated with total number of piglets born (A = 0.57 piglets; P = 0.0095 and D = 0.61 piglets; P = 0.0016, respectively). A SNP within PRLR was also associated with number of piglets born alive (D = 0.61; P = 0.0016). The PPAR gamma coactivator 1 SNP was associated with total number of piglets born (D = 0.38 piglets; P = 0.0391) and number of piglets born alive (D = 0.53 piglets; P = 0.0032). The SNP within ESR1 (A = 0.65 piglets; P = 0.0950), ESR2 (A = -0.33 piglets; P = 0.0176), IGF2 SNP (A = -0.26 piglets; P = 0.0032), and IGFBP3 SNP (D = 0.35 piglets; P = 0.0683) were associated with number of piglets born dead. A leptin SNP was associated with

  15. Genetic lineages of undifferentiated-type gastric carcinomas analysed by unsupervised clustering of genomic DNA microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is suspected that early gastric carcinoma (GC) is a dormant variant that rarely progresses to advanced GC. We demonstrated that the dormant and aggressive variants of tubular adenocarcinomas (TUBs) of the stomach are characterized by loss of MYC and gain of TP53 and gain of MYC and/or loss of TP53, respectively. The aim of this study is to determine whether this is also the case in undifferentiated-type GCs (UGCs) of different genetic lineages: one with a layered structure (LS+), derived from early signet ring cell carcinomas (SIGs), and the other, mostly poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, without LS but with a minor tubular component (TC), dedifferentiated from TUBs (LS−/TC+). Methods Using 29 surgically resected stomachs with 9 intramucosal and 20 invasive UGCs (11 LS+ and 9 LS−/TC+), 63 genomic DNA samples of mucosal and invasive parts and corresponding reference DNAs were prepared from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues with laser microdissection, and were subjected to array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), using 60K microarrays, and subsequent unsupervised, hierarchical clustering. Of 979 cancer-related genes assessed, we selected genes with mean copy numbers significantly different between the two major clusters. Results Based on similarity in genomic copy-number profile, the 63 samples were classified into two major clusters. Clusters A and B, which were rich in LS+ UGC and LS−/TC+ UGC, respectively, were discriminated on the basis of 40 genes. The aggressive pattern was more frequently detected in LS−/TC+ UGCs, (20/26; 77%), than in LS+UGCs (17/37; 46%; P = 0.0195), whereas no dormant pattern was detected in any of the UGC samples. Conclusions In contrast to TUBs, copy number alterations of MYC and TP53 exhibited an aggressive pattern in LS+ SIG at early and advanced stages, indicating that early LS+ UGCs inevitably progress to an advanced GC. Cluster B (enriched in LS−/TC+) exhibited more

  16. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  17. Utilising the left-helical conformation of L-DNA for analysing different marker types on a single universal microarray platform

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Martinez, Rafael; Jacob, Anette; Rupp, Steffen; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Matysiak, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    L-DNA is the perfect mirror-image form of the naturally occurring d-conformation of DNA. Therefore, L-DNA duplexes have the same physical characteristics in terms of solubility, duplex stability and selectivity as D-DNA but form a left-helical double-helix. Because of its chiral difference, L-DNA does not bind to its naturally occurring D-DNA counterpart, however. We analysed some of the properties that are typical for L-DNA. For all the differences, L-DNA is chemically compatible with the D-form of DNA, so that chimeric molecules can be synthesized. We take advantage of the characteristics of L-DNA toward the establishment of a universal microarray that permits the analysis of different kinds of molecular diagnostic information in a single experiment on a single platform, in various combinations. Typical results for the measurement of transcript level variations, genotypic differences and DNA–protein interactions are presented. However, on the basis of the characteristic features of L-DNA, also other applications of this molecule type are discussed. PMID:16990248

  18. Methodologies and experimental platforms for generating and analysing microarray and mass spectrometry-based omics data to support P4 medicine.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro H; Agapito, Giuseppe; Milano, Marianna; Cannataro, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine is an emerging medical model that is based on the customization of all medical aspects (i.e. practices, drugs, decisions) of the individual patient. P4 medicine presupposes the elucidation of the so-called omic world, under the assumption that this knowledge may explain differences of patients with respect to disease prevention, diagnosis and therapies. Here, we elucidate the role of some selected omics sciences for different aspects of disease management, such as early diagnosis of diseases, prevention of diseases, selection of personalized appropriate and optimal therapies based on molecular profiling of patients. After introducing basic concepts of P4 medicine and omics sciences, we review some computational tools and approaches for analysing selected omics data, with a special focus on microarray and mass spectrometry data, which may be used to support P4 medicine. Some applications of biomarker discovery and pharmacogenomics and some experiences on the study of drug reactions are also described. PMID:26351205

  19. Identification of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-transcription factors by microarray and knockdown analyses, and signature molecule-marked MSC in bone marrow by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Masakazu; Taya, Yuji; Kawamoto, Takeshi; Michida, Masahiko; Kaneko, Emi; Igarashi, Akira; Nishimura, Masahiro; Segoshi, Kazumi; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Tsuji, Koichiro; Aoba, Takaaki; Kato, Yukio

    2009-03-01

    Although ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used in numerous studies, the molecular signature and in vivo distribution status of MSC remain unknown. To address this matter, we identified numerous human MSC-characteristic genes--including nine transcription factor genes--using DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses: Most of the MSC-characteristic genes were down-regulated 24 h after incubation with osteogenesis-, chondrogenesis- or adipogenesis-induction medium, or 48-72 h after knockdown of the nine transcription factors. Furthermore, knockdowns of ETV1, ETV5, FOXP1, GATA6, HMGA2, SIM2 or SOX11 suppressed the self-renewal capacity of MSC, whereas those of FOXP1, SOX11, ETV1, SIM2 or PRDM16 reduced the osteogenic- and/or adipogenic potential. In addition, immunohistochemistry using antibodies for the MSC characteristic molecules--including GATA6, TRPC4, FLG and TGM2--revealed that MSC-like cells were present near the endosteum and in the interior of bone marrow of adult mice. These findings indicate that MSC synthesize a set of MSC markers in vitro and in vivo, and that MSC-characteristic transcription factors are involved in MSC stemness regulation. PMID:19228201

  20. Molecular epidemiologic investigations of Mycoplasma gallisepticum conjunctivitis in songbirds by random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Ley, D H; Berkhoff, J E; Levisohn, S

    1997-01-01

    An ongoing outbreak of conjunctivitis in free-ranging house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) began in 1994 in the eastern United States. Bacterial organisms identified as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) were isolated from lesions of infected birds. MG was also isolated from a blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) that contracted conjunctivitis after being housed in a cage previously occupied by house finches with conjunctivitis, and from free-ranging American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis) in North Carolina in 1996. To investigate the molecular epidemiology of this outbreak, we produced DNA fingerprints of MG isolates by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). We compared MG isolates from songbirds examined from 1994 through 1996 in 11 states, representing three host species, with vaccine and reference strains and with contemporary MG isolates from commercial poultry. All MG isolates from songbirds had RAPD banding patterns identical to each other but different from other strains and isolates tested. These results indicate that the outbreak of MG in songbirds is caused by the same strain, which suggests a single source; the outbreak is not caused by the vaccine or reference strains analyzed; and MG infection has not been shared between songbirds and commercial poultry. PMID:9284386

  1. Gaucher Disease: Transcriptome Analyses Using Microarray or mRNA Sequencing in a Gba1 Mutant Mouse Model Treated with Velaglucerase alfa or Imiglucerase

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sunghee; Sun, Ying; Jia, Li; Keddache, Mehdi; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease type 1, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in GBA1 leading to defective glucocerebrosidase (GCase) function and consequent excess accumulation of glucosylceramide/glucosylsphingosine in visceral organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with the biosimilars, imiglucerase (imig) or velaglucerase alfa (vela) improves/reverses the visceral disease. Comparative transcriptomic effects (microarray and mRNA-Seq) of no ERT and ERT (imig or vela) were done with liver, lung, and spleen from mice having Gba1 mutant alleles, termed D409V/null. Disease-related molecular effects, dynamic ranges, and sensitivities were compared between mRNA-Seq and microarrays and their respective analytic tools, i.e. Mixed Model ANOVA (microarray), and DESeq and edgeR (mRNA-Seq). While similar gene expression patterns were observed with both platforms, mRNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (∼3-fold) than the microarrays. Among the three analytic tools, DESeq identified the maximum number of DEGs for all tissues and treatments. DESeq and edgeR comparisons revealed differences in DEGs identified. In 9V/null liver, spleen and lung, post-therapy transcriptomes approximated WT, were partially reverted, and had little change, respectively, and were concordant with the corresponding histological and biochemical findings. DEG overlaps were only 8–20% between mRNA-Seq and microarray, but the biological pathways were similar. Cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, heme metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction were most altered with the Gaucher disease process. Imig and vela differentially affected specific disease pathways. Differential molecular responses were observed in direct transcriptome comparisons from imig- and vela-treated tissues. These results provide cross-validation for the mRNA-Seq and microarray platforms, and show differences between the molecular effects of two highly structurally similar ERT biopharmaceuticals

  2. Bridging the Gap Between Large-scale Data Sets and Analyses: Semi-automated Methods to Facilitate Length Polymorphism Scoring and Data Analyses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers can be developed more quickly and at a lower cost than microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism markers, which makes them ideal markers for large-scale studies of understudied taxa — such as species at risk. However,...

  3. Meta-Analyses of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Activity, Gene Ala-9Val Polymorphism, and the Risk of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-Fang; Cao, Bing; Xu, Mei-Yan; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Yan, Lai-Lai; Liu, Rong; Wang, Jing-Yu; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Schizophrenia is a complex and disabling psychiatric disorder, and tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a severe adverse drug effect occurring in 20% to 40% of schizophrenic patients chronically treated with typical neuroleptics. Previous studies suggested that the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity was associated with the development of schizophrenia. Ala-9Val polymorphism, a functional polymorphism of MnSOD gene, has been reported to be related to the risk of schizophrenia and TD. However, these studies did not lead to consistent results. We performed meta-analyses aiming to assess the association between MnSOD activity and schizophrenia, as well as the association of MnSOD Ala-9Val polymorphism with schizophrenia and TD in schizophrenic patients. We search for the literature on MnSOD and schizophrenia in English or Chinese published up to May 1, 2015 on PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Databases, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medical and Wanfang databases. Two investigators independently reviewed retrieved literature and evaluated eligibility. Discrepancy was resolved by consensus with a third reviewer. Data were pooled using fixed-effect or random-effect models. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for the MnSOD activity. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI were calculated for Ala-9Val genotype and allele frequencies. There were 6, 6, and 10 studies entering 3 parts of meta-analyses, respectively. The MnSOD activity of patients was significantly lower than that of controls (SMD = −0.94; 95% CI: −1.76, −0.12; P = 0.025). No significant associations of Ala-9Val genotypes (OR = 1.14; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.33; P = 0.109) and alleles (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.20; P = 0.361) with the risk of schizophrenia were observed. We also did not reveal significant associations of the genotypes (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.02; P = 0.075) and alleles (OR = 0

  4. Development of a universal microarray based on the ligation detection reaction and 16S rrna gene polymorphism to target diversity of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Bianca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Frosini, Andrea; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rajaniemi, Pirjo; Rantala, Anne; Mugnai, Maria Angela; Ventura, Stefano; Wilmotte, Annick; Boutte, Christophe; Grubisic, Stana; Balthasart, Pierre; Consolandi, Clarissa; Bordoni, Roberta; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2004-12-01

    The cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes of significant ecological and biotechnological interest, since they strongly contribute to primary production and are a rich source of bioactive compounds. In eutrophic fresh and brackish waters, their mass occurrences (water blooms) are often toxic and constitute a high potential risk for human health. Therefore, rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacterial species in complex environmental samples is important. Here we describe the development and validation of a microarray for the identification of cyanobacteria in aquatic environments. Our approach is based on the use of a ligation detection reaction coupled to a universal array. Probes were designed for detecting 19 cyanobacterial groups including Anabaena/Aphanizomenon, Calothrix, Cylindrospermopsis, Cylindrospermum, Gloeothece, halotolerants, Leptolyngbya, Palau Lyngbya, Microcystis, Nodularia, Nostoc, Planktothrix, Antarctic Phormidium, Prochlorococcus, Spirulina, Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Trichodesmium, and Woronichinia. These groups were identified based on an alignment of over 300 cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences. For validation of the microarrays, 95 samples (24 axenic strains from culture collections, 27 isolated strains, and 44 cloned fragments recovered from environmental samples) were tested. The results demonstrated a high discriminative power and sensitivity to 1 fmol of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. Accurate identification of target strains was also achieved with unbalanced mixes of PCR amplicons from different cyanobacteria and an environmental sample. Our universal array method shows great potential for rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacteria. It can be easily adapted to future development and could thus be applied both in research and environmental monitoring. PMID:15574913

  5. Analyses of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) indicate rapid radiation of Diospyros species (Ebenaceae) endemic to New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation in some plant groups has occurred on islands and due to the characteristic rapid pace of phenotypic evolution, standard molecular markers often provide insufficient variation for phylogenetic reconstruction. To resolve relationships within a clade of 21 closely related New Caledonian Diospyros species and evaluate species boundaries we analysed genome-wide DNA variation via amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP). Results A neighbour-joining (NJ) dendrogram based on Dice distances shows all species except D. minimifolia, D. parviflora and D. vieillardii to form unique clusters of genetically similar accessions. However, there was little variation between these species clusters, resulting in unresolved species relationships and a star-like general NJ topology. Correspondingly, analyses of molecular variance showed more variation within species than between them. A Bayesian analysis with BEAST produced a similar result. Another Bayesian method, this time a clustering method, Structure, demonstrated the presence of two groups, highly congruent with those observed in a principal coordinate analysis (PCO). Molecular divergence between the two groups is low and does not correspond to any hypothesised taxonomic, ecological or geographical patterns. Conclusions We hypothesise that such a pattern could have been produced by rapid and complex evolution involving a widespread progenitor for which an initial split into two groups was followed by subsequent fragmentation into many diverging populations, which was followed by range expansion of then divergent entities. Overall, this process resulted in an opportunistic pattern of phenotypic diversification. The time since divergence was probably insufficient for some species to become genetically well-differentiated, resulting in progenitor/derivative relationships being exhibited in a few cases. In other cases, our analyses may have revealed evidence for the existence of cryptic species, for which

  6. DNA microarrays in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lau, Kin-Mang

    2002-02-01

    DNA microarray technology provides a means to examine large numbers of molecular changes related to a biological process in a high throughput manner. This review discusses plausible utilities of this technology in prostate cancer research, including definition of prostate cancer predisposition, global profiling of gene expression patterns associated with cancer initiation and progression, identification of new diagnostic and prognostic markers, and discovery of novel patient classification schemes. The technology, at present, has only been explored in a limited fashion in prostate cancer research. Some hurdles to be overcome are the high cost of the technology, insufficient sample size and repeated experiments, and the inadequate use of bioinformatics. With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the advance of several highly complementary technologies, such as laser capture microdissection, unbiased RNA amplification, customized functional arrays (eg, single-nucleotide polymorphism chips), and amenable bioinformatics software, this technology will become widely used by investigators in the field. The large amount of novel, unbiased hypotheses and insights generated by this technology is expected to have a significant impact on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of prostate cancer. Finally, this review emphasizes existing, but currently underutilized, data-mining tools, such as multivariate statistical analyses, neural networking, and machine learning techniques, to stimulate wider usage. PMID:12084220

  7. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  8. Association analyses of FGFR2 gene polymorphisms with femoral neck bone mineral density in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan-Shan; Yang, Tie-Lin; Yan, Han; Rong, Zheng-Qin; Chen, Jia-Bin; Hao, Ruo-Han; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Femoral neck (FN) bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important risk phenotype for osteoporosis and has been used as a reference standard for describing osteoporosis. Identification of genetic variations associated with FN BMD may provide potential targets for therapeutic studies. Given the important biological role of FGFR2 gene involved in bone, we tested the associations between FGFR2 polymorphisms and FN BMD in 1,300 Chinese Han subjects. Of the 28 total SNPs, 2 SNPs, namely rs11200014 and rs1078806, were significantly associated with FN BMD under dominant model (P = 0.0014 and 0.0012, respectively) after conservative Bonferroni correction. The two SNPs were in complete linkage disequilibrium. In addition, haplotype-based association tests identified two haplotypes significantly associated with FN BMD, including one haplotype in block 4 where the two SNPs located. However, different from previous studies in white older men, we did not detect any significant association in sex-stratified analyses. In summary, our findings suggest that the FGFR2 gene may play an important role in variation in FN BMD in Chinese Han population, independent of gender effects. Further studies performed in multiple and large samples are needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism and pathophysiology of osteoporosis. PMID:25300516

  9. DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shinzo; Ishidou, Emi; Kurita, Sakiko; Suzuki, Yoshiteru; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep . E-mail: rakwal-68@aist.go.jp; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2006-07-21

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma ({gamma})-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and {gamma}-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and {gamma}-rays). Similarly, for X- and {gamma}-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and {gamma}-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-a-vis their energy levels.

  10. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  11. Microarrays under the microscope.

    PubMed

    Wildsmith, S E; Elcock, F J

    2001-02-01

    Microarray technology is a rapidly advancing area, which is gaining popularity in many biological disciplines from drug target identification to predictive toxicology. Over the past few years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of methods and techniques available for carrying out this form of gene expression analysis. The techniques and associated peripherals, such as slide types, deposition methods, robotics, and scanning equipment, are undergoing constant improvement, helping to drive the technology forward in terms of robustness and ease of use. These rapid developments, combined with the number of options available and the associated hyperbole, can prove daunting for the new user. This review aims to guide the researcher through the various steps of conducting microarray experiments, from initial strategy to analysing the data, with critical examination of the benefits and disadvantages along the way. PMID:11212888

  12. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 2 associated with deltamethrin detoxification in Drosophila Kc cells by cDNA microarray analysis and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Jiao, Dongxu; Xu, Qin; Ying, Xiaoli; Liu, Wei; Chi, Qingping; Ye, Yuting; Li, Xueyu; Cheng, Luogen

    2016-05-10

    Insecticide deltamethrin resistance has presented a difficult obstacle for pest control and the resistance development is complex and associated with many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM stress, in this study, cDNA microarray analysis was employed. 448 differentially expressed genes with at least a 2-fold expression difference were identified in Drosophila cells after DM exposure. Moreover, some genes were confirmed with qPCR, which yielded results consistent with the microarray analysis. Three members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-stressed cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM detoxification. The proteasome beta2 subunit (Prosbeta2) is a member of 20S proteasome subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. Whether Prosbeta2 participates in DM detoxification requires further study. RNAi and heterologous expression were conducted to investigate the contribution of Prosbeta2 in DM detoxification. The results revealed Prosbeta2 knockdown significantly reduce the level of DM detoxification in RNAi-treated cells after 48 h. Overexpression of Prosbeta2 increased cellular viability. These detoxification results represent the first evidence that Prosbeta2 plays a role in the detoxification of DM, which may provide new idea and target for studying the molecular mechanisms of insect resistance. PMID:26850132

  13. Consensus by Democracy. Using Meta-Analyses of Microarray and Genomic Data to Model the Cold Acclimation Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Catherine; Geisler, Matt; Trygg, Johan; Huner, Norman; Hurry, Vaughan

    2006-01-01

    The whole-genome response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to different types and durations of abiotic stress has now been described by a wealth of publicly available microarray data. When combined with studies of how gene expression is affected in mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis with altered ability to transduce the low temperature signal, these data can be used to test the interactions between various low temperature-associated transcription factors and their regulons. We quantized a collection of Affymetrix microarray data so that each gene in a particular regulon could vote on whether a cis-element found in its promoter conferred induction (+1), repression (−1), or no transcriptional change (0) during cold stress. By statistically comparing these election results with the voting behavior of all genes on the same gene chip, we verified the bioactivity of novel cis-elements and defined whether they were inductive or repressive. Using in silico mutagenesis we identified functional binding consensus variants for the transcription factors studied. Our results suggest that the previously identified ICEr1 (induction of CBF expression region 1) consensus does not correlate with cold gene induction, while the ICEr3/ICEr4 consensuses identified using our algorithms are present in regulons of genes that were induced coordinate with observed ICE1 transcript accumulation and temporally preceding genes containing the dehydration response element. Statistical analysis of overlap and cis-element enrichment in the ICE1, CBF2, ZAT12, HOS9, and PHYA regulons enabled us to construct a regulatory network supported by multiple lines of evidence that can be used for future hypothesis testing. PMID:16896234

  14. Consensus by democracy. Using meta-analyses of microarray and genomic data to model the cold acclimation signaling pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Catherine; Geisler, Matt; Trygg, Johan; Huner, Norman; Hurry, Vaughan

    2006-08-01

    The whole-genome response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to different types and durations of abiotic stress has now been described by a wealth of publicly available microarray data. When combined with studies of how gene expression is affected in mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis with altered ability to transduce the low temperature signal, these data can be used to test the interactions between various low temperature-associated transcription factors and their regulons. We quantized a collection of Affymetrix microarray data so that each gene in a particular regulon could vote on whether a cis-element found in its promoter conferred induction (+1), repression (-1), or no transcriptional change (0) during cold stress. By statistically comparing these election results with the voting behavior of all genes on the same gene chip, we verified the bioactivity of novel cis-elements and defined whether they were inductive or repressive. Using in silico mutagenesis we identified functional binding consensus variants for the transcription factors studied. Our results suggest that the previously identified ICEr1 (induction of CBF expression region 1) consensus does not correlate with cold gene induction, while the ICEr3/ICEr4 consensuses identified using our algorithms are present in regulons of genes that were induced coordinate with observed ICE1 transcript accumulation and temporally preceding genes containing the dehydration response element. Statistical analysis of overlap and cis-element enrichment in the ICE1, CBF2, ZAT12, HOS9, and PHYA regulons enabled us to construct a regulatory network supported by multiple lines of evidence that can be used for future hypothesis testing. PMID:16896234

  15. Aptamer Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  16. [Nucleotide polymorphism in the drought induced transcription factor CBF4 region of Arabidopsis thaliana and its molecular evolution analyses].

    PubMed

    Hao, Gang-Ping; Wu, Zhong-Yi; Cao, Ming-Qing; Pelletier, Georges; Brunel, Dominique; Huang, Cong-Lin; Yang, Qing

    2004-12-01

    Intraspecific nucleotide polymorphism in the drought induced transcription factor CBF4 region of Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed with 17 core accessions growing in different ecoclimate. High density of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and insertion/deletion (Indel) were found, on average 1 SNP per 35.8 bp and 1 Indel per 143 bp. Nucleotide polymorphism in non-coding region was three times higher than that in coding region. In coding region of CBF4, SNP frequency is one SNP per 96.4 bp, one nonsynonymous mutation was detected from 25 av, 203 av and 244 av accessions, which is the 205th site amino acid variation: gly <--> val caused by the 1034th site (corresponding to 19,696 site nucleotide of GenBank No. AB015478 as 1) nucleotide variation: G <--> T. Statistical result of nucleotide diversity showed that linkage disequilibrium (LD) existed in large-scale region of CBF4 and recombination event was also detected in 5' non-coding region. Identical to the results of other genes of Arabidopsis, different regions of the gene were seemingly under different selective pressures. Balancing selection resulted in high nucleotide diversity in 3' non-coding region, and the neutral mutation hypothesis can explain the DNA polymorphism in coding region, whereas, nature positive selection in the population affected nucleotide variation in 5' non-coding region of gene. PMID:15633649

  17. Clustering Short Time-Series Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Loh Wei; Hasan, Yahya Abu

    2008-01-01

    Most microarray analyses are carried out on static gene expressions. However, the dynamical study of microarrays has lately gained more attention. Most researches on time-series microarray emphasize on the bioscience and medical aspects but few from the numerical aspect. This study attempts to analyze short time-series microarray mathematically using STEM clustering tool which formally preprocess data followed by clustering. We next introduce the Circular Mould Distance (CMD) algorithm with combinations of both preprocessing and clustering analysis. Both methods are subsequently compared in terms of efficiencies.

  18. RNA-Seq and Microarrays Analyses Reveal Global Differential Transcriptomes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R between Bacteroids and Free-Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jieli; Hao, Baohai; Liu, Liu; Wang, Shanming; Ma, Binguang; Yang, Yi; Xie, Fuli; Li, Youguo

    2014-01-01

    Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R occurs either in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its host plant, Astragalus sinicus, or free-living in the soil. The M. huakuii 7653R genome has recently been sequenced. To better understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes that occur in 7653R during bacteroid development, RNA-Seq and Microarrays were used to investigate the differential transcriptomes of 7653R bacteroids and free-living cells. The two approaches identified several thousand differentially expressed genes. The most prominent up-regulation occurred in the symbiosis plasmids, meanwhile gene expression is concentrated to a set of genes (clusters) in bacteroids to fulfill corresponding functional requirements. The results suggested that the main energy metabolism is active while fatty acid metabolism is inactive in bacteroid and that most of genes relevant to cell cycle are down-regulated accordingly. For a global analysis, we reconstructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for 7653R and integrated gene expression data into the network using Cytoscape. A highly inter-connected subnetwork, with function enrichment for nitrogen fixation, was found, and a set of hubs and previously uncharacterized genes participating in nitrogen fixation were identified. The results described here provide a broader biological landscape and novel insights that elucidate rhizobial bacteroid differentiation, nitrogen fixation and related novel gene functions. PMID:24695521

  19. Microarray: an approach for current drug targets.

    PubMed

    Gomase, Virendra S; Tagore, Somnath; Kale, Karbhari V

    2008-03-01

    Microarrays are a powerful tool has multiple applications both in clinical and cellular and molecular biology arenas. Early assessment of the probable biological importance of drug targets, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A list of new drug candidates along with proposed targets for intervention is described. Recent advances in the knowledge of microarrays analysis of organisms and the availability of the genomics sequences provide a wide range of novel targets for drug design. This review gives different process of microarray technologies; methods for comparative gene expression study, applications of microarrays in medicine and pharmacogenomics and current drug targets in research, which are relevant to common diseases as they relate to clinical and future perspectives. PMID:18336225

  20. Small RNA sequencing-microarray analyses in Parkinson leukocytes reveal deep brain stimulation-induced splicing changes that classify brain region transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Salomonis, Nathan; Bronstein, Michal; Greenberg, David S.; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key post transcriptional regulators of their multiple target genes. However, the detailed profile of miRNA expression in Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide and the first motor disorder has not been charted yet. Here, we report comprehensive miRNA profiling by next-generation small-RNA sequencing, combined with targets inspection by splice-junction and exon arrays interrogating leukocyte RNA in Parkinson's disease patients before and after deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment and of matched healthy control volunteers (HC). RNA-Seq analysis identified 254 miRNAs and 79 passenger strand forms as expressed in blood leukocytes, 16 of which were modified in patients pre-treatment as compared to HC. 11 miRNAs were modified following brain stimulation 5 of which were changed inversely to the disease induced changes. Stimulation cessation further induced changes in 11 miRNAs. Transcript isoform abundance analysis yielded 332 changed isoforms in patients compared to HC, which classified brain transcriptomes of 47 PD and control independent microarrays. Functional enrichment analysis highlighted mitochondrion organization. DBS induced 155 splice changes, enriched in ubiquitin homeostasis. Cellular composition analysis revealed immune cell activity pre and post treatment. Overall, 217 disease and 74 treatment alternative isoforms were predictably targeted by modified miRNAs within both 3′ and 5′ untranslated ends and coding sequence sites. The stimulation-induced network sustained 4 miRNAs and 7 transcripts of the disease network. We believe that the presented dynamic networks provide a novel avenue for identifying disease and treatment-related therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the identification of these networks is a major step forward in the road for understanding the molecular basis for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and assessment of the impact of brain stimulation on human diseases

  1. Thyroid hormone-regulated gene expression in juvenile mouse liver: identification of thyroid response elements using microarray profiling and in silico analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of thyroid hormone signalling can alter growth, development and energy metabolism. Thyroid hormones exert their effects through interactions with thyroid receptors that directly bind thyroid response elements and can alter transcriptional activity of target genes. The effects of short-term thyroid hormone perturbation on hepatic mRNA transcription in juvenile mice were evaluated, with the goal of identifying genes containing active thyroid response elements. Thyroid hormone disruption was induced from postnatal day 12 to 15 by adding goitrogens to dams' drinking water (hypothyroid). A subgroup of thyroid hormone-disrupted pups received intraperitoneal injections of replacement thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (replacement). An additional group received only thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (hyperthyroid). Hepatic mRNA was extracted and hybridized to Agilent mouse microarrays. Results Transcriptional profiling enabled the identification of 28 genes that appeared to be under direct thyroid hormone-regulation. The regulatory regions of the genome adjacent to these genes were examined for half-site sequences that resemble known thyroid response elements. A bioinformatics search identified 33 thyroid response elements in the promoter regions of 13 different genes thought to be directly regulated by thyroid hormones. Thyroid response elements found in the promoter regions of Tor1a, 2310003H01Rik, Hect3d and Slc25a45 were further validated by confirming that the thyroid receptor is associated with these sequences in vivo and that it can bind directly to these sequences in vitro. Three different arrangements of thyroid response elements were identified. Some of these thyroid response elements were located far up-stream (> 7 kb) of the transcription start site of the regulated gene. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling of thyroid hormone disrupted animals coupled with a novel bioinformatics search revealed new thyroid

  2. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms.

  3. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  4. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2–6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2–6Galβ1–4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2–3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  5. Characterization of Influenza Vaccine Hemagglutinin Complexes by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Image Analyses Reveals Structural Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    McCraw, Dustin M; Gallagher, John R; Harris, Audray K

    2016-06-01

    Influenza virus afflicts millions of people worldwide on an annual basis. There is an ever-present risk that animal viruses will cross the species barrier to cause epidemics and pandemics resulting in great morbidity and mortality. Zoonosis outbreaks, such as the H7N9 outbreak, underscore the need to better understand the molecular organization of viral immunogens, such as recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) proteins, used in influenza virus subunit vaccines in order to optimize vaccine efficacy. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis, we show that recombinant H7 HA in vaccines formed macromolecular complexes consisting of variable numbers of HA subunits (range, 6 to 8). In addition, HA complexes were distributed across at least four distinct structural classes (polymorphisms). Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and molecular modeling indicated that HA was in the prefusion state and suggested that the oligomerization and the structural polymorphisms observed were due to hydrophobic interactions involving the transmembrane regions. These experiments suggest that characterization of the molecular structures of influenza virus HA complexes used in subunit vaccines will lead to better understanding of the differences in vaccine efficacy and to the optimization of subunit vaccines to prevent influenza virus infection. PMID:27074939

  6. Characterization of Influenza Vaccine Hemagglutinin Complexes by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Image Analyses Reveals Structural Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    McCraw, Dustin M.; Gallagher, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus afflicts millions of people worldwide on an annual basis. There is an ever-present risk that animal viruses will cross the species barrier to cause epidemics and pandemics resulting in great morbidity and mortality. Zoonosis outbreaks, such as the H7N9 outbreak, underscore the need to better understand the molecular organization of viral immunogens, such as recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) proteins, used in influenza virus subunit vaccines in order to optimize vaccine efficacy. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis, we show that recombinant H7 HA in vaccines formed macromolecular complexes consisting of variable numbers of HA subunits (range, 6 to 8). In addition, HA complexes were distributed across at least four distinct structural classes (polymorphisms). Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and molecular modeling indicated that HA was in the prefusion state and suggested that the oligomerization and the structural polymorphisms observed were due to hydrophobic interactions involving the transmembrane regions. These experiments suggest that characterization of the molecular structures of influenza virus HA complexes used in subunit vaccines will lead to better understanding of the differences in vaccine efficacy and to the optimization of subunit vaccines to prevent influenza virus infection. PMID:27074939

  7. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  8. Characteristic attributes in cancer microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, I N; Planet, P J; Bael, T E; Stanley, S E; Siddall, M; DeSalle, R; Figurski, D H

    2002-04-01

    Rapid advances in genome sequencing and gene expression microarray technologies are providing unprecedented opportunities to identify specific genes involved in complex biological processes, such as development, signal transduction, and disease. The vast amount of data generated by these technologies has presented new challenges in bioinformatics. To help organize and interpret microarray data, new and efficient computational methods are needed to: (1) distinguish accurately between different biological or clinical categories (e.g., malignant vs. benign), and (2) identify specific genes that play a role in determining those categories. Here we present a novel and simple method that exhaustively scans microarray data for unambiguous gene expression patterns. Such patterns of data can be used as the basis for classification into biological or clinical categories. The method, termed the Characteristic Attribute Organization System (CAOS), is derived from fundamental precepts in systematic biology. In CAOS we define two types of characteristic attributes ('pure' and 'private') that may exist in gene expression microarray data. We also consider additional attributes ('compound') that are composed of expression states of more than one gene that are not characteristic on their own. CAOS was tested on three well-known cancer DNA microarray data sets for its ability to classify new microarray samples. We found CAOS to be a highly accurate and robust class prediction technique. In addition, CAOS identified specific genes, not emphasized in other analyses, that may be crucial to the biology of certain types of cancer. The success of CAOS in this study has significant implications for basic research and the future development of reliable methods for clinical diagnostic tools. PMID:12474425

  9. Relatedness Analyses of Histoplasma capsulatum Isolates from Mexican Patients with AIDS-Associated Histoplasmosis by Using Histoplasmin Electrophoretic Profiles and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Montes, M. R.; Bobadilla-Del Valle, M.; Martínez-Rivera, M. A.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, G.; Maravilla, E.; Sifuentes-Osornio, J.; Taylor, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the histoplasmin electrophoretic profiles and the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum isolated from Mexican patients with AIDS-associated histoplasmosis. Clinical isolates from Guatemala, Colombia, and Panama, as well as H. capsulatum isolates from different sources in nature, were also processed. All histoplasmin samples shared four antigenic fractions of 200, 49, 10.5, and 8.5 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). According to their percentage of relatedness, based on SDS-PAGE histoplasmin electrophoretic image analysis, H. capsulatum isolates were divided in two groups: group A contained all AIDS-associated isolates studied and two human reference strains from Mexican histoplasmosis patients without AIDS; group B included bat guano, infected bat, and cock excreta isolates from the State of Guerrero, Mexico, plus three human histoplasmosis strains from Guatemala, Panama, and Colombia. Polymorphic DNA patterns evaluated by RAPD-PCR showed three major bands of 4.4, 3.2, and 2.3 kb in most H. capsulatum isolates studied. Four groups were related by DNA polymorphisms: group I was formed by most of the AIDS-associated H. capsulatum isolates studied, one human histoplasmosis strain from Colombia, two human reference strains from Mexican patients without AIDS, and one human histoplasmosis strain from Guatemala. Group II consisted of only a single strain from Panama. Group III included three strains: one from a Mexican patient with AIDS and two isolated from nature in Guerrero (cock excreta and bat guano). The last, group IV, consisted of only one strain isolated from an infected bat, captured in Guerrero. A tight relationship between phenotypic and genotypic characterization was observed, and both analyses could be useful tools for typing H. capsulatum from different sources and geographic origins. PMID:10203495

  10. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  11. Signatures of positive selection in genes associated with human skin pigmentation as revealed from analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lao, O; de Gruijter, J M; van Duijn, K; Navarro, A; Kayser, M

    2007-05-01

    Phenotypic variation between human populations in skin pigmentation correlates with latitude at the continental level. A large number of hypotheses involving genetic adaptation have been proposed to explain human variation in skin colour, but only limited genetic evidence for positive selection has been presented. To shed light on the evolutionary genetic history of human variation in skin colour we inspected 118 genes associated with skin pigmentation in the Perlegen dataset, studying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and analyzed 55 genes in detail. We identified eight genes that are associated with the melanin pathway (SLC45A2, OCA2, TYRP1, DCT, KITLG, EGFR, DRD2 and PPARD) and presented significant differences in genetic variation between Europeans, Africans and Asians. In six of these genes we detected, by means of the EHH test, variability patterns that are compatible with the hypothesis of local positive selection in Europeans (OCA2, TYRP1 and KITLG) and in Asians (OCA2, DCT, KITLG, EGFR and DRD2), whereas signals were scarce in Africans (DCT, EGFR and DRD2). Furthermore, a statistically significant correlation between genotypic variation in four pigmentation candidate genes and phenotypic variation of skin colour in 51 worldwide human populations was revealed. Overall, our data also suggest that light skin colour is the derived state and is of independent origin in Europeans and Asians, whereas dark skin color seems of unique origin, reflecting the ancestral state in humans. PMID:17233754

  12. Rumen bacterial community evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses in dairy sheep fed marine algae.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carrera, T; Toral, P G; Frutos, P; McEwan, N R; Hervás, G; Abecia, L; Pinloche, E; Girdwood, S E; Belenguer, A

    2014-03-01

    Developing novel strategies to increase the content of bioactive unsaturated fatty acids (FA) in ruminant-derived products requires a deeper understanding of rumen biohydrogenation and bacteria involved in this process. Although high-throughput pyrosequencing may allow for a great coverage of bacterial diversity, it has hardly been used to investigate the microbiology of ruminal FA metabolism. In this experiment, 454 pyrosequencing and a molecular fingerprinting technique (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism; T-RFLP) were used concurrently to assess the effect of diet supplementation with marine algae (MA) on the rumen bacterial community of dairy sheep. Eleven lactating ewes were divided in 2 lots and offered a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and concentrate (40:60), supplemented with 0 (control) or 8 (MA) g of MA/kg of dry matter. After 54 d on treatments, animals were slaughtered and samples of rumen content and fluid were collected separately for microbial analysis. Pyrosequencing yielded a greater coverage of bacterial diversity than T-RFLP and allowed the identification of low abundant populations. Conversely, both molecular approaches pointed to similar conclusions and showed that relevant changes due to MA addition were observed within the major ruminal phyla, namely Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Decreases in the abundance of unclassified Bacteroidales, Porphyromonadaceae, and Ruminococcaceae and increases in as-yet uncultured species of the family Succinivibrionaceae, might be related to a potential role of these groups in different pathways of rumen FA metabolism. Diet supplementation with MA, however, had no effect on the relative abundance of Butyrivibrio and Pseudobutyrivibrio genera. In addition, results from both 454 pyrosequencing and T-RFLP indicate that the effect of MA was rather consistent in rumen content or fluid samples, despite inherent differences between these fractions in their bacterial composition

  13. Genome-Wide Polymorphism and Comparative Analyses in the White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus): A Model for Conservation Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Seabury, Christopher M.; Bhattarai, Eric K.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Viswanathan, Ganesh G.; Cooper, Susan M.; Davis, Donald S.; Dowd, Scot E.; Lockwood, Mitch L.; Seabury, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) represents one of the most successful and widely distributed large mammal species within North America, yet very little nucleotide sequence information is available. We utilized massively parallel pyrosequencing of a reduced representation library (RRL) and a random shotgun library (RSL) to generate a complete mitochondrial genome sequence and identify a large number of putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed throughout the white-tailed deer nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. A SNP validation study designed to test specific classes of putative SNPs provides evidence for as many as 10,476 genome-wide SNPs in the current dataset. Based on cytogenetic evidence for homology between cow (Bos taurus) and white-tailed deer chromosomes, we demonstrate that a divergent genome may be used for estimating the relative distribution and density of de novo sequence contigs as well as putative SNPs for species without draft genome assemblies. Our approach demonstrates that bioinformatic tools developed for model or agriculturally important species may be leveraged to support next-generation research programs for species of biological, ecological and evolutionary importance. We also provide a functional annotation analysis for the de novo sequence contigs assembled from white-tailed deer pyrosequencing reads, a mitochondrial phylogeny involving 13,722 nucleotide positions for 10 unique species of Cervidae, and a median joining haplotype network as a putative representation of mitochondrial evolution in O. virginianus. The results of this study are expected to provide a detailed template enabling genome-wide sequence-based studies of threatened, endangered or conservationally important non-model organisms. PMID:21283515

  14. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  15. Meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and risk of head and neck and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Stefania; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Gianfagna, Francesco; Matsuo, Keitaro; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hung, Rayjean J

    2009-01-01

    Authors report the results of four meta-analyses of studies that examined the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and head and neck cancer (nine studies, 2076 cases and 4834 controls for C677T; four studies, 1439 cases and 3941 controls for A1298C), and lung cancer (ten studies, 5274 cases and 7435 controls for C677T; seven studies, 5098 cases and 6243 controls for A1298C). The summary odds ratio (OR) of head and neck cancer was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.76-1.11) for MTHFR 677 TT and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.37-1.26) for MTHFR 1298 CC. The OR of lung cancer was 1.22 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95-1.55] for MTHFR 677 TT and 1.07 (95% CI: 0.83-1.38) for MTHFR 1298 CC. Results from the meta-analysis of three studies on C677T stratified according to dietary folate intake showed an increased risk for individuals with low folate intake (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.92-2.06 for head and neck and OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 0.97-1.68 for lung) versus high folate intake (OR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.63-1.16 for head and neck, and OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.79-1.12 for lung). Despite the lack of formal statistical significance, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that folate play a role in lung and head/neck carcinogenesis, and show the need to incorporate data on folate intake when interpreting results of MTHFR polymorphisms in relation to cancer risk. PMID:18789576

  16. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  17. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  18. Microarrays: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lee, Norman H; Saeed, Alexander I

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression microarrays are being used widely to address a myriad of complex biological questions. To gather meaningful expression data, it is crucial to have a firm understanding of the steps involved in the application of microarrays. The available microarray platforms are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages. Additional considerations include study design, quality control and systematic assessment of microarray performance, RNA-labeling strategies, sample allocation, signal amplification schemes, defining the number of appropriate biological replicates, data normalization, statistical approaches to identify differentially regulated genes, and clustering algorithms for data visualization. In this chapter, the underlying principles regarding microarrays are reviewed, to serve as a guide when navigating through this powerful technology. PMID:17332646

  19. Microarrays--status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2004-12-01

    Microarrays have become an extremely important research tool for life science researchers and are also beginning to be used in diagnostic, treatment and monitoring applications. This article provides a detailed description of microarrays prepared by in situ synthesis, deposition using microspotting methods, nonplanar bead arrays, flow-through microarrays, optical fiber bundle arrays and nanobarcodes. The problems and challenges in the development of microarrays, development of standards and diagnostic microarrays are described. Tables summarizing the vendor list of various derivatized microarray surfaces, commercially sold premade microarrays, bead arrays and unique microarray products in development are also included. PMID:15542153

  20. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M; Aghi, Manish K

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: i. To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930-2942, 2012). ii. To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013). iii. To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59-70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98-110, 2010). While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  1. Stock Structure and Homing Fidelity in Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon (Acipenser Oxyrinchus Desotoi) Based on Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Sequence Analyses of Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, J.; Waldman, J. R.; Parauka, F.; Wirgin, I.

