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Sample records for polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes

  1. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically. PMID:7481699

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor does not enhance phagocytosis or microbicidal activity of human mature polymorphonuclear neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, N; Okada, K; Takeda, D; Eguchi, K; Misumi, H; Sawae, Y; Niho, Y

    1994-01-01

    The direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) on mature polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro were studied with regard to chemotaxis, superoxide production, and phagocytosis and microbicidal activity against the following viable microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, serum-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. Recombinant hG-CSF (rhG-CSF) acted as a chemoattractant for human PMNs in a dose-dependent manner. The chemotactic response of PMNs to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) was not enhanced by rhG-CSF at any of the concentrations used. rhG-CSF did not induce the generation of superoxide by itself. However, rhG-CSF was able to prime human PMNs and to enhance O2- release stimulated by FMLP in a dose-dependent manner. rhg-CSF did not enhance phagocytosis or killing of the three species of microorganisms by normal PMNs. With PMNs obtained from patients who had hematological disorders or solid tumors, no enhancement of the microbicidal activity was observed in most cases. Microbial killing mediated by PMNs depended on the ratio of PMNs to target organisms. We concluded from these facts that the most important effect of rhG-CSF was to increase the number of the peripheral PMNs and not to enhance the functions of mature PMNs. PMID:8556501

  3. Differential effects of nylon fibre adherence on the production of superoxide anion by human polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes stimulated with chemoattractants, ionophore A23187 and phorbol myristate acetate.

    PubMed Central

    Kownatzki, E; Uhrich, S

    1987-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes were made adherent by passing them over protein-coated nylon fibre columns and compared with suspended cells for their production of superoxide anion as measured by cytochrome C reduction. The cells were stimulated with chemotactic factors, the ionophore A 23187, and the tumour promoter phorbol myristate acetate. There was no increased O2-. production by adherent cells in the absence of a stimulus. Adherent cells produced considerably higher amounts of superoxide than suspended cells when stimulated with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, ionophore A 23187, C5a, C5adesArg, and the platelet activating factor 1-o-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine. In contrast, stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate did not result in higher superoxide release from adherent than from suspended cells, and leukotriene B4 and a mononuclear cell-derived chemotaxin did not stimulate either cell to release significant amounts of superoxide. It is suggested that the augmented production of oxygen radicals with certain stimuli contributes to inflammatory symptoms in situations involving adherent granulocytes. PMID:2820637

  4. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Czirják, L; Dankó, K; Sipka, S; Zeher, M; Szegedi, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro functions of polymorphonuclear (PMN) neutrophils were studied in 20 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS). An increase in the basal chemiluminescence (CL) activity of peripheral blood PMNs was found, suggesting that these cells had been preactivated in vivo. Patients with more extensive skin disease or signs of disease progression tended to have higher basal CL values. Active oxygen products during the respiratory burst may increase the extent of inflammatory and fibrotic processes and could be involved in the endothelial injury in PSS. The stimulatory capacity of CL response was normal in our study. No alterations were found in the opsonised yeast phagocytic activity of granulocytes when compared with control values. The binding of erythrocyte-antibody particles was found also to be normal. A depressed chemotactic activity of PMN cells against zymosan activated serum was also shown. The cause of the decreased chemotaxis of PMNs remains to be elucidated. PMID:3592786

  5. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils in periodontitis and their possible modulation as a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Nicu, Elena A; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this review is polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils play a pivotal role in normal host resistance to subgingival dental-plaque biofilm. Both hyper- and hypo-responsiveness of the immune system toward the microbial challenge in periodontitis have been described. We review polymorphonuclear neutrophil physiology with emphasis on the role of neutrophil functions and dysfunctions in periodontitis. Text boxes are given at the end of each subsection, which present the current knowledge on neutrophil-modulating agents as a potential therapeutic approach in periodontitis. PMID:27045435

  6. Generation of slow-reacting substance (leukotrienes) by endotoxin and lipid A from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bremm, K D; König, W; Spur, B; Crea, A; Galanos, C

    1984-01-01

    Leukotrienes were released from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes on incubation with endotoxins and lipid A. The analysis was performed by their smooth muscle contracting properties, reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay for leukotrienes C4 and D4. The active component of the lipopolysaccharides seems to be the lipid A portion. PMID:6490085

  7. [Advances in researches on polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase in semen].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-xiang; Lu, Kun-gang; Zhang, Hong-ye; Lu, Jin-chun

    2011-11-01

    Reproductive tract infection is one of the important factors of male reproduction. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase (PMNE) in semen, as a marker of male reproductive tract inflammation, especially recessive infection, potentially affects male fertility. The concentration of PMNE in semen is correlated significantly not only with semen white blood cell count and seminal plasma ROS level, but also with the levels of other inflammation related cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, PMNE has a negative impact on sperm quality by decreasing sperm motility, increasing the percentage of morphologically abnormal sperm and interfering with DNA integrity. PMNE inhibitors in semen can form a compound with PMNE, and the imbalanced proportions of the two may promote the development of chronic inflammation, and consequently lead to male infertility. At present, PMNE in semen is detected mainly by enzyme immunoassay, but this method still needs to be standardized, and the diagnostic standards to be unified. PMID:22141276

  8. Mechanism Underlying Levofloxacin Uptake by Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Vazifeh, Doina; Bryskier, André; Labro, Marie-Thérèse

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of radiolabeled levofloxacin ([3H]levofloxacin) uptake by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was investigated by a classical velocity centrifugation technique. PMNs were incubated with levofloxacin for 5 to 180 min under various conditions before centrifugation through an oil cushion. Radioactivity was measured in the cell pellet to determine the amount of cell-associated drug. The uptake of levofloxacin was moderate with a cellular concentration/extracellular concentration ratio of about 4 to 6. Levofloxacin accumulated in PMNs parallel to the extracellular concentration, without saturation, over the range of 2.5 to 200 mg/liter (linear regression analysis: r = 0.92; P < 0.001). The activation energy was low (36 ± 7.2 kJ/mol). Levofloxacin uptake was increased in Ca2+-depleted, EGTA-containing medium by approximately 33% (P = 0.022), while Ni2+, a Ca2+ channel inhibitor, inhibited it in a concentration-dependent manner, with the concentration that inhibited 50% of control uptake being approximately 2.65 mM. Verapamil (an l-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor) and other pharmacologic agents which modify Ca2+ homeostasis did not modify levofloxacin uptake. Interestingly, Ca2+ and Mg2+ inhibited levofloxacin uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. EGTA, Ni2+, and verapamil did not modify levofloxacin efflux; thapsigargin, a Ca2+ pool-releasing agent, modestly increased the intracellular retention of levofloxacin. In addition, contrary to other fluoroquinolones, probenecid at 1 to 10 mM did not modify either levofloxacin uptake or efflux. These data are consistent with a mechanism of passive accumulation of levofloxacin in PMNs. Extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ may influence the structural conformation of levofloxacin or the lipophilicity of PMN membranes, thus explaining their effect on levofloxacin uptake. PMID:9925513

  9. Type I interferon transcriptional signature in neutrophils and high frequency of low-density granulocytes are associated with tissue damage in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bruno Coelho; Marques, Pedro Elias; Leoratti, Fabiana Maria de Souza; Junqueira, Caroline; Pereira, Dhelio Batista; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Valle; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. Yet, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either resistance or pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, the enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, as well as the high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed an intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration, IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggests that type I interferon signaling have a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis. PMID:26711347

  10. The crucial role of neutrophil granulocytes in bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Kovtun, A; Bergdolt, S; Wiegner, R; Radermacher, P; Huber-Lang, M; Ignatius, A

    2016-01-01

    Delayed bone fracture healing and the formation of non-unions represent an important clinical problem, particularly in polytrauma patients who suffer from posttraumatic systemic inflammation. However, the underlying pathomechanisms remain unclear. Neutrophil granulocytes are crucial effector cells in the systemic immune response and represent the most abundant immune cell population in the early fracture haematoma. Here we investigated the role of neutrophils in a mouse model of uncomplicated fracture healing and compromised fracture healing induced by an additional thoracic trauma. Twenty four hours before injury, 50 % of the mice were systemically treated with an anti-Ly-6G-antibody to reduce neutrophil numbers. In the isolated fracture model, Ly-6G-Ab treatment significantly increased the concentration of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, and chemokines, for example, C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL1) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), in the fracture haematoma. Monocyte/macrophage recruitment was also significantly enhanced. After 21 d, bone regeneration was considerably impaired as demonstrated by significantly diminished bone content and impaired mechanical properties of the fracture callus. These results indicate that undisturbed neutrophil recruitment and function in the inflammatory phase after fracture is crucial to initiate downstream responses leading to bone regeneration. In the combined trauma model, the reduction of neutrophil numbers ameliorated pulmonary inflammation but did not provoke any significant effect on bone regeneration, suggesting that neutrophils may not play a crucial pathomechanistic role in compromised fracture healing induced by an additional thoracic trauma. PMID:27452963

  11. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits apoptosis in human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of intracellular cyclic AMP levels.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Gonella, R; Dapino, P; Sacchetti, C; Dallegri, F

    1998-08-01

    Human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are terminally differentiated cells that die by undergoing apoptosis. At present, the intracellular pathways governing this process are only partially known. In particular, although the adenylate cyclase-dependent generation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) has been implicated in the triggering of apoptosis in lymphoid cells, the role of the intracellular cAMP pathway in neutrophil apoptosis remains controversial. In the present study, we found that two cAMP-elevating agents, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor RO 20-1724, inhibit neutrophil apoptosis without inducing cell necrosis. When administered in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 displayed additive effects. Moreover, neutrophil apoptosis was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analog of cAMP, dibutyryl-cAMP, in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, treatment of neutrophils with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 prevented PGE2- and RO 20-1724-induced inhibition of cell apoptosis. In conclusion, taking into account that PGE2 and other cAMP-elevating agents are well known downregulators of neutrophil functions, our results suggest that conditions favoring a state of functional rest, such as intracellular cAMP elevation, prolong the life span of neutrophils by delaying apoptosis. PMID:9694511

  12. Interaction of intact porcine spermatozoa with epithelial cells and neutrophilic granulocytes during uterine passage.

    PubMed

    Taylor, U; Rath, D; Zerbe, H; Schuberth, H J

    2008-04-01

    New insemination techniques allow a tremendous sperm reduction for successful artificial insemination (AI) if highly diluted semen is deposited in the tip of the uterine horn and close to the utero-tubal junction. High sperm losses are known to occur during uterine passage and it was the general question whether specific binding mechanisms are involved. Upon arrival in the uterus, spermatozoa are confronted with mainly two different cell types: uterine epithelial cells (UEC) and neutrophilic granulocytes (polymorphonuclear neutrophil, PMN). As cell-sperm interactions can hardly be observed in vivo, an ex vivo system was established to study the interaction between spermatozoa and the UEC. Uterine segments (10 cm) from freshly slaughtered synchronized juvenile gilts were inseminated for 60 min at 38 degrees C. Thereafter spermatozoa were recovered, counted flow cytometrically and examined for changes in viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Significantly less spermatozoa with a functioning MMP and intact plasma membranes could be retrieved (55 +/- 7%), while the number of damaged spermatozoa hardly changed (93 +/- 12%), indicating retention of viable sperm cells in the uterine lumen. The interactions between porcine PMN and spermatozoa (motile, immotile, membrane-damaged) were studied in coincubation assays in vitro. The binding of membrane-damaged sperm cells to PMN was virtually non-existent (3 +/- 2%). Viable and motile spermatozoa attached to PMN without being phagocytosed within 60 min (45 +/- 3%), whereas binding to sodium fluoride (NaF)-immobilized spermatozoa was reduced to 20 +/- 2%. The binding of viable sperm to PMN is most likely not lectin-dependent; although both viable cell types were shown to express a broad range of different lectin-binding sugar residues, none of the lectins tested was able to selectively block PMN-sperm binding significantly. The results of the study suggest that viable spermatozoa are already subject to selective

  13. Suppression of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell function by neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral blood neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were found to inhibit the cytolytic efficiency of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes (LAK cells) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory activity of PMN was not merely due to PMN acting as cold alternative targets, PMN ingestion of the label released by target cells or cell overcrowding in test wells. Heat-treated (50 degrees C, 30 min) lysates from PMN maintained their ability to inhibit LAK cell cytotoxicity, whereas PMN supernatants were completely ineffective. Oxidant scavengers (catalase, superoxide, dismutase) did not affect the PMN-mediated inhibition of LAK cell function. The results suggest that PMN contain heat-stable factor(s) able to suppress LAK cytotoxicity and potentially capable of limiting the therapeutic efficacy of IL-2 and/or LAK cells. PMID:1667940

  14. Hidden truth of circulating neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophil) function in periodontally healthy smoker subjects

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Chitra; Baron, Tarun Kumar; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-01-01

    Context: Tobacco smoking is considered to be a major risk factor associated with periodontal disease. Smoking exerts a major effect on the protective elements of the immune response, resulting in an increase in the extent and severity of periodontal destruction. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess viability and phagocytic function of neutrophils in circulating blood of the smokers and nonsmokers who are periodontally healthy. Settings and Design: Two hundred subjects in the mean range of 20–30 years of age were included in the study population. It was a retrospective study carried out for 6 months. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects were divided into four groups: 50 nonsmokers, 50 light smokers (<5 cigarettes/day), 50 moderate smokers (5–15 cigarettes/day), and 50 heavy smokers (>15 cigarettes/day). Full mouth plaque index, sulcus bleeding index, and probing depths were measured. Percentage viability of circulating neutrophils and average number of phagocytosed Candida albicans were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Means and standard deviations were calculated from data obtained within the groups. Comparison between the smokers and nonsmokers was performed by Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA analysis. Comparison between smoker groups was performed using Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test. Results: Percentage viability of neutrophils was significantly less in heavy smokers (66.9 ± 4.0), moderate (76.6 ± 4.2), light smokers (83.1 ± 2.5) as compared to nonsmokers (92.3 ± 2.6) (P < 0.01). The ability of neutrophils to phagocytose, i.e., mean particle number was significantly less in light smokers (3.5 ± 0.5), moderate smokers (2.3 ± 0.5), and heavy smokers (1.4 ± 0.5) compared to nonsmokers (4.9 ± 0.7) (P < 0.01) with evidence of dose-response effect. Conclusions: Smoking significantly affects neutrophils viability and phagocytic function in periodontally healthy population. PMID:27143827

  15. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  16. Metabolism of platelet activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF in polymorphonuclear granulocytes from severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, W; Kasimir, S; Köller, M; Erbs, G; Müller, F E; König, W

    1990-12-01

    We studied the metabolism of 3H-platelet activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF in human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from severely burned patients (n = 6) on days 1, 5, 9, 15, and 25 post-trauma. All patients suffered from a severe burn trauma of more than 30% total body surface area. Stimulation of PMN in healthy donors (n = 10) with the Ca-ionophore resulted in the conversion of 3H-lyso-PAF into PAF (18 +/- 2% of total radioactivity) and alkyl-acyl-glycero-phosphorylcholine (alkyl-acyl-GPC, 50 +/- 6%). In burned patients a significantly reduced formation of 3H-PAF was observed between days 1 and 15 post-trauma (day 9: 1 +/- 1%, p less than 0.0001). This pattern was normalized again in patients (n = 5) who survived the trauma after septic periods and was observed during the second week post-trauma. In one patient who succumbed to his injuries a sustained inhibition of PAF formation was observed up to his death. The decreased formation of PAF correlated weakly with the appearance of immature granulocytes within the analyzed cell fraction (ratio of immature cells versus PAF-formation, r = -0.55, p = 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2258972

  17. Ethylmercury and Hg2+ induce the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) by human neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Haase, Hajo; Hebel, Silke; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Rink, Lothar

    2016-03-01

    Humans are exposed to different mercurial compounds from various sources, most frequently from dental fillings, preservatives in vaccines, or consumption of fish. Among other toxic effects, these substances interact with the immune system. In high doses, mercurials are immunosuppressive. However, lower doses of some mercurials stimulate the immune system, inducing different forms of autoimmunity, autoantibodies, and glomerulonephritis in rodents. Furthermore, some studies suggest a connection between mercury exposure and the occurrence of autoantibodies against nuclear components and granulocyte cytoplasmic proteins in humans. Still, the underlying mechanisms need to be clarified. The present study investigates the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to thimerosal and its metabolites ethyl mercury (EtHg), thiosalicylic acid, and mercuric ions (Hg(2+)). Only EtHg and Hg(2+) triggered NETosis. It was independent of PKC, ERK1/2, p38, and zinc signals and not affected by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. Instead, EtHg and Hg(2+) triggered NADPH oxidase-independent production of ROS, which are likely to be involved in mercurial-induced NET formation. This finding might help understanding the autoimmune potential of mercurial compounds. Some diseases, to which a connection with mercurials has been shown, such as Wegener's granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are characterized by high prevalence of autoantibodies against neutrophil-specific auto-antigens. Externalization in the form of NETs may be a source for exposure to these self-antigens. In genetically susceptible individuals, this could be one step in the series of events leading to autoimmunity. PMID:25701957

  18. Neutrophil kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced neutropenia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Yuji; Kawagishi, Mayumi; Kusaka, Masaru )

    1990-01-01

    Single injection of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) immediately induced a decrease in the number of circulating neutrophils in rats. This neutropenia occurred 10 minutes after the injection but disappeared 40 minutes after injection. This transient neutropenia was dose-dependently induced by rhG-CSF and also induced by repeated injections. We studied the kinetics of circulating neutrophils in transient neutropenia. rhG-CSF markedly decreased the number of {sup 3}H-diisopropylfluorophosphate ({sup 3}H-DFP) labeled neutrophils in the circulation 10 minutes after injection but the labeled neutrophils recovered to near the control level 40 minutes after the injection. These results indicate that the neutrophil margination accounts for the neutrophenia and the marginated neutrophils return to the circulation.

  19. Impaired bactericidal but not fungicidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Georgiadou, Sarah P; Wierda, William G; Wright, Susan; Albert, Nathaniel D; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael; Lewis, Russell E

    2013-08-01

    We examined the qualitative polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated immune impairment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) by characterizing phagocytic killing of key non-opsonized bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) pathogens. Neutrophils were collected from 47 non-neutropenic patients with CLL (PMN count > 1000/mm(3)) and age-matched and young healthy controls (five each). A subset of patients (13%) had prior or subsequent infections. We found that the patients with CLL had diminished PMN microbicidal response against bacteria but not against fungi compared with the controls. Compared to patients with effective PMN responses, we did not identify differences of basal PMN pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor gene expression, soluble pathogen-associated molecular pattern gene expression or inflammatory cytokine signatures in patients with impaired PMN responses when PMNs were analyzed in multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. However, differences in PMN microbicidal response against A. fumigatus in patients with CLL were associated with the degree of hypogammaglobulinemia. PMID:23163595

  20. Role of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils in a Murine Model of Chlamydia psittaci-Induced Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Buendía, Antonio J.; Montes de Oca, Roberto; Navarro, Jose A.; Sánchez, Joaquín; Cuello, Francisco; Salinas, Jesús

    1999-01-01

    To assess the role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in Chlamydia psittaci infection in a pregnant mouse model, pregnant and nonpregnant Swiss OF1 mice were depleted of PMNs by treatment with the RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody before intraperitoneal infection with C. psittaci serotype 1. Nondepleted mice served as infection controls. Depleted mice aborted earlier and had a much higher mortality rate than nondepleted mice. Bacteriological analysis showed that the number of chlamydiae isolated from the spleens of depleted mice at 5 and 7 days postinfection was 100 times greater than that isolated from nondepleted mice. Histopathological analysis of the placentas of depleted mice showed widespread necrosis of the uteroplacental units, with weak immunoreaction to chlamydial antigen, while the placentas of nondepleted mice showed substantial neutrophil infiltration but no large areas of necrosis, with moderate to strong immunoreaction to chlamydial antigen. The livers of depleted mice showed numerous chlamydial inclusions in the hepatocytes, delayed microgranuloma formation, and in the pregnant animals extensive coagulative periportal necrosis. The livers of nondepleted mice displayed multiple small foci of PMNs and mononuclear cells with microgranuloma formation. Among this group of mice, the pregnant animals always had more hepatic damage than nonpregnant animals. Our results suggest that PMNs play an essential role in the response to C. psittaci primary infection, preventing the uncontrolled multiplication of chlamydiae in the liver and spleen. PMID:10225862

  1. Identification of CD14 transcript in blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes and functional variation in Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, J M; Wang, X G; Jiang, Q; Sun, Y; Yang, C H; Ju, Z H; Hao, H S; Wang, C F; Zhong, J F; Zhu, H B

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) leukocytes are primary phagocytic cells of the bovine mammary gland and a first line of defense against invading pathogens during bovine mastitis infection. Cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) is mainly expressed in macrophages and neutrophils and acts as a co-receptor that binds bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and recruits PMNs to CD14-LPS complexes in mammary epithelial cells. In this study, we identified a novel splice variant in PMNs, named CD14-SV, characterized by a deleted region from c.143-579 nt compared to the CD14 reference mRNA sequence. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism (c.523 A>G) in exon 2 of CD14 was identified and found to modify the secondary structure and hydrophilicity of the CD14 protein. Association analysis also showed that the milk somatic cell score, an indicator of mastitis, of cows with the GG genotype was lower than that of cows with the AA and AG genotypes. Our findings suggest that the expression of CD14 in bovine blood PMNs is regulated by alternative splicing, and that CD14-SV is a candidate functional marker that may influence mastitis-resistance in dairy cows. PMID:27173290

  2. Effects of Montelukast on free radical production in whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Al Saadi, Muslim M.; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Mustafa, Ali; Shafi, Ahmed; Tuwajri, Ali S. Al

    2011-01-01

    Montelukast is a highly selective leukotriene-receptor antagonist (LTRA). It is widely used in the treatment of bronchial asthma, primarily as an adjunct to corticosteroids. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and oxidative stress contributing to the initiation and worsening of inflammatory respiratory disorders, such as asthma. Antioxidant drugs may have a role in minimizing or preventing damage in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant effect of montelukast on the production of free radicals in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children. A group of 48 (38 males and 10 females), apparently healthy asthmatic children were recruited with ages ranging between 6 and 14 years. In asthmatic children, base line (premedication) and post medication free radicals activity in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was determined by measuring chemiluminescence (CL) response through chemiluminescence luminometer. Free radical productions were significantly decreased in the whole blood, when stimulated with Phorbol Myristate Acetate (p < 0.04) and Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05). The free radicals were also significantly decreased in isolated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) when stimulated with Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05) after the post medication treatment of montelukast in asthmatic children. Montelukast decreased the reactive oxygen species production, both in the whole blood as well as isolated PMNs in asthmatic children. PMID:23960762

  3. Defective polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in dairy cows showing enhanced susceptibility to intramammary infections.

    PubMed

    Cooray, R; Håkansson, L

    1995-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear-neutrophil (PMN) oxidative-burst activity, chemotactic and chemokinetic migratory responses, and surface-adhesion protein expression in a mastitis-prone group of dairy cows were compared with corresponding variables in healthy cows. The cows had a well-documented history of udder infection caused by major mastitis pathogens. Analysis of PMN functions revealed a deficiency in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence responses that seemed to be associated with the mobilization of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the PMN of the patient group, as compared with the healthy controls. The migratory capacity of the PMN in response to a variety of chemotactic substances was enhanced in the patients. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the expression of surface-adhesion proteins (CD11a/CD18). It is proposed that the migratory activity of PMN cells was enhanced in order to compensate for their depressed respiratory-burst activity. Studies are under way to assess whether the defective mobilization of MPO in PMN of mastitis-prone cows is an acquired transient defect or a permanent hereditary defect. PMID:8594848

  4. Generation and secretion of eosinophilotactic activity from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils by various mechanisms of cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    König, W; Frickhofen, N; Tesch, H

    1979-01-01

    An eosinophil chemotactic factor(s) (ECF) can be generated from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils by the calcium ionophore, phagocytosis, arachidonic acid and hypotonic lysis. In kinetic studies it is observed that peak ECF activity is released prior to the maximum of lysosomal enzyme release with the calcium ionophore, phagocytosis and arachidonic acid, while under conditions of hypotonic exposure ECF activity appears after the maximum of enzyme release. The ECF obtained by hypotonic exposure shows a fluctuating pattern with sharp peaks and steep fall-offs in activity. The ECF-release for each stimulus is temperature dependent; extracellular calcium is required when the ionophore or phagocytosis are used as stimuli, while with arachidonic acid and hypotonic exposure no extracellular calcium is necessary for ECF-release. On Sephadex G-25 each preparation of ECF eluted in the low molecular weight range at approximately 500 daltons. Eosinophils can be deactivated and cross-deactivated with the various ECF-preparations indicating either a molecular identity or a common mode of action on eosinophils. PMID:437847

  5. Low-level laser therapy attenuates LPS-induced rats mastitis by inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophil adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueqiang; He, Xianjing; Hao, Dandan; Yu, Debin; Liang, Jianbin; Qu, Yanpeng; Sun, Dongbo; Yang, Bin; Yang, Keli; Wu, Rui; Wang, Jianfa

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on a rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis and its underlying molecular mechanisms. The rat model of mastitis was induced by inoculation of LPS through the canals of the mammary gland. The results showed that LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β and IL-8 significantly decreased after LLLT (650 nm, 2.5 mW, 30 mW/cm(2)). LLLT also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and attenuated the LPS-induced decrease of the expression of CD62L and increase of the expression of CD11b. Moreover, LLLT also suppressed LPS-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) entering the alveoli of the mammary gland. The number of PMNs in the mammary alveolus and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were decreased after LLLT. These results suggested that LLLT therapy is beneficial in decreasing the somatic cell count and improving milk nutritional quality in cows with an intramammary infection. PMID:25452258

  6. Complement factor H modulates the activation of human neutrophil granulocytes and the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Kárpáti, Éva; Józsi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Factor H (FH) is a major inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement activation in plasma and on certain host surfaces. In addition to being a complement regulator, FH can bind to various cells via specific receptors, including binding to neutrophil granulocytes through complement receptor type 3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18), and modulate their function. The cellular roles of FH are, however, poorly understood. Because neutrophils are important innate immune cells in inflammatory processes and the host defense against pathogens, we aimed at studying the effects of FH on various neutrophil functions, including the generation of extracellular traps. FH co-localized with CD11b on the surface of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and cell-bound FH retained its cofactor activity and enhanced C3b degradation. Soluble FH supported neutrophil migration and immobilized FH induced cell spreading. In addition, immobilized but not soluble FH enhanced IL-8 release from neutrophils. FH alone did not trigger the cells to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), but NET formation induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus fungal β-glucan were inhibited by immobilized, but not by soluble, FH. Moreover, in parallel with NET formation, immobilized FH also inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus β-glucan. Altogether, these data indicate that FH has multiple regulatory roles on neutrophil functions. While it can support the recruitment of neutrophils, FH may also exert anti-inflammatory effects and influence local inflammatory and antimicrobial reactions, and reduce tissue damage by modulating NET formation. PMID:26938503

  7. Neutrophilic granulocytes modulate invariant NKT cell function in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Wingender, Gerhard; Hiss, Marcus; Engel, Isaac; Peukert, Konrad; Ley, Klaus; Haller, Hermann; Kronenberg, Mitchell; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2012-04-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a conserved αβTCR(+) T cell population that can swiftly produce large amounts of cytokines, thereby activating other leukocytes, including neutrophilic granulocytes (neutrophils). In this study, we investigated the reverse relationship, showing that high neutrophil concentrations suppress the iNKT cell response in mice and humans. Peripheral Vα14 iNKT cells from spontaneously neutrophilic mice produced reduced cytokines in response to the model iNKT cell Ag α-galactosyl ceramide and expressed lower amounts of the T-box transcription factor 21 and GATA3 transcription factor than did wild-type controls. This influence was extrinsic, as iNKT cell transcription factor expression in mixed chimeric mice depended on neutrophil count, not iNKT cell genotype. Transcription factor expression was also decreased in primary iNKT cells from the neutrophil-rich bone marrow compared with spleen in wild-type mice. In vitro, the function of both mouse and human iNKT cells was inhibited by coincubation with neutrophils. This required cell-cell contact with live neutrophils. Neutrophilic inflammation in experimental peritonitis in mice decreased iNKT cell T-box transcription factor 21 and GATA3 expression and α-galactosyl ceramide-induced cytokine production in vivo. This was reverted by blockade of neutrophil mobilization. Similarly, iNKT cells from the human peritoneal cavity expressed lower transcription factor levels during neutrophilic peritonitis. Our data reveal a novel regulatory axis whereby neutrophils reduce iNKT cell responses, which may be important in shaping the extent of inflammation. PMID:22387552

  8. Neutrophilic granulocytes modulate invariant natural killer T cell function in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Gerhard; Hiss, Marcus; Engel, Isaac; Peukert, Konrad; Ley, Klaus; Haller, Hermann; Kronenberg, Mitchell; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a conserved αβTCR+ T cell population that can swiftly produce large amounts of cytokines, thereby activating other leukocytes, including neutrophilic granulocytes (neutrophils). Here we investigated the reverse relationship, showing that high neutrophil concentrations suppress the iNKT cell response in mice and humans. Peripheral Vα14i NKT cells from spontaneously neutrophilic mice produced reduced cytokines in response to the model iNKT cell antigen αGalCer and expressed lower amounts of the T-bet and GATA3 transcription factors than did wild-type controls. This influence was extrinsic, as iNKT cell transcription factor expression in mixed chimeric mice depended on neutrophil count, not iNKT cell genotype. Transcription factor expression was also decreased in primary iNKT cells from the neutrophil rich bone marrow compared to spleen in wild-type mice. In vitro, the function of both mouse and human iNKT cells was inhibited by co-incubation with neutrophils. This required cell-cell contact with live neutrophils. Neutrophilic inflammation in experimental peritonitis in mice decreasediNKT cell T-bet and GATA3 expression and αGalCer induced cytokine production in vivo. This was reverted by blockade of neutrophil mobilization. Similarly, iNKT cells from the human peritoneal cavity expressed lower transcription factor levels during neutrophilic peritonitis. Our data reveal a novel regulatory axis whereby neutrophils reduce iNKT cell responses, which may be important in shaping the extent of inflammation. PMID:22387552

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays neutrophil apoptosis by inhibition of calpains upstream of caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    Drewniak, Agata; Groenewold, Vincent; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophils have a very short life span and undergo apoptosis within 24 hours after leaving the bone marrow. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is essential for the recruitment of fresh neutrophils from the bone marrow but also delays apoptosis of mature neutrophils. To determine the mechanism by which G-CSF inhibits neutrophil apoptosis, the kinetics of neutrophil apoptosis during 24 hours in the absence or presence of G-CSF were analyzed in vitro. G-CSF delayed neutrophil apoptosis for approximately 12 hours and inhibited caspase-9 and -3 activation, but had virtually no effect on caspase-8 and little effect on the release of proapoptotic proteins from the mitochondria. However, G-CSF strongly inhibited the activation of calcium-dependent cysteine proteases calpains, upstream of caspase-3, via apparent control of Ca2+-influx. Calpain inhibition resulted in the stabilization of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and hence inhibited caspase-9 and -3 in human neutrophils. Thus, neutrophil apoptosis is controlled by G-CSF after initial activation of caspase-8 and mitochondrial permeabilization by the control of postmitochondrial calpain activity. PMID:18524991

  10. In vitro susceptibility of fungi to killing by neutrophil granulocytes discriminates between primary pathogenicity and opportunism.

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, A; Davis, C E; Schaffner, T; Markert, M; Douglas, H; Braude, A I

    1986-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi, according to their propensity to cause infection of apparently normal individuals, can be grouped into either primary pathogens (e.g., Coccidioides, Histoplasma, Paracoccidioides, Blastomyces, and Sporothrix) or opportunists (e.g., Candida, Mucoraceae, Aspergillus spp., Petriellidium, and Trichosporon). There is, however, no unifying concept explaining the difference between the virulence of the two fungal categories. Previously we have speculated that neutrophils are the common denominator of the high natural resistance to opportunistic fungi. Accordingly, we then compared the susceptibility to killing by neutrophil granulocytes of Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Paracoccidioides, and Sporothrix with that of 14 opportunistic fungi. We found the four virulent dimorphic yeasts, in contrast to opportunistic fungi, to be resistant to killing by neutrophils. Virulent dimorphic yeasts were ingested by neutrophils, and triggered a respiratory burst comparably to opportunists but were less susceptible to hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that differences in the susceptibility to microbicidal products of leukocytes may explain the difference in virulence. Images PMID:3734102

  11. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  12. Morphology and staining behavior of neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Bleyer, Martina; Curths, Christoph; Dahlmann, Franziska; Wichmann, Judy; Bauer, Natali; Moritz, Andreas; Braun, Armin; Knauf, Sascha; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Gruber-Dujardin, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are frequently used as translational animal models for human diseases. However, a comparative study of cytological and histochemical detection methods as well as morphometric and ultrastructural characterization of neutrophils and eosinophils in this species is lacking. Blood samples of house dust mite sensitized and allergen challenged as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged marmosets were analyzed with different cytological and histological staining methods. Furthermore, cell size and number of nuclear segments were compared between neutrophils and eosinophils. Electron microscopy was performed to characterize the ultrastructure of granulocytes. Of all applied cytological stains, three allowed differentiation of eosinophils and neutrophils and, thus, reliable quantification in blood smears: May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain, Congo Red and Naphthol AS-D Chloroacetate-Esterase. For histology, Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) could not demonstrate clear differences, whereas Sirius Red, Congo Red, and Naphthol AS-D Chloroacetate Esterase showed capable results for identification of eosinophils or neutrophils in lung tissue. Morphometry revealed that marmoset neutrophils have more nuclear segments and are slightly larger than eosinophils. Ultrastructurally, eosinophils presented with large homogeneous electron-dense granules without crystalloid cores, while neutrophils were characterized by heterogeneous granules of different size and density. Additionally, sombrero-like vesicles were detected in tissue eosinophils of atopic marmosets, indicative for hypersensitivity-related piecemeal degranulation. In conclusion, we provide a detailed overview of marmoset eosinophils and neutrophils, important for phenotypic characterization of marmoset models for human airway diseases. PMID:27165445

  13. Cellular Uptake of Two Fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghaffar, H.; Vazifeh, D.; Labro, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed the cellular accumulation of two new fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro. Both compounds were rapidly taken up by PMN, with a cellular-to-extracellular concentration ratio (C/E) of about 141 (HMR 3562) and 117 (HMR 3787) at 5 min, and this was followed by a plateau at 60 to 180 min, with a C/E of >300 at 180 min. Both ketolides were mainly located in PMN granules (about 75%) and egressed slowly from loaded cells (about 40% at 60 min), owing to avid reuptake. Uptake was moderately sensitive to external pH, and activation energy was also moderate (about 70 kJ/mol). As with other macrolides and ketolides, the existence of an active transport system was suggested by (i) the strong interindividual variability in uptake kinetics, suggesting variability in the number or activity of a transport protein; (ii) the saturation kinetics characteristic of a carrier-mediated transport system (Vmax, about 2,300 ng/2.5 × 106 PMN/5 min; Km, about 50 μg/ml); (iii) the inhibitory effects of Ni2+ (a blocker of the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger), phorbol myristate acetate (a protein kinase C activator), and H89 (a protein kinase A inhibitor). Although these two ketolides are more related to HMR 3647 (telithromycin), it is interesting that the presence of a fluoride gave these molecules a cellular pharmacokinetics more like those of HMR 3004 than those of HMR 3647. The macrolide transport system has not been yet elucidated, but our data confirm that, despite variations in chemical structure, all erythromycin A derivatives share a transmembrane transport system. PMID:11557472

  14. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  15. Monoclonal Lym-1 antibody-dependent lysis of B-lymphoblastoid tumor targets by human complement and cytokinine-exposed mononuclear and neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Morone, P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1996-06-15

    Lym-1 is a murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a polymorphic variant of HLA-DR antigens on malignant B cells, with minimal cross-reactivity with normal tissues. Because it can be safely administered in vivo, a detailed knowledge of its ability to recruit and trigger the antitumor immune effector systems is required to optimize potential serotherapeutic approaches in B-lymphoma patients. By using Raji cells as a model of B-lymphoma targets, we found that Lym-1 activates complement-mediated lysis efficiently. Moreover, Lym-1 was capable of triggering the antibody-dependent cellular cytolysis (ADCC) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs). On the contrary, it failed to trigger neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-mediated ADCC activity. In an attempt to enhance Lym-1 ADCC by MNCs and PMNs, nine biologic response modifiers were tested. MNC-mediated Lym-1 ADCC was significantly stimulated by interleukin-2 (IL-2) and unaffected by other mediators, including gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN), tumor necrosis factor a (TNFalpha), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). On the other hand, PMN-mediated Lym-1 ADCC was induced or significantly augmented by various cytokines, such as GM-CSF, TNFalpha, and gamma-IFN, and chemotaxins, such as formyl peptides (FMLP), complement fragment C5a, and IL-8. Both MNC- and PMN-mediated ADCC was unaffected by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G- CSF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Finally, only GM-CSF and TNFalpha augmented the number of PMNs actually engaged in the binding of Raji target cells. The findings presented here, in particular those showing stimulatory activity of biologic response modifiers, may inspire new attempts for developing Lym-1 antibody-based approaches to the therapy of B lymphomas. PMID:8652830

  16. Synergistic Interaction of the Triple Combination of Amphotericin B, Ciprofloxacin, and Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils against Aspergillus fumigatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Stergiopoulou, Theodouli; Meletiadis, Joseph; Sein, Tin; Papaioannidou, Paraskevi; Walsh, Thomas J.; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus is damaged by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) by means of nonoxidative and oxidative mechanisms, which may be affected by antifungal and antibacterial agents that patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis often receive. The pharmacodynamic interactions among deoxycholate amphotericin B (AMB), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and human PMNs against Aspergillus fumigatus growth are unknown. We therefore studied the interactions between 0.032 to 2.0 μg/ml of AMB, 0.1 to 50 μg/ml of CIP at a fixed AMB/CIP ratio of 1:3.125, and PMNs from six donors at an effector-to-target (E:T) ratio of 400:1 against a clinical A. fumigatus isolate using an XTT metabolic assay and the Bliss independence pharmacodynamic-interaction model. CIP exhibited no antifungal activity alone or in combination with PMNs. Synergy was found between AMB and PMNs, with interaction indices (II) of 0.06 to 0.21; the highest interaction of 21% ± 3.6% was observed at 0.22 ± 0.09 μg/ml of AMB. The AMB and CIP (AMB+CIP) combination was synergistic (II = 0.39) at low AMB concentrations and antagonistic (II = 1.39) at high AMB concentrations, with a maximal synergistic interaction of 16% ± 3.7% observed at 0.16 ± 0.08 μg/ml of AMB. The triple combination AMB+CIP+PMNs was synergistic, with interaction indices of 0.05 to 0.20, and a maximal synergistic interaction of 24% ± 4% was observed at 0.20 ± 0.07 μg/ml of AMB. The increased percentage of Bliss synergy of the triple combination AMB+CIP+PMNs (24% ± 4%) was the product of those of the constituent double combinations AMB+PMNs (21% ± 3.6%) and AMB+CIP (16% ± 3.7%). Thus, the antifungal activity of AMB, at clinically relevant concentrations, was enhanced in combination with PMNs and CIP against A. fumigatus growth in a concentration-dependent manner. PMID:21911564

  17. Effects of polymorphonuclear neutrophile infiltration into the endometrial environment on embryonic development in superovulated cows.

    PubMed

    Drillich, M; Tesfaye, D; Rings, F; Schellander, K; Heuwieser, W; Hoelker, M

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies on bovine uterine disorders have demonstrated that endometrial infiltration with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in the postpartum period or at the time of breeding negatively affects reproductive performance. The objective of the present study was therefore to analyze the effect of endometrial PMN infiltration on superovulation outcome. Cows were synchronized and superovulated receiving a total of three artificial inseminations within 24 h. Endometrial cytologic samples were collected by cytobrush technique at first artificial inseminations (AI) (d -1) and before embryo flush (d 7). Embryos were recovered by uterus flushing at Day 7 and evaluated for total cell number and apoptotic cell index. A total of 425 embryos were flushed out of 48 superovulated cows. The PMN dynamics from first AI to flushing had a significant effect on flushing outcome. Significant differences in terms of number of palpable corpora lutea (14.1 vs 7.2) and transferable embryos (8.8 vs 1.9) were found between cows with PMN proportions increasing from zero (0%) at AI to positive proportions (> 0%) at flushing (group PMNZP) and cows with higher endometrial PMN proportions decreasing to lower but still positive proportions from AI to flushing (group PMNHL). Moreover, cows classified to PMN class zero at first AI flushed a significant higher number of total embryos (10.3 vs 6.9) and transferable embryos (6.8 vs 3.7) compared to cows of PMN class positive at first AI (P > 0.05) in our study. Considering a significant interaction effect between PMN class at first AI and flush (P < 0.05), PMN class at first AI (d -1) correlated significantly with number of total flushed and transferable embryos only in combination with a positive PMN class at flush (d 7). Likewise, PMN class at flush (d 7) beard a significant effect on total number of flushed embryos only when classified to PMN class zero at first AI. Collectively, the present work is the first study that demonstrated a

  18. Carp neutrophilic granulocytes form extracellular traps via ROS-dependent and independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Pijanowski, L; Golbach, L; Kolaczkowska, E; Scheer, M; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M L; Chadzinska, M

    2013-05-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been described as an important innate defense mechanism that leads to immobilization and killing of invading pathogens. NETs have been identified in several species, but the mechanisms involved in NET formation and their role in infection have not been well determined yet. Here we show that upon in vitro stimulation with different immunostimulants of bacterial, fungal or viral origin, carp neutrophilic granulocytes rapidly release NET structures. We analyzed the composition of these structures and the kinetics of their formation by confocal microscopy, by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA and the release of enzymes originating from neutrophilic granules: myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Profiles of NET release by carp neutrophils as well as their enzyme composition are stimulus- and time-dependent. This study moreover provides evidence for a stimulus-dependent selective requirement of reactive oxygen species in the process of NET formation. Collectively the results support an evolutionary conserved and strictly regulated mechanism of NET formation in teleost fish. PMID:23422817

  19. Intratumoral neutrophil granulocytes contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pingping; Shen, Meixiao; Zhang, Ping; Zheng, Chunlong; Pang, Zhaofei; Zhu, Linhai; Du, Jiajun

    2015-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that haemoptysis as a prognostic factor in lung adenocarcinoma and haemoptysis was associated with severe vascular invasion and high circulating white blood cell count. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tumor invasion. We hypothesized there was some relationship between tumor-associated inflammatory cells, tumor invasion, EMT, and haemoptysis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect CD66b and E-cadherin expression in tumor tissue. By co-culture tumor cells with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the expressions of EMT markers were assessed by western blotting. TGF-β1 concentrations in the supernatant and the migration activities of tumor cells were performed by ELISA and migration assays. Intratumoral CD66b(+) PMN expression was negatively associated with E-cadherin expression. Haemoptysis was significantly associated with neutrophil infiltration (OR = 4.25, 95 % CI 1.246-14.502). Neutrophils promoted EMT of tumor cells in vitro and enhanced the migration activity of tumor cells. In addition, TGF-β1 was up-regulated and Smad4 translocated into nucleus, indicating that TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway was initiated during the process. We indicated that lung adenocarcinoma with haemoptysis was associated with more PMN infiltration and PMNs promoted EMT, partly via TGF-β/Smad signal pathway. This may provide mechanistic reasons for why haemoptysis was associated with poor outcome in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:25944163

  20. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  1. Granulocyte transfusions for preventing infections in people with neutropenia or neutrophil dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Blanco, Patricia; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Massey, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite modern antimicrobials and supportive therapy, bacterial and fungal infections are still major complications in people with prolonged disease-related or therapy-related neutropenia. Since the late 1990s there has been increasing demand for donated granulocyte transfusions to treat or prevent severe infections in people who lack their own functional granulocytes. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2009. Objectives To determine the effectiveness and safety of prophylactic granulocyte transfusions compared with a control population not receiving this intervention for preventing all-cause mortality, mortality due to infection, and evidence of infection due to infection or due to any other cause in people with neutropenia or disorders of neutrophil function. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to April 20 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing people receiving granulocyte transfusions to prevent the development of infection with a control group receiving no granulocyte transfusions. Neonates are the subject of another Cochrane review and were excluded from this review. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, but this review focuses on mortality, mortality due to infection and adverse events. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results Twelve trials met the inclusion criteria. One trial is still ongoing, leaving a total of 11 trials eligible involving 653 participants. These trials were conducted between 1978 and 2006 and enrolled participants from fairly comparable patient populations. None of the studies included people with

  2. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies promote bacterial opsonization and augment the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Høiby, Niels

    2016-07-01

    Moderation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as part of a critical defense against invading pathogens may offer a promising therapeutic approach to supplement the antibiotic eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in non-chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have observed that egg yolk antibodies (IgY) harvested from White leghorn chickens that target P. aeruginosa opsonize the pathogen and enhance the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing in vitro. The effects on PMN phagocytic activity were observed in different Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from non-chronically infected CF patients. Thus, oral prophylaxis with anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY may boost the innate immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the CF setting by facilitating a rapid and prompt bacterial clearance by PMNs. PMID:26901841

  3. Modulation and Apoptosis of Neutrophil Granulocytes by Extracorporeal Photopheresis in the Treatment of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Cindy; Cesko, Elvir; Hillen, Uwe; Schilling, Bastian; Brandau, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a common side effect of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. Especially skin, eyes and oral mucosa are affected. This can lead to pain and functional impairment. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy with minimal side effects but its mode of action is still largely unknown. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of ECP on neutrophil granulocytes in patients with cGVHD. Analysis of leukocytes from cGVHD patients obtained from the ECP device during treatment showed that neutrophil granulocytes account for the majority of cells treated during ECP. Neutrophils from healthy donors treated in vitro with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light as well as neutrophils from buffy coats of patients with cGVHD treated by ECP showed increased apoptosis and decreased half-life. In remaining non-apoptotic cells chemoirradiation resulted in loss of activation markers and reduced effector functions. This was accompanied by an increase in extracellular arginase-1 activity. Additional comparison of neutrophils isolated from blood of cGVHD patients before and 24h after ECP revealed a decreased half-life and reduction of effector functions of post-ECP neutrophils ex vivo. These observations strongly suggest that ECP induces both apoptosis and physiological changes in neutrophils and that these changes also take place in vivo. This study is the first to show that ECP modulates apoptosis and inflammatory activity in neutrophil granulocytes, indicating that neutrophils may significantly contribute to the overall immunomodulatory effects attributed to this treatment. PMID:26241482

  4. Modulation and Apoptosis of Neutrophil Granulocytes by Extracorporeal Photopheresis in the Treatment of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Cindy; Cesko, Elvir; Hillen, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a common side effect of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. Especially skin, eyes and oral mucosa are affected. This can lead to pain and functional impairment. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy with minimal side effects but its mode of action is still largely unknown. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of ECP on neutrophil granulocytes in patients with cGVHD. Analysis of leukocytes from cGVHD patients obtained from the ECP device during treatment showed that neutrophil granulocytes account for the majority of cells treated during ECP. Neutrophils from healthy donors treated in vitro with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light as well as neutrophils from buffy coats of patients with cGVHD treated by ECP showed increased apoptosis and decreased half-life. In remaining non-apoptotic cells chemoirradiation resulted in loss of activation markers and reduced effector functions. This was accompanied by an increase in extracellular arginase-1 activity. Additional comparison of neutrophils isolated from blood of cGVHD patients before and 24h after ECP revealed a decreased half-life and reduction of effector functions of post-ECP neutrophils ex vivo. These observations strongly suggest that ECP induces both apoptosis and physiological changes in neutrophils and that these changes also take place in vivo. This study is the first to show that ECP modulates apoptosis and inflammatory activity in neutrophil granulocytes, indicating that neutrophils may significantly contribute to the overall immunomodulatory effects attributed to this treatment. PMID:26241482

  5. Neutrophil Granulocytes in Ovarian Cancer - Induction of Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal-Transition and Tumor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christine; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Meyer, Anne-Sophie; Hübner, Katrin; Rom, Joachim; Sohn, Christof; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Hänsch, G. Maria; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is a highly aggressive malignoma with a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is frequently seen, raising the question of their impact on tumor development. In that context, effects of PMN on human ovarian cancer cells were assessed. Methods: Human epithelial ovarian cancer cells were incubated with human PMN, lysate of PMN, or neutrophil elastase. Morphological alterations were observed by time-lapse video-microscopy, and the underlying molecular mechanism was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Functional alternations were assessed by an in vitro wound healing assay. In parallel, a large cohort of n=334 primary OvCa tissue samples of various histological subtypes was histologically evaluated. Results: Co-cultivation of cancer cells with either PMN or PMN lysate causes a change of the polygonal epithelial phenotype of the cells towards a spindle shaped morphology, causing a cribriform cell growth. The PMN-induced alteration could be attributed to elastase, a major protease of PMN. Elastase-induced shape change was most likely due to the degradation of membranous E-cadherin, which results in loss of cell contacts and polarity. Moreover, in response to elastase, epithelial cytokeratins were downmodulated, in parallel with a nuclear translocation of β-catenin. These PMN-elastase induced alterations of cells are compatible with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the cancer cells. Following EMT, the cells displayed a more migratory phenotype. In human biopsies, neutrophil infiltration was seen in 72% of the cases. PMN infiltrates were detected preferentially in areas with low E-cadherin expression. Conclusion: PMN in the microenvironment of OvCa can alter tumor cells towards a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. PMID:27053953

  6. Subcellular localization and heterogeneity of neutral proteases in neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Dewald, B; Rindler-Ludwig, R; Bretz, U; Baggiolini, M

    1975-04-01

    The subcellular localization of elastase and of neutral proteases hydrolyzing histone and casein was determined in human and rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes using fractionation by isopycnic centrifugation. Granule-rich fractions obtained by this technique were extracted and analyzed by acrylamide gel electrophoresis, and proteolytic activity on the gels was demonstrated by staining with either N-acetyl-D,L-alanine alpha-naphthyl ester or naphthol AS-D acetate as substrate. In both species, all neutral proteases assayed were found to be localized exclusively in the azurophil granules. Specific activities were about 10-30 times higher in human than in rabbit preparations. In extracts of human azurophil granules up to 10 proteins exhibiting esterolytic activity could be demonstrated after electrophoretic separation. Three major and two or three minor components of these esterases were shown to possess elastase activity. Similar zymograms prepared with extracts from rabbit azurophil granules revealed only one major elastase band. The electrophoretic analysis further showed that the most strongly cationic proteins of both human and rabbit PMNs were also confined to the azurophil granules. PMID:236354

  7. Unconventional apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN): staurosporine delays exposure of phosphatidylserine and prevents phagocytosis by MΦ-2 macrophages of PMN.

    PubMed

    Franz, S; Muñoz, L E; Heyder, P; Herrmann, M; Schiller, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and subsequent 'silent' removal represents an important check-point for the resolution of inflammation. Failure in PMN clearance resulting in secondary necrosis-driven tissue damage has been implicated in conditions of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Apoptotic PMN undergo profound biophysical changes that warrant their efficient recognition and uptake by phagocytes before fading to secondary necrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that staurosporine (STS), a non-selective but potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase and protein kinase C, exerts a drastic impact on PMN apoptosis. PMN treated with STS underwent an unconventional form of cell death characterized by a delayed exposure of aminophospholipids, including phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine and an increased exposure of neo-glycans. STS caused an impaired cellular fragmentation and accelerated DNA fragmentation. Phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN lacking PS on their surfaces was decreased significantly, which highlights the importance of PS for the clearance of apoptotic PMN. Specific opsonization with immune complexes completely restored phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN, demonstrating the efficiency of back-up clearance pathways in the absence of PS exposure. PMID:24995908

  8. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY Antibodies Induce Specific Bacterial Aggregation and Internalization in Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, K.; Christophersen, L.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Jensen, P. Ø.; Moser, C.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are essential cellular constituents in the innate host response, and their recruitment to the lungs and subsequent ubiquitous phagocytosis controls primary respiratory infection. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive pulmonary decline governed by a persistent, exaggerated inflammatory response dominated by PMNs. The principal contributor is chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection, which attracts and activates PMNs and thereby is responsible for the continuing inflammation. Strategies to prevent initial airway colonization with P. aeruginosa by augmenting the phagocytic competence of PMNs may postpone the deteriorating chronic biofilm infection. Anti-P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies significantly increase the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa in vitro. The mode of action is attributed to IgY-facilitated formation of immobilized bacteria in aggregates, as visualized by fluorescence microscopy and the induction of increased bacterial hydrophobicity. Thus, the present study demonstrates that avian egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) targeting P. aeruginosa modify bacterial fitness, which enhances bacterial killing by PMN-mediated phagocytosis and thereby may facilitate a rapid bacterial clearance in airways of people with cystic fibrosis. PMID:25895968

  9. Unconventional apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN): staurosporine delays exposure of phosphatidylserine and prevents phagocytosis by MΦ-2 macrophages of PMN

    PubMed Central

    Franz, S; Muñoz, L E; Heyder, P; Herrmann, M; Schiller, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and subsequent ‘silent’ removal represents an important check-point for the resolution of inflammation. Failure in PMN clearance resulting in secondary necrosis-driven tissue damage has been implicated in conditions of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Apoptotic PMN undergo profound biophysical changes that warrant their efficient recognition and uptake by phagocytes before fading to secondary necrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that staurosporine (STS), a non-selective but potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase and protein kinase C, exerts a drastic impact on PMN apoptosis. PMN treated with STS underwent an unconventional form of cell death characterized by a delayed exposure of aminophospholipids, including phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine and an increased exposure of neo-glycans. STS caused an impaired cellular fragmentation and accelerated DNA fragmentation. Phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN lacking PS on their surfaces was decreased significantly, which highlights the importance of PS for the clearance of apoptotic PMN. Specific opsonization with immune complexes completely restored phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN, demonstrating the efficiency of back-up clearance pathways in the absence of PS exposure. PMID:24995908

  10. Kinetics of Neutrophils in Mice Exposed to Radiation and/or Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A. L.; Wan, X. S.; Diffenderfer, E. S.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts have the potential to develop the hematopoietic syndrome as a result of exposure to radiation from a solar particle event (SPE) during exploration class missions. This syndrome is characterized by a reduction in the number of circulating blood cells (cytopenias). In the present study the effects of SPE-like proton and γ radiation on the kinetics of circulating neutrophils were evaluated during a one-month time period using mice as a model system. The results revealed that exposure to a 2 Gy dose of either SPE-like proton or γ radiation significantly decreased the number of circulating neutrophils, with two nadirs observed on day 4 and day 16 postirradiation. Low circulating neutrophil count (neutropenia) is particularly important because it can increase the risk of astronauts developing infections, which can compromise the success of the mission. Thus, two granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs), filgrastim and pegfilgrastim were evaluated as countermeasures for this endpoint. Both forms of G-CSF significantly increased neutrophil counts in irradiated mice, however, the effect of pegfilgrastim was more potent and lasted longer than filgrastim. Using the expression of CD11b, CD18 and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as markers of neutrophil activation, it was determined that the neutrophils in the irradiated mice treated with pegfilgrastim were physiologically active. Thus, these results suggest that pegfilgrastim could be a potential countermeasure for the reduced number of circulating neutrophils in irradiated animals. PMID:23829559

  11. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and cyclic AMP interaction on human neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, C; Piazzolla, G; Spaccavento, F; Antonaci, S

    1998-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling interaction on human neutrophil apoptosis, either occurring spontaneously or induced by Fas antigen activation. Results show that GM-CSF, dibutyryl cAMP (a cAMP analog) and forskolin (an adenylate cyclase activator) are all able to suppress spontaneous neutrophil cell death. Of note however, when GM-CSF is used in combination with cAMP-elevating agents, an additive effect on neutrophil survival is observed with dibutyryl cAMP only, whereas supplementation of cell cultures with GM-CSF and forskolin results in a progressive reduction of antiapoptotic effects exerted by the single compounds. Moreover, although dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin do not affect Fas-triggered apoptotic events, they are still able to modulate the GM-CSF capacity to prolong neutrophil survival following anti-Fas IgM cell challenge, with effects similar to those respectively exerted on spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis. The data indicate that GM-CSF may negatively modulate the cAMP-mediated antiapoptotic pathway in human neutrophils, likely via the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. This would prevent an abnormal neutrophil survival as a result of cAMP signaling stimulation, which provides a novel insight into the role of GM-CSF as a physiological regulator of myeloid cell turnover. PMID:9927231

  12. Effects of cream on bactericidal and metabolic functions of bovine polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Eshelman, J E; Eberhart, R J; Scholz, R W

    1981-05-01

    The effects of cream on the bactericidal capacity and on selected metabolic characteristics of bovine blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were examined in vitro. These properties were also compared in blood PMN and PMN isolated from milk. Addition of 4% cream to the incubation medium reduced killing of Staphylococcus aureus by blood PMN. The PMN from milk were as bactericidal as blood PMN when incubated in a synthetic medium without cream. Cream reduced the phagocytosis-induced increment in O2 uptake in blood PMN. Compared to blood PMN in the absence of cream, PMN isolated from milk had reduced O2 uptake during phagocytosis. In all PMN preparations [14C]CO2 production from [1-14C]glucose and [6-14C]glucose was increased during phagocytosis. Rates of [14C]CO2 conversion from [1-C14]glucose were not significantly different among blood PMN, blood PMN plus cream, and milk PMN. Cream reduced [14C]CO2 conversion from [6-14C]glucose by blood PMN; milk PMN converted even less [6-14C]glucose to [14C]CO2 than did blood PMN in the presence of cream. Cream added to blood PMN preparations in the absence of other phagocytizable particles increased O2 uptake, increased (nonsignificantly) [14C]CO2 conversion from [1-14C]glucose, and reduced conversion from [6-14C]glucose. These studies confirm that cream reduces the bactericidal capacity of bovine PMN and reveal cream-induced alterations in selected metabolic pathways during phagocytosis. They show also that cream itself, in the absence of bacteria, alters PMN metabolism. PMID:7258794

  13. Absence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signaling and neutrophil development in CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D E; Zhang, P; Wang, N D; Hetherington, C J; Darlington, G J; Tenen, D G

    1997-01-21

    Transcription factors are master regulatory switches of differentiation, including the development of specific hematopoietic lineages from stem cells. Here we show that mice with targeted disruption of the CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha gene (C/EBP alpha) demonstrate a selective block in differentiation of neutrophils. Mature neutrophils and eosinophils are not observed in the blood or fetal liver of mutant animals, while other hematopoietic lineages, including monocytes, are not affected. Instead, most of the white cells in the peripheral blood of mutant mice had the appearance of myeloid blasts. We also observed a selective loss of expression of a critical gene target of CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. As a result, multipotential myeloid progenitors from the mutant fetal liver are unable to respond to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signaling, although they are capable of forming granulocyte-macrophage and macrophage colonies in methylcellulose in response to other growth factors. Finally, we demonstrate that the lack of granulocyte development results from a defect intrinsic to the hematopoietic system; transplanted fetal liver from mutant mice can reconstitute lymphoid but not neutrophilic cells in irradiated recipients. These studies suggest a model by which transcription factors can direct the differentiation of multipotential precursors through activation of expression of a specific growth factor receptor, allowing proliferation and differentiation in response to a specific extracellular signal. In addition, the c/ebp alpha -/- mice may be useful in understanding the mechanisms involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, in which a block in differentiation of myeloid precursors is a key feature of the disease. PMID:9012825

  14. [A quantitative analysis of the ultrastructures of the blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with ischemic heart disease after a session of intravenous laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Khomeriki, S G; Morozov, I A

    1998-01-01

    Circulating neutrophilic granulocytes before and after laser therapy were studied in 10 patients with ischemic heart disease and 5 healthy persons. The patients had severe cytoplasm vacuolization, specific granules number increase, a decrease in thickness of the submembranous actin layer and decrease of surface = volume ratio. Neutrophils indices in patients with ischemic heart disease become closer to those in donor cells after blood irradiation with a helium-neon laser. The results indicate a normalizing effect of helium-neon laser irradiation on the mechanisms of non-specific reactivity in some forms of ischemic heart disease. PMID:9949900

  15. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates in vitro mature human neutrophil and eosinophil function, surface receptor expression, and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, A F; Williamson, D J; Gamble, J R; Begley, C G; Harlan, J M; Klebanoff, S J; Waltersdorph, A; Wong, G; Clark, S C; Vadas, M A

    1986-01-01

    A purified recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) was a powerful stimulator of mature human eosinophils and neutrophils. The purified rH GM-CSF enhanced the cytotoxic activity of neutrophils and eosinophils against antibody-coated targets, stimulated phagocytosis of serum-opsonized yeast by both cell types in a dose-dependent manner, and stimulated neutrophil-mediated iodination in the presence of zymosan. In addition, rH GM-CSF enhanced N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine(FMLP)-stimulated degranulation of Cytochalasin B pretreated neutrophils and FMLP-stimulated superoxide production. In contrast, rH GM-CSF did not promote adherence of granulocytes to endothelial cells or plastic surfaces. rH GM-CSF selectively enhanced the surface expression of granulocyte functional antigens 1 and 2, and the Mo1 antigen. rH GM-CSF induced morphological changes and enhanced the survival of both neutrophils and eosinophils by 6 and 9 h, respectively. These experiments show that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor can selectively stimulate mature granulocyte function. PMID:3021817

  16. Effect of recombinant bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor covalently bound to polyethylene glycol injection on neutrophil number and function in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kayoko; Goff, Jesse P; Canning, Peter; Wang, Chong; Roth, James A

    2014-01-01

    Dairy cows often experience decreased immune function around the time of calving, typified by impaired polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function and a transient neutropenia. This is associated with increased disease incidence, including mastitis, retained placenta, and metritis. In an attempt to improve PMN functional capacity during the periparturient period, we injected cows with recombinant bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor covalently bound to polyethylene glycol (PEG rbG-CSF) twice subcutaneously, about 6d before calving and within 24h after calving. Twenty-one cows in their second pregnancy were enrolled in this study and divided into 2 groups: PEG rbG-CSF treated (n=11) and saline-treated controls (n=10). The PMN numbers quickly and dramatically increased after PEG rbG-CSF administration and remained elevated through the end of the experiment (13d after calving). Exocytosis of myeloperoxidase by stimulated PMN, which is generally decreased in periparturient cows, was markedly increased by PEG rbG-CSF after injection. Higher myeloperoxidase exocytosis persisted for at least 10d after calving. The PMN superoxide anion release and phagocytosis activity did not differ between groups. Injection of PEG rbG-CSF was safe for cows, with no significant negative effects observed. The greatest single effect of PEG rbG-CSF administration was a dramatic increase in circulating numbers of PMN. The increased numbers of PMN ready to move to a site of infection early in the course of an infection may improve the ability of the cow to ward off clinical disease in the periparturient period. PMID:24881799

  17. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  18. Cytochrome c modulates the mitochondrial signaling pathway and polymorphonuclear neutrophil apoptosis in bile duct-ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    DENG, XUESONG; DENG, TONGMING; NI, YONG; ZHAN, YONGQIANG; HUANG, WENLONG; LIU, JIANFENG; LIAO, CAIXIAN

