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Sample records for polyomavirus bk large

  1. BK polyomavirus: emerging pathogen.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Shauna M; Broekema, Nicole M; Imperiale, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a small double-stranded DNA virus that is an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. BKPyV is widespread in the general population, but primarily causes disease when immune suppression leads to reactivation of latent virus. Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis in renal and bone marrow transplant patients, respectively, are the most common diseases associated with BKPyV reactivation and lytic infection. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance, effects on the host, virus life cycle, and current treatment protocols. PMID:22402031

  2. BK Polyomavirus Infection and Renourinary Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, J C; Randhawa, P; Rinaldo, C Hanssen; Drachenberg, C B; Alexiev, B; Hirsch, H H

    2016-02-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) infection represents a major problem in transplantation, particularly for renal recipients developing polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN). The possibility that BKPyV may also be oncogenic is not routinely considered. Twenty high-grade renourinary tumors expressing polyomavirus large T antigen in the entirety of the neoplasm in 19 cases, including the metastases in six, have been reported in transplant recipients with a history of PyVAN or evidence of BKPyV infection. Morphological and phenotypical features consistent with inactivation of the tumor suppressors pRB and p53 were found in the bladder tumors, suggesting a carcinogenesis mechanism involving the BKPyV large tumor oncoprotein/antigen. The pathogenesis of these tumors is unclear, but given the generally long interval between transplantation and tumor development, the risk for neoplasms after BKPyV infections may well be multifactorial. Other elements potentially implicated include exposure to additional exogenous carcinogens, further viral mutations, and cell genomic instability secondary to viral integration, as occurs with the Merkel cell PyV-associated carcinoma. The still scarce but increasingly reported association between longstanding PyVAN and renourinary neoplasms requires a concerted effort from the transplant community to better understand, diagnose, and treat the putative association between the BKPyV and these neoplasms. PMID:26731714

  3. Exposing the Molecular Machinery of BK Polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Buck, Christopher B

    2016-04-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is an opportunistic pathogen that poses a serious threat to organ transplant recipients. In this issue of Structure, Hurdiss and colleagues' (Hurdiss et al., 2016) beautiful new high-resolution cryo-EM reconstruction of BKV provides a structural roadmap for the ongoing development of therapeutic antibodies and vaccines targeting this potentially deadly virus. The study also serves as a platform for exploring the basic biology of virion assembly and infectious entry. PMID:27050683

  4. BK polyomavirus association with colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, M N; Nedjadi, T; Gari, M A; Al-Maghrabi, J A; Atta, H M; Basuni, A A; Elderwi, D A

    2016-01-01

    The development of human neoplasms can be provoked by exposure to one of several viruses. Burkitt lymphoma, cervical carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma are associated with Epstein-Barr, human papilloma, and hepatitis B virus infections, respectively. Over the past three decades, many studies have attempted to establish an association between colorectal cancer and viruses, with debatable results. The aim of the present research was to assess the presence of BK polyomavirus (BKV) DNA and protein in colorectal cancer samples from patients in the Western Province of Saudi Arabia. DNA extracted from archival samples of colorectal cancer tissues was analyzed for BKV sequences using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. In addition, expression of a BKV protein was assessed using immunohistochemical staining. None of the tumor and control samples examined tested positive for BKV DNA in PCR assays. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining failed to detect viral proteins in both cancer and control specimens. These results may indicate that BKV is not associated with the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma in patients in the Western Province of Saudi Arabia. PMID:27173319

  5. Genome Sequence of a Central Chimpanzee-Associated Polyomavirus Related to BK and JC Polyomaviruses, Pan troglodytes troglodytes Polyomavirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Madinda, Nadège F.; Robbins, Martha M.; Boesch, Christophe; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ehlers, Bernhard; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We amplified and sequenced the genome of a polyomavirus infecting a central chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes). This virus, which is closely related to BK and JC polyomaviruses, may help shed a new light on these human pathogens’ evolutionary history. PMID:26337874

  6. [Cytomegalovirus and BK polyomavirus infection after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Paolis, P; Gervasio, E; Tedesco, M; Favaro', A; Iappelli, M; Di Giulio, S

    2009-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and BK polyomavirus (BKV) infections have been described in a high percentage of renal transplant patients and are known to cause various complications in renal transplantation. They are closely related to immunosuppressive therapy and implicated in the progression of graft failure. This review focuses on the clinical aspects of CMV and BKV infection after renal transplantation, optimal monitoring, and recent preventive measures and interventions to improve graft function and recipient survival. PMID:19382094

  7. The Polyomavirus BK Large T-Antigen-Derived Peptide Elicits an HLA-DR Promiscuous and Polyfunctional CD4+ T-Cell Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswami, Bala; Popescu, Iulia; Macedo, Camila; Luo, Chunqing; Shapiro, Ron; Metes, Diana; Chalasani, Geetha; Randhawa, Parmjeet S.

    2011-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis are increasingly recognized causes of disease in renal and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, respectively. Functional characterization of the immune response to BKV is important for clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and vaccine design. A peptide mix (PepMix) and overlapping (OPP) or random (RPP) peptide pools derived from BKV large T antigen (LTA) were used to restimulate 14-day-expanded peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 27 healthy control subjects in gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. A T-cell response to LTA PepMix was detected in 15/27 subjects. A response was frequently observed with peptides derived from the helicase domain (9/15 subjects), while the DNA binding and host range domains were immunologically inert (0/15 subjects). For all nine subjects who responded to LTA peptide pools, the immune response could be explained largely by a 15-mer peptide designated P313. P313-specific CD4+ T-cell clones demonstrated (i) stringent LTA peptide specificity; (ii) promiscuous recognition in the context of HLA-DR alleles; (iii) cross recognition of homologous peptides from the polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40); (iv) an effector memory phenotype, CD107a expression, and intracellular production of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α); (v) cytotoxic activity in a chromium release assay; and (vi) the ability to directly present cognate antigen to autologous T cells. In conclusion, T-cell-mediated immunity to BKV in healthy subjects is associated with a polyfunctional population of CD4+ T cells with dual T-helper and T-cytotoxic properties. HLA class II promiscuity in antigen presentation makes the targeted LTA peptide sequence a suitable candidate for inclusion in immunotherapy protocols. PMID:21367979

  8. Polyomavirus BK-specific immunity after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Comoli, Patrizia; Azzi, Alberta; Maccario, Rita; Basso, Sabrina; Botti, Gerardo; Basile, Giancarlo; Fontana, Iris; Labirio, Massimo; Cometa, Angela; Poli, Francesca; Perfumo, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Ginevri, Fabrizio

    2004-10-27

    Failure to mount or maintain a protective immune response may influence the development of polyomavirus BK (BKV)-associated nephropathy (PVAN). However, limited data are so far available on BKV-specific immunity after kidney transplantation. BKV-specific cellular immune response was retrospectively analyzed in kidney recipients with or without BKV infection/reactivation by measuring the frequency of interferon (IFN)-gamma-secreting cells in peripheral blood. Patients with BKV-active infection and good renal function (n=6) had a mean BKV-specific lymphocyte frequency 2 log lower than healthy controls and in the same range as BKV-seropositive recipients without active infection (n=7). Patients with PVAN (n=5) revealed undetectable levels of BKV-specific cells. However, two patients from the latter cohort treated with immunosuppression reduction showed the emergence of specific immunity, with IFN-gamma production in the same range as healthy controls. Our preliminary data suggest that lack of protective immunity toward BKV may favor the occurrence of BKV active infection and influence the progression to PVAN. PMID:15502726

  9. The polyomavirus BK agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Unterstab, Gunhild; Gosert, Rainer; Leuenberger, David; Lorentz, Pascal; Rinaldo, Christine H; Hirsch, Hans H

    2010-04-10

    Agnoprotein encoded by human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a late cytoplasmic protein of 66 amino acids (aa) of unknown function. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a fine granular and a vesicular distribution in donut-like structures. Using BKV(Dunlop)-infected or agnoprotein-transfected cells, we investigated agnoprotein co-localization with subcellular structures. We found that agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets (LD) in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells as well as in other cells supporting BKV replication in vitro (UTA, Vero cells). Using agnoprotein-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion constructs, we demonstrate that agnoprotein aa 20-42 are required for targeting LD, whereas aa 1-20 or aa 42-66 were not. Agnoprotein aa 22-40 are predicted to form an amphipathic helix, and mutations A25D and F39E, disrupting its hydrophobic domain, prevented LD targeting. However, changing the phosphorylation site serine-11 to alanine or aspartic acid did not alter LD co-localization. Our findings provide new clues to unravel agnoprotein function. PMID:20138326

  10. The polyomavirus BK agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Unterstab, Gunhild; Gosert, Rainer; Leuenberger, David; Lorentz, Pascal; Rinaldo, Christine H.; Hirsch, Hans H.