    1996-01-01

    Efforts have been proposed worldwide to restore sturgeon populations through the use of hatcheries to supplement natural reproduction and to reintroduce sturgeon where they have become extinct. We examined the population structure and inferred the extent of homing in the anadromous Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi). Restriction fragment length polymorphism and control region sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were used to identify haplotypes of Gulf sturgeon specimens obtained from eight drainages spanning the subspecies' entire distribution from Louisiana to Florida. Significant differences in haplotype frequencies indicated substantial geographic structuring of populations. A minimum of four regional or river-specific populations were identified (from west to east): (1) Pearl River, LA and Pascagoula River, MS, (2) Escambia and Yellow rivers, FL, (3) Choctawhatchee River, FL, and (4) Apalachicola, Ochlockonee, and Suwannee rivers, FL. Estimates of maternally mediated gene flow between any pair of the four regional or river-specific stocks ranged between 0.15 to 1.2. Tandem repeats in the mtDNA control region of Gulf sturgeon were not perfectly conserved. This result, together with an absence of heteroplasmy and length variation in Gulf sturgeon mtDNA, indicates that the molecular mechanisms of mtDNA control region sequence evolution differ among acipenserids. PMID:8889537

  2. Stock structure and homing fidelity in Gulf of Mexico sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi) based on restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Stabile, J; Waldman, J R; Parauka, F; Wirgin, I

    1996-10-01

    Efforts have been proposed worldwide to restore sturgeon populations through the use of hatcheries to supplement natural reproduction and to reintroduce sturgeon where they have become extinct. We examined the population structure and inferred the extent of homing in the anadromous Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi). Restriction fragment length polymorphism and control region sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were used to identify haplotypes of Gulf sturgeon specimens obtained from eight drainages spanning the subspecies' entire distribution from Louisiana to Florida. Significant differences in haplotype frequencies indicated substantial geographic structuring of populations. A minimum of four regional or river-specific populations were identified (from west to east): (1) Pearl River, LA and Pascagoula River, MS, (2) Escambia and Yellow rivers, FI, (3) Choctawbatchee River, FL and (4) Apalachicola Ochlockonee, and Suwannee rivers, FL. Estimates of maternally mediated gene flow between any pair of the four regional or river-specific stocks ranged between 0.15 to 1.2. Tandem repeats in the mtDNA control region of Gulf sturgeon were not perfectly conserved. This result, together with an absence of heteroplasmy and length variation in Gulf sturgeon mtDNA, indicates that the molecular mechanisms of mtDNA control region sequence evolution differ among acipenserids. PMID:8889537

  3. IS1311 and IS1245 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses, Serotypes, and Drug Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium avium Complex Isolates Obtained from a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dvorska, Lenka; Bartos, Milan; Ostadal, Oldrich; Kaustova, Jarmila; Matlova, Ludmila; Pavlik, Ivo

    2002-01-01

    Six isolates of Mycobacterium avium of genotype dnaJ+ IS901− IS1311+ IS1245+ and serotypes 6 (n = 1), 6/9, (n = 2), and 9 (n = 3) were obtained within a 5-month period from a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient treated for tuberculosis. The isolates were identified with PvuII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis as a single IS1311 RFLP type and six different IS1245 RFLP types. Six separate colonies/clones obtained by subculture from each of the six isolates were tested for MICs of a set of 10 drugs. This report documents the appearance of isolates that are resistant to antimycobacterial drugs as the duration of therapy increases. Because isolates recovered from the patient following longer duration of treatment were more likely to be resistant to more antimycobacterial drugs, we would conclude that there was selection for antimycobacterial drug-resistant isolates. Analyses of all 36 clones identified three IS1311 and 22 IS1245 types forming three clusters. Tests of 105 environmental samples collected in the home and the work place of the patient yielded 16 mycobacterial isolates, of which one M. avium from soil was of genotype dnaJ+ IS901+ IS1311+ IS1245+ and serotype 2, and the second M. avium from a vacuum cleaner was of genotype dnaJ+ IS901− IS1311+ IS1245+ and serotype 9. Overall analyses of the results did not reveal any relation between serotype, RFLP type, and drug susceptibility. Based on the course of the disease in the patient and different serotypes, IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP types of isolates of M. avium we suppose represent polyclonal infection. PMID:12354870

  4. Meta- and pooled analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk: a huge-GSEC review.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Stefania; Hung, Rayjean; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Gianfagna, Francesco; Ebert, Matthias P A; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Gao, Chang-Ming; Götze, Tobias; Graziano, Francesco; Lacasaña-Navarro, Marina; Lin, Dongxin; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Qiao, You-Lin; Shen, Hongbing; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Takezaki, Toshiro; Weng, Yu-Rong; Zhang, Fang Fang; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Boffetta, Paolo; Taioli, Emanuela

    2008-03-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in the metabolism of folate, whose role in gastric carcinogenesis is controversial. The authors performed a meta-analysis and individual data pooled analysis of case-control studies that examined the association between C677T and A1298C polymorphisms (the former being associated with low folate serum levels) and gastric cancer (meta-analyses: 16 studies, 2,727 cases and 4,640 controls for C677T and seven studies, 1,223 cases and 2,015 controls for A1298C; pooled analyses: nine studies, 1,540 cases and 2,577 controls for C677T and five studies, 1,146 cases and 1,549 controls for A1298C). An increased risk was found for MTHFR 677 TT in the meta-analysis (odds ratio (OR) = 1.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.31, 1.77) and pooled analysis (OR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.95). No association resulted for MTHFR 1298 CC (meta-OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.65, 1.35; pooled OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.69, 1.34). Results from the pooled analysis of four studies on C677T stratified according to folate levels showed an increased risk for individuals with low (OR = 2.05, 95% CI: 1.13, 3.72) versus high (OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.54, 1.67) folate levels. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that folate plays a role in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:18162478

  5. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  6. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  7. Studying cellular processes and detecting disease with protein microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.; Bollinger, Nikki

    2005-10-31

    Protein microarrays are a rapidly developing analytic tool with diverse applications in biomedical research. These applications include profiling of disease markers or autoimmune responses, understanding molecular pathways, protein modifications and protein activities. One factor that is driving this expanding usage is the wide variety of experimental formats that protein microarrays can take. In this review, we provide a short, conceptual overview of the different approaches for protein microarray. We then examine some of the most significant applications of these microarrays to date, with an emphasis on how global protein analyses can be used to facilitate biomedical research.

  8. Examining microarray slide quality for the EPA using SNL's hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Rachel M.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes research performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess microarray quality on arrays from two platforms of interest to the EPA. Custom microarrays from two novel, commercially produced array platforms were imaged with SNL's unique hyperspectral imaging technology and multivariate data analysis was performed to investigate sources of emission on the arrays. No extraneous sources of emission were evident in any of the array areas scanned. This led to the conclusions that either of these array platforms could produce high quality, reliable microarray data for the EPA toxicology programs. Hyperspectral imaging results are presented and recommendations for microarray analyses using these platforms are detailed within the report.

  9. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  10. Identification of IDUA and WNT16 Phosphorylation-Related Non-Synonymous Polymorphisms for Bone Mineral Density in Meta-Analyses of Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhua; Liu, Ning; Yu, Xun; Zhao, Ming; Choi, Hyung Jin; Leo, Paul J; Brown, Matthew A; Zhang, Lei; Pei, Yu-Fang; Shen, Hui; He, Hao; Fu, Xiaoying; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Cho, Nam H; Shen, Jie; Guo, Yan-Fang; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Prince, Richard L; Eisman, John A; Jones, Graeme; Sambrook, Philip N; Tian, Qing; Zhu, Xue-Zhen; Papasian, Christopher J; Duncan, Emma L; Uitterlinden, André G; Shin, Chan Soo; Xiang, Shuanglin; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2016-02-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates a wide variety of cellular processes. Thus, we hypothesize that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may modulate protein phosphorylation could affect osteoporosis risk. Based on a previous conventional genome-wide association (GWA) study, we conducted a three-stage meta-analysis targeting phosphorylation-related SNPs (phosSNPs) for femoral neck (FN)-bone mineral density (BMD), total hip (HIP)-BMD, and lumbar spine (LS)-BMD phenotypes. In stage 1, 9593 phosSNPs were meta-analyzed in 11,140 individuals of various ancestries. Genome-wide significance (GWS) and suggestive significance were defined by α = 5.21 × 10(-6) (0.05/9593) and 1.00 × 10(-4) , respectively. In stage 2, nine stage 1-discovered phosSNPs (based on α = 1.00 × 10(-4) ) were in silico meta-analyzed in Dutch, Korean, and Australian cohorts. In stage 3, four phosSNPs that replicated in stage 2 (based on α = 5.56 × 10(-3) , 0.05/9) were de novo genotyped in two independent cohorts. IDUA rs3755955 and rs6831280, and WNT16 rs2707466 were associated with BMD phenotypes in each respective stage, and in three stages combined, achieving GWS for both FN-BMD (p = 8.36 × 10(-10) , p = 5.26 × 10(-10) , and p = 3.01 × 10(-10) , respectively) and HIP-BMD (p = 3.26 × 10(-6) , p = 1.97 × 10(-6) , and p = 1.63 × 10(-12) , respectively). Although in vitro studies demonstrated no differences in expressions of wild-type and mutant forms of IDUA and WNT16B proteins, in silico analyses predicts that WNT16 rs2707466 directly abolishes a phosphorylation site, which could cause a deleterious effect on WNT16 protein, and that IDUA phosSNPs rs3755955 and rs6831280 could exert indirect effects on nearby phosphorylation sites. Further studies will be required to determine the detailed and specific molecular effects of these BMD-associated non-synonymous variants. © 2015 American Society for Bone and

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-2 P12A polymorphism and risk of acute myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke: A case-cohort study and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zafarmand, Mohammad Hadi; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Grobbee, Diederick E; de Leeuw, Peter W; Bots, Michiel L

    2008-01-01

    Background The alanine allele of P12A polymorphism in PPARG gene in a few studies has been associated with a reduced or increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Yet, the risk relation has not been confi rmed, and data on ischemic stroke (IS) is scarce. We therefore investigated the role of this polymorphism on occurrence of AMI, coronary heart disease (CHD) and IS. Methods and fi ndings We performed a case-cohort study in 15,236 initially healthy Dutch women and applied a Cox proportional hazards model to study the relation of the P12A polymorphism and AMI (n = 71), CHD (n = 211), and IS (n = 49) under different inheritance models. In addition, meta-analyses of published studies were performed. Under the dominant inheritance model, carriers of the alanine allele compared with those with the more common genotype were not at increased or decreased risk of CHD (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.82; 95% confi dence interval [CI], 0.58 to 1.17) and of IS (HR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.14 to 7.74). In addition no relations were found under the recessive and additive models. Our meta-analyses corroborated these fi ndings by showing no signifi cant association. For AMI we found a borderline signifi cant association under dominant (HR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.94), and additive (HR = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.26 to 1.00) models which could be due to chance, because of small cases in this subgroup. The meta-analysis did not show any association between the polymorphism and risk of AMI under the different genetic models. Conclusions Our study in healthy Dutch women in combination with the meta-analyses of previous reports does not provide support for a role of P12A polymorphism in PPARG gene in MI and CHD risk. Also our study shows that the polymorphism has no association with IS risk. PMID:18561518

  12. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  13. Basic Concepts of Microarrays and Potential Applications in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa B.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The introduction of in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, led by real-time PCR, into the clinical microbiology laboratory has transformed the laboratory detection of viruses and select bacterial pathogens. However, the progression of the molecular diagnostic revolution currently relies on the ability to efficiently and accurately offer multiplex detection and characterization for a variety of infectious disease pathogens. Microarray analysis has the capability to offer robust multiplex detection but has just started to enter the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Multiple microarray platforms exist, including printed double-stranded DNA and oligonucleotide arrays, in situ-synthesized arrays, high-density bead arrays, electronic microarrays, and suspension bead arrays. One aim of this paper is to review microarray technology, highlighting technical differences between them and each platform's advantages and disadvantages. Although the use of microarrays to generate gene expression data has become routine, applications pertinent to clinical microbiology continue to rapidly expand. This review highlights uses of microarray technology that impact diagnostic microbiology, including the detection and identification of pathogens, determination of antimicrobial resistance, epidemiological strain typing, and analysis of microbial infections using host genomic expression and polymorphism profiles. PMID:19822891

  14. The Perils of SNP Microarray Testing: Uncovering Unexpected Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Tarini, Beth A.; Konczal, Laura; Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Goldman, Edward B.; McCandless, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background While single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosomal microarrays identify areas of small genetic deletions/duplications, they can also reveal regions of homozygosity indicative of consanguinity. As more non-geneticists order SNP microarrays, they must prepare for the potential ethical, legal and social issues that result from revelation of unanticipated consanguinity. Patient An infant with multiple congenital anomalies underwent SNP microarray testing. Results The results of the SNP microarray revealed several large regions of homozygosity that indicated identity by descent most consistent with a second or third degree relative mating (e.g., uncle/ niece, half brother/sister, first cousins). Mother was not aware of the test's potential to reveal consanguinity. When informed of the test results, she reluctantly admitted to being raped by her half-brother around the time of conception. Conclusions During the pre-testing consent process, providers should inform parents that SNP microarray testing could reveal consanguinity. Providers must also understand the psychological implications, as well as the legal and moral obligations, that accompany SNP microarray results that indicate consanguinity. PMID:23827427

  15. A novel multifunctional oligonucleotide microarray for Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are invaluable tools for genome interrogation, SNP detection, and expression analysis, among other applications. Such broad capabilities would be of value to many pathogen research communities, although the development and use of genome-scale microarrays is often a costly undertaking. Therefore, effective methods for reducing unnecessary probes while maintaining or expanding functionality would be relevant to many investigators. Results Taking advantage of available genome sequences and annotation for Toxoplasma gondii (a pathogenic parasite responsible for illness in immunocompromised individuals) and Plasmodium falciparum (a related parasite responsible for severe human malaria), we designed a single oligonucleotide microarray capable of supporting a wide range of applications at relatively low cost, including genome-wide expression profiling for Toxoplasma, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotyping of both T. gondii and P. falciparum. Expression profiling of the three clonotypic lineages dominating T. gondii populations in North America and Europe provides a first comprehensive view of the parasite transcriptome, revealing that ~49% of all annotated genes are expressed in parasite tachyzoites (the acutely lytic stage responsible for pathogenesis) and 26% of genes are differentially expressed among strains. A novel design utilizing few probes provided high confidence genotyping, used here to resolve recombination points in the clonal progeny of sexual crosses. Recent sequencing of additional T. gondii isolates identifies >620 K new SNPs, including ~11 K that intersect with expression profiling probes, yielding additional markers for genotyping studies, and further validating the utility of a combined expression profiling/genotyping array design. Additional applications facilitating SNP and transcript discovery, alternative statistical methods for quantifying gene expression, etc. are also pursued at pilot scale to inform

  16. Navigating Public Microarray Databases

    PubMed Central

    Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  17. Navigating public microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  18. Monitoring Expression Profiles of Rice Genes under Cold, Drought, and High-Salinity Stresses and Abscisic Acid Application Using cDNA Microarray and RNA Gel-Blot Analyses1[w

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, M. Ashiq; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Abe, Hiroshi; Khan, M. Ayub; Katsura, Koji; Ito, Yusuke; Yoshiwara, Kyoko; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2003-01-01

    To identify cold-, drought-, high-salinity-, and/or abscisic acid (ABA)-inducible genes in rice (Oryza sativa), we prepared a rice cDNA microarray including about 1,700 independent cDNAs derived from cDNA libraries prepared from drought-, cold-, and high-salinity-treated rice plants. We confirmed stress-inducible expression of the candidate genes selected by microarray analysis using RNA gel-blot analysis and finally identified a total of 73 genes as stress inducible including 58 novel unreported genes in rice. Among them, 36, 62, 57, and 43 genes were induced by cold, drought, high salinity, and ABA, respectively. We observed a strong association in the expression of stress-responsive genes and found 15 genes that responded to all four treatments. Venn diagram analysis revealed greater cross talk between signaling pathways for drought, ABA, and high-salinity stresses than between signaling pathways for cold and ABA stresses or cold and high-salinity stresses in rice. The rice genome database search enabled us not only to identify possible known cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of several stress-inducible genes but also to expect the existence of novel cis-acting elements involved in stress-responsive gene expression in rice stress-inducible promoters. Comparative analysis of Arabidopsis and rice showed that among the 73 stress-inducible rice genes, 51 already have been reported in Arabidopsis with similar function or gene name. Transcriptome analysis revealed novel stress-inducible genes, suggesting some differences between Arabidopsis and rice in their response to stress. PMID:14645724

  19. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  20. Shrinkage regression-based methods for microarray missing value imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Missing values commonly occur in the microarray data, which usually contain more than 5% missing values with up to 90% of genes affected. Inaccurate missing value estimation results in reducing the power of downstream microarray data analyses. Many types of methods have been developed to estimate missing values. Among them, the regression-based methods are very popular and have been shown to perform better than the other types of methods in many testing microarray datasets. Results To further improve the performances of the regression-based methods, we propose shrinkage regression-based methods. Our methods take the advantage of the correlation structure in the microarray data and select similar genes for the target gene by Pearson correlation coefficients. Besides, our methods incorporate the least squares principle, utilize a shrinkage estimation approach to adjust the coefficients of the regression model, and then use the new coefficients to estimate missing values. Simulation results show that the proposed methods provide more accurate missing value estimation in six testing microarray datasets than the existing regression-based methods do. Conclusions Imputation of missing values is a very important aspect of microarray data analyses because most of the downstream analyses require a complete dataset. Therefore, exploring accurate and efficient methods for estimating missing values has become an essential issue. Since our proposed shrinkage regression-based methods can provide accurate missing value estimation, they are competitive alternatives to the existing regression-based methods. PMID:24565159

  1. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  2. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  3. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs) are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS) principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed. PMID:19158952

  4. RNAi microarray analysis in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mousses, Spyro; Caplen, Natasha J; Cornelison, Robert; Weaver, Don; Basik, Mark; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Lotufo, Roberto A; Choudary, Ashish; Dougherty, Edward R; Suh, Ed; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2003-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is a powerful new tool for analyzing gene knockdown phenotypes in living mammalian cells. To facilitate large-scale, high-throughput functional genomics studies using RNAi, we have developed a microarray-based technology for highly parallel analysis. Specifically, siRNAs in a transfection matrix were first arrayed on glass slides, overlaid with a monolayer of adherent cells, incubated to allow reverse transfection, and assessed for the effects of gene silencing by digital image analysis at a single cell level. Validation experiments with HeLa cells stably expressing GFP showed spatially confined, sequence-specific, time- and dose-dependent inhibition of green fluorescence for those cells growing directly on microspots containing siRNA targeting the GFP sequence. Microarray-based siRNA transfections analyzed with a custom-made quantitative image analysis system produced results that were identical to those from traditional well-based transfection, quantified by flow cytometry. Finally, to integrate experimental details, image analysis, data display, and data archiving, we developed a prototype information management system for high-throughput cell-based analyses. In summary, this RNAi microarray platform, together with ongoing efforts to develop large-scale human siRNA libraries, should facilitate genomic-scale cell-based analyses of gene function. PMID:14525932

  5. Molecular cloning, sequence characteristics, and polymorphism analyses of the tyrosinase-related protein 2 / DOPAchrome tautomerase gene of black-boned sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Deng, Weidong; Tan, Yuwen; Wang, Xinyu; Xi, Dongmei; He, Yiduo; Yang, Shuli; Mao, Huaming; Gao, Shizheng

    2009-12-01

    Tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TYRP2) plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of eumelanin. Black-boned sheep have excessive melanin and eumelanin, resulting in dark (black) muscles and organs. This study was designed to investigate the effects of variants of the TYRP2 gene on black traits and coat colour of black-boned sheep. Melanin traits were measured in three populations of sheep (Nanping black-boned, Nanping normal, and Romney Marsh) and compared in this study. From the TYRP2 cDNA, all 8 exons and their flanking regions were amplified and characterized. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the exons and their flanking regions. Five exonic polymorphic sites, including two synonymous (c.93T>G and c.1140C>T) and three non-synonymous mutations (c.163C>T (p.R55W), c.605G>A (p.R202H), and c.1141A>G (p.T381A)), were retrieved. PCR-RFLP analysis of c.605G>A showed that the frequencies of allele G in the Nanping black-boned, Nanping normal, and Romney Marsh sheep were 0.632, 0.603, and 0.886, respectively. Sheep with the GG genotype had significantly (P < 0.05) lower tyrosinase activity, alkali-soluble melanin content, and ratio of eumelanin : total melanin than sheep with GA and AA genotypes when measured across all investigated samples but not when samples within each population of sheep were compared. However, there was no association of TYRP2 genotype at a single SNP position with coat colour across populations. Nonetheless, the two breeds with higher overall tyrosinase activity did produce darker and more varied coat colours than the breed with lower tyrosinase activity. PMID:19953128

  6. Proteomic, Microarray, and Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis Analyses of Anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa at pH 6.5, Likely Representing Chronic, Late-Stage Cystic Fibrosis Airway Conditions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Mark D.; Schurr, Michael J.; Sauer, Karin; Vazquez, Gustavo; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Potvin, Eric; Levesque, Roger C.; Fedynak, Amber; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Schurr, Jill; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Lau, Gee W.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Rowe, John J.; Lieberman, Michael A.; Barraud, Nicolas; Webb, Jeremy; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Hunt, Donald F.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) commonly harbor the important pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in their airways. During chronic late-stage CF, P. aeruginosa is known to grow under reduced oxygen tension and is even capable of respiring anaerobically within the thickened airway mucus, at a pH of ∼6.5. Therefore, proteins involved in anaerobic metabolism represent potentially important targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, the clinically relevant “anaerobiome” or “proteogenome” of P. aeruginosa was assessed. First, two different proteomic approaches were used to identify proteins differentially expressed under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Microarray studies were also performed, and in general, the anaerobic transcriptome was in agreement with the proteomic results. However, we found that a major portion of the most upregulated genes in the presence of NO3− and NO2− are those encoding Pf1 bacteriophage. With anaerobic NO2−, the most downregulated genes are those involved postglycolytically and include many tricarboxylic acid cycle genes and those involved in the electron transport chain, especially those encoding the NADH dehydrogenase I complex. Finally, a signature-tagged mutagenesis library of P. aeruginosa was constructed to further screen genes required for both NO3− and NO2− respiration. In addition to genes anticipated to play important roles in the anaerobiome (anr, dnr, nar, nir, and nuo), the cysG and dksA genes were found to be required for both anaerobic NO3− and NO2− respiration. This study represents a major step in unraveling the molecular machinery involved in anaerobic NO3− and NO2− respiration and offers clues as to how we might disrupt such pathways in P. aeruginosa to limit the growth of this important CF pathogen when it is either limited or completely restricted in its oxygen supply. PMID:18203836

  7. Proteomic, microarray, and signature-tagged mutagenesis analyses of anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa at pH 6.5, likely representing chronic, late-stage cystic fibrosis airway conditions.

    PubMed

    Platt, Mark D; Schurr, Michael J; Sauer, Karin; Vazquez, Gustavo; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Potvin, Eric; Levesque, Roger C; Fedynak, Amber; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Schurr, Jill; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Lau, Gee W; Limbach, Patrick A; Rowe, John J; Lieberman, Michael A; Barraud, Nicolas; Webb, Jeremy; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Hunt, Donald F; Hassett, Daniel J

    2008-04-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) commonly harbor the important pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in their airways. During chronic late-stage CF, P. aeruginosa is known to grow under reduced oxygen tension and is even capable of respiring anaerobically within the thickened airway mucus, at a pH of approximately 6.5. Therefore, proteins involved in anaerobic metabolism represent potentially important targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, the clinically relevant "anaerobiome" or "proteogenome" of P. aeruginosa was assessed. First, two different proteomic approaches were used to identify proteins differentially expressed under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Microarray studies were also performed, and in general, the anaerobic transcriptome was in agreement with the proteomic results. However, we found that a major portion of the most upregulated genes in the presence of NO(3)(-) and NO(2)(-) are those encoding Pf1 bacteriophage. With anaerobic NO(2)(-), the most downregulated genes are those involved postglycolytically and include many tricarboxylic acid cycle genes and those involved in the electron transport chain, especially those encoding the NADH dehydrogenase I complex. Finally, a signature-tagged mutagenesis library of P. aeruginosa was constructed to further screen genes required for both NO(3)(-) and NO(2)(-) respiration. In addition to genes anticipated to play important roles in the anaerobiome (anr, dnr, nar, nir, and nuo), the cysG and dksA genes were found to be required for both anaerobic NO(3)(-) and NO(2)(-) respiration. This study represents a major step in unraveling the molecular machinery involved in anaerobic NO(3)(-) and NO(2)(-) respiration and offers clues as to how we might disrupt such pathways in P. aeruginosa to limit the growth of this important CF pathogen when it is either limited or completely restricted in its oxygen supply. PMID:18203836

  8. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:26614075

  9. Living-Cell Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yarmush, Martin L.; King, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:19413510

  10. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  11. Combining denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA V3 region and 16S-23S rDNA spacer region polymorphism analyses for the identification of staphylococci from Italian fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Pennacchia, Carmelina; Ercolini, Danilo; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Villani, Francesco

    2003-09-01

    Separation of amplified V3 region from 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region polymorphism (ISR-PCR) analyses were tested as tool for differentiation of staphylococcal strains commonly isolated from fermented sausages. Variable V3 regions of 25 staphylococcal reference strains and 96 wild strains of species belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Micrococcus and Kocuria were analyzed. PCR-DGGE profiles obtained were species-specific for S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. auricularis, S. condimenti, S. kloosi, S. vitulus, S. succinus, S. pasteuri, S. capitis and S. (Macrococcus) caseolyticus. Moreover, 7 groups could be distinguished gathering the remaining species as result of the separation of the V3 rDNA amplicons in DGGE. Furthermore, the combination of the results obtained by PCR-DGGE and ISR-PCR analyses allowed a clear differentiation of all the staphylococcal species analysed, with exception of the pairs S. equorum-S. cohnii and S. carnosus-S. schleiferi. The suitability of both molecular techniques and of the combination their results for the identification of staphylococci was validated analysing partial nucleotide sequence of the 16S rDNA of a representative number of wild strains. PMID:14529185

  12. Microarray platform for omics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecklenburg, Michael; Xie, Bin

    2001-09-01

    Microarray technology has revolutionized genetic analysis. However, limitations in genome analysis has lead to renewed interest in establishing 'omic' strategies. As we enter the post-genomic era, new microarray technologies are needed to address these new classes of 'omic' targets, such as proteins, as well as lipids and carbohydrates. We have developed a microarray platform that combines self- assembling monolayers with the biotin-streptavidin system to provide a robust, versatile immobilization scheme. A hydrophobic film is patterned on the surface creating an array of tension wells that eliminates evaporation effects thereby reducing the shear stress to which biomolecules are exposed to during immobilization. The streptavidin linker layer makes it possible to adapt and/or develop microarray based assays using virtually any class of biomolecules including: carbohydrates, peptides, antibodies, receptors, as well as them ore traditional DNA based arrays. Our microarray technology is designed to furnish seamless compatibility across the various 'omic' platforms by providing a common blueprint for fabricating and analyzing arrays. The prototype microarray uses a microscope slide footprint patterned with 2 by 96 flat wells. Data on the microarray platform will be presented.

  13. Polymorphism in the IL4R gene and clinical features are associated with glioma prognosis: Analyses of case-cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tian Bo; Du, Shuli; Zhu, Xi Kai; Li, Gang; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Na; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory gene polymorphisms may be associated with glioma risk. The purpose of this study was to analyze effects of certain inflammatory gene and some clinical factors on patient survival.The clinical information of 269 glioma patients conceived operation from September 2010 to May 2014 to decide the 1-, 3-year survival rates according to follow-up results and analyze age, gender, the WHO classification, extent of surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy factors effects on prognosis. Survival distributions were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and difference in the survival was tested using the log-rank test. To estimate the association between the IL4, IL13, IL10, IL4R SNPs, and PFS and OS in glioma, the HR and 95% CI were calculated by univariate Cox proportional hazards model. Multivariate Cox model were performed to compute adjusted HR and 95% CI. All data was analyzed with SPSS17.0 package. Extent of surgical resection, chemotherapy, and age are an important factor in glioma overall survival and progression-free survival overall. Extent of surgery and chemotherapy are important factors in astrocytoma overall survival. Univariate analysis showed that IL4R rs1801275 was significantly associated with overall survival of glioma and astrocytoma patients (P < 0.05). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that IL4R rs1801275 GG genotype could increase the death risk of glioma and astrocytoma patients (Glioma: hazard ratio [HR]: 4.897, 95% confidence limits [95% CI]: 1.962-12.222, P = 0.001; Astrocytoma: HR: 15.944, 95% CI: 4.019-63.253, P < 0.05).Our research results showed that extent of surgical resection, age, and chemotherapy affect the prognosis of glioma. The IL4R gene may affect the survival of glioma patients. PMID:27495027

  14. Phylogenetic diversity of bat trypanosomes of subgenus Schizotrypanum based on multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA, and cytochrome b nucleotide sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Barnabe, C; Brisse, S; Tibayrenc, M

    2003-02-01

    Trypanosome stocks isolated from bats (Chiroptera) and belonging to the subgenus Schizotrypanum were analyzed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) at 22 loci, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with 14 primers and/or cytochrome b nucleotide sequence. Bat trypanosomes belonged to the species Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei (10 stocks), Trypanosoma dionisii (four stocks) and Trypanosoma vespertilionis (three stocks). One T. rangeli stock and seven stocks of T. cruzi sensu stricto, the agent of Chagas disease, were included for comparison. The homology of several RAPD fragments shared by distinct species was verified by hybridization. The sequence of a 516-nucleotide portion of the maxicircle-encoded cytochrome b (CYb) coding region was determined in representative stocks of the species under study. Phylogenetic analysis of the data confirmed the previous taxonomic attribution of these bat trypanosomes based on biological, epidemiological and ecological features. However, a new finding was that within T. cruzi marinkellei two major subdivisions could be distinguished, T.c.m. I, found in the spear-nose bats Phyllostomus discolor and Phyllostomus hastatus, and T.c.m. II, from P. discolor. In addition, the T. c. marinkellei 'Z' stock from a short-tailed bat (Carollia perspicillata) was distantly related to these two subdivisions, and the monophyly of T. c. marinkellei is unclear based on the present data. Based on the present sample, the European species T. dionisii and T. vespertilionis appeared to be more homogeneous. RAPD and CYb data both suggested the monophyly of a group composed of T. cruzi and the two major subdivisions of T. cruzi marinkellei. This study shows that MLEE, RAPD and CYb can be used for taxonomic assignment and provide valuable phylogenetic information for strains and taxa within the subgenus Schizotrypanum. An evolutionary scenario in which the broad host-range parasite T. cruzi would be derived from a bat-restricted trypanosome ancestor

  15. Identification of SNPs and INDELS in swine transcribed sequences using short oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide detection of single feature polymorphisms (SFP) in swine using transcriptome profiling of day 25 placental RNA by contrasting probe intensities from either Meishan or an occidental composite breed with Affymetrix porcine microarrays is presented. A linear mixed model analysis was used to...

  16. APPLICATION OF DNA MICROARRAYS TO REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TESTIS ARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the advent of sequence information for entire mammalian genomes, it is now possible to analyze gene expression and gene polymorphisms on a genomic scale. The primary tool for analysis of gene expression is the DNA microarray. We have used commercially available cDNA micro...

  17. Detection of bacterial pathogens in environmental samples using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Call, Douglas R; Borucki, Monica K; Loge, Frank J

    2003-05-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an important tool for pathogen detection, but historically, it has not been possible to accurately identify PCR products without sequencing, Southern blots, or dot-blots. Microarrays can be coupled with PCR where they serve as a set of parallel dot-blots to enhance product detection and identification. Microarrays are composed of many discretely located probes on a solid substrate such as glass. Each probe is composed of a sequence that is complimentary to a pathogen-specific gene sequence. PCR is used to amplify one or more genes and the products are then hybridized to the array to identify species-specific polymorphism within one or more genes. We illustrate this type of array using 16S rDNA probes suitable for distinguishing between several salmonid pathogens. We also describe the use of microarrays for direct detection of either RNA or DNA without the aid of PCR, although the sensitivity of these systems currently limits their application for pathogen detection. Finally, microarrays can also be used to "fingerprint" bacterial isolates and they can be used to identify diagnostic markers suitable for developing new PCR-based detection assays. We illustrate this type of array for subtyping an important food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:12654494

  18. Electrostatic readout of DNA microarrays with charged microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, Nathan G.; Salaita, Khalid; Groves, Jay T.

    2008-06-29

    DNA microarrays are used for gene-expression profiling, single-nucleotide polymorphism detection and disease diagnosis. A persistent challenge in this area is the lack of microarray screening technology suitable for integration into routine clinical care. In this paper, we describe a method for sensitive and label-free electrostatic readout of DNA or RNA hybridization on microarrays. The electrostatic properties of the microarray are measured from the position and motion of charged microspheres randomly dispersed over the surface. We demonstrate nondestructive electrostatic imaging with 10-μm lateral resolution over centimeter-length scales, which is four-orders of magnitude larger than that achievable with conventional scanning electrostatic force microscopy. Changes in surface charge density as a result of specific hybridization can be detected and quantified with 50-pM sensitivity, single base-pair mismatch selectivity and in the presence of complex background. Lastly, because the naked eye is sufficient to read out hybridization, this approach may facilitate broad application of multiplexed assays.

  19. Chemistry of Natural Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycan microarrays have become indispensable tools for studying protein-glycan interactions. Along with chemo-enzymatic synthesis, glycans isolated from natural sources have played important roles in array development and will continue to be a major source of glycans. N- and O-glycans from glycoproteins, and glycans from glycosphingolipids can be released from corresponding glycoconjugates with relatively mature methods, although isolation of large numbers and quantities of glycans are still very challenging. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are less represented on current glycan microarrays. Glycan microarray development has been greatly facilitated by bifunctional fluorescent linkers, which can be applied in a “Shotgun Glycomics” approach to incorporate isolated natural glycans. Glycan presentation on microarrays may affect glycan binding by GBPs, often through multivalent recognition by the GBP. PMID:24487062

  20. Microarray Analysis of Microbial Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson-Francis, K.; van Houdt, R.; Leys, N.; Mergeay, M.; Cockell, C. S.

    2010-04-01

    Microarray analysis of the heavy metal resistant bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was used to investigate the genes involved in the weathering. The results demonstrated that large porin and membrane transporter genes were unregulated.

  1. Identification of a novel FGFRL1 MicroRNA target site polymorphism for bone mineral density in meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tianhua; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Guie; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jian; Pei, Yu-Fang; Shen, Hui; Fu, Xiaoying; He, Hao; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Leo, Paul J.; Duncan, Emma L.; Shen, Jie; Guo, Yan-Fang; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Prince, Richard L.; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Sambrook, Philip N.; Hu, Xiang; Das, Partha M.; Tian, Qing; Zhu, Xue-Zhen; Papasian, Christopher J.; Brown, Matthew A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Wang, Yu-Ping; Xiang, Shuanglin; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators. Based on a previous genome-wide association (GWA) scan, we conducted a polymorphism in microRNA target sites (poly-miRTS)-centric multistage meta-analysis for lumbar spine (LS)-, total hip (HIP)- and femoral neck (FN)-bone mineral density (BMD). In stage I, 41 102 poly-miRTSs were meta-analyzed in seven cohorts with a genome-wide significance (GWS) α = 0.05/41 102 = 1.22 × 10−6. By applying α = 5 × 10−5 (suggestive significance), 11 poly-miRTSs were selected, with FGFRL1 rs4647940 and PRR5 rs3213550 as top signals for FN-BMD (P = 7.67 × 10−6 and 1.58 × 10−5) in gender-combined sample. In stage II in silico replication (two cohorts), FGFRL1 rs4647940 was the only signal marginally replicated for FN-BMD (P = 5.08 × 10−3) at α = 0.10/11 = 9.09 × 10-3. PRR5 rs3213550 was also selected based on biological significance. In stage III de novo genotyping replication (two cohorts), FGFRL1 rs4647940 was the only signal significantly replicated for FN-BMD (P = 7.55 × 10−6) at α = 0.05/2 = 0.025 in gender-combined sample. Aggregating three stages, FGFRL1 rs4647940 was the single stage I-discovered and stages II- and III-replicated signal attaining GWS for FN-BMD (P = 8.87 × 10−12). Dual-luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that FGFRL1 3′ untranslated region harboring rs4647940 appears to be hsa-miR-140-5p's target site. In a zebrafish microinjection experiment, dre-miR-140-5p is shown to exert a dramatic impact on craniofacial skeleton formation. Taken together, we provided functional evidence for a novel FGFRL1 poly-miRTS rs4647940 in a previously known 4p16.3 locus, and experimental and clinical genetics studies have shown both FGFRL1 and hsa-miR-140-5p are important for bone formation. PMID:25941324

  2. Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Mattsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Eni; Hellström, Cecilia; Uhlen, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ayoglu, Burcu; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-25

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions. PMID:26417875

  3. Genetic polymorphism analyses of 30 InDels in Chinese Xibe ethnic group and its population genetic differentiations with other groups

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Shen, Chun-Mei; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Yang, Chun-Hua; Jin, Rui; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Hong-Dan; Liu, Wen-Juan; Jing, Hang; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we obtained population genetic data and forensic parameters of 30 InDel loci in Chinese Xibe ethnic group from northwestern China and studied the genetic relationships between the studied Xibe group and other reference groups. The observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.1704 at HLD118 locus to 0.5247 at HLD92 locus while the expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.1559 at HLD118 locus to 0.4997 at HLD101 locus. The cumulative power of exclusion and total probability of discrimination power in the studied group were 0.9867 and 0.9999999999902 for the 30 loci, respectively. Analyses of structure, PCA, interpopulation differentiations and phylogenetic tree revealed that the Xibe group had close genetic relationships with South Korean, Beijing Han and Guangdong Han groups. The results indicated that these 30 loci should only be used as a complement for autosomal STRs in paternity cases but could provide an acceptable level of discrimination in forensic identification cases in the studied Xibe group. Further studies should be conducted for better understanding of the Xibe genetic background. PMID:25651970

  4. Genetic polymorphism analyses of 30 InDels in Chinese Xibe ethnic group and its population genetic differentiations with other groups.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Shen, Chun-Mei; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Yang, Chun-Hua; Jin, Rui; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Hong-Dan; Liu, Wen-Juan; Jing, Hang; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we obtained population genetic data and forensic parameters of 30 InDel loci in Chinese Xibe ethnic group from northwestern China and studied the genetic relationships between the studied Xibe group and other reference groups. The observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.1704 at HLD118 locus to 0.5247 at HLD92 locus while the expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.1559 at HLD118 locus to 0.4997 at HLD101 locus. The cumulative power of exclusion and total probability of discrimination power in the studied group were 0.9867 and 0.9999999999902 for the 30 loci, respectively. Analyses of structure, PCA, interpopulation differentiations and phylogenetic tree revealed that the Xibe group had close genetic relationships with South Korean, Beijing Han and Guangdong Han groups. The results indicated that these 30 loci should only be used as a complement for autosomal STRs in paternity cases but could provide an acceptable level of discrimination in forensic identification cases in the studied Xibe group. Further studies should be conducted for better understanding of the Xibe genetic background. PMID:25651970

  5. The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Robert J; Montgomery, Kelli; Liu, Chih Long; Shah, Nigam H; Prapong, Wijan; Nitzberg, Michael; Zachariah, Zachariah K; Sherlock, Gavin J; Natkunam, Yasodha; West, Robert B; van de Rijn, Matt; Brown, Patrick O; Ball, Catherine A

    2008-01-01

    The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database (TMAD; http://tma.stanford.edu) is a public resource for disseminating annotated tissue images and associated expression data. Stanford University pathologists, researchers and their collaborators worldwide use TMAD for designing, viewing, scoring and analyzing their tissue microarrays. The use of tissue microarrays allows hundreds of human tissue cores to be simultaneously probed by antibodies to detect protein abundance (Immunohistochemistry; IHC), or by labeled nucleic acids (in situ hybridization; ISH) to detect transcript abundance. TMAD archives multi-wavelength fluorescence and bright-field images of tissue microarrays for scoring and analysis. As of July 2007, TMAD contained 205 161 images archiving 349 distinct probes on 1488 tissue microarray slides. Of these, 31 306 images for 68 probes on 125 slides have been released to the public. To date, 12 publications have been based on these raw public data. TMAD incorporates the NCI Thesaurus ontology for searching tissues in the cancer domain. Image processing researchers can extract images and scores for training and testing classification algorithms. The production server uses the Apache HTTP Server, Oracle Database and Perl application code. Source code is available to interested researchers under a no-cost license. PMID:17989087

  6. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  7. Development and application of a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix Genechip® for massively parallel discovery of single position polymorphisms in lettuce (Lactuca spp.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution genetic maps are needed in many crops to help characterize the genetic diversity that determines agriculturally important traits. Hybridization to microarrays to detect single feature polymorphisms is a powerful technique for marker discovery and genotyping because of its highly parallel nature. However, microarrays designed for gene expression analysis rarely provide sufficient gene coverage for optimal detection of nucleotide polymorphisms, which limits utility in species with low rates of polymorphism such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Results We developed a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix GeneChip® for efficient polymorphism discovery and genotyping, as well as for analysis of gene expression in lettuce. Probes on the microarray were designed from 26,809 unigenes from cultivated lettuce and an additional 8,819 unigenes from four related species (L. serriola, L. saligna, L. virosa and L. perennis). Where possible, probes were tiled with a 2 bp stagger, alternating on each DNA strand; providing an average of 187 probes covering approximately 600 bp for each of over 35,000 unigenes; resulting in up to 13 fold redundancy in coverage per nucleotide. We developed protocols for hybridization of genomic DNA to the GeneChip® and refined custom algorithms that utilized coverage from multiple, high quality probes to detect single position polymorphisms in 2 bp sliding windows across each unigene. This allowed us to detect greater than 18,000 polymorphisms between the parental lines of our core mapping population, as well as numerous polymorphisms between cultivated lettuce and wild species in the lettuce genepool. Using marker data from our diversity panel comprised of 52 accessions from the five species listed above, we were able to separate accessions by species using both phylogenetic and principal component analyses. Additionally, we estimated the diversity between different types of cultivated lettuce and distinguished morphological types

  8. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) - about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  9. Microarrayed Materials for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold remarkable promise for applications in disease modeling, cancer therapy and regenerative medicine. Despite the significant progress made during the last decade, designing materials to control stem cell fate remains challenging. As an alternative, materials microarray technology has received great attention because it allows for high throughput materials synthesis and screening at a reasonable cost. Here, we discuss recent developments in materials microarray technology and their applications in stem cell engineering. Future opportunities in the field will also be reviewed. PMID:24311967

  10. Immunoprofiling Using NAPPA Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sibani, Sahar; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Protein microarrays provide an efficient method to immunoprofile patients in an effort to rapidly identify disease immunosignatures. The validity of using autoantibodies in diagnosis has been demonstrated in type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus, and is now being strongly considered in cancer. Several types of protein microarrays exist including antibody and antigen arrays. In this chapter, we describe the immunoprofiling application for one type of antigen array called NAPPA (nucleic acids programmable protein array). We provide a guideline for setting up the screening study and designing protein arrays to maximize the likelihood of obtaining quality data. PMID:21370064

  11. Gene (mRNA) expression in canine atopic dermatitis: microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Merryman-Simpson, Annemarie E; Wood, Shona H; Fretwell, Neale; Jones, Paul G; McLaren, William M; McEwan, Neil A; Clements, Dylan N; Carter, Stuart D; Ollier, William E; Nuttall, Tim

    2008-04-01

    Genes potentially involved in the pathology of canine atopic dermatitis (AD) were identified using gene expression microarrays. Total RNA extracted from skin biopsies was hybridized to an Agilent Technologies custom-designed 22K canine array. The arrays were analysed using Genedata Analyst software. Data were corrected for multiple hypothesis testing and tested for significance using the National Institute on Aging array analysis tool. For comparison, data were divided into separate groups: lesional atopic (n = 16), nonlesional atopic (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9). Fifty-four genes were differentially expressed at a significance level of 0.05 in canine AD compared to healthy controls. Sixteen genes were differentially expressed in both nonlesional and lesional atopic skin, 26 genes only in nonlesional skin and 12 only in lesional skin. These genes were associated with innate immune and inflammatory responses, cell cycle, apoptosis, barrier formation and transcriptional regulation. The most dysregulated gene in lesional skin was S100A8, which showed an almost 23-fold increase in expression. This is a pro-inflammatory cytokine located in the epidermal differentiation complex. Microarray analysis is a novel technique in canine AD. Significant changes in gene expression were identified in atopic skin. These were relevant to skin barrier formation and the immune response, suggesting that they both participate in AD. Gene expression restricted to lesional skin may be involved in inflammatory changes, whereas those shared or restricted to nonlesional skin may reflect the atopic phenotype. Investigating gene polymorphisms in the targets identified in this study will help improve our understanding of the genetic basis of this disease. PMID:18336422

  12. Genetic Diversity of Human Pathogenic Members of the Fusarium oxysporum Complex Inferred from Multilocus DNA Sequence Data and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses: Evidence for the Recent Dispersion of a Geographically Widespread Clonal Lineage and Nosocomial Origin

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Magnon, Karen C.; Cox, Patricia A.; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sanche, Stephen; Geiser, David M.; Juba, Jean H.; van Burik, Jo-Anne H.; Padhye, Arvind; Anaissie, Elias J.; Francesconi, Andrea; Walsh, Thomas J.; Robinson, Jody S.