    2016-01-01

    It has been observed that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) increase in number and function during obstructive jaundice (OJ). However, the precise mechanisms underlying PMN apoptosis during OJ remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of cytochrome c (Cytc) on the mitochondrial signaling pathway in bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats and the effect on PMN apoptosis following the intravenous administration of Cytc. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: A control group, a sham group, a BDL group and a BDL + Cytc group (rats with common bile duct ligation as well as Cytc intravenous injection). Blood samples were collected from the inferior vein cava for biochemical analysis and separation of the PMN. PMN apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of PMN was detected by rhodamine-123 staining. The Cytc protein expression levels were examined using western blotting. PMN mitochondria were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The results of the present study revealed that the PMN apoptosis rate in rats decreased gradually from 12 to 72 h following BDL to levels that were significantly lower than those of the control group and the sham group. Compared with the corresponding time point of the BDL group, the BDL + Cytc group showed a significantly increased PMN apoptosis rate. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of ΔΨm decreased from 12 to 72 h following BDL, and was significantly increased compared with the control and sham groups. MFI in the BDL + Cytc group was higher compared with that in the BDL group. Cytc expression levels increased in the mitochondria and decreased in the cytoplasm from the 12 to 72 h in the BDL group, which was significantly different from that in the control and sham groups at the corresponding time points. Compared with the BDL group, Cytc expression levels in the cytoplasm for the BDL + Cytc group tended to gradually and significantly

  19. Immobilized immune complexes induce neutrophil extracellular trap release by human neutrophil granulocytes via FcγRIIIB and Mac-1.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Martina; Leschczyk, Christoph; Möller, Sonja; Batel, Tobit; Klinger, Matthias; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás

    2014-08-15

    Canonical neutrophil antimicrobial effector mechanisms, such as degranulation, production of reactive oxygen species, and release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), can result in severe pathology. Activation of neutrophils through immune complexes (ICs) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this study, we report that immobilized ICs (iICs), which are hallmarks of several autoimmune diseases, induce the release of NETs from primary human neutrophils. The iIC-induced NET formation was found to require production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase and to be mediated by FcγRIIIb. Blocking of the β2 integrin macrophage-1 Ag but not lymphocyte function-associated Ag-1 abolished iIC-induced NET formation. This suggests that FcγRIIIb signals in association with macrophage-1 Ag. As intracellular signaling pathways involved in iIC-induced NET formation we identified the tyrosine kinase Src/Syk pathway, which downstream regulates the PI3K/Akt, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 pathways. To our knowledge, the present study shows for the first time that iICs induce NET formation. Thus, we conclude that NETs contribute to pathology in autoimmune inflammatory disorders associated with surface-bound ICs. PMID:25024378

  20. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time. PMID:27021317

  1. Neutrophil apoptosis: impact of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor on cell survival and viability in chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Nariman; Sayed, Azza; William, Iman; Sabry, Omar; Rafaat, Manar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Altered neutrophil apoptosis might be responsible for recurrent bacterial infections encountered in hemodialysis (HD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This work was designed to assess the neutrophil apoptotic activity and the impact of implementation of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), as a survival factor, on neutrophil apoptosis among these patients. Material and methods Twenty-five patients on regular HD along with 34 CKD patients on conservative treatment, as well as 15 healthy controls, were investigated for apoptotic rate via assessment of neutrophil expression of Annexin-V by flow cytometry, before and after 20 h culture in absence and presence of GM-CSF. Neutrophil viability was determined using light microscopy. The preservation of neutrophil activation in these patients was analyzed by flow cytometric CD18 neutrophil expression. Chronic inflammatory state was evaluated by estimating C-reactive protein (CRP) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Obtained data were statistically analyzed. Results Compared to controls, both HD and CKD groups had a significant increase of Annexin-V and CD18 expression and significant decrease in neutrophil viability. Culture of their neutrophils with GM-CSF showed significant decrease of apoptosis accompanied by improvement of neutrophil viability compared to their cultured cells without GM-CSF. These patients also showed significant elevation of CRP and sICAM-1. Conclusions Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor demonstrated an evident impact on improving in vitro neutrophil survival and viability in HD and CKD patients. Therefore, this may represent promising preventive and/or therapeutic strategies against infection frequently observed in these patients and causing morbidity and mortality. PMID:24482640

  2. Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Are Necessary for the Recruitment of CD8+ T Cells in the Liver in a Pregnant Mouse Model of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Oca, Roberto Montes; Buendía, Antonio J.; Del Río, Laura; Sánchez, Joaquín; Salinas, Jesús; Navarro, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the development of the specific immune response against Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection was studied in a pregnant mouse model involving treatment with RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody. PMN depletion significantly affected the immune response in the liver, in which the T-lymphocyte and F4/80+ cell populations decreased, particularly the CD8+ T-cell population. A Th1-like response, characterized by high levels of gamma interferon without detectable levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4) in serum, was observed in both depleted and nondepleted mice, although an increased production of IL-10 was detected in the depleted group. Our results suggest that PMNs play a very important role in the recruitment of other leukocyte populations to the inflammatory foci but have little influence in the polarization of the immune specific response toward a Th1-like response. PMID:10679002

  3. Identification of a novel neutrophil population: proangiogenic granulocytes in second-trimester human decidua.

    PubMed

    Amsalem, Hagai; Kwan, Melissa; Hazan, Aleah; Zhang, Jianhong; Jones, Rebecca L; Whittle, Wendy; Kingdom, John C P; Croy, B Anne; Lye, Stephen J; Dunk, Caroline E

    2014-09-15

    The maternal leukocytes of the first-trimester decidua play a fundamental role in implantation and early development of the fetus and placenta, yet little is known regarding the second-trimester decidual environment. Our multicolor flow cytometric analyses of human decidual leukocytes detected an elevation in tissue resident neutrophils in the second trimester. These cells in both human and murine samples were spatially restricted to decidua basalis. In comparison with peripheral blood neutrophils (PMNs), the decidual neutrophils expressed high levels of neutrophil activation markers and the angiogenesis-related proteins: vascular endothelial growth factor-A, Arginase-1, and CCL2, similarly shown in tumor-associated neutrophils. Functional in vitro assays showed that second-trimester human decidua conditioned medium stimulated transendothelial PMN invasion, upregulated VEGFA, ARG1, CCL2, and ICAM1 mRNA levels, and increased PMN-driven in vitro angiogenesis in a CXCL8-dependent manner. This study identified a novel neutrophil population with a physiological, angiogenic role in human decidua. PMID:25135830

  4. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor amplifies lipopolysaccharide-induced bronchoconstriction by a neutrophil- and cyclooxygenase 2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wollin, L; Uhlig, S; Nüsing, R; Wendel, A

    2001-02-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is used to ameliorate neutropenia in patients after antineoplastic treatment. It has also been suggested as an adjunct treatment in septic patients; however, the recruitment and priming of leukocytes by GM-CSF bears the hazard of a hyperinflammatory response. In particular, the role of GM-CSF in pulmonary functions in septic lungs is still unclear. Therefore, we pretreated rats in vivo with GM-CSF (50 microg/kg, intravenous) and assessed the pulmonary functions of their subsequently prepared isolated perfused lungs when exposed to subtoxic concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 microg/ml). These lungs showed enhanced expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), a significant increase in thromboxane (TX) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release into the venous perfusate, and bronchoconstriction. COX-2 inhibition or blocking of the TX receptor abolished the GM-CSF/LPS-induced bronchoconstriction, but not the TNF release. Neutralizing antibodies against TNF did not prevent GM-CSF/LPS-induced bronchoconstriction. After GM-CSF pretreatment, massive neutrophil invasion into the lung occurred. Neutropenic rats were protected against GM-CSF/ LPS-induced lung injury. Similar results were obtained in rats pretreated with G-CSF instead of GM-CSF. We conclude that GM-CSF pretreatment exacerbates pulmonary injury by low-dose LPS via COX-2 expression, TX release, and bronchoconstriction by initiating neutrophil invasion and activation. PMID:11179120

  5. Evaluation of NAD(P)-Dependent Dehydrogenase Activities in Neutrophilic Granulocytes by the Bioluminescent Method.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescent method for measurements of the neutrophilic NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase, NADP-dependent decarboxylating malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) is developed. The sensitivity of the method allows minimization of the volume of biological material for measurements to 104 neutrophils per analysis. The method is tried in patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis. Low levels of NADPH synthesis enzymes and high levels of enzymes determining the substrate flow by the Krebs cycle found in these patients can lead to attenuation of functional activity of cells. PMID:26468025

  6. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Spindelboeck, Walter; Horvath, Angela; Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. PMID:26938078

  7. Feasibility of multiphoton microscopy-based quantification of antibiotic uptake into neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Adnan; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S; Prow, Tarl W

    2013-07-01

    Antibiotic levels in livestock are usually evaluated through destructive analysis. Taking advantage of the fluorescent properties of marbofloxacin (MBX) and trovafloxacin (TVX), multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was evaluated as a minimally invasive and nondestructive method to determine the penetration of TVX and MBX into sheep neutrophils. Standard curves were measured with drug-only solutions and suggested that MBX was more suited for this type of analysis. The intracellular concentration of both TVX and MBX was higher than the extracellular concentration after incubating neutrophils for 30 min at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100  μg/ml for both the drugs. The intracellular concentration of TVX increased with the extracellular concentration but was always greater than the extracellular concentration, suggesting active internalization. On the other hand, intracellular/extracellular ratio (I/E) peaked at 1.6-fold I/E for 1  μg/ml and then gradually decreased with increased concentration to 1.2-fold I/E at 100  μg/ml. For the first time, this study showed the use of MPM to quantify antibiotic uptake by sheep neutrophils and observed that both antibiotics were taken up by sheep neutrophils beyond extracellular levels. PMID:23824355

  8. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E.; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545400 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545335 PMID:26938078

  9. Rapid Immunomagnetic Negative Enrichment of Neutrophil Granulocytes from Murine Bone Marrow for Functional Studies In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hasenberg, Mike; Köhler, Anja; Bonifatius, Susanne; Borucki, Katrin; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Achilles, Julia; Männ, Linda; Baumgart, Kathleen; Schraven, Burkhart; Gunzer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) mediate early immunity to infection but can also cause host damage if their effector functions are not controlled. Their lack or dysfunction is associated with severe health problems and thus the analysis of PMN physiology is a central issue. One prerequisite for PMN analysis is the availability of purified cells from primary organs. While human PMN are easily isolated from peripheral blood, this approach is less suitable for mice due to limited availability of blood. Instead, bone marrow (BM) is an easily available reservoir of murine PMN, but methods to obtain pure cells from BM are limited. We have developed a novel protocol allowing the isolation of highly pure untouched PMN from murine BM by negative immunomagnetic isolation using a complex antibody cocktail. The protocol is simple and fast (∼1 h), has a high yield (5–10*106 PMN per animal) and provides a purity of cells equivalent to positive selection (>80%). Most importantly, cells obtained by this method are non-activated and remain fully functional in vitro or after adoptive transfer into recipient animals. This method should thus greatly facilitate the study of primary murine PMN in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21383835

  10. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  11. Modulation of human neutrophil polymorphonuclear leucocyte migration by human plasma alpha-globulin inhibitors and synthetic esterase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E J

    1975-01-01

    The exposure of isolated washed human neutrophils to purified human alpha1-antitrypsin resulted in a transient 2-fold enhancement of random migration and concomitant 70-90 per cent inhibition of chemotactic responsiveness to C5a or C3a, while treatment with alpha2-macroglobulin gave a less pronounced brief enhancement of random migration and prolonged 40-60 per cent suppression of chemotaxis. Peak effects occurred with concentrations of 1 mug/ml of alpha1-antitrypsin and 10 mug/ml of alpha2-macroglobulin. In contrast, the inhibitor of the activated first component of complement, at the highest concentration studied of 100/mug/ml, slightly enhanced chemotactic migration in response to C5a without influencing random migration. Preincubation of neutrophils with either L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) or N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) at concentrations of 10-8-10-4M suppressed chemotaxis with concomitant inhibition of random migration by TPCK and enhancement of random migration by TLCK. All agents worked directly and irreversibly on the cells but caused only slight stimulation of the activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt of layers of adherent neutrophils. The results suggest that interaction of the plasma alpha-globulins or synthetic esterase inhibitors with surface receptors on neutrophils can influence both the random migration and responsiveness to chemotactic factors of these cells. PMID:49293

  12. Granulocytes in Ocular HSV-1 Infection: Opposing Roles of Mast Cells and Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Derek J.; Zheng, Min; Conrady, Christopher D.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The contributions of mast cells (MCs) to immunologic defense against pathogens in the eye are unknown. We have characterized pericorneal MCs as tissue-resident innate sentinels and determined their impact on the immune response to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), a common ocular pathogen. Methods. The impact of mast cells on the immune response to HSV-1 infection was investigated using MC-deficient KitW-sh mice. Virus titers, inflammatory cytokine production, eicosanoid profiles, cellular immune responses, and ocular pathology were evaluated and compared with C57BL/6J mice during an acute corneal HSV-1 infection. Results. Corneas of KitW-sh mice have higher viral titers, increased edema, and greater leukocyte infiltration following HSV-1 infection. Following infection, cytokine profiles were slightly elevated overall in KitW-sh mice. Eicosanoid profiles were remarkably different only when comparing uninfected corneas from both groups. Neutrophils within infected corneas expressed HSV-1 antigen, lytic genes, and served as a disease-causing vector when adoptively transferred into immunocompromised animals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells did not infiltrate into the cornea or suppress the expansion, recruitment, or cytokine production by CD8+ T cells following acute HSV-1 infection. Conclusions. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into host defense in the cornea and the pathogenesis of HSV-1 infection by identifying previously unacknowledged MCs as protective innate sentinels for infection of the ocular surface and reinforcing that neutrophils are detrimental to corneal infection. PMID:26066745

  13. Effects of dietary supplementation of Chinese medicinal herbs on polymorphonuclear neutrophil immune activity and small intestinal morphology in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, C W; Lee, T T; Shih, Y C; Yu, B

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary Chinese medicinal herbs (CMH) supplementation composed of Panax ginseng, Dioscoreaceae opposite, Atractylodes macrocephala, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Ziziphus jujube and Platycodon grandiflorum, on the performance, intestinal tract morphology and immune activity in weanling pigs. Two hundred and forty weaned pigs were assigned randomly to four dietary groups including the negative control (basal diet), 0.1% CMH, 0.3% CMH and 0.114% antibiotic (Chlortetracycline calcium Complex, Sulfathiazole and Procaine Penicillin G) supplementation groups for a 28-day feeding trial. Results indicated that both CMH supplementation groups had a better gain and feed/gain than control group (CT) during the first 2 weeks of the experimental period. The 0.3% CMH had a significant decrease in the diarrhoea score in first 10 days of experimental period when compared with other groups. The CMH supplementation groups had a higher villous height, increased lactobacilli counts in digesta of ileum and decreased coliform counts in colon compared with CT. The immune activities of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs), including the respiratory burst and Salmonella-killing ability, were significantly enhanced in CMH supplementation groups at day 7 of experiment period. The CMH and antibiotic supplementations increased the nutrient digestibility such as dietary dry matter, crude protein and gross energy in weanling pigs. In conclusion, the dietary CMH supplementation improved intestinal morphology and immune activities of PMNs, thus giving rise to nutrient digestibility and reduce diarrhoea frequency in weanling pigs. PMID:21535231

  14. Effect of the synthetic Toll-like receptor ligands LPS, Pam3CSK4, HKLM and FSL-1 in the function of bovine polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Conejeros, Iván; Gibson, Amanda J; Werling, Dirk; Muñoz-Caro, Tamara; Hermosilla, Carlos; Taubert, Anja; Burgos, Rafael A

    2015-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are a family of pattern recognition receptors that sense microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMP) such as microbial membrane components and nucleic acids of bacterial origin. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cell of the innate immune system to arrive at the site of infection or injury and elicit oxidative and non-oxidative microbicidal mechanisms. Observations in human and mouse suggest that TLR ligands can induce direct responses in PMN. So far, there is no information of the effect of synthetic TLR ligands on the response of bovine PMN. The objective of this study was to evaluate the functional response of bovine PMN incubated with four synthetic TLR ligands: ultrapure LPS (TLR4), Pam(3)CSK(4) (TLR2/1), HKLM (TLR2) and FSL-1 (TLR2/6). The results show that all the ligands increment cells size as identified by changes in the FSC-SSC as part of the flow cytometric analysis. Interestingly, only Pam(3)CSK(4) consistently induced a calcium influx, increased ROS production and secretion of gelatinase granules, whereas no response was seen using other ligands. Furthermore, exposure of bovine PMN to ultrapure LPS, Pam(3)CSK(4), HKLM or FSL-1 for 24 hours did not impact on apoptosis of these cells. Our data provide evidence for a selective response of bovine PMNs to TLR ligands. PMID:26026246

  15. High numbers of circulating pigmented polymorphonuclear neutrophils as a prognostic marker for decreased birth weight during malaria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chua, Caroline Lin Lin; Robinson, Leanne J; Baiwog, Francesca; Stanisic, Danielle I; Hamilton, John A; Brown, Graham V; Rogerson, Stephen J; Boeuf, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    During gestational malaria, Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes can sequester within the placenta, contributing to poor pregnancy outcomes, especially low birth weight. In children and non-pregnant adults, pigmented leukocytes may serve as markers of sequestered parasite burden and predict clinical outcomes. Here, we investigated circulating pigmented leukocyte numbers as predictors of clinical outcomes in pregnant women presenting with malaria at enrolment. The number of circulating pigmented neutrophils at enrolment negatively correlated with birth weight (Rho=-25, P=.04), suggesting these cells may have a pathogenic role in, and could serve as prognostic markers for, malaria-associated low birth weight. PMID:25555554

  16. Septic Shock in Advanced Age: Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Molecular Signatures in Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira da Silva Pellegrina, Diogo; Severino, Patricia; Vieira Barbeiro, Hermes; Maziero Andreghetto, Flávia; Tadeu Velasco, Irineu; Possolo de Souza, Heraldo; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Reis, Eduardo Moraes; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the highest causes of mortality in hospitalized people and a common complication in both surgical and clinical patients admitted to hospital for non-infectious reasons. Sepsis is especially common in older people and its incidence is likely to increase substantially as a population ages. Despite its increased prevalence and mortality in older people, immune responses in the elderly during septic shock appear similar to that in younger patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide gene expression analysis of circulating neutrophils from old and young septic patients to better understand how aged individuals respond to severe infectious insult. We detected several genes whose expression could be used to differentiate immune responses of the elderly from those of young people, including genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and TGF-β signaling, among others. Our results identify major molecular pathways that are particularly affected in the elderly during sepsis, which might have a pivotal role in worsening clinical outcomes compared with young people with sepsis. PMID:26047321

  17. Neutrophil-Related Gene Expression And Low-Density Granulocytes Associated with Disease Activity and Response to Treatment in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Xu, Lijing; Lim, Noha; Gao, Zhong; Asare, Adam L.; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H.; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert F.; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St Clair, E. William; Tchao, Nadia K.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Phippard, Deborah J.; Merkel, Peter A.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Monach, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To discover biomarkers involved in the pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and determine if low-density granulocytes (LDGs) contribute to gene expression signatures in AAV. Methods The source of clinical data and linked biospecimens was a randomized controlled treatment trial in AAV. RNA-sequencing of whole blood from patients with AAV was performed during active disease at the baseline visit (BL) and during remission 6 months later (6M). Gene expression was compared between patients who met versus did not meet the primary trial outcome of clinical remission at 6M (responders vs. nonresponders). Measurement of neutrophil-related gene expression was confirmed in PBMCs to validate findings in whole blood. A negative selection strategy isolated LDGs from PBMC fractions. Results Differential expression between responders (n=77) and nonresponders (n=35) was detected in 2,346 transcripts at BL visit (p<0.05). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated a cluster of granulocyte-related genes, including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3). A granulocyte multi-gene composite score was significantly higher in nonresponders than responders (p<0.01) and during active disease compared to remission (p<0.01). This signature strongly overlapped an LDG signature identified previously in lupus (FDRGSEA<0.01). Transcription of PR3 measured in PBMCs was associated with active disease and treatment response (p<0.01). LDGs isolated from patients with AAV spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps containing PR3 and MPO. Conclusions In AAV an increased expression of a granulocyte gene signature is associated with disease activity and decreased response to treatment. The source of this signature is likely LDGs, a potentially pathogenic cell type in AAV. PMID:25891759

  18. Points of control exerted along the macrophage-endothelial cell-polymorphonuclear neutrophil axis by PECAM-1 in the innate immune response of acute colonic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naohito; Rui, Tao; Yang, Min; Bharwani, Sulaiman; Handa, Osamu; Yoshida, Norimasa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Kvietys, Peter R

    2008-08-01

    PECAM-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and leukocytes. Its extracellular domain has been implicated in leukocyte diapedesis. In this study, we used PECAM-1(-/-) mice and relevant cells derived from them to assess the role of PECAM-1 in an experimental model of acute colonic inflammation with a predominant innate immune response, i.e., 2,4,6-trinitrobenzine sulfonic acid (TNBS). Using chimeric approaches, we addressed the points of control exerted by PECAM-1 along the macrophage-endothelial cell-polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) axis. In vivo, TNBS-induced colitis was ameliorated in PECAM-1(-/-) mice, an event attributed to PECAM-1 on hematopoietic cells rather than to PECAM-1 on endothelial cells. The in vivo innate immune response was mimicked in vitro by using a construct of the vascular-interstitial interface, i.e., PMN transendothelial migration was induced by colonic lavage fluid (CLF) from TNBS mice or macrophages (MPhi) challenged with CLF. Using the construct, we confirmed that endothelial cell PECAM-1 does not play a role in PMN transendothelial migration. Although MPhi activation (NF-kappaB nuclear binding) and function (keratinocyte-derived chemokine production) induced by CLF was diminished in PECAM-1(-/-) MPhi, this did not affect their ability to promote PMN transendothelial migration. By contrast, PECAM-1(-/-) PMN did not adhere to or migrate across endothelial cell monolayers in response to CLF. Further, as compared with PECAM-1(+/+) PMN, PECAM-1(-/-) PMN were less effective in orientating their CXCR2 receptors (polarization) in the direction of a chemotactic gradient. Collectively, our findings indicate that PECAM-1 modulation of PMN function (at a step before diapedesis) most likely contributes to the inflammation in a colitis model with a strong innate immune component. PMID:18641353

  19. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  20. Involvement of the high-affinity receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI; CD64) in enhanced tumor cell cytotoxicity of neutrophils during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Valerius, T; Repp, R; de Wit, T P; Berthold, S; Platzer, E; Kalden, J R; Gramatzki, M; van de Winkel, J G

    1993-08-01

    Three different classes of Fc receptors for IgG (Fc gamma R) are currently distinguished in humans, of which polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMN) normally express both low-affinity receptor classes--Fc gamma RII (CD32) and Fc gamma RIII (CD16). During therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), neutrophils from patients with various malignancies and different hematologic disorders were found to additionally express high levels of the receptor with high affinity for IgG (Fc gamma RI; CD64). For these patients, the relative fluorescence intensity (rFI) for Fc gamma RI was 5.3 (range, 1.7 to 10.3; n = 19), compared with 1.0 (range, 1.0 to 1.1; n = 8) for healthy donors. The expression of Fc gamma RI during G-CSF therapy could be confirmed by using a panel of six CD64-specific antibodies, and by showing mRNA for Fc gamma RI. So far, three genes for Fc gamma RI have been identified, encoding four distinct transcription products. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technology, transcripts for both membrane-associated isoforms (hFc gamma RIa and hFc gamma RIb2) could be detected. The functional activity of Fc gamma RI on PMN during G-CSF therapy was shown by measuring binding of monomeric human IgG and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Thus, Fc gamma RI-positive neutrophils displayed enhanced ADCC activity to glioma (A1207), squamous cell (A431), and ovarian (SK-ov3) carcinoma cell lines. The involvement of Fc gamma RI in this increased cytotoxic activity was shown by blocking Fc gamma receptors with monoclonal antibodies, and by using F(ab')2 x F(ab')2-bispecific antibodies with specificities against tumor-related antigens and Fc gamma RI, resulting in solely Fc gamma RI-mediated cytotoxicity. Therapeutically, this additional Fc receptor on PMN may increase the efficacy of experimental antibody therapy. PMID:7687898

  1. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  2. Effect of the level of maternal energy intake prepartum on immunometabolic markers, polymorphonuclear leukocyte function, and neutrophil gene network expression in neonatal Holstein heifer calves.

    PubMed

    Osorio, J S; Trevisi, E; Ballou, M A; Bertoni, G; Drackley, J K; Loor, J J

    2013-06-01

    A conventional approach in dairy cow nutrition programs during late gestation is to feed moderate-energy diets. The effects of the maternal plane of nutrition on immune function and metabolism in newborn calves are largely unknown. Holstein cows (n=20) were fed a controlled-energy (CON) diet (1.24 Mcal/kg) for the entire dry period (~50 d) or the CON diet during the first 29 d of the dry period followed by a moderate-energy (OVE) diet (1.47 Mcal/kg) during the last 21 d prepartum. All calves were weighed at birth before first colostrum intake. Calves chosen for this study (n=6 per maternal diet) had blood samples harvested before colostrum feeding (d 0) and at 2 and 7 d of age. Blood samples were used to determine metabolites, acute-phase proteins, oxidative stress markers, hormones, phagocytic capacity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and monocytes, and total RNA was isolated from PMN. Calves from OVE dams weighed, on average, 5kg less at birth (44.0 vs. 48.6kg) than calves from CON dams. Blood glucose concentration in OVE calves had a more pronounced increase between 0 and 2 d than CON, at which point phagocytosis by PMN averaged 85% in OVE and 62% in CON. Compared with CON, calves from OVE had greater expression of TLR4, but lower expression of PPARA and PPARD at birth. Expression of PPARG and RXRA decreased between 0 and 2 d in both groups. Concentrations of leptin, cholesterol, ceruloplasmin, reactive oxygen metabolites, myeloperoxidase, retinol, tocopherol, IgG, and total protein, as well as expression of SOD2 and SELL increased markedly by 2 d in both groups; whereas, cortisol, albumin, acid-soluble protein, NEFA, insulin, as well as expression of IL6, TLR4, IL1R2, LTC4S, and ALOX5 decreased by 2 d. By 7 d of age, the concentration of haptoglobin was greater than precolostrum and was lower for OVE than CON calves. Our data provide evidence for a carry-over effect of maternal energy overfeeding during the last 3 wk before calving on some measurements of

  3. Neutrophil granulocytes recruited upon translocation of intestinal bacteria enhance graft-versus-host disease via tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Lukas; Goroncy, Luise; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Gautam, Sanjivan; Triantafyllopoulou, Antigoni; Mocsai, Attila; Reichardt, Wilfried; Karlsson, Fridrik J; Radhakrishnan, Sabarinath V; Hanke, Kathrin; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Freudenberg, Marina; von Loewenich, Friederike D; Wolf, Philipp; Leonhardt, Franziska; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Schmah, Oliver; Schönle, Anne; Martin, Stefan F; Mertelsmann, Roland; Duyster, Justus; Finke, Jürgen; Prinz, Marco; Henneke, Philipp; Häcker, Hans; Hildebrandt, Gerhard C; Häcker, Georg; Zeiser, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) considerably limits wider usage of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Antigen-presenting cells and T cells are populations customarily associated with GVHD pathogenesis. Of note, neutrophils are the largest human white blood cell population. The cells cleave chemokines and produce reactive oxygen species, thereby promoting T cell activation. Therefore, during an allogeneic immune response, neutrophils could amplify tissue damage caused by conditioning regimens. We analyzed neutrophil infiltration of the mouse ileum after allo-HCT by in vivo myeloperoxidase imaging and found that infiltration levels were dependent on the local microbial flora and were not detectable under germ-free conditions. Physical or genetic depletion of neutrophils reduced GVHD-related mortality. The contribution of neutrophils to GVHD severity required reactive oxygen species (ROS) because selective Cybb (encoding cytochrome b-245, beta polypeptide, also known as NOX2) deficiency in neutrophils impairing ROS production led to lower levels of tissue damage, GVHD-related mortality and effector phenotype T cells. Enhanced survival of Bcl-xL transgenic neutrophils increased GVHD severity. In contrast, when we transferred neutrophils lacking Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9, which are normally less strongly activated by translocating bacteria, into wild-type C57BL/6 mice, GVHD severity was reduced. In humans, severity of intestinal GVHD strongly correlated with levels of neutrophils present in GVHD lesions. This study describes a new potential role for neutrophils in the pathogenesis of GVHD in both mice and humans. PMID:24836575

  4. Saprochaete clavata invasive infection in a patient with severe aplastic anemia: Efficacy of voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B with adjuvant granulocyte transfusions before neutrophil recovery following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Simon; Rougeron, Amandine; Levoir, Laure; Pérard, Baptiste; Milpied, Noël; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Gabriel, Frédéric; Vigouroux, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 27-year old man with severe aplastic anemia who developed a Saprochaete clavata (Geotrichum clavatum) disseminated invasive infection shortly prior a scheduled allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Treatment with a combination of voriconazole, liposomal amphotericin B and adjuvant granulocyte transfusions was successful before neutrophil recovery. PMID:27069848

  5. Saprochaete clavata invasive infection in a patient with severe aplastic anemia: Efficacy of voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B with adjuvant granulocyte transfusions before neutrophil recovery following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Favre, Simon; Rougeron, Amandine; Levoir, Laure; Pérard, Baptiste; Milpied, Noël; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Gabriel, Frédéric; Vigouroux, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a 27-year old man with severe aplastic anemia who developed a Saprochaete clavata (Geotrichum clavatum) disseminated invasive infection shortly prior a scheduled allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Treatment with a combination of voriconazole, liposomal amphotericin B and adjuvant granulocyte transfusions was successful before neutrophil recovery. PMID:27069848

  6. Treatment with recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Filgrastin) stimulates neutrophils and tissue macrophages and induces an effective non-specific response against Mycobacterium avium in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, L E; Petrofsky, M; Stevens, P

    1998-01-01

    A role of neutrophils in the host response against Mycobacterium avium (MAC) has recently been suggested. To investigate this matter further, we determined the effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the outcome of MAC infection in mice. C57BL/6bg+/bg- black mice were intravenously infected with 1 x 10(7) MAC and then divided into four experimental groups to receive G-CSF as follows: (i) 10 micrograms/kg/day; (ii) 50 micrograms/kg/day; (iii) 100 micrograms/kg/day; (iv) placebo control. Mice were killed at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment to determine the bacterial load of liver and spleen. Treatment with G-CSF at both 10 and 50 micrograms/kg/day doses significantly decreased the number of viable bacteria in liver and spleen after 2 weeks (approximately 70.5% and 69.0%, respectively), and after 4 weeks (approximately 53% and 52%, respectively, P < 0.05 compared with placebo control). Treatment with 100 micrograms/kg/day did not result in decrease of bacterial colony-forming units in the liver and spleen after 4 weeks. Administration of G-CSF induced interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 production by splenocytes. To examine if the protective effect of G-CSF was accompanied by the activation of phagocytic cells, blood neutrophils and splenic macrophages were purified from mice receiving G-CSF and their ability to kill MAC was examined ex vivo. Neutrophils and macrophages from G-CSF-treated mice were able to inhibit the growth of or to kill MAC ex vivo, while phagocytic cells from untreated control mice had no anti-MAC effect. These results suggest that activation of neutrophils appears to induce an effective non-specific host defence against MAC, and further studies should aim for better understanding of the mechanisms of protection. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9767410

  7. Human Neutrophils Convert the Sebum-derived Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Sebaleic Acid to a Potent Granulocyte Chemoattractant*

    PubMed Central

    Cossette, Chantal; Patel, Pranav; Anumolu, Jaganmohan R.; Sivendran, Sashikala; Lee, Gue Jae; Gravel, Sylvie; Graham, François D.; Lesimple, Alain; Mamer, Orval A.; Rokach, Joshua; Powell, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Sebaleic acid (5,8-octadecadienoic acid) is the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in human sebum and skin surface lipids. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolism of this fatty acid by human neutrophils and to determine whether its metabolites are biologically active. Neutrophils converted sebaleic acid to four major products, which were identified by their chromatographic properties, UV absorbance, and mass spectra as 5-hydroxy-(6E,8Z)-octadecadienoic acid (5-HODE), 5-oxo-(6E,8Z)-octadecadienoic acid (5-oxo-ODE), 5S,18-dihydroxy-(6E,8Z)-octadecadienoic acid, and 5-oxo-18-hydroxy-(6E,8Z)-octadecadienoic acid. The identities of these metabolites were confirmed by comparison of their properties with those of authentic chemically synthesized standards. Both neutrophils and human keratinocytes converted 5-HODE to 5-oxo-ODE. This reaction was stimulated in neutrophils by phorbol myristate acetate and in keratinocytes by oxidative stress (t-butyl-hydroperoxide). Both treatments dramatically elevated intracellular levels of NADP+, the cofactor required by 5-hydroxyeicosanoid dehydrogenase. In keratinocytes, this was accompanied by a rapid increase in intracellular GSSG levels, consistent with the involvement of glutathione peroxidase. 5-Oxo-ODE stimulated calcium mobilization in human neutrophils and induced desensitization to 5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid but not leukotriene B4, indicating that this effect was mediated by the OXE receptor. 5-Oxo-ODE and its 8-trans isomer were equipotent with 5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid in stimulating actin polymerization and chemotaxis in human neutrophils, whereas 5-HODE, 5-oxo-18-hydroxy-(6E,8Z)-octadecadienoic acid, and 5S,18-dihydroxy-(6E,8Z)-octadecadienoic acid were much less active. We conclude that neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase converts sebaleic acid to 5-HODE, which can be further metabolized to 5-oxo-ODE by 5-hydroxyeicosanoid dehydrogenase in neutrophils and keratinocytes. Because of

  8. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  9. Specificity of indium-111 granulocyte scanning and fecal excretion measurement in inflammatory bowel disease--an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Price, Y.E.; Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Wright, N.A.; Hodgson, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    The validity of /sup 111/In granulocyte scanning and fecal excretion measurement, as a reflection of loss of cells into the gastrointestinal tract, was studied using an autoradiographic technique in 11 patients in whom /sup 111/In granulocyte scan and colonoscopy were carried out simultaneously. /sup 111/In granulocytes were injected 1.5-4 hr prior to colonoscopy, and intraluminal fluid, mucosal brushings, and colonic biopsies were collected during the colonoscopy. In two patients with no histological evidence of inflammatory bowel disease, and four patients with clinically and histologically inactive inflammatory bowel disease, no /sup 111/Indium was detected in fluid, brushing, or biopsies. In five patients with active disease, 85% of the /sup 111/In activity in colonic fluid was precipitated by low-speed centrifugation. Autoradiography confirmed that the label remained attached to whole granulocytes in colonic fluid and mucosal brushings. Studies on biopsies, at intervals up to 4 1/2 hr following labeled granulocyte injection, demonstrated labeled polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) on the inflamed epithelial surface, with occasional cells in crypt abscesses by 110 min. We conclude that the techniques of /sup 111/In granulocyte scanning and fecal counting in patients with IBD are specifically measuring cell loss; labeled PMNs are capable of migrating through the gastrointestinal mucosa, in active disease, within 2 hr of administration.

  10. Cytophotometry of granulocytes in chronic granulocytic leukemia patients. Part I. Cell cycle distribution, S-phase transition and quantitative cytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, V M; Lishmanova, N G; Khoroshko, N D; Dultsyna, S M; Alieva, T M; Khrust YuR; Kozinets, G I

    1987-01-01

    In the chronic phase of CGL the proportion of granulocytes in S + G2 was lower (18.7 +/- 1.3% in marrow and 16.7 +/- 2.4% in blood) than in normal bone marrow (42.4 +/- 2.9%) as studied by Feulgen-DNA cytophotometry. During the blast crisis the percentage of S + G2 blasts was 39.3 +/- 8.4 in marrow and 38.7 +/- 7.8 in blood which was much higher than in acute myeloblastic leukemia patients (10.8 +/- 1.4 and 5.1 +/- 1.0). Thymidine labelling index values were lower than the percentage of cytophotometrically detected S-phase cells: up to 28% of cells with Feulgen-DNA content corresponding to S-phase did not incorporate 3H-thymidine. The rate of DNA synthesis remained constant during the S-phase but 3H-thymidine uptake increases towards the end of the S-phase. Morphometric parameters and quantitative cytochemical (PAS, Sudan, myeloperoxidase activity) characteristics of polymorphonuclear neutrophils were altered during the chronic phase of the disease but remained in the normal range during the blast crisis. Mature neutrophils in the blast crisis are assumed to originate from normal granulocyte progenitors. PMID:2448196

  11. Transcellular migration of neutrophil granulocytes through the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier after infection with Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A critical point during the course of bacterial meningitis is the excessive influx of polymorphnuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from the blood into the brain. Both paracellular and transcellular routes of leukocyte transmigration through the blood-brain barrier have been described in CNS diseases so far. Thus, we investigated the mechanism of PMN transmigration through the blood-CSF barrier under inflammatory conditions. Methods In an "inverted" Transwell culture model of the blood-CSF barrier, the zoonotic agent Streptococcus suis (S. suis) was used to stimulate porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells (PCPECs) specifically from the physiologically relevant basolateral side. Barrier function was analyzed by measuring TEER and TR-dextran-flux, and tight junction morphology was investigated by immunofluorescence. Route and mechanism of PMN transmigration were determined by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and FACS analysis. Quantitative real time-PCR was used to determine expression levels of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Results Here, we show that the transmigration of PMNs through PCPECs was significantly higher after stimulation with TNFα or infection with S. suis strain 10 compared to its non-encapsulated mutant. Barrier function was not significantly affected by PMN migration alone, but in combination with S. suis infection. Tight junction and cytoskeletal actin reorganisation were also observed after stimulation with S. suis or TNFα. Most strikingly, PMNs preferentially migrated across PCPECs via the transcellular route. Extensive sequential analyses of the PMN transmigration process with Apotome®-imaging and electron microscopy revealed that paracellular migrating PMNs stop just before tight junctions. Interestingly, PMNs subsequently appeared to proceed by transcellular migration via funnel-like structures developing from the apical membrane. It is noteworthy that some PMNs contained bacteria during the transmigration process. Flow cytometric and

  12. The Small Breathing Amplitude at the Upper Lobes Favors the Attraction of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lesions and Helps to Understand the Evolution toward Active Disease in An Individual-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Pere-Joan; Prats, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) can induce two kinds of lesions, namely proliferative and exudative. The former are based on the presence of macrophages with controlled induction of intragranulomatous necrosis, and are even able to stop its physical progression, thus avoiding the induction of active tuberculosis (TB). In contrast, the most significant characteristic of exudative lesions is their massive infiltration with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), which favor enlargement of the lesions and extracellular growth of the bacilli. We have built an individual-based model (IBM) (known as “TBPATCH”) using the NetLogo interface to better understand the progression from Mtb infection to TB. We have tested four main factors previously identified as being able to favor the infiltration of Mtb-infected lesions with PMNs, namely the tolerability of infected macrophages to the bacillary load; the capacity to modulate the Th17 response; the breathing amplitude (BAM) (large or small in the lower and upper lobes respectively), which influences bacillary drainage at the alveoli; and the encapsulation of Mtb-infected lesions by the interlobular septae that structure the pulmonary parenchyma into secondary lobes. Overall, although all the factors analyzed play some role, the small BAM is the major factor determining whether Mtb-infected lesions become exudative, and thus induce TB, thereby helping to understand why this usually takes place in the upper lobes. This information will be very useful for the design of future prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against TB. PMID:27065951

  13. Neutrophil roles in left ventricular remodeling following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs; neutrophils) serve as key effector cells in the innate immune system and provide the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. In addition to producing inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and undergoing a respiratory burst that stimulates the release of reactive oxygen species, PMNs also degranulate to release components that kill pathogens. Recently, neutrophil extracellular traps have been shown to be an alternative way to trap microorganisms and contain infection. PMN-derived granule components are also involved in multiple non-infectious inflammatory processes, including the response to myocardial infarction (MI). In this review, we will discuss the biological characteristics, recruitment, activation, and removal of PMNs, as well as the roles of PMN-derived granule proteins in inflammation and innate immunity, focusing on the MI setting when applicable. We also discuss future perspectives that will direct research in PMN biology. PMID:23731794

  14. Monoclonal Lym-1 antibody-dependent cytolysis by neutrophils exposed to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor: intervention of FcgammaRII (CD32), CD11b-CD18 integrins, and CD66b glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Dapino, P; Barbera, P; Morone, P; Dallegri, F

    1999-05-15

    Murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) Lym-1 is an IgG2a able to bind HLA-DR variants on malignant B cells and suitable for serotherapeutic approaches in B-lymphoma patients. We have previously shown that Lym-1 can synergize with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to trigger neutrophil cytolysis towards Raji cells used as a model of B-lymphoma targets. Here we provide evidence for the intervention of certain neutrophil receptors or surface molecules in this model of cell-mediated lysis. The lysis was completely inhibited by the anti-FcgammaRII MoAb IV.3 and unaffected by the anti-FcgammaRIII MoAb 3G8. This suggests that neutrophil cytolysis involves FcgammaRII without cooperation of this receptor with FcgammaRIII. Moreover, the lysis was inhibited by an anti-CD18 MoAb (MEM48) and by a MoAb specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like and glycophosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-linked glycoproteins (CD66b). Using an immunofluorescence staining procedure, cross-linking of CD66b induced the redistribution of CD11b on neutrophils with distinct areas of CD11b clustering via a process susceptible of inhibition by D-mannose. This is consistent with the ability of CD11b-CD18 and CD66b to undergo lectin-like physical interactions on the neutrophil surface. Such a type of interaction is presumably instrumental for neutrophil cytolytic activity in that the lysis was inhibited by D-mannose and enhanced by the MoAb VIM-12, which mimics the cooperation between CD11b and GPI-anchored molecules by specifically interacting with CD11b lectin-like sites. Therefore, the present results prove the absolute requirement for FcgammaRII in neutrophil GM-CSF/Lym-1-mediated cytolysis and, on the other hand, define the crucial role of CD66b and CD11b/CD18 in the expression of the cell lytic potential. PMID:10233903

  15. Porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) delivered via replication-defective adenovirus induces a sustained increase in circulating peripheral blood neutrophils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising area for biotherapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease, particularly during periods of peak disease incidence. Cytokines, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), are one class of compounds that...

  16. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo. PMID:24319285

  17. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents down-regulate the oxidative burst induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Morone, M P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1995-09-01

    Human neutrophils, plated on fibronectin-precoated wells, were found to release large quantities of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to GM-CSF. O2- production was reduced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. Both agents are known to increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels by inducing its production (PGE2) or blocking its catabolism (RO 20-1724). When added in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 had a marked synergistic inhibitory effect, which was reproduced by replacing PGE2 with a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, i.e. forskolin (FK). Moreover, the neutrophil response to GM-CSF was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analogue of cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. As GM-CSF and PGE2 are known to be generated at tissue sites of inflammation, the results suggest the existence of a PGE2-dependent regulatory pathway potentially capable of controlling the neutrophil response to GM-CSF, in turn limiting the risk of local oxidative tissue injury. Moreover, owing to its susceptibility to amplification by RO 20-1724, the PGE2-dependent pathway and in particular PDE-IV may represent a pharmacological target to reduce the generation of histotoxic oxidants by GM-CSF-responding neutrophils. PMID:7664497

  18. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents down-regulate the oxidative burst induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Morone, M P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1995-01-01

    Human neutrophils, plated on fibronectin-precoated wells, were found to release large quantities of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to GM-CSF. O2- production was reduced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. Both agents are known to increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels by inducing its production (PGE2) or blocking its catabolism (RO 20-1724). When added in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 had a marked synergistic inhibitory effect, which was reproduced by replacing PGE2 with a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, i.e. forskolin (FK). Moreover, the neutrophil response to GM-CSF was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analogue of cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. As GM-CSF and PGE2 are known to be generated at tissue sites of inflammation, the results suggest the existence of a PGE2-dependent regulatory pathway potentially capable of controlling the neutrophil response to GM-CSF, in turn limiting the risk of local oxidative tissue injury. Moreover, owing to its susceptibility to amplification by RO 20-1724, the PGE2-dependent pathway and in particular PDE-IV may represent a pharmacological target to reduce the generation of histotoxic oxidants by GM-CSF-responding neutrophils. PMID:7664497

  19. Adherence of Borrelia burgdorferi to granulocytes of different animal species.

    PubMed

    Grassmann, B; Kopp, P A; Schmitt, M; Blobel, H

    1997-04-01

    Adherence of 4 Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi strains (z7/22, z7/27, z7/41, PBi) to polymorphonuclear granulocytes from different domestic animals (horses, cattle, sheep, dogs) was investigated. All 4 strains adhered to the granulocytes. Binding assays indicated that the adherence occurred between structures on the surface of the borreliae ("binding-sites") and on the membranes of the granulocytes ("receptors"). The "receptors" consisted of 4 fractions (A, B, C, and D) with components differing in molecular weight (MW) and binding activity for proteins on the surface of B. burgdorferi. Fraction A (MW 80000) had the highest binding activity for B. burgdorferi. PMID:9144911

  20. Chorioretinitis with a combined defect in T and B lymphocytes and granulocytes. A new syndrome successfully treated with dialyzable leukocyte extracts (transfer factor).

    PubMed

    Kyong, C U; Wilson, G B; Fudenberg, H H; Goust, J M; Richardson, P; Echerd, J

    1980-06-01

    A patient with immune deficiency, recurrent pyogenic infections and active chorioretinitis is described; in addition to agammaglobulinemia, both quantitative and qualitative T-cell deficiencies were documented. Furthermore, the patient's granulocytes (polymorphonuclear leukocytes), although normal in their bactericidal capacity for Staphylococcus, responded poorly to both leukocyte migration inhibition factor and neutrophil immobilizing factor obtained from normal cells. The immunologic features of this patient appear to comprise a new syndrome. Remarkable diminution of the ocular lesions and increased visual acuity occurred within two months after the initiation of therapy with dialyzable leukocyte extracts (transfer factor). Concurrent testing of the patient's cell-mediated immunity showed increased numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and improved T-cell function following dialyzable leukocyte extract [DLE] therapy. The dramatic clinical results indicate that similar therapy may prove to be beneficial in other patients with chorioretinitis and T-cell deficiency. PMID:6992573

  1. Neutrophil function and dysfunction in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, T E; Vaikuntam, J

    1994-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leukocyte or neutrophil is an integral part of the acute inflammatory response. Its function as a protective cell in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease has been studied extensively. Abnormal neutrophil function has been associated (directly or indirectly) with the pathogenesis of early onset periodontal disease. This paper reviews the recent developments in neutrophil function and dysfunction as they relate to periodontal disease progression. PMID:8032460

  2. The LINC-less granulocyte nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Olins, Ada L.; Hoang, Thanh V.; Zwerger, Monika; Herrmann, Harald; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Noegel, Angelika A.; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Hodzic, Didier; Olins, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    The major blood granulocyte (neutrophil) is rapidly recruited to sites of bacterial and fungal infections. It is a highly malleable cell, allowing it to squeeze out of blood vessels and migrate through tight tissue spaces. The human granulocyte nucleus is lobulated and exhibits a paucity of nuclear lamins, increasing its capability for deformation. The present study examined the existence of protein connections between the nuclear envelope and cytoskeletal elements (the LINC complex) in differentiated cell states (i.e. granulocytic, monocytic and macrophage) of the human leukemic cell line HL-60, as well as in human blood leukocytes. HL-60 granulocytes exhibited a deficiency of several LINC complex proteins (i.e. nesprin 1 giant, nesprin 2 giant, SUN1, plectin and vimentin); whereas, the macrophage state revealed nesprin 1 giant, plectin and vimentin. Both states possessed SUN2 in the nuclear envelope. Parallel differences were observed with some of the LINC complex proteins in isolated human blood leukocytes, including macrophage cells derived from blood monocytes. The present study documenting the paucity of LINC complex proteins in granulocytic forms, in combination with previous data on granulocyte nuclear shape and nuclear envelope composition, suggest the hypothesis that these adaptations evolved to facilitate granulocyte cellular malleability. PMID:19019491

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-dependent enhancement of adherence-mediated chemiluminescence response of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Dwenger, A; Schweitzer, G; Funck, M

    1988-01-01

    Adherence of resting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to nylon fibre increased the chemiluminescence response (CL) from 99,400 to 910,300 cpm/25,000 PMNL. This effect could be amplified by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) priming of granulocytes in a dose-dependent fashion. The results of nylon fibre adherence experiments suggest an in vitro model that might approximate certain conditions of in vivo PMNL-endothelial adherence and respiratory burst activation, and these reactions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes may contribute to the pathomechanisms of the Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome. PMID:3213589

  4. APPLICATION OF PROTEOMICS TO NEUTROPHIL BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Luerman, Gregory C.; Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils are a primary effector cell of the innate immune system and contribute to the development of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils participate in both the initiation and resolution of inflammatory responses through a series of highly coordinated molecular and phenotypic changes. To accomplish these changes, neutrophils express numerous receptors and use multiple overlapping and redundant signal transduction pathways. Dysregulation of the activation or resolution pathways plays a role in a number of human diseases. A comprehensive understanding of the regulation of neutrophil responses can be provided by high throughput proteomic technologies and sophisticated computational analysis. The first steps in the application of proteomics to understanding neutrophil biology have been taken. Here we review the application of expression, structural, and functional proteomic studies to neutrophils. Although defining the complex molecular events associated with neutrophil activation is in the early stages, the data generated to date suggest that proteomic technologies will dramatically enhance our understanding of neutrophil biology. PMID:19580889

  5. Giardia duodenalis Infection Reduces Granulocyte Infiltration in an In Vivo Model of Bacterial Toxin-Induced Colitis and Attenuates Inflammation in Human Intestinal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, James A.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L. Patrick; Hirota, Simon A.; Beck, Paul L.; Buret, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn’s disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  6. [Effect of drugs on granulocyte motility].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, D; Morenz, J

    1985-01-01

    The in-vitro influence of drugs on the chemokinesis and chemotaxis of neutrophils was investigated in order to prevent additional drug-induced motility impairment of cells in cases of already existing host defense disorders and for an eventual specific treatment of motility defects. Granulocyte motility is unimpaired by penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, streptomycin, nystatin, and cyclophosphamide. The chemokinesis and chemotaxis of neutrophils are inhibited by erythromycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, chloramphenicol, hydrocortisone, g-strophanthin, digoxin, and digitoxin and in higher concentrations also by sulfonamides, gentamycin, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, dexamethasone, and phenylbutazone. Chemotaxis is selectively or rather more inhibited than chemokinesis by amphotericin B, griseofulvin, vinblastine++, trifluoperazine, and promethazine. Granulocyte motility is, however, stimulated by ascorbic acid, potassium thiocyanate, levamisole, lithium, and metofenazate. PMID:3161313

  7. Increased FasL expression correlates with apoptotic changes in granulocytes cultured with oxidized clozapine

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Zaheed; Almeciga, Ingrid; Delgado, Julio C.; Clavijo, Olga P.; Castro, Januario E.; Belalcazar, Viviana; Pinto, Clara; Zuniga, Joaquin; Romero, Viviana; Yunis, Edmond J. . E-mail: edmond_yunis@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-08-01

    Clozapine has been associated with a 1% incidence of agranulocytosis. The formation of an oxidized intermediate clozapine metabolite has been implicated in direct polymorphonuclear (PMN) toxicity. We utilized two separate systems to analyze the role of oxidized clozapine in inducing apoptosis in treated cells. Human PMN cells incubated with clozapine (0-10 {mu}M) in the presence of 0.1 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} demonstrated a progressive decrease of surface CD16 expression along with increased apoptosis. RT-PCR analysis showed decreased CD16 but increased FasL gene expression in clozapine-treated PMN cells. No change in constitutive Fas expression was observed in treated cells. In HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with retinoic acid (RA), a similar increase in FasL expression, but no associated changes in CD16 gene expression, was observed following clozapine treatments. Our results demonstrate increased FasL gene expression in oxidized clozapine-induced apoptotic neutrophils suggesting that apoptosis in granulocytes treated with clozapine involves Fas/FasL interaction that initiates a cascade of events leading to clozapine-induced agranulocytosis.

  8. Animal Models of Human Granulocyte Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Klein, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to understand basic biological pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This manuscript addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  9. Neutrophil ageing is regulated by the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dachuan; Chen, Grace; Manwani, Deepa; Mortha, Arthur; Xu, Chunliang; Faith, Jeremiah J; Burk, Robert D; Kunisaki, Yuya; Jang, Jung-Eun; Scheiermann, Christoph; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S

    2015-09-24

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils provide immune protection against pathogens, but may also promote tissue injury in inflammatory diseases. Although neutrophils are generally considered to be a relatively homogeneous population, evidence for heterogeneity is emerging. Under steady-state conditions, neutrophil heterogeneity may arise from ageing and replenishment by newly released neutrophils from the bone marrow. Aged neutrophils upregulate CXCR4, a receptor allowing their clearance in the bone marrow, with feedback inhibition of neutrophil production via the IL-17/G-CSF axis, and rhythmic modulation of the haematopoietic stem-cell niche. The aged subset also expresses low levels of L-selectin. Previous studies have suggested that in vitro-aged neutrophils exhibit impaired migration and reduced pro-inflammatory properties. Here, using in vivo ageing analyses in mice, we show that neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity correlates positively with their ageing whilst in circulation. Aged neutrophils represent an overly active subset exhibiting enhanced αMβ2 integrin activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation under inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil ageing is driven by the microbiota via Toll-like receptor and myeloid differentiation factor 88-mediated signalling pathways. Depletion of the microbiota significantly reduces the number of circulating aged neutrophils and dramatically improves the pathogenesis and inflammation-related organ damage in models of sickle-cell disease or endotoxin-induced septic shock. These results identify a role for the microbiota in regulating a disease-promoting neutrophil subset. PMID:26374999

  10. Adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to endothelium enhances the efficiency of detoxification of oxygen-free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, R. L.; Robinson, J. M.; Karnovsky, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes can produce active oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide under various conditions. Because these substances can be toxic to cells, it is possible that the interaction between the circulating leukocytes and the blood vessel wall, either in normal circulation or during the acute inflammatory response, could damage the endothelial lining. Using an in vitro system of cultured endothelial cells and isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we have measured the levels of detectable superoxide when neutrophils are attached to either endothelial monolayers or to plastic. Our results show that the levels of superoxide, on a per-cell basis, are lower when the neutrophils are attached to endothelium than when attached to plastic, even if the neutrophils are stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. This is also reflected in data showing that no injury occurs to the endothelial cells, as measured by 51Cr release, under these same conditions. When endothelial cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase, diethyldithiocarbamate, the levels of superoxide detected are the same for neutrophils stimulated on plastic and those on the endothelial monolayer, suggesting that endothelial superoxide dismutase may remove a portion of the neutrophil-generated superoxide from the detection system. Further evidence for the role of endothelium in destroying superoxide is suggested by results that show that the level of detectable superoxide released from neutrophils attached to formalin-fixed endothelial monolayers is the same as that for neutrophils attached to plastic. It is important to note that with the inhibitor of superoxide dismutase present, the endothelial monolayers do not display enhanced 51Cr release under the conditions employed. When both endothelial catalase and glutathione reductase are inhibited, we detect increased 51Cr release from endothelial cells in response to stimulated neutrophils. Our results show that

  11. Comparative oxidation of loxapine and clozapine by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jegouzo, A; Gressier, B; Frimat, B; Brunet, C; Dine, T; Luyckx, M; Kouach, M; Cazin, M; Cazin, J C

    1999-01-01

    The clozapine-induced agranulocytosis could be due to the formation of a reactive intermediate formed in polymorphonuclear neutrophils and granulocyte precursors with the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide system. On the contrary, no case of agranulocytosis has been described for loxapine, an other neuroleptic drug with a very close structural analogy. We have compared the clozapine and loxapine interaction with the oxidative burst and particularly with this enzymatic complex. On the one hand, the assay of the oxidative species demonstrated a different impact for the two neuroleptics. The 50% inhibitory concentration was 92 microM for hydrogen peroxide and 40 microM for hypochlorous acid for loxapine. The loxapine target is located before the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide system in the oxidative stream, whereas clozapine diverts the chlorination pathway of the enzyme. On the other hand, the in vitro metabolism of drugs by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide system has been investigated by mass spectrometry. Loxapine remains inert but clozapine undergoes the oxidation. The glutathione or ascorbate addition in the medium leads to a removal of the oxidation. Glutathione is able to trap the toxic intermediate and could avoid its formation. PMID:10027097

  12. Quantitative investigations of the adhesiveness of circulating polymorphonuclear leucocytes to blood vessel walls

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Anne; Born, G. V. R.

    1972-01-01

    1. A new simple method is described for quantitating the adhesiveness of circulating polymorphonuclear leucocytes, or granulocytes, to the walls of blood vessels. The cheek pouch of anaesthetized hamsters or a small part of the mesentery of anaesthetized mice were prepared for continuous microscopic observation of selected venules. Those granulocytes which moved sufficiently slowly to be individually visible were counted for 1 or 2 min periods as they rolled past a selected point on one side of a vessel. The velocity distribution of these cells was determined by analysing films. Films were used also to measure mean blood flow velocity in the venules by observing embolizing platelet thrombi induced by the iontophoretic application of adenosine diphosphate. Emigration of granulocytes into the tissues was quantitated by enumerating them in standard areas of stained histological sections. 2. In control experiments with hamster cheek pouch venules, the rolling granulocyte count usually passed through a maximum shortly after the preparation was set up and then fell to a low constant value. In mouse mesentery venules the count remained at a low approximately constant value from the beginning for at least 3 hr. 3. The mean velocity of blood flow in the venules was between 900 and 200 μ/sec. All rolling granulocytes moved much more slowly; in hamster cheek pouch venules the mean velocity was about 20 μ/sec and in mouse mesentery venules about 10 μ/sec. Around these means the velocity distribution of individual cells was narrow. 4. Rolling of granulocytes was abolished by superfusing ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (EDTA, 0·1 M) suggesting that the phenomenon depends on calcium or magnesium ions. 5. Agents were applied locally to the observed venules. Human serum albumin, trypsin or histamine in high concentrations did not affect the rolling granulocyte count. 6. The rolling granulocyte count was increased during the application of Hammarsten casein or Escherichia coli

  13. Proteome Mapping of Adult Zebrafish Marrow Neutrophils Reveals Partial Cross Species Conservation to Human Peripheral Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sethi, Sachin; Aravamudhan, Sriram; Krüger, Marcus; Grabher, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes are pivotal cells within the first line of host defense of the innate immune system. In this study, we have used a gel-based LC-MS/MS approach to explore the proteome of primary marrow neutrophils from adult zebrafish. The identified proteins originated from all major cellular compartments. Gene ontology analysis revealed significant association of proteins with different immune-related network and pathway maps. 75% of proteins identified in neutrophils were identified in neutrophils only when compared to neutrophil-free brain tissue. Moreover, cross-species comparison with human peripheral blood neutrophils showed partial conservation of immune-related proteins between human and zebrafish. This study provides the first zebrafish neutrophil proteome and may serve as a valuable resource for an understanding of neutrophil biology and innate immunity. PMID:24019943

  14. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh G-CSF) on murine resistance against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Serushago, B A; Yoshikai, Y; Handa, T; Mitsuyama, M; Muramori, K; Nomoto, K

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh G-CSF) enhanced resistance of mice against Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as determined by survival and bacterial growth. Mice pretreated with rh G-CSF twice daily for 5 days survived better than untreated animals to the challenge with LM. Number of bacteria in peritoneal cavity (PC) and spleen was lower in treated mice than that in the control group. Rh G-CSF increased mainly polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in blood and spleen. After LM inoculation, a larger number of PMN and monocyte-macrophages accumulated in PC and spleen of tested mice. In addition, PMN primed in vivo with rh G-CSF released more superoxide anions when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. The inhibition of bacterial growth in PC and spleen could be ascribed to the accumulation of phagocytic cells at the infection sites and the increased oxidative metabolism. The results provided further evidence of the important contribution of G-CSF and neutrophils, as target cells, to the host defence against the intracellular bacteria. PMID:1374055

  15. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  16. Evasion of Neutrophil Killing by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Will A.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of infections, ranging from self-resolving skin infections to severe or fatal pneumonia. Human innate immune cells, called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils), are essential for defense against S. aureus infections. Neutrophils are the most prominent cell type of the innate immune system and are capable of producing non-specific antimicrobial molecules that are effective at eliminating bacteria. Although significant progress has been made over the past few decades, our knowledge of S. aureus-host innate immune system interactions is incomplete. Most notably, S. aureus has the capacity to produce numerous molecules that are directed to protect the bacterium from neutrophils. Here we review in brief the role played by neutrophils in defense against S. aureus infection, and correspondingly, highlight selected S. aureus molecules that target key neutrophil functions. PMID:26999220

  17. Evasion of Neutrophil Killing by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Will A; Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of infections, ranging from self-resolving skin infections to severe or fatal pneumonia. Human innate immune cells, called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils), are essential for defense against S. aureus infections. Neutrophils are the most prominent cell type of the innate immune system and are capable of producing non-specific antimicrobial molecules that are effective at eliminating bacteria. Although significant progress has been made over the past few decades, our knowledge of S. aureus-host innate immune system interactions is incomplete. Most notably, S. aureus has the capacity to produce numerous molecules that are directed to protect the bacterium from neutrophils. Here we review in brief the role played by neutrophils in defense against S. aureus infection, and correspondingly, highlight selected S. aureus molecules that target key neutrophil functions. PMID:26999220

  18. Multipotent hematopoietic cell lines derived from C/EBPalpha(-/-) knockout mice display granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte- colony-stimulating factor, and retinoic acid-induced granulocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Collins, S J; Ulmer, J; Purton, L E; Darlington, G

    2001-10-15

    The transcription factor C/EBPalpha is an important mediator of granulocyte differentiation and regulates the expression of multiple granulocyte-specific genes including the granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor, neutrophil elastase, and myeloperoxidase. Indeed C/EBPalpha knockout mice display a profound block in granulocyte differentiation. To study this block in granulocytic differentiation in more detail, retroviral vector-mediated transduction of a dominant-negative retinoic acid receptor was used to establish hematopoietic growth factor-dependent, lympho-myeloid progenitor cell lines from the fetal livers of both the C/EBPalpha knockout animals (C/EBPalpha(-/-)) and their heterozygous littermates (C/EBPalpha(+/-)). Surprisingly, the C/EBPalpha(-/-) cell lines displayed significant spontaneous granulocytic differentiation, and this differentiation was markedly enhanced when the cells were stimulated with granulocyte macrophage (GM)-CSF. This GM-CSF-mediated differentiation was associated with the up-regulation of G-CSF receptor mRNA, and the combination of GM-CSF and G-CSF generated more than 95% mature neutrophils in the C/EBPalpha(-/-) cultures. The addition of all-trans retinoic acid also enhanced this granulocytic differentiation of the cultured C/EBPalpha(-/-) cells, indicating that the activated retinoic acid receptors can enhance granulocytic differentiation through a molecular pathway that is independent of C/EBPalpha. These studies clearly indicate that terminal granulocytic differentiation associated with the up-regulation of C/EBPalpha-responsive genes can occur in the absence of C/EBPalpha, and they indicate the existence of multiple independent molecular pathways potentially used by primitive hematopoietic precursors that can lead to the development of mature granulocytes. PMID:11588034

  19. Animal models of human granulocyte diseases.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Alejandro A; Klein, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to the understanding of basic biologic pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This article addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish, and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  20. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration via P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important for inflammation in addition to thrombosis. Platelets promote the adhesion of neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)] to the endothelium; P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1 have been suggested to participate in these i...