    2010-04-10

    Agnoprotein encoded by human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a late cytoplasmic protein of 66 amino acids (aa) of unknown function. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a fine granular and a vesicular distribution in donut-like structures. Using BKV(Dunlop)-infected or agnoprotein-transfected cells, we investigated agnoprotein co-localization with subcellular structures. We found that agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets (LD) in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells as well as in other cells supporting BKV replication in vitro (UTA, Vero cells). Using agnoprotein-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion constructs, we demonstrate that agnoprotein aa 20-42 are required for targeting LD, whereas aa 1-20 or aa 42-66 were not. Agnoprotein aa 22-40 are predicted to form an amphipathic helix, and mutations A25D and F39E, disrupting its hydrophobic domain, prevented LD targeting. However, changing the phosphorylation site serine-11 to alanine or aspartic acid did not alter LD co-localization. Our findings provide new clues to unravel agnoprotein function.

  11. BK Polyomavirus Tubulointerstitial Nephritis With Urothelial Hyperplasia in a Kidney Transplant.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Miroslav; Crary, Gretchen S; Herrera Hernandez, Loren P

    2016-08-01

    Polyomavirus nephropathy is characterized histopathologically by evidence of viral replication and acute tubular injury with interstitial inflammation, tubulitis, and intranuclear inclusions. Polyomavirus nephropathy typically develops in the kidney transplant as a combination of the unique nature of the transplanted tissue and the immunomodulated status of the patient. We present a case in which a patient had lingering BK viremia and declining kidney function following receipt of lung and kidney transplants. A kidney biopsy was performed, which demonstrated BK polyomavirus tubulointerstitial nephritis, resultant cytopathic changes and tubular/ductal injury, associated urothelial hyperplasia with foci of squamous metaplasia, suspected membranous glomerulopathy, and moderate arterial/arteriolar sclerosis. There was also evidence of more proximal nephron viral involvement, with glomerular parietal epithelium infection and injury present. This case shows impressive BK polyomavirus-associated urothelial hyperplasia in the kidney, which to our knowledge has not been previously illustrated in the literature. There have been numerous studies attempting to show the association of polyomaviruses with the development of carcinoma, and this case report is significant because it is an example of viral-induced changes that are concerning and hold potential for malignant transformation. PMID:26992480

  12. Reactivation of BK polyomavirus in patients with multiple sclerosis receiving natalizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Roisin M; Carr, Michael J; De Gascun, Cillian F; Costelloe, Lisa F; Waters, Allison; Coughlan, Suzie; Duggan, Marguerite; Doyle, Katie; Jordan, Sinead; Hutchinson, Michael W; Hall, William W; Tubridy, Niall J

    2009-09-01

    Natalizumab therapy in multiple sclerosis has been associated with JC polyomavirus-induced progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy. We hypothesized that natalizumab may also lead to reactivation of BK, a related human polyomavirus capable of causing morbidity in immunosuppressed groups. Patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab were prospectively monitored for reactivation of BK virus in blood and urine samples, and for evidence of associated renal dysfunction. In this cohort, JC and BK DNA in blood and urine; cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in blood and urine; CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocyte counts and ratios in peripheral blood; and renal function were monitored at regular intervals. BK subtyping and noncoding control region sequencing was performed on samples demonstrating reactivation. Prior to commencement of natalizumab therapy, 3 of 36 patients with multiple sclerosis (8.3%) had BK viruria and BK reactivation occurred in 12 of 54 patients (22.2%). BK viruria was transient in 7, continuous in 2 patients, and persistent viruria was associated with transient viremia. Concomitant JC and CMV viral loads were undetectable. CD4:CD8 ratios fluctuated, but absolute CD4 counts did not fall below normal limits. In four of seven patients with BK virus reactivation, transient reductions in CD4 counts were observed at onset of BK viruria: these resolved in three of four patients on resuppression of BK replication. No renal dysfunction was observed in the cohort. BK virus reactivation can occur during natalizumab therapy; however, the significance in the absence of renal dysfunction is unclear. We propose regular monitoring for BK reactivation or at least for evidence of renal dysfunction in patients receiving natalizumab. PMID:19670070

  13. Anion homeostasis is important for non-lytic release of BK polyomavirus from infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Gareth L.; Caller, Laura G.; Foster, Victoria; Crump, Colin M.

    2015-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a member of a family of potentially oncogenic viruses, whose reactivation can cause severe pathological conditions in transplant patients, leading to graft rejection. As with many non-enveloped viruses, it is assumed that virus release occurs through lysis of the host cell. We now show the first evidence for a non-lytic release pathway for BKPyV and that this pathway can be blocked by the anion channel inhibitor DIDS. Our data show a dose-dependent effect of DIDS on the release of BKPyV virions. We also observed an accumulation of viral capsids in large LAMP-1-positive acidic organelles within the cytoplasm of cells upon DIDS treatment, suggesting potential late endosome or lysosome-related compartments are involved in non-lytic BKPyV release. These data highlight a novel mechanism by which polyomaviruses can be released from infected cells in an active and non-lytic manner, and that anion homeostasis regulation is important in this pathway. PMID:26246492

  14. Characterization of Immunodominant BK Polyomavirus 9mer Epitope T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Cioni, M; Leboeuf, C; Comoli, P; Ginevri, F; Hirsch, H H

    2016-04-01

    Uncontrolled BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and allograft loss. Reducing immunosuppression is associated with clearing viremia and nephropathy and increasing BKPyV-specific T cell responses in most patients; however, current immunoassays have limited sensitivity, target mostly CD4(+) T cells, and largely fail to predict onset and clearance of BKPyV replication. To characterize BKPyV-specific CD8(+) T cells, bioinformatics were used to predict 9mer epitopes in the early viral gene region (EVGR) presented by 14 common HLAs in Europe and North America. Thirty-nine EVGR epitopes were experimentally confirmed by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assays in at least 30% of BKPyV IgG-seropositive healthy participants. Most 9mers clustered in domains, and some were presented by more than one HLA class I, as typically seen for immunodominant epitopes. Specific T cell binding using MHC class I streptamers was demonstrated for 21 of 39 (54%) epitopes. In a prospective cohort of 118 pediatric KTRs, 19 patients protected or recovering from BKPyV viremia were experimentally tested, and 13 epitopes were validated. Single HLA mismatches were not associated with viremia, suggesting that failing immune control likely involves multiple factors including maintenance immunosuppression. Combining BKPyV load and T cell assays using immunodominant epitopes may help in evaluating risk and reducing immunosuppression and may lead to safe adoptive T cell transfer. PMID:26663765

  15. Disseminated BK type polyomavirus infection in an AIDS patient associated with central nervous system disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vallbracht, A.; Löhler, J.; Gossmann, J.; Glück, T.; Petersen, D.; Gerth, H. J.; Gencic, M.; Dörries, K.

    1993-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with hemophilia type A and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome developed a subacute meningoencephalitis, associated with a normotensive internal hydrocephalus, 14 weeks before his death. From cerebrospinal fluid and brain autopsy material, a virus could be isolated and was classified by Southern blot analysis and restriction endonuclease reactions as the human polyomavirus BK. The postmortem findings of polyomavirus antigen and BK virus DNA in various cell types of the kidneys, lungs, and central nervous system strongly suggest that BK virus was the causative agent of a tubulointerstitial nephropathy, an interstitial desquamative pneumonitis, and a subacute meningoencephalitis with accentuation of the ventricular and meningeal surfaces of the brain. Besides distinctive cytopathic effects, the presence of intranuclear inclusions was a prominent histopathological feature. Therefore, the human polyomavirus BK should be regarded as a new candidate on the still growing list of opportunistic pathogens in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8391217

  16. Simultaneous BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV)-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis after living donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Helanterä, Ilkka; Hirsch, Hans H; Wernli, Marion; Ortiz, Fernanda; Lempinen, Marko; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Auvinen, Eeva; Mannonen, Laura; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2016-03-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) commonly reactivates after kidney transplantation, and can cause polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN), whereas after allogeneic stem cell transplantation the most frequent manifestation of BKPyV is polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (PyVHC). Despite high-level BKPyV replication in both, the pathogenesis and manifestation of both BKPyV entities appears to differ substantially. We describe an unusual case of simultaneous PyVAN and PyVHC presenting with acute symptoms in a BKPyV-IgG positive recipient eight months after kidney transplantation from a haploidentical living donor, who was BKPyV-IgG negative. Symptoms of cystitis and viremia subsided rapidly after reduction of immunosuppression. PMID:26771744

  17. Antiviral Effects of Artesunate on Polyomavirus BK Replication in Primary Human Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Biswa Nath; Marschall, Manfred; Henriksen, Stian