    2004-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a phylogenetically diverse monophyletic complex of filamentous ascomycetous fungi that are responsible for localized and disseminated life-threatening opportunistic infections in immunocompetent and severely neutropenic patients, respectively. Although members of this complex were isolated from patients during a pseudoepidemic in San Antonio, Tex., and from patients and the water system in a Houston, Tex., hospital during the 1990s, little is known about their genetic relatedness and population structure. This study was conducted to investigate the global genetic diversity and population biology of a comprehensive set of clinically important members of the F. oxysporum complex, focusing on the 33 isolates from patients at the San Antonio hospital and on strains isolated in the United States from the water systems of geographically distant hospitals in Texas, Maryland, and Washington, which were suspected as reservoirs of nosocomial fusariosis. In all, 18 environmental isolates and 88 isolates from patients spanning four continents were genotyped. The major finding of this study, based on concordant results from phylogenetic analyses of multilocus DNA sequence data and amplified fragment length polymorphisms, is that a recently dispersed, geographically widespread clonal lineage is responsible for over 70% of all clinical isolates investigated, including all of those associated with the pseudoepidemic in San Antonio. Moreover, strains of the clonal lineage recovered from patients were conclusively shown to genetically match those isolated from the hospital water systems of three U.S. hospitals, providing support for the hypothesis that hospitals may serve as a reservoir for nosocomial fusarial infections. PMID:15528703

  13. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  14. Microarray analysis: Uses and Limitations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of microarray technology has exploded in resent years. All areas of biological research have found application for this powerful platform. From human disease studies to microbial detection systems, a plethora of uses for this technology are currently in place with new uses being developed ...

  15. Microarray Developed on Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, María-José; Morais, Sergi B; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge potential interest to use synthetic polymers as versatile solid supports for analytical microarraying. Chemical modification of polycarbonate (PC) for covalent immobilization of probes, micro-printing of protein or nucleic acid probes, development of indirect immunoassay, and development of hybridization protocols are described and discussed. PMID:26614067

  16. Evaluating concentration estimation errors in ELISA microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Don Simone; White, Amanda M; Varnum, Susan M; Anderson, Kevin K; Zangar, Richard C

    2005-01-01

    Background Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a standard immunoassay to estimate a protein's concentration in a sample. Deploying ELISA in a microarray format permits simultaneous estimation of the concentrations of numerous proteins in a small sample. These estimates, however, are uncertain due to processing error and biological variability. Evaluating estimation error is critical to interpreting biological significance and improving the ELISA microarray process. Estimation error evaluation must be automated to realize a reliable high-throughput ELISA microarray system. In this paper, we present a statistical method based on propagation of error to evaluate concentration estimation errors in the ELISA microarray process. Although propagation of error is central to this method and the focus of this paper, it is most effective only when comparable data are available. Therefore, we briefly discuss the roles of experimental design, data screening, normalization, and statistical diagnostics when evaluating ELISA microarray concentration estimation errors. Results We use an ELISA microarray investigation of breast cancer biomarkers to illustrate the evaluation of concentration estimation errors. The illustration begins with a description of the design and resulting data, followed by a brief discussion of data screening and normalization. In our illustration, we fit a standard curve to the screened and normalized data, review the modeling diagnostics, and apply propagation of error. We summarize the results with a simple, three-panel diagnostic visualization featuring a scatterplot of the standard data with logistic standard curve and 95% confidence intervals, an annotated histogram of sample measurements, and a plot of the 95% concentration coefficient of variation, or relative error, as a function of concentration. Conclusions This statistical method should be of value in the rapid evaluation and quality control of high-throughput ELISA microarray analyses

  17. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  18. The neoglycolipid (NGL)-based oligosaccharide microarray system poised to decipher the meta-glycome

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Angelina S.; Feizi, Ten; Childs, Robert A.; Chai, Wengang; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The neoglycolipid (NGL) technology is the basis of a state-of-the-art oligosaccharide microarray system. The NGL-based microarray system in the Glycosciences Laboratory Imperial College London (http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/glycosciences), is one of the two leading platforms for glycan microarrays, being offered for screening analyses to the broad biomedical community. Highlighted in this review are the sensitivity of the analysis system and, coupled with mass spectrometry, the provision for generating ‘designer’ microarrays from glycomes to identify novel ligands of biological relevance. Among recent applications are: assignments of ligands for apicomplexan parasites, pandemic 2009 influenza virus, polyoma and reoviruses, an innate immune receptor against fungal pathogens, Dectin-1, and a novel protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, malectin; also the characterization of an elusive cancer-associated antigen. Some other contemporary advances in glycolipid-containing arrays and microarrays are also discussed. PMID:24508828

  19. Uses of Dendrimers for DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Caminade, Anne-Marie; Padié, Clément; Laurent, Régis; Maraval, Alexandrine; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Biosensors such as DNA microarrays and microchips are gaining an increasing importance in medicinal, forensic, and environmental analyses. Such devices are based on the detection of supramolecular interactions called hybridizations that occur between complementary oligonucleotides, one linked to a solid surface (the probe), and the other one to be analyzed (the target). This paper focuses on the improvements that hyperbranched and perfectly defined nanomolecules called dendrimers can provide to this methodology. Two main uses of dendrimers for such purpose have been described up to now; either the dendrimer is used as linker between the solid surface and the probe oligonucleotide, or the dendrimer is used as a multilabeled entity linked to the target oligonucleotide. In the first case the dendrimer generally induces a higher loading of probes and an easier hybridization, due to moving away the solid phase. In the second case the high number of localized labels (generally fluorescent) induces an increased sensitivity, allowing the detection of small quantities of biological entities.

  20. Biclustering of time series microarray data.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jia; Huang, Yufei

    2012-01-01

    Clustering is a popular data exploration technique widely used in microarray data analysis. In this chapter, we review ideas and algorithms of bicluster and its applications in time series microarray analysis. We introduce first the concept and importance of biclustering and its different variations. We then focus our discussion on the popular iterative signature algorithm (ISA) for searching biclusters in microarray dataset. Next, we discuss in detail the enrichment constraint time-dependent ISA (ECTDISA) for identifying biologically meaningful temporal transcription modules from time series microarray dataset. In the end, we provide an example of ECTDISA application to time series microarray data of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. PMID:22130875

  1. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manufacturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microarrays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  2. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manu facturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthe-sized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microar-rays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  3. Tissue microarrays: applications in genomic research.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Aprill; Cornelison, Robert; Hostetter, Galen

    2005-03-01

    The widespread application of tissue microarrays in cancer research and the clinical pathology laboratory demonstrates a versatile and portable technology. The rapid integration of tissue microarrays into biomarker discovery and validation processes reflects the forward thinking of researchers who have pioneered the high-density tissue microarray. The precise arrangement of hundreds of archival clinical tissue samples into a composite tissue microarray block is now a proven method for the efficient and standardized analysis of molecular markers. With applications in cancer research, tissue microarrays are a valuable tool in validating candidate markers discovered in highly sensitive genome-wide microarray experiments. With applications in clinical pathology, tissue microarrays are used widely in immunohistochemistry quality control and quality assurance. The timeline of a biomarker implicated in prostate neoplasia, which was identified by complementary DNA expression profiling, validated by tissue microarrays and is now used as a prognostic immunohistochemistry marker, is reviewed. The tissue microarray format provides opportunities for digital imaging acquisition, image processing and database integration. Advances in digital imaging help to alleviate previous bottlenecks in the research pipeline, permit computer image scoring and convey telepathology opportunities for remote image analysis. The tissue microarray industry now includes public and private sectors with varying degrees of research utility and offers a range of potential tissue microarray applications in basic research, prognostic oncology and drug discovery. PMID:15833047

  4. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Heo, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Jin Yeop; Liuzzi, Michel; Soloveva, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  5. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  6. Optimisation algorithms for microarray biclustering.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Dimitri; Duhamel, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    In providing simultaneous information on expression profiles for thousands of genes, microarray technologies have, in recent years, been largely used to investigate mechanisms of gene expression. Clustering and classification of such data can, indeed, highlight patterns and provide insight on biological processes. A common approach is to consider genes and samples of microarray datasets as nodes in a bipartite graphs, where edges are weighted e.g. based on the expression levels. In this paper, using a previously-evaluated weighting scheme, we focus on search algorithms and evaluate, in the context of biclustering, several variations of Genetic Algorithms. We also introduce a new heuristic "Propagate", which consists in recursively evaluating neighbour solutions with one more or one less active conditions. The results obtained on three well-known datasets show that, for a given weighting scheme, optimal or near-optimal solutions can be identified. PMID:24109756

  7. Examination of Oral Cancer Biomarkers by Tissue Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Peter; Jordan, C. Diana; Mendez, Eduardo; Houck, John; Yueh, Bevan; Farwell, D. Gregory; Futran, Neal; Chen, Chu

    2008-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major healthcare problem worldwide. Efforts in our laboratory and others focusing on the molecular characterization of OSCC tumors with the use of DNA microarrays have yielded heterogeneous results. To validate the DNA microarray results on a subset of genes from these studies that could potentially serve as biomarkers of OSCC, we elected to examine their expression by an alternate quantitative method and by assessing their protein levels. Design Based on DNA microarray data from our lab and data reported in the literature, we identified six potential biomarkers of OSCC to investigate further. We employed quantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to examine expression changes of CDH11, MMP3, SPARC, POSTN, TNC, TGM3 in OSCC and normal control tissues. We further examined validated markers on the protein level by immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of OSCC tissue microarray (TMA) sections. Results qRT-PCR analysis revealed up-regulation of CDH11, SPARC, POSTN, and TNC gene expression, and decreased TGM3 expression in OSCC compared to normal controls. MMP3 was not found to be differentially expressed. In TMA IHC analyses, SPARC, periostin, and tenascin C exhibited increased protein expression in cancer compared to normal tissues, and their expression was primarily localized within tumor-associated stroma rather than tumor epithelium. Conversely, transglutaminase-3 protein expression was found only within keratinocytes in normal controls, and was significantly down-regulated in cancer cells. Conclusions Of six potential gene markers of OSCC, initially identified by DNA microarray analyses, differential expression of CDH11, SPARC, POSTN, TNC, and TGM3 were validated by qRT-PCR. Differential expression and localization of proteins encoded by SPARC, POSTN, TNC, and TGM3 were clearly shown by TMA IHC. PMID:18490578

  8. ArrayPipe: a flexible processing pipeline for microarray data.

    PubMed

    Hokamp, Karsten; Roche, Fiona M; Acab, Michael; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Kuo, Byron; Goode, David; Aeschliman, Dana; Bryan, Jenny; Babiuk, Lorne A; Hancock, Robert E W; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2004-07-01

    A number of microarray analysis software packages exist already; however, none combines the user-friendly features of a web-based interface with potential ability to analyse multiple arrays at once using flexible analysis steps. The ArrayPipe web server (freely available at www.pathogenomics.ca/arraypipe) allows the automated application of complex analyses to microarray data which can range from single slides to large data sets including replicates and dye-swaps. It handles output from most commonly used quantification software packages for dual-labelled arrays. Application features range from quality assessment of slides through various data visualizations to multi-step analyses including normalization, detection of differentially expressed genes, andcomparison and highlighting of gene lists. A highly customizable action set-up facilitates unrestricted arrangement of functions, which can be stored as action profiles. A unique combination of web-based and command-line functionality enables comfortable configuration of processes that can be repeatedly applied to large data sets in high throughput. The output consists of reports formatted as standard web pages and tab-delimited lists of calculated values that can be inserted into other analysis programs. Additional features, such as web-based spreadsheet functionality, auto-parallelization and password protection make this a powerful tool in microarray research for individuals and large groups alike. PMID:15215429

  9. Analysis of porcine MHC using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Wahlberg, Per; Marthey, Sylvain; Esquerré, Diane; Jaffrézic, Florence; Lecardonnel, Jérome; Hugot, Karine; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2012-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in Mammals is one of the most gene dense regions of the genome and contains the polymorphic histocompatibility gene families known to be involved in pathogen response and control of auto-immunity. The MHC is a complex genetic system that provides an interesting model system to study genome expression regulation and genetic diversity at the megabase scale. The pig MHC or SLA (Swine Leucocyte Antigen) complex spans 2.4 megabases and 151 loci have been annotated. We will review key results from previous RNA expression studies using microarrays containing probes specific to annotated loci within SLA and in addition present novel data obtained using high-density tiling arrays encompassing the whole SLA complex. We have focused on transcriptome modifications of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with a mixture of phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin known to activate B and T cell proliferation. Our results show that numerous loci mapping to the SLA complex are affected by the treatment. A general decreased level of expression for class I and II genes and an up-regulation of genes involved in peptide processing and transport were observed. Tiling array-based experiments contributed to refined gene annotations as presented for one SLA class I gene referred to as SLA-11. In conclusion, high-density tiling arrays can serve as an excellent tool to draw comprehensive transcription maps, and improve genome annotations for the SLA complex. We are currently studying their relevance to characterize SLA genetic diversity in combination with high throughput next generation sequencing. PMID:21561666

  10. Integrated Amplification Microarrays for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Bryant, Lexi; Griesemer, Sara B.; Gu, Rui; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Kukhtin, Alexander; Parker, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Cynthia; George, Kirsten St.; Cooney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This overview describes microarray-based tests that combine solution-phase amplification chemistry and microarray hybridization within a single microfluidic chamber. The integrated biochemical approach improves microarray workflow for diagnostic applications by reducing the number of steps and minimizing the potential for sample or amplicon cross-contamination. Examples described herein illustrate a basic, integrated approach for DNA and RNA genomes, and a simple consumable architecture for incorporating wash steps while retaining an entirely closed system. It is anticipated that integrated microarray biochemistry will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of microarray consumables, equipment, and workflow, which in turn will enable a broader spectrum of users to exploit the intrinsic multiplexing power of microarrays for infectious disease diagnostics.

  11. Simple sequence repeat polymorphisms in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic mapping, forward genetic analyses, and marker-assisted selection (MAS) have been intractable in intraspecific populations of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea), primarily because domestication and breeding bottlenecks have narrowed genetic diversity and depleted DNA polymorphisms. The DNA...

  12. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  13. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  14. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  15. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  16. Protein microarrays as tools for functional proteomics.

    PubMed

    LaBaer, Joshua; Ramachandran, Niroshan

    2005-02-01

    Protein microarrays present an innovative and versatile approach to study protein abundance and function at an unprecedented scale. Given the chemical and structural complexity of the proteome, the development of protein microarrays has been challenging. Despite these challenges there has been a marked increase in the use of protein microarrays to map interactions of proteins with various other molecules, and to identify potential disease biomarkers, especially in the area of cancer biology. In this review, we discuss some of the promising advances made in the development and use of protein microarrays. PMID:15701447

  17. Simultaneous Discrimination between 15 Fish Pathogens by Using 16S Ribosomal DNA PCR and DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Warsen, Adelaide E.; Krug, Melissa J.; LaFrentz, Stacey; Stanek, Danielle R.; Loge, Frank J.; Call, Douglas R.

    2004-01-01

    We developed a DNA microarray suitable for simultaneous detection and discrimination between multiple bacterial species based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphisms using glass slides. Microarray probes (22- to 31-mer oligonucleotides) were spotted onto Teflon-masked, epoxy-silane-derivatized glass slides using a robotic arrayer. PCR products (ca. 199 bp) were generated using biotinylated, universal primer sequences, and these products were hybridized overnight (55°C) to the microarray. Targets that annealed to microarray probes were detected using a combination of Tyramide Signal Amplification and Alexa Fluor 546. This methodology permitted 100% specificity for detection of 18 microbes, 15 of which were fish pathogens. With universal 16S rDNA PCR (limited to 28 cycles), detection sensitivity for purified control DNA was equivalent to <150 genomes (675 fg), and this sensitivity was not adversely impacted either by the presence of competing bacterial DNA (1.1 × 106 genomes; 5 ng) or by the addition of up to 500 ng of fish DNA. Consequently, coupling 16S rDNA PCR with a microarray detector appears suitable for diagnostic detection and surveillance for commercially important fish pathogens. PMID:15240304

  18. Photoelectrochemical synthesis of DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Brian Y.; Emig, Christopher J.; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Optical addressing of semiconductor electrodes represents a powerful technology that enables the independent and parallel control of a very large number of electrical phenomena at the solid-electrolyte interface. To date, it has been used in a wide range of applications including electrophoretic manipulation, biomolecule sensing, and stimulating networks of neurons. Here, we have adapted this approach for the parallel addressing of redox reactions, and report the construction of a DNA microarray synthesis platform based on semiconductor photoelectrochemistry (PEC). An amorphous silicon photoconductor is activated by an optical projection system to create virtual electrodes capable of electrochemically generating protons; these PEC-generated protons then cleave the acid-labile dimethoxytrityl protecting groups of DNA phosphoramidite synthesis reagents with the requisite spatial selectivity to generate DNA microarrays. Furthermore, a thin-film porous glass dramatically increases the amount of DNA synthesized per chip by over an order of magnitude versus uncoated glass. This platform demonstrates that PEC can be used toward combinatorial bio-polymer and small molecule synthesis. PMID:19706433

  19. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  20. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  1. Mouse strain specific gene expression differences for illumina microarray expression profiling in embryos

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the field of mouse genetics the advent of technologies like microarray based expression profiling dramatically increased data availability and sensitivity, yet these advanced methods are often vulnerable to the unavoidable heterogeneity of in vivo material and might therefore reflect differentially expressed genes between mouse strains of no relevance to a targeted experiment. The aim of this study was not to elaborate on the usefulness of microarray analysis in general, but to expand our knowledge regarding this potential “background noise” for the widely used Illumina microarray platform surpassing existing data which focused primarily on the adult sensory and nervous system, by analyzing patterns of gene expression at different embryonic stages using wild type strains and modern transgenic models of often non-isogenic backgrounds. Results Wild type embryos of 11 mouse strains commonly used in transgenic and molecular genetic studies at three developmental time points were subjected to Illumina microarray expression profiling in a strain-by-strain comparison. Our data robustly reflects known gene expression patterns during mid-gestation development. Decreasing diversity of the input tissue and/or increasing strain diversity raised the sensitivity of the array towards the genetic background. Consistent strain sensitivity of some probes was attributed to genetic polymorphisms or probe design related artifacts. Conclusion Our study provides an extensive reference list of gene expression profiling background noise of value to anyone in the field of developmental biology and transgenic research performing microarray expression profiling with the widely used Illumina microarray platform. Probes identified as strain specific background noise further allow for microarray expression profiling on its own to be a valuable tool for establishing genealogies of mouse inbred strains. PMID:22583621

  2. Polymorphic light eruption

    MedlinePlus

    ... outdoors. Wear a sun hat. Wear sunglasses with UV protection. Use a lip balm with sunscreen. Alternative Names Polymorphic light eruption; Photodermatosis; PMLE Images Polymorphic light eruption on ...

  3. Molecular Microbial Analyses of the Mars Exploration Rovers Assembly Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; LaDuc, Myron T.; Newcombe, David; Kempf, Michael J.; Koke, John. A.; Smoot, James C.; Smoot, Laura M.; Stahl, David A.

    2004-01-01

    During space exploration, the control of terrestrial microbes associated with robotic space vehicles intended to land on extraterrestrial solar system bodies is necessary to prevent forward contamination and maintain scientific integrity during the search for life. Microorganisms associated with the spacecraft assembly environment can be a source of contamination for the spacecraft. In this study, we have monitored the microbial burden of air samples of the Mars Exploration Rovers' assembly facility at the Kennedy Space Center utilizing complementary diagnostic tools. To estimate the microbial burden and identify potential contaminants in the assembly facility, several microbiological techniques were used including culturing, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, DNA microarray analysis, and ATP assays to assess viable microorganisms. Culturing severely underestimated types and amounts of contamination since many of the microbes implicated by molecular analyses were not cultivable. In addition to the cultivation of Agrobacterium, Burkholderia and Bacillus species, the cloning approach retrieved 16s rDNA sequences of oligotrophs, symbionts, and y-proteobacteria members. DNA microarray analysis based on rational probe design and dissociation curves complemented existing molecular techniques and produced a highly parallel, high resolution analysis of contaminating microbial populations. For instance, strong hybridization signals to probes targeting the Bacillus species indicated that members of this species were present in the assembly area samples; however, differences in dissociation curves between perfect-match and air sample sequences showed that these samples harbored nucleotide polymorphisms. Vegetative cells of several isolates were resistant when subjected to treatments of UVC (254 nm) and vapor H202 (4 mg/L). This study further validates the significance of non-cultivable microbes in association with spacecraft assembly facilities, as our analyses have

  4. Microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in ripening pineapple fruits

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is a tropical fruit crop of significant commercial importance. Although the physiological changes that occur during pineapple fruit development have been well characterized, little is known about the molecular events that occur during the fruit ripening process. Understanding the molecular basis of pineapple fruit ripening will aid the development of new varieties via molecular breeding or genetic modification. In this study we developed a 9277 element pineapple microarray and used it to profile gene expression changes that occur during pineapple fruit ripening. Results Microarray analyses identified 271 unique cDNAs differentially expressed at least 1.5-fold between the mature green and mature yellow stages of pineapple fruit ripening. Among these 271 sequences, 184 share significant homology with genes encoding proteins of known function, 53 share homology with genes encoding proteins of unknown function and 34 share no significant homology with any database accession. Of the 237 pineapple sequences with homologs, 160 were up-regulated and 77 were down-regulated during pineapple fruit ripening. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster (FAC) analysis of all 237 sequences with homologs revealed confident enrichment scores for redox activity, organic acid metabolism, metalloenzyme activity, glycolysis, vitamin C biosynthesis, antioxidant activity and cysteine peptidase activity, indicating the functional significance and importance of these processes and pathways during pineapple fruit development. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated the microarray expression results for nine out of ten genes tested. Conclusions This is the first report of a microarray based gene expression study undertaken in pineapple. Our bioinformatic analyses of the transcript profiles have identified a number of genes, processes and pathways with putative involvement in the pineapple fruit ripening process. This study extends our knowledge of the

  5. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  6. Protein-Based Microarray for the Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays have been used for gene expression and protein interaction studies, but recently, multianalyte diagnostic assays have employed the microarray platform. We developed a microarray immunoassay for bacteria, with biotinylated capture antibodies on streptavidin slides. To complete the fluor...

  7. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  8. Expression and Polymorphism of Watermelon Fruit ESTs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 8,000 ESTs were generated for watermelon and were assembled into 4,700 EST-unigenes (http://www.icugi.org). Microarray and Real-Time PCR analyses were used to examine differential expression of 832 of these EST-unigenes in developing and ripening watermelon fruit. RNA was isolated from waterm...

  9. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  10. MARS: Microarray analysis, retrieval, and storage system

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Michael; Molidor, Robert; Sturn, Alexander; Hartler, Juergen; Hackl, Hubert; Stocker, Gernot; Prokesch, Andreas; Scheideler, Marcel; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2005-01-01

    Background Microarray analysis has become a widely used technique for the study of gene-expression patterns on a genomic scale. As more and more laboratories are adopting microarray technology, there is a need for powerful and easy to use microarray databases facilitating array fabrication, labeling, hybridization, and data analysis. The wealth of data generated by this high throughput approach renders adequate database and analysis tools crucial for the pursuit of insights into the transcriptomic behavior of cells. Results MARS (Microarray Analysis and Retrieval System) provides a comprehensive MIAME supportive suite for storing, retrieving, and analyzing multi color microarray data. The system comprises a laboratory information management system (LIMS), a quality control management, as well as a sophisticated user management system. MARS is fully integrated into an analytical pipeline of microarray image analysis, normalization, gene expression clustering, and mapping of gene expression data onto biological pathways. The incorporation of ontologies and the use of MAGE-ML enables an export of studies stored in MARS to public repositories and other databases accepting these documents. Conclusion We have developed an integrated system tailored to serve the specific needs of microarray based research projects using a unique fusion of Web based and standalone applications connected to the latest J2EE application server technology. The presented system is freely available for academic and non-profit institutions. More information can be found at . PMID:15836795

  11. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection. PMID:27190571

  12. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  13. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  14. EMAAS: An extensible grid-based Rich Internet Application for microarray data analysis and management

    PubMed Central

    Barton, G; Abbott, J; Chiba, N; Huang, DW; Huang, Y; Krznaric, M; Mack-Smith, J; Saleem, A; Sherman, BT; Tiwari, B; Tomlinson, C; Aitman, T; Darlington, J; Game, L; Sternberg, MJE; Butcher, SA

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarray experimentation requires the application of complex analysis methods as well as the use of non-trivial computer technologies to manage the resultant large data sets. This, together with the proliferation of tools and techniques for microarray data analysis, makes it very challenging for a laboratory scientist to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in this field. Our aim was to develop a distributed e-support system for microarray data analysis and management. Results EMAAS (Extensible MicroArray Analysis System) is a multi-user rich internet application (RIA) providing simple, robust access to up-to-date resources for microarray data storage and analysis, combined with integrated tools to optimise real time user support and training. The system leverages the power of distributed computing to perform microarray analyses, and provides seamless access to resources located at various remote facilities. The EMAAS framework allows users to import microarray data from several sources to an underlying database, to pre-process, quality assess and analyse the data, to perform functional analyses, and to track data analysis steps, all through a single easy to use web portal. This interface offers distance support to users both in the form of video tutorials and via live screen feeds using the web conferencing tool EVO. A number of analysis packages, including R-Bioconductor and Affymetrix Power Tools have been integrated on the server side and are available programmatically through the Postgres-PLR library or on grid compute clusters. Integrated distributed resources include the functional annotation tool DAVID, GeneCards and the microarray data repositories GEO, CELSIUS and MiMiR. EMAAS currently supports analysis of Affymetrix 3' and Exon expression arrays, and the system is extensible to cater for other microarray and transcriptomic platforms. Conclusion EMAAS enables users to track and perform microarray data management and analysis tasks

  15. AMIC@: All MIcroarray Clusterings @ once

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Filippo; Pellegrini, Marco; Renda, M. Elena

    2008-01-01

    The AMIC@ Web Server offers a light-weight multi-method clustering engine for microarray gene-expression data. AMIC@ is a highly interactive tool that stresses user-friendliness and robustness by adopting AJAX technology, thus allowing an effective interleaved execution of different clustering algorithms and inspection of results. Among the salient features AMIC@ offers, there are: (i) automatic file format detection, (ii) suggestions on the number of clusters using a variant of the stability-based method of Tibshirani et al. (iii) intuitive visual inspection of the data via heatmaps and (iv) measurements of the clustering quality using cluster homogeneity. Large data sets can be processed efficiently by selecting algorithms (such as FPF-SB and k-Boost), specifically designed for this purpose. In case of very large data sets, the user can opt for a batch-mode use of the system by means of the Clustering wizard that runs all algorithms at once and delivers the results via email. AMIC@ is freely available and open to all users with no login requirement at the following URL http://bioalgo.iit.cnr.it/amica. PMID:18477631

  16. AMIC@: All MIcroarray Clusterings @ once.

    PubMed

    Geraci, Filippo; Pellegrini, Marco; Renda, M Elena

    2008-07-01

    The AMIC@ Web Server offers a light-weight multi-method clustering engine for microarray gene-expression data. AMIC@ is a highly interactive tool that stresses user-friendliness and robustness by adopting AJAX technology, thus allowing an effective interleaved execution of different clustering algorithms and inspection of results. Among the salient features AMIC@ offers, there are: (i) automatic file format detection, (ii) suggestions on the number of clusters using a variant of the stability-based method of Tibshirani et al. (iii) intuitive visual inspection of the data via heatmaps and (iv) measurements of the clustering quality using cluster homogeneity. Large data sets can be processed efficiently by selecting algorithms (such as FPF-SB and k-Boost), specifically designed for this purpose. In case of very large data sets, the user can opt for a batch-mode use of the system by means of the Clustering wizard that runs all algorithms at once and delivers the results via email. AMIC@ is freely available and open to all users with no login requirement at the following URL http://bioalgo.iit.cnr.it/amica. PMID:18477631

  17. Integrating Microarray Data and GRNs.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, L; Potamias, G; Tsiknakis, M; Zervakis, M; Moustakis, V

    2016-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the emergence of high-throughput technologies, a vast amount of molecular and biological data are being produced. Two of the most important and significant data sources come from microarray gene-expression experiments and respective databanks (e,g., Gene Expression Omnibus-GEO (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo)), and from molecular pathways and Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs) stored and curated in public (e.g., Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes-KEGG (http://www.genome.jp/kegg/pathway.html), Reactome (http://www.reactome.org/ReactomeGWT/entrypoint.html)) as well as in commercial repositories (e.g., Ingenuity IPA (http://www.ingenuity.com/products/ipa)). The association of these two sources aims to give new insight in disease understanding and reveal new molecular targets in the treatment of specific phenotypes.Three major research lines and respective efforts that try to utilize and combine data from both of these sources could be identified, namely: (1) de novo reconstruction of GRNs, (2) identification of Gene-signatures, and (3) identification of differentially expressed GRN functional paths (i.e., sub-GRN paths that distinguish between different phenotypes). In this chapter, we give an overview of the existing methods that support the different types of gene-expression and GRN integration with a focus on methodologies that aim to identify phenotype-discriminant GRNs or subnetworks, and we also present our methodology. PMID:26134183

  18. A microarray analysis of two distinct lymphatic endothelial cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Schweighofer, Bernhard; Rohringer, Sabrina; Pröll, Johannes; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) to form two morphologically different populations, exhibiting significantly different surface protein expression levels of podoplanin, a major surface marker for this cell type. In vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT) of LECs resulted in enrichment of the podoplaninhigh cell population and was accompanied by markedly increased cell proliferation, as well as 2D and 3D migration. Gene expression profiles of these distinct populations were established using Affymetrix microarray analyses. Here we provide additional details about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE62510) and describe how we analyzed the data to identify differently expressed genes in these two LEC populations. PMID:26484194

  19. Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Fish Pathogens Using a Naked-Eye Readable DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-I; Hung, Pei-Hsin; Wu, Chia-Che; Cheng, Ta Chih; Tsai, Jyh-Ming; Lin, King-Jung; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    We coupled 16S rDNA PCR and DNA hybridization technology to construct a microarray for simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight fish pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Flavobacterium columnare, Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio anguillarum) commonly encountered in aquaculture. The array comprised short oligonucleotide probes (30 mer) complementary to the polymorphic regions of 16S rRNA genes for the target pathogens. Targets annealed to the microarray probes were reacted with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP), resulting in blue spots that are easily visualized by the naked eye. Testing was performed against a total of 168 bacterial strains, i.e., 26 representative collection strains, 81 isolates of target fish pathogens, and 61 ecologically or phylogenetically related strains. The results showed that each probe consistently identified its corresponding target strain with 100% specificity. The detection limit of the microarray was estimated to be in the range of 1 pg for genomic DNA and 103 CFU/mL for pure pathogen cultures. These high specificity and sensitivity results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays in the diagnostic detection of fish pathogens. PMID:22736973

  20. Simultaneous detection of multiple fish pathogens using a naked-eye readable DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-I; Hung, Pei-Hsin; Wu, Chia-Che; Cheng, Ta Chih; Tsai, Jyh-Ming; Lin, King-Jung; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    We coupled 16S rDNA PCR and DNA hybridization technology to construct a microarray for simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight fish pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Flavobacterium columnare, Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio anguillarum) commonly encountered in aquaculture. The array comprised short oligonucleotide probes (30 mer) complementary to the polymorphic regions of 16S rRNA genes for the target pathogens. Targets annealed to the microarray probes were reacted with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3'-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP), resulting in blue spots that are easily visualized by the naked eye. Testing was performed against a total of 168 bacterial strains, i.e., 26 representative collection strains, 81 isolates of target fish pathogens, and 61 ecologically or phylogenetically related strains. The results showed that each probe consistently identified its corresponding target strain with 100% specificity. The detection limit of the microarray was estimated to be in the range of 1 pg for genomic DNA and 10(3) CFU/mL for pure pathogen cultures. These high specificity and sensitivity results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays in the diagnostic detection of fish pathogens. PMID:22736973

  1. Informatics Enhanced SNP Microarray Analysis of 30 Miscarriage Samples Compared to Routine Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lathi, Ruth B.; Loring, Megan; Massie, Jamie A. M.; Demko, Zachary P.; Johnson, David; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Gemelos, George; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The metaphase karyotype is often used as a diagnostic tool in the setting of early miscarriage; however this technique has several limitations. We evaluate a new technique for karyotyping that uses single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP). This technique was compared in a blinded, prospective fashion, to the traditional metaphase karyotype. Methods Patients undergoing dilation and curettage for first trimester miscarriage between February and August 2010 were enrolled. Samples of chorionic villi were equally divided and sent for microarray testing in parallel with routine cytogenetic testing. Results Thirty samples were analyzed, with only four discordant results. Discordant results occurred when the entire genome was duplicated or when a balanced rearrangement was present. Cytogenetic karyotyping took an average of 29 days while microarray-based karytoyping took an average of 12 days. Conclusions Molecular karyotyping of POC after missed abortion using SNP microarray analysis allows for the ability to detect maternal cell contamination and provides rapid results with good concordance to standard cytogenetic analysis. PMID:22403611

  2. Quality Visualization of Microarray Datasets Using Circos

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Martin; Wiese, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Quality control and normalization is considered the most important step in the analysis of microarray data. At present there are various methods available for quality assessments of microarray datasets. However there seems to be no standard visualization routine, which also depicts individual microarray quality. Here we present a convenient method for visualizing the results of standard quality control tests using Circos plots. In these plots various quality measurements are drawn in a circular fashion, thus allowing for visualization of the quality and all outliers of each distinct array within a microarray dataset. The proposed method is intended for use with the Affymetrix Human Genome platform (i.e., GPL 96, GPL570 and GPL571). Circos quality measurement plots are a convenient way for the initial quality estimate of Affymetrix datasets that are stored in publicly available databases.

  3. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van Huet, Ramon A. C.; Pierrache, Laurence H.M.; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Wijs, Ilse J.; Collin, Rob W. J.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Methods We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon–intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. Results The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). Conclusions The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis. PMID:25999674

  4. Development, Characterization and Experimental Validation of a Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Gene Expression Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  5. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  6. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  7. Selective recognition of DNA from olive leaves and olive oil by PNA and modified-PNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Stefano; Calabretta, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Arcioni, Sergio; Baldoni, Luciana; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2012-01-01

    PNA probes for the specific detection of DNA from olive oil samples by microarray technology were developed. The presence of as low as 5% refined hazelnut (Corylus avellana) oil in extra-virgin olive oil (Olea europaea L.) could be detected by using a PNA microarray. A set of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the Actin gene of Olive was chosen as a model for evaluating the ability of PNA probes for discriminating olive cultivars. Both unmodified and C2-modified PNAs bearing an arginine side-chain were used, the latter showing higher sequence specificity. DNA extracted from leaves of three different cultivars (Ogliarola leccese, Canino and Frantoio) could be easily discriminated using a microarray with unmodified PNA probes, whereas discrimination of DNA from oil samples was more challenging, and could be obtained only by using chiral PNA probes. PMID:22772038

  8. Selective recognition of DNA from olive leaves and olive oil by PNA and modified-PNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Stefano; Calabretta, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Arcioni, Sergio; Baldoni, Luciana; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2012-01-01

    PNA probes for the specific detection of DNA from olive oil samples by microarray technology were developed. The presence of as low as 5% refined hazelnut (Corylus avellana) oil in extra-virgin olive oil (Olea europaea L.) could be detected by using a PNA microarray. A set of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the Actin gene of Olive was chosen as a model for evaluating the ability of PNA probes for discriminating olive cultivars. Both unmodified and C2-modified PNAs bearing an arginine side-chain were used, the latter showing higher sequence specificity. DNA extracted from leaves of three different cultivars (Ogliarola leccese, Canino and Frantoio) could be easily discriminated using a microarray with unmodified PNA probes, whereas discrimination of DNA from oil samples was more challenging, and could be obtained only by using chiral PNA probes. PMID:22772038

  9. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner’s laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube’s voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  10. Comparison of RNA-Seq and Microarray in Transcriptome Profiling of Activated T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shanrong; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Bittner, Anton; Ngo, Karen; Liu, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the benefits of RNA-Seq over microarray in transcriptome profiling, both RNA-Seq and microarray analyses were performed on RNA samples from a human T cell activation experiment. In contrast to other reports, our analyses focused on the difference, rather than similarity, between RNA-Seq and microarray technologies in transcriptome profiling. A comparison of data sets derived from RNA-Seq and Affymetrix platforms using the same set of samples showed a high correlation between gene expression profiles generated by the two platforms. However, it also demonstrated that RNA-Seq was superior in detecting low abundance transcripts, differentiating biologically critical isoforms, and allowing the identification of genetic variants. RNA-Seq also demonstrated a broader dynamic range than microarray, which allowed for the detection of more differentially expressed genes with higher fold-change. Analysis of the two datasets also showed the benefit derived from avoidance of technical issues inherent to microarray probe performance such as cross-hybridization, non-specific hybridization and limited detection range of individual probes. Because RNA-Seq does not rely on a pre-designed complement sequence detection probe, it is devoid of issues associated with probe redundancy and annotation, which simplified interpretation of the data. Despite the superior benefits of RNA-Seq, microarrays are still the more common choice of researchers when conducting transcriptional profiling experiments. This is likely because RNA-Seq sequencing technology is new to most researchers, more expensive than microarray, data storage is more challenging and analysis is more complex. We expect that once these barriers are overcome, the RNA-Seq platform will become the predominant tool for transcriptome analysis. PMID:24454679

  11. Rivastigmine hydrogen tartrate polymorphs: Solid-state characterisation of transition and polymorphic conversion via milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Maria Inês; Simon, Alice; Cabral, Lúcio Mendes; de Sousa, Valéria Pereira; Healy, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Rivastigmine (RHT) is an active pharmaceutical ingredient that is used for the treatment of mild to moderately severe dementia in Alzheimer's disease, and is known to present two polymorphic forms and to amorphise upon granulation. To date there is no information in the scientific or patent literature on polymorphic transition and stability. Hence, the aim of the current study was to gain a fundamental understanding of the polymorphic forms by (1) evaluating RHT thermodynamic stability (monotropy or enantiotropy) and (2) investigating the potential for polymorphic transformation upon milling. The two polymorphic and amorphous forms were characterised using X-ray powder diffractometry, thermal analyses, infra-red spectroscopy and water sorption analysis. The polymorphic transition was found to be spontaneous (ΔG0 < 0) and exothermic (ΔH0 < 0), indicative of a monotropic polymorph pair. The kinetic studies showed a fast initial polymorphic transition characterised by a heterogeneous nucleation, followed by a slow crystal growth. Ball milling can be used to promote the polymorphic transition and for the production of RHT amorphous form.

  12. RECOVERING FILTER-BASED MICROARRAY DATA FOR PATHWAYS ANALYSIS USING A MULTIPOINT ALIGNMENT STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of commercial microarrays are rapidly becoming the method of choice for profiling gene expression and assessing various disease states. Research Genetics has provided a series of well defined biological and software tools to the research community for these analyses. Th...

  13. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  14. Isolation of Coxiella burnetii by a centrifugation shell-vial assay from ticks collected in Cyprus: detection by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses.

    PubMed

    Spyridaki, Ioanna; Psaroulaki, Anna; Loukaides, Fidias; Antoniou, Maria; Hadjichristodolou, Christos; Tselentis, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Ticks are the principal vectors and reservoirs of Coxiella burnetii. The identification of isolates is necessary for understanding the clinical diversity of Q fever in different geographic areas. This is the first report of isolation of C. burnetii from ticks by the shell-vial assay and by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of this pathogen in ticks. Of 141 ticks collected in Cyprus (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Hyalloma spp.), 10% were found to be infected with C. burnetii. Three ticks were positive by hemolymph test, and 11 triturated ticks were positive by nested PCR. Three isolates were obtained by the centrifugation shell-vial technique. Analysis by PCR, then restriction fragment length polymorphism showed that the 3 Cyprus isolates had identical restriction profiles to reference strains Nine Mile and Q212. The methods described are useful in studying the epidemiology and ecology of C. burnetii. PMID:12135275

  15. Structural analysis of hepatitis C RNA genome using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Martell, María; Briones, Carlos; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Piron, María; Esteban, Juan I.; Esteban, Rafael; Guardia, Jaime; Gómez, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have tried to identify specific nucleotide sequences in the quasispecies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that determine resistance or sensitivity to interferon (IFN) therapy, unfortunately without conclusive results. Although viral proteins represent the most evident phenotype of the virus, genomic RNA sequences determine secondary and tertiary structures which are also part of the viral phenotype and can be involved in important biological roles. In this work, a method of RNA structure analysis has been developed based on the hybridization of labelled HCV transcripts to microarrays of complementary DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridizations were carried out at non-denaturing conditions, using appropriate temperature and buffer composition to allow binding to the immobilized probes of the RNA transcript without disturbing its secondary/tertiary structural motifs. Oligonucleotides printed onto the microarray covered the entire 5′ non-coding region (5′NCR), the first three-quarters of the core region, the E2–NS2 junction and the first 400 nt of the NS3 region. We document the use of this methodology to analyse the structural degree of a large region of HCV genomic RNA in two genotypes associated with different responses to IFN treatment. The results reported here show different structural degree along the genome regions analysed, and differential hybridization patterns for distinct genotypes in NS2 and NS3 HCV regions. PMID:15247323

  16. Quantifying the Antibody Binding on Protein Microarrays using Microarray Nonlinear Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; Wallstrom, Garrick; Magee, Dewey Mitchell; Qiu, Ji; Mendoza, D. Eliseo A.; Wang, Jie; Bian, Xiaofang; Graves, Morgan; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    To address the issue of quantification for antibody assays with protein microarrays, we firstly developed a Microarray Nonlinear Calibration (MiNC) method that applies in the quantification of antibody binding to the surface of microarray spots. We found that MiNC significantly increased the linear dynamic range and reduced assay variations. A serological analysis of guinea pig Mycobacterium tuberculosis models showed that a larger number of putative antigen targets were identified with MiNC, which is consistent with the improved assay performance of protein microarrays. We expect that our cumulative results will provide scientists with a new appreciation of antibody assays with protein microarrays. Our MiNC method has the potential to be employed in biomedical research with multiplex antibody assays which need quantitation, including the discovery of antibody biomarkers, clinical diagnostics with multi-antibody signatures and construction of immune mathematical models. PMID:23662896

  17. PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 65-MER OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoyong; Xiang, Charlie C.; Trent, Jeffrey M.; Bittner, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Microarray fabrication using pre-synthesized long oligonucleotide is becoming increasingly important, but a study of large-scale array productions is not published yet. We addressed the issue of fabricating oligonucleotide microarrays by spotting commercial, pre-synthesized 65-mers with 5′ amines representing 7500 murine genes. Amine-modified oligonucleotides were immobilized on glass slides having aldehyde groups via transient Schiff base formation followed by reduction to produce a covalent conjugate. When RNA derived from the same source was used for Cy3 and Cy5 labeling and hybridized to the same array, signal intensities spanning three orders of magnitude were observed, and the coefficient of variation between the two channels for all spots was 8–10%. To ascertain the reproducibility of ratio determination of these arrays, two triplicate hybridizations (with fluorochrome reversal) comparing RNAs from a fibroblast (NIH3T3) and a breast cancer (JC) cell line were carried out. The 95% confidence interval for all spots in the six hybridizations was 0.60 – 1.66. This level of reproducibility allows use of the full range of pattern finding and discriminant analysis typically applied to cDNA microarrays. Further comparative testing was carried out with oligonucleotide microarrays, cDNA microarrays and RT-PCR assays to examine the comparability of results across these different methodologies. PMID:17617369

  18. Advancing microarray assembly with acoustic dispensing technology.

    PubMed

    Wong, E Y; Diamond, S L

    2009-01-01

    In the assembly of microarrays and microarray-based chemical assays and enzymatic bioassays, most approaches use pins for contact spotting. Acoustic dispensing is a technology capable of nanoliter transfers by using acoustic energy to eject liquid sample from an open source well. Although typically used for well plate transfers, when applied to microarraying, it avoids the drawbacks of undesired physical contact with the sample; difficulty in assembling multicomponent reactions on a chip by readdressing, a rigid mode of printing that lacks patterning capabilities; and time-consuming wash steps. We demonstrated the utility of acoustic dispensing by delivering human cathepsin L in a drop-on-drop fashion into individual 50-nanoliter, prespotted reaction volumes to activate enzyme reactions at targeted positions on a microarray. We generated variable-sized spots ranging from 200 to 750 microm (and higher) and handled the transfer of fluorescent bead suspensions with increasing source well concentrations of 0.1 to 10 x 10(8) beads/mL in a linear fashion. There are no tips that can clog, and liquid dispensing CVs are generally below 5%. This platform expands the toolbox for generating analytical arrays and meets needs associated with spatially addressed assembly of multicomponent microarrays on the nanoliter scale. PMID:19035650

  19. A Synthetic Kinome Microarray Data Generator

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cellular pathways involve the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins. Peptide microarrays called kinome arrays facilitate the measurement of the phosphorylation activity of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. Analyzing the data from kinome microarrays is a multi-step process. Typically, various techniques are possible for a particular step, and it is necessary to compare and evaluate them. Such evaluations require data for which correct analysis results are known. Unfortunately, such kinome data is not readily available in the community. Further, there are no established techniques for creating artificial kinome datasets with known results and with the same characteristics as real kinome datasets. In this paper, a methodology for generating synthetic kinome array data is proposed. The methodology relies on actual intensity measurements from kinome microarray experiments and preserves their subtle characteristics. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated by evaluating methods for eliminating heterogeneous variance in kinome microarray data. Phosphorylation intensities from kinome microarrays often exhibit such heterogeneous variance and its presence can negatively impact downstream statistical techniques that rely on homogeneity of variance. It is shown that using the output from the proposed synthetic data generator, it is possible to critically compare two variance stabilization methods.