  1. Epidemiology and control of human granulocytic anaplasmosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongtao; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan; Qian, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Granulocytic anaplasmosis caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging tick-borne zoonosis worldwide. The obligate intracellular pathogen is transmitted by Ixodes ticks and infects neutrophils in humans and animals, resulting in clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic seroconversion to mild, severe, or fatal disease. Since the initial description of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) in the United States in 1990, HGA has been increasingly recognized in America, Europe, and Asia. This review describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of HGA and provides background information on the potential vectors and reservoirs of A. phagocytophilum. PMID:22217177

  2. Neutrophil ageing is regulated by the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dachuan; Chen, Grace; Manwani, Deepa; Mortha, Arthur; Xu, Chunliang; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Burk, Robert D.; Kunisaki, Yuya; Jang, Jung-Eun; Scheiermann, Christoph; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils provide immune protection against pathogens but also may promote tissue injury in inflammatory diseases1,2. Although neutrophils are generally considered as a relatively homogeneous population, evidence for heterogeneity is emerging3,4. Under steady-state conditions, neutrophil heterogeneity may arise from ageing and the replenishment by newly released neutrophils from the bone marrow5. Aged neutrophils up-regulate CXCR4, a receptor allowing their clearance in the bone marrow6,7, with feedback inhibition of neutrophil production via the IL17/G-CSF axis8, and rhythmic modulation of the haematopoietic stem cell niche5. The aged subset also expresses low levels of L-selectin (CD62L)5,9. Previous studies have suggested that in vitro-aged neutrophils exhibit impaired migration and reduced pro-inflammatory properties6,10. Here, we show using in vivo ageing analyses that the neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity correlates positively with their ageing in the circulation. Aged neutrophils represent an overly active subset exhibiting enhanced αMβ2 integrin (Mac-1) activation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation under inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil ageing is driven by the microbiota via Toll-like receptors (TLRs)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88)-mediated signalling pathways. Depletion of the microbiota significantly reduces the number of circulating aged neutrophils and dramatically improves the pathogenesis and inflammation-related organ damage in models of sickle cell disease or endotoxin-induced septic shock. These results thus identify an unprecedented role for the microbiota in regulating a disease-promoting neutrophil subset. PMID:26374999

  3. C/EBP epsilon directs granulocytic versus monocytic lineage determination and confers chemotactic function via Hlx

    PubMed Central

    Halene, Stephanie; Gaines, Peter; Sun, Hong; Zibello, Theresa; Lin, Sharon; Khanna-Gupta, Arati; Williams, Simon C.; Perkins, Archibald; Krause, Diane; Berliner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the C/EBPε gene have been identified in the cells of patients with neutrophil specific granule deficiency (SGD), a rare congenital disorder marked by recurrent bacterial infections. Their neutrophils, in addition to lacking specific granules required for normal respiratory burst activity, also lack normal phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Although the SGD phenotype has been replicated in C/EBPε−/− (KO) mice, the mechanisms by which C/EBPε mutations act to decrease neutrophil function are not entirely clear. Methods In order to determine the role of C/EBPε in neutrophil differentiation and migration, we generated immortalized progenitor cell lines from C/EBPε KO and wild type (WT) mice and performed expression and flow cytometric analysis and functional studies. Results Expression of lineage specific cell surface antigens on our in vitro differentiated cell lines revealed persistent expression of monocytic markers on KO granulocytes. We verified this in primary murine peripheral blood and bone marrow cells. In addition, KO BM had an increase in immature myeloid precursors at the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) and granulocyte monocyte progenitor (GMP) level suggesting a critical role for C/EBPε not only in granulocyte maturation beyond the promyelocyte stage, but also in the monocyte/granulocyte lineage decision. We found that restoration of Hlx (H2.0-like homeo box 1) expression, which was decreased in C/EBPε KO cells, rescued chemotaxis, but not the other defects of C/EBPε KO neutrophils. Summary We show two new regulatory functions of C/EBPε in myelopoiesis: in the absence of C/EBPε, there is not only incomplete differentiation of granulocytes, but myelopoiesis is disrupted with the appearance of an intermediate cell type with monocyte and granulocyte features, and the neutrophils have abnormal chemotaxis. Restoration of expression of Hlx provides partial recovery of function; it has no effect on neutrophil maturation, but can

  4. A variable immunoreceptor in a subpopulation of human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Puellmann, Kerstin; Kaminski, Wolfgang E.; Vogel, Mandy; Nebe, C. Thomas; Schroeder, Josef; Wolf, Hans; Beham, Alexander W.

    2006-01-01

    Neutrophils are thought to rely solely on nonspecific immune mechanisms. Here we provide molecular biological, immunological, ultrastructural, and functional evidence for the presence of a T cell receptor (TCR)-based variable immunoreceptor in a 5–8% subpopulation of human neutrophils. We demonstrate that these peripheral blood neutrophils express variable and individual-specific TCRαβ repertoires and the RAG1/RAG2 recombinase complex. The proinflammatory cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor regulates expression of the neutrophil immunoreceptor and RAG1/RAG2 in vivo. Specific engagement of the neutrophil TCR complex protects from apoptosis and stimulates secretion of the neutrophil-activating chemokine IL-8. Our results, which also demonstrate the presence of the TCR in murine neutrophils, suggest the coexistence of a variable and an innate host defense system in mammalian neutrophils. PMID:16983085

  5. Purification of myeloperoxidase from equine polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mathy-Hartert, M; Bourgeois, E; Grülke, S; Deby-Dupont, G; Caudron, I; Deby, C; Lamy, M; Serteyn, D

    1998-01-01

    Increases of plasma concentrations of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) can be used as markers of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) activation in pathological situations (sepsis, acute lung injury, acute inflammation). To develop an assay for measurement of plasma MPO in horses during the above-mentioned infectious and inflammatory conditions, MPO was purified from equine PMN isolated from blood anticoagulated with citrate. PMN were extracted in a saline milieu (0.2 M Na acetate, 1 M NaCl, pH 4.7) to eliminate most of cellular proteins. Pellets were then extracted in the same buffer containing cationic detergent (1% cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide). The supernatant was further purified by ion exchange chromatography (Hiload S Sepharose HP column 0.5 x 26 cm, equilibrated with 25 mM Na acetate, 0.2 M NaCl, pH 4.7) with a NaCl gradient (until 1 M). Most of the peroxidase activity of MPO (spectrophotometrically measured by the oxidation of orthodianisidine by hydrogen peroxide) was eluted at 0.65 M NaCl. MPO was further purified by gel filtration chromatography (Sephacryl S 200 column 2.6 x 42 cm with 25 mM Na acetate, 0.2 M NaCl, pH 4.7). MPO (specific activity: 74.3 U/mg) was obtained with a yield of 30% from the detergent extraction supernatant. Electrophoresis (non-reducing conditions) showed 3 bands identified, by comparison with human MPO, (i) the mature tetrameric enzyme (150 kDa) with 2 light and 2 heavy subunits, (ii) the precursor form (88 kDa) and (iii) a form of the heavy subunit without the prosthetic heme group (40 kDa). The mature enzyme and its precursor were glycosylated and possessed peroxidase activity. Equine MPO showed strong similarities with human and bovine MPO, with an absorption peak at 430 nm (Soret peak) characteristic of ferrimyeloperoxidase. Enzymatic activity was pH dependent (optimal value at pH 5.5). Images Figure 1. PMID:9553712

  6. Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Gaowa; Wuritu; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Wu, Dongxing; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Chiya, Seizou; Fukunaga, Kazutoshi; Funato, Toyohiko; Shiojiri, Masaaki; Nakajima, Hideki; Hamauzu, Yoshiji; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ando, Shuji; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively confirmed 2 cases of human Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection. Patient blood samples contained unique p44/msp2 for the pathogen, and antibodies bound to A. phagocytophilum antigens propagated in THP-1 rather than HL60 cells. Unless both cell lines are used for serodiagnosis of rickettsiosis-like infections, cases of human granulocytic anaplasmosis could go undetected. PMID:23460988

  7. Uptake of antibiotics by human polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, W.L.; King-Thompson, N.L. , Decatur, GA )

    1990-06-01

    Enucleated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cytoplasts), which have no nuclei and only a few granules, retain many of the functions of intact neutrophils. To better define the mechanisms and intracellular sites of antimicrobial agent accumulation in human neutrophils, we studied the antibiotic uptake process in PMN cytoplasts. Entry of eight radiolabeled antibiotics into PMN cytoplasts was determined by means of a velocity gradient centrifugation technique. Uptakes of these antibiotics by cytoplasts were compared with our findings in intact PMN. Penicillin entered both intact PMN and cytoplasts poorly. Metronidazole achieved a concentration in cytoplasts (and PMN) equal to or somewhat less than the extracellular concentration. Chloramphenicol, a lipid-soluble drug, and trimethoprim were concentrated three- to fourfold by cytoplasts. An unusual finding was that trimethroprim, unlike other tested antibiotics, was accumulated by cytoplasts more readily at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. After an initial rapid association with cytoplasts, cell-associated imipenem declined progressively with time. Clindamycin and two macrolide antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin) were concentrated 7- to 14-fold by cytoplasts. This indicates that cytoplasmic granules are not essential for accumulation of these drugs. Adenosine inhibited cytoplast uptake of clindamycin, which enters intact phagocytic cells by the membrane nucleoside transport system. Roxithromycin uptake by cytoplasts was inhibited by phagocytosis, which may reduce the number of cell membrane sites available for the transport of macrolides. These studies have added to our understanding of uptake mechanisms for antibiotics which are highly concentrated in phagocytes.

  8. Ectopic expression of interferon regulatory factor-1 potentiates granulocytic differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, E M; Stellacci, E; Valtieri, M; Masella, B; Feccia, T; Marziali, G; Hiscott, J; Testa, U; Peschle, C; Battistini, A

    2001-01-01

    Numerous transcription factors allow haematopoietic cells to respond to lineage- and stage-specific cytokines and to act as their effectors. It is increasingly evident that the interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) transcription factor can selectively regulate different sets of genes depending on the cell type and/or the nature of cellular stimuli, evoking distinct responses in each. In the present study, we investigated mechanisms underlying the differentiation-inducing properties of granulocytic colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and whether IRF transcription factors are functionally relevant in myeloid differentiation. Both normal human progenitors and murine 32Dcl3 myeloblasts induced to differentiate along the granulocytic pathway showed an up-regulation of IRF-1 expression. Ectopic expression of IRF-1 did not abrogate the growth factor requirement of 32Dcl3 cells, although a small percentage of cells that survived cytokine deprivation differentiated fully to neutrophils. Moreover, in the presence of G-CSF, granulocytic differentiation of IRF-1-expressing cells was accelerated, as assessed by morphology and expression of specific differentiation markers. Down-modulation of c-Myb protein and direct stimulation of lysozyme promoter activity by IRF-1 were also observed. Conversely, constitutive expression of IRF-2, a repressor of IRF-1 transcriptional activity, completely abrogated the G-CSF-induced neutrophilic maturation. We conclude that IRF-1 exerts a pivotal role in granulocytic differentiation and that its induction by G-CSF represents a limiting step in the early events of differentiation. PMID:11716756

  9. Cytophotometry of granulocytes in chronic granulocytic leukaemia patients. Part II. Effects of chemotherapy on cell kinetics and cytochemical parameters of granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, V M; Lishmanova, N G; Khoroshko, N D; Alieva, T M; Kozinets, G I

    1987-01-01

    A successful course of chemotherapy (myelosan or combined regimens) results in a two to eight fold decrease of the percentage of S + G2 cells in the bone marrow and peripheral blood and in the restoration of normal morphometric and cytochemical patterns of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the chronic phase of CGL. In those patients of the chronic phase not responding to chemotherapy and in blast crisis the proportion of S + G2 cells did not change after a course of chemotherapy. Cytostatic drugs killed cells in all phases of the cell cycle. The initial response to chemotherapy was a slight increase of the proportion of S + G2 cells in peripheral blood, apparently as a result of the block in cell cycle transition which was followed by a rapid drop of S + G2 proportion. During chemotherapy such phenomena as an appearance of tetraploid mature neutrophils and of aneuploid clones were occasionally observed. PMID:2448197

  10. [Neutrophilic dermatosis in ulcerative colitis occurring in advanced age].

    PubMed

    López Maldonado, M D; Calvo Catalá, J; Ronda Gasulla, A; Hortelano Martínez, E; Herrera Ballester, A; Febrer Bosch, I

    1994-08-01

    The Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND) is considered as an independent entity with diverse clinical manifestations among which there are: gangrenous pyoderma, nodous erythema, Sweets Syndrome, vesiculopustula eruptions associated to ulcerous colitis and intestinal short circuit syndrome with or without short circuit. Histologically, they are characterized by infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, generally at the dermic level, but also at the epidermic. They are usually associated to systemic diseases, especially to chronic intestinal inflammatory disease. Our aim was to describe two forms of clinical presentation of neutrophilic dermatosis: gangrenous pyoderma and vesiculopustula eruption, associated to ulcerous colitis starting at advances ages. PMID:7772690

  11. Contributions of neutrophils to the adaptive immune response in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, Kathryn M; Liu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are granulocytic cytotoxic leukocytes of the innate immune system that activate during acute inflammation. Neutrophils can also persist beyond the acute phase of inflammation to impact the adaptive immune response during chronic inflammation. In the context of the autoimmune disease, neutrophils modulating T and B cell functions by producing cytokines and chemokines, forming neutrophil extracellular traps, and acting as or priming antigen presentation cells. Thus, neutrophils are actively involved in chronic inflammation and tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Using rheumatoid arthritis as an example, this review focuses on functions of neutrophils in adaptive immunity and the therapeutic potential of these cells in the treatment of autoimmune disease and chronic inflammation. PMID:27042404

  12. Interaction of the two components of leukocidin from Staphylococcus aureus with human polymorphonuclear leukocyte membranes: sequential binding and subsequent activation.

    PubMed Central

    Colin, D A; Mazurier, I; Sire, S; Finck-Barbançon, V

    1994-01-01

    The sequential interaction between the two components S and F of leukocidin from Staphylococcus aureus and the membrane of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils has been investigated in the presence of 1 mM Ca2+. With 125I-labeled components, it has been shown that binding of the F component occurred only after binding of the S component. The kinetic constants of binding of both components were not statistically different (Kd, approximately 5 nM; Bm, approximately 35,000 molecules per cell), and both Hill coefficients were 1. The application of increasing concentrations of leukocidin provoked a dose-dependent secretion of the granule content, as determined by hexosaminidase and lysozyme activity measurements. Furthermore, the separate perfusion of S and F components on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils deposited on a filter induced secretion of the granules content only when the perfusion of the S component preceded that of the F component. We conclude, therefore, that (i) S-component binding is a prerequisite for F-component binding and for subsequent activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and (ii) there is a specific binding site for the S component in the plasma membrane. PMID:8039887

  13. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  14. Impaired killing of Candida albicans by granulocytes mobilized for transfusion purposes: a role for granule components

    PubMed Central

    Gazendam, Roel P.; van de Geer, Annemarie; van Hamme, John L.; Tool, Anton T.J.; van Rees, Dieke J.; Aarts, Cathelijn E.M.; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van Alphen, Floris; Verkuijlen, Paul; Meijer, Alexander B.; Janssen, Hans; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are used to treat neutropenic patients with life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections that do not respond to anti-microbial drugs. Donor neutrophils that have been mobilized with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone are functional in terms of antibacterial activity, but less is known about their fungal killing capacity. We investigated the neutrophil-mediated cytotoxic response against C. albicans and A. fumigatus in detail. Whereas G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils appeared less mature as compared to neutrophils from untreated controls, these cells exhibited normal ROS production by the NADPH oxidase system and an unaltered granule mobilization capacity upon stimulation. G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils efficiently inhibited A. fumigatus germination and killed Aspergillus and Candida hyphae, but the killing of C. albicans yeasts was distinctly impaired. Following normal Candida phagocytosis, analysis by mass spectrometry of purified phagosomes after fusion with granules demonstrated that major constituents of the antimicrobial granule components, including major basic protein (MBP), were reduced. Purified MBP showed candidacidal activity, and neutrophil-like Crisp-Cas9 NB4-KO-MBP differentiated into phagocytes were impaired in Candida killing. Together, these findings indicate that G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils for transfusion purposes have a selectively impaired capacity to kill Candida yeasts, as a consequence of an altered neutrophil granular content. PMID:26802050

  15. Impaired killing of Candida albicans by granulocytes mobilized for transfusion purposes: a role for granule components.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; van Rees, Dieke J; Aarts, Cathelijn E M; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van Alphen, Floris; Verkuijlen, Paul; Meijer, Alexander B; Janssen, Hans; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are used to treat neutropenic patients with life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections that do not respond to anti-microbial drugs. Donor neutrophils that have been mobilized with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone are functional in terms of antibacterial activity, but less is known about their fungal killing capacity. We investigated the neutrophil-mediated cytotoxic response against C. albicans and A. fumigatus in detail. Whereas G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils appeared less mature as compared to neutrophils from untreated controls, these cells exhibited normal ROS production by the NADPH oxidase system and an unaltered granule mobilization capacity upon stimulation. G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils efficiently inhibited A. fumigatus germination and killed Aspergillus and Candida hyphae, but the killing of C. albicans yeasts was distinctly impaired. Following normal Candida phagocytosis, analysis by mass spectrometry of purified phagosomes after fusion with granules demonstrated that major constituents of the antimicrobial granule components, including major basic protein (MBP), were reduced. Purified MBP showed candidacidal activity, and neutrophil-like Crisp-Cas9 NB4-KO-MBP differentiated into phagocytes were impaired in Candida killing. Together, these findings indicate that G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils for transfusion purposes have a selectively impaired capacity to kill Candida yeasts, as a consequence of an altered neutrophil granular content. PMID:26802050

  16. Granulocyte-associated IgG in neutropenic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Passero, F.; Guerry, D.; Bina, M.; Dusak, B.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    We applied a radiolabeled antiglobulin test to a study of patients with a variety of neutropenic disorders. After defining the nature of the interaction of radiolabeled anti-IgG with the neutrophil, we studied 16 patients with neutropenia of uncertain etiology and adequate bone marrow granulocyte precursors. Twelve of these 16 patients had increased neutrophil-associated IgG (PMN-IgG). Patients with the highest levels of PMN-IgG had the lowest neutrophil counts. The majority of patients with neutropenia and increased PMN-IgG had an underlying immunologic disorder that included immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 5 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in 1 patient. In some patients, elevated PMN-IgG preceded other evidence for immunologic disease. The direct antiglobulin test helped to distinguish neutropenic patients with increased PMN-IgG both from patients with neutropenia due to a known nonimmune disorder and from nonneutropenic patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosis. Each of four patients with increased neutrophil-associated IgG treated with systemic corticosteroids responded clinically with an associated fall in neutrophil IgG and a rise in the circulating neutrophil count. The radiolabeled antiglobulin test appears useful in defining a subpopulation of patients with neutropenia due to an underlying immunologic disorder.

  17. Granulocyte-associated IgG in neutropenic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Passero, F.; Guerry, D. IV; Bina, M.; Dusak, B.; Schreiber, A.D

    1982-01-01

    We applied a radiolabeled antiglobulin test to a study of patients with a variety of neutropenic disorders. After defining the nature of the interaction of radiolabeled anti-IgG with the neutrophil, we studied 16 patients with neutropenia of uncertain etiology and adequate bone marrow granulocyte precursors. Twelve of these 16 patients had increased neutrophil-associated IgG (PMN-IgG). Patients with the highest levels of PMN-IgG had the lowest neutrophil counts. The majority of patients with neutropenia and increased PMN-IgG had an underlying immunologic disorder that included immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 5 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in 1 patient. In some patients, elevated PMN-IgG preceded other evidence for immunologic disease. The direct antiglobulin test helped to distinguish neutropenic patients with increased PMN-IgG both from patients with neutropenia due to a known nonimmune disorder and from noneutropenic patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosis. Each of four patients with increased neutrophil-associated IgG treated with systemic corticosteroids responded clinically with an associated fall in neutrophil IgG and a rise in the circulating neutrophil count. The radiolabeled antiglobulin test appears useful in defining a subpopulation of patients with neutropenia due to an underlying immunologic disorder.

  18. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Neutrophil Priming by PAF.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Elaine N; Neves, Anne C D; Santos, Karina C; Uribe, Carlos E; Souza, Paulo E N; Correa, José R; Castro, Mariana S; Fontes, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the main cells of the innate immunity inflammatory response. Several factors can activate or stimulate neutrophils, including platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid mediator. Some authors consider the activation induced by PAF priming because it triggers limited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and it amplifies the response of the cell to a subsequent activator. The stimulation is reversible, which is critical for modulating the inflammatory response. Exacerbated inflammatory responses lead to serious diseases, such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), among others. Characterizing the stimulation of neutrophils during the possible reversion or prevention of an exaggerated inflammatory response is critical for the development of control strategies. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to identify 36 proteins that differ in abundance between quiescent neutrophils and PAFstimulated neutrophils. The identified proteins were associated with increased DNA repair processes, calcium flux, protein transcription, cytoskeleton alterations that facilitate migration and degranulation, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines and proteins that modulate the inflammatory response. Some of the identified proteins have not been previously reported in neutrophils. PMID:26631175

  20. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF NEUTROPHILS AND EOSINOPHILS GRANULES IN SAPPHIRE MINKS].

    PubMed

    Uzenbaeva, L B; Kizhina, A G; Ilyukha, V A

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that sapphire minks have abnormality of subcellular structure of blood and bone marrow neutrophils and eosinophils. The abnormality consists in forming of abnormal "giant" granules. The si- ze and the number of abnormal granules significantly change during maturation of leucocytes in bone marrow. We have found differences between abnormal granules forming in neutrophils and eosinophils that depend on the maturing stage and the cells life cycle duration as well as morphofunctional features of these granulocytes. PMID:26863773

  1. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  2. Circulating granulocyte lifespan in compensated alcohol-related cirrhosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Farahi, Neda; Heard, Sarah; Chilvers, Edwin R; Verma, Sumita; Peters, Adrien M

    2016-09-01

    Although granulocyte dysfunction is known to occur in cirrhosis, in vivo studies of granulocyte lifespan have not previously been performed. The normal circulating granulocyte survival half-time (G - t½), determined using indium-111 ((111)In)-radiolabeled granulocytes, is ~7 h. In this pilot study, we aimed to measure the in vivo G - t½ in compensated alcohol-related cirrhosis. Sequential venous blood samples were obtained in abstinent subjects with alcohol-related cirrhosis over 24 h post injection (PI) of minimally manipulated (111)In-radiolabeled autologous mixed leukocytes. Purified granulocytes were isolated from each sample using a magnetic microbead-antibody technique positively selecting for the marker CD15. Granulocyte-associated radioactivity was expressed relative to peak activity, plotted over time, and G - t½ estimated from data up to 12 h PI This was compared with normal neutrophil half-time (N - t½), determined using a similar method specifically selecting neutrophils in healthy controls at a collaborating center. Seven patients with cirrhosis (six male, aged 57.8 ± 9.4 years, all Child-Pugh class A) and seven normal controls (three male, 64.4 ± 5.6 years) were studied. Peripheral blood neutrophil counts were similar in both groups (4.6 (3.5 - 5.5) × 10(9)/L vs. 2.8 (2.7 - 4.4) × 10(9)/L, respectively, P = 0.277). G - t½ in cirrhosis was significantly lower than N - t½ in controls (2.7 ± 0.5 h vs. 4.4 ± 1.0 h, P = 0.007). Transient rises in granulocyte and neutrophil-associated activities occurred in four patients from each group, typically earlier in cirrhosis (4-6 h PI) than in controls (8-10 h), suggesting recirculation of radiolabeled cells released from an unidentified focus. Reduced in vivo granulocyte survival in compensated alcohol-related cirrhosis is a novel finding and potentially another mechanism for immune dysfunction in chronic liver disease. Larger studies are needed to

  3. Monoclonal antibodies specific for human monocytes, granulocytes and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, N; MacDonald, S; Slusarenko, M; Beverley, P C

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against antigens of human myeloid cells have been produced and thoroughly characterized in terms of their reactions with peripheral blood cells, cell lines, nine lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and the polypeptides with which they react. UCHM1 and SmO identify antigens present on the majority of blood monocytes and a variable, but lower, proportion of tissue macrophages. From their morphology and location in tissues, these cells appear to be recirculating monocytes. SMO antigen is also present on platelets. In addition, both antibodies stained endothelial cells, SMO in all tissues examined and UCHM1 variably. Biochemical investigation indicated that the UCHM1 antigen is a protein of 52,000 MW while the SMO antigen could not be indentified. The antibodies TG1 and 28 identify antigens mainly present on granulocytes. While mAb 28 reacted with neutrophils, TG1 also stained eosinophils and stained strongly a proportion of monocytes. TG1 also reacted variably with some non-haemopoietic cell lines. Both antibodies reacted predominantly with granulocytes in tissue sections. MAb TG1 precipitated a single polypeptide of 156,000 MW from monocytes and granulocytes, while mAb 28 precipitated non-convalently associated polypeptides of 83,000 and 155,000 MW from granulocytes but only a single molecule from monocytes, corresponding to the lower MW chain of 83,000. The epitope with which mAb 28 reacts appears not to be exposed on the surface of intact monocytes. This suggests that a similar or identical 83,000 MW molecule is made by both neutrophils and monocytes, but that its expression differs according to cell type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6389324

  4. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha is a regulatory switch sufficient for induction of granulocytic development from bipotential myeloid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Radomska, H S; Huettner, C S; Zhang, P; Cheng, T; Scadden, D T; Tenen, D G

    1998-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) regulates a number of myeloid cell-specific genes. To delineate the role of C/EBPalpha in human granulopoiesis, we studied its expression and function in human primary cells and bipotential (granulocytic/monocytic) myeloid cell lines. We show that the expression of C/EBPalpha initiates with the commitment of multipotential precursors to the myeloid lineage, is specifically upregulated during granulocytic differentiation, and is rapidly downregulated during the alternative monocytic pathway. Conditional expression of C/EBPalpha alone in stably transfected bipotential cells triggers neutrophilic differentiation, concomitant with upregulation of the granulocyte-specific granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor and secondary granule protein genes. Moreover, induced expression of C/EBPalpha in bipotential precursors blocks their monocytic differentiation program. These results indicate that C/EBPalpha serves as a myeloid differentiation switch acting on bipotential precursors and directing them to mature to granulocytes. PMID:9632814

  5. Effects of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate ODN2216 on leukotriene synthesis in human neutrophils and neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Viryasova, Galina M; Golenkina, Ekaterina A; Galkina, Svetlana I; Gaponova, Tatjana V; Romanova, Yulia M; Sud'ina, Galina F

    2016-06-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, neutrophils) play a major role in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response, and neutrophil apoptosis is a critical step in resolving inflammation. We examined the effects of oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) species with different numbers of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate bonds on leukotriene synthesis in PMNLs and on neutrophil apoptosis. Our modifications were based on the well-known ODN2216 molecule (Krug et al., 2001). Treatment of cultured human neutrophils with ODN2216 accelerated apoptosis except in the case of a species with only phosphodiester bonds. The ODNs with poly(g) (phosphorothioate) sequences at both ends and a phosphodiester inner core had maximal effects on leukotriene synthesis in neutrophils and inhibited formation of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites. Addition of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate ODNs to PMNLs produced distinct effects on superoxide and nitric oxide formation: phosphorothioate-containing ODNs concomitantly stimulated production of nitric oxide and superoxide, which may rapidly combine to generate peroxynitrite. Altogether, our results describe strong activation of neutrophil's cellular responses by phosphorothioate ODN2216. We propose that phosphorothioate modification of ODNs represents a potential mechanism of PMNL activation. PMID:27036535

  6. Vasculitis complicating granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment of leukopenia and infection in Felty's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farhey, Y D; Herman, J H

    1995-06-01

    Recombinant myeloid growth factors have been increasingly used in recent years to combat induced and disease associated neutropenia. Their application in the management of Felty's syndrome with intercurrent infection has raised concern that resultant neutrophilia and activation of a diverse array of polymorphonuclear cell functions may have an adverse effect on the rheumatoid disease process. We describe a patient with Felty's syndrome receiving short term treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), who then developed acute renal failure in conjunction with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and presumptive gout. We address the issue of "adding fuel to the fire" and review reported implications of GCSF in induction of vasculitis. PMID:7545756

  7. Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, Johan S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a deer tick transmitted rickettsial infection caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is a common cause of undifferentiated fever in the Northeast and Upper Midwest U.S. Patients are often initially diagnosed with a mild viral infection, and illness readily resolves in most cases. However, as many as 3% may develop life threatening complications and nearly 1% die from the infection. A history of tick bite and a high degree of clinical suspicion thus warrant consideration for doxycycline treatment in both adults and children, even in the absence of known tick bite, a negative blood film examination, or pending results of specific A. phagocytophilum diagnostic tests such as paired serology or PCR on acute phase blood. Antibody tests and titers should not be used to monitor active infection as detectable antibodies can remain present for years. Moreover, persistent infection has never been reported. While co-infections with Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti occur, there is little evidence to suggest synergism of disease or a role for A. phagocytophilum in chronic illness. Preventive measures include avoiding tick-infested areas, use of tick repellents, and careful searches of skin to remove attached ticks; no vaccine is available. PMID:25999228

  8. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stephanie; Peters, Sebastian; Pitzer, Claudia; Resch, Herbert; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor. PMID:26301221

  9. Occurrence of granulocyte cytotoxins and agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Bergh, O J; Terasaki, P I; Graw, R G

    1975-01-01

    Granulocyte cytotoxic activity in sera from over 257 patients was shown to be distinct from HL-A lymphocytoxic activity. Granulocyte cytotoxins occur in approximately 25 per cent of sera from patients having leukemia, 45 per cent with aplastic anemia, 22 per cent with kidney disease on hemodialysis, and 19 per cent of pregnant women. By testing sera on the same panel of cells, the granulocyte cytotoxic activity was shown not to be associated with granulocyte agglutination activity or lymphocytotoxic acitivty. It is likely that granulocyte cytotoxins and granulocyte agglutinins will be useful in transfusion and bone marrow transplantation as a separate tool from the more widely used lymphocyte cytotoxicity reaction. PMID:1129831

  10. [Detection of anti-granulocyte antibodies using flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, T; Furihata, K; Misawa, K; Aoki, M; Kameko, M; Ichikawa, T; Okubo, Y; Ito, S; Ohto, H

    1994-03-01

    To detect anti-granulocyte antibodies (AGAs) in the sera of granulocytopenic patients is important to study the mechanism of the disease. In this report, we studied neutrophil associated immunoglobulin (NAIg) and neutrophil binding immunoglobulin (NBIg) in patients' sera using flow cytometry (FCM). We investigated the interference of circulating immune complexes (CIC) on measuring the NAIg and NBIg. No apparent effect of CIC was observed at concentrations up to 140 micrograms/ml. NAIg and NBIg were semiquantitated by determining the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) on a flow cytometer and the normal ranges of NAIg and NBIg were less than 15 RFI and less than 10 RFI, respectively. Of 100 sera from patients with neutropenia, 5 were positive for NBIg and 3 of them were positive for granulocyte-specific antibodies. One serum of a patient with benign chronic neutropenia showed clear specificity for NA1 alloantigen but the other 4 AGAs were not specific for NA alloantigen system. Our NAIg, NBIg screening procedure, including NA specificity testing of NBIg and detection of reactivity with normal lymphocytes using FCM, is simple and useful for measuring and studying serological and immunological characteristics of AGAs. PMID:8152165

  11. Cyclophosphamide induced generation of giant hypersegmented granulocytes in rat bone marrow: cell cycle distribution and silver nucleolar staining.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, V M; Pogorelov, V M; Berger, J; Kozinets, G I

    1988-01-01

    Daily injection of cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg body weight) for 7 days resulted in accumulation of 50% of rat bone marrow granulocytes in G2. Tetraploid neutrophils were hypersegmented (7.25 +/- 0.33) in comparison with diploid ones (3.92 +/- 0.33). After 14 days of cyclophosphamide treatment tetraploid hypersegmented neutrophils could be found in peripheral blood. Diploid neutrophils in these animals were also hypersegmented (4.78 +/- 0.14 versus 3.15 +/- 0.02 in control, p less than 0.001). Nucleolar ribosomal gene activities, evaluated by morphometry of silver nucleolar grains, decreased on bone marrow granulocytes in the course of differentiation in control rats. After cyclophosphamide treatment mature granulocytes contained more silver grains than in controls which may be explained by conservation of silver binding sites of nucleoli from the stages of promyelocytes and myelocytes. These results suggest two mechanisms of hypersegmented neutrophil, generation in cyclophosphamide treated rats: the first, via maturation of myelocytes arrested in G2, and second, a direct one, without tetraploid granulocyte involvement. PMID:2465255

  12. Inhibition of peripheral blood neutrophil oxidative burst in periodontitis patients with a homeopathic medication Traumeel S

    PubMed Central

    žilinskas, Juozas; žekonis, Jonas; žekonis, Gediminas; Šadzevičienė, Renata; Sapragonienė, Marija; Navickaitė, Justina; Barzdžiukaitė, Ingrida

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The anti-inflammatory effects of a homeopathic remedy, Traumeel S, have been observed in experimental and clinical studies; however, its antioxidant properties have not been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with periodontitis. Material/Methods The study was performed using venous blood of 22 individuals with chronic periodontitis and 21 healthy subjects. The antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on the production of reactive oxygen species by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli neutrophils were investigated using luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). Results Polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients produced higher levels (p<0.01) of light output of lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence and significantly reduced (p<0.01) light output of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence than analogous cells of healthy subjects. Highly diluted (10−4 of the stem solution) Traumeel S significantly (by approximately 50%) reduced superoxide-induced oxidation of lucigenin by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients and had a tendency to intensify luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Preincubation of the unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of healthy subjects with Traumeel S exerts no inhibitory action on the luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence of the above-mentioned cells. Conclusions This study indicates that Traumeel S may significantly reduce production of superoxide anion by unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils of periodontitis patients. PMID:21525811

  13. Analysis of cell locomotion. Contact guidance of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Matthes, T; Gruler, H

    1988-01-01

    The methods of statistical physics have been applied to the analysis of cell movement. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were exposed to different surfaces possessing parallel oriented physical structures (scratched glass surface, machine drilled aluminum surface, optical grid and stretched polyethylene foil) and cell migration was observed using time-lapse photography. We demonstrate that in cell migration along physical structures, referred to as contact guidance, two subgroups can be distinguished: 1) The nematic type where the cell size is large in relation to the grid distance of the undulate surface. 2) The smectic type where the cell size is small in relation to the grid distance of the substrate. Nematic contact guidance is characterized by an anisotropic random walk. In all substrates investigated the diffusion process parallel to the lines was faster than the diffusion process perpendicular to them. The angular dependent diffusion coefficient was described by an ellipse. Deviation from a circle defined an apolar order parameter, whose value was about 0.3. The amount of information which the cells collected from, the undulate surface was very low, between 0.1 and 0.2 bits. We demonstrate that cells do not recognize all the details of their surroundings and that their migration can be compared to the "groping around" of a short sighted man. The blurred environment can be described by a mean field whose strength is proportional to the apolar order parameter. It is argued that the anisotropic surface tension is the basic source for nematic contact guidance. Smectic contact guidance is characterized by an anisotropic random walk and is quantified by a density order parameter which is 0.28 in the case of the scratched glass surface of a Neubauer counting chamber. The information which the cells collect from their environment is very low (0.03 bits). The lines seen by the cell can be described by a mean field whose strength is proportional to the density oder

  14. Purified cytochrome b from human granulocyte plasma membrane is comprised of two polypeptides with relative molecular weights of 91,000 and 22,000.

    PubMed Central

    Parkos, C A; Allen, R A; Cochrane, C G; Jesaitis, A J

    1987-01-01

    A new method has been developed for purification of cytochrome b from stimulated human granulocytes offering the advantage of high yields from practical quantities of whole blood. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes were treated with diisopropylfluorophosphate, degranulated and disrupted by nitrogen cavitation. Membranes enriched in cytochrome b were prepared by differential centrifugation. Complete solubilization of the cytochrome from the membranes was achieved in octylglucoside after a 1-M salt wash. Wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated Sepharose 4B specifically bound the solubilized cytochrome b and afforded a threefold purification. Eluate from the immobilized wheat germ agglutinin was further enriched by chromatography on immobilized heparin. The final 260-fold purification of the b-type cytochrome with a 20-30% yield was achieved by velocity sedimentation in sucrose density gradients. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the purified preparation revealed two polypeptides of Mr 91,000 and Mr 22,000. Treatment of the 125I-labeled, purified preparation with peptide:N-glycosidase F, which removes N-linked sugars, decreased relative molecular weight of the larger species to approximately 50,000, whereas beta-elimination, which removes O-linked sugars, had little or no effect on the mobility of the Mr-91,000 polypeptide. Neither of the deglycosylation conditions had any effect on electrophoretic mobility of the Mr-22,000 polypeptide. Disuccinimidyl suberate cross-linked the two polypeptides to a new Mr of 120,000-135,000 by SDS-PAGE. Antibody raised to the purified preparation immunoprecipitated spectral activity and, on Western blots, bound to the Mr-22,000 polypeptide but not the Mr-91,000 polypeptide. Western blot analysis of granulocytes from patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease revealed a complete absence of the Mr-22,000 polypeptide. These results (a) suggest that the two polypeptides are in close association and are

  15. Alteration of rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte function after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Gruber, D F; D'Alesandro, M M

    1989-01-01

    One portion of host defense to bacterial challenge(s) involves the activation and infiltration of endogenous polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thermal injuries are frequently associated with immunologic abnormalities including alterations of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-associated nonspecific resistance. We examined isolated peripheral rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes for alterations in membrane potential, oxidative capability, and locomotor function after the experimental application of 20% full-thickness body surface area thermal injury. Thermal injury resulted in significant reductions of peripheral red blood cell concentration(s) and increases in leukocyte and platelet concentrations for 42 days after injury. In addition to the quantitative changes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes also demonstrated altered qualitative functions. Compared with phorbol myristate acetate-induced activation of normal cells, polymorphonuclear leukocyte membranes from thermal-injured animals were electrophysiologically less responsive for 3 weeks after injury. The ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to produce intracellular H2O2, a measure of oxidative function, was also significantly decreased for 7 days after injury. The paradox in this paradigm of thermal injury was the demonstration of peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocyte quantitative increases with concurrent significant qualitative impairment. Qualitative lesions included altered states of membrane depolarization and depressed oxidative capability that may individually, or collectively, reduce nonspecific immune capabilities of the host to levels that are inadequate to combat infection. PMID:2793916

  16. Effect of laser irradiation on neutrophils metabolism in stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Gregory E.; Grigoriev, Sergei N.; Romanova, Tatyana P.; Petrisheva, Svetlana G.

    1994-02-01

    In experiments on male mice of CBA line the alteration of neutrophils cytochemical profile in peripheral blood He-Ne laser irradiation in vitro (4 mW/cm2, 15 min) and modification of metabolic disturbances in polymorphonuclear leucocytes in stress by laser radiation were studied. It was found that direct laser irradiation of blood results in the decrease of glycogen and lipids content, the increase of ATP-ase, succinate dehydrogenase and myeloperoxidase activity, rise of lysosomal cationic proteins level, and membrane oxidase systems of neutrophils stimulation. In short-term immobilization stress conditions transcutaneous laser irradiation in vivo (19 mW/cm2, 15 min) prevents the development of stress induced changes of metabolism and function of neutrophils.

  17. Stimulus specificity of prostaglandin inhibition of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion production.

    PubMed Central

    Fantone, J. C.; Marasco, W. A.; Elgas, L. J.; Ward, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) of the E series and PGI2 have been shown to inhibit acute inflammatory reactions in vivo and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), chemotaxis, lysosomal enzyme release, and superoxide anion (O-2) production in vitro. This inhibition of neutrophil stimulation by PGEs and PGI2 has been correlated with their ability to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. However, the mechanism(s) by which PGEs and PGI2 alter the complex biochemical and biophysical events associated with stimulus-response coupling in the neutrophil are not clear. It is reported here that both PGEs and PGI2 in micromolar concentrations inhibit formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)- and zymosan-induced lysosomal enzyme secretion and superoxide anion production in a dose-dependent manner. No preincubation time of PMNs with the prostaglandins is required for inhibition. Addition of PGEs 10 seconds or later after FMLP stimulation does not alter the biologic response of the neutrophils to the stimulus, suggesting that the prostaglandin inhibition effects early events associated with stimulus-response coupling in the neutrophil. Prostaglandin inhibition of lysosomal enzyme release by the calcium ionophore A23187 was overcome by increasing the extracellular ionophore and/or calcium concentration, suggesting that PGs may modulate intracellular free calcium levels in a manner similar to that observed with platelets. Inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced neutrophil lysosomal enzyme secretion by PGEs and PGI2 was overcome by increasing concentrations of PMA. However, neither PGEs nor PGI2 altered O-2 production by PMA-treated neutrophils. These data indicate a dissociation between PMA-stimulated O-2 production and lysosomal enzyme release. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of neutrophil stimulation by PGEs and PGI2 is a result of increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels and modulation of calcium

  18. [Leucosis diagnosis in cattle using the Sudan black B staining method on granulocytes and monocytes].

    PubMed

    Rademacher, R; Vanásek, J; Sodomková, D

    1979-11-01

    In the peripheral blood of healthy cattle and cattle suffering from leucosis a positive reaction with Sudan black B was found in neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes: in healthy cattle at an intensity from ++ to ++++, and in cattle suffering from leucosis it was somewhat slighter (++ to +++). This finding can, to a certain extent, help in the distinguishing of reactive lymphocytosis from the leucosis of cattle. Compared with granulocytes the reaction of monocytes is markedly weaker: in healthy cattle at an intensity from 0 to (++), and in diseased cattle from 0 to (+++). In the bone marrow there is a significantly weaker reaction to Sudan black B in the group of large cells (neutrophilic and eosinophilic promyelocytes and myelocytes); in the group of healthy and diseases cattle the reaction is weaker than in neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes of the peripheral blood. The reaction obtained with Sudan black B for lipids can be used as an aid for the distinguishing of cells of the myeloid, monocytic, and lymphoid order of peripheral blood and bone marrow in cattle leucosis. PMID:92849

  19. Production of monoclonal antibody specific for bottlenose dolphin neutrophils and its application to cell separation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masako; Itou, Takuya; Nagatsuka, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    The authors produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dolphin neutrophils by fusing mouse myeloma cells with lymph node cells from a Wistar rat immunized with bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). This mAb (DN1) was reactive against 77.1 +/- 8.6% of dolphin peripheral blood PMN by flow cytometric analysis; furthermore, there was no cross-reactivity with human or bovine leukocytes. The DN1-positive cells isolated with a sorting cytometer were almost all (99.7%) neutrophils. By using DN1 in conjunction with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), the authors isolated neutrophils and eosinophils from density gradient-fractionated PMN with 100% and 95.6 +/- 4.8% purities, respectively. These results suggest that this mAb specific for bottlenose dolphin neutrophils is useful as a potential reagent to study bottlenose dolphin neutrophils and eosinophils. PMID:18773918

  20. Ultrastructural localization of cytochrome b in the membranes of resting and phagocytosing human granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jesaitis, A J; Buescher, E S; Harrison, D; Quinn, M T; Parkos, C A; Livesey, S; Linner, J

    1990-01-01

    Affinity-purified rabbit anti-neutrophil cytochrome b light or heavy chain antibodies were used to immunocytochemically and biochemically localize cytochrome b in neutrophils and eosinophils. The antibodies were monospecific, recognizing polypeptides of 91 and 22 kD, respectively, on Western blots of whole neutrophil extracts. The antibodies were used in Western blot analysis of subcellular fractions of purified neutrophils to confirm that the distribution of cytochrome b spectral absorbance matched that of the two subunits. Thin sections of cryofixed, molecular distillation-dried granulocytes were labeled with the anti-cytochrome b antibodies, followed by incubation with biotin-conjugated secondary antibody, and final labeling with streptavidin-conjugated colloidal gold. Electron microscopy revealed that the cytochrome b light and heavy chains were localized primarily (80%) to 0.1-0.2-micron round or elliptical granule-like structures in neutrophils and 0.4-0.5-micron granules in eosinophils. Approximately 20% of the cytochrome b was localized to the surface, confirming the subcellular fractionation studies. Double staining experiments on the neutrophils, using polyclonal rabbit anti-lactoferrin antibody, indicated that the cytochrome-bearing structures also contained lactoferrin and thus were specific granules. When the analysis was performed on neutrophils that had phagocytosed Staphylococcus aureus, cytochrome b was found in the phagosomal membrane adjoining the bacterial cell wall. Images PMID:2312727

  1. Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with recombinant interleukin-3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF), or granulocyte-macrophage CSF in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, B.I.; Molineux, G.; Pojda, Z.; Souza, L.M.; Mermod, J.J.; Dexter, T.M. )

    1991-05-15

    Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with pure hematopoietic growth factors have been investigated using tritiated thymidine labeling and autoradiography. Mice were injected subcutaneously with 125 micrograms/kg granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (in some cases 5 micrograms/kg), or 10 micrograms/kg of granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), or interleukin-3 (IL-3) every 12 hours for 84 hours. {sup 3}HTdR labeling was performed in vivo after 3 days of treatment. G-CSF increased the peripheral neutrophil count 14-fold and increased the proportion and proliferation rate of neutrophilic cells in the marrow, suppressing erythropoiesis at the same time. Newly produced mature cells were released into the circulation within 24 hours of labeling, compared with a normal appearance time of about 96 hours. By contrast, GM-CSF and IL-3 had little effect on either marrow cell kinetics or on the rate of release of mature cells, although GM-CSF did stimulate a 50% increase in peripheral neutrophils. Monocyte production was also increased about eightfold by G-CSF and 1.5-fold by GM-CSF, but their peak release was only slightly accelerated. While the peripheral half-lives of the neutrophilic granulocytes were normal, those of the monocytes were dramatically reduced, perhaps due to sequestration in the tissues for functional purposes. The stimulated monocyte production in the case of G-CSF required an additional five cell cycles, a level that might have repercussions on the progenitor compartments.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates acute pulmonary inflammation by decreasing the release of segmented neutrophils from the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Franziska M; Braun, Stefan; Ngamsri, Kristian-Christos; Vollmer, Irene; Reutershan, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Recruiting polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs) from circulation and bone marrow to the site of inflammation is one of the pivotal mechanisms of the innate immune system. During inflammation, the enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) has been shown to reduce PMN migration. Although these effects have been described in various models, underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Recent studies revealed an influence of HO-1 on different cells of the bone marrow. We investigated the particular role of the bone marrow in terms of HO-1-dependent pulmonary inflammation. In a murine model of LPS inhalation, stimulation of HO-1 by cobalt (III) protoporphyrin-IX-chloride (CoPP) resulted in reduced segmented PMN migration into the alveolar space. In the CoPP group, segmented PMNs were also decreased intravascularly, and concordantly, mature and immature PMN populations were higher in the bone marrow. Inhibition of the enzyme by tin protoporphyrin-IX increased segmented and banded PMN migration into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with enhanced PMN release from the bone marrow and aggravated parameters of tissue inflammation. Oxidative burst activity was significantly higher in immature compared with mature PMNs. The chemokine stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which mediates homing of leukocytes into the bone marrow and is decreased in inflammation, was increased by CoPP. When SDF-1 was blocked by the specific antagonist AMD3100, HO-1 activation was no longer effective in curbing PMN trafficking to the inflamed lungs. In conclusion, we show evidence that the anti-inflammatory effects of HO-1 are largely mediated by inhibiting the release of segmented PMNs from the bone marrow rather than direct effects within the lung. PMID:25172914

  3. Effects of leukotriene B4 inhalation. Airway sensitization and lung granulocyte infiltration in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Silbaugh, S A; Stengel, P W; Williams, G D; Herron, D K; Gallagher, P; Baker, S R

    1987-10-01

    Male Hartley guinea pigs were exposed by inhalation to leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and challenged 5 min or 4 h later with bronchoconstrictive aerosols of histamine or the divalent cationic ionophore A23187. Pulmonary gas trapping measured in excised lungs indicated the severity of post-challenge airway obstruction. Airway granulocyte infiltration was scored by an observer who was unaware of animal assignments. Treatment with LTB4 produced a marked influx of eosinophils and neutrophils into tracheal and bronchial airways. Granulocyte scores for LTB4-treated groups were 1.9 to 3.3 times higher than those for vehicle-treated groups at 5 min after exposure and 3.3 to 10.7 times higher at 4 h after exposure. Leukotriene B4 itself did not produce hyperinflation. However, histamine-induced gas trapping was increased 5 min after LTB4 exposure. Histamine responsiveness was unaffected 4 h after LTB4 treatment. In contrast, A23187-induced gas trapping was unaffected at 5 min, but diminished at 4 h after LTB4. Nonchemotactic stereoisomers of LTB4 did not produce granulocyte influx, but did produce altered airway responses similar to those seen for LTB4. We conclude that inhaled LTB4 produces airway granulocyte infiltration in the guinea pig and alterations in airway responsiveness that vary with the challenge stimulus and time after exposure. Alterations in airway responses may result from granulocyte-independent effects of LTB4 and its stereoisomers. PMID:2821855

  4. Low-Density Granulocytes Are Elevated in Mycobacterial Infection and Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qing; Huang, Zhikun; Peng, Yiping; Xiong, Guoliang; Guo, Yang; Jiang, Hong; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Numerous studies have established a close correlation between the development of tuberculosis and the roles of neutrophils. Recently, a distinct population of CD15+ granulocytes was found to be present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction in humans. This population of granulocytes, termed low-density granulocytes (LDGs), was reported to be elevated and associated with disease activity or severity in a number of different conditions including SLE, asthma and HIV infection. However, both the frequency and clinical significance of LDGs associated with tuberculosis are unclear. Here we determined LDG levels and made comparisons between subjects with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and healthy controls, between PTB patients with mild-to-moderate disease and patients with advanced disease, and among PTB patients following anti-tuberculous therapy of varying durations. The direct correlation between M. tuberculosis infection and LDG levels was confirmed by in vitro infection of whole peripheral blood and isolated granulocytes with mycobacteria. Our results demonstrated that PBMCs in PTB patients contained significantly elevated percentages of LDGs compared with control subjects. LDGs in tuberculosis expressed higher levels of activation markers compared to normal-density granulocytes (NDGs). M. tuberculosis induced the generation of LDGs in both whole blood and isolated NDGs from control subjects, which suggests that LDGs associated with M. tuberculosis infection are likely to originate from in situ activation. Furthermore, our results revealed that the frequency of LDGs is associated with the severity of tuberculosis. PMID:27073889

  5. Low-Density Granulocytes Are Elevated in Mycobacterial Infection and Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yating; Ye, Jianqing; Luo, Qing; Huang, Zhikun; Peng, Yiping; Xiong, Guoliang; Guo, Yang; Jiang, Hong; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Numerous studies have established a close correlation between the development of tuberculosis and the roles of neutrophils. Recently, a distinct population of CD15+ granulocytes was found to be present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction in humans. This population of granulocytes, termed low-density granulocytes (LDGs), was reported to be elevated and associated with disease activity or severity in a number of different conditions including SLE, asthma and HIV infection. However, both the frequency and clinical significance of LDGs associated with tuberculosis are unclear. Here we determined LDG levels and made comparisons between subjects with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and healthy controls, between PTB patients with mild-to-moderate disease and patients with advanced disease, and among PTB patients following anti-tuberculous therapy of varying durations. The direct correlation between M. tuberculosis infection and LDG levels was confirmed by in vitro infection of whole peripheral blood and isolated granulocytes with mycobacteria. Our results demonstrated that PBMCs in PTB patients contained significantly elevated percentages of LDGs compared with control subjects. LDGs in tuberculosis expressed higher levels of activation markers compared to normal-density granulocytes (NDGs). M. tuberculosis induced the generation of LDGs in both whole blood and isolated NDGs from control subjects, which suggests that LDGs associated with M. tuberculosis infection are likely to originate from in situ activation. Furthermore, our results revealed that the frequency of LDGs is associated with the severity of tuberculosis. PMID:27073889

  6. Human neutrophil peptide-1 decreases during ageing in selected Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; de Haro-Acosta, Jeny; Torres-Juarez, Flor; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; González-Amaro, Roberto; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptide innate immunity plays a central role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases, as has been described extensively in different settings. However, the role that these molecules play in the immunity mediated by polymorphonuclear phagocytes as part of the innate immunity of ageing individuals has not been described. In the present study, we addressed the question whether antimicrobial activity in polymorphonuclear cells from elderly individuals was altered in comparison with young adults. We compared phagocytosis index, bacterial killing efficiency, myeloperoxidase activity and cathelicidin expression. Results showed that there were no statistical differences among groups. However, human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) was decreased in the elderly individuals group. Results suggest that the decreased HNP-1 production in the polymorphonuclear phagocytes form elderly individuals might have an important participation in the increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. PMID:26323500

  7. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    1. Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function. 2. Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 microM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50 approximately 100 microM). 3. Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2 approximately 4.5). Glaucine (10 microM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2 approximately 3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (-log IC50 approximately 4.3). 4. Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89. 5. In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  8. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-01-01

    Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function.Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 μM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50∼100 μM).Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2∼4.5). Glaucine (10 μM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2∼3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (−log IC50∼4.3).Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89.In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  9. Role of YopK in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Resistance against Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Defense

    PubMed Central

    Thorslund, Sara E.; Ermert, David; Fahlgren, Anna; Erttmann, Saskia F.; Nilsson, Kristina; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Urban, Constantin F.

    2013-01-01

    The enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis can survive in the harsh environment of lymphoid compartments that abounds in immune cells. This capacity is dependent on the plasmid-encoded Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) that are delivered into the host cell via a mechanism involving the Yersinia type III secretion system. We show that the virulence protein YopK has a role in the mechanism by which Y. pseudotuberculosis avoids the polymorphonuclear leukocyte or neutrophil (PMN) defense. A yopK mutant, which is attenuated in the mouse infection model, where it fails to cause systemic infection, was found to colonize Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes more rapidly than the wild-type strain. Further, in mice lacking PMNs, the yopK mutant caused full disease with systemic spread and typical symptoms. Analyses of effects on PMNs revealed that both the wild-type strain and the yopK mutant inhibited internalization and reactive oxygen species production, as well as neutrophil extracellular trap formation by PMNs. However, the wild-type strain effectively avoided induction of PMN death, whereas the mutant caused a necrosis-like PMN death. Taken together, our results indicate that YopK is required for the ability of Yersinia to resist the PMN defense, which is critical for the virulence of the pathogen. We suggest a mechanism whereby YopK functions to prevent unintended Yop delivery and thereby PMN disruption, resulting in necrosis-like cell death, which would enhance the inflammatory response favoring the host. PMID:23090955

  10. Neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment: trying to heal the wound that cannot heal.

    PubMed

    Singel, Kelly L; Segal, Brahm H

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are the first responders to infection and injury and are critical for antimicrobial host defense. Through the generation of reactive oxidants, activation of granular constituents and neutrophil extracellular traps, neutrophils target microbes and prevent their dissemination. While these pathways are beneficial in the context of trauma and infection, their off-target effects in the context of tumor are variable. Tumor-derived factors have been shown to reprogram the marrow, skewing toward the expansion of myelopoiesis. This can result in stimulation of both neutrophilic leukocytosis and the release of immature granulocytic populations that accumulate in circulation and in the tumor microenvironment. While activated neutrophils have been shown to kill tumor cells, there is growing evidence for neutrophil activation driving tumor progression and metastasis through a number of pathways, including stimulation of thrombosis and angiogenesis, stromal remodeling, and impairment of T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity. There is also growing appreciation of neutrophil heterogeneity in cancer, with distinct neutrophil populations promoting cancer control or progression. In addition to the effects of tumor on neutrophil responses, anti-neoplastic treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, and growth factors, can influence neutrophil responses. Future directions for research are expected to result in more mechanistic knowledge of neutrophil biology in the tumor microenvironment that may be exploited as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27558344

  11. The in vivo behavior of granulocytes labeled with indium-111 in a canine model of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, J.P.; Konopka, R.G.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.; Spragg, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    Use of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes in the study of pulmonary inflammation requires study of their in vivo behavior. To study the pulmonary deposition of these cells and their ability to migrate from the capillary to the alveolus, we injected (/sup 111/In)granulocytes into dogs 24 h after the induction of a right lower lobe pneumococcal pneumonia. Using external imaging, we found rapid clearance of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes from the uninvolved lung (with a residual radioactivity of 24.5 +/- 4.2% at 4 h). In contrast, 83 +/- 12.4% of the initial radioactivity was present in inflamed lung at 4 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the inflamed lung was more cellular than that from control lung, contained a greater fraction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (82 +/- 4.1% versus 20 +/- 6.2%), and much greater cell-associated radioactivity (ratio of 423:1, inflamed to control). Autoradiography disclosed that this radioactivity was localized to consolidated alveoli and was not prominently distributed in arterioles or venules or in airways larger than 0.6 mm. We conclude that (/sup 111/In)granulocytes are biologically active in the setting of acute lung inflammation.

  12. Osmotic tolerance of human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, W.J.; Mazur, P.

    1984-11-01

    Human granulocytes are injured when returned to isotonic conditions after exposure at 0/sup 0/C to hyperosmotic solutions of NaCl or sucrose with osmolalities above 0.6 osmolal. The damage was expressed as a loss of membrane integrity (fluorescein diacetate (FDA) assay) only after 60-90 min incubation at 37/sup 0/C. Survival after exposure to a 1.4-osmolal solution at 0/sup 0/C was dependent on the extent of subsequent dilution. Dilution to below 0.6 osmolal was damaging, but cells could be returned to near-osmotic conditions provided that the solute concentration was increased again to 0.64 osmolal before the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C. Granulocyte cell volumes were measured under various osmotic conditions by computer-assisted micrometry. The cells did not display a minimum volume but behaved as osmometers over the observed range of 0.2-1.4 osmolal. Granulocyte volume at a given osmolality was independent of whether the cells had first been exposed to a strongly hyperosmotic medium, indicating that no solute loading occurred in hyperosmotic sucrose solutions. Even though the cells did not survive sequential exposure to >0.6 osmolal solutions, subsequent return to isotonicity, and incubation at 37/sup 0/C, neither cell lysis nor loss in FDA-positive cells occurred after the first two steps. This finding is not consistent with the critical-surface area-increment theory of freezing injury. The mechanism of cell injury in hyperosmotic solutions is thus not known. However, the results show that osmotic stress is potentially a major damaging factor both in the equilibration of cells with protective additives and during freezing and thawing.

  13. Survival of transfused CD18-positive granulocytes and their chemiluminescent response in a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Sakurai, N; Matsuki, S; Miura, T; Nioka, K; Kociba, G J

    1998-02-01

    Granulocyte transfusion (GT) was performed in an 8-month-old heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) to monitor the changes in transfused CD18-positive neutrophils and associated neutrophil chemiluminescent (CL) response in beta 2-integrin-deficient host. The CD18-positive neutrophils were detected in blood from the BLAD heifer during the first 3 hr after 2.6 x 10(9) cells were infused by GT, and disappeared by 5 hr after GT. The CL response of neutrophils was increased 1.7 to 2.8-fold in the BLAD heifer during the first 3 hr after GT, thereafter CL response decreased gradually from 2 to 5 hr after GT. PMID:9524955

  14. Arachidonic acid metabolism in the platelets and neutrophils of diabetic rabbit and human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    An alteration of arachidonic acid metabolism to prostaglandins and leukotrienes from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes respectively is evident in subjects with diabetes mellitus. There is evidence of altered platelet/vascular wall interactions in diabetes mellitus and evidence that polymorphonuclear leukocytes influence the vascular walls. Theories on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis include both blood cells. Platelet hypersensitivity is evident in those platelets from the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit either suspended in plasma or buffer. Arachidonic acid- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation, release of /sup 14/serotonin, and T x B/sub 2/ and 12-HETE production is enhanced when responses of diabetic platelets are compared to control platelets. Control rabbit neutrophils produce more LTB/sub 4/, LTB/sub 4/ isomers and 5-HETE than diabetic rabbits neutrophils. Decreased synthesis from diabetic rabbit neutrophils is not explained by increased catabolism of LTB/sub 4/, reesterification of 5-HETE, or increased eicosanoid formation. These experiments demonstrate both platelet and neutrophil dysfunction in diabetic subjects. Because of the involvement of these cells in regulating circulatory homeostatis, abnormal behavior could aggravate the atherosclerotic process. Platelet and neutrophil dysfunctions are noted before macroscopic vascular lesions are apparent suggesting an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  15. How neutrophils kill fungi.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the prevention of invasive fungal infections. Whereas mouse studies have demonstrated the role of various neutrophil pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), signal transduction pathways, and cytotoxicity in the murine antifungal immune response, much less is known about the killing of fungi by human neutrophils. Recently, novel primary immunodeficiencies have been identified in patients with a susceptibility to fungal infections. These human 'knock-out' neutrophils expand our knowledge to understand the role of PRRs and signaling in human fungal killing. From the studies with these patients it is becoming clear that neutrophils employ fundamentally distinct mechanisms to kill Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:27558342

  16. Effects of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins on Human Neutrophil Functions and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Moulding, Dale A.; Walter, Catherine; Hart, C. Anthony; Edwards, Steven W.