    2014-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKV) causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN) and hemorrhagic cystitis (PyVHC) in renal and bone marrow transplant patients, respectively. Antiviral drugs with targeted activity against BKV are lacking. Since the antimalarial drug artesunate was recently demonstrated to have antiviral activity, the possible effects of artesunate on BKV replication in human primary renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs), the host cells in PyVAN, were explored. At 2 h postinfection (hpi), RPTECs were treated with artesunate at concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 80 μM. After one viral replication cycle (approximately 72 hpi), the loads of extracellular BKV DNA, reflecting viral progeny production, were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner. Artesunate at 10 μM reduced the extracellular BKV load by 65%; early large T antigen mRNA and protein expression by 30% and 75%, respectively; DNA replication by 73%; and late VP1 mRNA and protein expression by 47% and 64%, respectively. Importantly, the proliferation of RPTECs was also inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner. At 72 hpi, artesunate at 10 μM reduced cellular DNA replication by 68% and total metabolic activity by 47%. Cell impedance and lactate dehydrogenase measurements indicated a cytostatic but not a cytotoxic mechanism. Flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation revealed a decreased number of cells in S phase and suggested cell cycle arrest in G0 or G2 phase. Both the antiproliferative and antiviral effects of artesunate at 10 μM were reversible. Thus, artesunate inhibits BKV replication in RPTECs in a concentration-dependent manner by inhibiting BKV gene expression and genome replication. The antiviral mechanism appears to be closely connected to cytostatic effects on the host cell, underscoring the dependence of BKV on host cell proliferative functions. PMID:24145549

  18. Diffuse gastrointestinal bleeding and BK polyomavirus replication in a pediatric allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, M; Lautenschlager, I; Kardas, P; Auvinen, E; Mannonen, L; Huttunen, P; Taskinen, M; Vettenranta, K; Hirsch, H H

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at high risk of severe gastrointestinal bleeding caused by infections, graft versus host disease, and disturbances in haemostasis. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is known to cause hemorrhagic cystitis, but there is also evidence of BKV shedding in stool and its association with gastrointestinal disease. We report putative association of BKPyV replication with high plasma viral loads in a pediatric HSCT patient developing hemorrhagic cystitis and severe gastrointestinal bleeding necessitating intensive care. The observation was based on chart review and analysis of BKPyV DNA loads in plasma and urine as well as retrospective BKPyV-specific IgM and IgG measurements in weekly samples until three months post-transplant. The gastrointestinal bleeding was observed after a >100-fold increase in the plasma BKPyV loads and the start of hemorrhagic cystitis. The BKPyV-specific antibody response indicated past infection prior to transplantation, but increasing IgG titers were seen following BKPyV replication. The gastrointestinal biopsies were taken at a late stage of the episode and were no longer informative of BK polyomavirus involvement. In conclusion, gastrointestinal complications with bleeding are a significant problem after allogeneic HSCT to which viral infections including BKPyV may contribute. PMID:25542476

  19. Rapid detection of urinary polyomavirus BK by heterodyne-based surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li-Chen; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2014-01-01

    In renal transplant patients, immunosuppressive therapy may result in the reactivation of polyomavirus BK (BKV), leading to polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN), which inevitably causes allograft failure. Since the treatment outcomes of PVAN remain unsatisfactory, early identification and continuous monitoring of BKV reactivation and reduction of immunosuppressants are essential to prevent PVAN development. The present study demonstrated that the developed dual-channel heterodyne-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is applicable for the rapid detection of urinary BKV. The use of a symmetrical reference channel integrated with the poly(ethylene glycol)-based low-fouling self-assembled monolayer to reduce the environmental variations and the nonspecific noise was proven to enhance the sensitivity in urinary BKV detection. Experimentally, the detection limit of the biosensor for BKV detection was estimated to be around 8500 copies/mL. In addition, urine samples from five renal transplant patients were tested to rapidly distinguish PVAN-positive and PVAN-negative renal transplant patients. By virtue of its simplicity, rapidity, and applicability, the SPR biosensor is a remarkable potential to be used for continuous clinical monitoring of BKV reactivation.

  20. The association between polyomavirus BK strains and BKV viruria in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Robert Y. L.; Li, Yi-Jung; Lee, Wei-Chen; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lin, Chan-Yu; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yung-Chang; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2016-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a polyomavirus that cause of allograft dysfunction among kidney transplant recipients. The role of BKV infection in non-renal solid organ transplant recipients is not well understood neither for the relationship between various BKV strains with occurrence of BKV viral viruria. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of BKV infection and identified of BKV various strains in the urine of liver transplant recipients. There was not significant difference of renal outcome between high BKV viruria and low BKV viruria in the liver transplant recipients. The WW-non-coding control region (NCCR) BKV detected in urine was associated with higher urinary BKV load, whereas the Dunlop-NCCR BKV was detected in the urine of low urinary BKV load. An in vitro cultivation system demonstrated that WW-BKV strain exhibiting the higher viral DNA replication efficiency and higher BKV load. Altogether, this is the first study to demonstrate the impact of BKV strains on the occurrence of BK viruria in the liver transplant recipients. PMID:27338010

  1. The association between polyomavirus BK strains and BKV viruria in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Y L; Li, Yi-Jung; Lee, Wei-Chen; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lin, Chan-Yu; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yung-Chang; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2016-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a polyomavirus that cause of allograft dysfunction among kidney transplant recipients. The role of BKV infection in non-renal solid organ transplant recipients is not well understood neither for the relationship between various BKV strains with occurrence of BKV viral viruria. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of BKV infection and identified of BKV various strains in the urine of liver transplant recipients. There was not significant difference of renal outcome between high BKV viruria and low BKV viruria in the liver transplant recipients. The WW-non-coding control region (NCCR) BKV detected in urine was associated with higher urinary BKV load, whereas the Dunlop-NCCR BKV was detected in the urine of low urinary BKV load. An in vitro cultivation system demonstrated that WW-BKV strain exhibiting the higher viral DNA replication efficiency and higher BKV load. Altogether, this is the first study to demonstrate the impact of BKV strains on the occurrence of BK viruria in the liver transplant recipients. PMID:27338010

  2. New Structural Insights into the Genome and Minor Capsid Proteins of BK Polyomavirus using Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurdiss, Daniel L.; Morgan, Ethan L.; Thompson, Rebecca F.; Prescott, Emma L.; Panou, Margarita M.; Macdonald, Andrew; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BK polyomavirus is the causative agent of several diseases in transplant patients and the immunosuppressed. In order to better understand the structure and life cycle of BK, we produced infectious virions and VP1-only virus-like particles in cell culture, and determined their three-dimensional structures using cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and single-particle image processing. The resulting 7.6-Å resolution structure of BK and 9.1-Å resolution of the virus-like particles are the highest-resolution cryo-EM structures of any polyomavirus. These structures confirm that the architecture of the major structural protein components of these human polyomaviruses are similar to previous structures from other hosts, but give new insight into the location and role of the enigmatic minor structural proteins, VP2 and VP3. We also observe two shells of electron density, which we attribute to a structurally ordered part of the viral genome, and discrete contacts between this density and both VP1 and the minor capsid proteins. PMID:26996963

  3. Brincidofovir (CMX001) Inhibits BK Polyomavirus Replication in Primary Human Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tylden, Garth D.; Hirsch, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV)-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (PyVHC) complicates 5 to 15% of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. Targeted antivirals are still unavailable. Brincidofovir (BCV; previously CMX001) has shown inhibitory activity against diverse viruses, including BKPyV in a primary human renal tubule cell culture model of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy. We investigated the effects of BCV in BKPyV-infected and uninfected primary human urothelial cells (HUCs), the target cells of BKPyV in PyVHC. The BCV concentrations causing 50 and 90% reductions (EC50 and EC90) in the number of intracellular BKPyV genome equivalents per cell (icBKPyV) were 0.27 μM and 0.59 μM, respectively. At 0.63 μM, BCV reduced viral late gene expression by 90% and halted progeny release. Preinfection treatment for only 24 h reduced icBKPyV similarly to treatment from 2 to 72 h postinfection, while combined pre- and postinfection treatment suppressed icBKPyV completely. After investigating BCV's effects on HUC viability, mean selectivity indices at 50 and 90% inhibition (SI50 and SI90) calculated for cellular DNA replication were 2.7 and 2.9, respectively, those for mitochondrial activity were 8.9 and 10.4, those for total ATP were 8.6 and 8.2, and those for membrane integrity were 25.9 and 16.7. The antiviral and cytostatic effects, but less so the cytotoxic effects, were inversely related to cell density. The cytotoxic effects at concentrations of ≥10 μM were rapid and likely related to BCV's lipid moiety. After carefully defining the antiviral, cytostatic, and cytotoxic properties of BCV in HUCs, we conclude that a preemptive or prophylactic approach in PyVHC is likely to give the best results. PMID:25801568