  20. Monitoring of malaria parasite resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in the Solomon Islands by DNA microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little information is available on resistance to anti-malarial drugs in the Solomon Islands (SI). The analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in drug resistance associated parasite genes is a potential alternative to classical time- and resource-consuming in vivo studies to monitor drug resistance. Mutations in pfmdr1 and pfcrt were shown to indicate chloroquine (CQ) resistance, mutations in pfdhfr and pfdhps indicate sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance, and mutations in pfATPase6 indicate resistance to artemisinin derivatives. Methods The relationship between the rate of treatment failure among 25 symptomatic Plasmodium falciparum-infected patients presenting at the clinic and the pattern of resistance-associated SNPs in P. falciparum infecting 76 asymptomatic individuals from the surrounding population was investigated. The study was conducted in the SI in 2004. Patients presenting at a local clinic with microscopically confirmed P. falciparum malaria were recruited and treated with CQ+SP. Rates of treatment failure were estimated during a 28-day follow-up period. In parallel, a DNA microarray technology was used to analyse mutations associated with CQ, SP, and artemisinin derivative resistance among samples from the asymptomatic community. Mutation and haplotype frequencies were determined, as well as the multiplicity of infection. Results The in vivo study showed an efficacy of 88% for CQ+SP to treat P. falciparum infections. DNA microarray analyses indicated a low diversity in the parasite population with one major haplotype present in 98.7% of the cases. It was composed of fixed mutations at position 86 in pfmdr1, positions 72, 75, 76, 220, 326 and 356 in pfcrt, and positions 59 and 108 in pfdhfr. No mutation was observed in pfdhps or in pfATPase6. The mean multiplicity of infection was 1.39. Conclusion This work provides the first insight into drug resistance markers of P. falciparum in the SI. The obtained results indicated the

  1. Parallel classification and feature selection in microarray data using SPRINT

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Lawrence; Sloan, Terence M.; Mewissen, Muriel; Ghazal, Peter; Forster, Thorsten; Piotrowski, Michal; Trew, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The statistical language R is favoured by many biostatisticians for processing microarray data. In recent times, the quantity of data that can be obtained in experiments has risen significantly, making previously fast analyses time consuming or even not possible at all with the existing software infrastructure. High performance computing (HPC) systems offer a solution to these problems but at the expense of increased complexity for the end user. The Simple Parallel R Interface is a library for R that aims to reduce the complexity of using HPC systems by providing biostatisticians with drop-in parallelised replacements of existing R functions. In this paper we describe parallel implementations of two popular techniques: exploratory clustering analyses using the random forest classifier and feature selection through identification of differentially expressed genes using the rank product method. PMID:24883047

  2. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  3. Using Kepler for Tool Integration in Microarray Analysis Workflows

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Zhuohui; Stowe, Jennifer C.; Altintas, Ilkay; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Zambon, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of genomic technologies are leading to massive amounts of genomic data, all of which requires complex analysis. More and more bioinformatics analysis tools are being developed by scientist to simplify these analyses. However, different pipelines have been developed using different software environments. This makes integrations of these diverse bioinformatics tools difficult. Kepler provides an open source environment to integrate these disparate packages. Using Kepler, we integrated several external tools including Bioconductor packages, AltAnalyze, a python-based open source tool, and R-based comparison tool to build an automated workflow to meta-analyze both online and local microarray data. The automated workflow connects the integrated tools seamlessly, delivers data flow between the tools smoothly, and hence improves efficiency and accuracy of complex data analyses. Our workflow exemplifies the usage of Kepler as a scientific workflow platform for bioinformatics pipelines. PMID:26605000

  4. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  5. Long synthetic oligonucleotides for microarray expression measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Heping; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Chunxiu; Lu, Zu-Hong; Gao, Xiang; Kong, Dong

    2001-09-01

    There are generally two kinds of DNA microarray used for genomic-scale gene expression profiling of mRNA: cDNA and DNA chip, but both of them suffer from some drawbacks. To meet more requirements, another oligonucleotide microarray with long was produced. This type of microarray had the advantages of low cost, minimal Cross-hybridization, flexible and easy to make, which is most fit for small laboratories with special purposes. In this paper, we devised different probes with different probe lengths, GC contents and gene positions to optimization the probe design. Experiments showed 70 mer probes are suitable for both sufficient sensitivity and reasonable costs. Higher G-C content produces stronger signal intensity thus better sensitivity and probes designed at 3 untranslated region of gene within the range of 300 pb should be best for both sensitivity and specificity.

  6. Protein microarrays for parasite antigen discovery.

    PubMed

    Driguez, Patrick; Doolan, Denise L; Molina, Douglas M; Loukas, Alex; Trieu, Angela; Felgner, Phil L; McManus, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The host serological profile to a parasitic infection, such as schistosomiasis, can be used to define potential vaccine and diagnostic targets. Determining the host antibody response using traditional approaches is hindered by the large number of putative antigens in any parasite proteome. Parasite protein microarrays offer the potential for a high-throughput host antibody screen to simplify this task. In order to construct the array, parasite proteins are selected from available genomic sequence and protein databases using bioinformatic tools. Selected open reading frames are PCR amplified, incorporated into a vector for cell-free protein expression, and printed robotically onto glass slides. The protein microarrays can be probed with antisera from infected/immune animals or humans and the antibody reactivity measured with fluorophore labeled antibodies on a confocal laser microarray scanner to identify potential targets for diagnosis or therapeutic or prophylactic intervention. PMID:25388117

  7. Applications of protein microarrays for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    The search for new biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring of diseases continues in earnest despite dwindling success at finding novel reliable markers. Some of the current markers in clinical use do not provide optimal sensitivity and specificity, with the prostate cancer antigen (PSA) being one of many such examples. The emergence of proteomic techniques and systems approaches to study disease pathophysiology has rekindled the quest for new biomarkers. In particular the use of protein microarrays has surged as a powerful tool for large scale testing of biological samples. Approximately half the reports on protein microarrays have been published in the last two years especially in the area of biomarker discovery. In this review, we will discuss the application of protein microarray technologies that offer unique opportunities to find novel biomarkers. PMID:21136793

  8. Analyzing illumina gene expression microarray data from different tissues: methodological aspects of data analysis in the metaxpress consortium.

    PubMed

    Schurmann, Claudia; Heim, Katharina; Schillert, Arne; Blankenberg, Stefan; Carstensen, Maren; Dörr, Marcus; Endlich, Karlhans; Felix, Stephan B; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Herder, Christian; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Homuth, Georg; Illig, Thomas; Kruppa, Jochen; Meitinger, Thomas; Müller, Christian; Nauck, Matthias; Peters, Annette; Rettig, Rainer; Roden, Michael; Strauch, Konstantin; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Wahl, Simone; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Philipp S; Zeller, Tanja; Teumer, Alexander; Prokisch, Holger; Ziegler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Microarray profiling of gene expression is widely applied in molecular biology and functional genomics. Experimental and technical variations make meta-analysis of different studies challenging. In a total of 3358 samples, all from German population-based cohorts, we investigated the effect of data preprocessing and the variability due to sample processing in whole blood cell and blood monocyte gene expression data, measured on the Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 BeadChip array.Gene expression signal intensities were similar after applying the log(2) or the variance-stabilizing transformation. In all cohorts, the first principal component (PC) explained more than 95% of the total variation. Technical factors substantially influenced signal intensity values, especially the Illumina chip assignment (33-48% of the variance), the RNA amplification batch (12-24%), the RNA isolation batch (16%), and the sample storage time, in particular the time between blood donation and RNA isolation for the whole blood cell samples (2-3%), and the time between RNA isolation and amplification for the monocyte samples (2%). White blood cell composition parameters were the strongest biological factors influencing the expression signal intensities in the whole blood cell samples (3%), followed by sex (1-2%) in both sample types. Known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were located in 38% of the analyzed probe sequences and 4% of them included common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%). Out of the tested SNPs, 1.4% significantly modified the probe-specific expression signals (Bonferroni corrected p-value<0.05), but in almost half of these events the signal intensities were even increased despite the occurrence of the mismatch. Thus, the vast majority of SNPs within probes had no significant effect on hybridization efficiency.In summary, adjustment for a few selected technical factors greatly improved reliability of gene expression analyses. Such adjustments are particularly required for meta-analyses

  9. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  10. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  11. Overview of DNA microarrays: types, applications, and their future.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Roger

    2013-01-01

    This unit provides an overview of DNA microarrays. Microarrays are a technology in which thousands of nucleic acids are bound to a surface and are used to measure the relative concentration of nucleic acid sequences in a mixture via hybridization and subsequent detection of the hybridization events. This overview first discusses the history of microarrays and the antecedent technologies that led to their development. This is followed by discussion of the methods of manufacture of microarrays and the most common biological applications. The unit ends with a brief description of the limitations of microarrays and discusses how microarrays are being rapidly replaced by DNA sequencing technologies. PMID:23288464

  12. Construction of citrus gene coexpression networks from microarray data using random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongliang; Rawat, Nidhi; Deng, Zhanao; Gmitter, Fred G

    2015-01-01

    After the sequencing of citrus genomes, gene function annotation is becoming a new challenge. Gene coexpression analysis can be employed for function annotation using publicly available microarray data sets. In this study, 230 sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) microarrays were used to construct seven coexpression networks, including one condition-independent and six condition-dependent (Citrus canker, Huanglongbing, leaves, flavedo, albedo, and flesh) networks. In total, these networks contain 37 633 edges among 6256 nodes (genes), which accounts for 52.11% measurable genes of the citrus microarray. Then, these networks were partitioned into functional modules using the Markov Cluster Algorithm. Significantly enriched Gene Ontology biological process terms and KEGG pathway terms were detected for 343 and 60 modules, respectively. Finally, independent verification of these networks was performed using another expression data of 371 genes. This study provides new targets for further functional analyses in citrus. PMID:26504573

  13. A multivariate approach for high throughput pectin profiling by combining glycan microarrays with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, António G; Ahl, Louise I; Pedersen, Henriette L; Fangel, Jonatan U; Sørensen, Susanne O; Willats, William G T

    2015-05-29

    Pectin-one of the most complex biomacromolecules in nature has been extensively studied using various techniques. This has been done so in an attempt to understand the chemical composition and conformation of pectin, whilst discovering and optimising new industrial applications of the polymer. For the last decade the emergence of glycan microarray technology has led to a growing capacity of acquiring simultaneous measurements related to various carbohydrate characteristics while generating large collections of data. Here we used a multivariate analysis approach in order to analyse a set of 359 pectin samples probed with 14 different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression were utilised to obtain the most optimal qualitative and quantitative information from the spotted microarrays. The potential use of microarray technology combined with chemometrics for the accurate determination of degree of methyl-esterification (DM) and degree of blockiness (DB) was assessed. PMID:25950120

  14. A Review of Feature Selection and Feature Extraction Methods Applied on Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Zena M.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    2015-01-01

    We summarise various ways of performing dimensionality reduction on high-dimensional microarray data. Many different feature selection and feature extraction methods exist and they are being widely used. All these methods aim to remove redundant and irrelevant features so that classification of new instances will be more accurate. A popular source of data is microarrays, a biological platform for gathering gene expressions. Analysing microarrays can be difficult due to the size of the data they provide. In addition the complicated relations among the different genes make analysis more difficult and removing excess features can improve the quality of the results. We present some of the most popular methods for selecting significant features and provide a comparison between them. Their advantages and disadvantages are outlined in order to provide a clearer idea of when to use each one of them for saving computational time and resources. PMID:26170834

  15. Construction of citrus gene coexpression networks from microarray data using random matrix theory

    PubMed Central

    Du, Dongliang; Rawat, Nidhi; Deng, Zhanao; Gmitter, Fred G.

    2015-01-01

    After the sequencing of citrus genomes, gene function annotation is becoming a new challenge. Gene coexpression analysis can be employed for function annotation using publicly available microarray data sets. In this study, 230 sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) microarrays were used to construct seven coexpression networks, including one condition-independent and six condition-dependent (Citrus canker, Huanglongbing, leaves, flavedo, albedo, and flesh) networks. In total, these networks contain 37 633 edges among 6256 nodes (genes), which accounts for 52.11% measurable genes of the citrus microarray. Then, these networks were partitioned into functional modules using the Markov Cluster Algorithm. Significantly enriched Gene Ontology biological process terms and KEGG pathway terms were detected for 343 and 60 modules, respectively. Finally, independent verification of these networks was performed using another expression data of 371 genes. This study provides new targets for further functional analyses in citrus. PMID:26504573

  16. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  17. Pineal function: impact of microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, David C; Bailey, Michael J; Carter, David A; Kim, Jong-so; Shi, Qiong; Ho, Anthony K; Chik, Constance L; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Morin, Fabrice; Ganguly, Surajit; Rath, Martin F; Møller, Morten; Sugden, David; Rangel, Zoila G; Munson, Peter J; Weller, Joan L; Coon, Steven L

    2010-01-27

    Microarray analysis has provided a new understanding of pineal function by identifying genes that are highly expressed in this tissue relative to other tissues and also by identifying over 600 genes that are expressed on a 24-h schedule. This effort has highlighted surprising similarity to the retina and has provided reason to explore new avenues of study including intracellular signaling, signal transduction, transcriptional cascades, thyroid/retinoic acid hormone signaling, metal biology, RNA splicing, and the role the pineal gland plays in the immune/inflammation response. The new foundation that microarray analysis has provided will broadly support future research on pineal function. PMID:19622385

  18. MicroRNA expression profiling using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which are able to regulate gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. There is a growing recognition of the role of microRNAs in nearly every tissue type and cellular process. Thus there is an increasing need for accurate quantitation of microRNA expression in a variety of tissues. Microarrays provide a robust method for the examination of microRNA expression. In this chapter, we describe detailed methods for the use of microarrays to measure microRNA expression and discuss methods for the analysis of microRNA expression data. PMID:23666707

  19. Protein Microarrays for the Detection of Biothreats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Amy E.

    Although protein microarrays have proven to be an important tool in proteomics research, the technology is emerging as useful for public health and defense applications. Recent progress in the measurement and characterization of biothreat agents is reviewed in this chapter. Details concerning validation of various protein microarray formats, from contact-printed sandwich assays to supported lipid bilayers, are presented. The reviewed technologies have important implications for in vitro characterization of toxin-ligand interactions, serotyping of bacteria, screening of potential biothreat inhibitors, and as core components of biosensors, among others, research and engineering applications.

  20. Apparent genetic difference between hypothyroid patients with blocking-type thyrotropin receptor antibody and those without, as shown by restriction fragement length polymorphism analyses of HLA-DP loci

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Daisuke; Sugawa, Hideo; Akamizu, Takashi; Mori, Toru ); Sato, Kaoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Tsuji, Kimiyoshi ); Maeda, Masahiro )

    1993-09-01

    HLA types in Japanese patients with primary hypothyroidism were analyzed to see whether those with blocking-type TSH receptor antibody (TSH-R BAb M) differed genetically from those with idiopathic myxedema (IM). HLA typings of -A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ (73 antigens) were performed serologically, and those of -D and -DP (29 antigens) were analyzed by the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Thirty patients were studied with TSH-R BAb M, and 28 with IM. The data were analyzed and compared with previous results from 88 Graves' patients, 46 Hashimoto patients, and 186 control subjects. Overall, 192 patients with 4 autoimmune thyroid disorders showed a decrease in -Aw19 and an increase in -DQw4 (corrected P < 0.05) and significant associations of -Aw33, -Bw46, -Cw3, -DRw8, -DR9, and -DQw3. In TSH-R BAb M patients, increases in -B35, -Bw60, and -Dw8 and decreases in -DR4 and -DPw2 were seen, whereas IM patients showed increased -DPw2, -Bw61, and -Dw23. In comparisons between TSH-R-BAb M and IM, the difference in -DPw2 was highly significant. HLA-B35 differed significantly in these 2 types of hypothyroidism. In conclusion, TSH-R BAb M patients have decreased frequency of -DPw2 and are genetically similar to Graves' disease, whereas IM patients are characterized by high frequency of -DPw2 and are genetically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Microarray testing for the presence of toxic algae monitoring programme in Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Dittami, Simon M; Pazos, Yolanda; Laspra, Melchor; Medlin, Linda K

    2013-10-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of harmful algae in coastal areas and shellfish farms is an important requirement of monitoring programmes. Monitoring of toxic algae by means of traditional methods, i.e., light microscopy, can be time consuming when many samples have to be routinely analysed. Reliable species identification requires expensive equipment and trained personnel to carry out the analyses. However, all techniques for the monitoring of harmful algae usually require transportation of samples to specialised laboratories. In many monitoring laboratories, results are usually obtained within five working days after receiving the sample and therefore preventative measures are not always possible. Molecular technologies are rapidly improving the detection of phytoplankton and their toxins and the speed at which the results can be obtained. Assays are based on the discrimination of the genetic differences of the different species and species-specific probes can be designed. Such probes have been adapted to a microarray or phylochip format and assessed in several EU monitoring sites. Microarray results are presented for 1 year of field samples validated with cell counts from concentrated samples taken during toxic events from the weekly sampling of the Galician Monitoring Programme done by INTECMAR. The Galician monitoring laboratory does their own counting and their results are posted on their web site within 24 h. There was good correlation between cells present and microarray signals. In the few cases of false negatives, these can be attributed to poor RNA extraction of the target species, viz. Prorocentrum or Dinophysis. Where potential false positives were encountered, the smaller volume taken for cell counts as compared to the upto 300 times more volume taken for RNA extraction for the microarray is likely the cause for these differences, making the microarray more sensitive. The microarray was able to provide better species resolution in Alexandrium and Pseudo

  2. Spot addressing for microarray images structured in hexagonal grids.

    PubMed

    Giannakeas, Nikolaos; Kalatzis, Fanis; Tsipouras, Markos G; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2012-04-01

    In this work, an efficient method for spot addressing in images, which are generated by the scanning of hexagonal structured microarrays, is proposed. Initially, the blocks of the image are separated using the projections of the image. Next, all the blocks of the image are processed separately for the detection of each spot. The spot addressing procedure begins with the detection of the high intensity objects, which are probably the spots of the image. Next, the Growing Concentric Hexagon algorithm, which uses the properties of the hexagonal grid, is introduced for the detection of the non-hybridized spots. Finally, the Voronoi diagram is applied to the centers of the detected spots for the gridding of the image. The method is evaluated using spots generated from the scanning of the Beadchip of Illumina, which is used for the detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the human genome, and uses hexagonal structure for the location of the spots. For the evaluation, the detected centers for each of the spot in the image are compared to the centers of the annotation, obtaining up to 98% accuracy for the spot addressing procedure. PMID:21924515

  3. Searching the Cambridge Structural Database for the 'best' representative of each unique polymorph.

    PubMed

    van de Streek, Jacco

    2006-08-01

    A computer program has been written that removes suspicious crystal structures from the Cambridge Structural Database and clusters the remaining crystal structures as polymorphs or redeterminations. For every set of redeterminations, one crystal structure is selected to be the best representative of that polymorph. The results, 243,355 well determined crystal structures grouped by unique polymorph, are presented and analysed. PMID:16840806

  4. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  5. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  6. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The primary…

  7. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  8. Microarray data classified by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Linder, Roland; Richards, Tereza; Wagner, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Systems biology has enjoyed explosive growth in both the number of people participating in this area of research and the number of publications on the topic. The field of systems biology encompasses the in silico analysis of high-throughput data as provided by DNA or protein microarrays. Along with the increasing availability of microarray data, attention is focused on methods of analyzing the expression rates. One important type of analysis is the classification task, for example, distinguishing different types of cell functions or tumors. Recently, interest has been awakened toward artificial neural networks (ANN), which have many appealing characteristics such as an exceptional degree of accuracy. Nonlinear relationships or independence from certain assumptions regarding the data distribution are also considered. The current work reviews advantages as well as disadvantages of neural networks in the context of microarray analysis. Comparisons are drawn to alternative methods. Selected solutions are discussed, and finally algorithms for the effective combination of multiple ANNs are presented. The development of approaches to use ANN-processed microarray data applicable to run cell and tissue simulations may be slated for future investigation. PMID:18220242

  9. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation.

  10. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout. PMID:26973235

  11. Cell-based microarrays: current progress, future prospects.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ella; Freeman, Tom

    2005-07-01

    Cell-based microarrays were first described by Ziauddin and Sabatini in 2001 as a novel method for performing high-throughput screens of gene function. In this study, expression vectors containing the open reading frame of human genes were printed onto glass microscope slides to form a microarray. Transfection reagents were added pre- or post-spotting, and cells grown over the surface of the array. They demonstrated that cells growing in the immediate vicinity of the expression vectors underwent 'reverse transfection', and that subsequent alterations in cell function could then be detected by secondary assays performed on the array. Subsequent publications have adapted the technique to a variety of applications, and have also shown that the approach works when arrays are fabricated using short interfering RNAs and compounds. The potential of this method for performing analyses of gene function and for identifying novel therapeutic agents has been clearly demonstrated, and current efforts are focused on improving and harnessing this technology for high-throughput screening applications. PMID:16014002

  12. Prevalent Polymorphism in Thyroid Hormone-Activating Enzyme Leaves a Genetic Fingerprint That Underlies Associated Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    McAninch, Elizabeth A.; Jo, Sungro; Preite, Nailliw Z.; Farkas, Erzsébet; Mohácsik, Petra; Fekete, Csaba; Egri, Péter; Gereben, Balázs; Li, Yan; Deng, Youping; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Zevenbergen, Chantal; Peeters, Robin P.; Mash, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: A common polymorphism in the gene encoding the activating deiodinase (Thr92Ala-D2) is known to be associated with quality of life in millions of patients with hypothyroidism and with several organ-specific conditions. This polymorphism results in a single amino acid change within the D2 molecule where its susceptibility to ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation is regulated. Objective: To define the molecular mechanisms underlying associated conditions in carriers of the Thr92Ala-D2 polymorphism. Design, Setting, Patients: Microarray analyses of 19 postmortem human cerebral cortex samples were performed to establish a foundation for molecular studies via a cell model of HEK-293 cells stably expressing Thr92 or Ala92 D2. Results: The cerebral cortex of Thr92Ala-D2 carriers exhibits a transcriptional fingerprint that includes sets of genes involved in CNS diseases, ubiquitin, mitochondrial dysfunction (chromosomal genes encoding mitochondrial proteins), inflammation, apoptosis, DNA repair, and growth factor signaling. Similar findings were made in Ala92-D2-expressing HEK-293 cells and in both cases there was no evidence that thyroid hormone signaling was affected ie, the expression level of T3-responsive genes was unchanged, but that several other genes were differentially regulated. The combined microarray analyses (brain/cells) led to the development of an 81-gene classifier that correctly predicts the genotype of homozygous brain samples. In contrast to Thr92-D2, Ala92-D2 exhibits longer half-life and was consistently found in the Golgi. A number of Golgi-related genes were down-regulated in Ala92-D2-expressing cells, but were normalized after 24-h-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylecysteine. Conclusions: Ala92-D2 accumulates in the Golgi, where its presence and/or ensuing oxidative stress disrupts basic cellular functions and increases pre-apoptosis. These findings are reminiscent to disease mechanisms observed in other neurodegenerative

  13. MICB Allele Genotyping on Microarrays by Improving the Specificity of Extension Primers

    PubMed Central

    Baek, In-Cheol; Jang, Jung-Pil; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene B (MICB) encodes a ligand for activating NKG2D that expressed in natural killer cells, γδ T cells, and αβ CD8+ T cells, which is associated with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. Here, we have established a system for genotyping MICB alleles using allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. Thirty-six high quality, allele-specific extension primers were evaluated using strict and reliable cut-off values using mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), whereby an MFI >30,000 represented a positive signal and an MFI <10,000 represented a negative signal. Eight allele-specific extension primers were found to be false positives, five of which were improved by adjusting their length, and three of which were optimized by refractory modification. The MICB alleles (*002:01, *003, *005:02/*010, *005:03, *008, *009N, *018, and *024) present in the quality control panel could be exactly defined by 22 allele-specific extension primers. MICB genotypes that were identified by ASPE on microarrays were in full concordance with those identified by PCR-sequence-based typing. In conclusion, we have developed a method for genotyping MICB alleles using ASPE on microarrays; which can be applicable for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism typing studies of population and disease associations. PMID:26569110

  14. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  15. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mureşan, Leila; Jacak, Jarosław; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  16. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO). However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM) tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and will be updated on regular

  17. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  18. A High-Density Genetic Map with Array-Based Markers Facilitates Structural and Quantitative Trait Locus Analyses of the Common Wheat Genome

    PubMed Central

    Iehisa, Julio Cesar Masaru; Ohno, Ryoko; Kimura, Tatsuro; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Satoru; Okamoto, Yuki; Nasuda, Shuhei; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    The large genome and allohexaploidy of common wheat have complicated construction of a high-density genetic map. Although improvements in the throughput of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made it possible to obtain a large amount of genotyping data for an entire mapping population by direct sequencing, including hexaploid wheat, a significant number of missing data points are often apparent due to the low coverage of sequencing. In the present study, a microarray-based polymorphism detection system was developed using NGS data obtained from complexity-reduced genomic DNA of two common wheat cultivars, Chinese Spring (CS) and Mironovskaya 808. After design and selection of polymorphic probes, 13,056 new markers were added to the linkage map of a recombinant inbred mapping population between CS and Mironovskaya 808. On average, 2.49 missing data points per marker were observed in the 201 recombinant inbred lines, with a maximum of 42. Around 40% of the new markers were derived from genic regions and 11% from repetitive regions. The low number of retroelements indicated that the new polymorphic markers were mainly derived from the less repetitive region of the wheat genome. Around 25% of the mapped sequences were useful for alignment with the physical map of barley. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of 14 agronomically important traits related to flowering, spikes, and seeds demonstrated that the new high-density map showed improved QTL detection, resolution, and accuracy over the original simple sequence repeat map. PMID:24972598

  19. Polymorphous computing fabric

    DOEpatents

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw; Gokhale, Maya B.; McCabe, Kevin Peter

    2011-01-18

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To enhance capabilities for genetic analyses in rainbow trout, a large suite of polymorphic markers that are amenable to high-throughput genotyping protocols must be developed. However, the evolutionarily recent whole genome duplication event complicates the use of standard approaches in the discove...

  1. Olfactory Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Nonallergic Vasomotor Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Zhang, Ge; Jin, Li; Abbott, Carol; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    We sought a genotype-phenotype association: between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in olfactory receptor (OR) genes from the two largest OR gene clusters and odor-triggered nonallergic vasomotor rhinitis (nVMR). In the initial pedigree screen, using transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis, six SNPs showed “significant” p-values between 0.0449 and 0.0043. In a second case-control population, the previously identified six SNPs did not re-emerge, whereas four new SNPs showed p-values between 0.0490 and 0.0001. Combining both studies, none of the SNPs in the TDT analysis survived the Bonferroni correction. In the population study, one SNP showed an empirical p-value of 0.0066 by shuffling cases and controls with 105 replicates; however, the p-value for this SNP was 0.83 in the pedigree study. This study emphasizes that underpowered studies having p-values between <0.05 and 0.0001 should be regarded as inconclusive and require further replication before concluding the study is “informative.” However, we believe that our hypothesis that an association between OR genotypes and the nVMR phenotype remains feasible. Future studies using either a genomewide association study of all OR gene-pseudogene regions throughout the genome—at the current recommended density of 2.5 to 5 kb per tag SNP—or studies incorporating microarray analyses of the entire “OR genome” in well-characterized nVMR patients are required. PMID:18446592

  2. Quality Control Usage in High-Density Microarrays Reveals Differential Gene Expression Profiles in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Moreno, Jose; Jacome-Lopez, Karina; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Juarez-Mendez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    There are several existing reports of microarray chip use for assessment of altered gene expression in different diseases. In fact, there have been over 1.5 million assays of this kind performed over the last twenty years, which have influenced clinical and translational research studies. The most commonly used DNA microarray platforms are Affymetrix GeneChip and Quality Control Software along with their GeneChip Probe Arrays. These chips are created using several quality controls to confirm the success of each assay, but their actual impact on gene expression profiles had not been previously analyzed until the appearance of several bioinformatics tools for this purpose. We here performed a data mining analysis, in this case specifically focused on ovarian cancer, as well as healthy ovarian tissue and ovarian cell lines, in order to confirm quality control results and associated variation in gene expression profiles. The microarray data used in our research were downloaded from ArrayExpress and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and analyzed with Expression Console Software using RMA, MAS5 and Plier algorithms. The gene expression profiles were obtained using Partek Genomics Suite v6.6 and data were visualized using principal component analysis, heat map, and Venn diagrams. Microarray quality control analysis showed that roughly 40% of the microarray files were false negative, demonstrating over- and under-estimation of expressed genes. Additionally, we confirmed the results performing second analysis using independent samples. About 70% of the significant expressed genes were correlated in both analyses. These results demonstrate the importance of appropriate microarray processing to obtain a reliable gene expression profile. PMID:27268623

  3. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation. PMID:26912948

  4. Advancing translational research with next-generation protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Petritis, Brianne; LaBaer, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarrays are a high-throughput technology used increasingly in translational research, seeking to apply basic science findings to enhance human health. In addition to assessing protein levels, posttranslational modifications, and signaling pathways in patient samples, protein microarrays have aided in the identification of potential protein biomarkers of disease and infection. In this perspective, the different types of full-length protein microarrays that are used in translational research are reviewed. Specific studies employing these microarrays are presented to highlight their potential in finding solutions to real clinical problems. Finally, the criteria that should be considered when developing next-generation protein microarrays are provided. PMID:26749402

  5. Population Screening for Hemoglobinopathy Profiling: Is the Development of a Microarray Worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Kambouris, Manousos E

    2016-08-01

    In order to perform affordable and expedient whole population scans for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in hemoglobinopathies, microarrays based on single nucleotide extension (SNE) might prove advantageous to whole genome/exome sequencing in terms of cost, speed, interpretation and discretion as they focus on a very small part of the tested genome. The development of a microarray assay entails most of the cost, to be deferred by the massive use of the end product. A microarray assay development project, involving multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), labeling, hybridization and scanning/scoring steps is presented as a paradigm of objective bug ratios expected to such procedures and of ways to cope with them. Qualification of the microarray genotypes needs a reference method, which may still be restriction digestion or other, as sequencing remains an expensive commodity. Optimization of wet steps should also be followed by careful and perhaps individualized dye excitation and in silico scoring rules, taking into consideration decay and bleaching effects that perplex development. The strategy of successive elimination of problems, a top-bottom procedure, which had been used and is usually preferred by developing agencies, might have been erroneous; a bottom-up course to delineate issues in different levels, although more laborious, might be the correct choice, especially as software and robotic hardware, high throughput tools become more mature and available. The testing for interlocus compatibility, specificity and robustness is demanding and warranted only in the case of steady, high volume use of an assay for territorial, national or international use. PMID:27250938

  6. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn. PMID:26813635

  7. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  8. Immobilization Techniques for Microarray: Challenges and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Song, Keumsoo; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Kim, Taisun

    2014-01-01

    The highly programmable positioning of molecules (biomolecules, nanoparticles, nanobeads, nanocomposites materials) on surfaces has potential applications in the fields of biosensors, biomolecular electronics, and nanodevices. However, the conventional techniques including self-assembled monolayers fail to position the molecules on the nanometer scale to produce highly organized monolayers on the surface. The present article elaborates different techniques for the immobilization of the biomolecules on the surface to produce microarrays and their diagnostic applications. The advantages and the drawbacks of various methods are compared. This article also sheds light on the applications of the different technologies for the detection and discrimination of viral/bacterial genotypes and the detection of the biomarkers. A brief survey with 115 references covering the last 10 years on the biological applications of microarrays in various fields is also provided. PMID:25429408

  9. Use of microarray technologies in toxicology research.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Kent E; Freeman, Willard M; Aschner, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Microarray technology provides a unique tool for the determination of gene expression at the level of messenger RNA (mRNA). The simultaneous measurement of the entire human genome (thousands of genes) will facilitate the uncovering of specific gene expression patterns that are associated with disease. One important application of microarray technology, within the context of neurotoxicological studies, is its use as a screening tool for the identification of molecular mechanisms of toxicity. Such approaches enable researchers to identify those genes and their products (either single or whole pathways) that are involved in conferring resistance or sensitivity to toxic substances. This review addresses: (1) the potential uses of array data; (2) the various array platforms, highlighting both their advantages and disadvantages; (3) insights into data analysis and presentation strategies; and (4) concrete examples of DNA array studies in neurotoxicological research. PMID:12782098

  10. A Flexible Microarray Data Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dembélé, Doulaye

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology allows monitoring of gene expression profiling at the genome level. This is useful in order to search for genes involved in a disease. The performances of the methods used to select interesting genes are most often judged after other analyzes (qPCR validation, search in databases...), which are also subject to error. A good evaluation of gene selection methods is possible with data whose characteristics are known, that is to say, synthetic data. We propose a model to simulate microarray data with similar characteristics to the data commonly produced by current platforms. The parameters used in this model are described to allow the user to generate data with varying characteristics. In order to show the flexibility of the proposed model, a commented example is given and illustrated. An R package is available for immediate use.

  11. Microarrays: how many do you need?

    PubMed

    Zien, Alexander; Fluck, Juliane; Zimmer, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. We show that current knowledge allows for the construction of models that look realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes and derive prototypical parameters from real data sets. Such models allow investigation of the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class, the fold changes in expression that are desired to be detected, the detection sensitivity of the microarrays, and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at www.scai.fhg.de/special/bio/howmanyarrays/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular settings. PMID:12935350

  12. Glycan microarrays for decoding the glycome

    PubMed Central

    Rillahan, Cory D.; Paulson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade glycan microarrays have revolutionized the analysis of the specificity of glycan binding proteins, providing information that simultaneously illuminates the biology mediated by them and decodes the information content of the glycome. Numerous methods have emerged for arraying glycans in a ‘chip’ format, and glycan libraries have been assembled that address the diversity of the human glycome. Such arrays have been successfully used for analysis of glycan binding proteins that mediate mammalian biology, host-pathogen interactions, immune recognition of glycans relevant to vaccine production and cancer antigens. This review covers the development of glycan microarrays and applications that have provided insights into the roles of mammalian and microbial glycan binding proteins. PMID:21469953

  13. Metadata Management and Semantics in Microarray Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-01-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  14. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed. PMID:25821171

  15. Integrating data from heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays are one of the most used technologies for gene expression measurement. However, there are several distinct microarray platforms, from different manufacturers, each with its own measurement protocol, resulting in data that can hardly be compared or directly integrated. Data integration from multiple sources aims to improve the assertiveness of statistical tests, reducing the data dimensionality problem. The integration of heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms comprehends a set of tasks that range from the re-annotation of the features used on gene expression, to data normalization and batch effect elimination. In this work, a complete methodology for gene expression data integration and application is proposed, which comprehends a transcript-based re-annotation process and several methods for batch effect attenuation. The integrated data will be used to select the best feature set and learning algorithm for a brain tumor classification case study. The integration will consider data from heterogeneous Agilent and Affymetrix platforms, collected from public gene expression databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus. PMID:26673932

  16. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Lu, Qing; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request. PMID:23505547

  17. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  18. The microarray explorer tool for data mining of cDNA microarrays: application for the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Lemkin, P F; Thornwall, G C; Walton, K D; Hennighausen, L

    2000-11-15

    The Microarray Explorer (MAExplorer) is a versatile Java-based data mining bioinformatic tool for analyzing quantitative cDNA expression profiles across multiple microarray platforms and DNA labeling systems. It may be run as either a stand-alone application or as a Web browser applet over the Internet. With this program it is possible to (i) analyze the expression of individual genes, (ii) analyze the expression of gene families and clusters, (iii) compare expression patterns and (iv) directly access other genomic databases for clones of interest. Data may be downloaded as required from a Web server or in the case of the stand-alone version, reside on the user's computer. Analyses are performed in real-time and may be viewed and directly manipulated in images, reports, scatter plots, histograms, expression profile plots and cluster analyses plots. A key feature is the clone data filter for constraining a working set of clones to those passing a variety of user-specified logical and statistical tests. Reports may be generated with hypertext Web access to UniGene, GenBank and other Internet databases for sets of clones found to be of interest. Users may save their explorations on the Web server or local computer and later recall or share them with other scientists in this groupware Web environment. The emphasis on direct manipulation of clones and sets of clones in graphics and tables provides a high level of interaction with the data, making it easier for investigators to test ideas when looking for patterns. We have used the MAExplorer to profile gene expression patterns of 1500 duplicated genes isolated from mouse mammary tissue. We have identified genes that are preferentially expressed during pregnancy and during lactation. One gene we identified, carbonic anhydrase III, is highly expressed in mammary tissue from virgin and pregnant mice and in gene knock-out mice with underdeveloped mammary epithelium. Other genes, which include those encoding milk proteins

  19. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  20. Evaluation of a novel automated allergy microarray platform compared with three other allergy test methods.

    PubMed

    Williams, P; Önell, A; Baldracchini, F; Hui, V; Jolles, S; El-Shanawany, T

    2016-04-01

    Microarray platforms, enabling simultaneous measurement of many allergens with a small serum sample, are potentially powerful tools in allergy diagnostics. We report here the first study comparing a fully automated microarray system, the Microtest allergy system, with a manual microarray platform, Immuno-Solid phase Allergen Chip (ISAC), and two well-established singleplex allergy tests, skin prick test (SPT) and ImmunoCAP, all tested on the same patients. One hundred and three adult allergic patients attending the allergy clinic were included into the study. All patients were tested with four allergy test methods (SPT, ImmunoCAP, Microtest and ISAC 112) and a total of 3485 pairwise test results were analysed and compared. The four methods showed comparable results with a positive/negative agreement of 81-88% for any pair of test methods compared, which is in line with data in the literature. The most prevalent allergens (cat, dog, mite, timothy, birch and peanut) and their individual allergen components revealed an agreement between methods with correlation coefficients between 0·73 and 0·95. All four methods revealed deviating individual patient results for a minority of patients. These results indicate that microarray platforms are efficient and useful tools to characterize the specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E profile of allergic patients using a small volume of serum sample. The results produced by the Microtest system were in agreement with diagnostic tests in current use. Further data collection and evaluation are needed for other populations, geographical regions and allergens. PMID:26437695

  1. Chromosomal Microarrays in Prenatal Diagnosis: Time for a Change of Policy?

    PubMed Central

    Miny, Peter; Wenzel, Friedel; Tercanli, Sevgi; Filges, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have replaced conventional karyotyping as a first-tier test for unbalanced chromosome anomalies in postnatal cytogenetics mainly due to their unprecedented resolution facilitating the detection of submicroscopic copy number changes at a rate of 10–20% depending on indication for testing. A number of studies have addressed the performance of microarrays for chromosome analyses in high risk pregnancies due to abnormal ultrasound findings and reported an excess detection rate between 5% and 10%. In low risk pregnancies, clear pathogenic copy number changes at the submicroscopic level were encountered in 1% or less. Variants of unclear clinical significance, unsolicited findings, and copy number changes with variable phenotypic consequences are the main issues of concern in the prenatal setting posing difficult management questions. The benefit of microarray testing may be limited in pregnancies with only moderately increased risks (advanced maternal age, positive first trimester test). It is suggested to not change the current policy of microarray application in prenatal diagnosis until more data on the clinical significance of copy number changes are available.