    1999-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins have marked effects on the properties of T cells and monocytes and have recently been reported to affect neutrophil function. In this study, we investigated the abilities of staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 to affect respiratory burst activity and to delay apoptosis in human neutrophils. When cultures containing approximately 97% neutrophils were tested, the toxins all delayed neutrophil apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and induced the expression of FcγRI on the neutrophil cell surface. These effects on apoptosis and expression of FcγRI were largely abrogated by the addition of a neutralizing anti-gamma interferon antibody. Similarly, the effects of these toxins on phorbol ester-induced chemiluminescence were decreased after neutralization of gamma interferon. These effects on neutrophil function were mimicked by the addition of conditioned medium from peripheral blood mononuclear cells incubated with the toxins, and again, neutralizing anti-gamma interferon antibodies largely negated the effects. However, when highly purified neutrophils prepared by immunodepletion of T cells and major histocompatibility complex class II-expressing cells were analyzed, the toxins were without effect on apoptosis and FcγRI expression, but granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and gamma interferon could still delay apoptosis. These data indicate that these toxins have no direct effect on neutrophil apoptosis but can act indirectly via the production of T-cell-derived and monocyte-derived cytokines. It is noteworthy that such effects are detected in neutrophil suspensions containing only 3% contamination with T cells and other mononuclear cells. PMID:10225889

  17. Neutrophil's weapons in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophils are important components of immunity associated with inflammatory responses against a broad spectrum of pathogens. These cells could be rapidly activated by proinflammatory stimuli and migrate to the inflamed and infected sites where they release a variety of cytotoxic molecules with antimicrobial activity. Neutrophil antibacterial factors include extracellular proteases, redox enzymes, antimicrobial peptides, and small bioactive molecules. In resting neutrophils, these factors are stored in granules and released upon activation during degranulation. These factors could be also secreted in a neutrophil-derived microparticle-dependent fashion. Neutrophils exhibit a unique property to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of decondensed chromatin and granular proteins to catch and kill bacteria. Neutrophil-released factors are efficient in inactivation and elimination of pathogens through oxidation-dependent or independent damage of bacterial cells, inactivation and neutralization of virulence factors and other mechanisms. However, in chronic atherosclerosis-associated inflammation, protective function of neutrophils could be impaired and misdirected against own cells. This could lead to deleterious effects and progressive vascular injury. In atherogenesis, a pathogenic role of neutrophils could be especially seen in early stages associated with endothelial dysfunction and induction of vascular inflammation and in late atherosclerosis associated with plaque rupture and atherothrombosis. Assuming a prominent impact of neutrophils in cardiovascular pathology, developing therapeutic strategies targeting neutrophil-specific antigens could have a promising clinical potential. PMID:26551083

  18. Proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase enhance inflammation in mice by inactivating antiinflammatory progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Kessenbrock, Kai; Fröhlich, Leopold; Sixt, Michael; Lämmermann, Tim; Pfister, Heiko; Bateman, Andrew; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Ring, Johannes; Ollert, Markus; Fässler, Reinhard; Jenne, Dieter E.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes form the body’s first line of antibacterial defense, but they also contribute to tissue injury and noninfectious, chronic inflammation. Proteinase 3 (PR3) and neutrophil elastase (NE) are 2 abundant neutrophil serine proteases implicated in antimicrobial defense with overlapping and potentially redundant substrate specificity. Here, we unraveled a cooperative role for PR3 and NE in neutrophil activation and noninfectious inflammation in vivo, which we believe to be novel. Mice lacking both PR3 and NE demonstrated strongly diminished immune complex–mediated (IC-mediated) neutrophil infiltration in vivo as well as reduced activation of isolated neutrophils by ICs in vitro. In contrast, in mice lacking just NE, neutrophil recruitment to ICs was only marginally impaired. The defects in mice lacking both PR3 and NE were directly linked to the accumulation of antiinflammatory progranulin (PGRN). Both PR3 and NE cleaved PGRN in vitro and during neutrophil activation and inflammation in vivo. Local administration of recombinant PGRN potently inhibited neutrophilic inflammation in vivo, demonstrating that PGRN represents a crucial inflammation-suppressing mediator. We conclude that PR3 and NE enhance neutrophil-dependent inflammation by eliminating the local antiinflammatory activity of PGRN. Our results support the use of serine protease inhibitors as antiinflammatory agents. PMID:18568075

  19. Granule Protein Processing and Regulated Secretion in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sheshachalam, Avinash; Srivastava, Nutan; Mitchell, Troy; Lacy, Paige; Eitzen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are part of a family of granulocytes that, together with eosinophils and basophils, play an essential role in innate immunity. Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating leukocytes and are vital for rapid immune responses, being recruited to sites of injury or infection within minutes, where they can act as specialized phagocytic cells. However, another prominent function of neutrophils is the release of pro-inflammatory compounds, including cytokines, chemokines, and digestive enzymes, which are stored in intracellular compartments and released through regulated exocytosis. Hence, an important feature that contributes to rapid immune responses is capacity of neutrophils to synthesize and store pre-formed pro-inflammatory mediators in specialized intracellular vesicles and thus no new synthesis is required. This review will focus on advancement in three topics relevant to neutrophil secretion. First, we will examine what is known about basal level pro-inflammatory mediator synthesis, trafficking, and storage in secretory compartments. Second, we will review recent advancements in the mechanisms that control vesicle mobilization and the release of pre-formed mediators. Third, we will examine the upregulation and de novo synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators by neutrophils engaged at sites of infection. PMID:25285096

  20. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors. PMID:26966341

  1. Effects of CXC chemokines on neutrophil activation and sequestration in hepatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Bajt, M L; Farhood, A; Jaeschke, H

    2001-11-01

    The initiating step of neutrophil-induced cytotoxicity in the liver is the recruitment of these phagocytes into sinusoids. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of systemic exposure with individual inflammatory mediators on neutrophil activation and sequestration in the hepatic vasculature of C3Heb/FeJ mice as assessed by flow cytometry and histochemistry, respectively. The CXC chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2; 20 microg/kg) induced a time-dependent upregulation of Mac-1 (318% at 4 h) and shedding of L-selectin (41% at 4 h). MIP-2 treatment caused a temporary increase of sinusoidal neutrophil accumulation at 0.5 h [97 +/- 6 polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)/50 high-power fields (HPF)], which declined to baseline (8 +/- 2) at 4 h. The CXC chemokine KC was largely ineffective in activating neutrophils or recruiting them into the liver. Cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1alpha) and cobra venom factor substantially increased Mac-1 expression and L-selectin shedding on neutrophils and caused stable sinusoidal neutrophil accumulation (170-220 PMN/50 HPF). Only cytokines induced venular neutrophil margination. Thus CXC chemokines in circulation are less effective than cytokines or complement in activation of neutrophils and their recruitment into the hepatic vasculature in vivo. PMID:11668027

  2. In vitro effect of immune serum and bovine granulocytes on juvenile Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed Central

    Duffus, W P; Franks, D

    1980-01-01

    Cattle, infected with Fasciola hepatica metacercariae, produce antibodies against the outer glycocalyx of freshly excysted juvenile F. hepatica. Using 51Cr-release and viability assays such antibodies in the presence or absence of bovine complement did not cause discernible damage to the parasite. The presence of excess antibody caused the build-up of large aggregates of antigen--antibody complexes over the parasite surface; these aggregates were eventually shed into the medium. Neutrophils and eosinophils were obtained by selective stimulation of the mammary gland of heifers, and attached in large numbers to flukes coated with either IgG1 or IgG2. Attachment was dependent on Fc receptors although the adherence of the eosinophils was more prolonged than that of the neutrophils. Using 51Cr-release and viability assays no damage occurred to the flukes using either eosinophils or neutrophils in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; adherent granulocytes were eventually shed. It is suggested that the rapid turnover and excretion of the outer glycocalyx of juvenile flukes prevents the intimate attachment of granulocytes to the helminth parasite, which is perhaps a prerequisite for cell-mediated damage to occur. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7438560

  3. Priming of Human Neutrophils Is Necessary for Their Activation by Extracellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Prikhodko, A S; Vitushkina, M V; Zinovkina, L A; Popova, E N; Zinovkin, R A

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular plasma DNA is thought to act as a damage-associated molecular pattern causing activation of immune cells. However, purified preparations of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA were unable to induce neutrophil activation in vitro. Thus, we examined whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) acting as a neutrophil priming agent can promote the activation of neutrophils by different types of extracellular DNA. GM-CSF pretreatment greatly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and promoted CD11b/CD66b expression in human neutrophils treated with mitochondrial and, to a lesser extent, with nuclear DNA. Our experiments clearly indicate that GM-CSF-induced priming of human neutrophils is necessary for their subsequent activation by extracellular DNA. PMID:27301289

  4. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, W M; Gushiken, V O; Ferreira-Duarte, A P; Pinheiro-Torres, A S; Roncalho-Buck, I A; Squebola-Cola, D M; Mello, G C; Anhê, G F; Antunes, E; DeSouza, I A

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1μg), and at 4, 12 and 24h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. PMID:26091799

  5. Pulmonary contusion induces alveolar type 2 epithelial cell apoptosis: role of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Perl, Mario; Mangold, Stefanie; Neddermann, Anne; Braumüller, Sonja T; Zhou, Shaoixa; Bachem, Max G; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Knöferl, Markus W

    2008-11-01

    Alveolar type 2 (AT-2) cell apoptosis is an important mechanism during lung inflammation, lung injury, and regeneration. Blunt chest trauma has been shown to activate inflammatory cells such as alveolar macrophages (AMs) or neutrophils (polymorphonuclear granulocytes [PMNs]), resulting in an inflammatory response. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of different components/cells of the alveolar compartment (AMs, PMNs, or bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] fluids) to induce apoptosis in AT-2 cells following blunt chest trauma. To study this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham procedure or blunt chest trauma induced by a single blast wave. Various time points after injury (6 h to 7 d), the lungs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, for AT-2 cells, or with antibodies directed against caspase 3, caspase 8, Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), BAX, and BCL-2. Bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and soluble FasL were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, cultures of AT-2 cells isolated from healthy rats were incubated with supernatants of AMs, PMNs, or BAL fluids obtained from either trauma or sham-operated animals in the presence or absence of oxidative stress. Annexin V staining or TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase) assay was used to detect apoptotic AT-2 cells. Histological evaluation revealed that the total number of AT-2 cells was significantly reduced at 48 h following trauma. Fas, FasL, active caspase 8, and active caspase 3 were markedly up-regulated in AT-2 cells after chest trauma. BAX and BCL-2 did not show any significant changes between sham and trauma. IL-1beta, but not TNF-alpha, levels were markedly increased at 24 h after the injury, and soluble FasL concentrations were significantly enhanced at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after the insult. Apoptosis of AT-2 cells incubated with supernatants from cultured AMs, isolated at 48 h following chest trauma was markedly increased when

  6. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  7. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  8. Proenkephalin system in human polymorphonuclear cells. Production and release of a novel 1.0-kD peptide derived from synenkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Vindrola, O; Padrós, M R; Sterin-Prync, A; Ase, A; Finkielman, S; Nahmod, V

    1990-01-01

    In the hematopoietic system a pluripotent stem cell generates precursors for lymphoid and myeloid lineages. Proenkephalin-derived peptides were previously detected in differentiated lymphoid cells. We have studied whether the proenkephalin system is expressed in a typical differentiated cell of the myeloid lineage, the neutrophil. Human peripheral polymorphonuclear cells contain and release proenkephalin-derived peptides. The opioid portion of proenkephalin (met-enkephalin-containing peptides) was incompletely processed, resulting in the absence of low molecular weight products. The nonopioid synenkephalin (proenkephalin 1-70) molecule was completely processed to a 1.0-kD peptide derived from the COOH-terminal. This molecule was characterized in neutrophils by biochemical and immunocytochemical methods. The chemotactic peptide FMLP and the calcium ionophore A23187 induced the release of the proenkephalin-derived peptides, and this effect was potentiated by cytochalasin B. The materials secreted were similar to those present in the cell, although in the supernatant a higher proportion corresponded to more processed products. The 1.0-kD peptide was detected in human, bovine, and rat neutrophils, but the chromatographic pattern of synenkephalin-derived peptides suggests a differential posttranslational processing among species. These findings demonstrate the existence of the proenkephalin system in human neutrophils and the production and release of a novel 1.0-kD peptide derived from the synenkephalin molecule. The presence of opioid peptides in neutrophils suggests their participation in the inflammatory process, including a local analgesic effect. Images PMID:2117023

  9. Regulation of 5-oxo-ETE synthesis by nitric oxide in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes upon their interaction with zymosan and Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Viryasova, Galina M.; Galkina, Svetlana I.; Gaponova, Tatjana V.; Romanova, Julia M.; Sud’ina, Galina F.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we have presented data on the regulation of LT (leukotriene) and 5-oxo-ETE (5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid) syntheses in human neutrophils upon interaction with OZ (opsonized zymosan) or Salmonella typhimurium. Priming of neutrophils with PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) and LPS (lipopolysaccharide) elicits 5-oxo-ETE formation in neutrophils exposed to OZ, and the addition of AA (arachidonic acid) significantly increases 5-oxo-ETE synthesis. We found that NO (nitric oxide)-releasing compounds induce 5-oxo-ETE synthesis in neutrophils treated with OZ or S. typhimurium. Exposure of neutrophils to zymosan or bacteria in the presence of the NO donor DEA NONOate (1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-hydrazine sodium) considerably increased the conversion of endogenously formed 5-HETE (5S-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid) to 5-oxo-ETE. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NO is a potent regulator of 5-oxo-ETE synthesis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes exposed to Salmonella typhimurium and zymosan. PMID:24712762

  10. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, W.M.; Gushiken, V.O.; Ferreira-Duarte, A.P.; Pinheiro-Torres, A.S.; Roncalho-Buck, I.A.; Squebola-Cola, D.M.; Mello, G.C.; Anhê, G.F.; Antunes, E.; DeSouza, I.A.

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and

  11. Intracellular Penetration and Activity of Gemifloxacin in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    García, Isabel; Pascual, Alvaro; Ballesta, Sofía; Joyanes, Providencia; Perea, Evelio J.

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular penetration and activity of gemifloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were evaluated. Gemifloxacin reached intracellular concentrations eight times higher than extracellular concentrations. The uptake was rapid, reversible, and nonsaturable and was affected by environmental temperature, cell viability, and membrane stimuli. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, gemifloxacin showed intracellular activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:11036051

  12. Macrophages are stimulated by muramyl dipeptide to induce polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation in the peritoneal cavities of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nagao, S; Nakanishi, M; Kutsukake, H; Yagawa, K; Kusumoto, S; Shiba, T; Tanaka, A; Kotani, S

    1990-02-01

    N-Acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide [MDP]) injected intraperitoneally significantly increased the number of cells entering the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs primed with liquid paraffin or thioglycollate. There was a close relationship between peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) accumulation and the uptake of glucosamine by macrophages in guinea pigs treated with a variety of bacterial cell surface components such as cell wall peptidoglycan subunits and bacterial or synthetic lipid A. The PMN accumulation was also facilitated by the intraperitoneal transfer of the peritoneal macrophages that had been stimulated by MDP in vitro. Furthermore, cell-free lavage fluids taken from the peritoneum of MDP-treated guinea pigs also initiated the influx of PMNs when introduced into the peritoneal cavities of liquid paraffin-pretreated guinea pigs. These results suggest that a soluble factor which attracts neutrophils is produced by MDP-treated macrophages. Partial characterization of the factor is described. PMID:2298491

  13. Apoptotic neutrophils in the circulation of patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b).

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Taco W; Maianski, Nikolai A; Tool, Anton T J; Smit, G Peter A; Rake, Jan Peter; Roos, Dirk; Visser, Gepke

    2003-06-15

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, and growth retardation, and associated-for unknown reasons- with neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. In 5 GSD1b patients in whom nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase activity and chemotaxis were defective, we found that the majority of circulating granulocytes bound Annexin-V. The neutrophils showed signs of apoptosis with increased caspase activity, condensed nuclei, and perinuclear clustering of mitochondria to which the proapoptotic Bcl-2 member Bax had translocated already. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) addition to in vitro cultures did not rescue the GSD1b neutrophils from apoptosis as occurs with G-CSF-treated control neutrophils. Moreover, the 2 GSD1b patients on G-CSF treatment did not show significantly lower levels of apoptotic neutrophils in the bloodstream. Current understanding of neutrophil apoptosis and the accompanying functional demise suggests that GSD1b granulocytes are dysfunctional because they are apoptotic. PMID:12576310

  14. Neutrophilic dermatoses in children.

    PubMed

    Berk, David R; Bayliss, Susan J

    2008-01-01

    The neutrophilic dermatoses are rare disorders, especially in children, and are characterized by neutrophilic infiltrates in the skin and less commonly in extracutaneous tissue. The neutrophilic dermatoses share similar clinical appearances and associated conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, malignancies, and medications. Overlap forms of disease demonstrating features of multiple neutrophilic dermatoses may be seen. The manuscript attempts to provide an up-to-date review of (i) classical neutrophilic dermatoses, focusing on distinctive features in children and (ii) neutrophilic dermatoses which may largely be pediatric or genodermatosis-associated (Majeed, SAPHO [synovitis, severe acne, sterile palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis] syndrome, PAPA (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne), PFAPA (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenopathy), and other periodic fever syndromes, and congenital erosive and vesicular dermatosis healing with reticulated supple scarring). PMID:18950391

  15. Neutrophil Depletion Attenuates Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Lillegard, Kathryn E; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Gilbert, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by reduced placental perfusion with placental ischemia and hypertension during pregnancy. Preeclamptic women also exhibit a heightened inflammatory state and greater number of neutrophils in the vasculature compared to normal pregnancy. Since neutrophils are associated with tissue injury and inflammation, we hypothesized that neutrophils are critical to placental ischemia-induced hypertension and fetal demise. Using the reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat, we determined the effect of neutrophil depletion on blood pressure and fetal resorptions. Neutrophils were depleted with repeated injections of polyclonal rabbit anti-rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) antibody (antiPMN). Rats received either antiPMN or normal rabbit serum (Control) on 13.5, 15.5, 17.5, and 18.5 days post conception (dpc). On 14.5 dpc, rats underwent either Sham surgery or clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta to reduce uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP). On 18.5 dpc, carotid arterial catheters were placed and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured on 19.5 dpc. Neutrophil-depleted rats had reduced circulating neutrophils from 14.5 to 19.5 dpc compared to Control, as well as decreased neutrophils in lung and placenta on 19.5 dpc. MAP increased in RUPP Control vs Sham Control rats, and neutrophil depletion attenuated this increase in MAP in RUPP rats without any effect on Sham rats. The RUPP-induced increase in fetal resorptions and complement activation product C3a were not affected by neutrophil depletion. Thus, these data are the first to indicate that neutrophils play an important role in RUPP hypertension and that cells of the innate immune system may significantly contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:26135305

  16. Relationship between DNA content and nuclear morphology of mature granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Berger, J; Kotelnikov, V M; Kozinec, G I

    1986-01-01

    Increased nuclear segmentation was experimentally induced in rat mature granulocytes. Some mature hypersegmented granulocytes were tetraploid, other hypersegmented granulocytes were diploid. The phenomenon of the formation of tetraploid mature granulocytes has not been observed till the present time. Our data suggest that the increase in nuclear segmentation of granulocytes can be stimulated by elevated DNA content, but the process of nuclear lobe formation is not dependent on cellular content of DNA. PMID:3803627

  17. The effect of epinephrine on granulocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kasprisin, D O; Pang, E J

    1978-01-15

    Preincubation of blood from normal human volunteers with epinephrine significantly decreased the granulocytes ability to adhere to nylon fibres. Possible significance for the in vivo correlation is discussed. PMID:620721

  18. Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation

    PubMed Central

    Köffel, René; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Warszawska, Joanna; Hennig, Annika; Wagner, Karin; Jörgl, Almut; Gubi, Daniela; Moser, Doris; Hladik, Anastasiya; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Fischer, Michael B.; van den Berg, Wim; Koenders, Marije; Scheinecker, Clemens; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Knapp, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell subsets. According to descriptive immunophenotypic and cell culture studies, neutrophils may directly “transdifferentiate” into monocytes/macrophages. We provide mechanistic data in human and murine models supporting the existence of this cellular pathway. First, the inflammatory signal–induced MKK6-p38MAPK cascade activates a monocyte differentiation program in human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor–dependent neutrophils. Second, adoptively transferred neutrophils isolated from G-CSF–pretreated mice rapidly acquired monocyte characteristics in response to inflammatory signals in vivo. Consistently, inflammatory signals led to the recruitment of osteoclast progenitor cell potential from ex vivo–isolated G-CSF–mobilized human blood neutrophils. Monocytic cell differentiation potential was retained in left-shifted band-stage neutrophils but lost in neutrophils from steady-state PB. MKK6-p38MAPK signaling in HL60 model cells led to diminishment of the transcription factor C/EBPα, which enabled the induction of a monocytic cell differentiation program. Gene profiling confirmed lineage conversion from band-stage neutrophils to monocytic cells. Therefore, inflammatory signals relayed by the MKK6-p38MAPK cascade induce monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils. PMID:25214442

  19. Restrictions among heavy and light chain determinants of granulocyte-specific antinuclear factors

    PubMed Central

    Wiik, A.; Munthe, E.

    1972-01-01

    In fifty-five rheumatoid arthritis sera with positive granulocyte-specific antinuclear factors (GS-ANF) tests were made to further characterize these antibodies. All sera contained GS-ANF of the IgG class and most of the sera also of the IgM and IgA classes, whereas only about 10 per cent of the sera contained GS-ANF of the IgD class. Most of the sera contained GS-ANF carrying both κ and λ light chain determinants, but in five cases only one of the light chain subclasses could be found. The distribution of the GS-ANF among the four subclasses of IgG showed marked variations. From one to three subclasses could be lacking or noticeably depressed. There was no predominance of any one or two subclasses. Complement (C3) fixing properties correlated with GS-ANF of the IgG1 and/or IgG3 subclasses. These properties make the GS-ANF interesting as possible pathogenic factors in rheumatoid arthritis. Some evidence is presented that the GS-ANF may be directed against several different antigens in the polymorphonuclear granulocyte nuclei. PMID:4114648

  20. p62/SQSTM1 upregulation constitutes a survival mechanism that occurs during granulocytic differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Trocoli, A; Bensadoun, P; Richard, E; Labrunie, G; Merhi, F; Schläfli, A M; Brigger, D; Souquere, S; Pierron, G; Pasquet, J-M; Soubeyran, P; Reiffers, J; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Tschan, M P; Djavaheri-Mergny, M

    2014-01-01

    The p62/SQSTM1 adapter protein has an important role in the regulation of several key signaling pathways and helps transport ubiquitinated proteins to the autophagosomes and proteasome for degradation. Here, we investigate the regulation and roles of p62/SQSTM1 during acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell maturation into granulocytes. Levels of p62/SQSTM1 mRNA and protein were both significantly increased during all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced differentiation of AML cells through a mechanism that depends on NF-κB activation. We show that this response constitutes a survival mechanism that prolongs the life span of mature AML cells and mitigates the effects of accumulation of aggregated proteins that occurs during granulocytic differentiation. Interestingly, ATRA-induced p62/SQSTM1 upregulation was impaired in maturation-resistant AML cells but was reactivated when differentiation was restored in these cells. Primary blast cells of AML patients and CD34+ progenitors exhibited significantly lower p62/SQSTM1 mRNA levels than did mature granulocytes from healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that p62/SQSTM1 expression is upregulated in mature compared with immature myeloid cells and reveal a pro-survival function of the NF-κB/SQSTM1 signaling axis during granulocytic differentiation of AML cells. These findings may help our understanding of neutrophil/granulocyte development and will guide the development of novel therapeutic strategies for refractory and relapsed AML patients with previous exposure to ATRA. PMID:25034783

  1. CD44 is a cytotoxic triggering molecule on human polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pericle, F; Sconocchia, G; Titus, J A; Segal, D M

    1996-11-15

    In this study, we present evidence that CD44 is a cytotoxic triggering molecule on freshly isolated polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). PMN constitutively express high levels of CD44 as determined by FACS analysis, and immunoprecipitation studies using PMN lysates and an anti-CD44 mAb show a band of 80 to 90 kDa that migrates slightly faster than CD44 from PBL. A bispecific Ab consisting of anti-CD44 Fab cross-linked to anti-DNP Fab (anti-CD44(Fab) x anti-DNP(Fab)) induces PMN to lyse DNP-coated tumor cells in an 18-h assay, and this lysis is specifically inhibited by a polyclonal anti-CD44 F(ab')2. A second bispecific Ab, anti-CD16(Fab) x anti-DNP(Fab), that binds to Fc(gamma)RIIIb on PMN does not induce lysis, indicating that the bridging of target cells to PMN per se is not sufficient for killing. Moreover, CD44-directed killing by PMN results in the lysis of bystander cells, suggesting that the mechanisms of tumor cytolysis by CD44-targeted PMN does not require cell-cell contact. Lastly, PMN lyse target cells coated with hyaluronic acid (HA), the principal ligand for CD44, and this cytolytic activity is specifically blocked by the polyclonal anti-CD44 F(ab')2 and by an anti-CD44 mAb. We suggest that the interaction of HA with CD44 on neutrophils might initiate cytotoxic or inflammatory responses in vivo when neutrophils encounter high amounts of HA, for example on tumor cells, or in the extracellular matrix. PMID:8906846

  2. Group A streptococcal peptidoglycan-polysaccharide inhibits phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, P A; Cohen, M S

    1984-01-01

    Injection of sterile aqueous preparations of the peptidoglycan-polysaccharide of group A streptococci (PG-APS) produces chronic inflammation in several animal models. Chronic bacterial infection may be involved in some aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammation associated with the accumulation of PG-APS. Accordingly, the effect of PG-APS on human neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte [PMN]) bactericidal activity was studied with the supposition that this interaction may contribute to the inflammation observed. Concentrations of PG-APS greater than 10 micrograms/ml inhibited the ability of PMNs to kill Staphylococcus aureus. This inhibition was not due to a cytotoxic effect of PG-APS on PMNs, nor did PG-APS inhibit PMN metabolism required for the formation of microbicidal oxygen reduction products. PG-APS concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml or greater in the presence of 10% normal serum inhibited the attachment of bacteria to PMNs by 49% as compared with control cell populations. The concentrations of PG-APS required to inhibit uptake of Staphylococcus aureus were identical to those required for inhibition of PMN bactericidal activity. This inhibition did not occur in the presence of serum-free medium or medium with sera that had been heated to inactivate complement. These results show that PG-APS interacts with serum to inhibit PMN-mediated killing of S. aureus, most probably by interfering with bacterial uptake. PMID:6378796

  3. CD99 is a key mediator of the transendothelial migration of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lou, Olivia; Alcaide, Pilar; Luscinskas, Francis W; Muller, William A

    2007-01-15

    Transendothelial migration of leukocytes is a critical event for inflammation, but the molecular regulation of this event is only beginning to be understood. PECAM (CD31) is a major mediator of monocyte and neutrophil transmigration, and CD99 was recently defined as a second mediator of the transmigration of monocytes. Expression of CD99 on the surface of circulating polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) is low compared with expression of CD99 on monocytes or expression of PECAM on PMN. We demonstrate here that, despite low expression of CD99, Fab of Abs against CD99 blocked over 80% of human neutrophils from transmigrating across HUVEC monolayers in an in vitro model of inflammation. Blocking CD99 on either the neutrophil or endothelial cell side resulted in a quantitatively equivalent block, suggesting a homophilic interaction between CD99 on the neutrophil and CD99 on the endothelial cell. Blocking CD99 and PECAM together resulted in additive effects, suggesting the two molecules work at distinct steps. Confocal microscopy confirmed that CD99-blocked neutrophils lodged in endothelial cell junctions at locations distal to PECAM-blocked neutrophils. The CD99-blocked PMN exhibited dynamic lateral movement within endothelial cell junctions, indicating that only the diapedesis step was blocked by interference with CD99. Anti-CD99 mAb also blocked PMN transmigration in a second in vitro model that incorporated shear stress. Taken together, the evidence demonstrates that PECAM and CD99 regulate distinct, sequential steps in the transendothelial migration of neutrophils during inflammation. PMID:17202377

  4. G-CSF Analogue Treatment Increases Peripheral Neutrophil Numbers in Pigs - a Potential Alternative for In-Feed Antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunomodulators is a promising area for therapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease during periods of peak disease incidence. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhances neutrophil production and release from the bone marrow and is already li...

  5. Functional interaction between mutations in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor in severe congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Gits, Judith; Majeed, Fidel; Aprikyan, Andrew A; Lewis, Rowena S; O'Sullivan, Lynda A; Freedman, Melvin; Shigdar, Sarah; Touw, Ivo P; Dale, David C; Dror, Yigal

    2008-08-01

    Most severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) cases possess constitutive neutrophil elastase mutations; a smaller cohort has acquired mutations truncating the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). We have described a case with constitutive extracellular G-CSF-R mutation hyporesponsive to ligand. Here we report two independent acquired G-CSF-R truncation mutations and a novel constitutive neutrophil elastase mutation in this patient. Co-expression of a truncated receptor chain restored STAT5 signalling responses of the extracellular G-CSF-R mutant, while constitutively-active STAT5 enhanced its proliferative capacity. These data add to our knowledge of SCN and further highlight the importance of STAT5 in mediating proliferative responses to G-CSF. PMID:18513286

  6. Immunoreceptors on neutrophils.

    PubMed

    van Rees, Dieke J; Szilagyi, Katka; Kuijpers, Taco W; Matlung, Hanke L; van den Berg, Timo K

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the host defense against infection, and they are able to perform a variety of effector mechanisms for this purpose. However, there are also a number of pathological conditions, including autoimmunity and cancer, in which the activities of neutrophils can be harmful to the host. Thus the activities of neutrophils need to be tightly controlled. As in the case of other immune cells, many of the neutrophil effector functions are regulated by a series of immunoreceptors on the plasma membrane. Here, we review what is currently known about the functions of the various individual immunoreceptors and their signaling in neutrophils. While these immunoreceptors allow for the recognition of a diverse range of extracellular ligands, such as cell surface structures (like proteins, glycans and lipids) and extracellular matrix components, they commonly signal via conserved ITAM or ITIM motifs and their associated downstream pathways that depend on the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and/or inositol lipids. This allows for a balanced homeostatic regulation of neutrophil effector functions. Given the number of available immunoreceptors and their fundamental importance for neutrophil behavior, it is perhaps not surprising that pathogens have evolved means to evade immune responses through some of these pathways. Inversely, some of these receptors evolved to specifically recognize these pathogens. Finally, some interactions mediated by immunoreceptors in neutrophils have been identified as promising targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26976825

  7. Neutrophils in cancer.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Louise W; Hiemstra, Ida H; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Matlung, Hanke L

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in cancer. This does not only relate to the well-established prognostic value of the presence of neutrophils, either in the blood or in tumor tissue, in the context of cancer progression or for the monitoring of therapy, but also to their active role in the progression of cancer. In the current review, we describe what is known in general about the role of neutrophils in cancer. What is emerging is a complex, rather heterogeneous picture with both pro- and anti-tumorigenic roles, which apparently differs with cancer type and disease stage. Furthermore, we will discuss the well-known role of neutrophils as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and also on the role of neutrophils as important effector cells during antibody therapy in cancer. It is clear that neutrophils contribute substantially to cancer progression in multiple ways, and this includes both direct effects on the cancer cells and indirect effect on the tumor microenvironment. While in many cases neutrophils have been shown to promote tumor progression, for instance by acting as MDSC, there are also protective effects, particularly when antibody immunotherapy is performed. A better understanding of the role of neutrophils is likely to provide opportunities for immunomodulation and for improving the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27558343

  8. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  9. [Neutrophilic functional heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    2006-02-01

    Blood neutrophilic functional heterogeneity is under discussion. The neutrophils of one subpopulation, namely killer neutrophils (Nk), potential phagocytes, constitute a marginal pool and a part of the circulating pool, intensively produce active oxygen forms (AOF) and they are adherent to the substrate. The neutrophils of another subpopulation, cager neutrophils (Nc), seem to perform a transport function of delivering foreign particles to the competent organs, to form about half of the circulating pool, to produce APC to a lesser extent, exclusively for self-defense and, probably, in usual conditions, to fail to interact with substrate. Analysis of the experimental findings suggests that the phylogenetic age of Nk is older than that of Nc and Nk has predominantly a tendency to spontaneous apoptosis under physiological conditions. PMID:16610631

  10. [Change in neutrophils in liquidators of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Zhiliaev, E G; Grebeniuk, A N; Antushevich, A E; Legeza, V I; Smirnov, N A

    1998-02-01

    In result of own researches and analysis of the literature? the information about high sensitivity of neutrophils of peripheric blood to infringements of constancy of internal state of body, arising as reply to radiating influence, are received. Ionized radiation modulates greatly properties and functions of neutrophilic granulocytes, which are the most sensitive and high-modulated cells of non-specific resistance system. The changes of the functional-metabolic status of neutrophils in participants of liquidation of consequences of Chernobyl disaster have been saving during 10 years after influence of the extreme, including radiating, factors of failure. PMID:9567724

  11. Pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly and granulocytic dysplasia associated with human granulocytic anaplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunyoung; Khankhanian, Pouya; Salama, Carlos; Brown, Maritza; Lieber, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly (PHA) refers to mono- or bi-lobed granulocytes, reportedly observed in patients with severe infections and inflammation or hematological malignancies including myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Dysplastic changes in granulocytes are typical manifestations in MDS and granulocytic leukemias. Here, we report the unique case of a patient found to have human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a tick-borne disease caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, a Gram-negative coccobacillus. This patient showed striking hematological manifestations including a large number of pseudo-PHA, a severe degree of left shift, and dysplastic granulocytes. These hematological presentations on the peripheral smear all resolved with doxycycline treatment, implying that the changes were most likely reactive manifestations secondary to HGA, rather than underlying hematological malignancies such as MDS or AML. PMID:25749661

  12. Improved viability and activity of neutrophils differentiated from HL-60 cells by co-culture with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yoon Shin; Lim, Goh-Woon; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn; Shin, Meeyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sun; Chan Ra, Jeong; Ryu, Kyung-Ha

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of neutrophils with AD-MSC retained cell survival and proliferation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum starved conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC increased functions of neutrophil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC promoted the viability of neutrophils by enhancing respiratory burst through the expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC can be used to improve immunity for neutropenia treatment. -- Abstract: Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. We investigated the supportive effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on the viability and function of neutrophils. Neutrophils were derived from HL-60 cells by dimethylformamide stimulation and cultured with or without AD-MSCs under serum-starved conditions to evaluate neutrophil survival, proliferation, and function. Serum starvation resulted in the apoptosis of neutrophils and decreased cell survival. The co-culture of neutrophils and AD-MSCs resulted in cell survival and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum-starved conditions. The survival rate of neutrophils was prolonged up to 72 h, and the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} in AD-MSCs were increased after co-culture with neutrophils. AD-MSCs promoted the viability of neutrophils by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing respiratory burst, which could potentially be mediated by the increased expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Thus, we conclude that the use of AD-MSCs may be a promising cell-based therapy for increasing immunity by accelerating neutrophil function.

  13. Influence of tetracyclines on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function.

    PubMed Central

    Glette, J; Sandberg, S; Hopen, G; Solberg, C O

    1984-01-01

    Low concentrations of oxytetracycline, doxycycline, or minocycline (less than 10 micrograms/ml) did not influence in vitro polymorphonuclear leukocyte random migration, chemiluminescence, or glucose oxidation. At high concentrations of doxycycline or minocycline (greater than 10 micrograms/ml), chemiluminescence and glucose oxidation were impaired. High concentrations of doxycycline also reduced random migration. Oxytetracycline did not influence these functions in concentrations up to 100 micrograms/ml. The inhibiting effect of doxycycline and minocycline was abolished when 4 mM Mg2+ was added to the reaction mixture, and 4 mM Ca2+ partly restored minocycline-inhibited polymorphonuclear leukocyte functions. This indicates that the major effect of tetracyclines on in vitro polymorphonuclear leukocyte functions is mediated by their divalent cation chelating effect and that the results of in vitro experiments are highly dependent on the concentration of divalent cations in the reaction mixtures. The difference between the tetracyclines may be due to differences in lipid solubility, with solubility being highest for minocycline and lowest for oxytetracycline, or to different divalent cation chelating ability. PMID:6721468

  14. Neutrophil kinetics in man.

    PubMed Central

    Dancey, J T; Deubelbeiss, K A; Harker, L A; Finch, C A

    1976-01-01

    A method has been developed for measuring neutrophil cellularity in normal human bone marrow, in which the neutrophil-erythroid ratio was determined from marrow sections and marrow normoblasts were estimated by the erythron iron turnover. Neutrophil maturational categories, defined by morphologic criteria, were supported by autoradiographs of marrow flashed-labeled with 3H-thymidine. Correction for multiple counting error was empirically derived by counting serial sections through cells of each maturational category. The normal neutrophil-erythroid ratio in 13 normal human subjects was 1.5 +/- 0.07. The mean number of normoblasts in the same subjects was estimated to be 5.07 +/- 0.84 X 10(9) cells/kg. Total marrow neutrophils (X 10(9) cells/kg) were 7.70 +/- 1.20, the postmitotic pool (metamyelocytes, bands, and segmented forms) was 5.59 +/- 0.90 and the mitotic pool (promyelocytes + myelocytes) was 2.11 +/- 0.36. Marrow neutrophil ("total") production has been determined from the number of neutrophils comprising the postmitotic marrow pool divided by their transit time Transit time was derived from the appearance in circulating neutrophils of injected 3H-thymidine. The postmitotic pool comprised 5.59 +/- 0.90 X 10(9) neutrophils/kg, and the transit time was 6.60 +/- 0.03 days. From these data marrow neutrophil production was calculated to be 0.85 X 10(9) cells/kg per day. Effective production, measured as the turnover of circulating neutrophils labeled with 3H-thymidine, was 0.87 +/- 0.13 X 10(9) cells/kg per day. This value correlated well with the calculation of marrow neutrophil production. A larger turnover of 1.62 +/- 0.46 X 10(9) cells/kg per day was obtained when diisopropylfluorophosphate-32P was used to label circulating neutrophils. Studies using isologous cells doubly labeled with 3H-thymidine and diisopropylfluorophosphate-32P demonstrated a lower recovery and shorter t1/2 of the 32P label. Images PMID:956397

  15. Granulocyte antigen systems and antibodies and their clinical significance

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, J.

    1983-03-01

    Granulocyte alloantibodies and autoantibodies have a key role in the pathophysiology of several clinical problems. These include febrile transfusion reactions, severe pulmonary reactions to transfusion, isoimmune neonatal neutropenia, failure of effective granulocyte transfusion, autoimmune neutropenia, drug-induced neutropenia, and neutropenias secondary to many other diseases. Although many techniques are available for detecting granulocyte antibodies, the optimal in-vitro tests for predicting the antibodies' clinical effects are not established. Use of indium-111-labeled granulocytes may provide valuable information regarding the in-vivo effects of different granulocyte antibodies. Granulocyte transfusions continue to be used for a limited number of severely infected neutropenic patients who do not respond to antibiotic therapy.

  16. Regulation of surface expression of the granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor in normal human myeloid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cannistra, S.A.; Groshek, P.; Griffin, J.D. ); Garlick, R.; Miller, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) exerts stimulatory effects on hematopoietic cells through binding to specific, high-affinity receptors. By using radiolabeled GM-CSF with high specific activity, the authors have investigated the factors and mechanisms that regulate GM-CSF receptor expression in normal human neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells. The neutrophil GM-CSF receptor was found to rapidly internalize in the presence of ligand through a mechanism that required endocytosis. Out of a large panel of naturally occurring humoral factors tested, only GM-CSF itself, tumor necrosis factor, and formyl-Met-Leu-Phe were found to down-regulate neutrophil GM-CSF receptor expression after a 2-hr exposure at biologically active concentrations. Since formyl-Met-Leu-Phe is known to stimulate neutrophil protein kinase C activity, they also tested the ability of protein kinase C agonists to modulate GM-CSF receptor expression. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, bryostatin-1, and 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol were found to induce rapid down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor in neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified myeloid progenitor cells, suggesting that this effect may be at least partially mediated by protein kinase C. These data suggest that certain activators of neutrophil function may negatively regulate their biological effects by inducing down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor.

  17. Modulation of leukotriene release from human polymorphonuclear leucocytes by PMA and arachidonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Raulf, M; König, W

    1988-01-01

    Stimulation of human neutrophils (PMN) with Ca ionophore A23187, opsonized zymosan and formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) led to a time- and dose-dependent release of LTB4, 20-OH-LTB4, 20-COOH-LTB4, 6-trans-LTB4, 12-epi-6-trans LTB4 and LTC4, as detected by reverse-phase HPLC. Preincubation of the PMN suspension in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) did not release leukotrienes by itself, but modulated the subsequent Ca ionophore-induced leukotriene release. The release of LTC4, 20-OH-LTB4 and 20-COOH-LTB4 was significantly decreased. Lesser effects were observed for the release of LTB4 and the non-enzymatic LTB4 isomers. In contrast, opsonized zymosan and FMLP enhanced the release of LTB4 and LTB4-omega-oxidation products from cells pretreated with PMA. With arachidonic acid as prestimulus, the amounts of the LTB4 isomers (6-trans-LTB4 and 12-epi-6-trans-LTB4) were enhanced significantly on subsequent stimulation with Ca ionophore. Prestimulation of lymphocytes, monocytes and basophilic granulocytes (LMB) with PMA had no significant effects on the ionophore-induced release of LTC4 and LTB4. PMN, but not LMB, suspensions prestimulated with PMA convert exogenously added LTC4 to LTB4 isomers and LTC4 sulphoxide. Our data suggest that preincubation of human granulocytes with PMA modified leukotriene release by activation or inhibition of different metabolic pathways for LTC4 and LTB4. PMID:2838420

  18. Cyclic oscillation of blood neutrophils in a patient with multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Chikkappa, G.; Chanana, A.D.; Chandra, P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Thompson, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with multiple myeloma developed periodic blood neutropenia (periodicity of 15 to 25 days) after 3 yr of intermittent treatment with cytotoxic agents. Peaks of serum colony-stimulating activity (CSA) level coincided with valleys of blood neutrophils. Fraction of marrow neutrophils in the multiplicative pool was high during blood neutrophil valleys and low during neutrophil peaks. In contrast, the maturation storage pool exhibited the reverse pattern. An increased fraction of marrow neutrophilic cells in the multiplicative pool was in active proliferation during a blood neutrophil valley and a decreased fraction during a blood neutrophil peak. These findings suggest that the marrow granulopoiesis was regulated through CSA. The defect causing the periodicity was probably related to the reduced number of neutrophils in the marrow maturation storge pool, which in turn may be related to a reduced and/or defective granulocytic stem cell pool size consiquent to the long-term administration of cytotoxic drugs and/or infiltration of the marrow by myeloma cells.

  19. Plasma myeloperoxidase level and polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation in horses suffering from large intestinal obstruction requiring surgery: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, S; Benbarek, H; Caudron, I; Deby-Dupont, G; Mathy-Hartert, M; Farnir, F; Deby, C; Lamy, M; Serteyn, D

    1999-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a specific enzyme of neutrophil azurophilic granules with a strong oxidative activity. Thanks to a radioimmunoassay of equine myeloperoxidase, the authors have observed a significantly higher plasma level of MPO in horses operated for strangulation obstruction of the large intestine (n = 6) than in horses suffering from a non-strangulating displacement of the large intestine (n = 9). For the 2 groups, 3 phases were distinguished: reception (P1), intensive care (P2) and terminal phase (P3). The mean peak values of MPO for these phases were 121.6 ng/mL (P1), 168.6 ng/mL (P2), and 107.0 ng/mL (P3) for the non-strangulating group, and 242.6 ng/mL (P1); 426.0 ng/mL (P2), and 379.5 ng/mL (P3) for the strangulation group. The variations of the mean peak values of plasma MPO were significantly different between the 2 groups and between the different phases. A significant increase of the least square means of MPO was observed between P1 and P2. A significant decrease of the least square means of the number of circulating leukocytes was observed between P1 and P3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation could play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute abdominal disease and endotoxic shock. PMID:10369573

  20. Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels modulate α-defensin release from polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lieberthal, Tyler Jacob; Cohen, Hannah Caitlin; Kao, W John

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) release granule proteins as the first line of defense against bacteria and set up chemotactic gradients that result in monocyte infiltration to the site of injury. Although well established, the role of biomaterials in regulating adherent PMN degranulation and subsequent PMN-monocyte paracrine interactions is less clear. The aim of this study was to determine how biomaterials affect the degranulation of selected biomarkers and downstream monocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-containing hydrogels (PEG and an interpenetrating network of PEG and gelatin) promote the release of the α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1-3, but not azurocidin or monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Although human neutrophil peptides 1-3 are monocyte chemoattractants, no subsequent effects on monocyte transmigration are observed in static conditions. Under flow conditions, monocyte adhesion on human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α is elevated in the presence of granule proteins from PMNs adherent on polydimethylsiloxane, but not from PMNs cultured on PEG hydrogels. These results suggest that PEG promotes PMN antimicrobial capacity without enhanced monocyte recruitment. PMID:26053326

  1. Metabolic regulation of neutrophil spreading, membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) formation and intracellular pH upon adhesion to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Galkina, Svetlana I. . E-mail: galkina@genebee.msu.su; Sud'ina, Galina F.; Klein, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Circulating leukocytes have a round cell shape and roll along vessel walls. However, metabolic disorders can lead them to adhere to the endothelium and spread (flatten). We studied the metabolic regulation of adhesion, spreading and intracellular pH (pHi) of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata. Resting neutrophils adhered and spread on fibronectin. An increase in pHi accompanied neutrophil spreading. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of P- and F-type ATPases affected neither neutrophil spreading nor pHi. Inhibition of glucose metabolism or V-ATPase impaired neutrophil spreading, blocked the increase in the pHi and induced extrusion of membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes), anchoring cells to substrata. Omission of extracellular Na{sup +} and inhibition of chloride channels caused a similar effect. We propose that these tubulovesicular extensions represent protrusions of exocytotic trafficking, supplying the plasma membrane of neutrophils with ion exchange mechanisms and additional membrane for spreading. Glucose metabolism and V-type ATPase could affect fusion of exocytotic trafficking with the plasma membrane, thus controlling neutrophil adhesive state and pHi. Cl{sup -} efflux through chloride channels and Na{sup +} influx seem to be involved in the regulation of the V-ATPase by carrying out charge compensation for the proton-pumping activity and through V-ATPase in regulation of neutrophil spreading and pHi.

  2. Propensity of crocin to offset Vipera russelli venom induced oxidative stress mediated neutrophil apoptosis: a biochemical insight.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M Sebastin; Sundaram, M Shanmuga; Sunitha, K; Jnaneshwari, S; Devaraja, S; Kemparaju, K; Girish, K S

    2016-01-01

    Viper envenomation results in inflammation at the bitten site as well as target organs. Neutrophils and other polymorphonuclear leukocytes execute inflammation resolving mechanism and will undergo apoptosis after completing the task. However, the target specific toxins induce neutrophil apoptosis at the bitten site and in circulation prior to their function, thus reducing their number. Circulating activated neutrophils are major source of inflammatory cytokines and leakage of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/other toxic intermediates resulting in aggravation of inflammatory response at the bitten/target site. Therefore, neutralization of venom induced neutrophil apoptosis reduces inflammation besides increasing the functional neutrophil population. Therefore, the present study investigates the venom induced perturbances in isolated human neutrophils and its neutralization by crocin (Crocus sativus) a potent antioxidant carotenoid. Human neutrophils on treatment with venom resulted in altered ROS generation, intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cyt-c translocation, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA damage. On the other hand significant protection against oxidative stress and apoptosis were evidenced in crocin pre-treated groups. In conclusion the viper venom induces neutrophil apoptosis and results in aggravation of inflammation and tissue damage. The present study demands the necessity of an auxiliary therapy in addition to antivenin therapy to treat secondary/overlooked complications of envenomation. PMID:25149285

  3. Human Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis Complicating Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Muffly, Tyler; McCormick, T. Chad; Cook, Christopher; Wall, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Background. The goal of this case is to review the zoonotic infection, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, presenting with pyrexia. Case. A 22-year-old multigravid female presented to the emergency department with a painful skin rash, high fever, and severe myalgias. The patient underwent a diagnostic evaluation for zoonotic infections due to her geographical and seasonal risk factors. Treatment of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis was successful though the patient spontaneously aborted presumably due to the severity of the acute illness. Conclusion. Treatment of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in pregnancy presents unique challenges. Management of pyrexia during pregnancy is limited to external cooling in the setting of thrombocytopenia and elevated aminotransferases. Extensive counseling regarding teratogenic potential of medications allows the patient to weigh the pros and cons of treatment. PMID:18509484

  4. Neutrophil Elastase, Proteinase 3, and Cathepsin G as Therapeutic Targets in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Gauthier, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the first cells recruited to inflammatory sites and form the earliest line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are three hematopoietic serine proteases stored in large quantities in neutrophil cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They act in combination with reactive oxygen species to help degrade engulfed microorganisms inside phagolysosomes. These proteases are also externalized in an active form during neutrophil activation at inflammatory sites, thus contributing to the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. As multifunctional proteases, they also play a regulatory role in noninfectious inflammatory diseases. Mutations in the ELA2/ELANE gene, encoding neutrophil elastase, are the cause of human congenital neutropenia. Neutrophil membrane-bound proteinase 3 serves as an autoantigen in Wegener granulomatosis, a systemic autoimmune vasculitis. All three proteases are affected by mutations of the gene (CTSC) encoding dipeptidyl peptidase I, a protease required for activation of their proform before storage in cytoplasmic granules. Mutations of CTSC cause Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. Because of their roles in host defense and disease, elastase, proteinase 3, and cathepsin G are of interest as potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we describe the physicochemical functions of these proteases, toward a goal of better delineating their role in human diseases and identifying new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of their bioavailability and activity. We also describe how nonhuman primate experimental models could assist with testing the efficacy of proposed therapeutic strategies. PMID:21079042

  5. The protective effect of GM-CSF on serum-induced neutrophil apoptosis in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Chiewchengchol, Direkrit; Midgley, Angela; Sodsai, Pimpayao; Deekajorndech, Tawatchai; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Beresford, Michael W; Edwards, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases in children and can affect multiple organs and systems. The etiology remains unclear, and current management only suppresses rather than eliminates the disease. The pathogenesis is triggered by autoantigens that induce autoantibody production. Apoptotic neutrophils may be one source of autoantigens in JSLE, and increased numbers of apoptotic neutrophils in JSLE have been reported. This study aimed to determine if factor(s) in JSLE serum induce neutrophil apoptosis, to identify the most potent cytokine in delaying neutrophil apoptosis, and to investigate whether this cytokine can reverse the pro-apoptotic effects of JSLE serum. Blood neutrophils and sera were collected from JSLE patients, healthy children and adult controls. Neutrophils from healthy adult controls were incubated with 10 % serum from either JSLE patients or pediatric controls. Neutrophils from healthy adult controls were also incubated with 10 % JSLE serum with or without granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) supplementation. Neutrophil apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry (annexin-V/propidium iodide staining). Caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-8 protein expression was detected using Western blotting. Neutrophils incubated with JSLE sera had significantly increased apoptosis at 6 h compared to those incubated with control sera. Cleaved (active) forms of caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-8 were identified in neutrophils incubated with JSLE sera (that showed high rates of apoptosis) compared to control sera. GM-CSF had the most protective effect on neutrophil apoptosis, significantly preventing neutrophil apoptosis and caspase activation induced by JSLE serum. JSLE serum significantly induced neutrophil apoptosis in healthy adult neutrophils, activating the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The observation that GM-CSF prevents activation of apoptosis in response to JSLE serum should prompt

  6. Cytotoxic immigration of granulocytes into megakaryocytes as a late consequence of irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, W.; Alabi, R.; Nothdurft, W.; Fliedner, T.M.

    1994-05-01

    The immigration of neutrophilic granulocytes into megakaryocyte was studied in the bone marrow of normal and X-irradiated beagle under various exposure conditions. Two groups of dogs received homogeneous total-body irradiation. One group received a dose of 1.6 Gy and the other received a dose of 2.4 Gy (midline tissue). A third group was irradiated from the left side of the body only. This exposure resulted in an inhomogeneous total-body irradiation (entrance dose 3.8 Gy, exit dose 0.9 Gy). A fourth group of animals received partial-body irradiation with a dose of 11.7 Gy delivered to the anterior two-thirds of the body, thereby subjecting about 70% of the hemopoietic marrow to irradiation. Dogs of a fifth group remained unexposed to irradiation and served as controls. The marrow was analyzed in sections of the ribs approximately 1 year after irradiation. The total number of megakaryocytes in one section was evaluated. The number of megakaryocytes showing granulocytes in their cytoplasm was determined and expressed as a percentage. This phenomenon can be explained as cytotoxic immigration of granulocytes into megakaryocytes. It was observed in approximately 1-2 of the megakaryocytes in the marrow of normal dogs. One year after irradiation the value increased of normal dogs. One year after irradiation the value increased to 10-26%. It was observed that neutrophilic granuloytes penetrated only into the large mature megakaryocytes in which the nuclei were most pyknotic. This phenomenon may be considered as a late effect of irradiation. 15 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The lymph node neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Henry R; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs provide a specialized microenvironment tailored to foster communication between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. These interactions allow immune cells to coordinate multilayered defense against pathogens. Until recently dendritic cells and macrophages were thought to comprise the main innate immune cell subsets responsible for delivering signals that drive the adaptive immune response, while the function of neutrophils was largely confined to the innate immune system. However, the discovery of neutrophils in lymph nodes has raised the question of whether neutrophils might play a more extensive role not only in innate immunity per se, but also in coordinating the interactions between innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review we discuss the mechanisms and consequences of neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes and how this recruitment influences subsequent immune responses both in situ and at distant sites. PMID:27025975

  8. Neutrophils in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laval, Julie; Ralhan, Anjali; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. Among inflammatory cells, neutrophils represent the major cell population accumulating in the airways of CF patients. While neutrophils provide the first defensive cellular shield against bacterial and fungal pathogens, in chronic disease conditions such as CF these short-lived immune cells release their toxic granule contents that cause tissue remodeling and irreversible structural damage to the host. A variety of human and murine studies have analyzed neutrophils and their products in the context of CF, yet their precise functional role and therapeutic potential remain controversial and incompletely understood. Here, we summarize the current evidence in this field to shed light on the complex and multi-faceted role of neutrophils in CF lung disease. PMID:26854289

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection of oral epithelium inhibits neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed Central

    Madianos, P N; Papapanou, P N; Sandros, J

    1997-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are inflammatory disorders caused by microorganisms of dental plaque that colonize the gingival sulcus and, subsequently, the periodontal pocket. As in other mucosal infections, the host response to plaque bacteria is characterized by an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the gingival crevice. Neutrophil migration through the epithelial lining of the gingival pocket is thought to be the first line of defense against plaque bacteria. In order to model this phenomenon in vitro, we used the oral epithelial cell line KB and human PMNs in the Transwell system and examined the impact of Porphyromonas gingivalis-epithelial cell interactions on subsequent PMN transepithelial migration. We demonstrate here that P. gingivalis infection of oral epithelial cells failed to trigger transmigration of PMNs. Furthermore, it significantly inhibited neutrophil transmigration actively induced by stimuli such as N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and the intestinal pathogen enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The ability of P. gingivalis to block PMN transmigration was strongly positively correlated with the ability to adhere to and invade epithelial cells. In addition, P. gingivalis attenuated the production of IL-8 and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 by epithelial cells. The ability of P. gingivalis to block neutrophil migration across an intact epithelial barrier may critically impair the potential of the host to confront the bacterial challenge and thus may play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:9316996

  10. Neutrophil dynamics in the blood and milk of crossbred cows naturally infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Dilip K.; Kushwah, Mohar Singh; Kaur, Mandheer; Dang, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the neutrophil dynamics in terms of the functional competence during subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis (CM). Materials and Methods: A total of 146 Karan fries cows were screened and were divided into three groups as control (n=12), SCM, n=12 and CM, n=12 groups on the basis of California mastitis test scoring, bacteriological evaluation, gross and morphological changes in milk and by counting milk somatic cell count (SCC). Both blood and milk polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) were isolated in the study. Phagocytic activity (PA) was studied by spectrophotometrically; neutrophil extracelluar traps (NETs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); CD44 was quantified by flow cytometry and apoptosis was studied by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Significantly (p<0.05) higher SCC, PA was found in milk of CM cows as compared to SCM and control cows. Significantly lower (p<0.05) apoptosis was observed in PMNs isolated from both blood and milk of CM group of cows when compared to control and SCM group. The milk neutrophils of CM group of cows formed NETs as evidenced from the SEM images. Surface expression of CD44 revealed a significantly (p<0.05) lower expression in milk neutrophils of CM group of cows when compared to SCM and control group of cows. Conclusion: The study indicated a positive correlation between delayed neutrophil apoptosis, persistent staying of neutrophils at the site of infection along with formation of NETs as the strategies to fight against the pathogens in the udder during Staphylococcal mastitis. The study forms a strong base for future molecular research in terms of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil removal from the site of infection. PMID:27047094

  11. Neutrophil biology: an update

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are involved in bacterial killing as well as autoimmunity, because NETs contain proteases, bactericidal peptides, DNA and ribonucleoprotein. NETs are formed via a novel type of cell death called NETosis. NETosis is distinct from apoptosis, but it resembles necrosis in that both membranes are not intact so that they allow intracellular proteins to leak outside of the cells. Removal of NETs and neutrophils undergoing NETosis by phagocytes and its subsequent response are not completely clarified, as compared with the response after removal of either apoptotic or necrotic neutrophils by phagocytes. How neutrophil density in peripheral blood is kept within a certain range is important for health and disease. Although the studies on severe congenital neutropenia and benign ethnic neutropenia have provided unbiased views on it, the studies are rather limited to human neutropenia, and mice with a mutation of mouse counterpart gene often fail to exhibit neutropenia. Degranulation plays a critical role in bactericidal action. The recent studies revealed that it is also involved in immunomodulation, pain control and estrous cycle control. N1 and N2 are representative of neutrophil subpopulations. The dichotomy holds true in patients or mice with severe trauma or cancer, providing the basis of differential roles of neutrophils in diseases. PMID:26600743

  12. Genetically Determined Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Mice Causally Involves Accelerated and Enhanced Recruitment of Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Brandau, Sven; Hermann, Corinna; Ehlers, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classical twin studies and recent linkage analyses of African populations have revealed a potential involvement of host genetic factors in susceptibility or resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to identify the candidate genes involved and test their causal implication, we capitalized on the mouse model of tuberculosis, since inbred mouse strains also differ substantially in their susceptibility to infection. Two susceptible and two resistant mouse strains were aerogenically infected with 1,000 CFU of M. tuberculosis, and the regulation of gene expression was examined by Affymetrix GeneChip U74A array with total lung RNA 2 and 4 weeks postinfection. Four weeks after infection, 96 genes, many of which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, were regulated in common. One hundred seven genes were differentially regulated in susceptible mouse strains, whereas 43 genes were differentially expressed only in resistant mice. Data mining revealed a bias towards the expression of genes involved in granulocyte pathophysiology in susceptible mice, such as an upregulation of those for the neutrophil chemoattractant LIX (CXCL5), interleukin 17 receptor, phosphoinositide kinase 3 delta, or gamma interferon-inducible protein 10. Following M. tuberculosis challenge in both airways or peritoneum, granulocytes were recruited significantly faster and at higher numbers in susceptible than in resistant mice. When granulocytes were efficiently depleted by either of two regimens at the onset of infection, only susceptible mice survived aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis significantly longer than control mice. We conclude that initially enhanced recruitment of granulocytes contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:16790804

  13. Role of neutrophils in experimental septicemia and septic arthritis induced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Verdrengh, M; Tarkowski, A

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a murine model of hematogenously induced Staphylococcus aureus sepsis and arthritis. In this model, large numbers of granulocytes can be observed both in the circulation and locally in the inflamed synovium within 24 h after bacterial inoculation. To assess the role of neutrophils in this severe infection, mice were given granulocyte-depleting monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 before being inoculated with S. aureus. All the control mice survived their intravenous injection with 3 x 10(7) CFU of S. aureus, whereas all the mice given RB6-8C5 antibody died of sepsis within 2 to 3 days. Even when the inoculum size was reduced sixfold (i.e., 6 x 10(6) CFU/mouse), 50% of the RB6-8C5-treated animals died within 6 days. The RB6-8C5-treated mice had a significantly higher burden of bacteria in their blood and kidneys 24 and 48 h after bacterial inoculation. In addition, when a suboptimal dose of bacteria was administered, the neutrophil-depleted animals displayed a higher frequency of arthritis than did the controls. The granulocyte-depleted animals exhibited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon, reflecting the severity of their disease. This is the first direct demonstration of neutrophils playing a crucial protective role in the early phase of S. aureus infection. PMID:9199413

  14. Interaction of Bovine Peripheral Blood Polymorphonuclear Cells and Leptospira Species; Innate Responses in the Natural Bovine Reservoir Host

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H.; Frank, Ami T.; Hornsby, Richard L.; Olsen, Steven C.; Alt, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and Leptospira interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia, and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2) was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of Leptospira strains

  15. Interaction of Bovine Peripheral Blood Polymorphonuclear Cells and Leptospira Species; Innate Responses in the Natural Bovine Reservoir Host.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H; Frank, Ami T; Hornsby, Richard L; Olsen, Steven C; Alt, David P

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and Leptospira interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia, and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2) was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of Leptospira strains

  16. Ozone-induced acute tracheobronchial epithelial injury: relationship to granulocyte emigration in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, D.M.; Hubbard, W.C.; Wong, V.; Wu, R.; Pinkerton, K.; Plopper, C.G. )

    1992-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between granulocyte emigration and epithelial injury in specific airway generations of the tracheobronchial tree following short-term ozone exposure, we exposed rhesus monkeys for 8 h to 0.00 (controls) or 0.96 ppm ozone with post-exposure periods of 1, 12, 24, 72, and 168 h in filtered air before necropsy. There were five control and three exposed monkeys for each of the post-exposure times for a total of 20 monkeys. Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood and labeled with 111In-tropolonate were infused in the cephalic vein in unanesthetized monkeys (except the 1-h group) 4 to 5 h before necropsy. The trachea and microdissected bronchi (fourth and ninth generations) and respiratory bronchioles (fifteenth generation) from the right upper lobe of each monkey were examined by electron microscopy. Labeled neutrophil influx into lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was maximal at 12 h and returned to baseline by 24 h after exposure. This was in contrast to total neutrophils in BALF, which were significantly elevated through 24 h after exposure but returned to baseline by 72 h. Lavage protein was significantly elevated at 24 h after exposure but was at control levels at all other times. Morphometric observations showed epithelial necrosis at 1 and 12 h in the trachea and bronchioles but continued to be observed in significant numbers at 24 h after exposure in bronchi. A significant increase in the labeling index of epithelial cells was observed at 12 h only in bronchi. Epithelial necrosis and repair was associated with the presence of granulocytes in the epithelium and interstitium of all airway levels. However, eosinophils were maximally increased in the epithelium and interstitium of bronchi at 24 h after exposure when epithelial necrosis was maximal in these airways and when lavage protein was significantly elevated.

  17. The influence of chemotactic factors on neutrophil adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, J T; Kreutzer, D L; Ward, P A

    1978-03-01

    The ability of several chemotactic factors to alter polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) adhesiveness to nylon fibers was studied. Partly purified bacterial chemotactic factor, the isolated chemotactic fragment of human C5, and the chemotactic synthetic tripeptide, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, transiently enhanced the nylon fiber adhesiveness of rabbit peritoneal PMSs. The capacity of these chemotactic factors to augment PMN adherence closely paralleled their ability to aggregate PMNs in suspension and to induce neutropenia when infused into rabbits. However, at least a portion of the adhreence-augmenting capacity of these agents was independent of their ability to induce PMN aggregation. Thus, chemotactic factors appear to transiently enhance PMN adhesiveness to a variety of surfaces. This hyper-adhesiveness may underlie the augmented nylon fiber adherence, aggregation, and neutropenia induced by these factors. PMID:680949

  18. Allelic and copy-number variations of FcγRs affect granulocyte function and susceptibility for autoimmune blistering diseases.