  4. Determining the Solar Inactivation Rate of BK Polyomavirus by Molecular Beacon.

    PubMed

    Reano, Dane C; Yates, Marylynn V

    2016-07-01

    The application of molecular beacons (MB) that bind to precise sequences of mRNA provides a near-universal approach in detecting evidence of viral replication. Here, we demonstrate the detection of BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV), an emerging indicator of microbiological water quality, by a quantum dot-based MB. The MB allowed us to rapidly characterize the inactivation rate of BKPyV following exposure to a solar simulator (kobs = 0.578 ± 0.024 h(-1), R(2) = 0.92). Results were validated through a traditional cell-culture assay with immunofluorescence detection (kobs = 0.568 ± 0.011 h(-1), R(2) = 0.97), which exhibited a strong correlation to MB data (R(2) = 0.93). Obtaining solar inactivation rates for BKPyV demonstrates the first use of a MB in characterizing a microbiological inactivation profile and helps assess the appropriateness of adopting BKPyV as an indicator organism for water quality. PMID:27269231

  5. Clinical polyomavirus BK variants with agnogene deletion are non-functional but rescued by trans-complementation

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, Marit Renee; Olsen, Gunn-Hege; Gosert, Rainer; Hirsch, Hans H.; Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen

    2010-03-01

    High-level replication of polyomavirus BK (BKV) in kidney transplant recipients is associated with the emergence of BKV variants with rearranged (rr) non-coding control region (NCCR) increasing viral early gene expression and cytopathology. Cloning and sequencing revealed the presence of a BKV quasispecies which included non-functional variants when assayed in a recombinant virus assay. Here we report that the rr-NCCR of BKV variants RH-3 and RH-12, both bearing a NCCR deletion including the 5' end of the agnoprotein coding sequence, mediated early and late viral reporter gene expression in kidney cells. However, in a recombinant virus they failed to produce infectious progeny despite large T-antigen and VP1 expression and the formation of nuclear virus-like particles. Infectious progeny was generated when the agnogene was reconstructed in cis or agnoprotein provided in trans from a co-existing BKV rr-NCCR variant. We conclude that complementation can rescue non-functional BKV variants in vitro and possibly in vivo.

  6. Efficient uptake of blood-borne BK and JC polyomavirus-like particles in endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and renal vasa recta.

    PubMed

    Simon-Santamaria, Jaione; Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen; Kardas, Piotr; Li, Ruomei; Malovic, Ivana; Elvevold, Kjetil; McCourt, Peter; Smedsrød, Bård; Hirsch, Hans H; Sørensen, Karen Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are specialized scavenger cells that mediate high-capacity clearance of soluble waste macromolecules and colloid material, including blood-borne adenovirus. To explore if LSECs function as a sink for other viruses in blood, we studied the fate of virus-like particles (VLPs) of two ubiquitous human DNA viruses, BK and JC polyomavirus, in mice. Like complete virions, VLPs specifically bind to receptors and enter cells, but unlike complete virions, they cannot replicate. 125I-labeled VLPs were used to assess blood decay, organ-, and hepatocellular distribution of ligand, and non-labeled VLPs to examine cellular uptake by immunohisto- and -cytochemistry. BK- and JC-VLPs rapidly distributed to liver, with lesser uptake in kidney and spleen. Liver uptake was predominantly in LSECs. Blood half-life (∼1 min), and tissue distribution of JC-VLPs and two JC-VLP-mutants (L55F and S269F) that lack sialic acid binding affinity, were similar, indicating involvement of non-sialic acid receptors in cellular uptake. Liver uptake was not mediated by scavenger receptors. In spleen, the VLPs localized to the red pulp marginal zone reticuloendothelium, and in kidney to the endothelial lining of vasa recta segments, and the transitional epithelium of renal pelvis. Most VLP-positive vessels in renal medulla did not express PV-1/Meca 32, suggesting location to the non-fenestrated part of vasa recta. The endothelial cells of these vessels also efficiently endocytosed a scavenger receptor ligand, formaldehyde-denatured albumin, suggesting high endocytic activity compared to other renal endothelia. We conclude that LSECs very effectively cleared a large fraction of blood-borne BK- and JC-VLPs, indicating a central role of these cells in early removal of polyomavirus from the circulation. In addition, we report the novel finding that a subpopulation of endothelial cells in kidney, the main organ of polyomavirus persistence, showed selective and

  7. No detection of BK virus, JC virus, KI, WU and Merkel cell polyomaviruses in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurological complications after hematopoetic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Giraud, G; Priftakis, P; Wide, K; Gustafsson, B; Ramqvist, T; Dalianis, T

    2011-10-01

    Neurological complications, often due to viral reactivation, after allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are associated with increased mortality. Here, cerebrospinal fluid from 20 HSCT patients with neurological symptoms were analyzed and found to be negative by PCR for BK virus, JC virus, KI, WU and Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA. PMID:21965766

  8. New insights on the association between the prostate cancer and the small DNA tumour virus, BK polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Mauro; Provenzano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the scientific literature in the field of the prostate carcinoma (PCa) pointed out on the genetic heterogeneity and mutations occurring in this tumour, while little attention was given to the causes of PCa onset, in particular infectious agents. In this brief commentary, we wish to point out recent advancements done on the role of the human polyomavirus BK (BKPyV) in the development of PCa by harnessing both humoral and cellular immune responses. Altogether, these new insights suggest that BKPyV is involved in the transforming activity during the multistep process of PCa development. Although these findings do not provide evidence for a causal relationship between BKPyV and PCa development, additional investigations with novel techniques will help to make it a concrete event. PMID:26699530

  9. Investigation of human urine for genomic sequences of the primate polyomaviruses simian virus 40, BK virus, and JC virus.

    PubMed

    Shah, K V; Daniel, R W; Strickler, H D; Goedert, J J

    1997-12-01

    Recent reports of the detection of simian virus 40 (SV40) nucleotide sequences in ependymomas, choroid plexus tumors, osteosarcomas, and mesotheliomas have raised the possibility that SV40, which naturally infects Asian macaques, is circulating among humans. This possibility was examined by performing polymerase chain reaction assays on urine samples of 166 homosexual men, 88 of them human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive, for genomic sequences of SV40 as well as of human polyomaviruses BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV). Tests with masked urine specimens spiked with SV40-transformed cells were included to monitor the SV40 assay. SV40, BKV, and JCV sequences were identified, respectively, in 0, 14%, and 34% of the urine specimens. JCV viruria was far more common (37%) than BKV viruria (5%) in HIV-seronegative persons. HIV infection and more severe immunosuppression were associated with a higher frequency of BKV viruria. In summary, SV40 viruria was not detected among homosexual men who shed human polyomaviruses at a high frequency. PMID:9395377

  10. Human polyomaviruses JC and BK in the urine of Brazilian children and adolescents vertically infected by HIV.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daisy Maria; Fink, Maria Cristina; Pannuti, Cláudio Sérgio; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes; Machado, Alessandra Aparecida; Carmo, Fabiana Bononi do; Gouvêa, Aída de Fátima Barbosa; Urbano, Paulo Roberto; Beltrão, Suenia Vasconcelos; Santos, Isabel Cristina Lopes dos; Machado, Clarisse Martins

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the urinary excretion of the BK (BKV) and JC (JCV) human polyomaviruses in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and adolescents. One hundred and fifty-six patients were enrolled: Group I included 116 HIV-infected children and adolescents [median age = 11.4 years (y); range 1-22 y]; Group II included 40 non-HIV-infected healthy controls (median age = 11.37 y; range 7-16 y). Single urine samples from both groups were screened for the presence of JCV and BKV DNA by polymerase chain reaction at enrolment. The overall rate of JCV and BKV urinary excretion was found to be 24.4% and 40.4%, respectively (n = 156). Group I had urinary excretion of JCV and BKV in 27.6% and 54.3% of subjects, respectively. In contrast, Group II showed positive results for JCV in 17.5% of subjects and for BKV in 12.5% of subjects (p Pearson JCV = 0.20; p Pearson BKV < 0.0001). In Group I, there was no association between JCV/BKV shedding and age, gender or CD4 values. Patients with an HIV viral load < 50 copies/mL had a lower excretion of BKV (p < 0.001) and a trend of lower JCV excretion (p = 0.07). One patient in Group I (1/116, 0.9%) showed clinical and radiological features consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, suggesting that children with HIV/polyomavirus coinfection should be kept under surveillance. PMID:22241113

  11. Distinct BK polyomavirus non-coding control region (NCCR) variants in oral fluids of HIV- associated Salivary Gland Disease patients.