  2. Long Noncoding RNA Expression Profiling Using Arraystar LncRNA Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanggu; Shang, Jindong

    2016-01-01

    Arraystar LncRNA microarrays are designed for global gene expression profiling of both LncRNAs and mRNAs on the same array. The array contents feature comprehensive collections of LncRNAs and include entire sets of known coding mRNAs. Each RNA transcript is detected by a splice junction-specific probe or a unique exon sequence, such that the alternatively spliced transcript isoforms or variants are reliably and accurately detected. The highly optimized experimental protocols and efficient workflow ensure sensitive, robust, and accurate microarray data generation. Standard data analyses are provided for microarray raw data processing, data quality control, gene expression clustering and heat map visualization, differentially expressed LncRNAs and mRNAs, LncRNA subcategories, regulatory relationships of LncRNAs with the mRNAs, gene ontology, and pathway analysis. The LncRNA microarrays are powerful tools for the study of LncRNAs in biology and disease, with broad applications in gene expression profiling, gene regulatory mechanism research, LncRNA functional discovery, and biomarker development. PMID:26721483

  3. Chromosomal imbalances in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor detected by metaphase and microarray comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuko; Yoshida, Aki; Numoto, Kunihiko; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Wai, Daniel; Ohata, Norihide; Takeda, Ken; Kawai, Akira; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly malignant tumors affecting adolescents and adults. There have been a few reports on chromosomal aberrations of MPNSTs; however, the tumor-specific alteration remains unknown. We characterized the genomic alterations in 8 MPNSTs and 8 schwannomas by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In 5 of 8 MPNSTs, microarray CGH was added for more detailed analyses. Frequent gains were identified on 3q13-26, 5p13-14, and 12q11-23 and frequent losses were at 1p31, 10p, 11q24-qter, 16, and 17. Microarray CGH revealed frequent gains of EGFR, DAB2, MSH2, KCNK12, DDX15, CDK6, and LAMA3, and losses of CDH1, GLTSCR2, EGR1, CTSB, GATA3, and SULT2A1. These genes seem to be responsible for developing MPNSTs. The concordance rate between metaphase CGH and microarray CGH was 66%. Metaphase CGH was useful for identifying chromosomal alterations before applying microarray CGH. PMID:16391845

  4. An evaluation of the applicability of microarrays for monitoring toxic algae in Irish coastal waters.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Gary R; Touzet, Nicolas; Fleming, Gerard Ta; Raine, Robin

    2013-10-01

    The applicability of microarrays to monitor harmful algae across a broad range of ecological niches and toxic species responsible for harmful algal events has been one of the key tasks in the EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)-funded Microarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae project. The technique has a strong potential for improving speed and accuracy of the identification of harmful algae and their toxins to assist monitoring programmes. Water samples were collected from a number of coastal sites around Ireland, including several that are used in the Irish National Phytoplankton and Biotoxin Monitoring Programme. Ribosomal RNA was extracted from filtered field samples, labelled with a fluorescent dye, and hybridised to probes spotted in a microarray format on a glass slide. The fluorescent signal intensity of the hybridisation to >120 probes on the chip was analysed and compared with actual field counts. There was a general agreement between cell counts and microarray signal. Results are presented for field samples taken from a range of stations along the Irish coastline known for harmful algal events during the first field trial (July 2009-April 2010). PMID:23184126

  5. GPR-Analyzer: a simple tool for quantitative analysis of hierarchical multispecies microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dittami, Simon M; Edvardsen, Bente

    2013-10-01

    Monitoring of marine microalgae is important to predict and manage harmful algae blooms. It currently relies mainly on light-microscopic identification and enumeration of algal cells, yet several molecular tools are currently being developed to complement traditional methods. MIcroarray Detection of Toxic ALgae (MIDTAL) is an FP7-funded EU project aiming to establish a hierarchical multispecies microarray as one of these tools. Prototype arrays are currently being tested with field samples, yet the analysis of the large quantities of data generated by these arrays presents a challenge as suitable analysis tools or protocols are scarce. This paper proposes a two-part protocol for the analysis of the MIDTAL and other hierarchical multispecies arrays: Signal-to-noise ratios can be used to determine the presence or absence of signals and to identify potential false-positives considering parallel and hierarchical probes. In addition, normalized total signal intensities are recommended for comparisons between microarrays and in order to relate signals for specific probes to cell concentrations using external calibration curves. Hybridization- and probe-specific detection limits can be calculated to help evaluate negative results. The suggested analyses were implemented in "GPR-Analyzer", a platform-independent and graphical user interface-based application, enabling non-specialist users to quickly and quantitatively analyze hierarchical multispecies microarrays. It is available online at http://folk.uio.no/edvardse/gpranalyzer . PMID:22767354

  6. Assessing Statistical Significance in Microarray Experiments Using the Distance Between Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Douglas; Lazar, Peter; Schoenfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    We propose permutation tests based on the pairwise distances between microarrays to compare location, variability, or equivalence of gene expression between two populations. For these tests the entire microarray or some pre-specified subset of genes is the unit of analysis. The pairwise distances only have to be computed once so the procedure is not computationally intensive despite the high dimensionality of the data. An R software package, permtest, implementing the method is freely available from the Comprehensive R Archive Network at http://cran.r-project.org. PMID:19529777

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis in straightbred and crossbred Angus, Brahman, and Romosinuano heifers: population genetic analyses and association of genotypes with reproductive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Luna-Nevarez, P; Rincon, G; Medrano, J F; Riley, D G; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W; Vanleeuwen, D M; DeAtley, K L; Islas-Trejo, A; Silver, G A; Thomas, M G

    2011-04-01

    The growth endocrine axis influences reproduction. The objectives of this study were to evaluate population genetic characteristics of SNP genotypes within genes of the GH-IGF axis in straightbred and crossbred Angus, Brahman, and Romosinuano heifers (n = 650) and to test the association of these genotypes with measures of reproduction. These objectives were achieved using 73 SNP within 7 genes on chromosome 5 and the pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2) and GH-receptor genes, which map to chromosomes 16 and 20, respectively. The SNP were elucidated by resequencing conserved regions of each gene by using DNA from familial-unrelated cattle of a multibreed discovery population. A multiplex SNP assay yielded 59 biallelic SNP useful for evaluating genetic identity and distance. Specifically, the divergence of straightbred Brahman cattle was approximately 15.5% from 5 Bos taurus-influenced breed groups. In the straightbred groups used as a validation population, only 3 SNP had minor allele frequencies >10%. These SNP were in the genes PAPP-A2 (ss115492449-A/C and ss115492450-G/T within intron 10) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 2 (STAT2; ss252841035-A/G within the 5' untranslated region), and they met the conditions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.31). The other 56 SNP were useful for assigning each animal into ancestral clusters (n = 3 proportions) to account for population stratification in genotype to phenotype association analyses. The 2 SNP in the PAPP-A2 gene influenced (P < 0.05) traits indicative of first-calf heifer rebreeding (i.e., calving interval, days to calving, and pregnancy rate). A STAT2 SNP genotype (i.e., GG) × primary ancestral cluster interaction (P < 0.05) suggested heifers primarily of B. taurus ancestry had a reduction of approximately 16.4 ± 0.1% in calving interval and days to calving relative to heifers clustering primarily as Bos indicus ancestry. Even though additional research is needed to

  8. Sociopolitical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains four articles devoted to the topic of "Sociopolitical Analyses." In "An Interview with Peter L. McLaren," Mary Leach presented the views of Peter L. McLaren on topics of local and national discourses, values, and the politics of difference. Landon E. Beyer's "Educational Studies and…

  9. MOLECULAR METHODS (E.G., MICROARRAYS) APPLIED TO PLANT GENOMES FOR ASSESSING GENETIC CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a technical document that presents a detailed sample standard operating procedure (S.O.P.) for preparing plant nucleic acid samples for microarray analyses using commercial ¿chips¿ such as those sold by Affymetrix. It also presents the application of a commercially availa...

  10. Polymorphism of triphenyl phosphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, J.; Davydova, N. A.; Drozd, M.

    2014-03-01

    The glass-forming liquid triphenyl phosphite (TPP) has recently attracted much attention due to the possible existence of a polyamorphism, i.e., the existence of two or more amorphous phases. In the present work we provide experimental evidence of the existence of a polymorphism in TPP. In addition to the already known conventional crystalline phase, which melts at 299.1 K, it has been found that TPP can crystallize in another polymorphic phase. The new polymorph can be obtained from the liquid phase due to direct cooling from the room temperature up to 245 K where it is held for 15 min and then heated up to 270 K. At 270 K crystallization of the new polymorph occurs, which melts at 291.6 K.

  11. Identification of significant features in DNA microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Bair, Eric

    2013-01-01

    DNA microarrays are a relatively new technology that can simultaneously measure the expression level of thousands of genes. They have become an important tool for a wide variety of biological experiments. One of the most common goals of DNA microarray experiments is to identify genes associated with biological processes of interest. Conventional statistical tests often produce poor results when applied to microarray data owing to small sample sizes, noisy data, and correlation among the expression levels of the genes. Thus, novel statistical methods are needed to identify significant genes in DNA microarray experiments. This article discusses the challenges inherent in DNA microarray analysis and describes a series of statistical techniques that can be used to overcome these challenges. The problem of multiple hypothesis testing and its relation to microarray studies are also considered, along with several possible solutions. PMID:24244802

  12. High-throughput allogeneic antibody detection using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jed; Sahaf, Bita; Perloff, Spenser; Schoenrock, Kelsi; Wu, Fang; Nakasone, Hideki; Coller, John; Miklos, David

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have traditionally been used to detect alloantibodies in patient plasma samples post hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, protein microarrays have the potential to be multiplexed, more sensitive, and higher throughput than ELISAs. Here, we describe the development of a novel and sensitive microarray method for detection of allogeneic antibodies against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded on the Y chromosome, called HY antigens. Six microarray surfaces were tested for their ability to bind recombinant protein and peptide HY antigens. Significant allogeneic immune responses were determined in male patients with female donors by considering normal male donor responses as baseline. HY microarray results were also compared with our previous ELISA results. Our overall goal was to maximize antibody detection for both recombinant protein and peptide epitopes. For detection of HY antigens, the Epoxy (Schott) protein microarray surface was both most sensitive and reliable and has become the standard surface in our microarray platform. PMID:26902899

  13. C677T (RS1801133 ) MTHFR gene polymorphism frequency in a colombian population

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Gómez, Piedad Elena; Casas-Gomez, Maria Consuelo; Briceño, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Abnormal levels of the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) are associated with an increased risk of both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and higher concentrations of homocysteine. Abnormal levels are also related to birth defects, pregnancy complications, cancer and toxicity to methotrexate (MTX). Polymorphisms of MTHFR affect the activity of the enzyme. Genetic associations have been related to treatment efficacy. Objective: To establish the frequency of the C> T polymorphism at nucleotide 677 of the MTHFR gene in a group of Colombian individuals. Methods: Data from pharmacogenetic microarrays that include MTX sensibility-associated polymorphisms were retrospectively collected (Pathway Genomics®). The frequency of the C> T MTHFR rs1801133 marker polymorphism was analyzed. Results: Microarray data from 68 men and 84 women were analyzed. Comparisons of genotype C/C vs. C/T and T/T were statistically significantly different (p= 0.00, p= 0.026, respectively), as were C/T and T / T (p= 0.0001). Conclusions: Results for the C/C and C/T genotypes in a Colombian population are similar to other previously studied groups of healthy subjects. Subjects from our population might be at risk of developing diseases associated with MTHFR polymorphisms and might present toxicity and adverse effects if treated with MTX, which suggests the need to evaluate therapeutic alternatives based on individual pharmacogenetic studies. PMID:26309343

  14. Prenatal chromosomal microarray for the Catholic physician

    PubMed Central

    Bringman, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal chromosomal microarray (CMA) is a test that is used to diagnose certain genetic problems in the fetus. While the test has been used in the pediatric setting for several years, it is now being introduced for use in the prenatal setting. The test offers great hope for detection of certain genetic defects in the fetus so that early intervention can be performed to improve the outcome for that individual. As with many biotechnical advances, CMA comes with certain bioethical issues that need to be addressed prior to its implementation. This paper is intended to provide guidance to all those that provide counseling regarding genetic testing options during pregnancy. PMID:24899750

  15. Protein Microarrays--Without a Trace

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-04-05

    Many experimental approaches in biology and biophysics, as well as applications in diagnosis and drug discovery, require proteins to be immobilized on solid supports. Protein microarrays, for example, provide a high-throughput format to study biomolecular interactions. The technique employed for protein immobilization is a key to the success of these applications. Recent biochemical developments are allowing, for the first time, the selective and traceless immobilization of proteins generated by cell-free systems without the need for purification and/or reconcentration prior to the immobilization step.

  16. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  17. Refractive index change detection based on porous silicon microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weirong; Jia, Zhenhong; Li, Peng; Lv, Guodong; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-05-01

    By combining photolithography with the electrochemical anodization method, a microarray device of porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal was fabricated on the crystalline silicon substrate. The optical properties of the microarray were analyzed with the transfer matrix method. The relationship between refractive index and reflectivity of each array element of the microarray at 633 nm was also studied, and the array surface reflectivity changes were observed through digital imaging. By means of the reflectivity measurement method, reflectivity changes below 10-3 can be observed based on PS microarray. The results of this study can be applied to the detection of biosensor arrays.

  18. DNA methylation analysis using CpG microarrays is impaired in benzopyrene exposed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Andrews, Joseph; Rodenhiser, David I.

    2007-12-15

    Epigenetic alterations have emerged as a key mechanism involved in tumorigenesis. These disruptions are partly due to environmental factors that change normal DNA methylation patterns necessary for transcriptional regulation and chromatin compaction. Microarray technologies are allowing environmentally susceptible epigenetic patterns to be mapped and the precise targets of environmentally induced alterations to be identified. Previously, we observed BaP-induced epigenetic events and cell cycle disruptions in breast cancer cell lines that included time- and concentration-dependent loss of proliferation as well as sequence-specific hypo- and hypermethylation events. In this present report, we further characterized epigenetic changes in BaP-exposed MCF-7 cells. We analyzed DNA methylation on a CpG island microarray platform with over 5400 unique genomic regions. Depleted and enriched microarray targets, representative of putative DNA methylation changes, were identified across the genome; however, subsequent sodium bisulfite analyses revealed no changes in DNA methylation at a number of these loci. Instead, we found that the identification of DNA methylation changes using this restriction enzyme-based microarray approach corresponded with the regions of DNA bound by the BaP derived DNA adducts. This DNA adduct formation occurs at both methylated and unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and affects PCR amplification during sample preparation. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when interpreting data from comparative microarray experiments that rely on enzymatic reactions. These results are relevant to genome screening approaches involving environmental exposures in which DNA adduct formation at specific nucleotide sites may bias target acquisition and compromise the correct identification of epigenetically responsive genes.

  19. Development and validation of a flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) gene expression oligo microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) has been cultivated for around 9,000 years and is therefore one of the oldest cultivated species. Today, flax is still grown for its oil (oil-flax or linseed cultivars) and its cellulose-rich fibres (fibre-flax cultivars) used for high-value linen garments and composite materials. Despite the wide industrial use of flax-derived products, and our actual understanding of the regulation of both wood fibre production and oil biosynthesis more information must be acquired in both domains. Recent advances in genomics are now providing opportunities to improve our fundamental knowledge of these complex processes. In this paper we report the development and validation of a high-density oligo microarray platform dedicated to gene expression analyses in flax. Results Nine different RNA samples obtained from flax inner- and outer-stems, seeds, leaves and roots were used to generate a collection of 1,066,481 ESTs by massive parallel pyrosequencing. Sequences were assembled into 59,626 unigenes and 48,021 sequences were selected for oligo design and high-density microarray (Nimblegen 385K) fabrication with eight, non-overlapping 25-mers oligos per unigene. 18 independent experiments were used to evaluate the hybridization quality, precision, specificity and accuracy and all results confirmed the high technical quality of our microarray platform. Cross-validation of microarray data was carried out using quantitative qRT-PCR. Nine target genes were selected on the basis of microarray results and reflected the whole range of fold change (both up-regulated and down-regulated genes in different samples). A statistically significant positive correlation was obtained comparing expression levels for each target gene across all biological replicates both in qRT-PCR and microarray results. Further experiments illustrated the capacity of our arrays to detect differential gene expression in a variety of flax tissues as well as between two contrasted

  20. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  1. Association Between NAT2 Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Cui, Wei; Cong, Lin; Wang, Li; Ruan, Xinjian; Jia, Jia; Liu, Yanfang; Jia, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xia

    2015-12-01

    To further investigate the association between NAT2 polymorphisms and lung cancer susceptibility.In terms of phenotypes, we investigated the acetylator status of NAT2 polymorphisms associated with lung cancer risk. Additionally, in view of genotypes, we mainly analyzed 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NAT2 gene, namely C282T, A803G, C481T, G590A, and G857A. Twenty-six eligible studies were included in our meta-analysis by searching PubMed, Embase, and CNKI databases. We used odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the susceptibility to lung cancer associated with NAT2 polymorphisms.Overall, based on phenotypes, the pooled ORs showed no significant association between NAT2 polymorphisms and lung cancer susceptibility. In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity and source of control, there was still no significant association. In terms of genotypes, overall, no obvious relationship was observed between NAT2 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. But increased risk of lung cancer was found in association with NAT2 C282T polymorphism (TT vs. CC + TC: OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.11-2.25).Our meta-analysis demonstrates that TT genotype in NAT2 C282T polymorphism may be a risk factor for lung cancer susceptibility. Additionally, the acetylator status of 5 SNPs in NAT2 gene may not be associated with lung cancer risk. PMID:26656326

  2. Inferring genetic networks from microarray data.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Davidson, George S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2004-06-01

    In theory, it should be possible to infer realistic genetic networks from time series microarray data. In practice, however, network discovery has proved problematic. The three major challenges are: (1) inferring the network; (2) estimating the stability of the inferred network; and (3) making the network visually accessible to the user. Here we describe a method, tested on publicly available time series microarray data, which addresses these concerns. The inference of genetic networks from genome-wide experimental data is an important biological problem which has received much attention. Approaches to this problem have typically included application of clustering algorithms [6]; the use of Boolean networks [12, 1, 10]; the use of Bayesian networks [8, 11]; and the use of continuous models [21, 14, 19]. Overviews of the problem and general approaches to network inference can be found in [4, 3]. Our approach to network inference is similar to earlier methods in that we use both clustering and Boolean network inference. However, we have attempted to extend the process to better serve the end-user, the biologist. In particular, we have incorporated a system to assess the reliability of our network, and we have developed tools which allow interactive visualization of the proposed network.

  3. Enzyme Microarrays Assembled by Acoustic Dispensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E. Y.; Diamond, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Miniaturizing bioassays to the nanoliter scale for high-throughput screening reduces the consumption of reagents that are expensive or difficult to handle. Utilizing acoustic dispensing technology, nanodroplets containing 10 µM ATP (3 µCi/µL 32P) and reaction buffer in 10% glycerol were positionally dispensed to the surface of glass slides to form 40 nL compartments (100 droplets/slide) for Pim1 (Proviral integration site 1) kinase reactions. The reactions were activated by dispensing 4 nL of various levels of a pyridocarbazolo-cyclopentadienyl ruthenium-complex Pim1 inhibitor, followed by dispensing 4 nL of a Pim1 kinase and peptide substrate solution to achieve final concentrations of 150 nM enzyme and 10 µM substrate. The microarray was incubated at 30°C (97% Rh) for 1.5 hr. The spots were then blotted to phosphocellulose membranes to capture phosphorylated substrate. Using phosphor imaging to quantify the washed membranes, the assay showed that, for doses of inhibitor from 0.75 µM to 3 µM, Pim1 was increasingly inhibited. Signal-to-background ratios were as high as 165 and average coefficients of variation (CVs) for the assay were ~20%. CVs for dispensing typical working buffers were under 5%. Thus, microarrays assembled by acoustic dispensing are promising as cost-effective tools that can be used in protein assay development. PMID:18616925

  4. Laser direct writing of biomolecule microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Berthet, F. X.; Colina, M.; Elvira, J.; Morenza, J. L.

    Protein-based biosensors are highly efficient tools for protein detection and identification. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of protein solutions in conditions preserving their biological properties. In this work, laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) was used for spotting an array of a purified bacterial antigen in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of protein microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength, 10 ns pulse duration) was used to transfer droplets of a solution containing the Treponema pallidum 17 kDa protein antigen on a glass slide. Optical microscopy showed that a regular array of micrometric droplets could be precisely and uniformly spotted onto a solid substrate. Subsequently, it was proved that LIFT deposition of a T. pallidum 17 kDa antigen onto nylon-coated glass slides preserves its antigenic reactivity and diagnostic properties. These results support that LIFT is suitable for the production of protein microarrays and pave the way for future diagnostics applications.

  5. Segmentation of prostate cancer tissue microarray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Can, Ali; Padfield, Dirk

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is diagnosed by histopathology interpretation of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)-stained tissue sections. Gland and nuclei distributions vary with the disease grade. The morphological features vary with the advance of cancer where the epithelial regions grow into the stroma. An efficient pathology slide image analysis method involved using a tissue microarray with known disease stages. Digital 24-bit RGB images were acquired for each tissue element on the slide with both 10X and 40X objectives. Initial segmentation at low magnification was accomplished using prior spectral characteristics from a training tissue set composed of four tissue clusters; namely, glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei. The segmentation method was automated by using the training RGB values as an initial guess and iterating the averaging process 10 times to find the four cluster centers. Labels were assigned to the nearest cluster center in red-blue spectral feature space. An automatic threshold algorithm separated the glands from the tissue. A visual pseudo color representation of 60 segmented tissue microarray image was generated where white, pink, red, blue colors represent glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei, respectively. The higher magnification images provided refined nuclei morphology. The nuclei were detected with a RGB color space principle component analysis that resulted in a grey scale image. The shape metrics such as compactness, elongation, minimum and maximum diameters were calculated based on the eigenvalues of the best-fitting ellipses to the nuclei.

  6. Mining microarray expression data by literature profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chaussabel, Damien; Sher, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Background The rapidly expanding fields of genomics and proteomics have prompted the development of computational methods for managing, analyzing and visualizing expression data derived from microarray screening. Nevertheless, the lack of efficient techniques for assessing the biological implications of gene-expression data remains an important obstacle in exploiting this information. Results To address this need, we have developed a mining technique based on the analysis of literature profiles generated by extracting the frequencies of certain terms from thousands of abstracts stored in the Medline literature database. Terms are then filtered on the basis of both repetitive occurrence and co-occurrence among multiple gene entries. Finally, clustering analysis is performed on the retained frequency values, shaping a coherent picture of the functional relationship among large and heterogeneous lists of genes. Such data treatment also provides information on the nature and pertinence of the associations that were formed. Conclusions The analysis of patterns of term occurrence in abstracts constitutes a means of exploring the biological significance of large and heterogeneous lists of genes. This approach should contribute to optimizing the exploitation of microarray technologies by providing investigators with an interface between complex expression data and large literature resources. PMID:12372143

  7. Enzyme microarrays assembled by acoustic dispensing technology.

    PubMed

    Wong, E Y; Diamond, S L

    2008-10-01

    Miniaturizing bioassays to the nanoliter scale for high-throughput screening reduces the consumption of reagents that are expensive or difficult to handle. Through the use of acoustic dispensing technology, nanodroplets containing 10 microM ATP (3 microCi/microL (32)P) and reaction buffer in 10% glycerol were positionally dispensed to the surface of glass slides to form 40-nL compartments (100 droplets/slide) for Pim1 (proviral integration site 1) kinase reactions. The reactions were activated by dispensing 4 nL of various levels of a pyridocarbazolo-cyclopentadienyl ruthenium complex Pim1 inhibitor, followed by dispensing 4 nL of a Pim1 kinase and peptide substrate solution to achieve final concentrations of 150 nM enzyme and 10 microM substrate. The microarray was incubated at 30 degrees C (97% R(h)) for 1.5 h. The spots were then blotted to phosphocellulose membranes to capture phosphorylated substrate. With phosphor imaging to quantify the washed membranes, the assay showed that, for doses of inhibitor from 0.75 to 3 microM, Pim1 was increasingly inhibited. Signal-to-background ratios were as high as 165, and average coefficients of variation for the assay were approximately 20%. Coefficients of variation for dispensing typical working buffers were under 5%. Thus, microarrays assembled by acoustic dispensing are promising as cost-effective tools that can be used in protein assay development. PMID:18616925

  8. Label-free detection repeatability of protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jun; Li, Lin; Wang, JingYi; He, LiPing; Lu, HuiBin; Ruan, KangCheng; Jin, KuiJuan; Yang, GuoZhen

    2012-12-01

    We examine the repeatabilities of oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) method for label-free detecting biological molecular interaction using protein microarrays. The experimental results show that the repeatabilities are the same in a given microarray or microarray-microarray and are consistent, indicating that OIRD is a promising label-free detection technique for biological microarrays.

  9. The Utility of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has emerged as a powerful new tool to identify genomic abnormalities associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities including congenital malformations, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. CMA includes array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, both of which are useful for detection of genomic copy number variants (CNV) such as microdeletions and microduplications. The frequency of disease-causing CNVs is highest (20%–25%) in children with moderate to severe intellectual disability accompanied by malformations or dysmorphic features. Disease-causing CNVs are found in 5%–10% of cases of autism, being more frequent in severe phenotypes. CMA has replaced Giemsa-banded karyotype as the first-tier test for genetic evaluation of children with developmental and behavioral disabilities. PMID:23311723

  10. [BCL1 POLYMORPHISM OF GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR GENE AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Prystupa, L N; Garbuzova, V Yu; Kmyta, V V

    2015-01-01

    The article analyses the results of investigating the connection between BCL1-polymorphism of glucocorticoid receptor gene and respiratory diseases. Its role in increasing sensitivity to glucocorticoids is proved here. The authors investigated the association of Bcl1 polymorphism with predisposition to bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with the nicotine addiction degree and with progressing disorders of pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26118026

  11. Microarray Analysis of the Intestinal Host Response in Giardia duodenalis Assemblage E Infected Calves

    PubMed Central

    Dreesen, Leentje; Rinaldi, Manuela; Chiers, Koen; Li, Robert; Geurden, Thomas; Van den Broeck, Wim; Goddeeris, Bruno; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin; Geldhof, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Despite Giardia duodenalis being one of the most commonly found intestinal pathogens in humans and animals, little is known about the host-parasite interactions in its natural hosts. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the intestinal response in calves following a G. duodenalis infection, using a bovine high-density oligo microarray to analyze global gene expression in the small intestine. The resulting microarray data suggested a decrease in inflammation, immune response, and immune cell migration in infected animals. These findings were examined in more detail by histological analyses combined with quantitative real-time PCR on a panel of cytokines. The transcription levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-γ showed a trend of being downregulated in the jejunum of infected animals compared to the negative controls,.No immune cell recruitment could be seen after infection, and no intestinal pathologies, such as villus shortening or increased levels of apoptosis. Possible regulators of this intestinal response are the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha (PPARα), and gamma (PPARγ) and the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA), all for which an upregulated expression was found in the microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. PMID:22848418

  12. Genome-wide analysis of mRNA polysomal profiles with spotted DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Daniel; Arava, Yoav

    2007-01-01

    The sedimentation of an mRNA in sucrose gradients is highly affected by its ribosomal association. Sedimentation analysis has therefore become routine for studying changes in ribosomal association of mRNAs of interest. DNA microarray technology has been combined with sedimentation analysis to characterize changes in ribosomal association for thousands of mRNAs in parallel. Such analyses revealed mRNAs that are translationally regulated and have provided new insights into the translation process. In this chapter, we describe possible experimental designs for analyzing genome-wide changes in ribosomal association, and discuss some of their advantages and disadvantages. We then provide a detailed protocol for analysis of polysomal fractions using spotted DNA microarrays. PMID:17923236

  13. Membrane gene ontology bias in sequencing and microarray obtained by housekeeping-gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijuan; Akintola, Oluwafemi S; Liu, Ken J A; Sun, Bingyun

    2016-01-10

    Microarray (MA) and high-throughput sequencing are two commonly used detection systems for global gene expression profiling. Although these two systems are frequently used in parallel, the differences in their final results have not been examined thoroughly. Transcriptomic analysis of housekeeping (HK) genes provides a unique opportunity to reliably examine the technical difference between these two systems. We investigated here the structure, genome location, expression quantity, microarray probe coverage, as well as biological functions of differentially identified human HK genes by 9 MA and 6 sequencing studies. These in-depth analyses allowed us to discover, for the first time, a subset of transcripts encoding membrane, cell surface and nuclear proteins that were prone to differential identification by the two platforms. We hope that the discovery can aid the future development of these technologies for comprehensive transcriptomic studies. PMID:26407868

  14. Identification of conserved and polymorphic STRs for personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Short tandem repeats (STRs) are abundant in human genomes. Numerous STRs have been shown to be associated with genetic diseases and gene regulatory functions, and have been selected as genetic markers for evolutionary and forensic analyses. High-throughput next generation sequencers have fostered new cutting-edge computing techniques for genome-scale analyses, and cross-genome comparisons have facilitated the efficient identification of polymorphic STR markers for various applications. Results An automated and efficient system for detecting human polymorphic STRs at the genome scale is proposed in this study. Assembled contigs from next generation sequencing data were aligned and calibrated according to selected reference sequences. To verify identified polymorphic STRs, human genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project were employed for comprehensive analyses, and STR markers from the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and disease-related STR motifs were also applied as cases for evaluation. In addition, we analyzed STR variations for highly conserved homologous genes and human-unique genes. In total 477 polymorphic STRs were identified from 492 human-unique genes, among which 26 STRs were retrieved and clustered into three different groups for efficient comparison. Conclusions We have developed an online system that efficiently identifies polymorphic STRs and provides novel distinguishable STR biomarkers for different levels of specificity. Candidate polymorphic STRs within a personal genome could be easily retrieved and compared to the constructed STR profile through query keywords, gene names, or assembled contigs. PMID:25560225

  15. The Importance of Normalization on Large and Heterogeneous Microarray Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA microarray technology is a powerful functional genomics tool increasingly used for investigating global gene expression in environmental studies. Microarrays can also be used in identifying biological networks, as they give insight on the complex gene-to-gene interactions, ne...

  16. Experimental Approaches to Microarray Analysis of Tumor Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furge, Laura Lowe; Winter, Michael B.; Meyers, Jacob I.; Furge, Kyle A.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive measurement of gene expression using high-density nucleic acid arrays (i.e. microarrays) has become an important tool for investigating the molecular differences in clinical and research samples. Consequently, inclusion of discussion in biochemistry, molecular biology, or other appropriate courses of microarray technologies has…

  17. Removal of hybridization and scanning noise from microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gopalappa, Chaitra; Das, Tapas K; Enkemann, Steven; Eschrich, Steven

    2009-09-01

    Microarray technology for measuring gene expression values has created significant opportunities for advances in disease diagnosis and individualized treatment planning. However, the random noise introduced by the sample preparation, hybridization, and scanning stages of microarray processing creates significant inaccuracies in the gene expression levels, and hence presents a major barrier in realizing the anticipated advances. Literature presents several methodologies for noise reduction, which can be broadly categorized as: 1) model based approaches for estimation and removal of hybridization noise; 2) approaches using commonly available image denoising tools; and 3) approaches involving the need for control sample(s). In this paper, we present a novel methodology for identifying and removing hybridization and scanning noise from microarray images, using a dual-tree-complex-wavelet-transform-based multiresolution analysis coupled with bivariate shrinkage thresholding. The key features of our methodology include consideration of inherent features and type of noise specific to microarray images, and the ability to work with a single microarray without needing a control. Our methodology is first benchmarked on a fabricated dataset that mimics a real microarray probe dataset. Thereafter, our methodology is tested on datasets obtained from a number of Affymetrix GeneChip human genome HG-U133 Plus 2.0 arrays, processed on HCT-116 cell line at the Microarray Core Facility of Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. The results indicate an appreciable improvement in the quality of the microarray data. PMID:20051337

  18. Applications of microarray technology in breast cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Colin S

    2001-01-01

    Microarrays provide a versatile platform for utilizing information from the Human Genome Project to benefit human health. This article reviews the ways in which microarray technology may be used in breast cancer research. Its diverse applications include monitoring chromosome gains and losses, tumour classification, drug discovery and development, DNA resequencing, mutation detection and investigating the mechanism of tumour development. PMID:11305951

  19. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  20. Application of Microarray Technology to Investigate Salmonella and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays have been developed for the study of various aspects of Salmonella, which is a model system for investigating pathogenesis. Microarrays were used to analyze the gene expression of Salmonella in various environments that mimic the host environment and these studies have helped to elucidat...

  1. Thrombophilic polymorphisms in Israel.

    PubMed

    Zoossmann-Diskin, Avshalom; Gazit, Ephraim; Peleg, Leah; Shohat, Mordechai; Turner, David

    2008-01-01

    Three thrombophilic polymorphisms, FV G1691A, FII G20210A and MTHFR C677T were investigated in Israeli populations by FRET, (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) real-time PCR. We observe extensive variability in the frequencies of each of the polymorphisms, as has been observed in the study of other polymorphisms in these populations. Very high allele frequencies for FV G1691A (the highest 0.087 in Turkish and Greek Jews) and FII G20210A (the highest 0.061 in Georgian Jews) in some of the Israeli populations justify a clinical investigation to assess their risk for venous thrombosis. Principal Coordinates Analysis demonstrates that the Jewish populations are interspersed among the non-Jewish populations. The resemblance of some Jewish populations to certain non-Jewish populations coincides with findings based on classical markers. PMID:18583164

  2. A Comparative Study of Normalization Methods Used in Statistical Analysis of Oligonucleotide Microarray Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Normalization methods used in the statistical analysis of oligonucleotide microarray data were evaluated. The oligonucleotide microarray is considered an efficient analytical tool for analyzing thousands of genes simultaneously in a single experiment. However, systematic variation in microarray, ori...

  3. Genomic-Wide Analysis with Microarrays in Human Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Inaoka, Kenichi; Inokawa, Yoshikuni; Nomoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarray technologies have advanced rapidly and had a profound impact on examining gene expression on a genomic scale in research. This review discusses the history and development of microarray and DNA chip devices, and specific microarrays are described along with their methods and applications. In particular, microarrays have detected many novel cancer-related genes by comparing cancer tissues and non-cancerous tissues in oncological research. Recently, new methods have been in development, such as the double-combination array and triple-combination array, which allow more effective analysis of gene expression and epigenetic changes. Analysis of gene expression alterations in precancerous regions compared with normal regions and array analysis in drug-resistance cancer tissues are also successfully performed. Compared with next-generation sequencing, a similar method of genome analysis, several important differences distinguish these techniques and their applications. Development of novel microarray technologies is expected to contribute to further cancer research.

  4. An ultralow background substrate for protein microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Zhang, Qingyang; Ma, Hongwei; Zheng, Bo

    2015-08-21

    We herein report an ultralow background substrate for protein microarrays. Conventional protein microarray substrates often suffer from non-specific protein adsorption and inhomogeneous spot morphology. Consequently, surface treatment and a suitable printing solution are required to improve the microarray performance. In the current work, we improved the situation by developing a new microarray substrate based on a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) membrane. A polydopamine microspot array was fabricated on the FEP membrane, with proteins conjugated to the FEP surface through polydopamine. Uniform microspots were obtained on FEP without the application of a special printing solution. The modified FEP membrane demonstrated ultralow background signal and was applied in protein and peptide microarray analysis. PMID:26134063

  5. The Microarray Explorer tool for data mining of cDNA microarrays: application for the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Lemkin, Peter F.; Thornwall, Gregory C.; Walton, Katherine D.; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2000-01-01

    The Microarray Explorer (MAExplorer) is a versatile Java-based data mining bioinformatic tool for analyzing quantitative cDNA expression profiles across multiple microarray platforms and DNA labeling systems. It may be run as either a stand-alone application or as a Web browser applet over the Internet. With this program it is possible to (i) analyze the expression of individual genes, (ii) analyze the expression of gene families and clusters, (iii) compare expression patterns and (iv) directly access other genomic databases for clones of interest. Data may be downloaded as required from a Web server or in the case of the stand-alone version, reside on the user’s computer. Analyses are performed in real-time and may be viewed and directly manipulated in images, reports, scatter plots, histograms, expression profile plots and cluster analyses plots. A key feature is the clone data filter for constraining a working set of clones to those passing a variety of user-specified logical and statistical tests. Reports may be generated with hypertext Web access to UniGene, GenBank and other Internet databases for sets of clones found to be of interest. Users may save their explorations on the Web server or local computer and later recall or share them with other scientists in this groupware Web environment. The emphasis on direct manipulation of clones and sets of clones in graphics and tables provides a high level of interaction with the data, making it easier for investigators to test ideas when looking for patterns. We have used the MAExplorer to profile gene expression patterns of 1500 duplicated genes isolated from mouse mammary tissue. We have identified genes that are preferentially expressed during pregnancy and during lactation. One gene we identified, carbonic anhydrase III, is highly expressed in mammary tissue from virgin and pregnant mice and in gene knock-out mice with underdeveloped mammary epithelium. Other genes, which include those encoding milk proteins

  6. Chapter 9 - Methylation Analysis by Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Deatherage, Daniel E.; Potter, Dustin; Yan, Pearlly S.; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Lin, Shili

    2010-01-01

    Differential Methylation Hybridization (DMH) is a high-throughput DNA methylation screening tool that utilizes methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes to profile methylated fragments by hybridizing them to a CpG island microarray. This array contains probes spanning all the 27,800 islands annotated in the UCSC Genome Browser. Herein we describe a DMH protocol with clearly identified quality control points. In this manner, samples that are unlikely to provide good read-outs for differential methylation profiles between the test and the control samples will be identified and repeated with appropriate modifications. The step-by-step laboratory DMH protocol is described. In addition, we provide descriptions regarding DMH data analysis, including image quantification, background correction, and statistical procedures for both exploratory analysis and more formal inferences. Issues regarding quality control are addressed as well. PMID:19488875

  7. Meta-analysis of incomplete microarray studies.

    PubMed

    Zollinger, Alix; Davison, Anthony C; Goldstein, Darlene R

    2015-10-01

    Meta-analysis of microarray studies to produce an overall gene list is relatively straightforward when complete data are available. When some studies lack information-providing only a ranked list of genes, for example-it is common to reduce all studies to ranked lists prior to combining them. Since this entails a loss of information, we consider a hierarchical Bayes approach to meta-analysis using different types of information from different studies: the full data matrix, summary statistics, or ranks. The model uses an informative prior for the parameter of interest to aid the detection of differentially expressed genes. Simulations show that the new approach can give substantial power gains compared with classical meta-analysis and list aggregation methods. A meta-analysis of 11 published studies with different data types identifies genes known to be involved in ovarian cancer and shows significant enrichment. PMID:25987649

  8. DNA microarrays on a mesospaced surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bong Jin; Park, Joon Won

    2004-12-01

    A dendron having nine carboxylic acid groups at the end of the branches and a protected amine at the apex was allowed to form a molecular layer on the aminosilylated surface through multipoint ionic attraction. It was found that a compact and smooth monolayer was obtained at appropriate condition. The film quality was maintained successfully after deprotecting CBZ group with trimethylsilyl iodide. The surface density of the primary amine after the deprotection was measured with fluorometry, and 0.1-0.2 amine group per 1 nm2 was observed. This implies that the spacing between the amine functional groups is 24-34 Å in hexagonal close packing (hcp) model. In addition, DNA microarrays were fabricated successfully on the dendron-modified surface.

  9. Digital microarray analysis for digital artifact genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger; Handley, James; Williams, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    We implement a Spatial Voting (SV) based analogy of microarray analysis for digital gene marker identification in malware code sections. We examine a famous set of malware formally analyzed by Mandiant and code named Advanced Persistent Threat (APT1). APT1 is a Chinese organization formed with specific intent to infiltrate and exploit US resources. Manidant provided a detailed behavior and sting analysis report for the 288 malware samples available. We performed an independent analysis using a new alternative to the traditional dynamic analysis and static analysis we call Spatial Analysis (SA). We perform unsupervised SA on the APT1 originating malware code sections and report our findings. We also show the results of SA performed on some members of the families associated by Manidant. We conclude that SV based SA is a practical fast alternative to dynamics analysis and static analysis.

  10. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors for DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Yu, Heng; Han, Shu-Jen; Osterfeld, Sebastian; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are developed for a DNA microarray. Compared with the conventional fluorescent sensors, GMR sensors are cheaper, more sensitive, can generate fully electronic signals, and can be easily integrated with electronics and microfluidics. The GMR sensor used in this work has a bottom spin valve structure with an MR ratio of 12%. The single-strand target DNA detected has a length of 20 bases. Assays with DNA concentrations down to 10 pM were performed, with a dynamic range of 3 logs. A double modulation technique was used in signal detection to reduce the 1/f noise in the sensor while circumventing electromagnetic interference. The logarithmic relationship between the magnetic signal and the target DNA concentration can be described by the Temkin isotherm. Furthermore, GMR sensors integrated with microfluidics has great potential of improving the sensitivity to 1 pM or below, and the total assay time can be reduced to less than 1 hour. PMID:20824116

  11. Disappearing Polymorphs Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Lancaster, Robert W; Bernstein, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Nearly twenty years ago, Dunitz and Bernstein described a selection of intriguing cases of polymorphs that disappear. The inability to obtain a crystal form that has previously been prepared is indeed a frustrating and potentially serious problem for solid-state scientists. This Review discusses recent occurrences and examples of disappearing polymorphs (as well as the emergence of elusive crystal forms) to demonstrate the enduring relevance of this troublesome, but always captivating, phenomenon in solid-state research. A number of these instances have been central issues in patent litigations. This Review, therefore, also highlights the complex relationship between crystal chemistry and the law. PMID:26031248

  12. Functional assessment of time course microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Nueda, María José; Sebastián, Patricia; Tarazona, Sonia; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquín; Ferrer, Alberto; Conesa, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Motivation Time-course microarray experiments study the progress of gene expression along time across one or several experimental conditions. Most developed analysis methods focus on the clustering or the differential expression analysis of genes and do not integrate functional information. The assessment of the functional aspects of time-course transcriptomics data requires the use of approaches that exploit the activation dynamics of the functional categories to where genes are annotated. Methods We present three novel methodologies for the functional assessment of time-course microarray data. i) maSigFun derives from the maSigPro method, a regression-based strategy to model time-dependent expression patterns and identify genes with differences across series. maSigFun fits a regression model for groups of genes labeled by a functional class and selects those categories which have a significant model. ii) PCA-maSigFun fits a PCA model of each functional class-defined expression matrix to extract orthogonal patterns of expression change, which are then assessed for their fit to a time-dependent regression model. iii) ASCA-functional uses the ASCA model to rank genes according to their correlation to principal time expression patterns and assess functional enrichment on a GSA fashion. We used simulated and experimental datasets to study these novel approaches. Results were compared to alternative methodologies. Results Synthetic and experimental data showed that the different methods are able to capture different aspects of the relationship between genes, functions and co-expression that are biologically meaningful. The methods should not be considered as competitive but they provide different insights into the molecular and functional dynamic events taking place within the biological system under study. PMID:19534758

  13. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  14. Image microarrays (IMA): Digital pathology's missing tool

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Jason; Cheng, Jerome; Pantanowitz, Liron; Hewitt, Stephen; Yagi, Yukako; Monaco, James; Madabhushi, Anant; Rodriguez-canales, Jaime; Hanson, Jeffrey; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Filie, Armando C.; Feldman, Michael D.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Shih, Natalie NC.; Brodsky, Victor; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Balis, Ulysses J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing availability of whole slide imaging (WSI) data sets (digital slides) from glass slides offers new opportunities for the development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) algorithms. With the all-digital pathology workflow that these data sets will enable in the near future, literally millions of digital slides will be generated and stored. Consequently, the field in general and pathologists, specifically, will need tools to help extract actionable information from this new and vast collective repository. Methods: To address this limitation, we designed and implemented a tool (dCORE) to enable the systematic capture of image tiles with constrained size and resolution that contain desired histopathologic features. Results: In this communication, we describe a user-friendly tool that will enable pathologists to mine digital slides archives to create image microarrays (IMAs). IMAs are to digital slides as tissue microarrays (TMAs) are to cell blocks. Thus, a single digital slide could be transformed into an array of hundreds to thousands of high quality digital images, with each containing key diagnostic morphologies and appropriate controls. Current manual digital image cut-and-paste methods that allow for the creation of a grid of images (such as an IMA) of matching resolutions are tedious. Conclusion: The ability to create IMAs representing hundreds to thousands of vetted morphologic features has numerous applications in education, proficiency testing, consensus case review, and research. Lastly, in a manner analogous to the way conventional TMA technology has significantly accelerated in situ studies of tissue specimens use of IMAs has similar potential to significantly accelerate CAD algorithm development. PMID:22200030

  15. Characterization of Polymorphic Forms of Rifaximin.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Ana Carolina; Antonio, Selma Gutierrez; Salgado, Hérida Regina Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Rifaximin is a gut-selective oral antimicrobial that has no systemic adverse effects compared with placebo. It is used for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy, traveler's diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, Clostridium difficile infection, ulcerative colitis, and acute diarrhea. The crystalline form present in rifaximin, α, has minimal systemic absorption compared to the amorphous form. The objective of this study was to obtain polymorphic forms of rifaximin using recrystallization processes. The forms were characterized and studied by thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubility testing. Six polymorphic forms of rifaximin, designated I-VI, were obtained by the crystallization process by evaporation of the solvent. Some polymorphic forms obtained in this work may not have the same excellent tolerability as the reference medicine; therefore, studies such as these are extremely important and point to the need for greater requirements by the regulatory agencies overseeing polymorph analysis of the raw materials used in the manufacture of medicines marketed globally. These analyses are not required in the majority of official compendia. Partnerships among industries, research centers, and universities would be a viable way to consolidate research in this area and contribute to improving the quality of solid drugs. PMID:27455934

  16. Enzyme polymorphisms in Canarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-two accessions of Canarium involving seven species, C. ovatum, C. album, C. megalanthum, C. harveyi, C. indicum, C. mehenbethene, and C. odontophyllum were studied for isozyme polymorphisms. Starch gel electrophoresis with a histidine-citrate buffer system (pH 6.5) was employed to assay six en...