    PubMed

    Recke, Andreas; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ludwig, Ralf J; Freitag, Miriam; Möller, Steffen; Vonthein, Reinhard; Schellenberger, Julia; Haase, Ozan; Görg, Siegfried; Nebel, Almut; Flachsbart, Friederike; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gläser, Regine; Benoit, Sandrine; Sárdy, Miklós; Eming, Rüdiger; Hertl, Michael; Zillikens, Detlef; König, Inke R; Schmidt, Enno; Ibrahim, Saleh

    2015-07-01

    Low-affinity Fcγ receptors (FcγR) bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. In many autoimmune diseases, these receptors act as key mediators of the pathogenic effects of autoantibodies. Genes encoding FcγR exhibit frequent variations in sequence and gene copy number that influence their functional properties. FcγR variations also affect the susceptibility to systemic autoimmunity, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. This raises the question whether FcγR variations are also associated with organ-specific autoimmunity, particularly autoantibody-mediated diseases, such as subepidermal autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD). A multitude of evidence suggests a pathogenic role of neutrophil granulocyte interaction with autoantibodies via FcγR. In a two-stage study, we analyzed whether the FcγR genotype affects neutrophil function and mRNA expression, and consequently, bullous pemphigoid (BP) disease risk. We compared this to findings in pemphigus vulgaris/foliaceus (PV/PF), two Fc-independent AIBDs. Our results indicate that both allele and copy number variation of FcγR genes affect FcγR mRNA expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) release by granulocytes. Susceptibility of BP was associated with FcγR genotypes that led to a decreased ROS release by neutrophils, indicating an unexpected protective role for these cells. BP and PV/PF differed substantially regarding the FcγR genotype association patterns, pointing towards different disease etiologies. PMID:26032265

  19. Successful treatment of fusarium solani ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient affected by leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 with granulocytes transfusions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) manifests as a skin lesion affecting patients suffering extreme neutropenia and is commonly associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in immunocompromised patients. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency I (LAD I) which count among primary immunodeficiency syndromes of the innate immunity, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized in its severe phenotype by a complete defect in CD18 expression on neutrophils, delayed cord separation, chronic skin ulcers mainly due to recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, leucocytosis with high numbers of circulating neutrophils and an accumulation of abnormally low number of neutrophils at sites of infection. Case Presentation We report at our knowledge the first case of a child affected by LAD-1, who experienced during her disease course a multi-bacterial and fungal EG lesion caused by fusarium solani. Despite targeted antibiotics and anti-fungi therapy, the lesion extended for as long as 18 months and only massive granulocytes pockets transfusions in association with G-CSF had the capacity to cure this lesion. Conclusion We propose that granulocytes pockets transfusions will be beneficial to heal EG especially in severely immunocompromised patients. PMID:20929531

  20. Neutrophil swarming: an essential process of the neutrophil tissue response.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Korbinian; Lämmermann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil infiltration into inflamed and infected tissues is a fundamental process of the innate immune response. While neutrophil interactions with the blood vessel wall have been intensely studied over the last decades, neutrophil dynamics beyond the vasculature have for a long time remained poorly investigated. Recent intravital microscopy studies of neutrophil populations directly at the site of tissue damage or microbial invasion have changed our perspective on neutrophil responses within tissues. Swarm-like migration patterns of neutrophils, referred to as 'neutrophil swarming', have been detected in diverse tissues under conditions of sterile inflammation and infection with various pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Current work has begun to unravel the molecular pathways choreographing the sequential phases of highly coordinated chemotaxis followed by neutrophil accumulation and the formation of substantial neutrophil clusters. It is now clear that intercellular communication among neutrophils amplifies their recruitment in a feed-forward manner, which provides them with a level of self-organization during neutrophil swarming. This review will summarize recent developments and current concepts on neutrophil swarming, an important process of the neutrophil tissue response with a critical role in maintaining the balance between host protection and inflammation-driven tissue destruction. PMID:27558329

  1. Characterization of Neutrophil Subsets in Healthy Human Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ssemaganda, Aloysius; Kindinger, Lindsay; Bergin, Philip; Nielsen, Leslie; Mpendo, Juliet; Ssetaala, Ali; Kiwanuka, Noah; Munder, Markus; Teoh, Tiong Ghee; Kropf, Pascale; Müller, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that in successful pregnancies increased arginase activity is a mechanism that contributes to the suppression of the maternal immune system. We identified the main type of arginase-expressing cells as a population of activated low-density granulocytes (LDGs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in term placentae. In the present study, we analyzed the phenotype of LDGs and compared it to the phenotype of normal density granulocytes (NDGs) in maternal peripheral blood, placental biopsies and cord blood. Our data reveal that only LDGs but no NDGs could be detected in placental biopsies. Phenotypically, NDGs and LDGs from both maternal and cord blood expressed different levels of maturation, activation and degranulation markers. NDGs from the maternal and cord blood were phenotypically similar, while maternal, cord and placental LDGs showed different expression levels of CD66b. LDGs present in cord blood expressed higher levels of arginase compared to maternal and placental LDGs. In summary, our results show that in maternal and cord blood, two phenotypically different populations of neutrophils can be identified, whereas in term placentae, only activated neutrophils are present. PMID:24551035

  2. Neutrophil α-Defensins Cause Lung Injury by Disrupting the Capillary–Epithelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bdeir, Khalil; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Allen, Timothy C.; Idell, Steven; Linzmeier, Rose; Ganz, Tomas; Cines, Douglas B.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: The involvement of neutrophil activation in the sentinel, potentially reversible, events in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) is only partially understood. α-Defensins are the most abundant proteins secreted by activated human neutrophils, but their contribution to ALI in mouse models is hindered by their absence from murine neutrophils and the inability to study their effects in isolation in other species. Objectives: To study the role of α-defensins in the pathogenesis of ALI in a clinically relevant setting using mice transgenic for polymorphonuclear leukocyte expression of α-defensins. Methods: Transgenic mice expressing polymorphonuclear leukocyte α-defensins were generated. ALI was induced by acid aspiration. Pulmonary vascular permeability was studied in vivo using labeled dextran and fibrin deposition. The role of the low-density lipoprotein–related receptor (LRP) in permeability was examined. Measurements and Main Results: Acid aspiration induced neutrophil migration and release of α-defensins into lung parenchyma and airways. ALI was more severe in α-defensin–expressing mice than in wild-type mice, as determined by inspection, influx of neutrophils into the interstitial space and airways, histological evidence of epithelial injury, interstitial edema, extravascular fibrin deposition, impaired oxygenation, and reduced survival. Within 4 hours of insult, α-defensin–expressing mice showed greater disruption of capillary–epithelial barrier function and ALI that was attenuated by systemic or intratracheal administration of specific inhibitors of the LRP. Conclusions: α-Defensins mediate ALI through LRP-mediated loss of capillary–epithelial barrier function, suggesting a potential new approach to intervention. PMID:20093642

  3. Clostridium perfringens α-Toxin Impairs Innate Immunity via Inhibition of Neutrophil Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Masaya; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Seike, Soshi; Ohtani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Keiko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Shimizu, Tohru; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Although granulopoiesis is accelerated to suppress bacteria during infection, some bacteria can still cause life-threatening infections, but the mechanism behind this remains unclear. In this study, we found that mature neutrophils in bone marrow cells (BMCs) were decreased in C. perfringens-infected mice and also after injection of virulence factor α-toxin. C. perfringens infection interfered with the replenishment of mature neutrophils in the peripheral circulation and the accumulation of neutrophils at C. perfringens-infected sites in an α-toxin-dependent manner. Measurements of bacterial colony-forming units in C. perfringens-infected muscle revealed that α-toxin inhibited a reduction in the load of C. perfringens. In vitro treatment of isolated BMCs with α-toxin (phospholipase C) revealed that α-toxin directly decreased mature neutrophils. α-Toxin did not influence the viability of isolated mature neutrophils, while simultaneous treatment of BMCs with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor attenuated the reduction of mature neutrophils by α-toxin. Together, our results illustrate that impairment of the innate immune system by the inhibition of neutrophil differentiation is crucial for the pathogenesis of C. perfringens to promote disease to a life-threatening infection, which provides new insight to understand how pathogenic bacteria evade the host immune system. PMID:27306065

  4. Adhesion Maturation of Neutrophils on Nanoscopically Presented Platelet Glycoprotein Ibα

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes play a fundamental role in cardiovascular disease. They interact with platelet aggregates via the integrin Mac-1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα). In vivo, GPIbα presentation is highly variable under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we quantitatively determined the conditions for neutrophil adhesion in a biomimetic in vitro system, which allowed precise adjustment of the spacings between human GPIbα presented on the nanoscale from 60 to 200 nm. Unlike most conventional nanopatterning approaches, this method provided control over the local receptor density (spacing) rather than just the global receptor density. Under physiological flow conditions, neutrophils required a minimum spacing of GPIbα molecules to successfully adhere. In contrast, under low-flow conditions, neutrophils adhered on all tested spacings with subtle but nonlinear differences in cell response, including spreading area, spreading kinetics, adhesion maturation, and mobility. Surprisingly, Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion was very robust to GPIbα density variations up to 1 order of magnitude. This complex response map indicates that neutrophil adhesion under flow and adhesion maturation are differentially regulated by GPIbα density. Our study reveals how Mac-1/GPIbα interactions govern cell adhesion and how neutrophils process the number of available surface receptors on the nanoscale. In the future, such in vitro studies can be useful to determine optimum therapeutic ranges for targeting this interaction. PMID:24093566

  5. How neutrophil extracellular traps orchestrate the local immune response in gout.

    PubMed

    Maueröder, Christian; Kienhöfer, Deborah; Hahn, Jonas; Schauer, Christine; Manger, Bernhard; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin; Hoffmann, Markus H

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes possess a large arsenal of pro-inflammatory substances and mechanisms that empower them to drive local acute immune reactions to invading microorganisms or endogenous inflammatory triggers. The use of this armory needs to be tightly controlled to avoid chronic inflammation and collateral tissue damage. In gout, inflammation arises from precipitation of uric acid in the form of needle-shaped monosodium urate crystals. Inflammasome activation by these crystals in local immune cells results in a rapid and dramatic recruitment of neutrophils. This neutrophil influx is accompanied by the infamously intense clinical symptoms of inflammation during an acute gout attack. Neutrophilic inflammation however is equipped with a built-in safeguard; activated neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). At the very high neutrophil densities that occur at the site of inflammation, NETs build aggregates that densely pack the monosodium urate (MSU) crystals and trap and degrade pro-inflammatory mediators by inherent proteases. Local removal of cytokines and chemokines by aggregated NETs explains how acute inflammation can stop in the consistent presence of the inflammatory trigger. Aggregated NETs resemble early stages of the typical large MSU deposits that constitute the pathognomonic structures of gout, tophi. Although tophi contribute to muscosceletal damage and mortality in patients with chronic gout, they can therefore be considered as a payoff that is necessary to silence the intense inflammatory response during acute gout. PMID:26002146

  6. Distinct Infiltration of Neutrophils in Lesion Shoulders in ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rotzius, Pierre; Thams, Sebastian; Soehnlein, Oliver; Kenne, Ellinor; Tseng, Chi-Nan; Björkström, Niklas K.; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Lindbom, Lennart; Eriksson, Einar E.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation and activation of immune cells are key mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. Previous data indicate important roles for monocytes and T-lymphocytes in lesions. However, recent data suggest that neutrophils also may be of importance in atherogenesis. Here, we use apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-deficient mice with fluorescent neutrophils and monocytes (ApoE−/−/LysEGFP/EGFP mice) to specifically study neutrophil presence and recruitment in atherosclerotic lesions. We show by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy that neutrophils make up for 1.8% of CD45+ leukocytes in the aortic wall of ApoE−/−/LysEGFP/EGFP mice and that their contribution relative to monocyte/macrophages within lesions is approximately 1:3. However, neutrophils accumulate at sites of monocyte high density, preferentially in shoulder regions of lesions, and may even outnumber monocyte/macrophages in these areas. Furthermore, intravital microscopy established that a majority of leukocytes interacting with endothelium on lesion shoulders are neutrophils, suggesting a significant recruitment of these cells to plaque. These data demonstrate neutrophilic granulocytes as a major cellular component of atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE−/− mice and call for further study on the roles of these cells in atherogenesis. PMID:20472897

  7. Evaluation of human polymorphonuclear behavior on textured titanium and calcium-phosphate coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moura, Camilla C G; Machado, Juliana R; Silva, Marcos V; Rodrigues, Denise B R; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny; Jimbo, Ryo; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo G

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of titanium (Ti) surface modifications on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Human PMNs' viability and release of key mediators-such as IL1β, IL6, TNFα, IL12, IL10, IL4, TGFβ1, IL8, IP-10, and Mig-were evaluated on three different Ti surface treatments: (1) machined Ti; (2) alumina-blasted and acid-etched Ti (AB/AE); and (3) calcium phosphate coating of 300-500 nm by ion beam onto the AB/AE Ti surface (CaP). A polystyrene surface was used as a negative control. The PMNs were purified from whole human blood and cultured for 6 h. Cell viability was determined by flow cytometry, and the supernatant was evaluated to determine the levels of cytokines and chemokines. Results showed that the percentage of viable cells was significantly lower on the CaP surface compared to the control (p < 0.05) relative to the other groups. No differences in the levels of IL8, MIG, and IP10 were detected between groups. Significantly higher levels of IL1β (p = 0.046) and TNFα (p = 0.016) were detected for the CaP surfaces compared to AB/AE surface only. The levels of IL4, IL10, and TGFβ1 secreted from the PMNs in the CaP group were significantly lower than in the control and machined groups (p < 0.05) that were statistically comparable to AB/AE. Overall, the addition of a thin CaP coating to the AB/AE Ti surface influenced the secretion profile of pro-inflammatory cytokines due to the higher release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1β and TNFα) on these surfaces. PMID:23598427

  8. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes inhibit Aspergillus fumigatus conidial growth by lactoferrin-mediated iron depletion.

    PubMed

    Zarember, Kol A; Sugui, Janyce A; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Gallin, John I

    2007-05-15

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold, rarely infects humans, except during prolonged neutropenia or in cases of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the NADPH oxidase that normally produces fungicidal reactive oxygen species. Filamentous hyphae of Aspergillus are killed by normal, but not CGD polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN); however, the few studies on PMN-mediated host defenses against infectious conidia (spores) of this organism have yielded conflicting results, some showing that PMN do not inhibit conidial growth, with others showing that they do, most likely using reactive oxygen species. Given that CGD patients are exposed daily to hundreds of viable A. fumigatus conidia, yet considerable numbers of them survive years without infection, we reasoned that PMN use ROS-independent mechanisms to combat Aspergillus. We show that human PMN from both normal controls and CGD patients are equipotent at arresting the growth of Aspergillus conidia in vitro, indicating the presence of a reactive oxygen species-independent factor(s). Cell-free supernatants of degranulated normal and CGD neutrophils both suppressed fungal growth and were found to be rich in lactoferrin, an abundant PMN secondary granule protein. Purified iron-poor lactoferrin at concentrations occurring in PMN supernatants (and reported in human mucosal secretions in vivo) decreased fungal growth, whereas saturation of lactoferrin or PMN supernatants with iron, or testing in the presence of excess iron in the form of ferritin, completely abolished activity against conidia. These results demonstrate that PMN lactoferrin sequestration of iron is important for host defense against Aspergillus. PMID:17475866

  9. Fenofibrate Attenuates Neutrophilic Inflammation in Airway Epithelia: Potential Drug Repurposing for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stolarz, Amanda J; Farris, Ryan A; Wiley, Charla A; O'Brien, Catherine E; Price, Elvin T

    2015-12-01

    A hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is neutrophilic airway inflammation. Elevated neutrophil counts have been associated with decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 second and poor clinical measures in patients with CF. Interleukin 8 (IL-8), epithelial neutrophil activating protein 78 (ENA-78), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) contribute to neutrophil activation and disease pathogenesis in the airways of patients with CF. Drugs that modify the production of these chemokines in the airways could potentially benefit CF patients. Thus, we determined the effects of fenofibrate on their production in cell populations obtained from the airways. Human small airway epithelial cells and CF bronchial epithelial cells were treated with IL-1β to induce inflammation. We cotreated the cells with fenofibrate at concentrations ranging from 10 to 50 μM to determine if this drug could attenuate the inflammation. IL-8, ENA-78, TNF-α, GM-CSF, and G-CSF production were measured from the cell culture supernates by ELISA. ANOVA statistical testing was conducted using SPSS 17.0. IL-1β increased the production of each of the chemokines by several fold. Fenofibrate reduced IL-1β induced production of each of these neutrophilic chemokines at the concentrations used. IL-1β increases the production of neutrophilic chemokines in airway epithelial cells. Cotreatment with fenofibrate blunts these processes. Fenofibrate should be explored as a therapeutic option to modulate the abundant neutrophilic inflammation observed in CF. PMID:26258991

  10. Application of gelatin zymography for evaluating low levels of contaminating neutrophils in red blood cell samples.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Cesare; Ciana, Annarita; Balduini, Cesare; Risso, Angela; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2011-02-15

    Supposedly "homogeneous" red blood cell (RBC) samples are commonly obtained by "washing" whole blood free of plasma, platelets, and white cells with physiological solutions, a procedure that does not result, however, in sufficient removal of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), leading to possible artifactual results. Pure RBC samples can be obtained only by leukodepletion procedures. Proposed here is a version of gelatin zymography adapted to detect matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), selectively expressed by PMNs, in heterogeneous mixtures of RBCs and PMNs that can reveal contamination at levels as low as 1 PMN/10⁶ RBCs. PMID:20971053

  11. Pre–B cell colony–enhancing factor inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in experimental inflammation and clinical sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Song Hui; Li, Yue; Parodo, Jean; Kapus, Andras; Fan, Lingzhi; Rotstein, Ori D.; Marshall, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Pre–B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) is a highly conserved 52-kDa protein, originally identified as a growth factor for early stage B cells. We show here that PBEF is also upregulated in neutrophils by IL-1β and functions as a novel inhibitor of apoptosis in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli. Induction of PBEF occurs 5–10 hours after LPS exposure. Prevention of PBEF translation with an antisense oligonucleotide completely abrogates the inhibitory effects of LPS, IL-1, GM-CSF, IL-8, and TNF-α on neutrophil apoptosis. Immunoreactive PBEF is detectable in culture supernatants from LPS-stimulated neutrophils, and a recombinant PBEF fusion protein inhibits neutrophil apoptosis. PBEF is also expressed in neutrophils from critically ill patients with sepsis in whom rates of apoptosis are profoundly delayed. Expression occurs at higher levels than those seen in experimental inflammation, and a PBEF antisense oligonucleotide significantly restores the normal kinetics of apoptosis in septic polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Inhibition of apoptosis by PBEF is associated with reduced activity of caspases-8 and -3, but not caspase-9. These data identify PBEF as a novel inflammatory cytokine that plays a requisite role in the delayed neutrophil apoptosis of clinical and experimental sepsis. PMID:15124023

  12. Neutrophil Protease Inhibition Reduces Neuromyelitis Optica–Immunoglobulin G–Induced Damage in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Saadoun, Samira; Waters, Patrick; MacDonald, Claire; Bell, B. Anthony; Vincent, Angela; Verkman, A.S.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with pathogenic autoantibodies against the astrocyte water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4). The presence of neutrophils is a characteristic feature in NMO lesions in humans. Neutrophils are not generally found in multiple sclerosis lesions. We evaluated the role of neutrophils in a mouse NMO model. Methods NMO lesions were produced in mice by intracerebral injection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) isolated from NMO patient serum and human complement. We previously reported that this mouse model produces the characteristic histological features of NMO, including perivascular complement activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and loss of myelin, AQP4, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Lesions are absent when AQP4 null mice are used or when IgG from non-NMO patients is injected. Results We found remarkably reduced neuroinflammation, myelin loss, and AQP4 loss in brains of neutropenic mice at 24 hours and 7 days, and increased severity of NMO lesions in mice made neutrophilic by granulocyte colony stimulating factor. NMO lesions were greatly reduced by intracerebral administration of the neutrophil protease inhibitors Sivelestat and cathepsin G inhibitor I or by intraperitoneal injection of Sivelestat alone. Immunostaining of human NMO lesions for neutrophil elastase revealed many degranulating perivascular neutrophils, with no equivalent perivascular neutrophils in human multiple sclerosis lesions. Interpretation Our data implicate a central role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of early NMO lesions and suggest the potential utility of neutrophil protease inhibitors such as Sivelestat in NMO therapy. PMID:22374891

  13. Effect of plastic catheters on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    López-López, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1990-05-01

    The effect of five kinds of plastic catheters (polyvinyl chloride, Teflon, polyurethane, Vialon and siliconized latex) on the phagocytic and bactericidal function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was evaluated. In the presence of the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters, superoxide radical production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was significantly inhibited. The effect of the siliconized latex catheter was presumably mediated by products eluted from the catheter into the medium, since the incubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in eluates obtained from the incubation of this catheter in buffer induced a similar inhibitory effect. This phenomenon was not observed with polyurethane or Vialon catheters. Neither the catheters evaluated nor their eluates affected the uptake of opsonized Staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is concluded that the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters used in this study could impair the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:2164932

  14. Differences in leukocyte differentiation molecule abundances on domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) neutrophils identified by flow cytometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundance was assessed by utilizing a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) tested in this study. Characterization of multichannel autofluorescence of eosinophils permitted cell-type specific gating of granulocytes for quantification of LDMs on neutrophils and eosinophils by indirect,...

  15. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  16. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  17. The Multifaceted Functions of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Mayadas, Tanya N.; Cullere, Xavier; Lowell, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and neutrophil-like cells are the major pathogen-fighting immune cells in organisms ranging from slime molds to mammals. Central to their function is their ability to be recruited to sites of infection, to recognize and phagocytose microbes, and then to kill pathogens through a combination of cytotoxic mechanisms. These include the production of reactive oxygen species, the release of antimicrobial peptides, and the recently discovered expulsion of their nuclear contents to form neutrophil extracellular traps. Here we discuss these primordial neutrophil functions, which also play key roles in tissue injury, by providing details of neutrophil cytotoxic functions and congenital disorders of neutrophils. In addition, we present more recent evidence that interactions between neutrophils and adaptive immune cells establish a feed-forward mechanism that amplifies pathologic inflammation. These newly appreciated contributions of neutrophils are described in the setting of several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24050624

  18. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-05-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure after acute lung injury and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after injury. Additional sheep received sham injury and were euthanized after 24 h. Pulmonary function was assessed by determination of oxygenation index and pulmonary shunt fraction. In addition, lung tissue was harvested at the respective time points for the measurement of malondialdehyde, interleukin 6, poly(ADP ribose), myeloperoxidase, and alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophil score. The injury induced severe respiratory failure that was associated with an early increase in lipid peroxidation and interleukin 6 expression. The injury further led to an increase in poly(ADP ribose) activity that reached its peak at 12 h after injury and declined afterward. In addition, progressive increases in markers of neutrophil accumulation in the lung were observed. The peak of neutrophil accumulation in the lung was associated with a severe depletion of circulating neutrophils. The results from our model may enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological alterations after acute lung injury and sepsis and thus be useful in exploring therapeutic interventions directed at modifying the expression or activation of inflammatory mediators. PMID:22266977

  19. Effects of Neutrophils on Cefazolin Activity and Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, David M.; Herndon, Betty L.; Fitch, Jeffrey; Florkowski, Aaron; Parkhurst, Vera

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria survive within abscesses despite antimicrobial therapy, usually necessitating drainage. Our previous work showed that bacterial killing is diminished within the neutrophils of animals with abscesses. To further assess the role of neutrophils in Staphylococcus aureus survival and the poor activities of β-lactams in abscesses, tissue cage abscess-bearing rats were given polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-depleting antibody prior to and several times following inoculation of the tissue cages with S. aureus. Cefazolin (300 mg/kg of body weight/day) was administered to all animals in appropriately divided doses. After 7 days of antimicrobial therapy, the 17 animals that received anti-PMN serum had significantly fewer abscess neutrophils than the 18 controls and fewer abscess bacteria (5.55 versus 3.79 log10 CFU/ml [P = 0.04]) than the 18 controls. The data were consistent with the premise that cefazolin is more effective in abscesses depleted of neutrophils. To investigate further, S. aureus was incubated with rat peritoneal neutrophils; and bacterial cell membrane proteins were isolated, labeled with biotinylated ampicillin, separated by electrophoresis, blotted onto nitrocellulose, and stained for biotin reactivity. PBP 2 expression was consistently and significantly decreased after a brief, nonkilling PMN exposure. These experiments showed that PMN depletion enhanced the activity of cefazolin in the abscess milieu. Furthermore, altered bacterial cell wall cefazolin targets may be the mechanism by which the PMN diminishes antimicrobial activity, suggesting the importance of the staphylococcus-PMN interaction in the outcome of established infections. PMID:12183241

  20. T(H)2 cytokines modulate the IL-9R expression on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Takhar, Manrit Kaur; Shan, Lianyu; Hayglass, Kent T; Simons, F Estelle; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2009-06-26

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is associated with key pathological features of asthma such as airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Inflammatory responses mediated by IL-9 rely on the expression of the IL-9R which has been reported on lung epithelial cells, T lymphocytes and recently on airway granulocyte infiltrates. In this study, we assessed the regulatory and constitutive cell surface expression of the IL-9Ralpha in unfractionated and purified human neutrophils from atopic asthmatics, atopic non-asthmatics and healthy normal controls. We demonstrate that T(H)2 cytokines (IL-4 or IL-13) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) up-regulated mRNA and cell surface expression levels of the IL-9Ralpha in primary human and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB did not affect T(H)2-mediated IL-9Ralpha expression in human neutrophils although IFN-gamma and IL-10 down-regulated IL-9Ralpha expression when co-incubated with IL-4, IL-13 or GM-CSF. Collectively, our results reveal a regulatory function for IFN-gamma and IL-10 on modulating the inducible IL-9Ralpha expression levels on peripheral blood neutrophils by T(H)2 cytokines. PMID:19401191

  1. A Combretastatin-Mediated Decrease in Neutrophil Concentration in Peripheral Blood and the Impact on the Anti-Tumor Activity of This Drug in Two Different Murine Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Anja Bille; Wittenborn, Thomas; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie; Laurberg, Tinne; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Nielsen, Thomas; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Møller, Bjarne Kuno; Horsman, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P) induces fluctuations in peripheral blood neutrophil concentration. Because neutrophils have the potential to induce both vascular damage and angiogenesis we analyzed neutrophil involvement in the anti-tumoral effects of CA4P in C3H mammary carcinomas in CDF1 mice and in SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H/HeN mice. Flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood before and up to 144 h after CA4P administration (25 and 250 mg/kg) revealed a decrease 1 h after treatment, followed by an early (3–6 h) and a late (>72 h) increase in the granulocyte concentration. We suggest that the early increase (3–6 h) in granulocyte concentration was caused by the initial decrease at 1 h and found that the late increase was associated with tumor size, and hence independent of CA4P. No alterations in neutrophil infiltration into the C3H tumor after CA4P treatment (25 and 250 mg/kg) were found. Correspondingly, neutrophil depletion in vivo, using an anti-neutrophil antibody, followed by CA4P treatment (25 mg/kg) did not increase the necrotic fraction in C3H tumors significantly. However, by increasing the CA4P dose to 250 mg/kg we found a significant increase of 359% in necrotic fraction when compared to neutrophil-depleted mice; in mice with no neutrophil depletion CA4P induced an 89% change indicating that the presence of neutrophils reduced the effect of CA4P. In contrast, neither CA4P nor 1A8 affected the necrotic fraction in the SCCVII tumors significantly. Hence, we suggest that the initial decrease in granulocyte concentration was caused by non-tumor-specific recruitment of neutrophils and that neutrophils may attenuate CA4P-mediated anti-tumor effect in some tumor models. PMID:25299269

  2. Flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis by down-regulation of Mcl-1 via a proteasomal-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Christopher D.; Allen, Keith C.; Dorward, David A.; Hoodless, Laura J.; Melrose, Lauren A.; Marwick, John A.; Tucker, Carl S.; Haslett, Christopher; Duffin, Rodger; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis and subsequent nonphlogistic clearance by surrounding phagocytes are key to the successful resolution of neutrophilic inflammation, with dysregulated apoptosis reported in multiple human inflammatory diseases. Enhancing neutrophil apoptosis has proresolution and anti-inflammatory effects in preclinical models of inflammation. Here we investigate the ability of the flavones apigenin, luteolin, and wogonin to induce neutrophil apoptosis in vitro and resolve neutrophilic inflammation in vivo. Human neutrophil apoptosis was assessed morphologically and by flow cytometry following incubation with apigenin, luteolin, and wogonin. All three flavones induced time- and concentration-dependent neutrophil apoptosis (apigenin, EC50=12.2 μM; luteolin, EC50=14.6 μM; and wogonin, EC50=28.9 μM). Induction of apoptosis was caspase dependent, as it was blocked by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh and was associated with both caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Flavone-induced apoptosis was preceded by down-regulation of the prosurvival protein Mcl-1, with proteasomal inhibition preventing flavone-induced Mcl-1 down-regulation and apoptosis. The flavones abrogated the survival effects of mediators that prolong neutrophil life span, including lipoteichoic acid, peptidoglycan, dexamethasone, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, by driving apoptosis. Furthermore, wogonin enhanced resolution of established neutrophilic inflammation in a zebrafish model of sterile tissue injury. Wogonin-induced resolution was dependent on apoptosis in vivo as it was blocked by caspase inhibition. Our data show that the flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis and have potential as neutrophil apoptosis-inducing anti-inflammatory, proresolution agents.—Lucas, C. D., Allen, K. C., Dorward, D. A., Hoodless, L. J., Melrose, L. A., Marwick, J. A., Tucker, C. S., Haslett, C., Duffin, R., Rossi, A. G. Flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis by down-regulation of Mcl

  3. [Leukemic neutrophilic dermatosis].

    PubMed

    Török, L; Kirschner, A; Gurzó, M; Krenács, L

    1999-03-28

    A case of a 67 year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia is presented. As the first manifestation of the disease, the patient had symptoms of Sweet's syndrome, later signs of gangrenous pyoderma have developed. This transient form is termed as a "leukemic neutrophilic dermatosis". The authors focus on the important diagnostic and prognostic value of this entity. PMID:10349319

  4. Neutrophilic dermatoses and autoinflammatory diseases with skin involvement--innate immune disorders.

    PubMed

    Navarini, Alexander A; Satoh, Takashi K; French, Lars E

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) such as Sweet's syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum were first described more than 50 years ago and grouped based on their clinical features combined with the typical, neutrophil-rich cutaneous inflammation. In contrast, the recently identified autoinflammatory diseases (ADs) that are also associated with neutrophil granulocyte infiltration of the skin were first characterized based on their genetic architecture. Though both the older ND and the newer AD encompass distinct conditions, they can be seen as parts of a spectrum of innate inflammation. Both groups of diseases show so many overlapping clinical, pathogenetic, histologic, and genetic features that together they should likely be considered as innate immune disorders. PMID:26620372

  5. Neutrophil function in a rat model of endotoxin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Simons, R K; Maier, R V; Lennard, E S

    1987-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNs) are known to cross the alveolar-capillary barrier and enter the alveolus in acute adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The pathogenic role of PMNs in both the acute lung injury and subsequent infectious susceptibility in ARDS is not clear. In the present study we investigated the functional status of various neutrophil populations using a chronic, endotoxemia-induced ARDS model. Rats infused with Escherichia coli endotoxin for three days develop an acute lung injury with a histologic picture closely resembling human ARDS. The PMNs recovered from the circulation and by bronchoalveolar lavage were compared with normal rat PMNs. In endotoxemic animals, superoxide production was markedly enhanced in circulating PMNs, indicating production of high levels of potentially cytotoxic oxygen intermediates, while myeloperoxidase activity was decreased in both circulating and lavage PMNs, indicating depressed myeloperoxidase-dependent antimicrobial activity. PMID:3028317

  6. Type 2 Interleukin-4 Receptor Signaling in Neutrophils Antagonizes Their Expansion and Migration during Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Woytschak, Janine; Keller, Nadia; Krieg, Carsten; Impellizzieri, Daniela; Thompson, Robert W; Wynn, Thomas A; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Boyman, Onur

    2016-07-19

    Neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of inflammation and infection. However, patients with allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis show a paucity of skin neutrophils and are prone to bacterial skin infections, suggesting that allergic inflammation curtails neutrophil responses. Here we have shown that the type 2 cell signature cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) hampers neutrophil expansion and migration by antagonizing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and chemokine receptor-mediated signals. Cutaneous bacterial infection in mice was exacerbated by IL-4 signaling and improved with IL-4 inhibition, each outcome inversely correlating with neutrophil migration to skin. Likewise, systemic bacterial infection was worsened by heightened IL-4 activity, with IL-4 restricting G-CSF-induced neutrophil expansion and migration to tissues by affecting CXCR2-CXCR4 chemokine signaling in neutrophils. These effects were dependent on IL-4 acting through type 2 IL-4 receptors on neutrophils. Thus, targeting IL-4 might be beneficial in neutropenic conditions with increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. PMID:27438770

  7. Effects of eugenol on polymorphonuclear cell migration and chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Woolverton, C J; Van Dyke, K; Powell, R L

    1987-03-01

    In this study, the effects of eugenol on human polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell migration and chemiluminescence were examined in vitro. Utilizing zymosan-activated serum or crude Bacteroides sonicate fractions as chemotractants, we found that eugenol inhibits PMN migration at 6.6 X 10(-2) to 6.6 X 10(-5) mol/L (P less than 0.05). Also, similar effects were observed in PMNs pre-incubated in eugenol. Regardless of concentration, eugenol was not found to induce chemotaxis of PMNs. An examination of PMN membrane activation through chemiluminescence gave results consistent with the chemotaxis data, demonstrating a decrease in light emission at concentrations as low as 6.6 X 10(-6) mol/L (P less than 0.05). In view of these data, the potential effect of eugenol on in vivo (sulcular or periapical) PMN function deserves further study. PMID:3475310

  8. NSP4, an elastase-related protease in human neutrophils with arginine specificity.

    PubMed

    Perera, Natascha C; Schilling, Oliver; Kittel, Heike; Back, Walter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Jenne, Dieter E

    2012-04-17

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) in cytoplasmic granules of neutrophils are regarded as important antimicrobial defense weapons after engulfment and exposure of pathogens to the content of primary granules. Despite intensive studies on neutrophils during the last three decades, only three active serine proteases, neutrophil elastase (NE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase 3 (PR3) have been identified in these short-lived cells. Here, we report on the identification of a fourth serine protease (NSP4) with 39% identity to NE and PR3, but arginine specificity, yet sharing features like propeptide processing by dipeptidyl peptidase I, storage, and release as an active enzyme with the three active proteases. We established monoclonal antibodies against NSP4, excluded cross-reactivity to human granzymes, NE, CG, PR3, and azurocidin, and screened for NSP4 protein expression in various human tissues and blood leukocyte populations. Only granulocyte precursors and neutrophil populations from peripheral blood were positive. The content of NSP4 in neutrophil lysates, however, was about 20-fold lower compared with CG. Upon neutrophil activation, NSP4 was released into the supernatant. Profiling its specificity with peptide libraries from Escherichia coli revealed a preference for arginine in P1; it cleaved Tyr-Arg-Phe-Arg-AMC and Ala-Pro-Nva-thiobenzyl esters. NSP4 was inhibited by α(1)-proteinase inhibitor (α(1)-antitrypsin), C1 inhibitor, and most efficiently by antithrombin-heparin, but not by elafin, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, α(1)-antichymotrypsin, and monocyte-neutrophil elastase inhibitor. Functional specialization and preferred natural substrates of NSP4 remain to be determined to understand the biological interplay of all four NSPs during neutrophil responses. PMID:22474388

  9. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer. PMID:27374224

  10. Phospholipid turnover during phagocytosis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    García Gil, Merche; Alonso, Fernando; Alvarez Chiva, Vicente; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Mato, José M.

    1982-01-01

    We have previously observed that the phagocytosis of zymosan particles coated with complement by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes is accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation [García Gil, Alonso, Sánchez Crespo & Mato (1981) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 101, 740–748]. The present studies show that phosphatidylcholine synthesis by a cholinephosphotransferase reaction is enhanced, up to 3-fold, during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. This effect was tested by both measuring the incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine in cells labelled with [Me-14C]choline, and by assaying the activity of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase. The time course of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase activation by zymosan mirrors the inhibition of phospholipid methyltransferase activity previously reported. The extent of incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine induced by various doses of zymosan correlates with the physiological response of the cells to this stimulus. This effect was specific for phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine turnover was not affected by zymosan. The purpose of this enhanced phosphatidylcholine synthesis is not to provide phospholipid molecules rich in arachidonic acid. The present studies show that about 80% of the arachidonic acid generated in response to zymosan derives from phosphatidylinositol. A transient accumulation of arachidonoyldiacylglycerol has also been observed, which indicates that a phospholipase C is responsible, at least in part, for the generation of arachidonic acid. Finally, isobutylmethylxanthine and quinacrine, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol turnover, inhibit both arachidonic acid generation and phagocytosis, indicating a function for this pathway during this process. PMID:6181780

  11. A Comparative Study of Lung Host Defense in Murine Obesity Models. Insights into Neutrophil Function.

    PubMed

    Ubags, Niki D J; Burg, Elianne; Antkowiak, Maryellen; Wallace, Aaron M; Dilli, Estee; Bement, Jenna; Wargo, Matthew J; Poynter, Matthew E; Wouters, Emiel F M; Suratt, Benjamin T

    2016-08-01

    We have shown that obesity-associated attenuation of murine acute lung injury is driven, in part, by blunted neutrophil chemotaxis, yet differences were noted between the two models of obesity studied. We hypothesized that obesity-associated impairment of multiple neutrophil functions contributes to increased risk for respiratory infection but that such impairments may vary between murine models of obesity. We examined the most commonly used murine obesity models (diet-induced obesity, db/db, CPE(fat/fat), and ob/ob) using a Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia model and LPS-induced pneumonitis. Marrow-derived neutrophils from uninjured lean and obese mice were examined for in vitro functional responses. All obesity models showed impaired clearance of K. pneumoniae, but in differing temporal patterns. Failure to contain infection in obese mice was seen in the db/db model at both 24 and 48 hours, yet this defect was only evident at 24 hours in CPE(fat/fat) and ob/ob models, and at 48 hours in diet-induced obesity. LPS-induced airspace neutrophilia was decreased in all models, and associated with blood neutropenia in the ob/ob model but with leukocytosis in the others. Obese mouse neutrophils from all models demonstrated impaired chemotaxis, whereas neutrophil granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mediated survival, LPS-induced cytokine transcription, and mitogen-activated protein kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation in response to LPS and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, respectively, were variably impaired across the four models. Obesity-associated impairment of host response to lung infection is characterized by defects in neutrophil recruitment and survival. However, critical differences exist between commonly used mouse models of obesity and may reflect variable penetrance of elements of the metabolic syndrome, as well as other factors. PMID:27128821

  12. G-CSF and Neutrophils Are Nonredundant Mediators of Murine Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Cornish, Ann L; Murphy, Jane; Pang, Ee Shan; Lim, Lyndell L; Campbell, Ian K; Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Chen, Xiangting; McMenamin, Paul G; Maraskovsky, Eugene; McKenzie, Brent S; Wicks, Ian P

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a regulator of neutrophil production, function, and survival. Herein, we investigated the role of G-CSF in a murine model of human uveitis-experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was dramatically reduced in G-CSF-deficient mice and in anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated, wild-type (WT) mice. Flow cytometric analysis of the ocular infiltrate in WT mice with experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis showed a mixed population, comprising neutrophils, macrophages, and T cells. The eyes of G-CSF-deficient and anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody-treated WT mice had minimal neutrophil infiltrate, but no change in other myeloid-derived inflammatory cells. Antigen-specific T-cell responses were maintained, but the differentiation of pathogenic type 17 helper T cells in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was reduced with G-CSF deficiency. We show that G-CSF controls the ocular neutrophil infiltrate by modulating the expression of C-X-C chemokine receptors 2 and 4 on peripheral blood neutrophils, as well as actin polymerization and migration. These data reveal an integral role for G-CSF-driven neutrophil responses in ocular autoimmunity, operating within and outside of the bone marrow, and also identify G-CSF as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of human uveoretinitis. PMID:26718978

  13. IL-17-producing γδ T cells and neutrophils conspire to promote breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Kersten, Kelly; Doornebal, Chris W; Weiden, Jorieke; Vrijland, Kim; Hau, Cheei-Sing; Verstegen, Niels J M; Ciampricotti, Metamia; Hawinkels, Lukas J A C; Jonkers, Jos; de Visser, Karin E

    2015-06-18

    Metastatic disease remains the primary cause of death for patients with breast cancer. The different steps of the metastatic cascade rely on reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and their microenvironment. Within this local microenvironment and in distant organs, immune cells and their mediators are known to facilitate metastasis formation. However, the precise contribution of tumour-induced systemic inflammation to metastasis and the mechanisms regulating systemic inflammation are poorly understood. Here we show that tumours maximize their chance of metastasizing by evoking a systemic inflammatory cascade in mouse models of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis. We mechanistically demonstrate that interleukin (IL)-1β elicits IL-17 expression from gamma delta (γδ) T cells, resulting in systemic, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-dependent expansion and polarization of neutrophils in mice bearing mammary tumours. Tumour-induced neutrophils acquire the ability to suppress cytotoxic T lymphocytes carrying the CD8 antigen, which limit the establishment of metastases. Neutralization of IL-17 or G-CSF and absence of γδ T cells prevents neutrophil accumulation and downregulates the T-cell-suppressive phenotype of neutrophils. Moreover, the absence of γδ T cells or neutrophils profoundly reduces pulmonary and lymph node metastases without influencing primary tumour progression. Our data indicate that targeting this novel cancer-cell-initiated domino effect within the immune system--the γδ T cell/IL-17/neutrophil axis--represents a new strategy to inhibit metastatic disease. PMID:25822788

  14. Expression of IL-17A concentration and effector functions of peripheral blood neutrophils in food allergy hypersensitivity patients.

    PubMed

    Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Pałgan, Krzysztof; Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Kuźmiński, Andrzej; Przybyszewski, Michał; Socha, Ewa; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    Lymphocytes Th17 and other types of immune system cells produce IL17. By induction of cytokines and chemokines, the IL17 cytokine is involved in mechanisms of allergic reaction with participation of neutrophil granulocytes. It affects activation, recruitment, and migration of neutrophils to the tissues, regulating inflammatory reaction intensity. Excited neutrophils secrete inter alia elastase and reactive oxygen species (ROS)--significant mediators of inflammation process responsible for tissues damage.The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentrations of serum interleukin 17A, serum neutrophil elastase, and ROS production by neutrophils in patients with food allergy.The study included 30 patients with food allergy diagnosed based on interview, clinical symptoms, positive SPT, placebo controlled double-blind oral provocation trial, and the presence of asIgE in blood serum against selected food allergens using fluoro-immuno-enzymatic method FEIA UNICap 100. The control group consisted of 10 healthy volunteers. The concentrations of IL17A were determined in all patients using ELISA method with eBioscience kits, and elastase using BenderMed Systems kits. Chemiluminescence of non-stimulated neutrophils was evaluated using luminol-dependent kinetic method for 40 min on Luminoskan (Labsystems luminometer).The results of serum IL-17A concentrations and the values of chemiluminescence obtained by non-activated neutrophils, as well as elastase concentrations, were higher in patients with food allergic hypersensitivity compared to healthy volunteers.This study demonstrates a significance of IL-17A and activated neutrophil granulocytes in the course of diseases with food allergic hypersensitivity. PMID:26684636

  15. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Usuki, K; Iki, S; Urabe, A

    1998-07-01

    We report on an 83-year-old male with chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) associated initially with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and later with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), in which the clone differed from that of the preceding monoclonal gammopathy. At initial presentation, the patient had hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis (29100 x 10(6)/l) with an increase of mature neutrophils (83%), 20q- chromosomal abnormality, an increased leukocyte alkaline phosphatase score, elevated serum levels of vitamin B12 and uric acid, a low serum level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and high serum IgM (1015 mg/dl: lambda type M protein). Thereafter, lymphocytosis developed gradually. Three years after the initial presentation, the patient had no serum M protein, but showed evidence of leukocytosis (36600 x 10(6)/l) with 20q- chromosomal abnormality and an increase of mature neutrophils (51%) and small lymphocytes (43.5%), CD5+/19+/20+/HLA-DR+ and surface membrane IgM+/D+/kappa+. Gene rearrangements of the immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light chains were also present. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CNL associated with CLL. PMID:9713172

  16. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Mock, Jason R; Singer, Benjamin D; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-03-11

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)-mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  17. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology. PMID:26609537

  18. Efficacy of granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis for treatment of palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Tomomi; Tawada, Chisato; Mizutani, Yoko; Doi, Tomoaki; Yoshida, Shozo; Ogura, Shinji; Seishima, Mariko

    2014-06-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) is characterized by neutrophilic pustules with erythema, which are limited to the hands and feet. Although granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis (GMA) has shown remarkable effects on generalized pustular psoriasis, there are few reports of PPP treated with GMA. We treated three refractory PPP patients using GMA weekly for 5 weeks. The skin eruptions were assessed by a 5-grade score for scales, pustules, and erythema. GMA decreased the total grade from 9 to 2 in patients 1 and 2, and from 7 to 3 in patient 3. The GMA effects were estimated to be excellent in all three patients. Pustule formation and pain disappeared in all cases. The treatment effect lasted for at least 5 months after GMA. GMA was also effective for relieving the arthralgia in one patient, but it recurred at 6 weeks. Based on these findings, GMA could be an effective therapy for refractory PPP. PMID:24965289

  19. A New Chemiluminescent Method for Evaluation of the Functional Activity of Neutrophils in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Proskurnina, E V; Sozarukova, M M; Polimova, A M; Prudnikova, M A; Ametov, A S; Vladimirov, Yu A

    2016-06-01

    Functional activity of neutrophils was evaluated by the chemiluminescent method with successive double stimulation by soluble stimuli with different mechanisms of action: phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and phormyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenilalanine (fMLP). The study was carried out in 26 patients receiving oral sugar-reducing therapy. In addition to the functional activity of neutrophils, the levels of TBA reactive products, inflammation markers, blood clotting values, and biochemical parameters were measured. The results showed mainly reduction of the granulocytic component of the immune system in the patients. PMID:27388632

  20. Granulocyte migration in uncomplicated intestinal anastomosis in man

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Gibson, R.; Guest, J.; Spencer, J.; Lavender, J.P.; Hodgson, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    We have investigated the presence, duration, and clinical significance of granulocyte accumulation, using indium-111 granulocyte scanning, in patients following uncomplicated intestinal anastomosis. Eight patients underwent intestinal resection and anastomosis (right hemicolectomy, 5; sigmoid colectomy, 2; ileal resection, 1) for carcinoma, angiodysplasia, or perforation. All patients had an uneventful postoperative course, with no evidence of any leakage or infection. Indium-111 granulocyte scan and abdominal ultrasound were performed 7-20 days (12 +/- 4.7 means +/- SD) following surgery. Indium-111 granulocyte scan showed the presence of labeled granulocytes at the site of anastomosis in all patients. In three of eight, cells subsequently passed into the lumen of the bowel. In contrast, granulocytes were not visualized along the abdominal incision. Thus, in contrast to skin wounds, granulocytes continue migrating into the intestinal wall in areas of anastomosis for at least up to 20 days following surgical trauma. They may play a significant role both in healing the anastomosis and in preventing systemic bacterial infection. Moreover, indium-111 granulocyte scans following intestinal surgery should be interpreted with care, and the presence of labeled granulocytes around anastomoses does not necessarily indicate abscess formation.

  1. Granulocytic Sarcoma in MLL-Positive Infant Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Dong Soon; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Chong Jai; Cho, Han Ik

    2001-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is considered to be rare and its frequent occurrence is associated with specific genetic changes such as t(8;21). To investigate an association between MLL (mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid-lymphoid leukemia) rearrangement and granulocytic sarcoma, we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of the 11q23/MLL rearrangements on the bone marrow cells of 40 patients with childhood acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Nine (22.5%) of 40 patients exhibited MLL rearrangements. Three (33.3%) of these nine patients had granulocytic sarcoma and were younger than 12 months of age. Of these three patients one presented as granulocytic sarcoma of both testes with cerebrospinal fluid involvement, the second case presented in the form of an abdominal mass, and the third as a periorbital granulocytic sarcoma. On the other hand, no granulocytic sarcomas were found among MLL-negative patients. It is likely that MLL-positive infant AML may predispose granulocytic sarcoma. Regarding the findings of our study and those of other reports, we would guess that the incidence of granulocytic sarcoma in pediatric MLL-positive AML may be equal to or greater than the 18 to 24% described in AML with t(8;21). Further investigations designed to identify 11q23/MLL abnormalities of leukemic cells or extramedullary tumor may be helpful for the precise diagnosis of granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:11733351

  2. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Juliane; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) that includes only 150 patients described to date meeting the latest World Health Organization (WHO) criteria and the recently reported CSF3R mutations. The diagnosis is based on morphological criteria of granulocytic cells and the exclusion of genetic drivers that are known to occur in others MPNs, such as BCR-ABL1, PDGFRA/B, or FGFR1 rearrangements. However, this scenario changed with the identification of oncogenic mutations in the CSF3R gene in approximately 83% of WHO-defined and no monoclonal gammopathy-associated CNL patients. CSF3R T618I is a highly specific molecular marker for CNL that is sensitive to inhibition in vitro and in vivo by currently approved protein kinase inhibitors. In addition to CSF3R mutations, other genetic alterations have been found, notably mutations in SETBP1, which may be used as prognostic markers to guide therapeutic decisions. These findings will help to understand the pathogenesis of CNL and greatly impact the clinical management of this disease. In this review, we discuss the new genetic alterations recently found in CNL and the clinical perspectives in its diagnosis and treatment. Fortunately, since the diagnosis of CNL is not based on exclusion anymore, the molecular characterization of the CSF3R gene must be included in the WHO criteria for CNL diagnosis. PMID:26366092

  3. Effect of chronic alcohol feeding on the ultrastructure of rat peripheral blood neutrophils: a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Todorović, V; Koko, V; Lacković, V; Milin, J; Varagić, J

    1994-03-01

    Morphometric methods were used to analyze the ultrastructural characteristics of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in 10 rats chronically consuming ethanol and 20 rats fed an isoenergetic standard diet (10 ad libitum and 10 pair fed control rats). Morphometric measurements were made, after a 4-month experimental period, of the following: the profile area of the cell, nucleus and cytoplasm; nucleus to cell profile area; volume density of the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria, Golgi system, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic granules; number of mitochondria per cell profile; number of cytoplasmic granules per cell profile and per micron2 of cytoplasm, as well as the azurophilic to specific granule ratio and mean diameter of granules. A significant decrease in cell profile area and cytoplasm profile area was shown in ethanol-treated rats. The volume density of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum nearly doubled during ethanol abuse. The results also showed that there were highly significant effects of ethanol on the total number of cytoplasmic granules per cell. In addition, changes were observed in mitochondria such as clumping, elongation, swelling and disruption of cristae, as well as changes in the topographic distribution of granules in the cytoplasm such as registration of cytoplasmic areas with numerous granules and areas with a smaller number or without any granules. Some neutrophils of ethanol-treated rats had autophagic vacuoles. The results indicate some ultrastructural abnormalities of PMN in chronic experimental alcoholism that may be related to polymorphonuclear phagocyte dysfunction. PMID:8189745

  4. Influence of histamine of precursors of granulocytic leukocytes in murine bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaya, N.; Tasaka, K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of histamine on granulocytic progenitor cells in murine bone marrow was studied in vitro. When bone marrow cells were cultured for three days with the drug, 10/sup -8/ M to 10/sup -5/ M of histamine stimulated differentiation and proliferation of myeloid precursor cells. Subsequently, the number of descendant cells, such as metamyelocytes and neutrophils, increased dose-dependently. Co-existence of equimolar H/sub 2/ blockers such as cimetidine and ranitidine completely suppressed this effect of histamine, though this was not the case with an H/sub 1/ blocker/histamine combination. Significant increase in /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was observed almost exclusively in myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes after exposure to histamine at concentrations higher than 10/sup -8/ M. Also, selective incorporation of /sup 3/H-histamine into bone marrow cells was observed in myeloblasts and promyelocytes, but histamine incorporation was not influenced by the presence of either of histamine agonists of antagonists. While histamine, via H/sub 2/ receptors, selectively increased the number of granulocytic colony forming units in culture (CFU-C), it had no such effect on macrophage colonies. 22 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  5. G-CSF improves murine G6PC3-deficient neutrophil function by modulating apoptosis and energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyun Sik; Lee, Young Mok; Song, Ki Duk; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2011-01-01

    G6PC3 (or glucose-6-phosphatase-β) deficiency underlies a congenital neutropenia syndrome in which neutrophils exhibit enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, increased apoptosis, impaired energy homeostasis, and impaired functionality. Here we show that murine G6pc3−/− neutrophils undergoing ER stress activate protein kinase-like ER kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate/Akt signaling pathways, and that neutrophil apoptosis is mediated in part by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In G6PC3-deficient patients, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves neutropenia, but its impact on neutrophil apoptosis and dysfunction is unknown. We now show that G-CSF delays neutrophil apoptosis in vitro by modulating apoptotic mediators. However, G6pc3−/− neutrophils in culture exhibit accelerated apoptosis compared with wild-type neutrophils both in the presence or absence of G-CSF. Limiting glucose (0.6mM) accelerates apoptosis but is more pronounced for wild-type neutrophils, leading to similar survival profiles for both neutrophil populations. In vivo G-CSF therapy completely corrects neutropenia and normalizes levels of p-Akt, phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, and active caspase-3. Neutrophils from in vivo G-CSF–treated G6pc3−/− mice exhibit increased glucose uptake and elevated intracellular levels of G6P, lactate, and adenosine-5′-triphosphate, leading to improved functionality. Together, the results strongly suggest that G-CSF improves G6pc3−/− neutrophil survival by modulating apoptotic mediators and rectifies function by enhancing energy homeostasis. PMID:21292774

  6. Neutrophil function in children with kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, K; Douglas, S D

    1976-09-01

    Peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function has been investigated for 46 children with kwashiorkor (without overt infection) in the Ivory Coast, West Africa. In vitro chemotactic response, candidacidal activity, and kinetic studies of metabolism during phagocytosis have been performed. Postphagocytic morphological events were evaluated by electron microscopy. The reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), measurement of enzyme activities, activity of glycolysis, and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity were assessed. The extent of iodide incorporation into trichloracetic acid (TCA)-precipitable protein by phagocytizing PMN'S and thyroid hormone degradation were measured. Chemotactic response was reduced at early time intervals (30, 60, and 120 minutes) and reached control values after 180 minutes. Whereas PMN's of controls killed 32.13 +/- 11.10 per cent of Candida albicans after 60 minutes, PMN's from kwashiorkor patients killed 18.55 +/- 7.74 per cent (p less than 0.01). HMS activity for resting PMN's of kwashiorkor children was higher than for controls, and during particle ingestion the extent of stimulation was comparable to controls. Electron microscopic assessment of phagocytic vacuole formation and degranulation showed no difference between PMN's from kwashiorkor and and control subjects. Incorporation of 131 I into TCA-precipitable proteins by phagocytizing PMN's from kwashiorkor children was reduced in compraison to controls, with either viable or heat-killed lactobacilli. No impairment in thyroxine (T4) degradation was observed for PMN's from kwashiorkor cases. PMS's from kwashiorkor patients show toxic granules, Dohle bodies, evidence of high baseline NBT reduction, and glucose decarboxylation. Functional studies indicate impaired kinetics of chemotaxis, diminished candidacidal activity, and reduced iodination. Enzymatic activities of resting cells are normal. Lactate production, HMS activity during phagocytosis, and morphological

  7. Neutrophil extracellular traps as a new paradigm in innate immunity: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Paul R; Palmer, Lisa J; Chapple, Iain L C

    2013-10-01

    The discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps in 2004 opened a fascinating new chapter in immune-mediated microbial killing. Brinkman et al. demonstrated that neutrophils, when catastrophically stimulated, undergo a novel form of programmed cell death (neutrophil extracellular trap formation) whereby they decondense their entire nuclear chromatin/DNA and release the resulting structure into the cytoplasm to mix with granule-derived antimicrobial peptides before extruding these web-like structures into the extracellular environment. The process requires the activation of the granule enzyme peptidyl arginine deiminase-4, the formation of reactive oxygen species (in particular hypochlorous acid), the neutrophil microtubular system and the actin cytoskeleton. Recent work by Yousefi et al. demonstrated that exposure to different agents for shorter stimulation periods resulted in neutrophil extracellular trap release from viable granulocytes, and that such neutrophil extracellular traps comprised mitochondrial DNA rather than nuclear DNA and were also capable of microbial entrapment and destruction. Deficiency in NADPH-oxidase production (as found in patients with chronic granulomatous disease) results in an inability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps and, along with their failure to produce antimicrobial reactive oxygen species, these patients suffer from severe, and sometimes life-threatening, infections. However, conversely the release of nuclear chromatin into tissues is also potentially autoimmunogenic and is now associated with the generation of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in seropositive rheumatoid arthritis. Other neutrophil-derived nuclear and cytoplasmic contents are also pathogenic, either through direct effects on tissues or via autoimmune processes (e.g. autoimmune vasculitis). In this review, we discuss the plant origins of a highly conserved innate immune method of microbial killing, the history and biology of neutrophil extracellular

  8. Comparative strain analysis of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection and clinical outcomes in a canine model of granulocytic anaplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scorpio, Diana G; Dumler, J Stephen; Barat, Nicole C; Cook, Judith A; Barat, Christopher E; Stillman, Brett A; DeBisceglie, Kristen C; Beall, Melissa J; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy

    2011-03-01

    A pilot study was conducted to determine whether existing human or canine strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum would reproduce clinical disease in experimentally inoculated dogs similar to dogs with naturally acquired granulocytic anaplasmosis. Six hounds were inoculated intravenously with one human and two canine strains of A. phagocytophilum that were propagated in vitro in HL-60 cells or in infected autologous neutrophils. Infected dogs were monitored for lethargy, anorexia, petechiae, lymphadenopathy, and fever. Dogs were assessed for complete blood count (CBC), serum chemistry, and serology (IFA and SNAP® 4Dx®); for A. phagocytophilum blood load by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; and for cytokine production. Prominent clinical signs were generalized lymphadenopathy and scleral injection; only one dog developed fever lasting 4 days. Notable laboratory alterations included sustained leukopenia and thrombocytopenia in all dogs. A. phagocytophilum morulae were noted in blood between days 10 and 11, although all dogs retained A. phagocytophilum DNA in blood through day 60. All dogs seroconverted by days 10-15 by IFA, and by days 17-30 by SNAP 4Dx; cytokine analyses revealed 10-fold increases in interleukin-2 and interleukin-18 in the neutrophil-propagated 98E4 strain-infected dog. All A. phagocytophilum strains produced infection, although canine 98E4 strain reproduced clinical signs, hematologic changes, and inflammatory cytokine elevations most consistent with granulocytic anaplasmosis when recognized clinically. Therefore, this strain should be considered for use in future studies of A. phagocytophilum canine infection models. PMID:20846015

  9. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    PubMed

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri. PMID:27189133

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Human Neutrophil Migration Across a Cultured Bladder Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Megan E.; Hunstad, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The recruitment of immune cells from the periphery to the site of inflammation is an essential step in the innate immune response at any mucosal surface. During infection of the urinary bladder, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN; neutrophils) migrate from the bloodstream and traverse the bladder epithelium. Failure to resolve infection in the absence of a neutrophilic response demonstrates the importance of PMN in bladder defense. To facilitate colonization of the bladder epithelium, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the causative agent of the majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), dampen the acute inflammatory response using a variety of partially defined mechanisms. To further investigate the interplay between host and bacterial pathogen, we developed an in vitro model of this aspect of the innate immune response to UPEC. In the transuroepithelial neutrophil migration assay, a variation on the Boyden chamber, cultured bladder epithelial cells are grown to confluence on the underside of a permeable support. PMN are isolated from human venous blood and are applied to the basolateral side of the bladder epithelial cell layers. PMN migration representing the physiologically relevant basolateral-to-apical direction in response to bacterial infection or chemoattractant molecules is enumerated using a hemocytometer. This model can be used to investigate interactions between UPEC and eukaryotic cells as well as to interrogate the molecular requirements for the traversal of bladder epithelia by PMN. The transuroepithelial neutrophil migration model will further our understanding of the initial inflammatory response to UPEC in the bladder. PMID:24300797

  11. Annexin A1 and the Resolution of Inflammation: Modulation of Neutrophil Recruitment, Apoptosis, and Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Michelle Amantéa; Vago, Juliana Priscila; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (also named polymorphonuclear leukocytes or PMN) are essential components of the immune system, rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation, providing the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Since neutrophils can also cause tissue damage, their fine-tuned regulation at the inflammatory site is required for proper resolution of inflammation. Annexin A1 (AnxA1), also known as lipocortin-1, is an endogenous glucocorticoid-regulated protein, which is able to counterregulate the inflammatory events restoring homeostasis. AnxA1 and its mimetic peptides inhibit neutrophil tissue accumulation by reducing leukocyte infiltration and activating neutrophil apoptosis. AnxA1 also promotes monocyte recruitment and clearance of apoptotic leukocytes by macrophages. More recently, some evidence has suggested the ability of AnxA1 to induce macrophage reprogramming toward a resolving phenotype, resulting in reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased release of immunosuppressive and proresolving molecules. The combination of these mechanisms results in an effective resolution of inflammation, pointing to AnxA1 as a promising tool for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:26885535

  12. Studies of oral neutrophil levels in patients receiving G-CSF after autologous marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lieschke, G J; Ramenghi, U; O'Connor, M P; Sheridan, W; Szer, J; Morstyn, G

    1992-11-01

    Patients are at risk of mucositis and infections in the oral cavity during the neutropenic period after chemotherapy, which are significant causes of morbidity. In phase I/II studies with the haemopoietic growth factor granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a reduction in post-chemotherapy mucositis has been observed in addition to haematologic effects. To understand this phenomenon better in patients receiving G-CSF following high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT), we studied the effects of G-CSF on levels of neutrophils recoverable from the oral cavity using a quantitative mouthrinse assay. In normal subjects, mouthrinses contained 472 +/- 329 x 10(3) neutrophils/mouthrinse. After chemotherapy followed by ABMT, mouthrinse neutrophil levels decreased to undetectable levels during the neutropenic period, but recovered 1-2 and 3-9 d before circulating neutrophil levels reached 0.1 and 1 x 10(9)/l respectively, whether or not patients received G-CSF. In patients who received G-CSF, the mean cumulative mucositis score was reduced from 35 +/- 9 to 21 +/- 12 (P < 0.05), and the maximum mean daily mucositis score was reduced from 2.8 +/- 0.5 to 1.7 +/- 0.9 (P < 0.01), compared to patients who did not receive G-CSF after ABMT. These studies provide in vivo evidence that neutrophils produced during G-CSF therapy are available to leave the circulation and enter tissues where their function is required for host defence. Since the usual temporal relationship between oral and peripheral blood neutrophil recovery was preserved during G-CSF administration after ABMT, these data support the hypothesis that the reduction in post-ABMT mucositis observed with G-CSF therapy may reflect a beneficial effect of G-CSF on the kinetics of oral mucosal neutrophil recovery in addition to the effect of G-CSF to accelerate peripheral blood neutrophil recovery. PMID:1283080

  13. Abnormal neutrophil adhesion in sickle cell anaemia and crisis: relationship to blood rheology.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, S H; Nash, G; Dormandy, J; Bevan, D H