    PubMed

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Ramsey, Kathy J; Dolittle-Hall, Janet M; Seaman, William T; Jeffers-Francis, Liesl K; Tesfu, Daniel; Nickeleit, Volker; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    HIV-associated Salivary Gland Disease (HIVSGD) is among the most common salivary gland-associated complications in HIV positive individuals and was associated with the small DNA tumorvirus BK polyomavirus (BKPyV). The BKPyV non-coding control region (NCCR) is the main determinant of viral replication and rearranges readily. This study analyzed the BKPyV NCCR architecture and viral loads of 35 immunosuppressed individuals. Throatwash samples from subjects diagnosed with HIVSGD and urine samples from transplant patients were BKPyV positive and yielded BKPyV NCCR sequences. 94.7% of the BKPyV HIVSGD NCCRs carried a rearranged OPQPQQS block arrangement, suggesting a distinct architecture among this sample set. BKPyV from HIV positive individuals without HIVSGD harbored NCCR block sequences that were distinct from OPQPQQS. Cloned HIVSGD BKPyV isolates displayed active promoters and efficient replication capability in human salivary gland cells. The unique HIVSGD NCCR architecture may represent a potentially significant oral-tropic BKPyV substrain. PMID:27085139

  12. Noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Chen, Wen-fang; Wang, Chang-xi; Fei, Ji-guang; Deng, Su-xiong; Qiu, Jiang; Chen, Li-zhong

    2013-03-01

    Noninvasive methods can facilitate early diagnosis of BK virus (BKV) replication and guide the evaluation of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN). We developed 3 noninvasive methods for BKVAN screening including quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for BKV DNA load in urine and plasma, and quantitative assay of urine cytology by light microscopy or electron microscopy, and used these assays concurrently with renal transplant biopsies for the evaluation of 338 patients. BKVAN was diagnosed in 24 (7.1%) of 338 renal recipients. The median level of the 3 methods was the highest in pattern B of BKVAN (P < 0.05). Using these 3 methods for pattern B of BKVAN yielded a high sensitivity of 100%. Using decoy cells without quantitation had a sensitivity of 95.8% and a specificity of 83.1% for BKVAN. The amount of decoy cells in urine samples was related to BKV DNAuria, BKV DNAemia, and the pattern of BKVAN. Using a decoy cell threshold of >5 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) had an ideal sensitivity and specificity for high-risk BKVAN and BKVAN. Using a decoy cell threshold of >20 per 10 HPF for BKVAN had a specificity of 99.7%. Quantitative assay of urine cytology is a very convenient and sensitive method for diagnosis of BKVAN, which can be deemed as an additional diagnostic method for quantitative PCR screening with increased accuracy. PMID:23276771

  13. Detection of Recently Discovered Human Polyomaviruses in a Longitudinal Kidney Transplant Cohort.

    PubMed

    Bialasiewicz, S; Rockett, R J; Barraclough, K A; Leary, D; Dudley, K J; Isbel, N M; Sloots, T P

    2016-09-01

    A large number of human polyomaviruses have been discovered in the last 7 years. However, little is known about the clinical impact on vulnerable immunosuppressed patient populations. Blood, urine, and respiratory swabs collected from a prospective, longitudinal adult kidney transplant cohort (n = 167) generally pre-operatively, at day 4, months 1, 3, and 6 posttransplant, and at BK viremic episodes within the first year were screened for 12 human polyomaviruses using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Newly discovered polyomaviruses were most commonly detected in the respiratory tract, with persistent shedding seen for up to 6 months posttransplant. Merkel cell polyomavirus was the most common detection, but was not associated with clinical symptoms or subsequent development of skin cancer or other skin abnormalities. In contrast, KI polyomavirus was associated with respiratory disease in a subset of patients. Human polyomavirus 9, Malawi polyomavirus, and human polyomavirus 12 were not detected in any patient samples. PMID:27000433

  14. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  15. Polyomavirus large T antigen is prevalent in urothelial carcinoma post-kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ling; Salama, Mohamed E; Lanciault, Christian; Matsumura, Linh; Troxell, Megan L

    2016-02-01

    Viral pathogens have been associated with both infectious disease and neoplasia in transplant recipients. Polyomavirus is emerging as a potential causative agent for genitourinary tract cancer in post-kidney transplant patients. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a proven role in squamous cancers, but has not been studied in genitourinary malignancies in transplantation. Of 2345 kidney transplants performed at our center over the past 20 years, we identified 16 patients with 20 genitourinary cancers (0.7%), including 13 bladder/ureter carcinomas, 5 renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), and 2 prostate carcinomas. We performed immunohistochemical staining for polyomavirus large T antigen and p16, followed by in situ hybridization for HPV in p16+ cases. Four cases of high-grade invasive urothelial bladder carcinomas were positive for large T. Large T+ urothelial carcinomas developed at least 8 years posttransplant in young men, 3 with history of BK polyoma viremia, 2 of whom had native kidney failure due to reflux/obstruction. In situ hybridization for high-risk HPV was negative in all tested cases. Overall, 3 patients died of carcinoma. All 5 RCCs were negative for both large T and p16; 2 prostate cancers were p16 negative and p16+/HPV negative, respectively. Thus, our study shows a relatively high prevalence of large T antigen in urothelial carcinoma in kidney transplant patients (31%), but not in RCC. Although sample size is small, young patients with obstructive disease may be at particular risk for developing large T-positive urothelial carcinoma. Overall, our data further support the necessities of long-term cancer surveillance for renal transplant patients. PMID:26615524

  16. High diversity of human polyomaviruses in environmental and clinical samples in Argentina: Detection of JC, BK, Merkel-cell, Malawi, and human 6 and 7 polyomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina; Barrios, Melina Elizabeth; Cammarata, Robertina Viviana; Cisterna, Daniel Marcelo; Estrada, Tatiana; Martini Novas, Sergio; Cahn, Pedro; Blanco Fernández, María Dolores; Mbayed, Viviana Andrea

    2016-01-15

    New human polyomaviruses have been recently described. The aim of this work was to detect and characterize human polyomaviruses circulating in Argentina by recovering viruses from environmental and sewage samples and evaluating their potential role as viral indicators of human waste contamination. Analysis was performed in a wider context including viruses from clinical samples from an immunocompromised population. River water and sewage samples were analyzed as a strategy to study the molecular epidemiology of viruses excreted by millions of people. Samples belonged to the Matanza-Riachuelo River (2005-2006: n=25 and 2012: n=20) and sewage from Buenos Aires city and suburbs (2011 and 2013: n=24). Viral detection was performed by PCR and the amplified viral genomes were characterized by phylogenetic analysis. Polyomaviruses were detected in 95.8% of sewage samples, identifying BKPyV (87.5%), JCPyV (83.3%), MCPyV (8.3%) and HPyV6 (8.3%). Besides, one sample collected in 2009 resulted positive for HPyV7. In 2005-2006, polyomaviruses were detected in 84.0% of river water samples, with the highest detection for MCPyV (52.0%), followed by BKPyV (44.0%), JCPyV (20.0%) and MWPyV (4.0%). In 2012, polyomaviruses were detected in 85.0% of river samples, finding JCPyV (85.0%), BKPyV (75.0%), MCPyV (25.0%) and HPyV6 (25.0%). Also, polyomaviruses, including JCPyV, BKPyV and MCPyV, were detected in 63.2% of urine samples from patients infected with HIV (n=19). Characterization indicated the coexistence of different genotypes and variants for each virus, particularly in sewage. MCPyV sequences (the only sequences from Argentina) formed a monophyletic group with the single sequence available for South America (French Guiana). The high level of detection and viral diversity found by environmental surveillance, which involved the characterization of viruses not previously described in South America, reinforces the usefulness of this approach to monitor viral contamination and

  17. Polyomavirus-associated nephritis in 2 horses.

    PubMed

    Jennings, S H; Wise, A G; Nickeleit, V; Maes, R K; Cianciolo, R E; Del Piero, F; Law, J M; Kim, Y; McCalla, A C; Breuhaus, B A; Roberts, M C; Linder, K E

    2013-09-01

    Polyomaviruses produce latent and asymptomatic infections in many species, but productive and lytic infections are rare. In immunocompromised humans, polyomaviruses can cause tubulointerstitial nephritis, demyelination, or meningoencephalitis in the central nervous system and interstitial pneumonia. This report describes 2 Standardbred horses with tubular necrosis and tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with productive equine polyomavirus infection that resembles BK polyomavirus nephropathy in immunocompromised humans. PMID:23381926