  17. Polymorphous Perversity in Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Eilola, Johndan

    2012-01-01

    Here's the tricky part: If we teach ourselves and our students that texts are made to be broken apart, remixed, remade, do we lose the polymorphous perversity that brought us pleasure in the first place? Does the pleasure of transgression evaporate when the borders are opened?

  18. Investigation of Uranium Polymorphs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-08-01

    The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. As an example, most production schemes for UO3 result in a mixture of up to six or more different polymorphic phases, and small differences in these conditions will affect phase genesis that ultimately result in measureable changes to the end product. As a result, this feature of the UO3-water system may be useful as a means for determining process history. This research effort attempts to better characterize the UO3-water system with a variety of optical techniques for the purpose of developing some predictive capability for estimating process history in polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Three commercially relevant preparation methods for the production of UO3 were explored. Previously unreported low temperature routes to β- and γ-UO3 were discovered. Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic libraries were established for pure and mixed polymorphic forms of UO3 in addition to the common hydrolysis products of UO3. An advantage of the sensitivity of optical fluorescence microscopy over XRD has been demonstrated. Preliminary aging studies of the α and γ forms of UO3 have been conducted. In addition, development of a 3-D phase field model used to predict phase genesis of the system was initiated. Thermodynamic and structural constants that will feed the model have been gathered from the literature for most of the UO3 polymorphic phases.

  19. Microarray characterization of gene expression changes in blood during acute ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of the civil aviation safety program to define the adverse effects of ethanol on flying performance, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human whole blood samples from a five-time point study of subjects administered ethanol orally, followed by breathalyzer analysis, to monitor blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to discover significant gene expression changes in response to the ethanol exposure. Methods Subjects were administered either orange juice or orange juice with ethanol. Blood samples were taken based on BAC and total RNA was isolated from PaxGene™ blood tubes. The amplified cDNA was used in microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analyses to evaluate differential gene expression. Microarray data was analyzed in a pipeline fashion to summarize and normalize and the results evaluated for relative expression across time points with multiple methods. Candidate genes showing distinctive expression patterns in response to ethanol were clustered by pattern and further analyzed for related function, pathway membership and common transcription factor binding within and across clusters. RT-qPCR was used with representative genes to confirm relative transcript levels across time to those detected in microarrays. Results Microarray analysis of samples representing 0%, 0.04%, 0.08%, return to 0.04%, and 0.02% wt/vol BAC showed that changes in gene expression could be detected across the time course. The expression changes were verified by qRT-PCR. The candidate genes of interest (GOI) identified from the microarray analysis and clustered by expression pattern across the five BAC points showed seven coordinately expressed groups. Analysis showed function-based networks, shared transcription factor binding sites and signaling pathways for members of the clusters. These include hematological functions, innate immunity and inflammation functions, metabolic functions expected of ethanol metabolism, and pancreatic

  20. Comparison of High-Level Microarray Analysis Methods in the Context of Result Consistency

    PubMed Central

    Chrominski, Kornel; Tkacz, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Motivation When we were asked for help with high-level microarray data analysis (on Affymetrix HGU-133A microarray), we faced the problem of selecting an appropriate method. We wanted to select a method that would yield "the best result" (detected as many "really" differentially expressed genes (DEGs) as possible, without false positives and false negatives). However, life scientists could not help us – they use their "favorite" method without special argumentation. We also did not find any norm or recommendation. Therefore, we decided to examine it for our own purpose. We considered whether the results obtained using different methods of high-level microarray data analyses – Significant Analysis of Microarrays, Rank Products, Bland-Altman, Mann-Whitney test, T test and the Linear Models for Microarray Data – would be in agreement. Initially, we conducted a comparative analysis of the results on eight real data sets from microarray experiments (from the Array Express database). The results were surprising. On the same array set, the set of DEGs by different methods were significantly different. We also applied the methods to artificial data sets and determined some measures that allow the preparation of the overall scoring of tested methods for future recommendation. Results We found a very low level concordance of results from tested methods on real array sets. The number of common DEGs (detected by all six methods on fixed array sets, checked on eight array sets) ranged from 6 to 433 (22,283 total array readings). Results on artificial data sets were better than those on the real data. However, they were not fully satisfying. We scored tested methods on accuracy, recall, precision, f-measure and Matthews correlation coefficient. Based on the overall scoring, the best methods were SAM and LIMMA. We also found TT to be acceptable. The worst scoring was MW. Based on our study, we recommend: 1. Carefully taking into account the need for study when choosing a

  1. Novel Microarrays for Simultaneous Serodiagnosis of Multiple Antiviral Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Moritsugu, Nozomi; Obuse, Sei; Isoshima, Takashi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    We developed an automated diagnostic system for the detection of virus-specific immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) that was based on a microarray platform. We compared efficacies of our automated system with conventional enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Viruses were immobilized to microarrays using a radical cross-linking reaction that was induced by photo-irradiation. A new photoreactive polymer containing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate was prepared and coated on plates. Inactivated measles, rubella, mumps, Varicella-Zoster and recombinant Epstein-Barr viruse antigen were added to coated plates, and irradiated with ultraviolet light to facilitate immobilization. Virus-specific IgGs in healthy human sera were assayed using these prepared microarrays and the results obtained compared with those from conventional EIAs. We observed high correlation (0.79–0.96) in the results between the automated microarray technique and EIAs. The microarray-based assay was more rapid, involved less reagents and sample, and was easier to conduct compared with conventional EIA techniques. The automated microarray system was further improved by introducing reagent storage reservoirs inside the chamber, thereby conserving the use of expensive reagents and antibodies. We considered the microarray format to be suitable for rapid and multiple serological diagnoses of viral diseases that could be developed further for clinical applications. PMID:24367491

  2. Novel microarrays for simultaneous serodiagnosis of multiple antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Moritsugu, Nozomi; Obuse, Sei; Isoshima, Takashi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    We developed an automated diagnostic system for the detection of virus-specific immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) that was based on a microarray platform. We compared efficacies of our automated system with conventional enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Viruses were immobilized to microarrays using a radical cross-linking reaction that was induced by photo-irradiation. A new photoreactive polymer containing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate was prepared and coated on plates. Inactivated measles, rubella, mumps, Varicella-Zoster and recombinant Epstein-Barr viruse antigen were added to coated plates, and irradiated with ultraviolet light to facilitate immobilization. Virus-specific IgGs in healthy human sera were assayed using these prepared microarrays and the results obtained compared with those from conventional EIAs. We observed high correlation (0.79-0.96) in the results between the automated microarray technique and EIAs. The microarray-based assay was more rapid, involved less reagents and sample, and was easier to conduct compared with conventional EIA techniques. The automated microarray system was further improved by introducing reagent storage reservoirs inside the chamber, thereby conserving the use of expensive reagents and antibodies. We considered the microarray format to be suitable for rapid and multiple serological diagnoses of viral diseases that could be developed further for clinical applications. PMID:24367491

  3. Microintaglio Printing for Soft Lithography-Based in Situ Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Biyani, Manish; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Advances in lithographic approaches to fabricating bio-microarrays have been extensively explored over the last two decades. However, the need for pattern flexibility, a high density, a high resolution, affordability and on-demand fabrication is promoting the development of unconventional routes for microarray fabrication. This review highlights the development and uses of a new molecular lithography approach, called “microintaglio printing technology”, for large-scale bio-microarray fabrication using a microreactor array (µRA)-based chip consisting of uniformly-arranged, femtoliter-size µRA molds. In this method, a single-molecule-amplified DNA microarray pattern is self-assembled onto a µRA mold and subsequently converted into a messenger RNA or protein microarray pattern by simultaneously producing and transferring (immobilizing) a messenger RNA or a protein from a µRA mold to a glass surface. Microintaglio printing allows the self-assembly and patterning of in situ-synthesized biomolecules into high-density (kilo-giga-density), ordered arrays on a chip surface with µm-order precision. This holistic aim, which is difficult to achieve using conventional printing and microarray approaches, is expected to revolutionize and reshape proteomics. This review is not written comprehensively, but rather substantively, highlighting the versatility of microintaglio printing for developing a prerequisite platform for microarray technology for the postgenomic era.

  4. Applications of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) in molecular ecology.

    PubMed

    Hadrys, H; Balick, M; Schierwater, B

    1992-05-01

    Molecular genetic markers have been developed into powerful tools to analyse genetic relationships and genetic diversity. As an extension to the variety of existing techniques using polymorphic DNA markers, the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique may be used in molecular ecology to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyse mixed genome samples, and create specific probes. Main advantages of the RAPD technology include (i) suitability for work on anonymous genomes, (ii) applicability to problems where only limited quantities of DNA are available, (iii) efficiency and low expense. PMID:1344984

  5. High-throughput prediction of protein antigenicity using protein microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, Christophe N.; Zeller, Michael; Kayala, Matthew A.; Vigil, Adam; Randall, Arlo; Felgner, Philip L.; Baldi, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Discovery of novel protective antigens is fundamental to the development of vaccines for existing and emerging pathogens. Most computational methods for predicting protein antigenicity rely directly on homology with previously characterized protective antigens; however, homology-based methods will fail to discover truly novel protective antigens. Thus, there is a significant need for homology-free methods capable of screening entire proteomes for the antigens most likely to generate a protective humoral immune response. Results: Here we begin by curating two types of positive data: (i) antigens that elicit a strong antibody response in protected individuals but not in unprotected individuals, using human immunoglobulin reactivity data obtained from protein microarray analyses; and (ii) known protective antigens from the literature. The resulting datasets are used to train a sequence-based prediction model, ANTIGENpro, to predict the likelihood that a protein is a protective antigen. ANTIGENpro correctly classifies 82% of the known protective antigens when trained using only the protein microarray datasets. The accuracy on the combined dataset is estimated at 76% by cross-validation experiments. Finally, ANTIGENpro performs well when evaluated on an external pathogen proteome for which protein microarray data were obtained after the initial development of ANTIGENpro. Availability: ANTIGENpro is integrated in the SCRATCH suite of predictors available at http://scratch.proteomics.ics.uci.edu. Contact: pfbaldi@ics.uci.edu PMID:20934990

  6. Profiling Caenorhabditis elegans non-coding RNA expression with a combined microarray.

    PubMed

    He, Housheng; Cai, Lun; Skogerbø, Geir; Deng, Wei; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Yudong; Jia, Dong; Zhang, Zhihua; Tao, Yong; Zeng, Haipan; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Cui, Yan; Liu, Guozhen; Chen, Runsheng

    2006-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are encoded by genes that function at the RNA level, and several hundred ncRNAs have been identified in various organisms. Here we describe an analysis of the small non-coding transcriptome of Caenorhabditis elegans, microRNAs excepted. As a substantial fraction of the ncRNAs is located in introns of protein-coding genes in C.elegans, we also analysed the relationship between ncRNA and host gene expression. To this end, we designed a combined microarray, which included probes against ncRNA as well as host gene mRNA transcripts. The microarray revealed pronounced differences in expression profiles, even among ncRNAs with housekeeping functions (e.g. snRNAs and snoRNAs), indicating distinct developmental regulation and stage-specific functions of a number of novel transcripts. Analysis of ncRNA-host mRNA relations showed that the expression of intronic ncRNA loci with conserved upstream motifs was not correlated to (and much higher than) expression levels of their host genes. Even promoter-less intronic ncRNA loci, though showing a clear correlation to host gene expression, appeared to have a surprising amount of 'expressional freedom', depending on host gene function. Taken together, our microarray analysis presents a more complete and detailed picture of a non-coding transcriptome than hitherto has been presented for any other multicellular organism. PMID:16738136

  7. Identification of Genes Expressed in Hyperpigmented Skin Using Meta-Analysis of Microarray Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lanlan; Coelho, Sergio G; Valencia, Julio C; Ebsen, Dominik; Mahns, Andre; Smuda, Christoph; Miller, Sharon A; Beer, Janusz Z; Kolbe, Ludger; Hearing, Vincent J

    2015-10-01

    More than 375 genes have been identified that are involved in regulating skin pigmentation and these act during development, survival, differentiation, and/or responses of melanocytes to the environment. Many of these genes have been cloned, and disruptions of their functions are associated with various pigmentary diseases; however, many remain to be identified. We have performed a series of microarray analyses of hyperpigmented compared with less pigmented skin to identify genes responsible for these differences. The rationale and goal for this study was to perform a meta-analysis on these microarray databases to identify genes that may be significantly involved in regulating skin phenotype either directly or indirectly that might not have been identified due to subtle differences by any of these individual studies alone. The meta-analysis demonstrates that 1,271 probes representing 921 genes are differentially expressed at significant levels in the 5 microarray data sets compared, providing new insights into the variety of genes involved in determining skin phenotype. Immunohistochemistry was used to validate two of these markers at the protein level (TRIM63 and QPCT), and we discuss the possible functions of these genes in regulating skin physiology. PMID:25950827

  8. Gene selection and classification for cancer microarray data based on machine learning and similarity measures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microarray data have a high dimension of variables and a small sample size. In microarray data analyses, two important issues are how to choose genes, which provide reliable and good prediction for disease status, and how to determine the final gene set that is best for classification. Associations among genetic markers mean one can exploit information redundancy to potentially reduce classification cost in terms of time and money. Results To deal with redundant information and improve classification, we propose a gene selection method, Recursive Feature Addition, which combines supervised learning and statistical similarity measures. To determine the final optimal gene set for prediction and classification, we propose an algorithm, Lagging Prediction Peephole Optimization. By using six benchmark microarray gene expression data sets, we compared Recursive Feature Addition with recently developed gene selection methods: Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination, Leave-One-Out Calculation Sequential Forward Selection and several others. Conclusions On average, with the use of popular learning machines including Nearest Mean Scaled Classifier, Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes Classifier and Random Forest, Recursive Feature Addition outperformed other methods. Our studies also showed that Lagging Prediction Peephole Optimization is superior to random strategy; Recursive Feature Addition with Lagging Prediction Peephole Optimization obtained better testing accuracies than the gene selection method varSelRF. PMID:22369383

  9. Identification of Genes Expressed in Hyperpigmented Skin using Meta-Analysis of Microarray Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lanlan; Coelho, Sergio G.; Valencia, Julio C.; Ebsen, Dominik; Mahns, Andre; Smuda, Christoph; Miller, Sharon A.; Beer, Janusz Z.; Kolbe, Ludger; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    More than 375 genes have been identified that are involved in regulating skin pigmentation, and those act during development, survival, differentiation and/or responses of melanocytes to the environment. Many of those genes have been cloned and disruptions of their functions are associated with various pigmentary diseases, however many remain to be identified. We have performed a series of microarray analyses of hyperpigmented compared to less pigmented skin to identify genes responsible for those differences. The rationale and goal for this study was to perform a meta-analysis on those microarray databases to identify genes that may be significantly involved in regulating skin phenotype either directly or indirectly that might not have been identified due to subtle differences by any of those individual studies alone. The meta-analysis demonstrates that 1,271 probes representing 921 genes are differentially expressed at significant levels in the 5 microarray datasets compared, which provides new insights into the variety of genes involved in determining skin phenotype. Immunohistochemistry was used to validate 2 of those markers at the protein level (TRIM63 and QPCT) and we discuss the possible functions of those genes in regulating skin physiology. PMID:25950827

  10. Unsolvated ruthenium(II) benzene dichloride: The beta polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Simona; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Tabacaru, Aurel; Xhaferaj, Nertil; Pettinari, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    A novel polymorph of the unsolvated species [Ru2(benzene)2Cl4] (β form in the following) was serendipitously isolated as a polycrystalline powder. Its molecular and crystal structure was unraveled by means of state-of-the-art X-ray powder diffraction structure determination methods applied to laboratory data, and was compared to those of both the α polymorph and the CHCl3 solvate, throwing light on some discrepant results recently appeared in the literature. The thermal behavior of the α and β polymorphs was investigated by coupling thermogravimetric analyses to variable-temperature X-ray powder diffraction experiments. No temperature-stimulated phase transformation could be detected between the two polymorphs, each preserving its structural features up to decomposition, suggesting that kinetic, more than thermodynamic, factors regulate their isolation.

  11. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Chandra K.; Aguirre, Gerson R.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation.

  12. A Perspective on DNA Microarrays in Pathology Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarray technology matured in the mid-1990s, and the past decade has witnessed a tremendous growth in its application. DNA microarrays have provided powerful tools for pathology researchers seeking to describe, classify, and understand human disease. There has also been great expectation that the technology would advance the practice of pathology. This review highlights some of the key contributions of DNA microarrays to experimental pathology, focusing in the area of cancer research. Also discussed are some of the current challenges in translating utility to clinical practice. PMID:17600117

  13. Deciphering the glycosaminoglycan code with the help of microarrays.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Jose L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have become a powerful tool to elucidate the biological role of complex sugars. Microarrays are particularly useful for the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a key class of carbohydrates. The high-throughput chip format enables rapid screening of large numbers of potential GAG sequences produced via a complex biosynthesis while consuming very little sample. Here, we briefly highlight the most recent advances involving GAG microarrays built with synthetic or naturally derived oligosaccharides. These chips are powerful tools for characterizing GAG-protein interactions and determining structure-activity relationships for specific sequences. Thereby, they contribute to decoding the information contained in specific GAG sequences. PMID:18563243

  14. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  15. New technologies for fabricating biological microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Bradley James

    This dissertation contains the description of two technologies that we have developed to reduce the cost and improve the quality of spotted biological microarrays. The first is a device, called a fluid microplotter, that uses ultrasonics to deposit spots with diameters of less than 5 microns. It consists of a dispenser, composed of a micropipette fastened to a piece of PZT piezoelectric, attached to a precision positioning system. A gentle pumping of fluid to the surface occurs when the micropipette is driven at specific frequencies. Spots or continuous lines can be deposited in this manner. The small fluid features conserve expensive and limited-quantity biological reagents. We characterize the performance of the microplotter in depositing fluid and examine the theoretical underpinnings of its operation. We present an analytical expression for the diameter of a deposited spot as a function of droplet volume and wettability of a surface and compare it with experimental results. We also examine the resonant properties of the piezoelectric element used to drive the dispenser and relate that to the frequencies at which pumping occurs. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain the pumping behavior within the microplotter dispenser. The second technology we present is a process that uses a cold plasma and a subsequent in vacuo vapor-phase reaction to terminate a variety of oxide surfaces with epoxide chemical groups. These epoxide groups can react with amine-containing biomolecules to form strong covalent linkages between the biomolecules and the treated surface. The use of a plasma activation step followed by an in vacuo vapor-phase reaction allows for the precise control of surface functional groups, rather than the mixture of functionalities normally produced. This process modifies a range of different oxide surfaces, is fast, consumes a minimal amount of reagents, and produces attachment densities for bound biomolecules that are comparable to or better than

  16. Peptide Conformations for a Microarray Surface-Tethered Epitope of the Tumor Suppressor p53

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Lynch, Gillian C.; Gao, Xiaolian; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-12-13

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Peptides or proteins near surfaces exhibit different structural properties from those present in a homogeneous solution, and these differences give rise to varied biological activity. Therefore, understanding the detailed molecular structure of these molecules tethered to a surface is important for interpreting the performance of the various microarrays based on the activities of the immobilized peptides or proteins. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of a pentapeptide, RHSVV, an epitope of the tumor suppressor protein p53, tethered via a spacer on a functionalized silica surface and free in solution, to study their structural and conformational differences. These calculations allowed analyses of the peptide-surface interactions, the sequence orientations, and the translational motions of the peptide on the surface to be performed. Conformational similarities are found among dominant structures of the tethered and free peptide. In the peptide microarray simulations, the peptide fluctuates between a parallel and tilted orientation driven in part by the hydrophobic interactions between the nonpolar peptide residues and the methyl-terminated silica surface. The perpendicular movement of the peptide relative to the surface is also restricted due to the hydrophobic nature of the microarray surface. With regard to structures available for recognition and binding, we find that similar conformations to those found in solution are available to the peptide tethered to the surface, but with a shifted equilibrium constant. Comparisons with experimental results show important implications of this for peptide microarray design and assays.

  17. A Simple Method for Optimization of Reference Gene Identification and Normalization in DNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Federico M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Comparative DNA microarray analyses typically yield very large gene expression data sets that reflect complex patterns of change. Despite the wealth of information that is obtained, the identification of stable reference genes is required for normalization of disease- or drug-induced changes across tested groups. This is a prerequisite in quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and relative RT-PCR but rare in gene microarray analysis. The goal of the present study was to outline a simple method for identification of reliable reference genes derived from DNA microarray data sets by comparative statistical analysis of software-generated and manually calculated candidate genes. Material/Methods DNA microarray data sets derived from whole-blood samples obtained from 14 Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (7 lean and 7 diabetic obese) were used for the method development. This involved the use of software-generated filtering parameters to accomplish the desired signal-to-noise ratios, 75th percentile signal manual normalizations, and the selection of reference genes as endogenous controls for target gene expression normalization. Results The combination of software-generated and manual normalization methods yielded a group of 5 stably expressed, suitable endogenous control genes which can be used in further target gene expression determinations in whole blood of ZDF rats. Conclusions This method can be used to correct for potentially false results and aid in the selection of suitable endogenous control genes. It is especially useful when aimed to aid the software in cases of borderline results, where the expression and/or the fold change values are just beyond the pre-established set of acceptable parameters. PMID:27122237

  18. Fish ‘n’ chips: the use of microarrays for aquatic toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Denslow, Nancy D.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Barber, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression analysis is changing the way that we look at toxicity, allowing toxicologists to perform parallel analyses of entire transcriptomes. While this technology is not as advanced in aquatic toxicology as it is for mammalian models, it has shown promise for determining modes of action, identifying biomarkers and developing ‘‘signatures’’ of chemicals that can be used for field and mixture studies. A major hurdle for the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology is the lack of sequence information for non-model species. Custom arrays based on gene libraries enriched for genes that are expressed in response to specific contaminants have been used with excellent success for some non-model species, suggesting that this approach will work well for ecotoxicology and spurring on the sequencing of cDNA libraries for species of interest. New sequencing technology and development of repositories for gene expression data will accelerate the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology. Notwithstanding the preliminary successes that have been achieved even with partial cDNA libraries printed on arrays, ecological samples present elevated challenges for this technology due to the high degree of variation of the samples. Furthermore, recent studies that show nonlinear toxic responses for ecological species underscore the necessity of establishing time and dose dependence of effects on gene expression and comparing these results with traditional markers of toxicity. To realize the full potential of microarrays, researchers must do the experiments required to bridge the gap between the ‘omics’ technologies and traditional toxicology to demonstrate that microarrays have predictive value in ecotoxicology. PMID:17308663

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in rainbow trout by deep sequencing of a reduced representation library

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: To enhance capabilities for genomic analyses in rainbow trout, such as genomic selection, a large suite of polymorphic markers that are amenable to high-throughput genotyping protocols must be identified. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) have been used for single nucleotide polymorphism (...

  20. Ontology-Based Analysis of Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Agapito; Milano, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    The importance of semantic-based methods and algorithms for the analysis and management of biological data is growing for two main reasons. From a biological side, knowledge contained in ontologies is more and more accurate and complete, from a computational side, recent algorithms are using in a valuable way such knowledge. Here we focus on semantic-based management and analysis of protein interaction networks referring to all the approaches of analysis of protein-protein interaction data that uses knowledge encoded into biological ontologies. Semantic approaches for studying high-throughput data have been largely used in the past to mine genomic and expression data. Recently, the emergence of network approaches for investigating molecular machineries has stimulated in a parallel way the introduction of semantic-based techniques for analysis and management of network data. The application of these computational approaches to the study of microarray data can broad the application scenario of them and simultaneously can help the understanding of disease development and progress. PMID:25971913

  1. Noncoding RNAs in human intervertebral disc degeneration: An integrated microarray study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Xie, Yan-Ke; Hu, Qing-Jie; Ma, Chi-Jiao; Pei, Yan-Jun; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Fan, Li-Ying; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that noncoding RNAs play important roles in a multitude of biological processes. The striking findings of miRNAs (microRNAs) and lncRNAs (long noncoding RNAs) as members of noncoding RNAs open up an exciting era in the studies of gene regulation. More recently, the reports of circRNAs (circular RNAs) add fuel to the noncoding RNAs research. Human intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a main cause of low back pain as a disabling spinal disease. We have addressed the expression profiles if miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs in IDD (Wang et al., J Pathology, 2011 and Wan et al., Arthritis Res Ther, 2014). Furthermore, we thoroughly analysed noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs in IDD using the very same samples. Here we delineate in detail the contents of the aforementioned microarray analyses. Microarray and sample annotation data were deposited in GEO under accession number GSE67567 as SuperSeries. The integrated analyses of these noncoding RNAs will shed a novel light on coding-noncoding regulatory machinery. PMID:26484230

  2. Noncoding RNAs in human intervertebral disc degeneration: An integrated microarray study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Che, Lu; Xie, Yan-Ke; Hu, Qing-Jie; Ma, Chi-Jiao; Pei, Yan-Jun; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Fan, Li-Ying; Wang, Hai-Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that noncoding RNAs play important roles in a multitude of biological processes. The striking findings of miRNAs (microRNAs) and lncRNAs (long noncoding RNAs) as members of noncoding RNAs open up an exciting era in the studies of gene regulation. More recently, the reports of circRNAs (circular RNAs) add fuel to the noncoding RNAs research. Human intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a main cause of low back pain as a disabling spinal disease. We have addressed the expression profiles if miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs in IDD (Wang et al., J Pathology, 2011 and Wan et al., Arthritis Res Ther, 2014). Furthermore, we thoroughly analysed noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs in IDD using the very same samples. Here we delineate in detail the contents of the aforementioned microarray analyses. Microarray and sample annotation data were deposited in GEO under accession number GSE67567 as SuperSeries. The integrated analyses of these noncoding RNAs will shed a novel light on coding-noncoding regulatory machinery. PMID:26484230

  3. Development and Optimization of a Thrombin Sandwich Aptamer Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Meneghello, Anna; Sosic, Alice; Antognoli, Agnese; Cretaio, Erica; Gatto, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    A sandwich microarray employing two distinct aptamers for human thrombin has been optimized for the detection of subnanomolar concentrations of the protein. The aptamer microarray demonstrates high specificity for thrombin, proving that a two-site binding assay with the TBA1 aptamer as capture layer and the TBA2 aptamer as detection layer can ensure great specificity at times and conditions compatible with standard routine analysis of biological samples. Aptamer microarray sensitivity was evaluated directly by fluorescent analysis employing Cy5-labeled TBA2 and indirectly by the use of TBA2-biotin followed by detection with fluorescent streptavidin. Sub-nanomolar LODs were reached in all cases and in the presence of serum, demonstrating that the optimized aptamer microarray can identify thrombin by a low-cost, sensitive and specific method.

  4. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  5. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches. PMID:26077916

  6. Applications in high-content functional protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cedric D; Ajala, Olutobi Z; Zhu, Heng

    2016-02-01

    Protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a parallel and high-throughput manner. Over the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function at a systems level and have led to the construction of networks and pathways describing these functions. Relevant areas of research include the detection of various binding properties of proteins, the study of enzyme-substrate relationships, the analysis of host-microbe interactions, and profiling antibody specificity. In addition, discovery of novel biomarkers in autoimmune diseases and cancers is emerging as a major clinical application of functional protein microarrays. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances of functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical applications. PMID:26599287

  7. Improving Microarray Sample Size Using Bootstrap Data Combination

    PubMed Central

    Phan, John H.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Barrett, Andrea B.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray technology has enabled us to simultaneously measure the expression of thousands of genes. Using this high-throughput technology, we can examine subtle genetic changes between biological samples and build predictive models for clinical applications. Although microarrays have dramatically increased the rate of data collection, sample size is still a major issue when selecting features. Previous methods show that combining multiple microarray datasets improves feature selection using simple methods such as fold change. We propose a wrapper-based gene selection technique that combines bootstrap estimated classification errors for individual genes across multiple datasets and reduces the contribution of datasets with high variance. We use the bootstrap because it is an unbiased estimator of classification error that is also effective for small sample data. Coupled with data combination across multiple datasets, we show that our meta-analytic approach improves the biological relevance of gene selection using prostate and renal cancer microarray data. PMID:19164001

  8. Polymorphism of phosphoric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, W.L.; Faust, G.T.; Hendricks, S.B.

    1943-01-01

    The melting points and monotropic relationship of three crystalline forms of phosphoric oxide were determined by the method of quenching. Previous vapor pressure data are discussed and interpreted to establish a pressure-temperature diagram (70 to 600??) for the one-component system. The system involves three triple points, at which solid, liquid and vapor (P4O10) coexist in equilibrium, namely: 420?? and 360 cm., 562?? and 43.7 cm. and 580?? and 55.5 cm., corresponding to the hexagonal, orthorhombic and stable polymorphs, respectively, and at least two distinct liquids, one a stable polymer of the other, which are identified with the melting of the stable form and the hexagonal modification, respectively. Indices of refraction of the polymorphs and glasses were determined. The density and the thermal, hygroscopic and structural properties of the several phases are discussed.

  9. Facts and fictions about polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M; Bernstein, Joel

    2015-12-01

    We present new facts about polymorphism based on (i) crystallographic data from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD, a database built over 50 years of community effort), (ii) 229 solid form screens conducted at Hoffmann-La Roche and Eli Lilly and Company over the course of 8+ and 15+ years respectively and (iii) a dataset of 446 polymorphic crystals with energies and properties computed with modern DFT-d methods. We found that molecular flexibility or size has no correlation with the ability of a compound to be polymorphic. Chiral molecules, however, were found to be less prone to polymorphism than their achiral counterparts and compounds able to hydrogen bond exhibit only a slightly higher propensity to polymorphism than those which do not. Whilst the energy difference between polymorphs is usually less than 1 kcal mol(-1), conformational polymorphs are capable of differing by larger values (up to 2.5 kcal mol(-1) in our dataset). As overall statistics, we found that one in three compounds in the CSD are polymorphic whilst at least one in two compounds from the Roche and Lilly set display polymorphism with a higher estimate of up to three in four when compounds are screened intensively. Whilst the statistics provide some guidance of expectations, each compound constitutes a new challenge and prediction and realization of targeted polymorphism still remains a holy grail of materials sciences. PMID:26400501

  10. Methods for transcriptomic analyses of the porcine host immune response: application to Salmonella infection using microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technological developments in both the collection and analysis of molecular genetic data over the past few years have provided new opportunities for an improved understanding of the global response to pathogen exposure. Such developments are particularly dramatic for scientists studying the pig, whe...

  11. [Polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulfate].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Huang, Hai-Wei; Wu, Jian-Min; Shi, Ya-Qin; Yang, La-Hu

    2013-08-01

    This paper is to report the polymorphism of raw materials of clopidogrel bisulfate at home and abroad. By the analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD), samples are roughly classified into two groups, except one patent material. And the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) examination showed more detailed information for these materials. The results of the study could provide comprehensive basis for the quality evaluation of clopidogrel bisulfate. PMID:24187849

  12. Analyzing Illumina Gene Expression Microarray Data Obtained From Human Whole Blood Cell and Blood Monocyte Samples.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Schurmann, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Schramm, Katharina; Ziegler, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Microarray profiling of gene expression is widely applied to studies in molecular biology and functional genomics. Experimental and technical variations make not only the statistical analysis of single studies but also meta-analyses of different studies very challenging. Here, we describe the analytical steps required to substantially reduce the variations of gene expression data without affecting true effect sizes. A software pipeline has been established using gene expression data from a total of 3358 whole blood cell and blood monocyte samples, all from three German population-based cohorts, measured on the Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 BeadChip array. In summary, adjustment for a few selected technical factors greatly improved reliability of gene expression analyses. Such adjustments are particularly required for meta-analyses of different studies. PMID:26614070

  13. Major histocompatibility complex locus DRA polymorphism in the endangered Sorraia horse and related breeds.

    PubMed

    Luís, C; Cothran, E G; Oom, M M; Bailey, E

    2005-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play well-defined roles in eliciting immune responses and combating infectious diseases. This genetic system is among the most polymorphic. The extent of genetic variation within a population has been directly correlated with fitness for many traits. The MHC class II locus DRA polymorphism was analysed in the endangered Sorraia horse, two other Portuguese and four New World horse breeds considered to be historically close to the Sorraia. Comparison of the Sorraia with other breeds demonstrated less MHC variation among Sorraia horses. If DRA polymorphism provides greater disease resistance, selective breeding to increase MHC polymorphism may increase fitness of this population. PMID:16130491

  14. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology weremore » selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry.« less

  15. Profiling In Situ Microbial Community Structure with an Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Knickerbocker, Christopher; Bryant, Lexi; Golova, Julia; Wiles, Cory; Williams, Kenneth H.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to unify amplification, labeling, and microarray hybridization chemistries within a single, closed microfluidic chamber (an amplification microarray) and verify technology performance on a series of groundwater samples from an in situ field experiment designed to compare U(VI) mobility under conditions of various alkalinities (as HCO3−) during stimulated microbial activity accompanying acetate amendment. Analytical limits of detection were between 2 and 200 cell equivalents of purified DNA. Amplification microarray signatures were well correlated with 16S rRNA-targeted quantitative PCR results and hybridization microarray signatures. The succession of the microbial community was evident with and consistent between the two microarray platforms. Amplification microarray analysis of acetate-treated groundwater showed elevated levels of iron-reducing bacteria (Flexibacter, Geobacter, Rhodoferax, and Shewanella) relative to the average background profile, as expected. Identical molecular signatures were evident in the transect treated with acetate plus NaHCO3, but at much lower signal intensities and with a much more rapid decline (to nondetection). Azoarcus, Thaurea, and Methylobacterium were responsive in the acetate-only transect but not in the presence of bicarbonate. Observed differences in microbial community composition or response to bicarbonate amendment likely had an effect on measured rates of U reduction, with higher rates probable in the part of the field experiment that was amended with bicarbonate. The simplification in microarray-based work flow is a significant technological advance toward entirely closed-amplicon microarray-based tests and is generally extensible to any number of environmental monitoring applications. PMID:23160129

  16. Plant protein kinase substrates identification using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate signaling pathways by phosphorylating their targets. They play critical roles in plant signaling networks. Although many important protein kinases have been identified in plants, their substrates are largely unknown. We have developed and produced plant protein microarrays with more than 15,000 purified plant proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to use these microarrays to identify plant protein kinase substrates via in vitro phosphorylation assays on these arrays. PMID:25930701

  17. Where statistics and molecular microarray experiments biology meet.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Diana M

    2013-01-01

    This review chapter presents a statistical point of view to microarray experiments with the purpose of understanding the apparent contradictions that often appear in relation to their results. We give a brief introduction of molecular biology for nonspecialists. We describe microarray experiments from their construction and the biological principles the experiments rely on, to data acquisition and analysis. The role of epidemiological approaches and sample size considerations are also discussed. PMID:23385529

  18. Evaluating concentration estimation errors in ELISA microarray experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Don S.; White, Amanda M.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2005-01-26

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a standard immunoassay to predict a protein concentration in a sample. Deploying ELISA in a microarray format permits simultaneous prediction of the concentrations of numerous proteins in a small sample. These predictions, however, are uncertain due to processing error and biological variability. Evaluating prediction error is critical to interpreting biological significance and improving the ELISA microarray process. Evaluating prediction error must be automated to realize a reliable high-throughput ELISA microarray system. Methods: In this paper, we present a statistical method based on propagation of error to evaluate prediction errors in the ELISA microarray process. Although propagation of error is central to this method, it is effective only when comparable data are available. Therefore, we briefly discuss the roles of experimental design, data screening, normalization and statistical diagnostics when evaluating ELISA microarray prediction errors. We use an ELISA microarray investigation of breast cancer biomarkers to illustrate the evaluation of prediction errors. The illustration begins with a description of the design and resulting data, followed by a brief discussion of data screening and normalization. In our illustration, we fit a standard curve to the screened and normalized data, review the modeling diagnostics, and apply propagation of error.

  19. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments. PMID:27600247

  20. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  1. A comparative analysis of DNA barcode microarray feature size

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Ron; Smith, Andrew M; Heisler, Lawrence E; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarrays are an invaluable tool in many modern genomic studies. It is generally perceived that decreasing the size of microarray features leads to arrays with higher resolution (due to greater feature density), but this increase in resolution can compromise sensitivity. Results We demonstrate that barcode microarrays with smaller features are equally capable of detecting variation in DNA barcode intensity when compared to larger feature sizes within a specific microarray platform. The barcodes used in this study are the well-characterized set derived from the Yeast KnockOut (YKO) collection used for screens of pooled yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) deletion mutants. We treated these pools with the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin as a test compound. Three generations of barcode microarrays at 30, 8 and 5 μm features sizes independently identified the primary target of tunicamycin to be ALG7. Conclusion We show that the data obtained with 5 μm feature size is of comparable quality to the 30 μm size and propose that further shrinking of features could yield barcode microarrays with equal or greater resolving power and, more importantly, higher density. PMID:19825181

  2. Novel 3-Dimensional Dendrimer Platform for Glycolipid Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Xichun

    2011-01-01

    Glycolipids are important biological molecules that modulate cellular recognitions and pathogen adhesions. In this paper, we report a sensitive glycolipid microarray for non-covalently immobilizing glycolipids on a microarray substrate and we perform a set of immunoassays to explore glycolipid-protein interactions. This substrate utilizes a three-dimensional hydrazide-functionalized dendrimer monolayer attached onto a microscopic glass surface, which possesses the characteristics to adsorb glycoliplids non-covalently and facilitates multivalent attributes on the substrate surface. In the proof-of-concept experiments, gangliosides such as GM1, FucGM1, GM3, GD1b, GT1b, and GQ1b, and a lipoarabinomannan were tested on the substrate and interrogated with toxins and antibodies. The resulting glycolipid microarrays exhibited hypersensitivity and specificity for detection of glycolipid-protein interactions. In particular, a robust and specific binding of a pentameric cholera toxin B subunit to the GM1 glycolipid spotted on the array has demonstrated its superiority in sensitivity and specificity. In addition, this glycolipid microarray substrate was used to detect lipoarabinomannan in buffer within a limit-of-detection of 125 ng/mL. Furthermore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) Lipoarabinomannan was tested in human urine specimens on this platform, which can effectively identify urine samples either infected or not infected with Mtb. The results of this work suggest the possibility of using this glycolipid microarray platform to fabricate glycoconjugate microarrays, which includes free glycans and glycolipids and potential application in detection of pathogen and toxin. PMID:21820887

  3. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Jennifer B; Corn, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator-detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements. PMID:25641598

  4. DNA Microarray Characterization of Pathogens Associated with Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Suwei; Tian, Zhenyang; Hu, Pinliang; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study established a multiplex PCR-based microarray to detect simultaneously a diverse panel of 17 sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)-associated pathogens including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 54 and 58. The target genes are 16S rRNA gene for N. gonorrhoeae, M. genitalium, M. hominism, and Ureaplasma, the major outer membrane protein gene (ompA) for C. trachomatis, the glycoprotein B gene (gB) for HSV; and the L1 gene for HPV. A total of 34 probes were selected for the microarray including 31 specific probes, one as positive control, one as negative control, and one as positional control probe for printing reference. The microarray is specific as the commensal and pathogenic microbes (and closely related organisms) in the genitourinary tract did not cross-react with the microarray probes. The microarray is 10 times more sensitive than that of the multiplex PCR. Among the 158 suspected HPV specimens examined, the microarray showed that 49 samples contained HPV, 21 samples contained Ureaplasma, 15 contained M. hominis, four contained C. trachomatis, and one contained N. gonorrhoeae. This work reports the development of the first high through-put detection system that identifies common pathogens associated with STDs from clinical samples, and paves the way for establishing a time-saving, accurate and high-throughput diagnostic tool for STDs. PMID:26208181

  5. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator–detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements. PMID:25641598

  6. Microintaglio Printing of In situ Synthesized Proteins Enables Rapid Printing of High-Density Protein Microarrays Directly from DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biyani, Manish; Moriyasu, Junpei; Tanaka, Yoko; Sato, Shusuke; Ueno, Shingo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-08-01

    A simple and versatile approach to the simultaneous on-chip synthesis and printing of proteins has been studied for high-density protein microarray applications. The method used is based on the principle of intaglio printing using microengraved plates. Unlike conventional approaches that require multistep reactions for synthesizing proteins off the chip followed by printing using a robotic spotter, our approach demonstrates the following: (i) parallel and spotter-free printing of high-density protein microarrays directly from a type of DNA microarray and (ii) microcompartmentalization of cell-free coupled transcription/translation reaction and direct transferring of picoliter protein solution per spot to pattern microarrays of 25-100 µm features.