    1991-07-01

    Defects in neutrophil adhesion and migration may contribute to the susceptibility to infection seen in sickle cell anaemia (SCA). These dynamic defects may be influenced by abnormalities in blood rheology found in this disorder. A whole blood model was used to study neutrophil adhesion in SCA patients: neutrophil adhesion to protein coated glass was quantitated by measuring the rate of disappearance of neutrophils from heparinized whole blood circulating through a perfusion chamber. Twenty-three adult patients (Hb SS) were studied in asymptomatic steady state, of whom nine were also studied during pain crisis, both before and 4-7 d after conventional therapy. Red cell and granulocyte filterability and whole blood and plasma viscosity were also measured. The half-time for disappearance from the perfusion system (t1/2) of neutrophils from patients in the steady-state was 93.5 +/- 8.4 min, compared to 49.1 +/- 2.8 min in normal age-matched controls (P = 0.001). In crisis t1/2 was further prolonged to 170.0 +/- 16.1 min (P = 0.01 v. steady state). After therapy, t1/2 decreased to 57.0 +/- 4.5 min (P = 0.001 v. pre-therapy state and P = 0.009 v. steady state) and was comparable to Hb AA controls. These findings reveal a neutrophil adhesion defect in SCA which worsens in crisis but is corrected following supportive therapy. Red cell filterability (expressed as average resistance to flow and pore-clogging particles) and white cell filterability (expressed as pore-clogging particles) were also abnormal in SCA and were found to correlate with neutrophil adhesion. Plasma viscosity also correlated with adhesion t1/2. The defect appears to be related to abnormal blood flow properties in SCA but the rheological factors cannot fully explain either the steady-state defect or the marked changes in neutrophil adhesion during crisis. PMID:1873228

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Intracerebral Granulocytic Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, E; Thirumavalavan; Sowrirajan

    2015-10-01

    The CNS involvement of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is more commonly manifest as meningeal involvement. Rarely it may present as intravascular tumor aggregates called granulocytic sarcoma which presents as intracranial hemorrhage. We are presenting a case of intracranial, intra-parenchymal granulocytic sarcoma (other names: chloroma, extramedullary myeloblastoma), presenting as acute hemiplegia without cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27608697

  15. Granulocyte proteases do not process endothelial cell-derived unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers to plasma vWF in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M D; Vu, C; Nolasco, L; Moake, J L

    1991-06-01

    The unusually large von Willebrand factor (ULvWF) multimers present within endothelial cells and platelets are larger than the vWF multimers normally found in adult human plasma. Furthermore, ULvWF multimers are cleared rapidly from the circulation if they are released by intense endothelial cell stimulation. The mechanisms by which the ULvWF multimers are processed to large plasma vWF multimers are not known. It has been demonstrated that granulocyte proteases are capable of decreasing vWF multimer size in vitro, and that some patients with myeloproliferative syndromes have a relative absence of large plasma vWF multimers in sodium citrate-anticoagulated plasma samples. In order to assess the influence of granulocyte proteases on vWF multimer size, we evaluated the vWF multimeric patterns in 94 plasma samples from 60 patients with neutrophil counts that were either considerably elevated or extremely reduced. In 83 of 94 plasma samples, the vWF multimeric patterns were normal. No patients with very low neutrophil counts had ULvWF multimers present. These observations suggest that granulocyte proteases are not likely to be involved in vivo in the processing of ULvWF multimers from endothelial cells to the smaller vWF forms in circulation. PMID:2069167

  16. Retinoid agonist Am80-enhanced neutrophil bactericidal activity arising from granulopoiesis in vitro and in a neutropenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wanjing; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Li, Lin; Mittal, Rahul; Zhang, Xiaokun; Shudo, Koichi; He, Qiaojun; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Wu, Lingtao

    2013-02-01

    Despite advances in the therapeutic use of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to promote granulopoiesis of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), neutropenia remains one of the most serious complications of cancer chemotherapy. We discovered that retinoid agonist Am80 (tamibarotene) is more potent than G-CSF in coordinating neutrophil differentiation and immunity development. Am80-induced neutrophils (AINs) either in vitro or in neutropenic mouse model displayed strong bactericidal activities, similar to those of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) or mouse peripheral blood neutrophils (MPBNs) but markedly greater than did G-CSF–induced neutrophils (GINs). In contrast to GINs but similar to PBNs, the enhanced bacterial killing by AINs accompanied both better granule maturation and greater coexpression of CD66 antigen with the integrin β2 subunit CD18. Consistently, anti-CD18 antibody neutralized Am80-induced bactericidal activities of AINs. These studies demonstrate that Am80 is more effective than G-CSF in promoting neutrophil differentiation and bactericidal activities, probably through coordinating the functional interaction of CD66 with CD18 to enhance the development of neutrophil immunity during granulopoiesis. Our findings herein suggest a molecular rationale for developing new therapy against neutropenia using Am80 as a cost-effective treatment option. PMID:23243275

  17. Retinoid agonist Am80-enhanced neutrophil bactericidal activity arising from granulopoiesis in vitro and in a neutropenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wanjing; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Li, Lin; Mittal, Rahul; Zhang, Xiaokun; Shudo, Koichi; He, Qiaojun; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in the therapeutic use of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to promote granulopoiesis of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), neutropenia remains one of the most serious complications of cancer chemotherapy. We discovered that retinoid agonist Am80 (tamibarotene) is more potent than G-CSF in coordinating neutrophil differentiation and immunity development. Am80-induced neutrophils (AINs) either in vitro or in neutropenic mouse model displayed strong bactericidal activities, similar to those of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) or mouse peripheral blood neutrophils (MPBNs) but markedly greater than did G-CSF–induced neutrophils (GINs). In contrast to GINs but similar to PBNs, the enhanced bacterial killing by AINs accompanied both better granule maturation and greater coexpression of CD66 antigen with the integrin β2 subunit CD18. Consistently, anti-CD18 antibody neutralized Am80-induced bactericidal activities of AINs. These studies demonstrate that Am80 is more effective than G-CSF in promoting neutrophil differentiation and bactericidal activities, probably through coordinating the functional interaction of CD66 with CD18 to enhance the development of neutrophil immunity during granulopoiesis. Our findings herein suggest a molecular rationale for developing new therapy against neutropenia using Am80 as a cost-effective treatment option. PMID:23243275

  18. The impact of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles on human neutrophil activation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Hung, Chi-Feng; Chen, Chun-Han; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-06-25

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLNs) are extensively employed as the nanocarriers for drug/gene targeting to tumors and the brain. Investigation into the possible immune response of cSLNs is still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cSLNs upon the activation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells (PMNs). The cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory mediators, Ca(2+) mobilization, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as the indicators of PMN stimulation were examined in this work. The cSLNs presented a diameter of 195 nm with a zeta potential of 44 mV. The cSLNs could interact with the cell membrane to produce a direct membrane lysis and the subsequent cytotoxicity according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) elevation. The interaction of cSLNs with the membrane also triggered a Ca(2+) influx, followed by the induction of oxidative stress and degranulation. The cationic nanoparticles elevated the levels of superoxide anion and elastase by 24- and 9-fold, respectively. The PMN activation by cSLNs promoted the phosphorylation of p38 and Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The imaging of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence demonstrated the production of NETs by cSLNs. This phenomenon was not significant for the neutral SLNs (nSLNs), although histones in NETs also increased after treatment of nSLNs. Our results suggest an important role of cSLNs in governing the activation of human neutrophils. PMID:25920576

  19. Annexin A1 Is a Physiological Modulator of Neutrophil Maturation and Recirculation Acting on the CXCR4/CXCL12 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Spatti, Marina; Hastreiter, Araceli; Santin, José Roberto; Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Gil, Cristiane Damas; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Perretti, Mauro; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2016-11-01

    Neutrophil production and traffic in the body compartments is finely controlled, and the strong evidences support the role of CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway on neutrophil trafficking to and from the bone marrow (BM). We recently showed that the glucocorticoid-regulated protein, Annexin A1 (AnxA1) modulates neutrophil homeostasis and here we address the effects of AnxA1 on steady-state neutrophil maturation and trafficking. For this purpose, AnxA1(-/-) and Balb/C wild-type mice (WT) were donors of BM granulocytes and mesenchymal stem cells and blood neutrophils. In vivo treatments with the pharmacological AnxA1 mimetic peptide (Ac2-26) or the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) antagonist (Boc-2) were used to elucidate the pathway of AnxA1 action, and with the cytosolic glucocorticoid antagonist receptor RU 38486. Accelerated maturation of BM granulocytes was detected in AnxA1(-/-) and Boc2-treated WT mice, and was reversed by treatment with Ac2-26 in AnxA1(-/-) mice. AnxA1 and FPR2 were constitutively expressed in bone marrow granulocytes, and their expressions were reduced by treatment with RU38486. Higher numbers of CXCR4(+) neutrophils were detected in the circulation of AnxA1(-/-) or Boc2-treated WT mice, and values were rescued in Ac2-26-treated AnxA1(-/-) mice. Although circulating neutrophils of AnxA1(-/-) animals were CXCR4(+) , they presented reduced CXCL12-induced chemotaxis. Moreover, levels of CXCL12 were reduced in the bone marrow perfusate and in the mesenchymal stem cell supernatant from AnxA1(-/-) mice, and in vivo and in vitro CXCL12 expression was re-established after Ac2-26 treatment. Collectively, these data highlight AnxA1 as a novel determinant of neutrophil maturation and the mechanisms behind blood neutrophil homing to BM via the CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2418-2427, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892496

  20. [Granulocyte adherence and chemotaxis in children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rister, M; Horatz, M

    1981-01-01

    Granulocyte adherence to endothelial surfaces associated with their chemotactic property enables these cells to leave the peripheral blood and to migrate into the tissue. This study was performed to investigate the effect of bacterial and viral infections as well as various kinds of therapies on these leukocyte functions. The adherence of control granulocytes to nylon fibers was 70%. In contrast to viral infections bacterial infections increased the adherence to 91%. Following the treatment with high dose methotrexate or vincristine the adherence was reduced to 20%. This granulocyte function defect was evident up to 14 days after the high dose methotrexate infusion. An age dependency of granulocyte adherence was not observed. In addition, viral infections as well as cytostatic therapy did not effect granulozyte chemotaxis. But bacterial infections and various defined phagocytic defects impaired the granulocyte chemotactic activity. PMID:7193772

  1. [GPI-Pr Deficiency and Apoptosis of PNH Granulocytes

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Li; Xu, Cai-Min; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Lu, Zhao-Jiang; Pan, Hua-Zhen; Zhang, Zhi-Nan

    2001-09-01

    To study the relationship of Glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (GIP-Pr) and apoptosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells, we isolated peripheral granulocytes from 10 patients with PNH and 10 normal controls and measured apoptosis induced by serum starvation. The FCM analysis of phosphotidylserine (ps) externalization in granulocytes was determined using Annexin-V-FLUOS labeling. After the cells were induced for apoptosis in serum-free medium for 20 hours, the percentage of externalization was 78.6% in normal control cells but 39.5% in PNH cells. The results of FCM analysis of PI stained granulocytes showed that the PI positive rate was 51.5% in control cells and 30.2% in PNH cells. The gel electrophoresis analysis of DNA fragmentation all indicate that PNH granulocytes were relatively resistant to apoptosis as compared with normal controls. This resistance to apoptosis might not be related to the percentage of CD59 deficient granulocytes. PMID:12578597

  2. Neisseria gonorrhoeae suppresses the oxidative burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Criss, Alison K.; Seifert, H. Steven

    2008-01-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) results in a potent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-driven inflammatory response, but the mechanisms by which Gc withstands PMN attack are poorly defined. Here we report that Gc can suppress the PMN oxidative burst, a central component of the PMN antimicrobial arsenal. Primary human PMNs remained viable after exposure to liquid-grown, exponential-phase, opacity-associated protein (Opa)-negative Gc of strains FA1090 and MS11 but did not generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), even after bacterial opsonization. Liquid-grown FA1090 Gc expressing OpaB, an Opa protein previously correlated with PMN ROS production, elicited a minor PMN oxidative burst. PMN ROS production in response to Opa− and OpaB+ Gc was markedly enhanced if bacteria were agar-grown or if liquid-grown bacteria were heat killed. Liquid-grown Opa- Gc inhibited the PMN oxidative burst elicited by isogenic dead bacteria, formylated peptides or Staphylococcus aureus but did not inhibit PMN ROS production by OpaB+ Gc or phorbol esters. Suppression of the oxidative burst required Gc-PMN contact and bacterial protein synthesis but not phagocytosis. These results suggest that viable Gc directly inhibits PMN signaling pathways required for induction of the oxidative burst, which may contribute to gonococcal pathogenesis during inflammatory stages of gonorrheal disease. PMID:18684112

  3. Role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, I. Y.; Bowden, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Silicosis is usually attributed to fibroblast stimulation by secretion of damaged alveolar macrophages (AMs), but the role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and of continuing cell injury in the pathogenesis has not been fully studied. Mice given intratracheal injections of 2 mg of silica received 3H-thymidine 1 hour before death at intervals to 20 weeks. Cellular populations and lysosomal content of lavage fluids were correlated with morphology, DNA synthesis, and collagen content of the lung. The initial response involved rapid PMN and AM recruitment to the alveoli. Some free particles crossed Type 1 epithelial cells, and silica was found in interstitial macrophages. Focal Type 1 cell damage was rapidly repaired by Type 2 cell proliferation. Although PMN numbers dropped after a few days, they never reached control levels and rose again after 8 weeks; the number of AMs fell to control values from 2 to 8 weeks, then increased again. Glucosaminidase and glucuronidase levels in the lavage fluid were much higher than control levels throughout the study. Increased DNA synthesis by interstitial cells occurred from 2 days to 20 weeks; increased collagen synthesis was found from 4 weeks onward. The continuing inflammatory response of the lung to silica suggests may contribute to fibroblastic stimulation. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:6486244

  4. Role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, I.Y.; Bowden, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    Silicosis is usually attributed to fibroblast stimulation by secretion of damaged alveolar macrophages (AMs), but the role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and of continuing cell injury in the pathogenesis has not been fully studied. Mice given intratracheal injections of 2 mg of silica received 3H-thymidine 1 hour before death at intervals to 20 weeks. Cellular populations and lysosomal content of lavage fluids were correlated with morphology, DNA synthesis, and collagen content of the lung. The initial response involved rapid PMN and AM recruitment to the alveoli. Some free particles crossed Type 1 epithelial cells, and silica was found in interstitial macrophages. Focal Type 1 cell damage was rapidly repaired by Type 2 cell proliferation. Although PMN numbers dropped after a few days, they never reached control levels and rose again after 8 weeks; the number of AMs fell to control values from 2 to 8 weeks, then increased again. Glucosaminidase and glucuronidase levels in the lavage fluid were much higher than control levels throughout the study. Increased DNA synthesis by interstitial cells occurred from 2 days to 20 weeks; increased collagen synthesis was found from 4 weeks onward. The continuing inflammatory response of the lung to silica suggests may contribute to fibroblastic stimulation.

  5. Superoxide-forming NADPH oxidase preparation of pig polymorphonuclear leucocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Wakeyama, H; Takeshige, K; Takayanagi, R; Minakami, S

    1982-01-01

    A phagocytic vesicle fraction with high NADPH-dependent superoxide-forming activity was obtained in large quantity from pig blood polymorphonuclear leucocytes, phagocytosing oil droplets in the presence of cyanide. The activity of the homogenate of the phagocytosing cells was 40 times that of the resting cells, and 70% of the activity in the homogenate was recovered in the phagocytic vesicle fraction. Essentially all of the superoxide-forming activity was extracted by repeated extraction with a mixture containing deoxycholate and Tween 20. The extract had a superoxide-forming activity of 1 mumol/min per mg of protein with NADPH, and one-fifth of this with NADH, Km values being similar to those of the vesicle fraction (40 microM for NADPH and 400 microM for NADH). A stoichiometric relationship of 1:2 for NADPH oxidation and superoxide formation was obtained, in agreement with the reaction NADPH +2O2 leads to NADP+ + 2O2 -. + H+. The activity of the extract was enhanced 2-fold by the addition of FAD, suggesting that the flavin is a component of the enzyme system. The Km value for FAD was 0.077 microM. The activities in both vesicle fraction and extract were labile even on refrigeration, but could be kept for several months at -70 degrees C. PMID:6293459

  6. Effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were investigated, using male Long-Evans rats exposed to 1% lead acetate in the drinking water for varying periods of time to achieve blood lead levels ranging from 20-200 ..mu..g/dl. Studies of PMN bacterial and fungal killing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis demonstrated that: 1) bactericidal activity of PMN from rats exposed to lead was not altered; 2) chemotactic activity remained within normal limits; 3) the phagocytic ability of the PMN also remained unaltered. In addition to these normal findings, one major abnormality was demonstrated: a significant decrease in the ability of PMN from rats exposed to lead to kill Candida albicans. This defect was not related to age or to length of exposure. It could not be produced by addition of lead to the test system in vitro. Further investigation revealed significant decreases in PMN glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities. These data support two possible mechanisms for the abnormal fungicidal activity of PMN from lead-exposed rats: decrease in ability to reduce oxygen to active metabolites, or reduction in myeloperoxidase activity due to diminshed synthesis of the heme moiety required for its function.

  7. Aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes during phagocytosis of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, P A; van der Tol, M E; Verhoef, J

    1984-01-01

    The process of aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during the uptake of bacteria was studied. Radiolabelled S. aureus were opsonized in different sera, washed, resuspended in buffer and added to the PMN. Uptake of the bacteria and aggregation of the PMN were measured simultaneously. Maximal aggregation occurred within 6 min, when 5 X 10(6) PMN had phagocytosed 2.5 X 10(8) S. aureus. Also the effects of serum concentrations and different sera for opsonization of the bacteria on PMN aggregation were studied. Despite normal uptake, aggregation of PMN was low when bacteria were opsonized in complement-deficient sera. Furthermore when PMN were treated with pronase to inactivate complement receptors on the cell surface of the PMN, and bacteria preopsonized in immune serum were added, no change in uptake occurred, although the degree of aggregation halved compared to control PMN. So, interaction between the bacteria and the complement receptor of the PMN cell membrane is needed for triggering the process of aggregation. By using dansylcadaverin and diphenylamine to modulate lysosomal enzyme release, azide or PMN from a chronic granulomatous disease patient to study the effect of the formation of oxygen species, and theophylline, DB-cAMP or 8 Br-cAMP to increase cAMP levels, it was concluded that aggregation of PMN during phagocytosis was not dependent on oxygen metabolism, degranulation or cAMP levels of PMN. PMID:6086503

  8. Automated segmentation and tracking of non-rigid objects in time-lapse microscopy videos of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Susanne; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-02-01

    Time-lapse microscopy is an important technique to study the dynamics of various biological processes. The labor-intensive manual analysis of microscopy videos is increasingly replaced by automated segmentation and tracking methods. These methods are often limited to certain cell morphologies and/or cell stainings. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation and tracking framework that does not have these restrictions. In particular, our framework handles highly variable cell shapes and does not rely on any cell stainings. Our segmentation approach is based on a combination of spatial and temporal image variations to detect moving cells in microscopy videos. This method yields a sensitivity of 99% and a precision of 95% in object detection. The tracking of cells consists of different steps, starting from single-cell tracking based on a nearest-neighbor-approach, detection of cell-cell interactions and splitting of cell clusters, and finally combining tracklets using methods from graph theory. The segmentation and tracking framework was applied to synthetic as well as experimental datasets with varying cell densities implying different numbers of cell-cell interactions. We established a validation framework to measure the performance of our tracking technique. The cell tracking accuracy was found to be >99% for all datasets indicating a high accuracy for connecting the detected cells between different time points. PMID:25465844

  9. Geographic, clinical, serologic, and molecular evidence of granulocytic ehrlichiosis, a likely zoonotic disease, in Minnesota and Wisconsin dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Greig, B; Asanovich, K M; Armstrong, P J; Dumler, J S

    1996-01-01

    Seventeen Minnesota and Wisconsin dogs with granulocytic ehrlichosis were studied. The diagnoses were made by finding ehrlichia morulae in peripheral blood neutrophils. Eight dogs were studied retrospectively, and nine dogs were studied prospectively. The medical records of all dogs were reviewed. Eighty-eight percent of the dogs were purebred and 76% were spayed females. The median age was 8 years. Sixty-five percent of the cases were diagnosed in October and November. Fever and lethargy were the most common clinical signs. The most frequent laboratory findings were lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, elevated activities of serum alkaline phosphatase and amylase, and hypoalbuminemia. No dogs seroreacted to Ehrlichia canis or Ehrlichia chaffeensis antigens, which are cross-reactive. Seventy-five percent of the dogs tested during the acute phase of disease and 100% of the dogs tested during convalescence were seropositive for E. equi antigens. Granulocytic ehrlichial 16S rRNA gene DNAs from six dogs were amplified by PCR. Sequence analysis of a 919-bp sequence of the ehrlichial 16S rRNA gene amplified by PCR from the blood of two dogs revealed the agent to be identical to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in Minnesota and Wisconsin and to be very similar to E. equi and Ehrlichia phagocytophila and less similar to E. canis, Ehrlichia ewingii, and E. chaffeensis. The geographic, clinical, serologic, and molecular evidence indicates that granulocytic ehrlichiosis in Minnesota and Wisconsin dogs is not caused by E. ewingii, but suggests that it is a zoonotic disease caused by an agent closely related to E. equi and that dogs likely contribute to the enzootic cycle and human infection. PMID:8748270

  10. Analysis of electrophysiological properties and responses of neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Deri; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The past decade has seen increasing use of the patch clamp technique on neutrophils and eosinophils. The main goal of these electrophysiological studies has been to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the phagocyte respiratory burst. NADPH oxidase activity, which defines the respiratory burst in granulocytes, is electrogenic because electrons from NADPH are transported across the cell membrane, where they reduce oxygen to form superoxide anion (O2−). This passage of electrons comprises an electrical current that would rapidly depolarize the membrane if the charge movement were not balanced by proton efflux. The patch clamp technique enables simultaneous recording of NADPH oxidase-generated electron current and H+ flux through the closely related H+ channel. Increasing evidence suggests that other ion channels may play crucial roles in degranulation, phagocytosis, and chemotaxis, highlighting the importance of electrophysiological studies to advance knowledge of granulocyte function. Several configurations of the patch clamp technique exist. Each has advantages and limitations that are discussed here. Meaningful measurements of ion channels cannot be achieved without an understanding of their fundamental properties. We describe the types of measurements that are necessary to characterize a particular ion channel. PMID:24504950

  11. Pathophysiologic importance of E- and L-selectin for neutrophil-induced liver injury during endotoxemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J A; Burns, A R; Farhood, A; Lynn Bajt, M; Collins, R G; Smith, C W; Jaeschke, H

    2000-11-01

    Neutrophils can cause parenchymal cell injury in the liver during ischemia-reperfusion and endotoxemia. Neutrophils relevant for the injury accumulate in sinusoids, transmigrate, and adhere to hepatocytes. To investigate the role of E- and L-selectin in this process, C3Heb/FeJ mice were treated with 700 mg/kg galactosamine and 100 microgram/kg endotoxin (Gal/ET). Immunogold labeling verified the expression of E-selectin on sinusoidal endothelial cells 4 hours after Gal/ET injection. In addition, Gal/ET caused up-regulation of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) and shedding of L-selectin from circulating neutrophils. Gal/ET induced hepatic neutrophil accumulation (422 +/- 32 polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMN]/50 high power fields [HPF]) and severe liver injury (plasma alanine transaminase [ALT] activities: 4,120 +/- 960 U/L; necrosis: 44 +/- 3%) at 7 hours. Treatment with an anti-E-selectin antibody (3 mg/kg, intravenously) at the time of Gal/ET administration did not significantly affect hepatic neutrophil accumulation and localization. However, the anti-E-selectin antibody significantly attenuated liver injury as indicated by reduced ALT levels (-84%) and 43% less necrotic hepatocytes. In contrast, animals treated with an anti-L-selectin antibody or L-selectin gene knock out mice were not protected against Gal/ET-induced liver injury. However, E-, L-, and P-selectin triple knock out mice showed significantly reduced liver injury after Gal/ET treatment as indicated by lower ALT levels (-65%) and reduced necrosis (-68%). Previous studies showed that circulating neutrophils of E-selectin-overexpressing mice are primed and activated similar to neutrophils adhering to E-selectin in vitro. Therefore, we conclude that blocking E-selectin or eliminating this gene may have protected against Gal/ET-induced liver injury in vivo by inhibiting the full activation of neutrophils during the transmigration process. PMID:11050049

  12. BAFF-secreting neutrophils drive plasma cell responses during emergency granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Roham; Lund, Harald; Georgoudaki, Anna-Maria; Zhang, Xing-Mei; Ortlieb Guerreiro-Cacais, André; Grommisch, David; Warnecke, Andreas; Croxford, Andrew L; Jagodic, Maja; Becher, Burkhard; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Harris, Robert A

    2016-07-25

    Prolonged infections or adjuvant usage can trigger emergency granulopoiesis (EG), leading to dysregulation in neutrophil blood counts. However, the impact of EG on T and B cell function remains largely unknown. In this study, to address this question, we used a mouse model of neutropenia and studied immune activation after adjuvant administration. The initial neutropenic state fostered an environment of increased dendritic cell activation and T cell-derived IL-17 production. Interestingly, neutropenic lysozyme 2-diphtheria toxin A mice exhibited striking EG and amplified neutrophil recruitment to the lymph nodes (LNs) that was dependent on IL-17-induced prostaglandin activity. The recruited neutrophils secreted a B cell-activating factor that highly accelerated plasma cell generation and antigen-specific antibody production. Reduction of neutrophil functions via granulocyte colony-stimulating factor neutralization significantly diminished plasma cell formation, directly linking EG with the humoral immune response. We conclude that neutrophils are capable of directly regulating T cell-dependent B cell responses in the LN. PMID:27432941

  13. Cardiopulmonary effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in a canine model of bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Eichacker, P Q; Waisman, Y; Natanson, C; Farese, A; Hoffman, W D; Banks, S M; MacVittie, T J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the effects of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a canine model of septic shock. Awake 2-yr-old beagles were studied before and after intraperitoneal placement of an Escherichia coli-infected clot. Nine days before and until 3 days after clot placement, animals received daily high-dose (G-CSF (5 microgram/kg body wt; n = 17), low-dose G-CSF (0.1 microgram/kg body wt; n = 17), or a control protein (5 micrograms/kg body wt; n = 20). Survival rate was greater (P < 0.04, Wilcoxon test) in the high-dose G-CSF group (14/17) than in the low-dose G-CSF (10/17) and control (12/20) groups. High-dose G-CSF improved cardiovascular function, as evidenced by increased left ventricular ejection fraction (day 1 after clot; P < 0.001) and mean arterial pressure (day 2; P < 0.02) compared with low-dose G-CSF and control groups. High-dose G-CSF increased (P < 0.001) mean peripheral neutrophils before (-3 days) and after (2 h to 4 days) clot and produced a more rapid (P < 0.001) rise (day 2) and fall (day 4) in mean alveolar neutrophil numbers compared with the low-dose G-CSF and control groups. High-dose G-CSF decreased mean serum endotoxin (2-8 h; P < 0.002) and tumor necrosis factor (2 h; P < 0.02) levels and lowered blood bacteria counts (2-6 h; P < 0.04) compared with the low-dose G-CSF and control groups. Thus, in this canine model, G-CSF sufficient to increase peripheral neutrophils before and during peritonitis and septic shock enhances host defense, reduces cytokine (tumor necrosis factor) levels, and improves cardiovascular function and survival. PMID:7532649

  14. Aleukemic bcr-abl positive granulocytic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Jew-Win; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Chang, Kian-Meng; Tan, Sen-Moi

    2009-11-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) can occur de novo or in association with intramedullary myeloid disorders. With the advent of sophisticated molecular detection techniques to detect diagnostic genes such as bcr-abl, PML-RARA and CBFB/MYH11 in bone marrow or peripheral blood, many cases of the so called 'primary' GS are questionable. We report a case of primary GS where the tumor mass bcr-abl translocation was demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization in which there was no evidence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). This is an important finding as it highlights the possibility that CML may present as a sole extramedullary form, and illustrates potential treatment by tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:19215983

  15. Timing of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration on neutropenia induced by cyclophosphamide in normal mice.

    PubMed Central

    Misaki, M.; Ueyama, Y.; Tsukamoto, G.; Matsumura, T.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of altering the timing of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) administration on neutropenia induced by cyclophosphamide (CPA) were studied experimentally in a mouse model. Experimental mice were divided into three groups: (a) treatment with rhG-CSF after CPA administration (post-treatment group); (b) treatment with rhG-CSF both before and after CPA administration (pre- and post-treatment group); and (c) treatment with saline after CPA administration (control group). The results were as follows. Mice receiving rhG-CSF on the 2 days preceding CPA treatment, in which progenitor cell counts outside the S-phase when CPA was administered were the lowest of all the groups, showed accelerated neutrophil recovery but decreased neutrophil nadirs compared with the control group despite rhG-CSF treatment. The pre- and post-treatment group, consisting of mice who received rhG-CSF treatment on days -4 and -3 before CPA treatment, and in which progenitor cell counts when CPA was administered were increased to greater levels than in the other groups, showed remarkably accelerated neutrophil recovery and the greatest increase in the neutrophil nadirs of all the groups. These results suggested that the kinetics of progenitor cell populations when chemotherapeutic agents were administered seemed to play an important role in neutropenia after chemotherapy, and that not only peripheral neutrophil cell and total progenitor cell counts but also progenitor cell kinetics should be taken into consideration when administering rhG-CSF treatment against the effects of chemotherapy. PMID:9528829

  16. [A comparative study of the reactions of the peripheral blood neutrophils from donors and from lymphogranulomatosis patients to arachidonate stimulation of the cells].

    PubMed

    Zorin, V P; Pogirnitskaia, A V; Semenkova, G N; Cherenkevich, S N; Krutilina, N I; Muravskaia, G V

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonate-induced aggregation and generalization of active oxygen forms (OAF) by peripheral blood neutrophils in donors were studied in donors and Hodgkin's disease patients. Leukocytes of the latter had incomplete ability to produce AOF in response to cell stimulation with arachidonic acid. The study of arachidonate-induced aggregation of neutrophils indicated no differences in the speed of the process in the patients and donors. AOF catchers did not act on the rate of leukocyte aggregation in the patients though accelerated the process in the donors. It is inferred that Hodgkin's disease is associated with dysfunction of oxygen activation by neutrophils. The findings suggest that defects in leukocytes ability to activate oxygen in Hodgkin's disease may entail deranged regulation of other processes essential for functional activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:8020703

  17. Granulocytic sarcoma of the rectum: a rare complication of myelodysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, V; Browne, G; Parapia, L A; Price, J J; Batman, P A

    1999-01-01

    A 67 year old man with myelodysplasia was admitted as an emergency with a six week history of rectal bleeding and diarrhoea. Barium enema showed an irregular polypoid filling defect in the lateral wall of the proximal rectum near the rectosigmoid junction. Histology showed this to be a granulocytic sarcoma (extramedullary granulocytic leukaemia; chloroma) infiltrating the bowel. A low index of suspicion of this lesion results in an incorrect diagnosis in many such cases. A chloroacetate esterase immunoperoxidase stain will confirm the granulocytic nature of the tumour cells. Images PMID:10690184

  18. Circumventing Y. pestis Virulence by Early Recruitment of Neutrophils to the Lungs during Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Vagima, Yaron; Zauberman, Ayelet; Levy, Yinon; Gur, David; Tidhar, Avital; Aftalion, Moshe; Shafferman, Avigdor; Mamroud, Emanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is a fatal disease caused by Yersinia pestis that is associated with a delayed immune response in the lungs. Because neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of infection, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for their delayed homing to the lung. During the first 24 hr after pulmonary infection with a fully virulent Y. pestis strain, no significant changes were observed in the lungs in the levels of neutrophils infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules, or the expression of the major neutrophil chemoattractants keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In contrast, early induction of chemokines, rapid neutrophil infiltration and a reduced bacterial burden were observed in the lungs of mice infected with an avirulent Y. pestis strain. In vitro infection of lung-derived cell-lines with a YopJ mutant revealed the involvement of YopJ in the inhibition of chemoattractants expression. However, the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs of mice infected with the mutant was still delayed and associated with rapid bacterial propagation and mortality. Interestingly, whereas KC, MIP-2 and G-CSF mRNA levels in the lungs were up-regulated early after infection with the mutant, their protein levels remained constant, suggesting that Y. pestis may employ additional mechanisms to suppress early chemoattractants induction in the lung. It therefore seems that prevention of the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs is of major importance for Y. pestis virulence. Indeed, pulmonary instillation of KC and MIP-2 to G-CSF-treated mice infected with Y. pestis led to rapid homing of neutrophils to the lung followed by a reduction in bacterial counts at 24 hr post-infection and improved survival rates. These observations shed new light on the virulence mechanisms of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague, and have implications for the development of novel

  19. Anti-neutrophil antibody enhances the neuroprotective effects of G-CSF by decreasing number of neutrophils in hypoxic ischemic neonatal rat model

    PubMed Central

    Doycheva, Desislava M.; Hadley, Tiffany; Li, Li; Applegate, Richard L.; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Neonatal hypoxia ischemia (HI) is an injury that can lead to neurological impairments such as behavioral and learning disabilities. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective in ischemic stroke however it has also been shown to induce neutrophilia, ultimately exacerbating neuronal injury. Our hypothesis is that coadministration of anti-neutrophil antibody (Ab) with G-CSF will decrease blood neutrophil counts thereby reducing infarct volume and improving neurological function post HI brain injury. Methods Rat pups were subjected to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2.5h of hypoxia. Animals were randomly assigned to five groups: Sham (n=15), Vehicle (HI, n=15), HI with G-CSF treatment (n=15), HI with G-CSF+Ab treatment (n=15), and HI with Ab treatment (n=15). Ab (325μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally while G-CSF (50μg/kg) was administered subcutaneously 1h post HI followed by daily injections for 3 consecutive days. Animals were euthanized at 96h post HI for blood neutrophil counts and brain infarct volume measurements as well as at 5 weeks for neurological function testing and brain weight measurements. Lung and spleen weights at both time points were further analyzed. Results The G-CSF treatment group showed tendencies to reduce infarct volume and improve neurological function while significantly increasing neutrophil counts. On the other hand, the G-CSF+Ab group significantly reduced infarct volume, improved neurological function and decreased neutrophil counts. The Ab alone group showed reversal of the neuroprotective effects of the G-CSF+Ab group. No significant differences were found in peripheral organ weights between groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that coadministration of G-CSF with Ab not only prevented brain atrophy but also significantly improved neurological function by decreasing blood neutrophil counts. Hence the neuroprotective effects of G-CSF may be further enhanced

  20. The new genetics of chronic neutrophilic leukemia and atypical CML: implications for diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maxson, Julia E.; George, Tracy I.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Although activation of tyrosine kinase pathways is a shared theme among myeloproliferative neoplasms, the pathogenetic basis of chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) has remained elusive. Recently, we identified high-frequency oncogenic mutations in the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF3R) in CNL and in some patients with atypical chronic myeloid leukemia. Inhibition of Janus kinase 2 or SRC kinase signaling downstream of mutated CSF3R is feasible and should be explored therapeutically. Herein, we discuss the potential impact of these findings for the classification and treatment of these disorders. PMID:23896413

  1. Brief review on the effect of low-power laser irradiation on neutrophils with emphasis on emerging fungal infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperandio, F. F.; Bani, G. M. A. C.; Mendes, A. C. S. C.; Brigagão, M. R. P. L.; Santos, G. B.; Malaquias, L. C. C.; Chavasco, J. K.; Verinaud, L. M.; Burger, E.

    2015-03-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) participate in an active way in the innate immunity developed after the fungal infection paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Nevertheless, the sole participation of neutrophils is not sufficient to eradicate PCM`s pathogenic fungus: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb). In that way, we aimed to develop a treatment capable of stimulating PMN to the site of injury through low-level laser therapy (LLLT). (LLLT) is safe to use and has not been linked to microorganism resistance so far; in addition, based on previous studies we understand that LLLT may be useful to treat several medical conditions through the stimulation and activation of certain types of cells. This brief review is based on the novel attempt of activating PMN against a fungal infection.

  2. Protective effect of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in leukocytopenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T.; Okamura, S.; Okada, K.; Suga, A.; Shimono, N.; Ohhara, N.; Hirota, Y.; Sawae, Y.; Niho, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in ICR mice were investigated. Mice were treated with cyclophosphamide (CPA) and were then injected intraperitoneally with rmGM-CSF three times daily, beginning on the day after CPA treatment, for 7 days. The number of peripheral blood leukocytes in both CPA- and rmGM-CSF-treated mice and control CPA-treated mice reached a nadir on day 4, when P. aeruginosa was injected intraperitoneally. The administration of rmGM-CSF significantly increased the proportion of survivors among mice infected with a lethal dose of P. aeruginosa. This effect was further analyzed by monitoring sequential changes in leukocyte count and bacterial growth in various organs. The number of bacteria in the peritoneal cavities, peripheral blood samples, and livers of GM-CSF-treated mice decreased to an undetectable level after a transient increase, and the number was significantly lower than that in control mice. In GM-CSF-treated mice, the neutrophil levels in peripheral blood started to increase 5 days after CPA administration and were consistently higher than those in controls. Furthermore, the neutrophils in GM-CSF-treated mice were more mature morphologically. Thus, the prophylactic effect of rmGM-CSF against P. aeruginosa infection may result from a rapid recovery of myelopoiesis and a partial enhancement of mature neutrophil function. PMID:2656523

  3. CD66b Overexpression and Loss of C5a Receptors as Surface Markers for Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Neutrophil Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Norbert; Grüger, Thomas; Brandenburg, Kerstin; Zinserling, Jörg; Zündorf, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes constitute the main component of innate immunity in the clearance of bacterial infections. However, during systemic inflammation, immunoparalysis may occur resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. This study presents a new in vitro model for analyzing the dysfunction of human peripheral blood neutrophils resulting from the interaction with Staphylococcus aureus components in whole blood. After induction of a massive complement activation by S. aureus supernatant, the neutrophils exhibit a reduced phagocytic capacity resulting in a dramatic reduction of the antibacterial activity similar to that of neutrophils isolated from septic patients. The number of phagocytozing neutrophils is drastically reduced as well as the phagocytic capacity designated by a significantly lower number of ingested microbes. This dysfunction correlates with the loss of complement component 5a receptor 1 from the neutrophil cell surface and can be further characterized by a C5a-induced CD66b overexpression. The presented in vitro model offers a new platform for preclinical testing of immunosuppressive drugs and delivers new information for the understanding of neutrophil dysfunctions under the conditions described. PMID:26176669

  4. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos; Uribe-Querol, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  5. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  6. The neutrophil-specific antigen CD177 is a counter-receptor for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD31).

    PubMed

    Sachs, Ulrich J H; Andrei-Selmer, Cornelia L; Maniar, Amudhan; Weiss, Timo; Paddock, Cathy; Orlova, Valeria V; Choi, Eun Young; Newman, Peter J; Preissner, Klaus T; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Santoso, Sentot

    2007-08-10

    Human neutrophil-specific CD177 (NB1 and PRV-1) has been reported to be up-regulated in a number of inflammatory settings, including bacterial infection and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor application. Little is known about its function. By flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation studies, we identified platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) as a binding partner of CD177. Real-time protein-protein analysis using surface plasmon resonance confirmed a cation-dependent, specific interaction between CD177 and the heterophilic domains of PECAM-1. Monoclonal antibodies against CD177 and against PECAM-1 domain 6 inhibited adhesion of U937 cells stably expressing CD177 to immobilized PECAM-1. Transendothelial migration of human neutrophils was also inhibited by these antibodies. Our findings provide direct evidence that neutrophil-specific CD177 is a heterophilic binding partner of PECAM-1. This interaction may constitute a new pathway that participates in neutrophil transmigration. PMID:17580308

  7. Neutrophil elastase activity in differentiating HL-60 promyelocytes is decreased by culture with ethanol and elastase deficient neutrophils are produced in alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, C.; Christianson, R.; Pratt, P.; Lynn, W.

    1987-05-01

    Serum-free culture of HL-60 in the presence of recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor in four days elicits a five-fold increase in esterolytic neutrophil elastase (NE) like activity measured with methoxy-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-val p-nitroanilide and purified NE standard but does not cause terminal differentiation. Simultaneous exposure to 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6% (vol./vol.) ethanol blocks this increase in NE activity. Exposure to 0.85% ethanol promotes terminal differentiation to elastase-deficient granulocytes which as been described using DMSO. To ascertain if ethanol may have similar effects on granulocytic differentiation in vivo, they compared oxidase and elastase activities of PMN's in male alcoholics on a binge (ethanol > 200 mg/dl.). In 29 patients an average of 872 (+/- 237) (SD) ng./10/sup 6/ PMN's of active NE was found compared to 1571 (+/- 177) in 13 controls. Patients admitted for treatment of alcoholism had similar NE activity in 3-4 days, showed a slight increase in activity within one week and had NE activity comparable to controls within 2-3 weeks. These findings support the previous observation that smoking related emphysema is less prevalent and severe in patients who regularly consume alcohol. They conclude that ethanol may visibly alter responsiveness of promyelocytic precursors to regulatory differentiating factors.

  8. Granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate increase permeability to albumin of cultured endothelial monolayers and isolated perfused lungs. Role of oxygen radicals and granulocyte adherence.

    PubMed

    Shasby, D M; Shasby, S S; Peach, M J

    1983-01-01

    Human granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) increased permeability to albumin of monolayers of cultured endothelial cells grown on micropore filters. Granulocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease and PMA did not increase endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that the increase in permeability is dependent on granulocyte-derived oxygen radicals. When granulocytes were separated from the endothelial cells by a micropore filter, granulocytes and PMA no longer increased endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely approximated to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability. The relevance of these in vitro findings to an intact microvasculature was confirmed by demonstrating that agents that reduce granulocyte adherence to endothelium reduce edema formed in isolated lungs by granulocytes and PMA, an oxygen radical dependent process. Pretreatment of granulocytes with cytochalasin B or addition of 2% dextran to isolated lung perfusates reduced granulocyte adherence and markedly reduced edema formation in isolated lungs. These studies demonstrate that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely apposed to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability through an oxygen-radical-dependent mechanism, and they suggest that reduction of granulocyte adherence may protect against granulocyte-dependent edema. PMID:6849554

  9. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease. PMID:25929952

  10. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:7497089

  11. Favorable outcome of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor use in neuromyelitis optica patients presenting with agranulocytosis in the setting of rituximab.

    PubMed

    Mealy, Maureen A; Levy, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe autoimmune condition affecting the central nervous system characterized by a relapsing disease course. Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the protein CD20, and is one of the most utilized medications for management of this disease. A known complication of rituximab use is neutropenia. We report on two patients who developed symptomatic early-onset rituximab-induced agranulocytosis who safely received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Neutrophil counts recovered quickly and both patients continue to receive rituximab without further incident. PMID:26439958

  12. Parenchymal cell apoptosis as a signal for sinusoidal sequestration and transendothelial migration of neutrophils in murine models of endotoxin and Fas-antibody-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J A; Fisher, M A; Simmons, C A; Farhood, A; Jaeschke, H

    1998-09-01

    Endotoxin (ET) induces neutrophil sequestration in hepatic sinusoids, the activation of proinflammatory transcription factors (nuclear factor KB [NF-kappaB]) with up-regulation of adhesion molecules on sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes. However, if galactosamine (Gal) is co-administered with ET, neutrophils transmigrate and attack parenchymal cells. This suggests that a signal from parenchymal cells triggers neutrophil transmigration. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that parenchymal cell apoptosis may induce neutrophil transendothelial migration in the Gal/ET model. Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 700 mg/kg Gal and 100 microg/kg ET induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) formation (13.25 +/- 0.75 ng/mL) and hepatic NF-kappaB activation at 90 minutes; the generation of the C-X-C chemokine KC (2.86 +/- 0.30 ng/mL at 5 hours); sinusoidal neutrophil sequestration (380 +/- 21 polymorphonuclear leukocytes/50 high-power fields) and apoptosis (925% +/- 29% increase of DNA fragmentation; and a 45-fold increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells) at 6 hours, followed by transmigration of neutrophils and development of substantial necrosis (38% +/- 3% of hepatocytes; alanine transaminase [ALT]: 1,500 +/- 300 U/L) at 7 hours. Administration of uridine (1,000 mg/kg) did not reduce plasma levels of TNF-alpha and KC, NF-kappaB activation, or polymorphonuclear leukocyte sequestration, but attenuated apoptosis by 90% to 94%. In these livers, neutrophils did not transmigrate and liver injury was prevented (necrosis: < 5%; ALT: 40 +/- 3 U/L). However, massive apoptosis and liver injury initiated by the anti-Fas antibody, Jo2, did not recruit neutrophils into the liver. We conclude that excessive parenchymal cell apoptosis represents an important signal for transmigration of primed neutrophils sequestered in sinusoids during endotoxemia in vivo. However, apoptosis per se does not cause neutrophil

  13. EFFECTS OF SHIGA TOXIN ON ISOLATED PORCINE GRANULOCYTES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Shiga toxin (Stx) binding to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) is hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) disease in humans. Pigs are an excellent model for studying the role of PMN in STEC disease because, like humans, they are ...

  14. Deficient Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Jared W.; Cody, Mark J.; McManus, Meghann P.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Yost, Christian Con

    2016-01-01

    Overwhelming infection causes significant morbidity and mortality among patients treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for primary immune deficiencies, syndromes of bone marrow failure, or cancer. The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN; neutrophil) is the first responder to microbial invasion and acts within the innate immune system to contain and clear infections. PMNs contain, and possibly clear, infections in part by forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are extensive lattices of extracellular DNA and decondensed chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins and degradative enzymes, such as histones, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil elastase. They trap and contain microbes, including bacteria and fungi, and may directly affect extracellular microbial killing. Whether or not deficient NET formation contributes to the increased risk for overwhelming infection in patients undergoing BMT remains incompletely characterized, especially in the pediatric population. We examined NET formation in vitro in PMNs isolated from 24 patients who had undergone BMT for 13 different clinical indications. For these 24 study participants, the median age was 7 years. For 6 of the 24 patients, we examined NET formation by PMNs isolated from serial, peripheral blood samples drawn at three different clinical time points: pre-BMT, pre-engraftment, and post-engraftment. We found decreased NET formation by PMNs isolated from patients prior to BMT and during the pre-engraftment and post-engraftment phases, with decreased NET formation compared with healthy control PMNs detected even out to 199 days after their BMT. This decrease in NET formation after BMT did not result from neutrophil developmental immaturity as we demonstrated that >80% of the PMNs tested using flow cytometry expressed both CD10 and CD16 as markers of terminal differentiation along the neutrophilic lineage. These pilot study results mandate further exploration regarding the mechanisms or factors

  15. Role of activated neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Perl, Mario; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Kellermann, Philipp; Lu, Dapeng; Braumüller, Sonja; Bachem, Max G; Thomas, Jörg; Knöferl, Markus W; Ayala, Alfred; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus S

    2012-07-01

    More than 50% of severely injured patients have chest trauma. Second insults frequently result in acute lung injury (ALI), with sepsis being the main underlying condition. We aimed to develop a standardized, reproducible, and clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of ALI induced by chest trauma and polymicrobial sepsis and to investigate the pathophysiologic role of activated neutrophils. Lung contusion was applied to C57Bl/6 mice via a focused blast wave. Twenty-four hours later, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. For polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) depletion, animals received intravenous injections of PMN-depleting antibody. In response to blunt chest trauma followed by sepsis as well as after sepsis alone, a significant local and systemic inflammatory response with increased cytokine/chemokine levels in lung and plasma was observed. In contrast, lung apoptosis was markedly elevated only after a double hit. Intra-alveolar neutrophils and total bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations were markedly increased following isolated chest trauma or the combined insult, but not after sepsis alone. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced only in response to the double hit accompanied by histological disruption of the alveolar architecture, lung congestion, and marked cellular infiltrates. Neutrophil depletion significantly diminished lung interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 concentrations and reduced the degree of septic ALI. Here we have established a novel and highly reproducible mouse model of chest trauma-induced septic ALI characterizing a clinical relevant double-hit scenario. In particular, the depletion of neutrophils substantially mitigated the extent of lung injury, indicating a pathomechanistic role for neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:22552016

  16. Deficient Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jared W; Cody, Mark J; McManus, Meghann P; Pulsipher, Michael A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Yost, Christian Con

    2016-01-01

    Overwhelming infection causes significant morbidity and mortality among patients treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for primary immune deficiencies, syndromes of bone marrow failure, or cancer. The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN; neutrophil) is the first responder to microbial invasion and acts within the innate immune system to contain and clear infections. PMNs contain, and possibly clear, infections in part by forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are extensive lattices of extracellular DNA and decondensed chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins and degradative enzymes, such as histones, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil elastase. They trap and contain microbes, including bacteria and fungi, and may directly affect extracellular microbial killing. Whether or not deficient NET formation contributes to the increased risk for overwhelming infection in patients undergoing BMT remains incompletely characterized, especially in the pediatric population. We examined NET formation in vitro in PMNs isolated from 24 patients who had undergone BMT for 13 different clinical indications. For these 24 study participants, the median age was 7 years. For 6 of the 24 patients, we examined NET formation by PMNs isolated from serial, peripheral blood samples drawn at three different clinical time points: pre-BMT, pre-engraftment, and post-engraftment. We found decreased NET formation by PMNs isolated from patients prior to BMT and during the pre-engraftment and post-engraftment phases, with decreased NET formation compared with healthy control PMNs detected even out to 199 days after their BMT. This decrease in NET formation after BMT did not result from neutrophil developmental immaturity as we demonstrated that >80% of the PMNs tested using flow cytometry expressed both CD10 and CD16 as markers of terminal differentiation along the neutrophilic lineage. These pilot study results mandate further exploration regarding the mechanisms or factors

  17. Trauma-associated Human Neutrophil Alterations Revealed by Comparative Proteomics Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian-Ying; Krovvidi, Ravi K.; Gao, Yuqian; Gao, Hong; Petritis, Brianne O.; De, Asit; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Bankey, Paul E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese R; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Tujin; Brown, Joseph N.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Davis, Ronald W.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) play an important role in mediating the innate immune response after severe traumatic injury; however, the cellular proteome response to traumatic condition is still largely unknown. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We applied 2D-LC-MS/MS based shotgun proteomics to perform comparative proteome profiling of human PMNs from severe trauma patients and healthy controls. RESULTS A total of 197 out of ~2500 proteins (being identified with at least two peptides) were observed with significant abundance changes following the injury. The proteomics data were further compared with transcriptomics data for the same genes obtained from an independent patient cohort. The comparison showed that the protein abundance changes for the majority of proteins were consistent with the mRNA abundance changes in terms of directions of changes. Moreover, increased protein secretion was suggested as one of the mechanisms contributing to the observed discrepancy between protein and mRNA abundance changes. Functional analyses of the altered proteins showed that many of these proteins were involved in immune response, protein biosynthesis, protein transport, NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and apoptosis pathways. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Our data suggest increased neutrophil activation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis in response to trauma. The study not only reveals an overall picture of functional neutrophil response to trauma at the proteome level, but also provides a rich proteomics data resource of trauma-associated changes in the neutrophil that will be valuable for further studies of the functions of individual proteins in PMNs. PMID:23589343

  18. Interaction of Escherichia coli with Different Fimbriae and Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Björkstén, Bengt; Wadström, Torkel

    1982-01-01

    The effects of Escherichia coli strains with various fimbriae on bacteria-polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) interactions were studied. Strains of E. coli were cultivated at 37°C to express and at 18°C to suppress the formation of fimbriae. The presence of fimbriae was confirmed by electron microscopic studies and hemagglutination and salt aggregation tests. Fimbriated E. coli strains were more readily PMN associated than the nonfimbriated strains in the absence of opsonins, confirming the results of previous studies. However, the PMN chemiluminescence (CL) induced by the various strains in the absence of serum opsonins depended on the type of fimbriae they expressed. Strains with type 1 fimbriae expressing mannose-sensitive hemagglutination induced 5 to 15 times more CL than the same strains grown at 18°C, i.e., not expressing this type of fimbriae. For strains showing mannose-resistant hemagglutination, the differences between fimbriated and nonfimbriated variants of the same strains grown at 37 and 18°C, respectively, were less pronounced. Analysis of enterotoxigenic strains expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae showed that these induced only 25 to 33% of the CL induced by the same E. coli strains not expressing CFA/I, whereas enterotoxigenic strains expressing CFA/II fimbriae induced 100 to 200% of the CL induced by the nonfimbriated variants. Although less CL was induced by bacteria with CFA/I fimbriae than by nonfimbriated variants, this situation was reversed when the microorganisms were opsonized. Thus, CFA/I fimbriae, while enhancing adhesion to cells, induce less activation of PMN-killing mechanisms in a serum-free environment. These findings may be relevant for the virulence in certain body sites, since CFA/I fimbriae, while facilitating adhesiveness, may protect the bacteria from PMN killing. Our findings indicate that PMN interactions with fimbriated E. coli in the host defense may be complex. Certain fimbriae may indeed be

  19. Fracture initiates systemic inflammatory response syndrome through recruiting polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Haipeng; Liu, Jia; Yao, Jianhua; Zhong, Jianfeng; Guo, Lei; Sun, Tiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Fracture, a common type injury in trauma patients, often results in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Though the mechanism of the fracture-initiated SIRS still remains not well characterized, it is well documented that the polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) play an important role in the inflammatory process. We hypothesize that fractures recruit PMN to the local tissue, which is followed by an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and initiation of SIRS. In the current study, we established a closed femoral fracture rat model. We evaluated the levels of MPO, IL-1β and CINC-1 in fractured tissue homogenate, and we measured the levels of IL-6 and IL-10, the biomarkers for systemic inflammatory response, in the rat sera. In clinical part of the study, we collected blood from patients with isolated closed femoral fractures and evaluated PMN-related chemoattractants (IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF) and the number of peripheral PMN. We further evaluated the level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of the patients with fracture. In the animal model of closed femoral fracture, we found a significant recruitment of PMN to the local tissue after fracture, which correlates with the elevated MPO level. We also showed that the concentration of IL-1β and CINC-1 in local tissue is significantly increased and might be responsible for the PMN recruitment. Recruitment of PMN to the local tissue was accompanied with a significant increase in the systemic levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in serum. In the patients with closed femoral fracture, we observed an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and PMN-related chemoattractants, including IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF. The level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of patients were significantly higher compared to the healthy volunteers. Our data suggest that fracture released mitochondrial DNA into the local haematoma of

  20. Comparative adherence of granulocytes to endothelial monolayers and nylon fiber.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, R R; Macarak, E J; Kefalides, N A

    1978-03-01

    Adherence of granulocytes to tissue culture monolayers of endothelium averaged 26.2 +/- 1.3% SEM, which was similar to their adherence on 50-mg nylon fiber columns (27.7 +/- 3.6%). In contrast, adherence to epithelial cells, fibroblasts, kidney cells, and plastic Petri dishes without monolayers was only 12.4, 9.9, 11.1, and 4.3%, respectively. Cyclic nucleotides and adherence-modifying plasma factors induced changes of adherence to endothelium similar to those in nylon fiber columns. Adherence of granulocytes in whole blood was the same as for purified granulocytes in Hank's balanced salt solution. Exposure of endothelial monolayers to 0.18% trypsin for 10 min reduced subsequent granulocyte adherence to 25.2% of control values. Incubation of trypsin-treated monolayers with nutrient medium for 4 h did not improve adherence, but values returned to normal or above by 24 h, with or without serum proteins present in the nutrient medium. The similarity of granulocyte adherence to nylon fiber and to endothelial monolayers in vitro suggests that results with the nylon fiber assay reflect in vivo granulocyte-endothelium interaction. Furthermore, the endothelial monolayer offers a new model for studying this cell-cell relationship in vitro. PMID:641148

  1. Feedback Amplification of Neutrophil Function.

    PubMed

    Németh, Tamás; Mócsai, Attila

    2016-06-01

    As the first line of innate immune defense, neutrophils need to mount a rapid and robust antimicrobial response. Recent studies implicate various positive feedback amplification processes in achieving that goal. Feedback amplification ensures effective migration of neutrophils in shallow chemotactic gradients, multiple waves of neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, and the augmentation of various effector functions of the cells. We review here such positive feedback loops including intracellular and autocrine processes, paracrine effects mediated by lipid (LTB4), chemokine, and cytokine mediators, and bidirectional interactions with the complement system and with other immune and non-immune cells. These amplification mechanisms are not only involved in antimicrobial immunity but also contribute to neutrophil-mediated tissue damage under pathological conditions. PMID:27157638

  2. Histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatoses and panniculitides: variations on a theme.

    PubMed

    Chow, Stephen; Pasternak, Sylvia; Green, Peter; Tremaine, Robert; Reardon, Michael; Murray, Scott; Northgrave, Stacey; Walsh, Noreen

    2007-08-01

    Requena et al, in their article titled "Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome," in 2005, established that the dermal infiltrate in some patients with Sweet's syndrome is composed of histiocyte-like immature myeloid cells, not polymorphonuclear leukocytes as is the norm. With this premise in mind, we report on 6 cases of inflammatory skin disease in which the common denominator was a dermal and/or subcutaneous infiltrate of histiocytoid myeloid cells in patients with new-onset cutaneous eruptions and systemic symptoms. The cases were diverse clinically and microscopically, fell short of the criteria necessary for a diagnosis of classical Sweet's syndrome, and were difficult to categorize at the outset. The systemic manifestations ranged from malaise alone to a combination of fever, chills, night sweats, and polyarthralgia. The clinical morphology of the cutaneous eruptions varied from being papulovesicular in 1 patient to mainly consisting of erythematous plaques and nodules in the remainder. The dermatologists' differential diagnoses included Sweet's syndrome in 3 cases, a drug eruption in 2, and other entities such as erythema nodosum and Well's syndrome. Biopsies in all cases revealed a dermal and/or subcutaneous infiltrate composed predominantly of mononuclear histiocytoid cells of myeloid origin. With the benefit of detailed clinicopathologic correlation, the cases were classified for the purpose of this report as follows: Sweet's-like neutrophilic dermatosis, histiocytoid (3 cases); subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome, histiocytoid (2 cases); histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatosis, unspecified (1 case). In addition, we describe a further instructive case that exhibited overlap with those in the series but proved ultimately to represent leukemia cutis. The spectrum of observations in this report supports and expands the original concept of histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome. PMID:17667165

  3. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Binet, Francois; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2{alpha} are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  4. Very-late-antigen-4 (VLA-4)-mediated brain invasion by neutrophils leads to interactions with microglia, increased ischemic injury and impaired behavior in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jens; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Herz, Josephine; Doeppner, Thorsten R; König, Rebecca; Hütten, Heiko; Etemire, Eloho; Männ, Linda; Klingberg, Anika; Fischer, Thomas; Görtler, Michael W; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reichardt, Peter; Schraven, Burkhart; Hermann, Dirk M; Reymann, Klaus G; Gunzer, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal injury from ischemic stroke is aggravated by invading peripheral immune cells. Early infiltrates of neutrophil granulocytes and T-cells influence the outcome of stroke. So far, however, neither the timing nor the cellular dynamics of neutrophil entry, its consequences for the invaded brain area, or the relative importance of T-cells has been extensively studied in an intravital setting. Here, we have used intravital two-photon microscopy to document neutrophils and brain-resident microglia in mice after induction of experimental stroke. We demonstrated that neutrophils immediately rolled, firmly adhered, and transmigrated at sites of endothelial activation in stroke-affected brain areas. The ensuing neutrophil invasion was associated with local blood-brain barrier breakdown and infarct formation. Brain-resident microglia recognized both endothelial damage and neutrophil invasion. In a cooperative manner, they formed cytoplasmic processes to physically shield activated endothelia and trap infiltrating neutrophils. Interestingly, the systemic blockade of very-late-antigen-4 immediately and very effectively inhibited the endothelial interaction and brain entry of neutrophils. This treatment thereby strongly reduced the ischemic tissue injury and effectively protected the mice from stroke-associated behavioral impairment. Behavioral preservation was also equally well achieved with the antibody-mediated depletion of myeloid cells or specifically neutrophils. In contrast, T-cell depletion more effectively reduced the infarct volume without improving the behavioral performance. Thus, neutrophil invasion of the ischemic brain is rapid, massive, and a key mediator of functional impairment, while peripheral T-cells promote brain damage. Acutely depleting T-cells and inhibiting brain infiltration of neutrophils might, therefore, be a powerful early stroke treatment. PMID:25391494

  5. Granulocytes Impose a Tight Bottleneck upon the Gut Luminal Pathogen Population during Salmonella Typhimurium Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Lisa; Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E.; Chouffane, Elsa-Sarah; Trautwein-Weidner, Kerstin; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Slack, Emma; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Stecher, Bärbel; Loverdo, Claude; Regoes, Roland R.; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Topological, chemical and immunological barriers are thought to limit infection by enteropathogenic bacteria. However, in many cases these barriers and their consequences for the infection process remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed a mouse model for Salmonella colitis and a mixed inoculum approach to identify barriers limiting the gut luminal pathogen population. Mice were infected via the oral route with wild type S. Typhimurium (S. Tm) and/or mixtures of phenotypically identical but differentially tagged S. Tm strains (“WITS”, wild-type isogenic tagged strains), which can be individually tracked by quantitative real-time PCR. WITS dilution experiments identified a substantial loss in tag/genetic diversity within the gut luminal S. Tm population by days 2–4 post infection. The diversity-loss was not attributable to overgrowth by S. Tm mutants, but required inflammation, Gr-1+ cells (mainly neutrophilic granulocytes) and most likely NADPH-oxidase-mediated defense, but not iNOS. Mathematical modelling indicated that inflammation inflicts a bottleneck transiently restricting the gut luminal S. Tm population to approximately 6000 cells and plating experiments verified a transient, inflammation- and Gr-1+ cell-dependent dip in the gut luminal S. Tm population at day 2 post infection. We conclude that granulocytes, an important clinical hallmark of S. Tm-induced inflammation, impose a drastic bottleneck upon the pathogen population. This extends the current view of inflammation-fuelled gut-luminal Salmonella growth by establishing the host response in the intestinal lumen as a double-edged sword, fostering and diminishing colonization in a dynamic equilibrium. Our work identifies a potent immune defense against gut infection and reveals a potential Achilles' heel of the infection process which might be targeted for therapy. PMID:25522364

  6. Regulation of granulocyte and monocyte differentiation by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Alan D; Keefer, Jeffrey R; Kummalue, Tanawan; Liu, Huaitian; Wang, Qian-fei; Cleaves, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha)-ER induces 32Dcl3 neutrophilic differentiation and inhibits 32DPKCdelta maturation to macrophages in response to phorbol ester. In 32Dcl3 cells, C/EBPalpha-ER rapidly induces the PU.1 and C/EBPalpha RNAs even in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that these are direct C/EBPalpha genetic targets. C/EBPalpha strongly binds and modestly activates the murine PU.1 promoter via an evolutionarily conserved binding site. C/EBPalpha-ER variants incapable of binding DNA still slow G1 progression but do not induce differentiation. N-terminally truncated C/EBPalpha variants, including the p30 isoform expressed in a subset of AMLs, also retain the ability to slow 32D cl3 proliferation, whereas the C/EBPalpha(BRM2)-ER variant does not slow G1 progression, has a reduced capacity to induce early granulocytic markers, and does not induce terminal maturation. In 32DPKCdelta cells, C/EBPalpha-ER strongly inhibits endogenous or exogenous JunB induction, dependent upon the outer surface of the C/EBPalpha basic region, but does not inhibit c-Jun, PU.1, or C/EBPbeta expression. Exogenous JunB restores AP-1 DNA binding but does not overcome inhibition of monopoiesis by C/EBPalpha-ER. In summary, we propose that while C/EBPalpha is required for development of immature granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, C/EBPalpha subsequently inhibits monopoiesis, via inhibition of JunB express and via additional activities, and induces granulopoiesis, via induction of PU.1, C/EBPepsilon, and cell cycle arrest. PMID:14636649

  7. Intracellular signalling during neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Attila; Walzog, Barbara; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-08-01