  18. Sp1 Sites in the Noncoding Control Region of BK Polyomavirus Are Key Regulators of Bidirectional Viral Early and Late Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bethge, Tobias; Hachemi, Helen A.; Manzetti, Julia; Gosert, Rainer; Schaffner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In kidney transplant patients with BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) nephropathy, viral variants arise bearing rearranged noncoding control regions (rr-NCCRs) that increase viral early gene expression, replicative fitness, and cytopathology. rr-NCCRs result from various deletions and duplications of archetype NCCR (ww-NCCR) sequences, which alter transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). However, the role of specific TFBS is unclear. We inactivated 28 TFBS in the archetype NCCR by selective point mutations and examined viral gene expression in bidirectional reporter constructs. Compared to the archetype, group 1 mutations increased viral early gene expression similar to rr-NCCR and resulted from inactivating one Sp1 or one Ets1 TFBS near the late transcription start site (TSS). Group 2 mutations conferred intermediate early gene activation and affected NF1, YY1, and p53 sites between early and late TSS. Group 3 mutations decreased early and late gene expression and included two other Sp1 sites near the early TSS. Recombinant viruses bearing group 1 NCCRs showed increased replication in human renal epithelial cells similar to clinical rr-NCCR variants. Group 2 and 3 viruses showed intermediate or no replication, respectively. A literature search revealed unnoticed group 1 mutations in BKPyV nephropathy, hemorrhagic cystitis, and disseminated disease. IMPORTANCE The NCCRs of polyomaviruses mediate silent persistence of the viral genome as well as the appropriately timed (re)activation of the viral life cycle. This study indicates that the basal BKPyV NCCR is critically controlled by a hierarchy of single TFBS in the archetype NCCR that direct, modulate, and execute the bidirectional early and late viral gene expression. The results provide new insights into how BKPyV NCCR functions as a viral sensor of host cell signals and shed new light on how transcription factors like Sp1 control bidirectional viral gene expression and contribute to replication and pathology

  19. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  20. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Singh, Aditya K.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated K+ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. PMID:22584144

  1. Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Cristina; Cavallo, Rossana

    2012-01-01

    Polyomaviruses BK and JC are ubiquitous viruses with high seroprevalence rates in general population. Following primary infection, polyomaviruses BK and JC persist latently in different sites, particularly in the reno-urinary tract. Reactivation from latency may occur in normal subjects with asymptomatic viruria, while it can be associated to nephropathy (PVAN) in kidney transplantat recipients. PVAN may occur in 1%-10% of renal transplant patients with loss of the transplanted organ in 30% up to 80% of the cases. Etiology of PVAN is mainly attributable to BK virus, although approximately 5% of the cases may be due to JC. Pathogenesis of PVAN is still unknown, although viral replication and the lack of immune control play a major role. Immunosuppression represents the condicio sine qua non for the development of PVAN and the modulation of anti-rejection treatment represents the first line of intervention, given the lack of specific antiviral agents. At moment, an appropriate immunemodulation can only be accomplished by early identification of viral reactivacation by evaluation of polyomavirus load on serum and/or urine specimens, particularly in the first year post-trasplantation. Viro-immunological monitoring of specific cellular immune response could be useful to identify patients unable to recover cellular immunity posttransplantation, that are at higher risk of viral reactivation with development of PVAN. Herein, the main features of polyomaviruses BK and JC, biological properties, clinical characteristics, etiopathogenesis, monitoring and diagnosing of PVAN will be described and discussed, with an extended citation of related relevant literature data. PMID:24175200

  2. Survey for human polyomaviruses in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toptan, Tuna; Yousem, Samuel A.; Ho, Jonhan; Matsushima, Yuki; Stabile, Laura P.; Fernández-Figueras, Maria-Teresa; Bhargava, Rohit; Ryo, Akihide; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 8 years, the discovery of 11 new human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) has revived interest in this DNA tumor virus family. Although HPyV infection is widespread and largely asymptomatic, one of these HPyVs, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), is a bona fide human tumor virus. JC virus (JCV), BK virus, HPyV7, and trichodysplasia-spinulosa virus (TSV) can cause nonneoplastic diseases in the setting of immunosuppression. Few specific reagents are available to study the biology of the newly discovered HPyVs. We developed a pan-HPyV-screening method using a cocktail of 3 antibodies that, when combined, recognize T antigen proteins of all HPyVs. We validated detection characteristics of the antibody cocktail by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry and screened 1,184 cases, including well-defined diseases and tumor tissue microarrays. This assay robustly detected MCV, TSV, JCV, and HPyV7 in etiologically related diseases. We further identified WU polyomavirus in a case of chronic lymphocytic lymphoma-associated bronchitis. Except for scattered, incidentally infected cells in 5% of lung squamous cell carcinomas and colon adenocarcinomas, a broad panel of tumor tissues was largely negative for infection by any HPyV. This method eliminates known HPyVs as suspected causes of cancers investigated in this study. Pan-HPyV survey can be applied to identify diseases associated with recently discovered polyomaviruses. PMID:27034991

  3. Human Polyomaviruses in Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Ludvigsen, Maria; Van Ghelue, Marijke

    2011-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small, nonenveloped viruses with a circular double-stranded DNA genome of ∼5,000 base pairs protected by an icosahedral protein structure. So far, members of this family have been identified in birds and mammals. Until 2006, BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), and simian virus 40 (SV40) were the only polyomaviruses known to circulate in the human population. Their occurrence in individuals was mainly confirmed by PCR and the presence of virus-specific antibodies. Using the same methods, lymphotropic polyomavirus, originally isolated in monkeys, was recently shown to be present in healthy individuals although with much lower incidence than BKV, JCV, and SV40. The use of advanced high-throughput sequencing and improved rolling circle amplification techniques have identified the novel human polyomaviruses KI, WU, Merkel cell polyomavirus, HPyV6, HPyV7, trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus, and HPyV9. The skin tropism of human polyomaviruses and their dermatopathologic potentials are the focus of this paper. PMID:21941687

  4. Comparing Phylogenetic Codivergence between Polyomaviruses and Their Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Christensen, Ryan G.; McClellan, David A.; Adams, Byron J.; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Demma, James C.; Crandall, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Seventy-two full genomes corresponding to nine mammalian (67 strains) and two avian (5 strains) polyomavirus species were analyzed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods of phylogenetic inference. Our fully resolved and well-supported (bootstrap proportions > 90%; posterior probabilities = 1.0) trees separate the bird polyomaviruses (avian polyomavirus and goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus) from the mammalian polyomaviruses, which supports the idea of spitting the genus into two subgenera. Such a split is also consistent with the different viral life strategies of each group. Simian (simian virus 40, simian agent 12 [Sa12], and lymphotropic polyomavirus) and rodent (hamster polyomavirus, mouse polyomavirus, and murine pneumotropic polyomavirus [MPtV]) polyomaviruses did not form monophyletic groups. Using our best hypothesis of polyomavirus evolutionary relationships and established host phylogenies, we performed a cophylogenetic reconciliation analysis of codivergence. Our analyses generated six optimal cophylogenetic scenarios of coevolution, including 12 codivergence events (P < 0.01), suggesting that Polyomaviridae coevolved with their avian and mammal hosts. As individual lineages, our analyses showed evidence of host switching in four terminal branches leading to MPtV, bovine polyomavirus, Sa12, and BK virus, suggesting a combination of vertical and horizontal transfer in the evolutionary history of the polyomaviruses. PMID:16731904

  5. Airway Hydration, Apical K(+) Secretion, and the Large-Conductance, Ca(2+)-activated and Voltage-dependent Potassium (BK) Channel.

    PubMed

    Kis, Adrian; Krick, Stefanie; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Large-conductance, calcium-activated, and voltage-gated K(+) (BK) channels are expressed in many tissues of the human body, where they play important roles in signaling not only in excitable but also in nonexcitable cells. Because BK channel properties are rendered in part by their association with four β and four γ subunits, their channel function can differ drastically, depending on in which cellular system they are expressed. Recent studies verify the importance of apically expressed BK channels for airway surface liquid homeostasis and therefore of their significant role in mucociliary clearance. Here, we review evidence that inflammatory cytokines, which contribute to airway diseases, can lead to reduced BK activity via a functional down-regulation of the γ regulatory subunit LRRC26. Therefore, manipulation of LRRC26 and pharmacological opening of BK channels represent two novel concepts of targeting epithelial dysfunction in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:27115952

  6. Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen has growth-promoting and inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G; Nghiem, Paul; DeCaprio, James A

    2013-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  7. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Has Growth-Promoting and Inhibitory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  8. Regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    BK (large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium) channels are important determinants of physiological control in the nervous, endocrine and vascular systems with channel dysfunction associated with major disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. Thus the mechanisms that control channel surface expression and/or activity are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. BK channels are S-acylated (palmitoylated) at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus of the pore-forming α-subunit. Palmitoylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas palmitoylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. Recent studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic insights into how palmitoylation controls channel trafficking and cross-talk with phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways. Intriguingly, each site of palmitoylation is regulated by distinct zDHHCs (palmitoyl acyltransferases) and APTs (acyl thioesterases). This supports that different mechanisms may control substrate specificity by zDHHCs and APTs even within the same target protein. As palmitoylation is dynamically regulated, this fundamental post-translational modification represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:23356260