  7. Nucleosome positioning from tiling microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Yassour, Moran; Kaplan, Tommy; Jaimovich, Ariel; Friedman, Nir

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The packaging of DNA around nucleosomes in eukaryotic cells plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression, and other DNA-related processes. To better understand the regulatory role of nucleosomes, it is important to pinpoint their position in a high (5–10 bp) resolution. Toward this end, several recent works used dense tiling arrays to map nucleosomes in a high-throughput manner. These data were then parsed and hand-curated, and the positions of nucleosomes were assessed. Results: In this manuscript, we present a fully automated algorithm to analyze such data and predict the exact location of nucleosomes. We introduce a method, based on a probabilistic graphical model, to increase the resolution of our predictions even beyond that of the microarray used. We show how to build such a model and how to compile it into a simple Hidden Markov Model, allowing for a fast and accurate inference of nucleosome positions. We applied our model to nucleosomal data from mid-log yeast cells reported by Yuan et al. and compared our predictions to those of the original paper; to a more recent method that uses five times denser tiling arrays as explained by Lee et al.; and to a curated set of literature-based nucleosome positions. Our results suggest that by applying our algorithm to the same data used by Yuan et al. our fully automated model traced 13% more nucleosomes, and increased the overall accuracy by about 20%. We believe that such an improvement opens the way for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression, and how they are encoded in the DNA. Contact: nir@cs.huji.ac.il PMID:18586706

  8. Configurable low-cost plotter device for fabrication of multi-color sub-cellular scale microarrays.

    PubMed

    Arrabito, Giuseppe; Schroeder, Hendrik; Schröder, Kathrin; Filips, Christian; Marggraf, Ulrich; Dopp, Christian; Venkatachalapathy, Muthukumaran; Dehmelt, Leif; Bastiaens, Philippe I H; Neyer, Andreas; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2014-07-23

    The construction and operation of a low-cost plotter for fabrication of microarrays for multiplexed single-cell analyses is reported. The printing head consists of polymeric pyramidal pens mounted on a rotation stage installed on an aluminium frame. This construction enables printing of microarrays onto glass substrates mounted on a tilt stage, controlled by a Lab-View operated user interface. The plotter can be assembled by typical academic workshops from components of less than 15,000 Euro. The functionality of the instrument is demonstrated by printing DNA microarrays on the area of 0.5 cm2 using up to three different oligonucleotides. Typical feature sizes are 5 μm diameter with a pitch of 15 μm, leading to densities of up to 10(4)-10(5) spots/mm2. The fabricated DNA microarrays are used to produce sub-cellular scale arrays of bioactive epidermal growth factor peptides by means of DNA-directed immobilization. The suitability of these biochips for cell biological studies is demonstrated by specific recruitment, concentration, and activation of EGF receptors within the plasma membrane of adherent living cells. This work illustrates that the presented plotter gives access to bio-functionalized arrays usable for fundamental research in cell biology, such as the manipulation of signal pathways in living cells at subcellular resolution. PMID:24678019

  9. Microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in HepG2 cells cultured in simulated microgravity: preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaoustov, V. I.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Yoffe, B.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Developed at NASA, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS) allows the creation of unique microgravity environment of low shear force, high-mass transfer, and enables three-dimensional (3D) cell culture of dissimilar cell types. Recently we demonstrated that a simulated microgravity is conducive for maintaining long-term cultures of functional hepatocytes and promote 3D cell assembly. Using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) microarray technology, it is now possible to measure the levels of thousands of different messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) in a single hybridization step. This technique is particularly powerful for comparing gene expression in the same tissue under different environmental conditions. The aim of this research was to analyze gene expression of hepatoblastoma cell line (HepG2) during early stage of 3D-cell assembly in simulated microgravity. For this, mRNA from HepG2 cultured in the RCCS was analyzed by deoxyribonucleic acid microarray. Analyses of HepG2 mRNA by using 6K glass DNA microarray revealed changes in expression of 95 genes (overexpression of 85 genes and downregulation of 10 genes). Our preliminary results indicated that simulated microgravity modifies the expression of several genes and that microarray technology may provide new understanding of the fundamental biological questions of how gravity affects the development and function of individual cells.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in rainbow trout using reduced representation libraries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly abundant, widespread and evenly distributed markers, which can be easily genotyped using high-throughput assays. These characteristics explain their increasing popularity in genome analyses such as quantitative trait loci mapping, linkage disequilibr...

  11. PIIKA 2: an expanded, web-based platform for analysis of kinome microarray data.

    PubMed

    Trost, Brett; Kindrachuk, Jason; Määttänen, Pekka; Napper, Scott; Kusalik, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Kinome microarrays are comprised of peptides that act as phosphorylation targets for protein kinases. This platform is growing in popularity due to its ability to measure phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling in a high-throughput manner. While software for analyzing data from DNA microarrays has also been used for kinome arrays, differences between the two technologies and associated biologies previously led us to develop Platform for Intelligent, Integrated Kinome Analysis (PIIKA), a software tool customized for the analysis of data from kinome arrays. Here, we report the development of PIIKA 2, a significantly improved version with new features and improvements in the areas of clustering, statistical analysis, and data visualization. Among other additions to the original PIIKA, PIIKA 2 now allows the user to: evaluate statistically how well groups of samples cluster together; identify sets of peptides that have consistent phosphorylation patterns among groups of samples; perform hierarchical clustering analysis with bootstrapping; view false negative probabilities and positive and negative predictive values for t-tests between pairs of samples; easily assess experimental reproducibility; and visualize the data using volcano plots, scatterplots, and interactive three-dimensional principal component analyses. Also new in PIIKA 2 is a web-based interface, which allows users unfamiliar with command-line tools to easily provide input and download the results. Collectively, the additions and improvements described here enhance both the breadth and depth of analyses available, simplify the user interface, and make the software an even more valuable tool for the analysis of kinome microarray data. Both the web-based and stand-alone versions of PIIKA 2 can be accessed via http://saphire.usask.ca. PMID:24312246

  12. Identification of genes associated with osteoarthritis by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Yan, Bingshan; Yin, Wangping; Zhang, Xinchao

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms of osteoarthritis (OA). Raw microarray data (GSE51588) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, including samples from OA (n=20) and non‑OA (n=5) knee lateral and medial tibial plateaus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using Student's t‑test. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed for the upregulated and downregulated DEGs. A protein‑protein interaction network (PPI) was constructed according to the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and module analysis of the PPI network was performed using CFinder. The protein domain enrichment analysis for genes in modules was performed using the INTERPRO database. A total of 869 upregulated and 508 downregulated DEGs were identified. The enriched pathways of downregulated and upregulated DEGs were predominantly associated with the cell cycle (BUB1, BUB1B, CCNA2, CCNB1 and CCNE1), and extracellular matrix (ECM)‑receptor interaction (CD36, COL11A2, COL1A1, COL2A1 and COL3A1). Functional enrichment analysis of the DEGs demonstrated that FGF19, KIF11 and KIF2C were involved in the response to stress and that ACAN, ADAMTS10 and BGN were associated with proteinaceous ECM. The top protein domain was IPR001752: Kinesin motor region involving three genes (KIF2C, KIF11 and KIF20A). The identified DEGs, including KIF2C, KIF11 and KIF20A, may be significant in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:26151199

  13. TAMEE: data management and analysis for tissue microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Thallinger, Gerhard G; Baumgartner, Kerstin; Pirklbauer, Martin; Uray, Martina; Pauritsch, Elke; Mehes, Gabor; Buck, Charles R; Zatloukal, Kurt; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2007-01-01

    Background With the introduction of tissue microarrays (TMAs) researchers can investigate gene and protein expression in tissues on a high-throughput scale. TMAs generate a wealth of data calling for extended, high level data management. Enhanced data analysis and systematic data management are required for traceability and reproducibility of experiments and provision of results in a timely and reliable fashion. Robust and scalable applications have to be utilized, which allow secure data access, manipulation and evaluation for researchers from different laboratories. Results TAMEE (Tissue Array Management and Evaluation Environment) is a web-based database application for the management and analysis of data resulting from the production and application of TMAs. It facilitates storage of production and experimental parameters, of images generated throughout the TMA workflow, and of results from core evaluation. Database content consistency is achieved using structured classifications of parameters. This allows the extraction of high quality results for subsequent biologically-relevant data analyses. Tissue cores in the images of stained tissue sections are automatically located and extracted and can be evaluated using a set of predefined analysis algorithms. Additional evaluation algorithms can be easily integrated into the application via a plug-in interface. Downstream analysis of results is facilitated via a flexible query generator. Conclusion We have developed an integrated system tailored to the specific needs of research projects using high density TMAs. It covers the complete workflow of TMA production, experimental use and subsequent analysis. The system is freely available for academic and non-profit institutions from . PMID:17343750

  14. Differential analysis for high density tiling microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Srinka; Hirsch, Heather A; Sekinger, Edward A; Kapranov, Philipp; Struhl, Kevin; Gingeras, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Background High density oligonucleotide tiling arrays are an effective and powerful platform for conducting unbiased genome-wide studies. The ab initio probe selection method employed in tiling arrays is unbiased, and thus ensures consistent sampling across coding and non-coding regions of the genome. These arrays are being increasingly used to study the associated processes of transcription, transcription factor binding, chromatin structure and their association. Studies of differential expression and/or regulation provide critical insight into the mechanics of transcription and regulation that occurs during the developmental program of a cell. The time-course experiment, which comprises an in-vivo system and the proposed analyses, is used to determine if annotated and un-annotated portions of genome manifest coordinated differential response to the induced developmental program. Results We have proposed a novel approach, based on a piece-wise function – to analyze genome-wide differential response. This enables segmentation of the response based on protein-coding and non-coding regions; for genes the methodology also partitions differential response with a 5' versus 3' versus intra-genic bias. Conclusion The algorithm built upon the framework of Significance Analysis of Microarrays, uses a generalized logic to define regions/patterns of coordinated differential change. By not adhering to the gene-centric paradigm, discordant differential expression patterns between exons and introns have been identified at a FDR of less than 12 percent. A co-localization of differential binding between RNA Polymerase II and tetra-acetylated histone has been quantified at a p-value < 0.003; it is most significant at the 5' end of genes, at a p-value < 10-13. The prototype R code has been made available as supplementary material [see Additional file 1]. PMID:17892592

  15. Introgressive hybridization in a trophically polymorphic cichlid

    PubMed Central

    Hulsey, C Darrin; García-de-León, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Trophically polymorphic species could represent lineages that are rapidly diverging along an ecological axis or could phenotypically mark the collapse of species through introgressive hybridization. We investigated patterns of introgression between the trophically polymorphic cichlid fish Herichthys minckleyi and its relative H. cyanoguttatus using a combination of population genetics and species tree analyses. We first examined the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes within the alternative H. minckleyi pharyngeal jaw morphotypes that are endemic to the small desert valley of Cuatro Ciénegas. We recovered two clusters of mitochondrial haplotypes. The first contained a number of slightly differentiated cytochrome b (cytb) haplotypes that showed some phylogeographic signal and were present in both jaw morphotypes. The other haplotype was monomorphic, highly differentiated from the other cluster, present in equal frequencies in the morphotypes, and identical to H. cyanoguttatus haplotypes found outside Cuatro Ciénegas. Then, we investigated whether H. minckleyi individuals with the H. cyanoguttatus cytb were more evolutionarily similar to H. cyanoguttatus or other H. minckleyi using a species tree analysis of 84 nuclear loci. Both H. minckleyi pharyngeal morphotypes, regardless of their cytb haplotype, were quite distinct from H. cyanoguttatus. However, hybridization could be blurring subdivision within H. minckleyi as the alternative jaw morphotypes were not genetically distinct from one another. Accounting for introgression from H. cyanoguttatus will be essential to understand the evolution of the trophically polymorphic cichlid H. minckleyi. PMID:24340193

  16. Introgressive hybridization in a trophically polymorphic cichlid.

    PubMed

    Hulsey, C Darrin; García-de-León, Francisco J

    2013-11-01

    Trophically polymorphic species could represent lineages that are rapidly diverging along an ecological axis or could phenotypically mark the collapse of species through introgressive hybridization. We investigated patterns of introgression between the trophically polymorphic cichlid fish Herichthys minckleyi and its relative H. cyanoguttatus using a combination of population genetics and species tree analyses. We first examined the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes within the alternative H. minckleyi pharyngeal jaw morphotypes that are endemic to the small desert valley of Cuatro Ciénegas. We recovered two clusters of mitochondrial haplotypes. The first contained a number of slightly differentiated cytochrome b (cytb) haplotypes that showed some phylogeographic signal and were present in both jaw morphotypes. The other haplotype was monomorphic, highly differentiated from the other cluster, present in equal frequencies in the morphotypes, and identical to H. cyanoguttatus haplotypes found outside Cuatro Ciénegas. Then, we investigated whether H. minckleyi individuals with the H. cyanoguttatus cytb were more evolutionarily similar to H. cyanoguttatus or other H. minckleyi using a species tree analysis of 84 nuclear loci. Both H. minckleyi pharyngeal morphotypes, regardless of their cytb haplotype, were quite distinct from H. cyanoguttatus. However, hybridization could be blurring subdivision within H. minckleyi as the alternative jaw morphotypes were not genetically distinct from one another. Accounting for introgression from H. cyanoguttatus will be essential to understand the evolution of the trophically polymorphic cichlid H. minckleyi. PMID:24340193

  17. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P; Leathart, Julian B S

    2006-01-01

    Protocols for the extraction of DNA from human blood and for genotyping for a number of common cytochrome P450 polymorphisms using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis are described. Rapid high-throughput techniques are also available for analyses of this type, but they require access to specialized equipment and are not considered here. General guidelines for performing amplification using PCR are described together with electrophoresis protocols for analysis of restriction digests of PCR products with agarose and polyacrylamide gels including the use of polyacrylamide-based gels for SSCP analysis. Protocols for the following specific isoforms and alleles are also provided: CYP1A1 (*2B and *4 alleles), CYP2C8 (*3 and *4 alleles), CYP2C9 (*2, *3, and *11 alleles), CYP2C19 (*2 and *3 alleles), CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *5, and *6 alleles), CYP2E1 (*5A, *5B, and *6 alleles), and CYP3A5 (*3 allele). PMID:16719392

  18. Inflammasome polymorphisms in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pontillo, Alessandra; Reis, Edione C; Liphaus, Bernadete L; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasome is the cytoplasmic complex responsible for pro-IL1 β cleavage and secretion of IL-1β. Recently our group reported the first association between polymorphisms in the inflammasome receptor NLRP1 and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) "di per se" and especially in SLE-associated renal disease, suggesting the involvement of NLRP1-inflammasome in the immune dysregulation characteristic of SLE patients. Considering that juvenile-onset SLE (JSLE) is more severe than adult SLE, and that the genetic background plays a major role in the early development of autoimmune diseases, we analysed selected polymorphisms in inflammasome genes (NLRP1, NLRP3, CARD8, IL1B, TNFAIP3) of children and adolescents with JSLE (n = 90) and in healthy controls (n = 144). A single polymorphism in IL1B, and not NLRP1, gene resulted in association with JSLE, suggesting that IL-1 β is involved in the pathogenesis of SLE, but different genes could play specific role in adult- or early-onset disease. PMID:26182076

  19. A time-course comparative microarray analysis of an incompatible and compatible response by Glycine max (soybean) to Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode) infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of infection in soybean cv. Peking roots by compatible or incompatible races of Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode [SCN]) was assayed by microarray analyses. Using three time-points, one as nematodes penetrate the root prior to feeding site selection; a second as the nematode...

  20. Self-Directed Student Research through Analysis of Microarray Datasets: A Computer-Based Functional Genomics Practical Class for Masters-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenville-Briggs, Laura J.; Stansfield, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a linked series of Masters-level computer practical workshops. They comprise an advanced functional genomics investigation, based upon analysis of a microarray dataset probing yeast DNA damage responses. The workshops require the students to analyse highly complex transcriptomics datasets, and were designed to stimulate…

  1. Construction and validation of a Bovine Innate Immune Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Laurelea; Vuocolo, Tony; Gray, Christian; Strandberg, Ylva; Reverter, Antonio; McWilliam, Sean; Wang, YongHong; Byrne, Keren; Tellam, Ross

    2005-01-01

    Background Microarray transcript profiling has the potential to illuminate the molecular processes that are involved in the responses of cattle to disease challenges. This knowledge may allow the development of strategies that exploit these genes to enhance resistance to disease in an individual or animal population. Results The Bovine Innate Immune Microarray developed in this study consists of 1480 characterised genes identified by literature searches, 31 positive and negative control elements and 5376 cDNAs derived from subtracted and normalised libraries. The cDNA libraries were produced from 'challenged' bovine epithelial and leukocyte cells. The microarray was found to have a limit of detection of 1 pg/μg of total RNA and a mean slide-to-slide correlation co-efficient of 0.88. The profiles of differentially expressed genes from Concanavalin A (ConA) stimulated bovine peripheral blood lymphocytes were determined. Three distinct profiles highlighted 19 genes that were rapidly up-regulated within 30 minutes and returned to basal levels by 24 h; 76 genes that were up-regulated between 2–8 hours and sustained high levels of expression until 24 h and 10 genes that were down-regulated. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR on selected genes was used to confirm the results from the microarray analysis. The results indicate that there is a dynamic process involving gene activation and regulatory mechanisms re-establishing homeostasis in the ConA activated lymphocytes. The Bovine Innate Immune Microarray was also used to determine the cross-species hybridisation capabilities of an ovine PBL sample. Conclusion The Bovine Innate Immune Microarray has been developed which contains a set of well-characterised genes and anonymous cDNAs from a number of different bovine cell types. The microarray can be used to determine the gene expression profiles underlying innate immune responses in cattle and sheep. PMID:16176586

  2. Protein microarray: sensitive and effective immunodetection for drug residues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Veterinary drugs such as clenbuterol (CL) and sulfamethazine (SM2) are low molecular weight (<1000 Da) compounds, or haptens, that are difficult to develop immunoassays due to their low immunogenicity. In this study, we conjugated the drugs to ovalbumin to increase their immunogenicity for antiserum production in rabbits and developed a protein microarray immunoassay for detection of clenbuterol and sulfamethazine. The sensitivity of this approach was then compared to traditional ELISA technique. Results The artificial antigens were spotted on microarray slides. Standard concentrations of the compounds were added to compete with the spotted antigens for binding to the antisera to determine the IC50. Our microarray assay showed the IC50 were 39.6 ng/ml for CL and 48.8 ng/ml for SM2, while the traditional competitive indirect-ELISA (ci-ELISA) showed the IC50 were 190.7 ng/ml for CL and 156.7 ng/ml for SM2. We further validated the two methods with CL fortified chicken muscle tissues, and the protein microarray assay showed 90% recovery while the ci-ELISA had 76% recovery rate. When tested with CL-fed chicken muscle tissues, the protein microarray assay had higher sensitivity (0.9 ng/g) than the ci-ELISA (0.1 ng/g) for detection of CL residues. Conclusions The protein microarrays showed 4.5 and 3.5 times lower IC50 than the ci-ELISA detection for CL and SM2, respectively, suggesting that immunodetection of small molecules with protein microarray is a better approach than the traditional ELISA technique. PMID:20158905

  3. Microarray studies of psychostimulant-induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Nielsen, David; Butelman, Eduardo; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2005-03-01

    Alterations in the expression of multiple genes in many brain regions are likely to contribute to psychostimulant-induced behaviours. Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the simultaneous interrogation of gene expression levels of a large number of genes. Several recent experimental studies, reviewed here, demonstrate the power, limitations and progress of microarray technology in the field of psychostimulant addiction. These studies vary in the paradigms of cocaine or amphetamine administration, drug doses, route and also mode of administration, duration of treatment, animal species, brain regions studied and time of tissue collection after final drug administration. The studies also utilize different microarray platforms and statistical techniques for analysis of differentially expressed genes. These variables influence substantially the results of these studies. It is clear that current microarray techniques cannot detect small changes reliably in gene expression of genes with low expression levels, including functionally significant changes in components of major neurotransmission systems such as glutamate, dopamine, opioid and GABA receptors, especially those that may occur after chronic drug administration or drug withdrawal. However, the microarray studies reviewed here showed cocaine- or amphetamine-induced alterations in the expression of numerous genes involved in the modulation of neuronal growth, cytoskeletal structures, synaptogenesis, signal transduction, apoptosis and cell metabolism. Application of laser capture microdissection and single-cell cDNA amplification may greatly enhance microarray studies of gene expression profiling. The combination of rapidly evolving microarray technology with established methods of neuroscience, molecular biology and genetics, as well as appropriate behavioural models of drug reinforcement, may provide a productive approach for delineating the neurobiological underpinnings of drug responses that lead to

  4. Microarray evidence of glutaminyl cyclase gene expression in melanoma: implications for tumor antigen specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, John Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Background In recent years encouraging progress has been made in developing vaccine treatments for cancer, particularly with melanoma. However, the overall rate of clinically significant results has remained low. The present research used microarray datasets from previous investigations to examine gene expression patterns in cancer cell lines with the goal of better understanding the tumor microenvironment. Methods Principal Components Analyses with Promax rotational transformations were carried out with 90 cancer cell lines from 3 microarray datasets, which had been made available on the internet as supplementary information from prior publications. Results In each of the analyses a well defined melanoma component was identified that contained a gene coding for the enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, which was as highly expressed as genes from a variety of well established biomarkers for melanoma, such as MAGE-3 and MART-1, which have frequently been used in clinical trials of melanoma vaccines. Conclusion Since glutaminyl cyclase converts glutamine and glutamic acid into a pyroglutamic form, it may interfere with the tumor destructive process of vaccines using peptides having glutamine or glutamic acid at their N-terminals. Finding ways of inhibiting the activity of glutaminyl cyclase in the tumor microenvironment may help to increase the effectiveness of some melanoma vaccines. PMID:16820060

  5. Distinct germline polymorphisms underlie glioma morphologic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Johnson, Derek; Fridley, Brooke L.; Decker, Paul A.; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Fink, Stephanie; Rice, Terri; McCoy, Lucie S.; Halder, Chandralekha; Kosel, Matthew L.; Giannini, Caterina; Tihan, Tarik; O’Neill, Brian P.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent genome-wide association studies reported that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in (or near) TERT (5p15), CCDC26 (8q24), CDKN2A/B (9p21), PHLDB1 (11q23), and RTEL1 (20q13) are associated with infiltrating glioma. From these reports it was not clear if the SNP associations predispose to glioma in general or whether they are specific to certain glioma grades or morphologic subtypes. To identify hypothesized associations between susceptibility loci and tumor subtype, we genotyped two case/control groups composed of the spectrum of infiltrating glioma subtypes, and stratified the analyses by type. We report that specific germline polymorphisms are associated with different glioma subtypes. CCDC26 (8q24) region polymorphisms are strongly associated with oligodendroglial tumor risk (rs4295627, OR=2.05, p=8.3*10−11), but not glioblastoma risk. The opposite is true of RTEL (20q13) region polymorphisms which are significantly associated with glioblastoma (rs2297440, OR = 0.56, p= 4.6*10−10) but not oligodendroglial tumor. The SNPs in or near CCDC26 (8q24) are associated with oligodendroglial tumors regardless of combined 1p and 19q deletion status; however, the association is greatest for those with combined deletion (rs4295627, OR=2.77, p=2.6*10-9). These observations generate hypotheses concerning the possible mechanisms by which specific SNPs (or alterations in linkage disequilibrium with such SNPs) are associated with glioma development. PMID:21356187

  6. Can Zipf's law be adapted to normalize microarrays?

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tim; Costello, Christine M; Croucher, Peter JP; Häsler, Robert; Deuschl, Günther; Schreiber, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Background Normalization is the process of removing non-biological sources of variation between array experiments. Recent investigations of data in gene expression databases for varying organisms and tissues have shown that the majority of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1 (i.e. obey Zipf's law). Based on the observation that our single channel and two channel microarray data sets also followed a power-law distribution, we were motivated to develop a normalization method based on this law, and examine how it compares with existing published techniques. A computationally simple and intuitively appealing technique based on this observation is presented. Results Using pairwise comparisons using MA plots (log ratio vs. log intensity), we compared this novel method to previously published normalization techniques, namely global normalization to the mean, the quantile method, and a variation on the loess normalization method designed specifically for boutique microarrays. Results indicated that, for single channel microarrays, the quantile method was superior with regard to eliminating intensity-dependent effects (banana curves), but Zipf's law normalization does minimize this effect by rotating the data distribution such that the maximal number of data points lie on the zero of the log ratio axis. For two channel boutique microarrays, the Zipf's law normalizations performed as well as, or better than existing techniques. Conclusion Zipf's law normalization is a useful tool where the Quantile method cannot be applied, as is the case with microarrays containing functionally specific gene sets (boutique arrays). PMID:15727680

  7. Electronic microarray assays for avian influenza and Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lung, Oliver; Beeston, Anne; Ohene-Adjei, Samuel; Pasick, John; Hodko, Dalibor; Hughes, Kimberley Burton; Furukawa-Stoffer, Tara; Fisher, Mathew; Deregt, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Microarrays are suitable for multiplexed detection and typing of pathogens. Avian influenza virus (AIV) is currently classified into 16 H (hemagglutinin) and 9 N (neuraminidase) subtypes, whereas Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains differ in virulence and are broadly classified into high and low pathogenicity types. In this study, three assays for detection and typing of poultry viruses were developed on an automated microarray platform: a multiplex assay for simultaneous detection of AIV and detection and pathotyping of NDV, and two separate assays for differentiating all AIV H and N subtypes. The AIV-NDV multiplex assay detected all strains in a 63 virus panel, and accurately typed all high pathogenicity NDV strains tested. A limit of detection of 10(1)-10(3) TCID(50)/mL and 200-400 EID(50)/mL was obtained for NDV and AIV, respectively. The AIV typing assays accurately typed all 41 AIV strains and a limit of detection of 4-200 EID(50)/mL was obtained. Assay validation showed that the microarray assays were generally comparable to real-time RT-PCR. However, the AIV typing microarray assays detected more positive clinical samples than the AIV matrix real-time RT-PCR, and also provided information regarding the subtype. The AIV-NDV multiplex and AIV H typing microarray assays detected mixed infections and could be useful for detection and typing of AIV and NDV. PMID:22796283

  8. A protein multiplex microarray substrate with high sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fici, Dolores A.; McCormick, William; Brown, David W.; Herrmann, John E.; Kumar, Vikram; Awdeh, Zuheir L.

    2010-01-01

    The problems that have been associated with protein multiplex microarray immunoassay substrates and existing technology platforms include: binding, sensitivity, a low signal to noise ratio, target immobilization and the optimal simultaneous detection of diverse protein targets. Current commercial substrates for planar multiplex microarrays rely on protein attachment chemistries that range from covalent attachment to affinity ligand capture, to simple adsorption. In this pilot study, experimental performance parameters for direct monoclonal mouse IgG detection were compared for available two and three dimensional slide surface coatings with a new colloidal nitrocellulose substrate. New technology multiplex microarrays were also developed and evaluated for the detection of pathogen specific antibodies in human serum and the direct detection of enteric viral antigens. Data supports the nitrocellulose colloid as an effective reagent with the capacity to immobilize sufficient diverse protein target quantities for increased specificory signal without compromising authentic protein structure. The nitrocellulose colloid reagent is compatible with the array spotters and scanners routinely used for microarray preparation and processing. More importantly, as an alternate to fluorescence, colorimetric chemistries may be used for specific and sensitive protein target detection. The advantages of the nitrocellulose colloid platform indicate that this technology may be a valuable tool for the further development and expansion of multiplex microarray immunoassays in both the clinical and research laborat environment. PMID:20974147

  9. Production of biomolecule microarrays through laser induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Pradas, Juan Marcos; Serra, Pere; Colina, Monica; Morenza, Jose-Luis

    2004-10-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are a kind of biosensors that consist in patterns of different biological molecules immobilized on a solid substrate and capable to bind specifically to their complementary targets. In particular, DNA and protein microarrays have been revealed to be very efficient devices for genen and protein identification, what has converted them in powerful tools for many applications, like clinical diagnose, drug discovery analysis, genomics and proteomics. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of a liquid solution containing biomolecules without damaging them. In this work laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) has been used for spotting a biomolecule in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength) has been used to transfer droplets of a biomolecule containing solution onto a solid slide. Optical microscopy of the transferred material has been carried out to investigate the morphological characteristics of the droplets obtained under different irradiation conditions. Afterwards, a DNA microarray has been spotted. The viability of the transference has been tested by checking the biological activity of the biomolecule in front of its specific complementary target. This has revealed that, indeed, the LIFT technique is adequate for the production of DNA microarrays.

  10. Inkjet printing for the production of protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Iain; Chong Kwan, Marisa; Hall, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    A significant proportion of protein microarray researchers would like the arrays they develop to become widely used research, screening, validation or diagnostic devices. For this to be achievable the arrays must be compatible with high-throughput techniques that allow manufacturing scale production. In order to simplify the transition from laboratory bench to market, Arrayjet have developed a range of inkjet microarray printers, which, at one end of the scale, are suitable for R&D and, at the other end, are capable of true high-throughput array output. To maintain scalability, all Arrayjet microarray printers utilise identical core technology comprising a JetSpyder™ liquid handling adaptor, which enables automated loading of an industry standard inkjet printhead compatible with non-contact on-the-fly printing. This chapter contains a detailed explanation of Arrayjet technology followed by a historical look at the development of inkjet technologies for protein microarray production. The method described subsequently is a simple example of an antibody array printed onto nitrocellulose-coated slides with specific detection with fluorescently labelled IgG. The method is linked to a notes section with advice on best practice and sources of useful information for protein microarray production using inkjet technology. PMID:21901611

  11. Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae Based on Capsular Genes Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Frédéric; Boucher, Nancy; Allary, Robin; Robitaille, Lynda; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Tremblay, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype epidemiology is essential since serotype replacement is a concern when introducing new polysaccharide-conjugate vaccines. A novel PCR-based automated microarray assay was developed to assist in the tracking of the serotypes. Autolysin, pneumolysin and eight genes located in the capsular operon were amplified using multiplex PCR. This step was followed by a tagged fluorescent primer extension step targeting serotype-specific polymorphisms. The tagged primers were then hybridized to a microarray. Results were exported to an expert system to identify capsular serotypes. The assay was validated on 166 cultured S. pneumoniae samples from 63 different serotypes as determined by the Quellung method. We show that typing only 12 polymorphisms located in the capsular operon allows the identification at the serotype level of 22 serotypes and the assignation of 24 other serotypes to a subgroup of serotypes. Overall, 126 samples (75.9%) were correctly serotyped, 14 were assigned to a member of the same serogroup, 8 rare serotypes were erroneously serotyped, and 18 gave negative serotyping results. Most of the discrepancies involved rare serotypes or serotypes that are difficult to discriminate using a DNA-based approach, for example 6A and 6B. The assay was also tested on clinical specimens including 43 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with meningitis and 59 nasopharyngeal aspirates from bacterial pneumonia patients. Overall, 89% of specimens positive for pneumolysin were serotyped, demonstrating that this method does not require culture to serotype clinical specimens. The assay showed no cross-reactivity for 24 relevant bacterial species found in these types of samples. The limit of detection for serotyping and S. pneumoniae detection was 100 genome equivalent per reaction. This automated assay is amenable to clinical testing and does not require any culturing of the samples. The assay will be useful for the evaluation of serotype

  12. Polymorphic Electronic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Polymorphic electronics is a nascent technological discipline that involves, among other things, designing the same circuit to perform different analog and/or digital functions under different conditions. For example, a circuit can be designed to function as an OR gate or an AND gate, depending on the temperature (see figure). Polymorphic electronics can also be considered a subset of polytronics, which is a broader technological discipline in which optical and possibly other information- processing systems could also be designed to perform multiple functions. Polytronics is an outgrowth of evolvable hardware (EHW). The basic concepts and some specific implementations of EHW were described in a number of previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. To recapitulate: The essence of EHW is to design, construct, and test a sequence of populations of circuits that function as incrementally better solutions of a given design problem through the selective, repetitive connection and/or disconnection of capacitors, transistors, amplifiers, inverters, and/or other circuit building blocks. The evolution is guided by a search-and-optimization algorithm (in particular, a genetic algorithm) that operates in the space of possible circuits to find a circuit that exhibits an acceptably close approximation of the desired functionality. The evolved circuits can be tested by computational simulation (in which case the evolution is said to be extrinsic), tested in real hardware (in which case the evolution is said to be intrinsic), or tested in random sequences of computational simulation and real hardware (in which case the evolution is said to be mixtrinsic).

  13. Polymorphisms and genes associated with puberty in heifers.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Marina R S; Nguyen, Loan To; Porto Neto, Laercio R; Reverter, Antonio; Moore, Stephen S; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Thomas, Milton G

    2016-07-01

    Puberty onset is a multifactorial process influenced by genetic determinants and environmental conditions, especially nutritional status. Genes, genetic variations, and regulatory networks compose the molecular basis of achieving puberty. In this article, we reviewed the discovery of multiple polymorphisms and genes associated with heifer puberty phenotypes and discuss the opportunities to use this evolving knowledge of genetic determinants for breeding early pubertal Bos indicus-influenced cattle. The discovery of polymorphisms and genes was mainly achieved through candidate gene studies, quantitative trait loci analyses, genome-wide association studies, and recently, global gene expression studies (transcriptome). These studies are recapitulated and summarized in the current review. PMID:27238439

  14. CLUM: a cluster program for analyzing microarray data.

    PubMed

    Irigoien, I; Fernandez, E; Vives, S; Arenas, C

    2008-08-01

    Microarray technology is increasingly being applied in biological and medical research to address a wide range of problems. Cluster analysis has proven to be a very useful tool for investigating the structure of microarray data. This paper presents a program for clustering microarray data, which is based on the so call path-distance. The algorithm gives in each step a partition in two clusters and no prior assumptions on the structure of clusters are required. It assigns each object (gene or sample) to only one cluster and gives the global optimum for the function that quantifies the adequacy of a given partition of the sample into k clusters. The program was tested on experimental data sets, showing the robustness of the algorithm. PMID:18825964

  15. Comparative analysis of genomic signal processing for microarray data clustering.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, Robert S H; Sungoor, Ala; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Genomic signal processing is a new area of research that combines advanced digital signal processing methodologies for enhanced genetic data analysis. It has many promising applications in bioinformatics and next generation of healthcare systems, in particular, in the field of microarray data clustering. In this paper we present a comparative performance analysis of enhanced digital spectral analysis methods for robust clustering of gene expression across multiple microarray data samples. Three digital signal processing methods: linear predictive coding, wavelet decomposition, and fractal dimension are studied to provide a comparative evaluation of the clustering performance of these methods on several microarray datasets. The results of this study show that the fractal approach provides the best clustering accuracy compared to other digital signal processing and well known statistical methods. PMID:22157075

  16. [Research progress of probe design software of oligonucleotide microarrays].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Zaoquan; Liu, Zhengchun

    2014-02-01

    DNA microarray has become an essential medical genetic diagnostic tool for its high-throughput, miniaturization and automation. The design and selection of oligonucleotide probes are critical for preparing gene chips with high quality. Several sets of probe design software have been developed and are available to perform this work now. Every set of the software aims to different target sequences and shows different advantages and limitations. In this article, the research and development of these sets of software are reviewed in line with three main criteria, including specificity, sensitivity and melting temperature (Tm). In addition, based on the experimental results from literatures, these sets of software are classified according to their applications. This review will be helpful for users to choose an appropriate probe-design software. It will also reduce the costs of microarrays, improve the application efficiency of microarrays, and promote both the research and development (R&D) and commercialization of high-performance probe design software. PMID:24804514

  17. Fluorous-based Peptide Microarrays for Protease Screening

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Beatrice Y. M.; Nagashima, Tadamichi; Yu, Marvin S.; Pohl, Nicola L. B.

    2009-01-01

    As ever more protease sequences are uncovered through genome sequencing projects, efficient parallel methods to discover the potential substrates of these proteases becomes crucial. Herein we describe the first use of fluorous-based microarrays to probe peptide sequences and begin to define the scope and limitations of fluorous microarray technologies for the screening of proteases. Comparison of a series of serine proteases showed that their ability to cleave peptide substrates in solution was maintained upon immobilization of these substrates onto fluorous-coated glass slides. The fluorous surface did not serve to significantly inactivate the enzymes. However, addition of hydrophilic components to the peptide sequences could induce lower rates of substrate cleavage with enzymes such as chymotrypsin with affinities to hydrophobic moieties. This work represents the first step to creating robust protease screening platforms using noncovalent microarray interface that can easily incorporate a range of compounds on the same slide. PMID:20161483

  18. A Protein Microarray ELISA for Screening Biological Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2004-02-01

    Protein microarrays permit the simultaneous measurement of many proteins in a small sample volume and therefore provide an attractive approach for the quantitative measurement of proteins in biological fluids, including serum. This chapter describes a microarray ELISA assay. Capture antibodies are immobilized onto a glass surface, the covalently attached antibodies bind a specific antigen from a sample overlaying the array. A second, biotinylated antibody that recognizes the same antigen as the first antibody but at a different epitope is then used for detection. Detection is based upon an enzymatic signal enhancement method known as tyramide signal amplification (TSA). By coupling a microarray-ELISA format with the signal amplification of tyramide deposition, the assay sensitivity is as low as sub-pg/ml.

  19. Emergent FDA biodefense issues for microarray technology: process analytical technology.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Sandy

    2004-11-01

    A successful biodefense strategy relies upon any combination of four approaches. A nation can protect its troops and citizenry first by advanced mass vaccination, second, by responsive ring vaccination, and third, by post-exposure therapeutic treatment (including vaccine therapies). Finally, protection can be achieved by rapid detection followed by exposure limitation (suites and air filters) or immediate treatment (e.g., antibiotics, rapid vaccines and iodine pills). All of these strategies rely upon or are enhanced by microarray technologies. Microarrays can be used to screen, engineer and test vaccines. They are also used to construct early detection tools. While effective biodefense utilizes a variety of tactical tools, microarray technology is a valuable arrow in that quiver. PMID:15525220

  20. Salt concentration effects on equilibrium melting curves from DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, J; Fiche, J-B; Buhot, A; Calemczuk, R; Livache, T

    2010-09-22

    DNA microarrays find applications in an increasing number of domains where more quantitative results are required. DNA being a charged polymer, the repulsive interactions between the surface of the microarray and the targets in solution are increasing upon hybridization. Such electrostatic penalty is generally reduced by increasing the salt concentration. In this article, we present equilibrium-melting curves obtained from dedicated physicochemical experiments on DNA microarrays in order to get a better understanding of the electrostatic penalty incurred during the hybridization reaction at the surface. Various salt concentrations have been considered and deviations from the commonly used Langmuir adsorption model are experimentally quantified for the first time in agreement with theoretical predictions. PMID:20858434

  1. An automated method for gridding in microarray images.

    PubMed

    Giannakeas, Nikolaos; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Politou, Anastasia S

    2006-01-01

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool for analyzing the expression of a large number of genes in parallel. A typical microarray image consists of a few thousands of spots which determine the level of gene expression in the sample. In this paper we propose a method which automatically addresses each spot area in the image. Initially, a preliminary segmentation of the image is produced using a template matching algorithm. Next, grid and spot finding are realized. The position of non-expressed spots is located and finally a Voronoi diagram is employed to fit the grid on the image. Our method has been evaluated in a set of five images consisting of 45960 spots, from the Stanford microarray database and the reported accuracy for spot detection was 93% PMID:17946343

  2. DRD4 and novelty seeking: results of meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Schinka, J A; Letsch, E A; Crawford, F C

    2002-08-01

    Studies of the association between polymorphisms within and near the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene and novelty seeking (NS) have produced inconsistent results, raising questions about the strength of the relationship and the methodological conditions under which the relationship holds. We conducted three meta-analyses of existing studies to provide formal statistical measures of the strength of the DRD4-NS relationship. Results provided no support for a relationship between NS and the presence of the 7-repeat allele of the VNTR polymorphism. A small positive effect, however, was found for long repeats of the same polymorphism. The most promising findings were obtained for the relationship with the -521 C/T promoter polymorphism, for which the analysis showed an effect size of 0.32. The positive findings are consistent with a polygenic model of influence on fundamental personality dimensions. PMID:12210280

  3. Efficient SNP Discovery by Combining Microarray and Lab-on-a-Chip Data for Animal Breeding and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao-Wei; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lo, Ling-Ling; Wang, Pei-Hwa; Lin, En-Chung; Liu, Fang-Wei; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The genetic markers associated with economic traits have been widely explored for animal breeding. Among these markers, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) are gradually becoming a prevalent and effective evaluation tool. Since SNPs only focus on the genetic sequences of interest, it thereby reduces the evaluation time and cost. Compared to traditional approaches, SNP genotyping techniques incorporate informative genetic background, improve the breeding prediction accuracy and acquiesce breeding quality on the farm. This article therefore reviews the typical procedures of animal breeding using SNPs and the current status of related techniques. The associated SNP information and genotyping techniques, including microarray and Lab-on-a-Chip based platforms, along with their potential are highlighted. Examples in pig and poultry with different SNP loci linked to high economic trait values are given. The recommendations for utilizing SNP genotyping in nimal breeding are summarized. PMID:27600241

  4. Nanodroplet chemical microarrays and label-free assays.

    PubMed

    Gosalia, Dhaval; Diamond, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    The microarraying of chemicals or biomolecules on a glass surface allows for dense storage and miniaturized screening experiments and can be deployed in chemical-biology research or drug discovery. Microarraying allows the production of scores of replicate slides. Small molecule libraries are typically stored as 10 mM DMSO stock solutions, whereas libraries of biomolecules are typically stored in high percentages of glycerol. Thus, a method is required to print such libraries on microarrays, and then assay them against biological targets. By printing either small molecule libraries or biomolecule libraries in an aqueous solvent containing glycerol, each adherent nanodroplet remains fixed at a position on the microarray by surface tension without the use of wells, without evaporating, and without the need for chemically linking the compound to the surface. Importantly, glycerol is a high boiling point solvent that is fully miscible with DMSO and water and has the additional property of stabilizing various enzymes. The nanoliter volume of the droplet forms the reaction compartment once additional reagents are metered onto the microarray, either by aerosol spray deposition or by addressable acoustic dispensing. Incubation of the nanodroplet microarray in a high humidity environment controls the final water content of the reaction. This platform has been validated for fluorescent HTS assays of protease and kinases as well as for fluorogenic substrate profiling of proteases. Label-free HTS is also possible by running nanoliter HTS reactions on a MALDI target for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis without the need for desalting of the samples. A method is described for running nanoliter-scale multicomponent homogeneous reactions followed by label-free MALDI MS spectrometry analysis of the reactions. PMID:20857358

  5. Chromosomal Microarrays for the Prenatal Detection of Microdeletions and Microduplications.

    PubMed

    Wou, Karen; Levy, Brynn; Wapner, Ronald J

    2016-06-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis has replaced conventional G-banded karyotype in prenatal diagnosis as the first-tier test for the cytogenetic detection of copy number imbalances in fetuses with/without major structural abnormalities. This article reviews the basic technology of microarray; the value and clinical significance of the detection of microdeletions, microduplications, and other copy number variants; as well as the importance of genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis. It also discusses the current status of noninvasive screening for some of these microdeletion and microduplication syndromes. PMID:27235911

  6. On the use of standards for microarray lossless image compression.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Armando J; Paiva, António R C; Neves, António J R

    2006-03-01

    The interest in methods that are able to efficiently compress microarray images is relatively new. This is not surprising, since the appearance and fast growth of the technology responsible for producing these images is also quite recent. In this paper, we present a set of compression results obtained with 49 publicly available images, using three image coding standards: lossless JPEG2000, JBIG, and JPEG-LS. We concluded that the compression technology behind JBIG seems to be the one that offers the best combination of compression efficiency and flexibility for microarray image compression. PMID:16532784

  7. Unravelling Microbial Communities with DNA-Microarrays: Challengesand Future Directions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Michael; Smidt, Hauke; Loy, Alexander; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-03-08

    High-throughput technologies are urgently needed formonitoring the formidable biodiversity and functional capabilities ofmicroorganisms in the environment. Ten years ago, DNA microarrays,miniaturized platforms for highly parallel hybridization reactions, foundtheir way into environmental microbiology and raised great expectationsamong researchers in the field. In this article, we briefly summarize thestate-of-the-art of microarray approaches in microbial ecology researchand discuss in more detail crucial problems and promising solutions.Finally, we outline scenarios for an innovative combination ofmicroarrays with other molecular tools for structure-function analysis ofcomplex microbial communities.

  8. Label and Label-Free Detection Techniques for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Syahir, Amir; Usui, Kenji; Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has gone through numerous innovative developments in recent decades. In this review, we focus on the development of protein detection methods embedded in the technology. Early microarrays utilized useful chromophores and versatile biochemical techniques dominated by high-throughput illumination. Recently, the realization of label-free techniques has been greatly advanced by the combination of knowledge in material sciences, computational design and nanofabrication. These rapidly advancing techniques aim to provide data without the intervention of label molecules. Here, we present a brief overview of this remarkable innovation from the perspectives of label and label-free techniques in transducing nano-biological events.

  9. A biomimetic algorithm for the improved detection of microarray features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, Dan V., Jr.; Nicolau, Dan V.; Maini, Philip K.

    2007-02-01

    One the major difficulties of microarray technology relate to the processing of large and - importantly - error-loaded images of the dots on the chip surface. Whatever the source of these errors, those obtained in the first stage of data acquisition - segmentation - are passed down to the subsequent processes, with deleterious results. As it has been demonstrated recently that biological systems have evolved algorithms that are mathematically efficient, this contribution attempts to test an algorithm that mimics a bacterial-"patented" algorithm for the search of available space and nutrients to find, "zero-in" and eventually delimitate the features existent on the microarray surface.