    Recruitment of leucocytes such as neutrophils to the extravascular space is a critical step of the inflammation process and plays a major role in the development of various diseases including several cardiovascular diseases. Neutrophils themselves play a very active role in that process by sensing their environment and responding to the extracellular cues by adhesion and de-adhesion, cellular shape changes, chemotactic migration, and other effector functions of cell activation. Those responses are co-ordinated by a number of cell surface receptors and their complex intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we review neutrophil signal transduction processes critical for recruitment to the site of inflammation. The two key requirements for neutrophil recruitment are the establishment of appropriate chemoattractant gradients and the intrinsic ability of the cells to migrate along those gradients. We will first discuss signalling steps required for sensing extracellular chemoattractants such as chemokines and lipid mediators and the processes (e.g. PI3-kinase pathways) leading to the translation of extracellular chemoattractant gradients to polarized cellular responses. We will then discuss signal transduction by leucocyte adhesion receptors (e.g. tyrosine kinase pathways) which are critical for adhesion to, and migration through the vessel wall. Finally, additional neutrophil signalling pathways with an indirect effect on the neutrophil recruitment process, e.g. through modulation of the inflammatory environment, will be discussed. Mechanistic understanding of these pathways provide better understanding of the inflammation process and may point to novel therapeutic strategies for controlling excessive inflammation during infection or tissue damage. PMID:25998986

  8. A single injection of polyethylene-glycol granulocyte colony-stimulating factor strongly prolongs survival of mice with systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    van Spriel, A B; van den Herik-Oudijk, I E; van de Winkel, J G

    2000-06-01

    Systemic candidiasis is a life-threatening disease occurring in immunocompromized patients. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces mortality in experimental invasive candidiasis. Covalent conjugation of polyethylene-glycol (peg) to proteins increases their stability and in vivo bioactivity. In this study, the effect of a single subcutaneous injection of peg-G-CSF on lethal candidiasis was assessed. This was performed in acute and chronic candidiasis models in non-neutropenic FVB/N mice. Peg-G-CSF rapidly increased circulating polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) numbers in mice, sustaining high for >4 days. Candida albicans outgrowth from kidneys of infected mice was strongly reduced after peg-G-CSF treatment (5.76 log cfu/g kidney vs 7.66 control), with absence of hyphal outgrowth and enhanced PMNL influx. Moreover, peg-G-CSF increased survival of C. albicans -infected mice, whereas efficacy of uncoupled G-CSF was obtained only after repeated treatment. These data document a potent in vivo biological effect of peg-G-CSF, resulting in strongly enhanced resistance against systemic candidiasis. PMID:10843742

  9. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  10. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  11. Cancers predispose neutrophils to release extracellular DNA traps that contribute to cancer-associated thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Mélanie; Krause, Daniela S.; Schatzberg, Daphne; Martinod, Kimberly; Voorhees, Jaymie R.; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Scadden, David T.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-associated thrombosis often lacks a clear etiology. However, it is linked to a poor prognosis and represents the second-leading cause of death in cancer patients. Recent studies have shown that chromatin released into blood, through the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), is procoagulant and prothrombotic. Using a murine model of chronic myelogenous leukemia, we show that malignant and nonmalignant neutrophils are more prone to NET formation. This increased sensitivity toward NET generation is also observed in mammary and lung carcinoma models, suggesting that cancers, through a systemic effect on the host, can induce an increase in peripheral blood neutrophils, which are predisposed to NET formation. In addition, in the late stages of the breast carcinoma model, NETosis occurs concomitant with the appearance of venous thrombi in the lung. Moreover, simulation of a minor systemic infection in tumor-bearing, but not control, mice results in the release of large quantities of chromatin and a prothrombotic state. The increase in neutrophil count and their priming is mediated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which accumulates in the blood of tumor-bearing mice. The prothrombotic state in cancer can be reproduced by treating mice with G-CSF combined with low-dose LPS and leads to thrombocytopenia and microthrombosis. Taken together, our results identify extracellular chromatin released through NET formation as a cause for cancer-associated thrombosis and unveil a target in the effort to decrease the incidence of thrombosis in cancer patients. PMID:22826226

  12. Concurrent activation of granulocytes and osteoclasts in busulfan-suppressed bone marrow in response to transplantation of a mammary carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    McCracken, C H; Lottsfeldt, J L; Lee, M Y

    1988-05-01

    Transplantation of CE mammary adenocarcinoma (CE maca) into normal mice produces both neutrophilia and hypercalcemia due to osteoclastic bone resorption. In order to explore the physiology of osteoclast formation in vivo, the time course of neutrophilia and osteoclast development was examined in mice that had been pretreated with busulfan prior to the CE maca implantation. Busulfan-treated tumor-bearing mice (BUTUM), busulfan-treated control mice (BUCON), tumor-bearing mice with no busulfan (TUM), and normal controls (CON) were sacrificed on days 4, 7, 11, 14, and 17 after tumor implantation. Leukocyte counts, serum calcium levels, marrow cellularity, and marrow colony-forming units (CFU) were determined. Osteoclasts were quantified histologically by the osteoclast: endosteum ratio (OER). BUCON bone marrow was hypoplastic with CFU remaining significantly lower than that of controls over the course of the experiment. In contrast, BUTUM marrow CFU increased dramatically with the growth of the tumor. The most predominant increase was observed in neutrophilic CFU. Development of hypercalcemia closely paralleled neutrophilia in both TUM and BUTUM mice, although these changes were significantly delayed in the BUTUM group. The neutrophil count and serum calcium levels remained within normal control levels for BUCON mice. The OER correlated with serum calcium, and it closely paralleled the neutrophil count in TUM and BUTUM mice. These results clearly indicated the stimulation of bone marrow neutrophilic granulocyte progenitors and osteoclasts by the CE maca, indicating that the bone marrow is the primary target of this tumor. There may be a closely related mechanism in osteoclast and granulocyte stimulation by one or more CE maca factors. PMID:3360066

  13. Cytokine signals through STAT3 promote expression of granulocyte secondary granule proteins in 32D cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Arcasoy, Murat O.; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Forget, Bernard G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study, we showed that activation of a transfected human erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) in the murine myeloid cell line 32D resulted in the development of morphologic features of granulocytic differentiation and expression of the neutrophil primary granule protein myeloperoxidase. We now studied if EPOR signaling could also mediate secondary granule protein gene expression and investigated the signal transduction requirements for induction of secondary granule gene expression in 32D cells. Materials and Methods Wild-type and variant 32D cells expressing normal or chimeric EPORs or receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSFRs) were stimulated with EPO or G-CSF and the expression of granulocyte-specific genes was analyzed by Northern blot analysis. To determine the signaling mechanisms required for secondary granule protein gene induction, the activation of STAT pathways following growth factor stimulation was studied by Western blot analysis. Results We found that EPO treatment of 32D cells engineered to express EPOR did not result in induction of the secondary granule protein genes encoding lactoferrin and 24p3 lipocalin, the mouse homolog of human N-Gal, or the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPε. Replacement of the intracellular domain of EPOR with the intracellular domain of G-CSFR in a chimeric receptor was associated with EPO-mediated induction of lactoferrin, 24p3 lipocalin, and C/EBPε genes. We found that STAT3 phosphorylation was mediated by the intracellular domain of G-CSFR, but not EPOR. Replacement of one or two of the STAT5 binding sites in the intracytoplasmic domain of the EPOR with STAT3 binding sites resulted in EPO-mediated STAT3 activation and a marked increase in the expression of the 24p3 lipocalin gene. Knockdown of STAT3 protein levels with siRNA caused significant decrease in 24p3 lipocalin gene induction. Conclusion These results indicate that EPOR signaling cannot substitute for G-CSFR signaling to

  14. Naringenin suppresses K562 human leukemia cell proliferation and ameliorates Adriamycin-induced oxidative damage in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    LI, RUI-FANG; FENG, YING-QIAN; CHEN, JUN-HUI; GE, LIN-TONG; XIAO, SHU-YUAN; ZUO, XUE-LAN

    2015-01-01

    Treatments for leukemia remain unsatisfactory. Conventional chemotherapy agents that aim to kill tumor cells may also damage normal cells and thus result in severe side-effects. Naringenin, a natural polyphenolic compound with antioxidant effects, has been revealed to have significant antitumor effects with low toxicity in preliminary studies. Thus, it is considered as one of the most promising flavonoids in the treatment of leukemia. In the present study, the effects of naringenin on the K562 human leukemia cell line and the underlying mechanisms were explored in vitro. In addition, human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were used as a normal control in order to evaluate the effects of naringenin on normal granulocytes and in the mediation of Adriamycin (ADM)-induced oxidative damage. The results revealed that K562 proliferation was significantly inhibited by naringenin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner; however, minimal cytotoxic effects were observed in PMNs when naringenin was used at concentrations <400 μmol/l. Morphological changes indicative of apoptosis were observed in naringenin-treated K562 cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the K562 cells were arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with a significantly upregulated rate of apoptosis. Furthermore, in the naringenin-treated K562 cells, the labeling index of proliferating cell nuclear antigen was observed to be increased by immunochemical staining, the mRNA and protein expression levels of p21/WAF1 were strongly upregulated in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, whereas p53 gene expression was not significantly changed. In PMNs to which naringenin (50~80 μmol/l) was added 1 h subsequent to ADM, the cell damage induced by ADM was significantly reduced, coincident with reductions in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and increases in the activity of superoxide dismutase and

  15. Neutrophils Oppose Uterine Epithelial Carcinogenesis via Debridement of Hypoxic Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, Adam; Crequer, Amandine; Columbus, Devin; Daikoku, Takiko; Mittal, Khush; Dey, Sudhansu K; Erlebacher, Adrian

    2015-12-14

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are largely considered to foster cancer development despite wielding an arsenal of cytotoxic agents. Using a mouse model of PTEN-deficient uterine cancer, we describe a surprising inhibitory role for PMNs in epithelial carcinogenesis. By inducing tumor cell detachment from the basement membrane, PMNs impeded early-stage tumor growth and retarded malignant progression. Unexpectedly, PMN recruitment and tumor growth control occurred independently of lymphocytes and cellular senescence and instead ensued as part of the tumor's intrinsic inflammatory response to hypoxia. In humans, a PMN gene signature correlated with improved survival in several cancer subtypes, including PTEN-deficient uterine cancer. These findings provide insight into tumor-associated PMNs and reveal a context-specific capacity for PMNs to directly combat tumorigenesis. PMID:26678340

  16. Biological evaluation of the inhibition of neutrophil elastase by a synthetic beta-lactam derivative.

    PubMed

    Maillard, J L; Favreau, C; Reboud-Ravaux, M; Kobaiter, R; Joyeau, R; Wakselman, M

    1990-08-01

    A novel beta-lactam derivative, N-(2-chloromethylphenyl) 3,3-difluoroazetidin-2-one, which behaves as a time-dependent inactivator of leukocyte elastase, has been tested in biological models designed to detect its potential therapeutic value in the treatment of emphysema. Its effect on two types of leukocyte elastase, purified human leukocyte elastase and elastase freshly discharged upon stimulation of guinea pig polymorphonuclear neutrophils, was examined using three methods: the cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate, MeO-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-NA, the lysis and solubilization of tritiated elastin and the microscopic examination of the damage to lung elastic network. The inhibitor was shown to be effective at preventing proteolysis due to leukocyte elastase. Besides its low cellular toxicity, no apparent hindrance of its efficiency was found in the above quasi in vivo environment. This suggests that this inhibitor may be of potential therapeutic value in elastase-related pathology. PMID:2081524

  17. The inward rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 is expressed in mouse neutrophils from bone marrow and liver

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Daniela S.; Yellen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are phagocytic cells that play a critical role in innate immunity by destroying bacterial pathogens. Channels belonging to the inward rectifier potassium channel subfamily 2 (Kir2 channels) have been described in other phagocytes (monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils) and in hematopoietic precursors of phagocytes. Their physiological function in these cells remains unclear, but some evidence suggests a role in growth factor-dependent proliferation and development. Expression of functional Kir2 channels has not been definitively demonstrated in mammalian neutrophils. Here, we show by RT-PCR that neutrophils from mouse bone marrow and liver express mRNA for the Kir2 subunit Kir2.1 but not for other subunits (Kir2.2, Kir2.3, and Kir2.4). In electrophysiological experiments, resting (unstimulated) neutrophils from mouse bone marrow and liver exhibit a constitutively active, external K+-dependent, strong inwardly rectifying current that constitutes the dominant current. The reversal potential is dependent on the external K+ concentration in a Nernstian fashion, as expected for a K+-selective current. The current is not altered by changes in external or internal pH, and it is blocked by Ba2+, Cs+, and the Kir2-selective inhibitor ML133. The single-channel conductance is in agreement with previously reported values for Kir2.1 channels. These properties are characteristic of homomeric Kir2.1 channels. Current density in short-term cultures of bone marrow neutrophils is decreased in the absence of growth factors that are important for neutrophil proliferation [granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF)]. These results demonstrate that mouse neutrophils express functional Kir2.1 channels and suggest that these channels may be important for neutrophil function, possibly in a growth factor-dependent manner. PMID:25472961

  18. Alterations of the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children. A chemiluminescence study.

    PubMed

    Kantar, A; Wilkins, G; Swoboda, B; Littarru, G P; Bertoli, E; Catassi, C; Coppa, G; Giorgi, P L

    1990-05-01

    The respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was investigated in 24 children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 24 healthy controls. This oxygen dependent, membrane associated process generates a number of toxic oxygen metabolites which are implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial damage. The activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied in terms of luminol amplified chemiluminescence. It was found that the resting luminol amplified chemiluminescence activity of isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children was significantly higher than that of controls (342,000 +/- 174,000 cpm vs. 165,000 +/- 82,000 cpm, p less than 0.01). The addition of respiratory burst inhibitors caused a significant reduction of basal chemiluminescence (greater than 80%). When the ratio of phorbol myristate acetate stimulated activity to basal activity was calculated and used as an activation index, it was found to be significantly reduced in diabetics relative to controls (4.29 +/- 2.46 vs. 8.34 +/- 3.21, p less than 0.01). These observations suggest that increased release of toxic oxygen metabolites from polymorphonuclear leukocytes in diabetic subjects may play a role in the development of diabetic angiopathies. PMID:2166990

  19. Diagnosis of autoimmune neutropenia by neutrophil-bound IgG and IgM antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taichi; Taniuchi, Shoichiro; Tsuji, Shoji; Iharada, Anna; Hasui, Masafumi; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune neutropenia (AIN) in infancy is caused by antineutrophil (granulocyte-specific) autoantibodies. These antibodies are rarely found in circulation because their serum levels are extremely low. We hypothesized that a direct granulocyte immunofluorescence test (D-GIFT) that enables us to detect neutrophil-bound autoantibodies consisting of both immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM has better diagnostic value than the detection of circulating autoantibodies. Whole blood (100 μL) was obtained from 50 infants with AIN, 12 infants with transient neutropenia, and 37 control infants. D-GIFT was performed using both fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antihuman IgG Fc portion monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein isothiocyanate antihuman IgM monoclonal antibodies. Results were assessed as relative fluorescence intensity (RFI). The RFIs of antineutrophil IgG-bound and antineutrophil IgM-bound cells in patients with AIN were significantly higher than those in patients with transient neutropenia and in controls. Positive results, as assessed by RFI scores of more than 1.81 in either antineutrophil IgG-bound or antineutrophil IgM-bound cells, showed the sensitivity and specificity of D-GIFT, and the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.98, 0.98, and 0.997, respectively) in the diagnosis of AIN. D-GIFT detecting both neutrophil-bound IgG autoantibodies and IgM autoantibodies has discriminatory power for identifying patients with AIN and, therefore, can be a useful diagnostic test. PMID:21941149

  20. Hevein, an allergenic lectin from rubber latex, activates human neutrophils' oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Llinas, P; Rodríguez-Romero, A; Hernández, C; Linares, M; Zenteno, E; Lascurain, R

    2001-04-01

    Hevein is an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) specific lectin that has been hypothesized to participate in the IgE-mediated allergic reactions in patients with latex allergy. In this work we assessed the specificity and biological effect of hevein purified from rubber latex on human leukocytes, using epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Purified human granulocytes were stimulated in vitro with hevein, and production of oxidative radicals was measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium formazan. Histochemical staining and flow cytometry showed that hevein recognizes specifically monocytes (CD14+) and neutrophils (CD16+), but not lymphoid cells. Hevein induced oxidative response in purified granulocytes; this effect was 1.3-1.5-fold higher than the effect observed with the lectin WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), or other lectins with different sugar specificity. The induced reactions and cellular recognition by hevein were inhibited with GlcNAc and its oligomers; as well as by glycoproteins containing tri-and tetra-antennary N-glycosydically linked glycans. Our findings suggest that neutrophils are the main target for latex hevein; this lectin induces production of oxidative radicals, which seem to play an important role in tissue damage during latex allergy. PMID:11788802

  1. Radiation Therapy for Chloroma (Granulocytic Sarcoma)

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne; Yahalom, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Chloroma (granulocytic sarcoma) is a rare, extramedullary tumor of immature myeloid cells related to acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Radiation therapy (RT) is often used in the treatment of chloromas; however, modern studies of RT are lacking. We reviewed our experience to analyze treatment response, disease control, and toxicity associated with RT to develop treatment algorithm recommendations for patients with chloroma. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients who underwent treatment for chloromas at our institution between February 1990 and June 2010 were identified and their medical records were reviewed and analyzed. Results: The majority of patients that presented with chloroma at the time of initial leukemia diagnosis (78%) have not received RT because it regressed after initial chemotherapy. Yet most patients that relapsed or remained with chloroma after chemotherapy are in the RT cohort (90%). Thirty-three courses of RT were administered to 22 patients. Radiation subsite breakdown was: 39% head and neck, 24% extremity, 9% spine, 9% brain, 6% genitourinary, 6% breast, 3% pelvis, and 3% genitourinary. Median dose was 20 (6-36) Gy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival and overall survival in the RT cohort were 39% and 43%, respectively, at 5 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months since RT, only 1 patient developed progressive disease at the irradiated site and 4 patients developed chloromas at other sites. RT was well tolerated without significant acute or late effects and provided symptom relief in 95% of cases. Conclusions: The majority of patients with chloromas were referred for RT when there was extramedullary progression, marrow relapse, or rapid symptom relief required. RT resulted in excellent local disease control and palliation of symptoms without significant toxicity. We recommend irradiating chloromas to at least 20 Gy, and propose 24 Gy in 12 fractions as an appropriate regimen.

  2. Heterogeneity of functional responses in differentiated myeloid cell lines reveals EPRO cells as a valid model of murine neutrophil functional activation.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Peter; Chi, Jeffrey; Berliner, Nancy

    2005-05-01

    Mature neutrophils display multiple functional responses upon activation that include chemotaxis, adhesion to and transmigration across endothelial cells, phagocytosis, and pathogen destruction via potent microbicidal enzymes and reactive oxygen species. We are using myeloid cell line models to investigate the signaling pathways that govern neutrophil functional activation. To facilitate these studies, we have performed a direct comparison of functional responses of human and murine myeloid cell line models upon neutrophil differentiation. Our results show that EPRO cells, promyelocytes that undergo complete neutrophil maturation, demonstrate a full spectrum of functional responses, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis toward two murine chemokines, and phagocytosis. We also extend previous studies of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-induced 32Dcl3 cells, showing they demonstrate chemotaxis and phogocytosis but completely lack a respiratory burst as a result of the absent expression of a critical oxidase subunit, gp91(phox). Induced human leukemic NB4 and HL-60 cells display a respiratory burst and phagocytosis but have defective chemotaxis to multiple chemoattractants. We also tested each cell line for the ability to up-regulate cell-surface membrane-activated complex-1 (Mac-1) expression upon activation, a response mediating neutrophil adhesion and a surrogate marker for degranulation. We show that EPRO cells, but not 32Dcl3 or NB4, significantly increase Mac-1 surface expression upon functional activation. Together, these data show that EPRO and MPRO cells demonstrate complete, functional activation upon neutrophil differentiation, suggesting these promyelocytic models accurately reflect the functional capacity of mature murine neutrophils. PMID:15673544

  3. Large-Scale Hematopoietic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Provides Granulocytes or Macrophages for Cell Replacement Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Nico; Ackermann, Mania; Frenzel, Eileen; Liebhaber, Steffi; Brennig, Sebastian; Happle, Christine; Hoffmann, Dirk; Klimenkova, Olga; Lüttge, Doreen; Buchegger, Theresa; Kühnel, Mark Philipp; Schambach, Axel; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Figueiredo, Constanca; Hansen, Gesine; Skokowa, Julia; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types, whereas granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage CSF (M-CSF) represent critical cytokines in myeloid differentiation. When this was investigated in a pluripotent-stem-cell-based hematopoietic differentiation model, IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF exposure resulted in the continuous generation of myeloid cells from an intermediate myeloid-cell-forming complex containing CD34+ clonogenic progenitor cells for more than 2 months. Whereas IL-3/G-CSF directed differentiation toward CD45+CD11b+CD15+CD16+CD66b+ granulocytic cells of various differentiation stages up to a segmented morphology displaying the capacity of cytokine-directed migration, respiratory burst response, and neutrophil-extracellular-trap formation, exposure to IL-3/M-CSF resulted in CD45+CD11b+CD14+CD163+CD68+ monocyte/macrophage-type cells capable of phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Hence, we show here that myeloid specification of human pluripotent stem cells by IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF allows for prolonged and large-scale production of myeloid cells, and thus is suited for cell-fate and disease-modeling studies as well as gene- and cell-therapy applications. PMID:25680479

  4. Inhibition of Neutrophils by Hypertonic Saline Involves Pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and Other Ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2015-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. Hypertonic saline blocks PMNs by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here, we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mmol/L beyond isotonic levels). Adenosine triphosphate release was measured with a luciferase assay. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. Hypertonic saline blocked N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation. PMID:26009814

  5. Hematopoietic properties of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/immunoglobulin (G-CSF/IgG-Fc) fusion proteins in normal and neutropenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Cox, George N; Chlipala, Elizabeth A; Smith, Darin J; Carlson, Sharon J; Bell, Stacie J; Doherty, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Previously we showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro bioactivity is preserved when the protein is joined via a flexible 7 amino acid linker to an immunoglobulin-1 (IgG1)-Fc domain and that the G-CSF/IgG1-Fc fusion protein possessed a longer circulating half-life and improved hematopoietic properties compared to G-CSF in normal rats. We have extended this analysis by comparing the relative hematopoietic potencies of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc to G-CSF in normal mice and to G-CSF and polyethylene glycol (PEG) -modified G-CSF in neutropenic rats. Mice were treated for 5 days using different doses and dosing regimens of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc or G-CSF and circulating neutrophil levels in the animals measured on Day 6. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc stimulated greater increases in blood neutrophils than comparable doses of G-CSF when administered using daily, every other day or every third day dosing regimens. In rats made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide, G-CSF/IgG1-Fc accelerated recovery of blood neutrophils to normal levels (from Day 9 to Day 5) when administered as 5 daily injections or as a single injection on Day 1. By contrast, G-CSF accelerated neutrophil recovery when administered as 5 daily injections, but not when administered as a single injection. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc was as effective as PEG-G-CSF at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc and G-CSF/IgG4-Fc fusion proteins in which the 7 amino acid linker was deleted also were effective at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. These studies confirm the enhanced in vivo hematopoietic properties of G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins. PMID:24637521

  6. Hematopoietic Properties of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/Immunoglobulin (G-CSF/IgG-Fc) Fusion Proteins in Normal and Neutropenic Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cox, George N.; Chlipala, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Darin J.; Carlson, Sharon J.; Bell, Stacie J.; Doherty, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro bioactivity is preserved when the protein is joined via a flexible 7 amino acid linker to an immunoglobulin-1 (IgG1)-Fc domain and that the G-CSF/IgG1-Fc fusion protein possessed a longer circulating half-life and improved hematopoietic properties compared to G-CSF in normal rats. We have extended this analysis by comparing the relative hematopoietic potencies of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc to G-CSF in normal mice and to G-CSF and polyethylene glycol (PEG) - modified G-CSF in neutropenic rats. Mice were treated for 5 days using different doses and dosing regimens of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc or G-CSF and circulating neutrophil levels in the animals measured on Day 6. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc stimulated greater increases in blood neutrophils than comparable doses of G-CSF when administered using daily, every other day or every third day dosing regimens. In rats made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide, G-CSF/IgG1-Fc accelerated recovery of blood neutrophils to normal levels (from Day 9 to Day 5) when administered as 5 daily injections or as a single injection on Day 1. By contrast, G-CSF accelerated neutrophil recovery when administered as 5 daily injections, but not when administered as a single injection. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc was as effective as PEG-G-CSF at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc and G-CSF/IgG4-Fc fusion proteins in which the 7 amino acid linker was deleted also were effective at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. These studies confirm the enhanced in vivo hematopoietic properties of G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins. PMID:24637521

  7. Reactive oxygen species and neutrophil respiratory burst cytochrome b558 are produced by kidney glomerular cells in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T J; Ullrich, R; Ojha, P; Poczewski, H; Verhoeven, A J; Kerjaschki, D

    1993-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the production of glomerular damage in passive Heymann nephritis (PHN), an experimental form of membranous nephropathy with neutrophil-independent proteinuria. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies specific for cytochrome b558 (a major component of the oxidoreductase complex of the respiratory burst in stimulated neutrophilic granulocytes) showed that this enzyme is localized within visceral glomerular epithelial cells (GECs) in a dense, granular pattern in rats with PHN and proteinuria. By immunoelectron-microscopy, the cytochrome was found in membrane vesicles within the GEC and also extracellularly on the GEC membranes facing the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). By immunoblotting, cytochrome b558 was detected in highest concentration in lysates of isolated glomeruli from proteinuric rats. By contrast, only traces were found in normal glomeruli by immunohistochemistry. Depletion of complement abolished the expression of the cytochrome. Using an ultrastructural cerium-H2O2 histochemistry technique, the functional activity of the glomerular ROS-generating system was demonstrated exclusively in proteinuric PHN, where H2O2 was found in highest concentration within the GBM. These results provide evidence that in rats with PHN and proteinuria, the GECs express and externalize respiratory-burst enzymes that generate ROS in a manner similar to neutrophilic granulocytes, which could then lead to glomerular damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8475113

  8. The microbiota regulates neutrophil homeostasis and host resistance to Escherichia coli K1 sepsis in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Hitesh S; Liu, Yuhong; Menkiti, Ogechukwu R; Mei, Junjie; Dai, Ning; O'Leary, Claire E; Oliver, Paula M; Kolls, Jay K; Weiser, Jeffrey N; Worthen, G Scott

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother's microbiota and is modified by exposure to antibiotics. In neonates, prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy is associated with increased risk of late-onset sepsis (LOS), a disorder controlled by neutrophils. A role for the microbiota in regulating neutrophil development and susceptibility to sepsis in the neonate remains unclear. We exposed pregnant mouse dams to antibiotics in drinking water to limit transfer of maternal microbes to the neonates. Antibiotic exposure of dams decreased the total number and composition of microbes in the intestine of the neonates. This was associated with decreased numbers of circulating and bone marrow neutrophils and granulocyte/macrophage-restricted progenitor cells in the bone marrow of antibiotic-treated and germ-free neonates. Antibiotic exposure of dams reduced the number of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing cells in the intestine and production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Granulocytopenia was associated with impaired host defense and increased susceptibility to Escherichia coli K1 and Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis in antibiotic-treated neonates, which could be partially reversed by administration of G-CSF. Transfer of a normal microbiota into antibiotic-treated neonates induced IL-17 production by group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the intestine, increasing plasma G-CSF levels and neutrophil numbers in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent manner and restored IL-17-dependent resistance to sepsis. Specific depletion of ILCs prevented IL-17- and G-CSF-dependent granulocytosis and resistance to sepsis. These data support a role for the intestinal microbiota in regulation of granulocytosis, neutrophil homeostasis and host resistance to sepsis in neonates. PMID:24747744

  9. Neutrophils: game changers in glomerulonephritis?

    PubMed Central

    Mayadas, Tanya N.; Rosetti, Florencia; Ernandez, Thomas; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulonephritides represent a diverse array of diseases that have in common immune cell-mediated effector mechanisms that cause organ damage. The contribution of neutrophils to the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) is not well recognized. Most equate neutrophils with killing pathogens and causing collateral tissue damage during acute inflammation. However, these phagocytes are endowed with additional characteristics that have been traditionally reserved for cells of the adaptive immune system. They communicate with other cells, exhibit plasticity in their responses and have the potential to coordinate and inform the subsequent immune response, thus countering the notion that they arrive, destroy and then disappear. Therefore, neutrophils, which are the first to arrive at a site of inflammation, are potential game changers in GN. PMID:20667782

  10. NADPH oxidase controls neutrophilic response to sterile inflammation in mice by regulating the IL-1α/G-CSF axis.

    PubMed

    Bagaitkar, Juhi; Pech, Nancy K; Ivanov, Stoyan; Austin, Anthony; Zeng, Melody Yue; Pallat, Sabine; Huang, Guangming; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Dinauer, Mary C

    2015-12-17

    The leukocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase generates reactive oxygen species essential in microbial killing and regulation of inflammation. Inactivating mutations in this enzyme lead to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), associated with increased susceptibility to both pyogenic infections and to inflammatory disorders. The role of the NADPH oxidase in regulating inflammation driven by nonmicrobial stimuli is poorly understood. Here, we show that NADPH oxidase deficiency enhances the early local release of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) in response to damaged cells, promoting an excessive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-regulated neutrophilic response and prolonged inflammation. In peritoneal inflammation elicited by tissue injury, X-linked Cybb-null (X-CGD) mice exhibited increased release of IL-1α and IL-1 receptor -mediated G-CSF production. In turn, higher levels of systemic G-CSF increased peripheral neutrophilia, which amplified neutrophilic peritoneal inflammation in X-CGD mice. Dampening early neutrophil recruitment by neutralization of IL-1α, G-CSF, or neutrophil depletion itself promoted resolution of otherwise prolonged inflammation in X-CGD. IL-1β played little role. Thus, we identified an excessive IL-1α/G-CSF response as a major driver of enhanced sterile inflammation in CGD in the response to damaged cells. More broadly, these results provide new insights into the regulation of sterile inflammation, and identify the NADPH oxidase in regulating the amplitude of the early neutrophilic response. PMID:26443623

  11. Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma: two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Hong; Ma, Quanfeng; Chen, Yiyang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma was a relatively rare tumor composed of myeloid blasts and/or immature myeloid cells in an extramedullary site which is associated with acute/chronic myeloid leukemia. In this paper, two cases of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma, one male aged 36 and one 28-year-old female, were reported to improve the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases. Diagnostic and treatment procedures for them were retrospectively summarized and relevant literature reviews were combined. Pathological biopsy was conducted to validate the diagnosis. Surgical resections in combination with chemotherapy were performed. The differential diagnosis of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma from malignant lymphomas and alternative small round cell malignancy was confirmed by biopsy and immunohistochemistry. PMID:26770615

  12. Transcriptional mechanisms underlying sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons by Granulocyte-/Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-associated pain is a major cause of poor quality of life in cancer patients and is frequently resistant to conventional therapy. Recent studies indicate that some hematopoietic growth factors, namely granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), are abundantly released in the tumor microenvironment and play a key role in regulating tumor-nerve interactions and tumor-associated pain by activating receptors on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Moreover, these hematopoietic factors have been highly implicated in postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain and osteoarthritic pain. However, the molecular mechanisms via which G-/GMCSF bring about nociceptive sensitization and elicit pain are not known. Results In order to elucidate G-/GMCSF mediated transcriptional changes in the sensory neurons, we performed a comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of changes in the transcriptome of DRG neurons brought about by exposure to GMCSF or GCSF. We present complete information on regulated genes and validated profiling analyses and report novel regulatory networks and interaction maps revealed by detailed bioinformatics analyses. Amongst these, we validate calpain 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and a RhoGTPase Rac1 as well as Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as transcriptional targets of G-/GMCSF and demonstrate the importance of MMP9 and Rac1 in GMCSF-induced nociceptor sensitization. Conclusion With integrative approach of bioinformatics, in vivo pharmacology and behavioral analyses, our results not only indicate that transcriptional control by G-/GMCSF signaling regulates a variety of established pain modulators, but also uncover a large number of novel targets, paving the way for translational analyses in the context of pain disorders. PMID:24067145

  13. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases in the Microenvironment of Pancreatic Cancer -Active Players in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Klaus; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fibro-inflammatory microenvironment, consisting of activated pancreatic stellate cells, extracellular matrix proteins, and a variety of inflammatory cells, such as T cells, macrophages, or neutrophils. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells, which are found in nearly all cancers, including PDAC, often fail to eliminate the tumor, but conversely can promote its progression by altering the tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic cancer cells are able to attract polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via tumor secreted chemokines and in human PDAC, PMN infiltrates can be observed in the vicinity of tumor cells and in the desmoplastic tumor stroma, which correlate with undifferentiated tumor growth and poor prognosis. The behavior of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils in the tumor micromilieu is not yet understood at a mechanistic level. It has been shown that PMN have the potential to kill tumor cells, either directly or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but on the other side various adverse effects of PMN, such as promotion of aggressive tumor growth with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and increased metastatic potential, have been described. Recent therapeutic approaches for PDAC focus not only the tumor cell itself, but also elements of the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, the role of PMN and their derived products (e.g. cytokines, proteases) as a new vein for a therapeutic target should be critically evaluated in this context. This review summarizes the current understanding of the interplay between proteases of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils and pancreatic tumor cells and elements of the desmoplastic stroma. PMID:26929737

  14. Nicotinic receptor involvement in regulation of functions of mouse neutrophils from inflammatory site.

    PubMed

    Safronova, Valentina G; Vulfius, Catherine A; Shelukhina, Irina V; Mal'tseva, Valentina N; Berezhnov, Alexey V; Fedotova, Eugeniya I; Miftahova, Regina G; Kryukova, Elena V; Grinevich, Andrey A; Tsetlin, Victor I

    2016-07-01

    Participation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in functioning of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) isolated from inflammatory site of mice and expression of different nAChR subunits were studied. Nicotine and acetylcholine (ACh) modified respiratory burst induced by a chemotactic peptide N-formyl-MLF in neutrophils of male (but not female) mice. Antagonists of nAChRs α-cobratoxin (αCTX), α-conotoxins MII and [A10L]PnIA at concentrations of 0.01-5μM, 0.2μM and 1μM, respectively, eliminated nAChR agonist effects. ACh also affected adhesion of PMNs, this effect was also prevented by αCTX (100nM) and MII (1nM). Neutrophils of female mice after chronic nicotine consumption acquired sensitivity to nAChR agonists. Changes of free intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in neutrophils under the action of nAChR ligands were analyzed. In cells with no Ca(2+) oscillations and relatively low resting level of intracellular Ca(2+), nicotine triggered Ca(2+)-spikes, the lag of the response shortened with increasing nicotine concentration. A nicotinic antagonist caramiphen strongly decreased the effect of nicotine. RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNAs of α2, α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, α9, β2, β3, and β4 nAChR subunits. Specific binding of [(125)I]-α-bungarotoxin was demonstrated. Thus in view of the effects and binding characteristics the results obtained suggest a regulatory role of α7, α3β2 or α6* nAChR types in specific functions of PMNs. PMID:26965141

  15. Prolactin modulation of nitric oxide and TNF-alpha production by peripheral neutrophils in rats.

    PubMed

    Meli, R; Raso, G M; Gualillo, O; Pacilio, M; Di Carlo, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that prolactin (PRL) is a potent immunomodulator that exerts stimulatory effects on physiological responses of immune cells. In the present research we have investigated whether PRL may influence nitric oxide (NO) and/or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production in neutrophils obtained from inflammatory exudate of carrageenin-induced experimental pleurisy in the rat. In this acute model of inflammation the role of endogenous NO was evaluated using an inhibitor of NO-synthase, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). A treatment of animals with L-NAME (10 mg/kg s.c.) induced a reduction of volume and cell number of pleural exudate and a decrease of nitrite production (measured by the Griees reaction) by polymorphonuclear cells after 24 h of incubation, while D-NAME, the inactive isomer, was without effect. Neutrophils from ovine prolactin (oPRL) treated rats (5 mg/kg for 5 times s.c.) or from rats with a hyperprolactinaemia induced by pituitary gland graft produced higher amounts of NO both after 24 and 48 h of incubation. On the contrary, a clear reduction in the production of NO was found in neutrophils from rats treated with bromocriptine (BRC) (2 mg/kg s.c.), a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. TNF-alpha production (measured by MTT/cytotoxic assay) by neutrophils was markedly increased in PRL-treated or pituitary-grafted rats in comparison to controls, whereas BRC treatment reduced TNF-alpha production. PMID:9335229

  16. Role of neutrophils in systemic autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have emerged as important regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent evidence indicates that neutrophils display marked abnormalities in phenotype and function in various systemic autoimmune diseases, and may play a central role in initiation and perpetuation of aberrant immune responses and organ damage in these conditions. This review discusses the putative roles that neutrophils and aberrant neutrophil cell death play in the pathogenesis of various systemic autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, small vessel vasculitis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24286137

  17. Enhanced and Secretory Expression of Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor by Bacillus subtilis SCK6

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shaista; Sadaf, Saima; Ahmad, Sajjad; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for enhanced expression and secretion of a pharmaceutically important human cytokine, that is, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), in the culture supernatant of Bacillus subtilis SCK6 cells. Codon optimized GCSF and pNWPH vector containing SpymwC signal sequence were amplified by prolonged overlap extension PCR to generate multimeric plasmid DNA, which was used directly to transform B. subtilis SCK6 supercompetent cells. Expression of GCSF was monitored in the culture supernatant for 120 hours. The highest expression, which corresponded to 17% of the total secretory protein, was observed at 72 hours of growth. Following ammonium sulphate precipitation, GCSF was purified to near homogeneity by fast protein liquid chromatography on a QFF anion exchange column. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis showed that the secondary structure contents of the purified GCSF are similar to the commercially available GCSF. Biological activity, as revealed by the regeneration of neutrophils in mice treated with ifosfamine, was also similar to the commercial preparation of GCSF. This, to our knowledge, is the first study that reports secretory expression of human GCSF in B. subtilis SCK6 with final recovery of up to 96 mg/L of the culture supernatant, without involvement of any chemical inducer. PMID:26881203

  18. Circulating colony-forming units of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    López-Karpovitch, X; Cardiel, M; Cardenas, R; Piedras, J; Alarcón-Segovia, D

    1989-01-01

    In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, in vitro bone marrow (BM) colony-forming units of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages (CFU-GM) are decreased, suggesting that granulomonopoietic failure may play an important role in the mechanism of peripheral blood (PB) depletion of neutrophils and monocytes. No information concerning CFU-GM in PB of patients with SLE is available. The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether SLE itself and the inactive or active stage of disease would modify the number of GFU-GM in PB samples from 20 treatment-free SLE women, 12 inactive and eight active. CFU-GM growth was significantly decreased in both inactive (P = 0.018) and active (P = 0.008) SLE patients as compared with controls (n = 8). The difference in CFU-GM growth between SLE groups was not significant. These results indicate that the number of circulating CFU-GM is significantly reduced in patients with SLE regardless of disease activity or remission. PMID:2766577

  19. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF. PMID:27094941

  20. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto; Serrano-Escobedo, Carmen J; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Rivas-Santiago, Cesar; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB) express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) cathelicidin (LL-37) and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD) and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT)-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST) and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals. PMID:24937049

  1. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto; Serrano-Escobedo, Carmen J; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Rivas-Santiago, Cesar; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB) express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) cathelicidin (LL-37) and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD) and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT)-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST) and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals. PMID:24937049

  2. Modulation of human eosinophil polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration and function.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Eosinophil migration toward a concentration gradient of a chemotactic factor is regulated at four levels. Diverse immunologic pathways generate stimuli with eosinophil chemotactic activity, including the complement products C5a and a fragment of C3a and the peptide products of mast cells and basophils activated by IgE-mediated reactions, such as eosinophil chemotactic factor of anaphylaxis (ECF-A) and other oligopeptides. The intrinsic preferential leukocyte activity of the chemotactic stimuli represents the second level of modulation, with ECF-A and other mast cell-derived peptides exhibiting the most selective action on eosinophils. The third level of control of eosinophil chemotaxis is composed of inactivators and inhibitors of chemotactic stimuli and is exemplified by degradation of C5a by anaphylatoxin inactivator or chemotactic factor inactivator and of ECF-A by carboxypeptidase-A or aminopeptidases. The activity of ECF-A is uniquely suppressed by equimolar quantities of its NH2- terminal tripeptide substituent, presumably by eosinophil membrane receptor competition. Factors comprising the fourth level of regulation, which alter eosinophil responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli, include the chemotactic factors themselves, through deactivation; nonchemotactic inhibitors such as the COOH-terminal tripeptide substituent of ECF-A, the neutrophil-immobilizing factor (NIF), the phagocytosis-enhancing factor Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg, and histamine at concentrations greater than 400 ng/ml; and nonchemotactic enhancing principles represented by ascorbate and by histamine at concentrations of 30 ng/ml or less. Local concentrations of eosinophils called to and immobilized at the site of a hypersenitivity reaction may express their regulatory functions by degrading the chemical mediators elaborated including histamine, slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A), and platelet-activating factor (PAF) by way of their content of histaminase, arylsulfatase B, and phospholipase D

  3. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  4. FLOW CYTOMETRIC DETECTION OF SHIGA TOXIN 2 BINDING TO PORCINE GRANULOCYTES IN VITRO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Granulocytes are hypothesized to be involved in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) pathogenesis in humans. Granulocytes bind Shiga toxin (Stx) and may facilitate the transport of Stx to target organs. Pigs are an excellent model for studying the role of granulocytes in STEC disease. Pig...

  5. C5a Mediates Peripheral Blood Neutrophil Dysfunction in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Andrew Conway; Kefala, Kallirroi; Wilkinson, Thomas S.; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Farrell, Lesley; Walsh, Tim; Mackenzie, Simon J.; Reid, Hamish; Davidson, Donald J.; Haslett, Chris; Rossi, Adriano G.; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Simpson, A. John

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Critically ill patients are highly susceptible to hospital-acquired infection. Neutrophil function in critical illness remains poorly understood. Objectives To characterize and define mechanisms of peripheral blood neutrophil (PBN) dysfunction in critically ill patients. To determine whether the inflamed lung contributes additional phagocytic impairment. Methods Prospective collection of blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia and from age- and sex-matched volunteers; laboratory analysis of neutrophil functions. Measurements and Main Results Seventy-two patients and 21 volunteers were included. Phagocytic capacity of PBNs was 36% lower in patients than in volunteers (P < 0.0001). From several biologically plausible candidates only activated complement was significantly associated with impaired PBN phagocytosis (P < 0.0001). Phagocytosis was negatively correlated with serum C3a and positively correlated with expression of C5a receptor type 1 (CD88) on PBNs. C5a recapitulated impaired PBN phagocytosis and significantly down-regulated CD88 expression in vitro. C5a-mediated phagocytic impairment was prevented by blocking either CD88 or phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and completely reversed by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. C5a also impaired killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by, and migration of, PBNs, indicating that effects were not restricted to phagocytosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid leukocytes from patients also demonstrated significantly impaired function, and lavage supernatant reduced phagocytosis in healthy neutrophils by 43% (P = 0.0001). However, lavage fluid did not affect CD88 expression and lavage-mediated impairment of phagocytosis was not blocked by anti-CD88 antibody. Conclusions Critically ill patients have significant dysfunction of PBNs, which is mediated predominantly by activated complement. Further, profound complement-independent neutrophil dysfunction occurs

  6. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-05-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. (/sup 3/H)Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes.

  7. Neutrophils in cancer: neutral no more.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Wellenstein, Max D; de Visser, Karin E

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable antagonists of microbial infection and facilitators of wound healing. In the cancer setting, a newfound appreciation for neutrophils has come into view. The traditionally held belief that neutrophils are inert bystanders is being challenged by the recent literature. Emerging evidence indicates that tumours manipulate neutrophils, sometimes early in their differentiation process, to create diverse phenotypic and functional polarization states able to alter tumour behaviour. In this Review, we discuss the involvement of neutrophils in cancer initiation and progression, and their potential as clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27282249

  8. Indium-granulocyte scanning in the painful prosthetic joint

    SciTech Connect

    Pring, D.J.; Henderson, R.G.; Keshavarzian, A.; Rivett, A.G.; Krausz, T.; Coombs, R.R.; Lavender, J.P.

    1986-07-01

    The value of indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning to determine the presence of infection was assessed in 50 prosthetic joints (41 of which were painful) in 40 patients. Granulocytes were obtained from the patients' blood and labeled in plasma with indium 111 tropolonate. Abnormal accumulation of indium 111 in the region of the prosthesis was noted. Proven infection occurred in 11 prostheses, and all of the infections were detected by indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning. Nineteen were not infected (including nine asymptomatic controls) and only two produced false-positive scans. This represents a specificity of 89.5%, sensitivity of 100%, and overall accuracy of 93.2%. These results compare favorably with plain radiography. There was no radiologic evidence of infection in three of the infected prostheses, and 10 of the noninfected prostheses had some radiologic features that suggested sepsis. We conclude that indium-granulocyte scanning can reliably detect or exclude infection in painful prosthetic joints and should prove useful in clinical management.

  9. Harvesting of granulocytes using a hydroxyethyl starch solution.

    PubMed

    Sussman, L N; Colli, W; Pichetshote, C

    1975-01-01

    The need for sophisticated ocmponent therapy has resulted in improved techniques for obtaining concentrates of platelets and granulocytes. The use of single donors as a source for these products is advisable to avoid multiple sensitizations. Obtaining concentrated granulocytes represents a problem because of the difficulty in separating granulocytes from red blood cells by differential centrifugation or sedimentation since the specific gravities are similar. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) makes the separation more effective. A solution made of 250 ml of 6 per cent HES, 250 ml of distilled water, and 15 g of sodium citrate in 30 ml distilled water provided a satisfactory anticoagulant solution for this purpose. The granulocytes collected averaged 49 per cent of the total available in the processed blood; the platelets averages 82 per cent. A satisfactory yield could thus be obtained from a single donor, and this could be repeated several times in a month. The value of ABO, Rh, and HL-A compatibility between donor and recipient probably increases the viability and safety of this procedure. The Haemonetic No. 30 Cell Separator provided an easy and rapid method for this procedure. PMID:53918

  10. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage PMID:24475687

  11. Distribution of macrophages and granulocytes expressing L1 protein (calprotectin) in human Peyer's patches compared with normal ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjerke, K; Halstensen, T S; Jahnsen, F; Pulford, K; Brandtzaeg, P

    1993-01-01

    Antibodies to the cytosolic leucocyte L1 protein (or calprotectin) were examined for reactivity with macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils identified by paired immunofluorescence staining in sections of normal human ileal mucosa, including Peyer's patches. Macrophages were recognised by expression of the myelomonocytic antigen CD68 (monoclonal antibody KP1). Neutrophilic granulocytes were identified by their content of neutrophil elastase, and eosinophilic granulocytes by monoclonal antibody EG2. Virtually all CD68+ macrophages in normal lamina propria and Peyer's patches were L1- and the same was true for most extravasated macrophages in normal peripheral lymph nodes. Some mesenteric lymph nodes, however, and all peripheral lymph nodes with overt pathological processes (malignant lymphoma) contained many CD68+L1+ macrophages. Numerous L1+ cells were also localised to the crypt region and to some extent beneath the villous epithelium in normal lamina propria, but they were mainly identified as EG2+ eosinophils. Such cells were remarkably scarce or absent beneath the follicle associated epithelium in the dome region of Peyer's patches, where CD68+L1- macrophages were abundant. Also subepithelial and interfollicular CD68- interdigitating dendritic cells in Peyer's patches (recognised by antibody to S-100 protein) were usually unreactive with L1 antibody. The L1 protein shows a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities in vitro, and its putative antiproliferative properties are interesting in relation to the immunosuppression postulated to take place in lamina propria. The virtual absence of L1 producing cells beneath the follicle associated epithelium in Peyer's patches may support the immunostimulatory function of these macrophage rich structures, which are held to be crucial for induction of specific mucosal immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8244101

  12. Short-Term Heat Exposure Inhibits Inflammation by Abrogating Recruitment of and Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Neutrophils Exposed to Chemotactic Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mira; Salanova, Birgit; Rolle, Susanne; Wellner, Maren; Schneider, Wolfgang; Luft, Friedrich C.; Kettritz, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Cytokines, such as granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-8 attract neutrophils into inflammatory sites. During emigration from the blood neutrophils interact with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin. Fibronectin provides β2-integrin co-stimulation, allowing GM-CSF and IL-8 to activate nuclear factor (NF)-κB, an effect that does not occur in suspension. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of mice to fever-like temperatures abrogates neutrophil recruitment and NF-κB activation in a mouse model of skin inflammation. Mice that were exposed to 40°C for 1 hour showed strongly reduced GM-CSF- and IL-8-induced neutrophilic skin inflammation. In vitro heat exposure did not interfere with neutrophil adhesion or spreading on fibronectin but strongly inhibited migration toward both cytokines. Using specific inhibitors, we found that PI3-K/Akt was pivotal for neutrophil migration and that heat down-regulated this pathway. Furthermore, neutrophils on fibronectin showed abrogated NF-κB activation in response to GM-CSF and IL-8 after heat. In vivo heat exposure of mice followed by ex vivo stimulation of isolated bone marrow neutrophils confirmed these results. Finally, less NF-κB activation was seen in the inflammatory lesions of mice exposed to fever-like temperatures as demonstrated by in situ hybridization for IκBα mRNA. These new findings suggest that heat may have anti-inflammatory effects in neutrophil-dependent inflammation. PMID:18187571

  13. Gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-like immunoreactivity in blood cells of human eosinophilic patients.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Virtanen, M; Hilliges, M; Hansson, L O

    1991-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of the peptide gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma-MSH) within human polymorphonuclear leucocytes of blood from eosinophilic patients is described. The gamma-MSH immunoreactivity was observed only in neutrophilic granulocytes leaving all other cell types immuno-negative. PMID:1805488

  14. Defect of In Vitro Digestive Ability of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes in Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio; Essenfeld-Yahr, Ervin; De Albornoz, María C.; Yarzábal, Luis; De Gómez, MaríA H.; Martín, Blanca San; Ocanto, Ana; Gil, Francisco; Convit, Jacinto

    1980-01-01

    Selected functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes were studied in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (South American blastomycosis), in healthy control individuals, and in patients with diseases unrelated to paracoccidioidomycosis. Patients with paracoccidioidomycosis were also evaluated by standard immunological techniques. Phagocytosis and digestion of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeastlike cells in vitro was estimated by an original method. It was based on the appearance of phagocytosed P. brasiliensis in preparations stained by a modification of the Papanicolaou method and examined with phase-contrast optics. Interpretation of such findings was confirmed by electron microscopy. Two strains of P. brasiliensis were used. Strain 8506 was freshly isolated from a patient. Strain Pb9 was known to be nonpathogenic and to have a peculiar cell wall composition. Yeastlike cells of the Pb9 strain were digested significantly better than those of strain 8506. A higher number of leukocytes per fungus cells led to a higher proportion of digested P. brasiliensis. Leukocytes from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis phagocytosed the fungus in a normal way, but had a significant lower ability to digest it in vitro. When individual cases were analyzed, there was an excellent correlation between clinical evolution and digestive ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. There was good correlation between both of these and immunological parameters. Leukocytes from all groups behaved comparably in tests of general leukocyte function and in their abilities to kill and digest Candida albicans. Our results indicate that, as a group, polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis had a significant, rather specific, defect in their in vitro digestive capacity against phagocytosed P. brasiliensis. There was also an inverse correlation between strain pathogenicity and its susceptibility to in vitro digestion by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Our findings are

  15. Regulation of immune responses by neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant circulating cells in humans, are major pathogen-killing immune cells. For many years, these cells were considered to be simple killers at the "bottom" of immune responses. However, recent studies have revealed more sophisticated mechanisms associated with neutrophilic cytotoxic functions, and neutrophils have been shown to contribute to various infectious and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the key features of neutrophils during inflammatory responses, from their release from the bone marrow to their death in inflammatory loci. We also discuss the expanding roles of neutrophils that have been identified in the context of several inflammatory diseases. We further focus on the mechanisms that regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflamed tissues and neutrophil cytotoxic activities against both pathogens and host tissues. PMID:24850053

  16. Increased expression of low density granulocytes in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients correlates with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Midgley, A; Beresford, M W

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils are implicated in a wide range of non-infectious inflammatory conditions. A subset of neutrophils in the peripheral circulation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been described and termed low density granulocytes (LDGs). This study investigates the expression of LDG in juvenile-onset SLE (JSLE) patients compared to controls, and any correlations with disease activity.Neutrophils and LDGs were isolated from JSLE (n = 13) and paediatric non-inflammatory control patients (n = 12). Cell populations were assessed and compared using flow cytometry and morphological analysis. Standard clinical data, which included disease activity markers/scores, were collected for each patient.Significantly increased LDG expression (%mean ± SEM, range) was observed in JSLE patients (10.4 ± 3.26, 3.41-36.3) compared to controls (2.4 ± 0.44, 0.36-5.27; p = 0.005). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between LDG expression and the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (correlation coefficient 0.685; p = 0.010) and SLE Disease Activity Index (correlation coefficient 0.567; p = 0.043) and the biomarker of dsDNA-antibodies (correlation coefficient 0.590; p = 0.043).Here we observe increased expression in LDGs in JSLE patients, which correlate with dsDNA antibody concentration and scores of disease activity. These correlations indicate that the increased LDG expression observed in this study may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of JSLE, and may be a useful biomarker. PMID:26453665

  17. Purification of equine neutrophil lysozyme and its antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, A; Waiblinger, S; Von Fellenberg, R

    1991-01-01

    Lysozyme from equine neutrophil granulocytes was isolated in a pure form by fast performance liquid chromatography, i.e. ion-exchange chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography. The lysozyme lysed Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus lentus and was also bactericidal against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Serratia marcescens. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were not lysed. The lysozyme was only very slightly bactericidal for S. epidermidis and S. aureus. Equine neutrophil lysozyme was found to be bactericidal for Gram-positive as well as for Gram-negative bacteria without further treatment. Equine and chicken egg white lysozymes were found to be immunologically related when examined using specific antisera against each of them. Both lysozymes also had very similar specific enzymatic activities against M. luteus membranes. PMID:1803722

  18. Transfusion of granulocyte rich buffy coats to neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Reiss, R F; Pindyck, J; Waldman, A A; Raju, M; Kulpa, J

    1982-01-01

    Granulocyte rich buffy coats were transfused to infected neutropenic patients when leukapheresis donors were not available. Efficacy of transfusions was evaluated from data supplied by hospitals administering them. Buffy coats separated from ACD blood contained a mean of 4.9 X 10(8) granulocytes. Fifty-seven patients received a course consisting of a mean of 3.8 transfusions. Of these, 27 received a mean of 17.5 units per transfusion and had a survival rate of 44.4%, which was not significantly different from the 50.0% found in 30 who received a mean of 11.1 units per transfusion. No significant difference in survival rate was found between 31 patients with acute leukemia and 26 with other disorders or 38 patients with positive and 19 with negative cultures. Finally, no significant difference in survival rate was noted between patients who received a course of greater than or equal to four transfusions or less than or equal to three transfusions in any of the above groups. Survival rates were less than those generally reported following similar courses of leukapheresis units. Buffy coat transfusions consisting of a mean of approximately 17.5 units as produced during this study have therefore been shown to be not generally beneficial. The increased survival seen in some studies utilizing leukapheresis products may relate in part to the larger number of granulocytes they contained. Greater benefit from buffy coat transfusions might result if the number of granulocytes infused were increased. Evaluation of possible efficacy associated with transfusions of increased numbers of buffy coat units further enriched with granulocytes may be justified when leukapheresis donors are not available. PMID:7144696

  19. Neutrophil extracellular traps - the dark side of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were discovered as extracellular strands of decondensed DNA in complex with histones and granule proteins, which were expelled from dying neutrophils to ensnare and kill microbes. NETs are formed during infection in vivo by mechanisms different from those originally described in vitro. Citrullination of histones by peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is central for NET formation in vivo. NETs may spur formation of autoantibodies and may also serve as scaffolds for thrombosis, thereby providing a link among infection, autoimmunity, and thrombosis. In this review, we present the mechanisms by which NETs are formed and discuss the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of NET formation. We conclude that NETs may be of more importance in autoimmunity and thrombosis than in innate immune defense. PMID:27135878

  20. Prevention of granulocyte-mediated oxidant lung injury in rats by a hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethylthiourea.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, R B

    1984-01-01

    Toxic, partially reduced metabolites of oxygen (toxic oxygen radicals) are increasingly implicated in acute leukocyte-mediated tissue injury. To further probe the roles of oxygen radicals in acute lung edema, I studied the effects of a recently described and very potent oxygen radical scavenger, dimethylthiourea (DMTU) (Fox, R. B., R. N. Harada, R. M. Tate, and J. E. Repine, 1983, J. Appl. Physiol., 55:1456-1459) on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) oxidant function and on two types of lung injury mediated by oxygen radicals and PMN. DMTU (10 mM) blocked 79% of hydroxyl radical (OH) production by PMN in vitro without interfering with other PMN functions, such as O-2 production, myeloperoxidase activity, chemotaxis, degranulation, or aggregation. When isolated rat lung preparations were perfused with PMN activated to produce OH, lung weights were increased from 2.3 +/- 0.2 to 11.2 +/- 0.8 g. DMTU (10 mM) prevented 70% of these increases (lung weights, 5.0 +/- 1.1 g, P less than 0.005). Finally, when intact rats were exposed to 100% O2 for 66 h, lung weight:body weight ratios were increased from 5.78 +/- 0.33 to 8.87 +/- 0.16 g. DMTU (500 mg/kg) prevented 83% of this hyperoxia-induced lung edema in vivo (lung:body weight ratios, 6.05 +/- 0.21, P less than 0.001). Pharmacokinetic studies showed that DMTU diffused effectively into lung interstitial fluids and had a relatively long half-life (25-35 h) in the circulation. Because a variety of oxygen radicals, such as superoxide (O-2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), or OH are produced by PMN, there is usually some uncertainty about which one is responsible for injury. However, in these studies, DMTU did not scavenge O-2 and scavenged H2O2 only very slowly while scavenging OH very effectively. Therefore, DMTU may be useful in the investigation of the roles of oxygen radicals, especially OH, in acute granulocyte-mediated tissue injury. PMID:6090504

  1. Early Systemic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment Attenuates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Lin; Chen, Jin-Chung; Wang, Hung-Li; Yang, Yi-Ling; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Liao, Ming-Feng; Ro, Long-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that opioid treatment can reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production and counteract various neuropathic pain syndromes. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can promote immune cell differentiation by increasing leukocytes (mainly opioid-containing polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells), suggesting a potential beneficial role in treating chronic pain. This study shows the effectiveness of exogenous G-CSF treatment (200 µg/kg) for alleviating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI), during post-operative days 1–25, compared to that of vehicle treatment. G-CSF also increases the recruitment of opioid-containing PMN cells into the injured nerve. After CCI, single administration of G-CSF on days 0, 1, and 2, but not on day 3, relieved thermal hyperalgesia, which indicated that its effect on neuropathic pain had a therapeutic window of 0–48 h after nerve injury. CCI led to an increase in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) protein in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These high levels of IL-6 mRNA and TNF-α were suppressed by a single administration of G-CSF 48–144 h and 72–144 h after CCI, respectively. Furthermore, G-CSF administered 72–144 h after CCI suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of microglial activation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn, which is essential for sensing neuropathic pain. Moreover, the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide (NLXM) reversed G-CSF-induced antinociception 3 days after CCI, suggesting that G-CSF alleviates hyperalgesia via opioid/opioid receptor interactions. These results suggest that an early single systemic injection of G-CSF alleviates neuropathic pain via activation of PMN cell-derived endogenous opioid secretion to activate opioid receptors in the injured nerve, downregulate IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, and attenuate microglial activation in the spinal dorsal horn. This

  2. Activity of lung neutrophils and matrix metalloproteinases in cyclophosphamide-treated mice with experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Mark; Carmel, Julie; Kaplan, Viktoria; Livne, Erella; Krausz, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    Sepsis in patients receiving chemotherapy may result in acute respiratory distress syndrome, despite decreased number of blood neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)]. In the present study, we investigated the correlation of cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced neutropenia with the destructive potential of lung PMN in respect to formation of septic acute lung injury (ALI). Mice were treated with 250 mg/kg of CY or saline (control) and subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation. ALI was verified by histological examination. Lung PMNs and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were assessed by flow cytometry and gelatin zymography. CLP in CY-treated mice induced a typical lung injury. Despite profound neutropenia, CY treatment did not attenuate CLP-induced ALI. This might relate to only a partial suppression of PMN: CY has significantly reduced PMN influx into the lungs (P = 0.008) and suppressed their oxidative metabolism, but had no suppressive effect on degranulation (P = 0.227) and even induced MMP-9 activity (P = 0.0003). In CY-untreated animals, peak of CLP-induced ALI coincided with massive PMN influx (P = 0.013), their maximal degranulation (P = 0.014) and activation of lung MMP-9 (P = 0.002). These findings may indicate an important role of the residual lung PMN and activation of MMP-9 in septic lung injury during CY chemotherapy. PMID:15255968

  3. A PPARγ AGONIST ENHANCES BACTERIAL CLEARANCE THROUGH NEUTROPHIL EXTRACELLULAR TRAP FORMATION AND IMPROVES SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Cláudia V; Campbell, Clarissa; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano F; Molinaro, Raphael; Cody, Mark J; Yost, Christian C; Bozza, Patricia T; Zimmerman, Guy A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Silva, Adriana R

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the inflammatory response against infection contributes to mortality in sepsis. Inflammation provides critical host defense, but it can cause tissue damage, multiple organ failure, and death. Because the nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) exhibits therapeutic potential, we characterized the role of PPARγ in sepsis. We analyzed severity of clinical signs, survival rates, cytokine production, leukocyte influx, and bacterial clearance in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis in Swiss mice. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone treatment improved clinical status and mortality, while increasing IL-10 production and decreasing TNF-α and IL-6 levels, and peritoneal neutrophil accumulation 24 h after CLP. We noted increased bacterial killing in rosiglitazone treated mice, correlated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) incubated with LPS or Escherichia coli and rosiglitazone increased peritoneal neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-mediated bacterial killing, an effect reversed by the PPARγ antagonist (GW 9662) treatment. Rosiglitazone also enhanced the release of histones by PMN, a surrogate marker of NET formation, effect abolished by GW 9662. Rosiglitazone modulated the inflammatory response and increased bacterial clearance through PPARγ activation and NET formation, combining immunomodulatory and host-dependent anti-bacterial effects and, therefore, warrants further study as a potential therapeutic agent in sepsis. PMID:26618986

  4. Human neutrophil peptides: a novel potential mediator of inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kieran; Henriques, Melanie; Parker, Tom; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of atherosclerosis has recently been expanded from a predominantly lipid retentive disease to a coupling of inflammatory mechanisms and dyslipidemia. Studies have suggested a novel role for polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-dominant inflammation in the development of atherosclerosis. Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs), also known as α-defensins, are secreted and released from PMN granules upon activation and are conventionally involved in microbial killing. Current evidence suggests an important immunomodulative role for these peptides. HNP levels are markedly increased in inflammatory diseases including sepsis and acute coronary syndromes. They have been found within the intima of human atherosclerotic arteries, and their deposition in the skin correlates with the severity of coronary artery diseases. HNPs form complexes with LDL in solution and increase LDL binding to the endothelial surface. HNPs have also been shown to contribute to endothelial dysfunction, lipid metabolism disorder, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Given the emerging relationship between PMN-dominant inflammation and atherosclerosis, HNPs may serve as a link between them and as a biological marker and potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery diseases and acute coronary syndromes. PMID:18805897

  5. Transcriptional activation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 gene in vivo and its role in the pathophysiology of neutrophil-induced liver injury in murine endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Essani, N A; Bajt, M L; Farhood, A; Vonderfecht, S L; Jaeschke, H

    1997-06-15

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) can cause hepatic parenchymal cell injury during endotoxin (ET) shock. Because adhesion molecules are critical for inflammatory cell damage, the role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was studied in the pathophysiology of ET shock. ET-sensitive mice (C3Heb/FeJ) were treated with 700 mg/kg galactosamine in combination with 100 microg/kg Salmonella abortus equi ET, 15 microg/kg TNF-alpha, or 13 to 23 microg/kg IL-1. VCAM-1 mRNA formation was strongly activated in animals treated with ET, TNF-alpha, or IL-1. In contrast, only TNF-alpha and IL-1, not ET, induced VCAM-1 gene transcription in livers of ET-resistant mice (C3H/HeJ). Immunohistochemistry and isolation of liver cells during endotoxemia indicated that VCAM-1 mRNA and protein were only formed in endothelial cells and Kupffer cells, not in hepatocytes. Galactosamine/ET induced neutrophil accumulation in sinusoids (515 +/- 30 neutrophils/50 high power fields) followed by transmigration at 7 h. At that time, severe liver injury was observed (necrosis, 53 +/- 5%). An anti-VCAM-1 Ab (3 mg/kg) attenuated the area of necrosis by 60%. The Ab reduced neutrophil transmigration by 84%, but had no effect on the total number of cells in the liver vasculature. Flow cytometric analysis identified the presence of very late Ag-4 on mouse peripheral neutrophils. Our data demonstrated cytokine-dependent VCAM-1 gene transcription and protein expression in the liver during endotoxemia. Neutrophils were able to use very late Ag-4/VCAM-1 interactions to transmigrate into liver parenchyma in vivo. Preventing transmigration by blocking VCAM-1 protected hepatocytes against neutrophil-induced injury. PMID:9190948

  6. Mechanisms of Liver Injury. II. Mechanisms of neutrophil-induced liver cell injury during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and other acute inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2006-06-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are a vital part of the innate immune response to microbial infections and tissue trauma, e.g., ischemia-reperfusion injury, in many organs including the liver. However, an excessive inflammatory response can lead to a dramatic aggravation of the existing injury. To design interventions, which selectively target the detrimental effects of neutrophils, a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology is critical. Systemic or local exposure to proinflammatory mediators causes activation and priming of neutrophils for reactive oxygen formation and recruits them into the vascular beds of the liver without causing tissue injury. However, generation of a chemotactic signal from the parenchyma will trigger extravasation and an attack on target cells (e.g., hepatocytes). Adhesion to the target induces degranulation with release of proteases and formation of reactive oxygen species including hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorous acid, which can diffuse into hepatocytes and induce an intracellular oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Various neutrophil-derived proteases are involved in transmigration and cell toxicity but can also promote the inflammatory response by processing of proinflammatory mediators. In addition, necrotic cells release mediators, e.g., high-mobility group box-1, which further promotes neutrophilic hepatitis and tissue damage. On the basis of these evolving insights into the mechanisms of neutrophil-mediated liver damage, the most selective strategies appear not to interfere with the cytotoxic potential of neutrophils, but rather strengthen the target cells' defense mechanisms including enhancement of the intracellular antioxidant defense systems, activation of cell survival pathways, or initiation of cell cycle activation and regeneration. PMID:16687579

  7. Thymoquinone strongly inhibits fMLF-induced neutrophil functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boudiaf, Kaouthar; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Marie, Jean-Claude; Derradji, Yacine; Benboubetra, Mustapha; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2016-03-15

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are key players in host defense against pathogens through the robust production of superoxide anion by the NADPH oxidase and the release of antibacterial proteins from granules. However, inappropriate release of these agents in the extracellular environment induces severe tissue injury, thereby contributing to the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. Many studies have been carried out to identify molecules capable of inhibiting phagocyte functions, in particular superoxide anion production, for therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we show that thymoquinone (TQ), the major component of the volatile oil from Nigella sativa (black cumin) seeds strongly inhibits fMLF-induced superoxide production and granules exocytosis in neutrophils. The inhibition of superoxide anion was not due to a scavenger effect, as TQ did not inhibit superoxide anion produced by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Interestingly, TQ impaired the phosphorylation on Ser-304 and Ser-328 of p47(PHOX), a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase. TQ also attenuated specific and azurophilic granule exocytosis in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of gp91(PHOX) and CD11b, and release of myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, both the PKC and MAPK pathways, which are involved in p47(PHOX) phosphorylation and granules exocytosis, respectively, were inhibited by TQ in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils. Finally, in a model of pleurisy induced by λ-carrageenan in rats, TQ reduced neutrophil accumulation in the pleural space, showing that it not only inhibits PMN functions in vitro, but also exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. Thus, TQ possesses promising anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential. PMID:26774451

  8. New Aspects on the Structure of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and In Vitro Generation

    PubMed Central

    Krautgartner, Wolf-Dietrich; Klappacher, Michaela; Kofler, Barbara; Steinbacher, Peter; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Grabcanovic-Musija, Fikreta; Studnicka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils have in recent years attracted new attention due to their ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These web-like extracellular structures deriving from nuclear chromatin have been depicted in ambiguous roles between antimicrobial defence and host tissue damage. NETs consist of DNA strands of varying thickness and are decorated with microbicidal and cytotoxic proteins. Their principal structure has in recent years been characterised at molecular and ultrastructural levels but many features that are of direct relevance to cytotoxicity are still incompletely understood. These include the extent of chromatin decondensation during NET formation and the relative amounts and spatial distribution of the microbicidal components within the NET. In the present work, we analyse the structure of NETs found in induced sputum of patients with acutely exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy. In vitro induced NETs from human neutrophils serve for purposes of comparison and extended analysis of NET structure. Results demonstrate that COPD sputa are characterised by the pronounced presence of NETs and NETotic neutrophils. We provide new evidence that chromatin decondensation during NETosis is most extensive and generates substantial amounts of double-helix DNA in ‘beads-on-a-string’ conformation. New information is also presented on the abundance and location of neutrophil elastase (NE) and citrullinated histone H3 (citH3). NE occurs in high densities in nearly all non-fibrous constituents of the NETs while citH3 is much less abundant. We conclude from the results that (i) NETosis is an integral part of COPD pathology; this is relevant to all future research on the etiology and therapy of the disease; and that (ii) release of ‘beads-on-a-string’ DNA studded with non-citrullinated histones is a common feature of in vivo NETosis; this is of relevance to both

  9. The infiltration of 'primed' neutrophils into multiple organs due to physical abuse to the elderly: An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Yamanouchi, Haruo; Bunai, Yasuo; Ogata, Mamoru

    2010-10-10

    The infiltration of 'primed' polymorphonuclear neutrophils into multiple organs has been reported in cases of traumatic or hemorrhagic shock. Since multiple injuries are usually observed in cases of physical abuse of the elderly, we investigated neutrophil infiltration into the heart, lung, liver and kidney in cases of abused elderly individuals using immunohistochemistry for myeloperoxidase (MPO). In addition, we examined the expression of molecules associated with neutrophil infiltration, including P-selectin as the adhesion molecule and IL-8 as the chemotactic factor. The number of neutrophils in the physically abused elder cases was increased significantly, particularly in the lung and liver, compared with that of control cases of sharp instrument injury, single fatal blunt injury and polytrauma. In addition, P-selection expression in the endothelium and the presence of IL-8-positive cells (mainly macrophages) in the lung and liver of abuse cases were significantly greater than those in control cases. In contrast, the number of MPO-, P-selectin- and IL-8-positive cells in cases of multiple organ failure (MOF) due to various causes was significantly greater than that in abuse cases. It is known that primed neutrophils accumulation may undergo MOF by 'activation' due to secondary insults. Thus, our results suggest that MPO immunostaining can distinguish cases of elderly physical abuse from non-abuse and MOF cases. In addition, our results indicate that MPO is a potential diagnostic marker for elder physical abuse, and that P-selectin and IL-8 may be useful for a more accurate diagnosis. Finally, our results also suggest that elder cases of physical abuse may be in a primed stage of MOF, and are at risk of falling into MOF by various secondary insults including those following abuse. PMID:20447785

  10. Elevated granulocyte strontium in inflammatory arthritides is related to the inflammatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haellgren, R.; Svensson, K.; Johansson, E.; Lindh, U.