  9. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    SciTech Connect

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  10. Polyoma (BK) virus associated urothelial carcinoma originating within a renal allograft five years following resolution of polyoma virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Steven P; Myers-Gurevitch, Patricia M; Chu, Stacy; Robinson, Brian D; Dadhania, Darshana; Seshan, Surya V

    2016-03-01

    A direct role for BK polyomavirus infection in malignant tumors of renal allografts and urinary tract is emerging. Case reports suggest a link between BK virus (BKV) reactivation and development of malignancy in renal allograft recipients. Herein we describe the first case of BKV positive invasive urothelial carcinoma within the renal allograft, presenting with chronic diarrhea and weight loss 5 years following resolution of BK viremia/nephropathy (BKVN). Unique to our case was the remote history of BK viremia/BKVN, rising titer of anti-HLA antibody and presence of renal limited urothelial carcinoma with microinvasion of malignant cells staining positive for SV40 large T antigen (T-Ag). These findings suggest that persistence of subclinical BKV infection within the renal allograft may play a role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. Patients with history of BKVN may be at risk for kidney and urinary tract malignancy despite resolution of BK viremia/BKVN. PMID:26709521

  11. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  12. S-acylation dependent post-translational cross-talk regulates large conductance calcium- and voltage- activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms that control surface expression and/or activity of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. Indeed, BK channel dysfunction is associated with major human disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. S-acylation (S-palmitoylation) represents a major reversible, post-translational modification controlling the properties and function of many proteins including ion channels. Recent evidence reveals that both pore-forming and regulatory subunits of BK channels are S-acylated and control channel trafficking and regulation by AGC-family protein kinases. The pore-forming α-subunit is S-acylated at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus, each site being regulated by different palmitoyl acyl transferases (zDHHCs) and acyl thioesterases (APTs). S-acylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas S-acylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. S-acylation of the regulatory β4-subunit controls ER exit and surface expression of BK channels but does not affect ion channel kinetics at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a significant number of previously identified BK-channel interacting proteins have been shown, or are predicted to be, S-acylated. Thus, the BK channel multi-molecular signaling complex may be dynamically regulated by this fundamental post-translational modification and thus S-acylation likely represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:25140154

  13. S-acylation dependent post-translational cross-talk regulates large conductance calcium- and voltage- activated potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Shipston, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms that control surface expression and/or activity of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. Indeed, BK channel dysfunction is associated with major human disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. S-acylation (S-palmitoylation) represents a major reversible, post-translational modification controlling the properties and function of many proteins including ion channels. Recent evidence reveals that both pore-forming and regulatory subunits of BK channels are S-acylated and control channel trafficking and regulation by AGC-family protein kinases. The pore-forming α-subunit is S-acylated at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus, each site being regulated by different palmitoyl acyl transferases (zDHHCs) and acyl thioesterases (APTs). S-acylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas S-acylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. S-acylation of the regulatory β4-subunit controls ER exit and surface expression of BK channels but does not affect ion channel kinetics at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a significant number of previously identified BK-channel interacting proteins have been shown, or are predicted to be, S-acylated. Thus, the BK channel multi-molecular signaling complex may be dynamically regulated by this fundamental post-translational modification and thus S-acylation likely represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:25140154

  14. The Role of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus and Other Human Polyomaviruses in Emerging Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Rasheed, Kashif; Abdulsalam, Ibrahim; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are non-enveloped, dsDNA viruses that are common in mammals, including humans. All polyomaviruses encode the large T-antigen and small t-antigen proteins that share conserved functional domains, comprising binding motifs for the tumor suppressors pRb and p53, and for protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. At present, 13 different human polyomaviruses are known, and for some of them their large T-antigen and small t-antigen have been shown to possess oncogenic properties in cell culture and animal models, while similar functions are assumed for the large T- and small t-antigen of other human polyomaviruses. However, so far the Merkel cell polyomavirus seems to be the only human polyomavirus associated with cancer. The large T- and small t-antigen exert their tumorigenic effects through classical hallmarks of cancer: inhibiting tumor suppressors, activating tumor promoters, preventing apoptosis, inducing angiogenesis and stimulating metastasis. This review elaborates on the putative roles of human polyomaviruses in some of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. The reciprocal interactions between human polyomaviruses and the immune system response are discussed, a plausible role of polyomavirus-encoded and polyomavirus-induced microRNA in cancer is described, and the effect of polyomaviruses on energy homeostasis and exosomes is explored. Therapeutic strategies against these emerging hallmarks of cancer are also suggested. PMID:25866902

  15. Large Conductance Voltage- and Ca2+-gated Potassium (BK) Channel β4 Subunit Influences Sensitivity and Tolerance to Alcohol by Altering Its Response to Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Marrero, Cristina; Seale, Garrett E.; Treistman, Steven N.; Martin, Gilles E.

    2014-01-01

    Tolerance is a well described component of alcohol abuse and addiction. The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-gated potassium channel (BK) has been very useful for studying molecular tolerance. The influence of association with the β4 subunit can be observed at the level of individual channels, action potentials in brain slices, and finally, drinking behavior in the mouse. Previously, we showed that 50 mm alcohol increases both α and αβ4 BK channel open probability, but only α BK develops acute tolerance to this effect. Currently, we explore the possibility that the influence of the β4 subunit on tolerance may result from a striking effect of β4 on kinase modulation of the BK channel. We examine the influence of the β4 subunit on PKA, CaMKII, and phosphatase modulation of channel activity, and on molecular tolerance to alcohol. We record from human BK channels heterologously expressed in HEK 293 cells composed of its core subunit, α alone (Insertless), or co-expressed with the β4 BK auxiliary subunit, as well as, acutely dissociated nucleus accumbens neurons using the cell-attached patch clamp configuration. Our results indicate that BK channels are strongly modulated by activation of specific kinases (PKA and CaMKII) and phosphatases. The presence of the β4 subunit greatly influences this modulation, allowing a variety of outcomes for BK channel activity in response to acute alcohol. PMID:25190810

  16. Overexpression of the Large-Conductance, Ca2+-Activated K+ (BK) Channel Shortens Action Potential Duration in HL-1 Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stimers, Joseph R.; Song, Li; Rusch, Nancy J.; Rhee, Sung W.

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is characterized by a prolongation of the interval between the Q wave and the T wave on the electrocardiogram. This abnormality reflects a prolongation of the ventricular action potential caused by a number of genetic mutations or a variety of drugs. Since effective treatments are unavailable, we explored the possibility of using cardiac expression of the large-conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel to shorten action potential duration (APD). We hypothesized that expression of the pore-forming α subunit of human BK channels (hBKα) in HL-1 cells would shorten action potential duration in this mouse atrial cell line. Expression of hBKα had minimal effects on expression levels of other ion channels with the exception of a small but significant reduction in Kv11.1. Patch-clamped hBKα expressing HL-1 cells exhibited an outward voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K+ current, which was inhibited by the BK channel blocker iberiotoxin (100 nM). This BK current phenotype was not detected in untransfected HL-1 cells or in HL-1 null cells sham-transfected with an empty vector. Importantly, APD in hBKα-expressing HL-1 cells averaged 14.3 ± 2.8 ms (n = 10), which represented a 53% reduction in APD compared to HL-1 null cells lacking BKα expression. APD in the latter cells averaged 31.0 ± 5.1 ms (n = 13). The shortened APD in hBKα-expressing cells was restored to normal duration by 100 nM iberiotoxin, suggesting that a repolarizing K+ current attributed to BK channels accounted for action potential shortening. These findings provide initial proof-of-concept that the introduction of hBKα channels into a cardiac cell line can shorten APD, and raise the possibility that gene-based interventions to increase hBKα channels in cardiac cells may hold promise as a therapeutic strategy for long QT syndrome. PMID:26091273

  17. Phosphorylation of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large Tumor Antigen at Serine 816 by ATM Kinase Induces Apoptosis in Host Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H.; You, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a highly aggressive form of skin cancer. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) infection and DNA integration into the host genome correlate with 80% of all Merkel cell carcinoma cases. Integration of the MCV genome frequently results in mutations in the large tumor antigen (LT), leading to expression of a truncated LT that retains pRB binding but with a deletion of the C-terminal domain. Studies from our laboratory and others have shown that the MCV LT C-terminal helicase domain contains growth-inhibiting properties. Additionally, we have shown that host DNA damage response factors are recruited to viral replication centers. In this study, we identified a novel MCV LT phosphorylation site at Ser-816 in the C-terminal domain. We demonstrate that activation of the ATM pathway stimulated MCV LT phosphorylation at Ser-816, whereas inhibition of ATM kinase activity prevented LT phosphorylation at this site. In vitro phosphorylation experiments confirmed that ATM kinase is responsible for phosphorylating MCV LT at Ser-816. Finally, we show that ATM kinase-mediated MCV LT Ser-816 phosphorylation may contribute to the anti-tumorigenic properties of the MCV LT C-terminal domain. PMID:25480786