  10. DNA microarrays: design principles for maximizing ergodic, chaotic mixing.

    PubMed

    Hertzsch, Jan-Martin; Sturman, Rob; Wiggins, Stephen

    2007-02-01

    In this article we show that models of flows in DNA microarrays generated by pulsed source-sink pairs can be studied as linked twist maps. The significance of this is that it enables us to relate the flow to mathematically precise notions of chaotic mixing that can be realized through specific design criteria. We apply these techniques to three different mixing protocols, two of which have been previously described in the literature, and we are able to isolate the features of each mixer that lead to "good" or "bad" mixing. Based on this, we propose a new design to generate a "well-mixed" flow in a DNA microarray. PMID:17262763

  11. Hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Deanna Lynn; Coleman, Matthew A; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Albala, Joanna; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2013-04-23

    A hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection includes a microarray reader engineered to be small enough for portable applications. The invention includes a high-powered light-emitting diode that emits excitation light, an excitation filter positioned to receive the excitation light, a slide, a slide holder assembly for positioning the slide to receive the excitation light from the excitation filter, an emission filter positioned to receive the excitation light from the slide, a lens positioned to receive the excitation light from the emission filter, and a CCD camera positioned to receive the excitation light from the lens.

  12. Consensus gene regulatory networks: combining multiple microarray gene expression datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeling, Emma; Tucker, Allan

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we present a method for modelling gene regulatory networks by forming a consensus Bayesian network model from multiple microarray gene expression datasets. Our method is based on combining Bayesian network graph topologies and does not require any special pre-processing of the datasets, such as re-normalisation. We evaluate our method on a synthetic regulatory network and part of the yeast heat-shock response regulatory network using publicly available yeast microarray datasets. Results are promising; the consensus networks formed provide a broader view of the potential underlying network, obtaining an increased true positive rate over networks constructed from a single data source.

  13. Are glycan biosensors an alternative to glycan microarrays?

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates (glycans) play an important role in nature and study of their interaction with proteins or intact cells can be useful for understanding many physiological and pathological processes. Such interactions have been successfully interrogated in a highly parallel way using glycan microarrays, but this technique has some limitations. Thus, in recent years glycan biosensors in numerous progressive configurations have been developed offering distinct advantages compared to glycan microarrays. Thus, in this review advances achieved in the field of label-free glycan biosensors are discussed.

  14. Sequence polymorphism can produce serious artifacts in real-time PCR assays: lessons from Pacific oysters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since it was first described in the mid-1990s, quantitative real time PCR (Q-PCR) has been widely used in many fields of biomedical research and molecular diagnostics. This method is routinely used to validate whole transcriptome analyses such as DNA microarrays, suppressive subtractive hybridizati...

  15. Genome Rearrangements Detected by SNP Microarrays in Individuals with Intellectual Disability Referred with Possible Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Ariel M.; Hobart, Holly H.; Morris, Colleen A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Kimberley, Kendra W.; Rios, Cecilia M.; Clark, Robin C.; Gulbronson, Maricela D.; Gowans, Gordon C.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) affects 2–3% of the population and may occur with or without multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) or other medical conditions. Established genetic syndromes and visible chromosome abnormalities account for a substantial percentage of ID diagnoses, although for ∼50% the molecular etiology is unknown. Individuals with features suggestive of various syndromes but lacking their associated genetic anomalies pose a formidable clinical challenge. With the advent of microarray techniques, submicroscopic genome alterations not associated with known syndromes are emerging as a significant cause of ID and MCA. Methodology/Principal Findings High-density SNP microarrays were used to determine genome wide copy number in 42 individuals: 7 with confirmed alterations in the WS region but atypical clinical phenotypes, 31 with ID and/or MCA, and 4 controls. One individual from the first group had the most telomeric gene in the WS critical region deleted along with 2 Mb of flanking sequence. A second person had the classic WS deletion and a rearrangement on chromosome 5p within the Cri du Chat syndrome (OMIM:123450) region. Six individuals from the ID/MCA group had large rearrangements (3 deletions, 3 duplications), one of whom had a large inversion associated with a deletion that was not detected by the SNP arrays. Conclusions/Significance Combining SNP microarray analyses and qPCR allowed us to clone and sequence 21 deletion breakpoints in individuals with atypical deletions in the WS region and/or ID or MCA. Comparison of these breakpoints to databases of genomic variation revealed that 52% occurred in regions harboring structural variants in the general population. For two probands the genomic alterations were flanked by segmental duplications, which frequently mediate recurrent genome rearrangements; these may represent new genomic disorders. While SNP arrays and related technologies can identify potentially pathogenic deletions and

  16. A new 12-gene diagnostic biomarker signature of melanoma revealed by integrated microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanting

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide microarray technology has facilitated the systematic discovery of diagnostic biomarkers of cancers and other pathologies. However, meta-analyses of published arrays often uncover significant inconsistencies that hinder advances in clinical practice. Here we present an integrated microarray analysis framework, based on a genome-wide relative significance (GWRS) and genome-wide global significance (GWGS) model. When applied to five microarray datasets on melanoma published between 2000 and 2011, this method revealed a new signature of 200 genes. When these were linked to so-called ‘melanoma driver’ genes involved in MAPK, Ca2+, and WNT signaling pathways we were able to produce a new 12-gene diagnostic biomarker signature for melanoma (i.e., EGFR, FGFR2, FGFR3, IL8, PTPRF, TNC, CXCL13, COL11A1, CHP2, SHC4, PPP2R2C, and WNT4). We have begun to experimentally validate a subset of these genes involved in MAPK signaling at the protein level, including CXCL13, COL11A1, PTPRF and SHC4 and found these to be over-expressed in metastatic and primary melanoma cells in vitro and in situ compared to melanocytes cultured from healthy skin epidermis and normal healthy human skin. While SHC4 has been reported previously to be associated to melanoma, this is the first time CXCL13, COL11A1, and PTPRF have been associated with melanoma on experimental validation. Our computational evaluation indicates that this 12-gene biomarker signature achieves excellent diagnostic power in distinguishing metastatic melanoma from normal skin and benign nevus. Further experimental validation of the role of these 12 genes in a new signaling network may provide new insights into the underlying biological mechanisms driving the progression of melanoma. PMID:23638386

  17. Design of a Seven-Genome Escherichia coli Microarray for Comparative Genomic Profiling▿

    PubMed Central

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Petersen, Anne; Sekse, Camilla; Kiil, Kristoffer; Wasteson, Yngvild; Ussery, David W.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design and evaluate the use of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray covering seven sequenced Escherichia coli genomes in addition to several sequenced E. coli plasmids, bacteriophages, pathogenicity islands, and virulence genes. Its utility is demonstrated for comparative genomic profiling of two unsequenced strains, O175:H16 D1 and O157:H7 3538 (Δstx2::cat) as well as two well-known control strains, K-12 W3110 and O157:H7 EDL933. By using fluorescently labeled genomic DNA to query the microarrays and subsequently analyze common virulence genes and phage elements and perform whole-genome comparisons, we observed that O175:H16 D1 is a K-12-like strain and confirmed that its φ3538 (Δstx2::cat) phage element originated from the E. coli 3538 (Δstx2::cat) strain, with which it shares a substantial proportion of phage elements. Moreover, a number of genes involved in DNA transfer and recombination was identified in both new strains, providing a likely explanation for their capability to transfer φ3538 (Δstx2::cat) between them. Analyses of control samples demonstrated that results using our custom-designed microarray were representative of the true biology, e.g., by confirming the presence of all known chromosomal phage elements as well as 98.8 and 97.7% of queried chromosomal genes for the two control strains. Finally, we demonstrate that use of spatial information, in terms of the physical chromosomal locations of probes, improves the analysis. PMID:16963574

  18. Discovery of Novel MicroRNAs in Rat Kidney Using Next Generation Sequencing and Microarray Validation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguang; Yan, Jian; Chen, Tao

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate a variety of biological processes. The latest version of the miRBase database (Release 18) includes 1,157 mouse and 680 rat mature miRNAs. Only one new rat mature miRNA was added to the rat miRNA database from version 16 to version 18 of miRBase, suggesting that many rat miRNAs remain to be discovered. Given the importance of rat as a model organism, discovery of the completed set of rat miRNAs is necessary for understanding rat miRNA regulation. In this study, next generation sequencing (NGS), microarray analysis and bioinformatics technologies were applied to discover novel miRNAs in rat kidneys. MiRanalyzer was utilized to analyze the sequences of the small RNAs generated from NGS analysis of rat kidney samples. Hundreds of novel miRNA candidates were examined according to the mappings of their reads to the rat genome, presence of sequences that can form a miRNA hairpin structure around the mapped locations, Dicer cleavage patterns, and the levels of their expression determined by both NGS and microarray analyses. Nine novel rat hairpin precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNA) were discovered with high confidence. Five of the novel pre-miRNAs are also reported in other species while four of them are rat specific. In summary, 9 novel pre-miRNAs (14 novel mature miRNAs) were identified via combination of NGS, microarray and bioinformatics high-throughput technologies. PMID:22470567

  19. Dealing with missing values in large-scale studies: microarray data imputation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Aittokallio, Tero

    2010-03-01

    High-throughput biotechnologies, such as gene expression microarrays or mass-spectrometry-based proteomic assays, suffer from frequent missing values due to various experimental reasons. Since the missing data points can hinder downstream analyses, there exists a wide variety of ways in which to deal with missing values in large-scale data sets. Nowadays, it has become routine to estimate (or impute) the missing values prior to the actual data analysis. After nearly a decade since the publication of the first missing value imputation methods for gene expression microarray data, new imputation approaches are still being developed at an increasing rate. However, what is lagging behind is a systematic and objective evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches when faced with different types of data sets and experimental questions. In this review, the present strategies for missing value imputation and the measures for evaluating their performance are described. The imputation methods are first reviewed in the context of gene expression microarray data, since most of the methods have been developed for estimating gene expression levels; then, we turn to other large-scale data sets that also suffer from the problems posed by missing values, together with pointers to possible imputation approaches in these settings. Along with a description of the basic principles behind the different imputation approaches, the review tries to provide practical guidance for the users of high-throughput technologies on how to choose the imputation tool for their data and questions, and some additional research directions for the developers of imputation methodologies. PMID:19965979

  20. ArraySolver: An Algorithm for Colour-Coded Graphical Display and Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Statistics for Comparing Microarray Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The massive surge in the production of microarray data poses a great challenge for proper analysis and interpretation. In recent years numerous computational tools have been developed to extract meaningful interpretation of microarray gene expression data. However, a convenient tool for two-groups comparison of microarray data is still lacking and users have to rely on commercial statistical packages that might be costly and require special skills, in addition to extra time and effort for transferring data from one platform to other. Various statistical methods, including the t-test, analysis of variance, Pearson test and Mann–Whitney U test, have been reported for comparing microarray data, whereas the utilization of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, which is an appropriate test for two-groups comparison of gene expression data, has largely been neglected in microarray studies. The aim of this investigation was to build an integrated tool, ArraySolver, for colour-coded graphical display and comparison of gene expression data using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The results of software validation showed similar outputs with ArraySolver and SPSS for large datasets. Whereas the former program appeared to be more accurate for 25 or fewer pairs (n ≤ 25), suggesting its potential application in analysing molecular signatures that usually contain small numbers of genes. The main advantages of ArraySolver are easy data selection, convenient report format, accurate statistics and the familiar Excel platform. PMID:18629036

  1. Self-directed student research through analysis of microarray datasets: a computer-based functional genomics practical class for masters-level students.

    PubMed

    Grenville-Briggs, Laura J; Stansfield, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a linked series of Masters-level computer practical workshops. They comprise an advanced functional genomics investigation, based upon analysis of a microarray dataset probing yeast DNA damage responses. The workshops require the students to analyse highly complex transcriptomics datasets, and were designed to stimulate active learning through experience of current research methods in bioinformatics and functional genomics. They seek to closely mimic a realistic research environment, and require the students first to propose research hypotheses, then test those hypotheses using specific sections of the microarray dataset. The complexity of the microarray data provides students with the freedom to propose their own unique hypotheses, tested using appropriate sections of the microarray data. This research latitude was highly regarded by students and is a strength of this practical. In addition, the focus on DNA damage by radiation and mutagenic chemicals allows them to place their results in a human medical context, and successfully sparks broad interest in the subject material. In evaluation, 79% of students scored the practical workshops on a five-point scale as 4 or 5 (totally effective) for student learning. More broadly, the general use of microarray data as a "student research playground" is also discussed. PMID:22081549

  2. Rapid Diagnosis of Imprinting Disorders Involving Copy Number Variation and Uniparental Disomy Using Genome-Wide SNP Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Rui; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Huimin; Yu, Guojiu; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Min; Sun, Xiaofang

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting disorders, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS), can be detected via methylation analysis, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA), or other methods. In this study, we applied single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based chromosomal microarray analysis to detect copy number variations (CNVs) and uniparental disomy (UPD) events in patients with suspected imprinting disorders. Of 4 patients, 2 had a 5.25-Mb microdeletion in the 15q11.2q13.2 region, 1 had a 38.4-Mb mosaic UPD in the 11p15.4 region, and 1 had a 60-Mb detectable UPD between regions 14q13.2 and 14q32.13. Although the 14q32.2 region was classified as normal by SNP array for the 14q13 UPD patient, it turned out to be a heterodisomic UPD by short tandem repeat marker analysis. MS-MLPA analysis was performed to validate the variations. In conclusion, SNP-based microarray is an efficient alternative method for quickly and precisely diagnosing PWS, AS, BWS, and other imprinted gene-associated disorders when considering aberrations due to CNVs and most types of UPD. PMID:26184742

  3. Development of a DNA Microarray-Based Assay for the Detection of Sugar Beet Root Rot Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Christ, Daniela S; Ehricht, Ralf; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet root rot diseases that occur during the cropping season or in storage are accompanied by high yield losses and a severe reduction of processing quality. The vast diversity of microorganism species involved in rot development requires molecular tools allowing simultaneous identification of many different targets. Therefore, a new microarray technology (ArrayTube) was applied in this study to improve diagnosis of sugar beet root rot diseases. Based on three marker genes (internal transcribed spacer, translation elongation factor 1 alpha, and 16S ribosomal DNA), 42 well-performing probes enabled the identification of prevalent field pathogens (e.g., Aphanomyces cochlioides), storage pathogens (e.g., Botrytis cinerea), and ubiquitous spoilage fungi (e.g., Penicillium expansum). All probes were proven for specificity with pure cultures from 73 microorganism species as well as for in planta detection of their target species using inoculated sugar beet tissue. Microarray-based identification of root rot pathogens in diseased field beets was successfully confirmed by classical detection methods. The high discriminatory potential was proven by Fusarium species differentiation based on a single nucleotide polymorphism. The results demonstrate that the ArrayTube constitute an innovative tool allowing a rapid and reliable detection of plant pathogens particularly when multiple microorganism species are present. PMID:26524545

  4. Polymorphic Evolutionary Games.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, I present an analytical framework for polymorphic evolutionary games suitable for explicitly modeling evolutionary processes in diploid populations with sexual reproduction. The principal aspect of the proposed approach is adding diploid genetics cum sexual recombination to a traditional evolutionary game, and switching from phenotypes to haplotypes as the new game׳s pure strategies. Here, the relevant pure strategy׳s payoffs derived by summing the payoffs of all the phenotypes capable of producing gametes containing that particular haplotype weighted by the pertinent probabilities. The resulting game is structurally identical to the familiar Evolutionary Games with non-linear pure strategy payoffs (Hofbauer and Sigmund, 1998. Cambridge University Press), and can be analyzed in terms of an established analytical framework for such games. And these results can be translated into the terms of genotypic, and whence, phenotypic evolutionary stability pertinent to the original game. PMID:27016340

  5. Association between three exonuclease 1 polymorphisms and cancer risks: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Zheng, Si-Rong; Zhong, Jie-Hui; Zhuang, Xiao-Duan; Zhou, Jue-Yu

    2016-01-01

    To date, the results of studies exploring the relation between exonuclease 1 (Exo1) polymorphisms and cancer risks have differed. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effect of the three most extensively studied Exo1 polymorphisms (Pro757Leu, Glu589Lys, and Glu670Gly) on cancer susceptibility. The related studies published before August 5, 2015, were collected by searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases. We found 16 publications containing studies that were eligible for our study, including 10 studies for Pro757Leu polymorphism (4,093 cases and 3,834 controls), 12 studies for Glu589Lys polymorphism (6,479 cases and 6,550 controls), and 7 studies for Glu670Gly polymorphism (3,700 cases and 3,496 controls). Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the associations, and all the statistical analyses were calculated using the software program STATA version 12.0. Our results revealed that the Pro757Leu polymorphism was significantly associated with a reduced cancer risk, whereas an inverse association was found for the Glu589Lys polymorphism. Furthermore, subgroup analysis of smoking status indicated that the Glu589Lys polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased cancer risk in smokers, but not in nonsmokers. However, no evidence was found for an association between the Glu670Gly polymorphism and cancer risk. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that the Pro757Leu polymorphism may provide protective effects against cancer, while the Glu589Lys polymorphism may be a risk factor for cancer. Moreover, the Glu670Gly polymorphism may have no influence on cancer susceptibility. In the future, large-scaled and well-designed studies are needed to achieve a more precise and comprehensive result. PMID:26966378

  6. Meta-analyses of genetic studies on major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    López-León, S; Janssens, A C J W; González-Zuloeta Ladd, A M; Del-Favero, J; Claes, S J; Oostra, B A; van Duijn, C M

    2008-08-01

    The genetic basis of major depressive disorder (MDD) has been investigated extensively, but the identification of MDD genes has been hampered by conflicting results from underpowered studies. We review all MDD case-control genetic association studies published before June 2007 and perform meta-analyses for polymorphisms that had been investigated in at least three studies. The study selection and data extraction were performed in duplicate by two independent investigators. The 183 papers that met our criteria studied 393 polymorphisms in 102 genes. Twenty-two polymorphisms (6%) were investigated in at least three studies. Seven polymorphisms had been evaluated in previous meta-analyses, 5 of these had new data available. Hence, we performed meta-analyses for 20 polymorphisms in 18 genes. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Statistically significant associations were found for the APOE varepsilon2 (OR, 0.51), GNB3 825T (OR, 1.38), MTHFR 677T (OR, 1.20), SLC6A4 44 bp Ins/Del S (OR, 1.11) alleles and the SLC6A3 40 bpVNTR 9/10 genotype (OR, 2.06). To date, there is statistically significant evidence for six MDD susceptibility genes (APOE, DRD4, GNB3, MTHFR, SLC6A3 and SLC6A4). PMID:17938638

  7. Characteristics of Highly Polymorphic Segmental Copy-Number Variations Observed in Japanese by BAC-Array-CGH

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Norio; Satoh, Yasunari; Sasaki, Keiko; Shimoichi, Yuko; Sugita, Keiko; Katayama, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Segmental copy-number variations (CNVs) may contribute to genetic variation in humans. Reports of the existence and characteristics of CNVs in a large Japanese cohort are quite limited. We report the data from a large Japanese population. We conducted population screening for 213 unrelated Japanese individuals using comparative genomic hybridization based on a bacterial artificial chromosome microarray (BAC-aCGH). We summarize the data by focusing on highly polymorphic CNVs in ≥5.0% of the individual, since they may be informative for demonstrating the relationships between genotypes and their phenotypes. We found a total of 680 CNVs at 16 different BAC-regions in the genome. The majority of the polymorphic CNVs presented on BAC-clones that overlapped with regions of segmental duplication, and the majority of the polymorphic CNVs observed in this population had been previously reported in other publications. Some of the CNVs contained genes which might be related to phenotypic heterogeneity among individuals. PMID:21197411

  8. Association between HRH4 polymorphisms and ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Bo; Wang, Yongcheng; Zhang, Yonggang; Mao, Keya; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Target: The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between the histamine H4 receptor (HRH4) polymorphisms and the susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used to analyze the HRH4 rs8088140 and rs657132 polymorphisms. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted with Haploview software. The genotypes distributions of HRH4 polymorphisms in the control group were tested by Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies between the cases and control groups were compared by χ2 test. The controls were matched with cases by age and gender. The relative risk of AS with HRH4 polymorphisms was represented by odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) calculated by χ2 test. Results: The genotypes distributions of HRH4 rs8088140, rs657132 polymorphisms in controls conformed to HWE. The frequency of rs657132 AA genotype in the case group was obviously higher than that in the control group (P=0.040), and so was the A allele (OR=2.572, 95% CI=1.475-4.486, P=0.022). The frequency differences of A-A haplotype between two groups had statistical significance (P=0.011, OR=2.071, 95% CI=1.172-3.660) through haplotype analysis, indicating A-A might be the susceptible haplotype to AS. Conclusion: The AA genotypes of HRH4 rs657132 polymorphism may be the susceptible factors for AS, and rs657132 plays a role in generation of AS. In addition, A-A haplotype in rs8088140-rs657132 is also increased the risk of AS. PMID:26823878

  9. Prenatal Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Anomalies by High-Resolution Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lijuan; Wu, Qingqing; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Yan, Yani; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Yan; Yao, Ling; Ma, Yuqing; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the contribution of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) in the prenatal diagnosis of fetuses with central nervous system (CNS) anomalies but normal chromosomal karyotype. A total of 46 fetuses with CNS anomalies with or without other ultrasound anomalies but normal karyotypes were evaluated by array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) or single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The result showed that CNVs were detected in 17 (37.0%) fetuses. Of these, CNVs identified in 5 (5/46, 10.9%) fetuses were considered to be likely pathogenic, and CNVs detected in 3 (3/46, 6.5%) fetuses were defined as being of uncertain clinical significance. Fetuses with CNS malformations plus other ultrasound anomalies had a higher rate of pathogenic CNVs than those with isolated CNS anomalies (13.6% versus 8.3%), but there was no significant difference (Fisher's exact test, P > 0.05). Pathogenic CNVs were detected most frequently in fetuses with Dandy-Walker syndrome (2/6, 33.3%) when compared with other types of neural malformations, and holoprosencephaly (2/7, 28.6%) ranked the second. CMA is valuable in prenatal genetic diagnosis of fetuses with CNS anomalies. It should be considered as part of prenatal diagnosis in fetuses with CNS malformations and normal karyotypes. PMID:26064910

  10. Microarray platform for the detection of a range of plant viruses and viroids.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ian; Harrison, Catherine; Tomlinson, Jenny; Boonham, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic microarrays are a useful tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple targets. In this chapter we describe the use of a simple tube-based microarray platform for the detection of plant infecting viruses and viroids. PMID:25981261

  11. IMPROVING THE RELIABILITY OF MICROARRAYS FOR TOXICOLOGY RESEARCH: A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray-based gene expression profiling is a critical tool to identify molecular biomarkers of specific chemical stressors. Although current microarray technologies have progressed from their infancy, biological and technical repeatability and reliability are often still limit...

  12. THE MAQC PROJECT: ESTABLISHING QC METRICS AND THRESHOLDS FOR MICROARRAY QUALITY CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarrays represent a core technology in pharmacogenomics and toxicogenomics; however, before this technology can successfully and reliably be applied in clinical practice and regulatory decision-making, standards and quality measures need to be developed. The Microarray Qualit...

  13. Challenges of microarray applications for microbial detection and gene expression profiling in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology represents one of the latest advances in molecular biology. The diverse types of microarrays have been applied to clinical and environmental microbiology, microbial ecology, and in human, veterinary, and plant diagnostics. Since multiple genes can be analyzed simultaneously, ...

  14. Using The Affymetrix Wheat Microarray As An Oat Expression Platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in sequencing have resulted in the sequence of a large number of plant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to entire plant genomes. Using these EST sequences, oligonucleotide microarray chips have been developed for several species including barley (Hordeum vulgare), maize (Zea mays), ric...

  15. Genetic mapping in grapevine using a SNP microarray: intensity values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping microarrays are widely used for genome wide association studies, but in high-diversity organisms, the quality of SNP calls can be diminished by genetic variation near the assayed nucleotide. To address this limitation in grapevine, we developed a simple heuristic that uses hybridization i...

  16. Disc-based microarrays: principles and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-07-01

    The idea of using disk drives to monitor molecular biorecognition events on regular optical discs has received considerable attention during the last decade. CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and other new optical discs are universal and versatile supports with the potential for development of protein and DNA microarrays. Besides, standard disk drives incorporated in personal computers can be used as compact and affordable optical reading devices. Consequently, a CD technology, resulting from the audio-video industry, has been used to develop analytical applications in health care, environmental monitoring, food safety and quality assurance. The review presents and critically evaluates the current state of the art of disc-based microarrays with illustrative examples, including past, current and future developments. Special mention is made of the analytical developments that use either chemically activated or raw standard CDs where proteins, oligonucleotides, peptides, haptens or other biological probes are immobilized. The discs are also used to perform the assays and must maintain their readability with standard optical drives. The concept and principle of evolving disc-based microarrays and the evolution of disk drives as optical detectors are also described. The review concludes with the most relevant uses ordered chronologically to provide an overview of the progress of CD technology applications in the life sciences. Also, it provides a selection of important references to the current literature. Graphical Abstract High density disc-based microarrays. PMID:26922341

  17. Gene expression profiling in peanut using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently have a moderately significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for the oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate l...

  18. See what you eat--broad GMO screening with microarrays.

    PubMed

    von Götz, Franz

    2010-03-01

    Despite the controversy of whether genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are beneficial or harmful for humans, animals, and/or ecosystems, the number of cultivated GMOs is increasing every year. Many countries and federations have implemented safety and surveillance systems for GMOs. Potent testing technologies need to be developed and implemented to monitor the increasing number of GMOs. First, these GMO tests need to be comprehensive, i.e., should detect all, or at least the most important, GMOs on the market. This type of GMO screening requires a high degree of parallel tests or multiplexing. To date, DNA microarrays have the highest number of multiplexing capabilities when nucleic acids are analyzed. This trend article focuses on the evolution of DNA microarrays for GMO testing. Over the last 7 years, combinations of multiplex PCR detection and microarray detection have been developed to qualitatively assess the presence of GMOs. One example is the commercially available DualChip GMO (Eppendorf, Germany; http://www.eppendorf-biochip.com), which is the only GMO screening system successfully validated in a multicenter study. With use of innovative amplification techniques, promising steps have recently been taken to make GMO detection with microarrays quantitative. PMID:19862507

  19. Impact of microarray technology in nutrition and food research.

    PubMed

    Spielbauer, Bettina; Stahl, Frank

    2005-10-01

    Microarrays have become standard tools for gene expression profiling as the mRNA levels of a large number of genes can be measured in a single assay. Many technical aspects concerning microarray production and laboratory usage have been addressed in great detail, but it remains still crucial to establish this technology in new research fields such as human nutrition and food-related areas. The correlation between diet and inter-individual variation in gene expression is an important and relatively unexplored issue in human nutrition. Therefore, nutritionists changed their research field dramatically from epidemiology and physiology towards the "omics" sciences. Nutrigenomics as a field of research is based on the complete knowledge of the human genome and refers to the entire spectrum of human genes that determine the interactions of nutrition with the organism. Nutrigenetics is based on the inter-individual, genetically determined differences in metabolism. Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics carry the hope that individualized diet can improve human health and prevent nutrition-related diseases. In this article we give an overview of current DNA and protein microarray techniques (including fabrication, experimental procedure and data analysis), we describe their applications to nutrition and food research and point out the limitations, problems and pitfalls of microarray experiments. PMID:16189797

  20. A microarray immunoassay for simultaneous detection of proteins and bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development and characterization of an antibody microarray biosensor for the rapid detection of both protein and bacterial analytes under flow conditions. Using a noncontact microarray printer, biotinylated capture antibodies were immobilized at discrete locations on the surface of an avidin-coated glass microscope slide. Preservation of capture antibody function during the deposition process was accomplished with the use of a low-salt buffer containing sucrose and bovine serum albumin. The slide was fitted with a six-channel flow module that conducted analyte-containing solutions over the array of capture antibody microspots. Detection of bound analyte was subsequently achieved using fluorescent tracer antibodies. The pattern of fluorescent complexes was interrogated using a scanning confocal microscope equipped with a 635-nm laser. This microarray system was employed to detect protein and bacterial analytes both individually and in samples containing mixtures of analytes. Assays were completed in 15 min, and detection of cholera toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, and Bacillus globigii was demonstrated at levels as low as 8 ng/mL, 4 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, and 6.2 x 10(4) cfu/mL, respectively. The assays presented here are very fast, as compared to previously published methods for measuring antibody-antigen interactions using microarrays (minutes versus hours).

  1. Application of Microarray Technology to Investigate Salmonella genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays were developed for the molecular study of various genes in Salmonella species, which may be important in causing illness in both humans and animals. There are over 2400 Salmonella serotypes each of which differs in their ability to cause disease in humans and animals, persist within the ...

  2. IDENTIFYING AND MONITORING ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICITY USING CERIODAPHNIA MICROARRAYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SBIR solicitation states that “technology is needed to better identify and monitor sources of pollution and protect water quality.” Microarrays may be particularly well suited to identifying environmental toxic...

  3. Improved microarray methods for profiling the yeast knockout strain collection

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Daniel S.; Pan, Xuewen; Ooi, Siew Loon; Peyser, Brian D.; Spencer, Forrest A.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2005-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the Yeast Knockout strain collection is the presence of two unique 20mer TAG sequences in almost every strain. In principle, the relative abundances of strains in a complex mixture can be profiled swiftly and quantitatively by amplifying these sequences and hybridizing them to microarrays, but TAG microarrays have not been widely used. Here, we introduce a TAG microarray design with sophisticated controls and describe a robust method for hybridizing high concentrations of dye-labeled TAGs in single-stranded form. We also highlight the importance of avoiding PCR contamination and provide procedures for detection and eradication. Validation experiments using these methods yielded false positive (FP) and false negative (FN) rates for individual TAG detection of 3–6% and 15–18%, respectively. Analysis demonstrated that cross-hybridization was the chief source of FPs, while TAG amplification defects were the main cause of FNs. The materials, protocols, data and associated software described here comprise a suite of experimental resources that should facilitate the use of TAG microarrays for a wide variety of genetic screens. PMID:15994458

  4. Comparison of Comparative Genomic Hybridization Technologies across Microarray Platforms

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the 2007 Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) project, we analyzed HL-60 DNA with five platforms: Agilent, Affymetrix 500K, Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0, Illumina, and RPCI 19K BAC arrays. Copy number variation (CNV) was analyzed ...

  5. Assessing Agreement between miRNA Microarray Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Niccolò P.; Ambrogi, Federico; Biganzoli, Elia M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, miRNA microarray platforms have provided great insights into the biological mechanisms underlying the onset and development of several diseases. However, only a few studies have evaluated the concordance between different microarray platforms using methods that took into account measurement error in the data. In this work, we propose the use of a modified version of the Bland–Altman plot to assess agreement between microarray platforms. To this aim, two samples, one renal tumor cell line and a pool of 20 different human normal tissues, were profiled using three different miRNA platforms (Affymetrix, Agilent, Illumina) on triplicate arrays. Intra-platform reliability was assessed by calculating pair-wise concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) between technical replicates and overall concordance correlation coefficient (OCCC) with bootstrap percentile confidence intervals, which revealed moderate-to-good repeatability of all platforms for both samples. Modified Bland–Altman analysis revealed good patterns of concordance for Agilent and Illumina, whereas Affymetrix showed poor-to-moderate agreement for both samples considered. The proposed method is useful to assess agreement between array platforms by modifying the original Bland–Altman plot to let it account for measurement error and bias correction and can be used to assess patterns of concordance between other kinds of arrays other than miRNA microarrays.

  6. Exploiting fluorescence for multiplex immunoassays on protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Andrea; Matkó, János; Prechl, József

    2014-09-01

    Protein microarray technology is becoming the method of choice for identifying protein interaction partners, detecting specific proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, or for characterizing protein interactions and serum antibodies in a massively parallel manner. Availability of the well-established instrumentation of DNA arrays and development of new fluorescent detection instruments promoted the spread of this technique. Fluorescent detection has the advantage of high sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and wide dynamic range required by most measurements. Fluorescence through specifically designed probes and an increasing variety of detection modes offers an excellent tool for such microarray platforms. Measuring for example the level of antibodies, their isotypes and/or antigen specificity simultaneously can offer more complex and comprehensive information about the investigated biological phenomenon, especially if we take into consideration that hundreds of samples can be measured in a single assay. Not only body fluids, but also cell lysates, extracted cellular components, and intact living cells can be analyzed on protein arrays for monitoring functional responses to printed samples on the surface. As a rapidly evolving area, protein microarray technology offers a great bulk of information and new depth of knowledge. These are the features that endow protein arrays with wide applicability and robust sample analyzing capability. On the whole, protein arrays are emerging new tools not just in proteomics, but glycomics, lipidomics, and are also important for immunological research. In this review we attempt to summarize the technical aspects of planar fluorescent microarray technology along with the description of its main immunological applications.

  7. Development of DNA Microarrays for Metabolic Pathway and Bioprocess Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2004-07-31

    Transcriptional profiling experiments utilizing DNA microarrays to study the intracellular accumulation of PHB in Synechocystis has proved difficult in large part because strains that show significant differences in PHB which would justify global analysis of gene expression have not been isolated.

  8. Microtiter plate-based antibody microarrays for bacteria and toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has focused on the development of rapid biosensor-based, high-throughput, and multiplexed detection of pathogenic bacteria in foods. Specifically, antibody microarrays in 96-well microtiter plates have been generated for the purpose of selective detection of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (...

  9. Low-density microarray technologies for rapid human norovirus genotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human noroviruses cause up to 21 million cases of foodborne disease in the United States annually and are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in industrialized countries. To reduce the burden of foodborne disease associated with viruses, the use of low density DNA microarrays in conjuncti...

  10. Food Microbial Pathogen Detection and Analysis Using DNA Microarray Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Keith E.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Culture-based methods used for microbial detection and identification are simple to use, relatively inexpensive, and sensitive. However, culture-based methods are too time-consuming for high-throughput testing and too tedious for analysis of samples with multiple organisms and provide little clinical information regarding the pathogen (e.g., antibiotic resistance genes, virulence factors, or strain subtype). DNA-based methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), overcome some these limitations since they are generally faster and can provide more information than culture-based methods. One limitation of traditional PCR-based methods is that they are normally limited to the analysis of a single pathogen, a small group of related pathogens, or a small number of relevant genes. Microarray technology enables a significant expansion of the capability of DNA-based methods in terms of the number of DNA sequences that can be analyzed simultaneously, enabling molecular identification and characterization of multiple pathogens and many genes in a single array assay. Microarray analysis of microbial pathogens has potential uses in research, food safety, medical, agricultural, regulatory, public health, and industrial settings. In this article, we describe the main technical elements of microarray technology and the application and potential use of DNA microarrays for food microbial analysis. PMID:18673074

  11. Microarrays/DNA Chips for the Detection of Waterborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vale, Filipa F

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarrays are useful for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms in water samples. Specific probes targeting waterborne pathogens are selected with bioinformatics tools, synthesized and spotted onto a DNA array. Here, the construction of a DNA chip for waterborne pathogen detection is described, including the processes of probe in silico selection, synthesis, validation, and data analysis. PMID:27460375

  12. Analysis of microarray experiments of gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tarca, Adi L.; Romero, Roberto; Draghici, Sorin

    2008-01-01

    The study of gene expression profiling of cells and tissue has become a major tool for discovery in medicine. Microarray experiments allow description of genome-wide expression changes in health and disease. The results of such experiments are expected to change the methods employed in the diagnosis and prognosis of disease in obstetrics and gynecology. Moreover, an unbiased and systematic study of gene expression profiling should allow the establishment of a new taxonomy of disease for obstetric and gynecologic syndromes. Thus, a new era is emerging in which reproductive processes and disorders could be characterized using molecular tools and fingerprinting. The design, analysis, and interpretation of microarray experiments require specialized knowledge that is not part of the standard curriculum of our discipline. This article describes the types of studies that can be conducted with microarray experiments (class comparison, class prediction, class discovery). We discuss key issues pertaining to experimental design, data preprocessing, and gene selection methods. Common types of data representation are illustrated. Potential pitfalls in the interpretation of microarray experiments, as well as the strengths and limitations of this technology, are highlighted. This article is intended to assist clinicians in appraising the quality of the scientific evidence now reported in the obstetric and gynecologic literature. PMID:16890548

  13. CONFIRMING MICROARRAY DATA--IS IT REALLY NECESSARY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation of corroborative data has become a commonly used approach for ensuring the veracity of microarray data. Indeed, the need to conduct corroborative studies has now become official editorial policy for at least two journals, and several more are considering introducin...

  14. Carboxymethyl cellulose film as a substrate for microarray fabrication.

    PubMed

    Shlyapnikov, Yuri M; Shlyapnikova, Elena A; Morozov, Victor N

    2014-02-18

    Magnetic beads (MB) are widely used for quick and highly sensitive signal detection in microarray-based assays. However, this technique imposes stringent requirements for smoothness and adhesive properties of the surface, which most common substrates do not satisfy. We report here a new type of substrate for microarrays with a low adhesion to MB-thermally cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) film. This substrate can be readily fabricated on a conventional glass slide. A highly cross-linked CMC film (∼1 cross-link per monomer unit) possesses a surface smooth on a nanometer scale and a low adhesion to protein-coated MB, which partly originates from electrostatic repulsion of MB from negatively charged CMC surface. The efficiency of the CMC substrate is demonstrated hereby in fabrication of microarrays for the detection of three bacterial toxins: cholera toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin A, and toxic shock syndrome toxin. The assay employing a primary antibodies arrayed on a CMC surface and detection of the bound bacterial toxins with a biotinylated secondary antibodies and streptavidin-coated MB resulted in a limits of detection as low as 0.1 ng/mL. The CMC-based microarrays demonstrated very high storage stability; their activity did not change after one year storage at room temperature. PMID:24446727

  15. Genomic and microarray approaches to coral reef conservation biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forêt, S.; Kassahn, K. S.; Grasso, L. C.; Hayward, D. C.; Iguchi, A.; Ball, E. E.; Miller, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    New technologies based on DNA microarrays and comparative genomics hold great promise for providing the background biological information necessary for effective coral reef conservation and management. Microarray analysis has been used in a wide range of applications across the biological sciences, most frequently to examine simultaneous changes in the expression of large numbers of genes in response to experimental manipulation or environmental variation. Other applications of microarray methods include the assessment of divergence in gene sequences between species and the identification of fast-evolving genes. Arrays are presently available for only a limited range of species, but with appropriate controls they can be used for related species, thus avoiding the considerable costs associated with development of a system de novo. Arrays are in use or preparation to study stress responses, early development, and symbiosis in Acropora and Montastraea. Ongoing projects on several corals are making available large numbers of expressed gene sequences, enabling the identification of candidate genes for studies on gamete specificity, allorecognition and symbiont interactions. Over the next few years, microarray and comparative genomic approaches are likely to assume increasingly important and widespread use to study many aspects of the biology of coral reef organisms. Application of these genomic approaches to enhance our understanding of genetic and physiological correlates during stress, environmental disturbance and disease bears direct relevance to the conservation of coral reef ecosystems.

  16. USING MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY TO OPTIMIZE ARTIFICIAL DIETS FOR BENEFICIAL INSECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An optimized artificial diet is key for the production of high quality beneficial insects at affordable cost. Using a Drosophila microarray chip with 7000 unigenes, several hundred dietary regulated genes were identified in Perillus bioculatus that fed on a suboptimal artificial diet. These dietary ...

  17. Microarray-Based Comparative Genomic and Transcriptome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Radha; Schwartz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is maintained in nature in a cycle involving a tick vector and a mammalian host. Adaptation to the diverse conditions of temperature, pH, oxygen tension and nutrient availability in these two environments requires the precise orchestration of gene expression. Over 25 microarray analyses relating to B. burgdorferi genomics and transcriptomics have been published. The majority of these studies has explored the global transcriptome under a variety of conditions and has contributed substantially to the current understanding of B. burgdorferi transcriptional regulation. In this review, we present a summary of these studies with particular focus on those that helped define the roles of transcriptional regulators in modulating gene expression in the tick and mammalian milieus. By performing comparative analysis of results derived from the published microarray expression profiling studies, we identified composite gene lists comprising differentially expressed genes in these two environments. Further, we explored the overlap between the regulatory circuits that function during the tick and mammalian phases of the enzootic cycle. Taken together, the data indicate that there is interplay among the distinct signaling pathways that function in feeding ticks and during adaptation to growth in the mammal. PMID:27600075

  18. Insights from the clustering of microarray data associated with the heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Venkatesan; Mahalingam, Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the major of cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. Gene expression profiles of animal model of heart failure have been used in number of studies to understand human cardiac disease. In this study, statistical methods of analysing microarray data on cardiac tissues from dogs with pacing induced HF were used to identify differentially expressed genes between normal and two abnormal tissues. The unsupervised techniques principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis were explored to distinguish between three different groups of 12 arrays and to separate the genes which are up regulated in different conditions among 23912 genes in heart failure canines' microarray data. It was found that out of 23912 genes, 1802 genes were differentially expressed in the three groups at 5% level of significance and 496 genes were differentially expressed at 1% level of significance using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The genes clustered using PCA and clustering analysis were explored in the paper to understand HF and a small number of differentially expressed genes related to HF were identified. PMID:24023417

  19. Capturing genomic signatures of DNA sequence variation using a standard anonymous microarray platform

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, C. H.; Kua, C. S.; Lobenhofer, E. K.; Hurban, P.

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genomics, using the model organism approach, has provided powerful insights into the structure and evolution of whole genomes. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of Earth's biodiversity will have its genome sequenced in the foreseeable future. Most wild organisms have radically different life histories and evolutionary genomics than current model systems. A novel technique is needed to expand comparative genomics to a wider range of organisms. Here, we describe a novel approach using an anonymous DNA microarray platform that gathers genomic samples of sequence variation from any organism. Oligonucleotide probe sequences placed on a custom 44 K array were 25 bp long and designed using a simple set of criteria to maximize their complexity and dispersion in sequence probability space. Using whole genomic samples from three known genomes (mouse, rat and human) and one unknown (Gonystylus bancanus), we demonstrate and validate its power, reliability, transitivity and sensitivity. Using two separate statistical analyses, a large numbers of genomic ‘indicator’ probes were discovered. The construction of a genomic signature database based upon this technique would allow virtual comparisons and simple queries could generate optimal subsets of markers to be used in large-scale assays, using simple downstream techniques. Biologists from a wide range of fields, studying almost any organism, could efficiently perform genomic comparisons, at potentially any phylogenetic level after performing a small number of standardized DNA microarray hybridizations. Possibilities for refining and expanding the approach are discussed. PMID:17000641

  20. Peptidoglycan microarray as a novel tool to explore protein-ligand recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Hirata, Akiyoshi; Nokihara, Kiyoshi; Fukase, Koichi; Fujimoto, Yukari

    2016-11-01

    Peptidoglycan is a giant bag-shaped molecule essential for bacterial cell shape and resistance to osmotic stresses. The activity of a large number of bacterial surface proteins involved in cell growth and division requires binding to this macromolecule. Recognition of peptidoglycan by immune effectors is also crucial for the establishment of the immune response against pathogens. The availability of pure and chemically defined peptidoglycan fragments is a major technical bottleneck that has precluded systematic studies of the mechanisms underpinning protein-mediated peptidoglycan recognition. Here, we report a microarray strategy suitable to carry out comprehensive studies to characterize proteins-peptidoglycan interactions. We describe a method to introduce a functional group on peptidoglycan fragments allowing their stable immobilization on amorphous carbon chip plates to minimize nonspecific binding. Such peptidoglycan microarrays were used with a model peptidoglycan binding protein-the human peptidoglycan recognition protein-S (hPGRP-S). We propose that this strategy could be implemented to carry out high-throughput analyses to study peptidoglycan binding proteins. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 422-429, 2016. PMID:26773558