    1984-12-01

    Total cellular strontium and calcium were measured by the nuclear microprobe technique. Increased mass fraction of both elements was found in granulocytes isolated from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and other kinds of inflammatory arthritides. Increased granulocyte calcium but only marginally elevated granulocyte strontium was demonstrated in patients with scleroderma. The granulocyte accumulation of strontium and calcium seems to be linked to the degree of inflammatory activity, because the granulocyte content of both elements was positively correlated to the plasma concentration of acute-phase proteins. Corticosteroid therapy induced a marked reduction of granulocyte strontium but a more modest decrease of granulocyte calcium. The serum levels of strontium and calcium were within the normal ranges in all patients and were not significantly altered by corticosteroids. 21 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Bone marrow PMN-MDSCs and neutrophils are functionally similar in protection of multiple myeloma from chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Indu R; Condamine, Thomas; Lin, Cindy; Herlihy, Sarah E; Garfall, Alfred; Vogl, Dan T; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Nefedova, Yulia

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable cancer of plasma cells localized preferentially in the bone marrow (BM). Resistance to chemotherapy represents one of the main challenges in MM management. BM microenvironment is known to play a critical role in protection of MM cells from chemotherapeutics; however, mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Development of MM is associated with accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) mostly represented by pathologically activated relatively immature polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN-MDSCs). Here, we investigated whether PMN-MDSCs are responsible for BM microenvironment-mediated MM chemoresistance. Using in vivo mouse models allowing manipulation of myeloid cell number, we demonstrated a critical role for myeloid cells in MM growth and chemoresistance. PMN-MDSCs isolated from MM-bearing host are immunosuppressive and thus, functionally distinct from their counterpart in tumor-free host neutrophils. We found, however, that both PMN-MDSCs and neutrophils equally promote MM survival from doxorubicin and melphalan and that this effect is mediated by soluble factors rather than direct cell-cell contact. Our data indicate that targeting PMN-MDSCs would enhance chemotherapy efficacy in MM. PMID:26639197

  12. Low DICER1 expression is associated with attenuated neutrophil differentiation and autophagy of NB4 APL cells.

    PubMed

    Wampfler, Julian; Federzoni, Elena A; Torbett, Bruce E; Fey, Martin F; Tschan, Mario P

    2015-09-01

    Successful myeloid differentiation depends on the expression of a series of miRNAs. Thus, it is hardly surprising that miRNAs are globally repressed in AML, a disease mainly characterized by a block in cellular myeloid differentiation. Studies investigating the mechanisms for low miRNA expression in AML has mostly focused on altered transcriptional regulation or deletions, whereas defective miRNA processing has received less attention. In this study, we report that the expression of the key miRNA processing enzyme DICER1 is down-regulated in primary AML patient samples and healthy CD34(+) progenitor cells as compared with granulocytes. In line with these findings, Dicer1 expression was induced significantly in AML cell lines upon neutrophil differentiation. The knocking down of DICER1 in AML cells significantly attenuated neutrophil differentiation, which was paralleled by decreased expression of miRNAs involved in this process. Moreover, we found that inhibiting DICER1 attenuated the activation of autophagy, a cellular recycling process that is needed for proper neutrophil differentiation of AML cells. Our results clearly indicate that DICER1 plays a novel role in neutrophil differentiation as well as in myeloid autophagy of AML cells. PMID:25990244

  13. Neutrophils and their Fcγ receptors are essential in a mouse model of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Su, Xiao; Van Ziffle, Jessica A.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most common cause of transfusion-related mortality. To explore the pathogenesis of TRALI, we developed an in vivo mouse model based on the passive transfusion of an MHC class I (MHC I) mAb (H2Kd) to mice with the cognate antigen. Transfusion of the MHC I mAb to BALB/c mice produced acute lung injury with increased excess lung water, increased lung vascular and lung epithelial permeability to protein, and decreased alveolar fluid clearance. There was 50% mortality at a 2-hour time point after Ab administration. Pulmonary histology and immunohistochemistry revealed prominent neutrophil sequestration in the lung microvasculature that occurred concomitantly with acute peripheral blood neutropenia, all within 2 hours of administration of the mAb. Depletion of neutrophils by injection of anti-granulocyte mAb Gr-1 protected mice from lung injury following MHC I mAb challenge. FcRγ–/– mice were resistant to MHC I mAb–induced lung injury, while adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into the FcRγ–/– animals restored lung injury following MHC I mAb challenge. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant in vivo mouse model of TRALI using an MHC I mAb, the mechanism of lung injury was dependent on neutrophils and their Fcγ receptors. PMID:16710475

  14. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  15. Different Leishmania Species Drive Distinct Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Benjamin P; Regli, Ivo B; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne

    2016-05-01

    Leishmaniases are vector-borne diseases of serious public health importance. During a sand fly blood meal, Leishmania parasites are deposited in the host dermis where neutrophils are rapidly recruited. Neutrophils are the first line of defense and can kill pathogens by an array of mechanisms. They can also form web-like structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that can trap and/or kill microbes. The function of neutrophils in leishmaniasis was reported to be either beneficial by contributing to parasite killing or detrimental by impairing immune response development and control of parasite load. Here we review recent data showing that different Leishmania species elicit distinct neutrophil functions thereby influencing disease outcomes. Emerging evidence suggests that neutrophils should be considered important modulators of leishmaniasis. PMID:26944469

  16. Neutrophil Responses to Sterile Implant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Aresta-DaSilva, Stephanie; Tang, Katherine; Alvarez, David; Webber, Matthew J.; Tang, Benjamin C.; Lavin, Danya M.; Veiseh, Omid; Doloff, Joshua C.; Bose, Suman; Vegas, Arturo; Ma, Minglin; Sahay, Gaurav; Chiu, Alan; Bader, Andrew; Langan, Erin; Siebert, Sean; Li, Jie; Greiner, Dale L.; Newburger, Peter E.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30–500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices. PMID:26355958

  17. All-trans retinoic acid inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression in a cell model of neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Tee, Meng Kian; Vigne, Jean-Louis; Taylor, Robert N

    2006-03-01

    Infiltrating neutrophil granulocytes are a particularly rich source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the endometrium and may contribute to the angiogenesis of endometriosis lesions. The objective of this study is to evaluate the expression and regulation of VEGF in endometrial neutrophils and in a model of neutrophil differentiation relevant to endometriosis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on endometriosis patient biopsies and cultured neutrophil-like HL-60 cells were assessed. The study was set in a reproductive biology division within an academic medical center. Endometrial biopsies were performed on women with endometriosis and HL-60 cells were treated with all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and dimethyl sulfoxide in vitro. Immunofluorescence histochemistry, VEGF mRNA and protein quantification, and transfection studies of VEGF gene promoter-luciferase constructs were all main outcome measures. Immunofluorescence studies verified the presence of neutrophils in eutopic endometrium from women with endometriosis. Examination of the regulation of VEGF using differentiated HL-60 cells as a model, revealed that atRA induced a dose- and time-dependent suppression of VEGF mRNA and protein. Transient transfection, truncation, EMSA, and site-directed mutagenesis of human VEGF promoter-luciferase constructs in HL-60 cells indicated that atRA repressed VEGF gene transcription via a direct repeat 1 element located between -443 and -431 bp relative to the transcription initiation site. Because retinoic acid is synthesized de novo in endometrial cells under the influence of progesterone, our findings suggest that the up-regulated VEGF and angiogenesis in tissue from women with endometriosis may reflect failure of neutrophil differentiation in these cases, and provide a rationale for retinoid therapy in this condition. PMID:16322068

  18. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  19. Granulocytic sarcoma: an atypical presentation in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Pinto, Andres; Alawi, Faizan; Raghavendra, Sree; Boyce, Ricardo; Porter, David; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a hematologic disorder that is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of immature myeloid cells. Granulocytic sarcomas are clusters of leukemic myeloid cells that may develop as a result of AML. Oral manifestations of AML are common and often involve enlargements of the gingiva and/or mucosal tissue from direct leukemia cell infiltration. We describe the case history of a 50-year-old man who had an ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa that was determined to be a granulocytic sarcoma of AML-MO subtype. The combination of both the subtype and clinical presentation of the leukemia makes this presentation unusual, and to the best of our knowledge, of a type that has not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:15200230

  20. Granulocyte transfusions in children using filter-collected cells.

    PubMed

    Higby, D J; Freeman, A; Henderson, E S; Sinks, L; Cohen, E

    1976-09-01

    Twenty-three children with various stages and morphologic types of leukemia were treated with multiple granulocyte transfusions obtained by filtration leukapheresis when neutropenia-associated infection appeared unresponsive to antibiotics. All children meeting the above qualifications were given granulocyte transfusions during this time period. Twenty-one of 23 became afebrile during or shortly after the transfusions; one died with disseminated Herpes simplex; and one became well enough to be discharged, although he was never free of fever. Frequent mild to moderate fever and chills were noted. One child developed a severe pulmonary reaction followed by resolution of pneumonia. Filtration leukapheresis is a useful adjunct in controlling severe infections in neutropenic children. PMID:821603

  1. Separation of granulocytes from whole blood by leukoadhesion, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Capillary glass tubes are investigated for the separation and retrieval of large quantities of viable granulocytes and monocytes from whole blood on a continuous basis from a single donor. This effort represented the feasibility demonstration of a three phase program for development of a capillary tube cell separation device. The activity included the analysis and parametric laboratory testing with subscale models required to design a prototype device. Capillary tubes 40 cm long with a nominal 0.030 cm internal diameter yielded the highest total process efficiency. Recovery efficiencies as high as 89% of the adhering cell population were obtained. Granulocyte phagocytosis of latex particles indicated approximately 90% viability. Monocytes recovered from the separation column retained their capability to stimulate human bone marrow colony growth, as demonstrated in an in vitro cell culture assay.

  2. Catecholamine stress alters neutrophil trafficking and impairs wound healing by β2-adrenergic receptor-mediated upregulation of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Gorouhi, Farzam; Ramirez, Sandra; Granick, Jennifer L; Byrne, Barbara A; Soulika, Athena M; Simon, Scott I; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2014-03-01

    Stress-induced hormones can alter the inflammatory response to tissue injury; however, the precise mechanism by which epinephrine influences inflammatory response and wound healing is not well defined. Here we demonstrate that epinephrine alters the neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN))-dependent inflammatory response to a cutaneous wound. Using noninvasive real-time imaging of genetically tagged PMNs in a murine skin wound, chronic, epinephrine-mediated stress was modeled by sustained delivery of epinephrine. Prolonged systemic exposure of epinephrine resulted in persistent PMN trafficking to the wound site via an IL-6-mediated mechanism, and this in turn impaired wound repair. Further, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of proinflammatory macrophages is critical for epinephrine-mediated IL-6 production. This study expands our current understanding of stress hormone-mediated impairment of wound healing and provides an important mechanistic link to explain how epinephrine stress exacerbates inflammation via increased number and lifetime of PMNs. PMID:24121404

  3. Glibenclamide reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by neutrophils of diabetes patients in response to bacterial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Utispan, Kusumawadee; Suwannasaen, Duangchan; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for melioidosis, which is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our previous study has shown that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from diabetic subjects exhibited decreased functions in response to B. pseudomallei. Here we investigated the mechanisms regulating cytokine secretion of PMNs from diabetic patients which might contribute to patient susceptibility to bacterial infections. Purified PMNs from diabetic patients who had been treated with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker for anti-diabetes therapy), showed reduction of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 secretion when exposed to B. pseudomallei. Additionally, reduction of these pro-inflammatory cytokines occurred when PMNs from diabetic patients were treated in vitro with glibenclamide. These findings suggest that glibenclamide might be responsible for the increased susceptibility of diabetic patients, with poor glycemic control, to bacterial infections as a result of its effect on reducing IL-1β production by PMNs.

  4. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  5. Cyclosporine Does Not Prevent Microvascular Loss in Transplantation but Can Synergize With a Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitor, Elafin, to Maintain Graft Perfusion During Acute Rejection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Nguyen, T T; Tian, W; Sung, Y K; Yuan, K; Qian, J; Rajadas, J; Sallenave, J-M; Nickel, N P; de Jesus Perez, V; Rabinovitch, M; Nicolls, M R

    2015-07-01

    The loss of a functional microvascular bed in rejecting solid organ transplants is correlated with fibrotic remodeling and chronic rejection; in lung allografts, this pathology is predicted by bronchoalveolar fluid neutrophilia which suggests a role for polymorphonuclear cells in microcirculatory injury. In a mouse orthotopic tracheal transplant model, cyclosporine, which primarily inhibits T cells, failed as a monotherapy for preventing microvessel rejection and graft ischemia. To target neutrophil action that may be contributing to vascular injury, we examined the effect of a neutrophil elastase inhibitor, elafin, on the microvascular health of transplant tissue. We showed that elafin monotherapy prolonged microvascular perfusion and enhanced tissue oxygenation while diminishing the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages and decreasing tissue deposition of complement C3 and the membrane attack complex, C5b-9. Elafin was also found to promote angiogenesis through activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway but was insufficient as a single agent to completely prevent tissue ischemia during acute rejection episodes. However, when combined with cyclosporine, elafin effectively preserved airway microvascular perfusion and oxygenation. The therapeutic strategy of targeting neutrophil elastase activity alongside standard immunosuppression during acute rejection episodes may be an effective approach for preventing the development of irreversible fibrotic remodeling. PMID:25727073

  6. Cyclosporine does not prevent microvascular loss in transplantation but can synergize with a neutrophil elastase inhibitor, elafin, to maintain graft perfusion during acute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinguo; Nguyen, Tom T.; Tian, Wen; Sung, Yon K.; Yuan, Ke; Qian, Jin; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Nickel, Nils P.; de Jesus Perez, Vinicio; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    The loss of a functional microvascular bed in rejecting solid organ transplants is correlated with fibrotic remodeling and chronic rejection; in lung allografts, this pathology is predicted by bronchoalveolar fluid neutrophilia which suggests a role for polymorphonuclear cells in microcirculatory injury. In a mouse orthotopic tracheal transplant model, cyclosporine, which primarily inhibits T cells, failed as a monotherapy for preventing microvessel rejection and graft ischemia. To target neutrophil action that may be contributing to vascular injury, we examined the effect of a neutrophil elastase inhibitor, elafin, on the microvascular health of transplant tissue. We showed that elafin monotherapy prolonged microvascular perfusion and enhanced tissue oxygenation while diminishing the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages and decreasing tissue deposition of complement C3 and the membrane attack complex, C5b-9. Elafin was also found to promote angiogenesis through activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway but was insufficient as a single agent to completely prevent tissue ischemia during acute rejection episodes. However, when combined with cyclosporine, elafin effectively preserved airway microvascular perfusion and oxygenation. The therapeutic strategy of targeting neutrophil elastase activity alongside standard immunosuppression during acute rejection episodes may be an effective approach for preventing the development of irreversible fibrotic remodeling. PMID:25727073

  7. Toxic and osmotic effects of glycerol on human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, W.J.; Mazur, P.

    1984-11-01

    Human granulocytes are damaged by exposure to concentrations of glycerol as low as 0.5 M. We therefore investigated the addition of glycerol to granulocytes and its subsequent dilution under various conditions to try to distinguish between toxic and harmful osmotic effects of glycerol. The lesion caused by glycerol at 0/sup 0/C was expressed as a loss of plasma membrane integrity (as visualized by fluorescein diacetate) only after incubation (greater than or equal to1 h) at 37/sup 0/C. This damage was not ameliorated when osmotic stress was lessened by reducing the rates of addition and dilution of glycerol to keep the computed cell volume within 80-170% of isotonic cell volume. However, when osmotic stress was reduced further by increasing the temperature of addition and dilution of glycerol from 0/sup 0/ to 22/sup 0/C, the tolerance of the cells to 1 M glycerol increased somewhat. Reducing exposure to glycerol to 3 min or less at 0/sup 0/C greatly increased survival, but this time was too short to allow glycerol to equilibrate intracellularly. Finally, the presence of extra impermeant solute (NaCl or sucrose) in the medium to reduce the equilibrium cell volume to 60% of isotonic cell volume enabled granulocytes to survive 30-min exposure to 1 M glycerol at 0/sup 0/C, but cells had to remain shrunken during the 37/sup 0/C incubation to prevent the loss of membrane integrity. Suspensions that contained damaged granulocytes formed aggregates when incubated at 37/sup 0/C, and these aggregates were responsible for a major fraction of the observed loss in viability.

  8. Ultrastructural study on the granulocytes of Uttara fowl (Gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Khan Idrees; Mrigesh, Meena; Singh, Balwinder; Singh, Ishwar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to know the ultrastructural detail of the blood cells of Uttara fowl (native fowl of Uttarakhand). Materials and Methods: The experiment was conducted on 10 apparently healthy adult birds of either sex reared at the Instructional Poultry Farm, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand. The blood was collected from wing vein using ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid as anticoagulant. The blood was further processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies separately. Results: Ultrastructurally, the heterophils were irregularly round in shape. The cytoplasm was laden with pleomorphic membrane-bound granules, viz., large elliptical-, medium oval-, large round-, and medium round-shaped granules. The eosinophils under TEM were irregularly circular in outline showing pseudopodia and finger-like cytoplasmic processes. The cytoplasmic granules were pleomorphic with elliptical-, round-, and rod-shaped granules. The basophils were irregularly circular in outline containing small hook-like cytoplasmic processes. The cytoplasm contained electron dense and electron lucent round-shaped granules. Conclusion: Granulocytes contained pleomorphic cytoplasmic granules. However, the shape and electron density of granules varied among the different granulocytes and helped in the characterization of different granulocytes. PMID:27057119

  9. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is expressed in synovial fluid granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    CEDERGREN, J; FORSLUND 2, T; SUNDQVIST 2, T; SKOGH 1, T

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the NO-producing potential of synovial fluid (SF) cells. SF from 15 patients with arthritis was compared with blood from the same individuals and with blood from 10 healthy controls. Cellular expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was analysed by flow cytometry. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure l-arginine and l-citrulline. Nitrite and nitrate were measured colourimetrically utilizing the Griess’ reaction. Compared to whole blood granulocytes in patients with chronic arthritis, a prominent iNOS expression was observed in SF granulocytes (P < 0·001). A slight, but statistically significant, increase in iNOS expression was also recorded in lymphocytes and monocytes from SF. l-arginine was elevated in SF compared to serum (257 ± 78 versus 176 ± 65 µmol/l, P = 0·008), whereas a slight increase in l-citrulline (33 ± 11 versus 26 ± 9 µmol/l), did not reach statistical significance. Great variations but no significant differences were observed comparing serum and SF levels of nitrite and nitrate, respectively, although the sum of nitrite and nitrate tended to be elevated in SF (19·2 ± 20·7 versus 8·6 ± 6·5 µmol/l, P = 0·054). Synovial fluid leucocytes, in particular granulocytes, express iNOS and may thus contribute to intra-articular NO production in arthritis. PMID:12296866

  10. Interleukin-8 in Hodgkin's disease. Preferential expression by reactive cells and association with neutrophil density.

    PubMed Central

    Foss, H. D.; Herbst, H.; Gottstein, S.; Demel, G.; Araujó, I.; Stein, H.

    1996-01-01

    Hodgkin's disease (HD) shows rare neoplastic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells embedded in an abundant reactive infiltrate containing, among other cell types, neutrophilic granulocytes. Interleukin (IL)-8 is chemotactic for neutrophils. The expression of IL-8 was tested by in situ hybridization with 35S-labeled IL-8-specific RNA probes on 38 cases of HD. Reactive lesions, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of B and T phenotype, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis served as controls. IL-8 expression was observed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in 3 of 33 cases of classical HD and in reactive cells in 20 of 33 HD cases as evidenced by combined isotopic in situ hybridization and immunohistology for the demonstration of cell-type-characteristic antigens or enzyme histochemistry for chloroacetate esterase. IL-8-positive cells were more numerous in cases of nodular sclerosing HD as compared with the mixed cellularity histotype (P = 0.01). The number of IL-8-positive cells and the density of neutrophils were positively correlated (P < 0. 01). In 5 cases of lymphocyte-predominant HD, IL-8 expression was not displayed. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases contained IL-8 transcripts only in 1 of 23 cases in sparse reactive cells. In 4 of 7 cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, IL-8-specific signals were displayed in S100-negative cells. In conclusion, IL-8 expression in HD is largely confined to reactive cells and associated with infiltration by neutrophils. Elaboration of other cytokines by Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and reactive cells may explain the frequent expression of this cytokine in HD, particularly in the nodular sclerosing type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8644863

  11. Novel neutrophil chemotactic factor derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kownatzki, E; Kapp, A; Uhrich, S

    1986-01-01

    Human mononuclear leucocytes isolated from the peripheral blood by centrifugation on Ficoll-Hypaque cushions and adherent on plastic petri dishes, produced a chemotactic factor that attracted human neutrophilic granulocytes to the same extent as did optimal concentrations of the complement split product C5a and the leukotriene B4. The active component eluted from a Sephadex G-50 gel filtration column as a single peak with an apparent molecular weight of 10,000. The chemotactic activity was resistant to reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds and heating at 100 degrees C for 30 min but was lost when reduction and heating were combined. Digestion with a proteolytic enzyme eliminated the attractive potential. The data suggest that this is a novel chemotactic peptide. It is conceivable that it has been seen previously and was mistaken for a lymphokine or interleukin 1. PMID:3731527

  12. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  13. Maturation arrest of neutrophils-a possible reason for the leucopenia in sodium selenite induced sub-chronic selenosis in cow calves.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Satyavan; Kumar, Rakesh; Randhawa, Charanjit S; Sood, Naresh

    2008-01-01

    The effect of long-term administration of sodium selenite on leucocyte indices of peripheral blood of calves was determined. Nine calves, 9-12 months old, with an average body weight of 104kg were divided into three groups. Calves of groups 2 and 3 were administered with sodium selenite at 0.1 and 0.25mg/kg body weight for 98 consecutive days. The clinical signs characteristic of selenosis viz. alopecia, cracking of hooves, intradigital lesions and discoloration of hard palate, started appearing from 45 to 60 days onwards with high dose, whereas only subtle indications of toxicosis were observed in the low-dose group. The prolonged administration of sodium selenite produced a progressive and dose-dependent decline in the circulating leucocyte count with concomitant decline in the circulating neutrophil count. There was a high negative correlation (0.94) between blood selenium levels and neutrophils. Granulocyte/agranulocyte ratio was also significantly reduced in the treated animals. Evaluation of bone marrow smears revealed a decline in the myeloid to erythroid ratio. In addition, there was also maturation arrest of neutrophils at promyelocyte or myelocyte level as shown by differential granulocyte count in the bone marrow. The results indicated that host's immune response may be adversely affected. PMID:21783834

  14. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: a survey among Italian medical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Danova, Marco; Rosti, Giovanni; De Placido, Sabino; Bencardino, Katia; Venturini, Marco

    2005-12-01

    In October 2003, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) published its own guidelines on the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The present survey was conducted during the same period with the aim of collecting data on the current use of G-CSF to provide a starting point for future evaluations of the implementation of AIOM guidelines. From October 2003 to January 2004, 1591 AIOM members were asked to complete a questionnaire based on specific clinical scenarios, regarding the use of G-CSF for primary and secondary prophylaxis and treatment of neutropenia. The rate of response was 22%. For primary prophylaxis, the majority of physicians avoid using G-CSF, with no difference in cases of adjuvant, curative or palliative chemotherapy (CT). In fact, 67.2% to 74.9% would 'rarely or never' use G-CSF in the proposed clinical scenarios. In chemosensitive tumors, rather than reducing CT doses, 55.7% would use G-CSF as a secondary prophylaxis after afebrile neutropenia (AN), and 68.8% after febrile neutropenia (FN). In elderly patients experiencing FN, 35.7% would reduce the adjuvant CT doses and 23.1% would change the regimen. Most oncologists would use G-CSF to treat neutropenia, and the median duration of G-CSF treatment is less than 1 week and would depend on neutrophil count. Our survey shows that Italian oncologists are particularly oriented towards the use of G-CSF in clinical practice to maintain the CT dose intensity, and are sensitive to the prevention and treatment of not only FN, but also AN. Finally, Italian medical oncologists appear to be very cautious in introducing G-CSF when treating elderly patients. PMID:16273232

  15. Leukotriene B/sub 4/ production by stimulated whole blood: comparative studies with isolated polymorphonuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gresele, P.; Arnout, J.; Coene, M.C.; Deckmyn, H.; Vermylen, J.

    1986-05-29

    A new method was developed to study leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) production by stimulated whole blood. The calcium ionophore A23187 and serum-treated zymosan induced LTB/sub 4/ production, measured by radioimmunoassay, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The pattern of LTB/sub 4/ production by whole blood differed markedly from that observed with isolated, purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Higher levels of LTB/sub 4/ were reached and maintained in whole blood. The system allowed to detect drug effects on LTB/sub 4/ takes into account the complex interactions between different cell types which can modulate LTB/sub 4/ metabolism.

  16. Dithranol modulates the leukotriene B4-induced intraepidermal accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, A; Alkemade, H; van de Kerkhof, P C

    1989-06-01

    Dithranol, with and without the addition of salicylic acid, was applied daily on normal skin according to a short contact protocol as used in the treatment of psoriasis. Sellotape stripping and epicutaneous application of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were carried out within these pretreated areas. The challenged skin was subsequently biopsied and the intraepidermal accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was quantified using the marker enzyme elastase. Dithranol pretreatment yielded a significant reduction of the LTB4-induced accumulation of PMN, whereas the tape stripping-induced accumulation of PMN was not affected by dithranol pretreatment. The addition of salicylic acid did not significantly enhance the effect of dithranol. PMID:2542415

  17. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  18. A Radical Break: Restraining Neutrophil Migration.

    PubMed

    Renkawitz, Jörg; Sixt, Michael

    2016-09-12

    When neutrophils infiltrate a site of inflammation, they have to stop at the right place to exert their effector function. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Wang et al. (2016) show that neutrophils sense reactive oxygen species via the TRPM2 channel to arrest migration at their target site. PMID:27623379

  19. Mechanotransduction in neutrophil activation and deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Toepfner, Nicole; Chilvers, Edwin R; Guck, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the processes through which cells sense mechanical stimuli by converting them to biochemical signals and, thus, eliciting specific cellular responses. Cells sense mechanical stimuli from their 3D environment, including the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells and other mechanical forces. Incidentally, the emerging concept of mechanical homeostasis,long term or chronic regulation of mechanical properties, seems to apply to neutrophils in a peculiar manner, owing to neutrophils' ability to dynamically switch between the activated/primed and deactivated/deprimed states. While neutrophil activation has been known for over a century, its deactivation is a relatively recent discovery. Even more intriguing is the reversibility of neutrophil activation and deactivation. We review and critically evaluate recent findings that suggest physiological roles for neutrophil activation and deactivation and discuss possible mechanisms by which mechanical stimuli can drive the oscillation of neutrophils between the activated and resting states. We highlight several molecules that have been identified in neutrophil mechanotransduction, including cell adhesion and transmembrane receptors, cytoskeletal and ion channel molecules. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of such mechanically induced signal transduction in neutrophils are highlighted as a basis for future work. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26211453

  20. Chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and plasma cell-related neutrophilic leukaemoid reactions.

    PubMed

    Bain, Barbara J; Ahmad, Shahzaib

    2015-11-01

    Many cases reported as 'chronic neutrophilic leukaemia' have had an associated plasma cell neoplasm. Recent evidence suggests that the great majority of such cases represent a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction to the underlying multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We have analysed all accessible reported cases to clarify the likely diagnosis and to ascertain whether toxic granulation, Döhle bodies and an increased neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score were useful in making a distinction between chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction. We established that all these changes occur in both conditions. Toxic granulation and Döhle bodies are more consistently present in leukaemoid reactions but also occur quite frequently in chronic neutrophilic leukaemia. The neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score is increased in both conditions and is of no value in making a distinction. PMID:26218186

  1. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine. PMID:22719015

  2. Neutrophil Elastase Modulates Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Benabid, Rym; Wartelle, Julien; Malleret, Laurette; Guyot, Nicolas; Gangloff, Sophie; Lebargy, François; Belaaouaj, Azzaq

    2012-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that following bacterial infection, the massive recruitment and activation of the phagocytes, neutrophils, is accompanied with the extracellular release of active neutrophil elastase (NE), a potent serine protease. Using NE-deficient mice in a clinically relevant model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia, we provide compelling in vivo evidence that the absence of NE was associated with decreased protein and transcript levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6 in the lungs, coinciding with increased mortality of mutant mice to infection. The implication of NE in the induction of cytokine expression involved at least in part Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). These findings were further confirmed following exposure of cultured macrophages to purified NE. Together, our data suggest strongly for the first time that NE not only plays a direct antibacterial role as it has been previously reported, but released active enzyme can also modulate cytokine expression, which contributes to host protection against P. aeruginosa. In light of our findings, the long held view that considers NE as a prime suspect in P. aeruginosa-associated diseases will need to be carefully reassessed. Also, therapeutic strategies aiming at NE inhibition should take into account the physiologic roles of the enzyme. PMID:22927440

  3. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  4. Effect of ABO incompatibility on the fate in vivo of 111-Indium granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, J.; Clay, M.; Loken, M.; Hurd, D.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of ABO incompatibility on the in vivo fate of 111-Indium granulocytes was determined. The intravascular recovery and survival (t1/2) and extravascular migration into a skin window of normal-donor granulocytes did not differ in 15 subjects from the values obtained in four controls who received ABO-compatible granulocytes. Nor was the correlation between the ABO antibody titers and the in vivo measurements strongly positive. It is concluded that ABO incompatibility did not alter the in vivo fate of granulocytes.

  5. Effect of histocompatibility factors on pulmonary retention of indium-111-labeled granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, J.P.; Riggs, C. Jr.; Fox, J.J.; Johnston, G.S.; Norris, D.; Wiernik, P.H.; Schiffer, C.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are associated with a number of side effects including febrile transfusion reactions and occasionally pulmonary infiltrates. There is evidence that the presence of preformed antibodies may be a cause of these complications. In this study, allogeneic 111Indium-labeled granulocytes were used to evaluate the pulmonary retention of radioactivity in alloimmunized and non-alloimmunized patients in an attempt to assess antibody effect on granulocyte migration. After injection of labeled allogeneic granulocytes into neutropenic patients, the ratios of lung to heart activity were calculated for the first 30 min of scanning. There was significantly greater retention of radioactivity from cells in the lungs of patients who were alloimmunized, having both lymphocytotoxic (anti-HLA) and leuko-agglutinating antibodies, compared to the activity in the lungs of non-alloimmunized patients (P less than .001) or of patients receiving autologous granulocytes (P less than .001). This study demonstrates that labeled, mismatched granulocytes may be retained in the lungs for a significantly longer time in patients with preformed antibodies. This implies that transfusion of large numbers of such mismatched granulocytes, i.e., granulocyte transfusions, may also be retained in the lungs of alloimmunized patients, which could lead to pulmonary compromise. Therefore, granulocyte transfusions from random donors should not be given to alloimmunized patients.

  6. Human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases cell-to-cell adhesion and surface expression of adhesion-promoting surface glycoproteins on mature granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Arnaout, M A; Wang, E A; Clark, S C; Sieff, C A

    1986-01-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit migration of mature granulocytes and to enhance their antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We found that human recombinant GM-CSF also enhanced granulocyte-granulocyte adhesion and increased by two- to threefold the surface expression of Mo1 and LeuM5 (P150, 95), two members of a family of leukocyte adhesion molecules (Leu-CAM). Increased Mo1 surface expression occurred within 15 min at 37 degrees C and was maximal at the migration inhibitory concentration of 500 pM. One-half maximal rise in the expression of Mo1 on the cell surface occurred at 5 pM. The chemotactic peptide f-Met-Leu-Phe produced a comparable rise in surface Mo1 with one-half maximal expression occurring at 7 nM. Both GM-CSF and f-Met-Leu-Phe produced optimal granulocyte-granulocyte adhesion at 500 pM and 100 nM, respectively. This adhesion-promoting effect induced by either stimulus was inhibited by a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against Mo1 antigen. These data indicate that GM-CSF promotes cell-to-cell adhesion, presumably through enhanced expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. This mechanism may explain, in part, the known effects of GM-CSF on the function of mature granulocytes. Images PMID:3090106

  7. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown. PMID:25523872

  8. Tumour Cell Lines HT-29 and FaDu Produce Proinflammatory Cytokines and Activate Neutrophils In Vitro: Possible Applications for Neutrophil-Based Antitumour Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Souto, Juan-Carlos; Alcolea, Sonia; Antón, Rosa; Remacha, Angel; Camacho, Mercedes; Soler, Marta; Brú, Isabel; Porres, Amelia; Vila, Luis

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) can exert severe antineoplastic effects. Cross-talk between tumour cells and endothelial cells (ECs) is necessary for the accumulation of PMN around a tumour. This work reports the ability of two PMN-sensitive, human, permanent cell lines—colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) and pharyngeal squamous-cell carcinoma (FaDu) cells—to act as inflammatory foci. PMNs were cytotoxic to both lines, the adhesion of the PMNs to the tumour cells being important in this effect. The tumour cells released appreciable amounts of IL-8 and GROα, and induced the transmigration of PMN through human microvascular-EC monolayers. Conditioning media associated with both lines induced the adhesion of PMN and the surface expression of ICAM-1 in microvascular-EC. In addition, FaDu-conditioning-medium strongly induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines by microvascular-EC. These results support the idea that tumour cells might normally induce a potent acute inflammatory response, leading to their own destruction. PMID:20169105

  9. Adjuvant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy results in improved spatial learning and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anna Kathrin; Reich, Arno; Falkenburger, Björn; Schulz, Jörg B; Brandenburg, Lars Ove; Ribes, Sandra; Tauber, Simone C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the development of new antibiotic agents, mortality of pneumococcal meningitis remains high. In addition, meningitis results in severe long-term morbidity, most prominently cognitive deficits. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and increases the number of circulating neutrophil granulocytes. This study investigated the effect of adjuvant G-CSF treatment on cognitive function after pneumococcal meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were infected by subarachnoid injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 and treated with ceftriaxone and G-CSF subcutaneously or ceftriaxone alone for 5 days. Clinical scores, motor performance, and mortality during bacterial meningitis were unaffected by adjuvant G-CSF treatment. No effect of G-CSF treatment on production of proinflammatory cytokines or activation of microglia or astrocytes was observed. The G-CSF treatment did, however, result in hippocampal neurogenesis and improved spatial learning performance 6 weeks after meningitis. These results suggest that G-CSF might offer a new adjuvant therapeutic approach in bacterial meningitis to reduce long-term cognitive deficits. PMID:25470346

  10. [Successful treatment of an overwhelming infection with granulocyte transfusion in severe aplastic anemia patient undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kazuma, Yasuhiro; Ono, Yuichiro; Yonetani, Noboru; Imai, Yukihiro; Kawakami, Manabu; Hashimoto, Hisako; Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    A 19-year-old woman complaining of fever and a sore throat was diagnosed with very severe aplastic anemia (AA) by bone marrow examination at a local hospital. Despite administration of antibiotics and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to treat the soft tissue infection in her neck, her neutrophil count showed no increase. Because emergent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) was necessary, she was referred to our hospital. On admission, computed tomography revealed right-sided severe pharyngitis and lymphadenitis causing tracheal stenosis, and emergent intubation was required the next day. Granulocyte transfusion therapy (GTX) from related donors coupled with broad-spectrum antibiotic administration controlled the otherwise overwhelming infection. The patient received allogeneic peripheral blood SCT using a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. After allogeneic SCT, successful engraftment was obtained. She was discharged from the hospital 59 days after allogeneic SCT. She remains alive and well, as of the latest follow up. This case clearly demonstrates that GTX is useful for controlling severe infection and enables patients with severe AA to receive allogeneic SCT safely. PMID:27169447

  11. G-CSF signaling can differentiate promyelocytes expressing a defective retinoic acid receptor: evidence for divergent pathways regulating neutrophil differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maun, Noel A; Gaines, Peter; Khanna-Gupta, Arati; Zibello, Theresa; Enriquez, Louie; Goldberg, Laura; Berliner, Nancy

    2004-03-01

    Several lines of investigation suggest that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) augments all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced neutrophil differentiation in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). We sought to characterize the relationship between G-CSF- and ATRA-mediated neutrophil differentiation. We established a G-CSF receptor-transduced promyelocytic cell line, EPRO-Gr, derived from the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent EPRO cell line harboring a dominant-negative retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha). In EPRO-Gr, neutrophil differentiation occurs either in GM-CSF upon addition of ATRA or upon induction with G-CSF alone. Transient transfection of EPRO-Gr cells with a RARE-containing reporter plasmid demonstrates increased activity in the presence of ATRA, but not G-CSF, while STAT3 phosphorylation occurs only in response to G-CSF. This suggests that ATRA-mediated differentiation of EPRO-Gr cells occurs via a RARE-dependent, STAT3-independent pathway, while G-CSF-mediated differentiation occurs via a RARE-independent, STAT3-dependent pathway. ATRA and G-CSF thus regulate differentiation by divergent pathways. We characterized these pathways in the APL cell line, NB4. ATRA induction of NB4 cells resulted in morphologic differentiation and up-regulation of C/EBPepsilon and G-CSFR, but not in STAT3 phosphorylation. The addition of G-CSF with ATRA during NB4 induction resulted in STAT3 phosphorylation but did not enhance differentiation. These results may elucidate how G-CSF and ATRA affect the differentiation of primary and ATRA-resistant APL cells. PMID:14604978

  12. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with radiotherapy promotes tumor growth by stimulating vascularization in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Bae, Min Ji; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Chang Geun; Jo, Wol Soon; Kim, Sung Dae; Yang, Kwangmo

    2015-07-01

    Although granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used to support recovery from radiation-induced side-effects, the precise effects of G-CSF on colon cancer under radiotherapy remain poorly understood. In the present study, to investigate the effects of tumor growth following radiotherapy and G-CSF administration in a murine xenograft model of colon cancer, female BALB/c mice were injected with cells of a colon carcinoma cell line (CT26) with irradiation and G-CSF, alone or in combination. Mice received 2 Gy of focal radiation daily for 5 days and intraperitoneal injection of G-CSF (100 µg/kg/day) after irradiation for 7 days. Changes in the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase type 9 (MMP-9) and CD31 were assessed in the mouse cancer induced by injection of colon cancer cells. We observed that G-CSF increased the number of circulating neutrophils, but facilitated tumor growth. However, G-CSF treatment did not affect radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell viability in CT26 cells in vitro. Increased levels of myeloperoxidase, a neutrophil marker and those of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed in tumors with G-CSF supplementation. In addition, we found that increased levels of CD31 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were correlated with the enhanced tumor growth after G-CSF treatment. Therefore, these data suggest that G-CSF may contribute to tumor growth and decrease the antitumor effect of radiotherapy, possibly by promoting vascularization in cancer lesions. PMID:25976379

  13. Pristane-induced granulocyte recruitment promotes phenotypic conversion of macrophages and protects against diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage in Mac-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yiqin; Tsuboi, Naotake; Furuhashi, Kazuhiro; Du, Qiuna; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maeda, Kayaho; Kosugi, Tomoki; Matsuo, Seiichi; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2014-11-15

    Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage (DPH) is an uncommon but critical complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Peritoneal administration of 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (pristane) can recapitulate a lupus-like syndrome in mice, which can develop into DPH within a few weeks, especially in C57BL/6 mice. Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), a leukocyte adhesion molecule, is known to play a role in inflammation by regulating migration of leukocytes into injured tissue. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of Mac-1 in pristane-induced DPH, using Mac-1(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice on a C57BL/6 background. After pristane injection, Mac-1(-/-) mice showed reduced prevalence of DPH and attenuated peritonitis compared with WT mice. Analysis of the peritoneal lavage on days 5 and 10 after pristane treatment revealed increased numbers of eosinophils and alternatively activated macrophages, but decreased numbers of neutrophils and classically activated macrophages in Mac-1(-/-) mice compared with WT. Enhanced production of IL-4 and IL-13, both key mediators of macrophage polarization toward the mannose receptor(+) (MMR(+)) phenotype, was observed in the peritoneal cavity of Mac-1(-/-) mice. Depletion of neutrophils and eosinophils or adoptive transfer of classically activated macrophages resulted in the exacerbation of pristane-mediated DPH in both WT and Mac-1(-/-) mice. Moreover, peritoneal transfer of F4/80(high)MMR(+) alternatively activated macrophages successfully reduced the prevalence of DPH in WT mice. Collectively, Mac-1 promoted acute inflammatory responses in the peritoneal cavity and the lungs by downregulating granulocyte migration and subsequent phenotypic conversion of macrophages in a pristane-induced systemic lupus erythematosus model. PMID:25281714

  14. Monoclonal LYM-1 antibody-dependent cytolysis by human neutrophils exposed to GM-CSF: auto-regulation of target cell attack by cathepsin G.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, Luciano; Epstein, Alan L; Mancini, Marina; Dapino, Patrizia; Dallegri, Franco

    2004-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) Lym-1 is an immunoglobulin G2a specific for certain human leukocyte antigen-DR variants expressed on the surface of malignant B cells. It has been proposed for serotherapy in patients with B lymphomas. We have previously shown that mAb Lym-1 synergizes with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor to promote Raji B-lymphoid cell lysis by human neutrophils via the intervention of neutrophil Fc receptors type II and D-mannose-inhibitable interactions between CD11b-CD18 integrins and CD66b glycoproteins. Here, we provide evidence that the process is oxygen-independent by inference related to the release of primary granules and is regulated by cathepsin G activity. The lysis was indeed reproduced by replacing normal neutrophils with cells from three patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease, i.e., neutrophils genetically incapable of generating oxidants. Moreover, the lysis was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin and by Z-glycyl-leucyl-phenyl-chloromethyl ketone (Z-Gly-Leu-Phe-CMK), which blocks cathepsin G. Conversely, the lysis was unaffected by N-methoxysuccinyl-alanyl-alanyl-prolyl-alanyl-CMK (MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-CMK; elastase inhibitor) and MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-valine (Val)-CMK, which inhibits elastase and proteinase 3. The ability of neutrophils, engaged in cytolysis, to release cathepsin G was proved by detecting this enzymatic activity spectrophotometrically and immunocytochemically. Moreover, inhibition of cathepsin G activity by concentrations of Z-Gly-Leu-Phe-CMK, incapable of affecting elastase activity, was found to reduce the release of elastase and myeloperoxidase from neutrophils under conditions similar to those used for cytolytic assays. These findings suggest that neutrophils auto-regulate their lytic efficiency by controlling the exocytosis of primary granules via their cathepsin G activity. PMID:14525961

  15. Promoting effect of neutrophils on lung tumorigenesis is mediated by CXCR2 and neutrophil elastase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor cells produce various cytokines and chemokines that attract leukocytes. Leukocytes can amplify parenchymal innate immune responses, and have been shown to contribute to tumor promotion. Neutrophils are among the first cells to arrive at sites of inflammation, and the increased number of tumor-associated neutrophils is linked to poorer outcome in patients with lung cancer. Results We have previously shown that COPD-like airway inflammation promotes lung cancer in a K-ras mutant mouse model of lung cancer (CC-LR). This was associated with severe lung neutrophilic influx due to the increased level of neutrophil chemoattractant, KC. To further study the role of neutrophils in lung tumorigenesis, we depleted neutrophils in CC-LR mice using an anti-neutrophil antibody. This resulted in a significant reduction in lung tumor number. We further selectively inhibited the main receptor for neutrophil chemo-attractant KC, CXCR2. Similarly, this resulted in suppression of neutrophil recruitment into the lung of CC-LR mice followed by significant tumor reduction. Neutrophil elastase (NE) is a potent elastolytic enzyme produced by neutrophils at the site of inflammation. We crossed the CC-LR mice with NE knock-out mice, and found that lack of NE significantly inhibits lung cancer development. These were associated with significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Conclusion We conclude that lung cancer promotion by inflammation is partly mediated by activation of the IL-8/CXCR2 pathway and subsequent recruitment of neutrophils and release of neutrophil elastase. This provides a baseline for future clinical trials using the IL-8/CXCR2 pathway or NE inhibitors in patients with lung cancer. PMID:24321240

  16. Activation of bovine neutrophils by Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Keleher, Lauren L; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis is a globally important zoonotic infectious disease caused by gram negative bacteria of the genus Brucella. While many species of Brucella exist, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis are the most common pathogens of humans and livestock. The virulence of Brucella is largely influenced by its ability to evade host factors, including phagocytic killing mechanisms, which are critical for the host response to infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the bovine neutrophil response to virulent Brucella spp. Here, we found that virulent strains of smooth B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and virulent, rough, strains of Brucella canis possess similar abilities to resist killing by resting, or IFN-γ-activated, bovine neutrophils. Bovine neutrophils responded to infection with a time-dependent oxidative burst that varied little between Brucella spp. Inhibition of TAK1, or SYK kinase blunted the oxidative burst of neutrophils in response to Brucella infection. Interestingly, Brucella spp. did not induce robust death of bovine neutrophils. These results indicate that bovine neutrophils respond similarly to virulent Brucella spp. In addition, virulent Brucella spp., including naturally rough strains of B. canis, have a conserved ability to resist killing by bovine neutrophils. PMID:27436438

  17. Neutrophil gene expression in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cross, Andrew; Bakstad, Denise; Allen, John C; Thomas, Luke; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2005-10-01

    There is now a growing awareness that infiltrating neutrophils play an important role in the molecular pathology of rheumatoid arthritis. In part, this arises from the fact that neutrophils have potent cytotoxic activity, but additionally from the fact that inflammatory neutrophils can generate a number of cytokines and chemokines that can have a direct influence on the progress of an inflammatory episode. Furthermore, the molecular properties of inflammatory neutrophils are quite different from those normally found in the circulation. For example, inflammatory neutrophils, but not blood neutrophils, can express cell surface receptors (such as MHC Class II molecules and FcgammaRI) that dramatically alter the way in which these cells can interact with ligands to modulate immune function. Cytokine/chemokine expression and surface expression of these novel cell surface receptors is dependent upon the neutrophil responding to local environmental factors to selectively up-regulate the expression of key cellular components via signalling pathways coupled to transcriptional activation. However, major changes in the expression levels of some proteins are also regulated by post-translational modifications that alter rates of proteolysis, and hence changes in the steady-state levels of these molecules. PMID:16112850

  18. Neutrophil dysfunction and increased susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Dallegri, F; Sacchetti, C

    1995-09-01

    A critical evaluation of 3 years' experience using laboratory screening to detect neutrophil dysfunction is described. Neutrophil dysfunctions in patients with recurrent bacterial infections were investigated by using the following screening tests: (1) neutrophil chemotaxis towards N-formylmethionyl peptides (FMLP) and the complement fragment C5a; (2) neutrophil production of superoxide anions (O2-) in response to phorbol myristate acetate and opsonized zymosan particles; and (3) examination of May-Grünwald and myeloperoxidase cytochemical staining of peripheral blood smears. These tests were carried out in 100 patients suffering from infections and suspected of having altered neutrophil functional competence. A minority of patients was found to have well defined neutrophil dysfunction syndromes: chronic granulomatous disease (four cases), Chediak-Higashi disease (one case) and myeloperoxidase deficiency (one case). Of the remaining 94 patients, in whom infections localized to airways and/or skin predominated, 53 cases were found to have impaired chemotaxis (41 cases) or partial defects of the O2- production. Defects of chemotaxis toward FMLP and those towards both FLMP and C5a were the most frequent abnormalities. No defect was found in the other 41 patients. Moreover, impaired neutrophil chemotaxis was found in some patients with selective IgA deficiency (five cases) or immotile cilia syndrome (seven cases). The results suggest that (a) additional screening tests are required to ameliorate the efficiency of the diagnostic work-up of the patients suspected to have neutrophil dysfunction; and (b) further evaluation, also at the molecular level, should be considered at least in selected cases of non-classified neutrophil dysfunction in order to clarify diagnosis and plan rational therapeutic strategies. PMID:7498244

  19. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia 2016: Update on diagnosis, molecular genetics, prognosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Michelle A; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-03-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a potentially aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasm, for which current WHO diagnostic criteria include leukocytosis of ≥25 × 10(9) /L (of which >80% are neutrophils) and with <10 and <1% circulating immature granulocytes and blasts, respectively without dysplasia, clinical, or molecular criteria for other myeloproliferative disorders, nor an identifiable cause for physiologic neutrophilia in the absence of markers of myeloid clonality. Such a pathogenic clonal marker has now been identified as a somatic activating mutation of CSF3R, most commonly CSF3R T618I, thus demanding revision of the current WHO diagnostic classification to include the molecular criterion of mutated CSF3R. The clinical presentation, disease course and prognosis of CSF-R mutated CNL have been recently outlined. Co-operative mutations in SETBP1 and ASXL1 appear to be of prognostic significance and correlate with disease progression. Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CNL, have not yet fully translated into satisfactory therapeutic strategies, but the foundations for these are strengthening. Am. J. Hematol. 91:342-349, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26700908

  20. Neutrophil-Mediated Phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Initial elimination of invading Staphylococcus aureus from the body is mediated by professional phagocytes. The neutrophil is the major phagocyte of the innate immunity and plays a key role in the host defense against staphylococcal infections. Opsonization of the bacteria with immunoglobulins and complement factors enables efficient recognition by the neutrophil that subsequently leads to intracellular compartmentalization and killing. Here, we provide a review of the key processes evolved in neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of S. aureus and briefly describe killing. As S. aureus is not helpless against the professional phagocytes, we will also highlight its immune evasion arsenal related to phagocytosis. PMID:25309547

  1. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Shuman, Anne L; Diener, Antonia K; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  2. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  3. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved white blood cell (WBC), specifically neutrophil, loss in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor enhances bone tumor growth in mice in an osteoclast-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Uluçkan, Özge; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Prior, Julie L.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Apicelli, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast (OC) activity has been associated with decreased tumor growth in bone in animal models. Increased recognition of factors that promote osteoclastic bone resorption in cancer patients led us to investigate whether increased OC activation could enhance tumor growth in bone. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, but is also associated with increased markers of OC activity and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). We used G-CSF as a tool to investigate the impact of increased OC activity on tumor growth in 2 murine osteolytic tumor models. An 8-day course of G-CSF alone (without chemotherapy) significantly decreased BMD and increased OC perimeter along bone in mice. Mice administered G-CSF alone demonstrated significantly increased tumor growth in bone as quantitated by in vivo bioluminescence imaging and histologic bone marrow tumor analysis. Short-term administration of AMD3100, a CXCR4 inhibitor that mobilizes neutrophils with little effect on bone resorption, did not lead to increased tumor burden. However, OC-defective osteoprotegerin transgenic (OPGTg) mice and bisphosphonate-treated mice were resistant to the effects of G-CSF administration upon bone tumor growth. These data demonstrate a G-CSF–induced stimulation of tumor growth in bone that is OC dependent. PMID:17192391

  5. IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF pathway is associated with granulocyte recruitment to the lung during African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Karalyan, Z; Voskanyan, H; Ter-Pogossyan, Z; Saroyan, D; Karalova, E

    2016-10-15

    The interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17 pathway plays a crucial role in various forms of inflammation but its function in acute African swine fever (ASF) is not well understood. Thus, in this study, we aimed to find out whether IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF is released in acute ASF and what function it may have. The present study revealed that the production of IL-17 and IL-23 were significantly increased in the sera of ASFV infected pigs. Using ELISA, we found that the serum levels of IL-23 and IL-17 have overexpressed in ASF virus infected pigs compared with healthy controls. The levels of IL-17 and IL-23 increase in the early stages and the levels of G-CSF and C - reactive protein in the later stages of ASF. Simultaneously, with the increase of the levels of IL-23/IL-17 extravasation of granular leukocytes in the tissue (diapedesis) is observed. Diapedesis can explain the neutropenia that we identified previously in the terminal stages of ASF. The increase in serum levels of IL-23/IL-17 is preceded by enhanced migration of neutrophils in tissues, and the last one is preceded by neutropenia. The increase in serum levels of G-CSF has compensatory nature, directed on stimulation of proliferation of granulocytes. Taken together, our results revealed an overexpression of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in the ASF virus infected pigs, suggesting that it may be a crucial pathway in the diapedesis at ASF. PMID:27590426

  6. Image-based Flow Cytometry Technique to Evaluate Changes in Granulocyte Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Brian K.; Venable, Adam S.; Prado, Eric A.; Henning, Andrea L.; Williams, Randall R.

    2014-01-01

    Granulocytes play a key role in the body’s innate immune response to bacterial and viral infections. While methods exist to measure granulocyte function, in general these are limited in terms of the information they can provide. For example, most existing assays merely provide a percentage of how many granulocytes are activated following a single, fixed length incubation. Complicating matters, most assays focus on only one aspect of function due to limitations in detection technology. This report demonstrates a technique for simultaneous measurement of granulocyte phagocytosis of bacteria and oxidative burst. By measuring both of these functions at the same time, three unique phenotypes of activated granulocytes were identified: 1) Low Activation (minimal phagocytosis, no oxidative burst), 2) Moderate Activation (moderate phagocytosis, some oxidative burst, but no co-localization of the two functional events), and 3) High Activation (high phagocytosis, high oxidative burst, co-localization of phagocytosis and oxidative burst). A fourth population that consisted of inactivated granulocytes was also identified. Using assay incubations of 10, 20, and 40-min the effect of assay incubation duration on the redistribution of activated granulocyte phenotypes was assessed. A fourth incubation was completed on ice as a control. By using serial time incubations, the assay may be able to able to detect how a treatment spatially affects granulocyte function. All samples were measured using an image-based flow cytometer equipped with a quantitative imaging (QI) option, autosampler, and multiple lasers (488, 642, and 785 nm). PMID:25591001

  7. Efficacy of granulocyte transfusions in the control of systemic candidiasis in the leukopenic host.

    PubMed

    Ruthe, R C; Andersen, B R; Cunningham, B L; Epstein, R B

    1978-09-01

    An experimental canine model was designed to evaluate the effect of granulocyte transfusions on systemic infection with Candida albicans in the granulocytopenic host. Each of a pair of dogs was rendered granulocytopenic with a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg body weight) and challenged with 10(6) Candida albicans organisms administered i.v. when granulocyte counts were less than or equal to 500/mm3. Granulocytes procured by leukofiltration were infused into six experimental dogs 1, 24, 48, and 72 hr after challenge with Candida. An average of 13 +/- 1.3 X 10(9) granulocytes were administered per infusion, producing an average 1-hr increment of 588 +/- 146 granulocytes/mm3 over the pretransfusion granulocyte count. Experimental and control dogs were killed 96 hr after challenge and organs examined grossly and by quantitative culture techniques to measure the extent of infection. All animals receiving granulocyte transfusions had significantly less tissue infection than nontransfused controls (p