  18. Serine 220 phosphorylation of the Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen crucially supports growth of Merkel cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schrama, David; Hesbacher, Sonja; Angermeyer, Sabrina; Schlosser, Andreas; Haferkamp, Sebastian; Aue, Annemarie; Adam, Christian; Weber, Alexandra; Schmidt, Marc; Houben, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is regarded as a major causal factor for Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Indeed, tumor cell growth of MCPyV-positive MCC cells is dependent on the expression of a truncated viral Large T antigen (LT) with an intact retinoblastoma protein (RB)-binding site. Here we determined the phosphorylation pattern of a truncated MCPyV-LT characteristically for MCC by mass spectrometry revealing MCPyV-LT as multi-phospho-protein phosphorylated at several serine and threonine residues. Remarkably, disruption of most of these phosphorylation sites did not affect its ability to rescue knockdown of endogenous T antigens in MCC cells indicating that phosphorylation of the respective amino acids is not essential for the growth promoting function of MCPyV-LT. However, alteration of serine 220 to alanine completely abolished the ability of MCPyV-LT to support proliferation of MCC cells. Conversely, mimicking the phosphorylated state by mutation of serine 220 to glutamic acid resulted in a fully functional LT. Moreover, MCPyV-LT(S220A) demonstrated reduced binding to RB in co-immunoprecipitation experiments as well as weaker induction of RB target genes in MCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of serine 220 is required for efficient RB inactivation in MCC and may therefore be a potential target for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26383606

  19. Rheological properties of magnetorheological fluid and its finishing application on large aperture BK7 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Wei, Q. L.; Huang, W.; Luo, Q.; He, J. G.; Tang, G. P.

    2013-07-01

    The CeO2 nanoparticles with modified surface and mean sizes distribution during 107.0 nm - 127.7 nm are used as abrasive in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) fluid. The slow rotation dispersion without shearing thinning is better than fast emulsification dispersion. Steady D-shaped finishing spots and high quality precise processing surface with PV=0.1λ, GRMS=0.002λ/cm, Rq=0.83 nm are obtained on a 435 mm x 435 mm BK7 glass under self-developed MRF apparatus.

  20. A case of primary JC polyomavirus infection-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, I; Jahnukainen, T; Kardas, P; Lohi, J; Auvinen, E; Mannonen, L; Dumoulin, A; Hirsch, H H; Jalanko, H

    2014-12-01

    A 15-year-old boy with a posterior urethral valve received a deceased donor kidney transplant (KT) in March 2011. Basiliximab induction followed by tacrolimus-based triple medication was used as immunosuppression. Eleven months after KT, the graft function deteriorated and the biopsy demonstrated interstitial nephritis suggestive of acute rejection. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) surveillance in urine and plasma was negative. The patient received methylprednisolone pulses and anti-thymocyte globulin. Immunohistochemistry was positive for simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen (LTag) in the biopsies, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) indicated high viral loads in urine and borderline levels in plasma. Immunosuppression was reduced and follow-up biopsies showed tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Two years after KT, antibody-mediated rejection resulted in graft loss and return to hemodialysis. Retrospective serologic work-up indicated a primary JCPyV infection with seroconversion first for IgM, followed by IgG, but no indication of BKPyV infection. In the SV40 LTag positive biopsies, JCPyV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with archetype noncoding control region was detected, while BKPyV DNA was undetectable. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary JCPyV infection as the cause of PyV-associated nephropathy in KT. PMID:25359127

  1. Intracellular BK(Ca) (iBK(Ca)) channels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpreet; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia

    2012-12-01

    The large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BK(Ca)) is widely expressed at the plasma membrane. This channel is involved in a variety of fundamental cellular functions including excitability, smooth muscle contractility, and Ca(2+) homeostasis, as well as in pathological situations like proinflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer cell proliferation. Immunochemical, biochemical and pharmacological studies from over a decade have intermittently shown the presence of BK(Ca) in intracellular organelles. To date, intracellular BK(Ca) (iBK(Ca)) has been localized in the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and Golgi apparatus but its functional role remains largely unknown except for the mitochondrial BK(Ca) whose opening is thought to play a role in protecting the heart from ischaemic injury. In the nucleus, pharmacology suggests a role in regulating nuclear Ca(2+), membrane potential and eNOS expression. Establishing the molecular correlates of iBK(Ca), the mechanisms defining iBK(Ca) organelle-specific targeting, and their modulation are challenging questions. This review summarizes iBK(Ca) channels, their possible functions, and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. PMID:22930268

  2. Loss of DNA-binding and new transcriptional trans-activation function in polyomavirus large T-antigen with mutation of zinc finger motif.

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, A; Nilsson, M; Bondeson, K; Magnusson, G

    1990-01-01

    A putative zinc finger in polyomavirus large T-antigen was investigated. We were unable to demonstrate unequivocally a requirement for zinc in specific DNA-binding using the chelating agent 1, 10-phenanthroline. An involvement of the putative zinc finger in specific DNA-binding was nevertheless suggested by the properties of a mutant protein with a cys----ser replacement in the finger motif. Probably as a result of the defective DNA-binding, the mutant protein had lost its activity in initiation of viral DNA-replication and in negative regulation of viral early transcription. However, the trans-activation of the viral late promoter was normal. The analysis also revealed a previously unrecognized activity of large T-antigen. The mutant protein trans-activated the viral early promoter. In the wild-type protein this activity is probably concealed by the separate, negative regulatory function. Images PMID:2160069

  3. Natural History of Polyomaviruses in Men: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Hampras, Shalaka S.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fisher, Kate J.; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Several new polyomaviruses have been discovered in the last decade, including Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Little is known about the natural history of the more recently discovered polyomaviruses. We estimated the incidence, prevalence, and persistence of 9 polyomaviruses (MCPyV, BK polyomavirus, KI polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus, WU polyomavirus, Human polyomavirus 6 [HPyV6], HPyV7, HPyV9, and Trichodysplasia spinulosa–associated polyomavirus) and examined factors associated with MCPyV infection in a prospective cohort of 209 men initially enrolled in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study. Methods. Participants enrolled at the US site of the HIM study were recruited into a substudy of cutaneous viral infections and followed for a median of 12.6 months. Eyebrow hair and normal skin swab specimens were obtained at each study visit, and the viral DNA load was measured using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Results. MCPyV infection showed the highest prevalence (65.1% of normal skin swab specimens and 30.6% of eyebrow hair specimens), incidence (81.7 cases per 1000 person-months among normal skin swab specimens, and 24.1 cases per 1000 person-months among eyebrow hair specimens), and persistence (85.8% of normal skin swab specimens and 58.9% of eyebrow hair specimens) among all polyomaviruses examined. Age of >44 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–4.33) and Hispanic race (OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.01–6.88) were associated with an increased prevalence of MCPyV infection in eyebrow hair and normal skin swab specimens, respectively. Conclusion. MCPyV infection is highly prevalent in adults, with age and race being predisposing factors. PMID:25387582

  4. Large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels promote secretagogue-induced transition from spiking to bursting in murine anterior pituitary corticotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Peter J; Şengül, Sevgi; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard; Shipston, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Anterior pituitary corticotroph cells are a central component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis essential for the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are excitable cells that receive input from two hypothalamic secretagogues, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) to control the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Although corticotrophs are spontaneously active and increase in excitability in response to CRH and AVP the patterns of electrical excitability and underlying ionic conductances are poorly understood. In this study, we have used electrophysiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches coupled with mathematical modelling to investigate whether CRH and AVP promote distinct patterns of electrical excitability and to interrogate the role of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in spontaneous and secretagogue-induced activity. We reveal that BK channels do not play a significant role in the generation of spontaneous activity but are critical for the transition to bursting in response to CRH. In contrast, AVP promotes an increase in single spike frequency, a mechanism independent of BK channels but dependent on background non-selective conductances. Co-stimulation with CRH and AVP results in complex patterns of excitability including increases in both single spike frequency and bursting. The ability of corticotroph excitability to be differentially regulated by hypothalamic secretagogues provides a mechanism for differential control of corticotroph excitability in response to different stressors. Key points Corticotroph cells of the anterior pituitary are electrically excitable and are an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which governs the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs display predominantly single spike activity under basal conditions that transition to complex bursting behaviours upon stimulation by the

  5. Diagnosis of childhood BK virus cystitis by electron microscopy and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, K; Sugae, N; Koike, N; Akiyama, Y; Iwamura, Y; Kimura, H

    1993-01-01

    A case of BK virus cystitis in a 5 year old boy is reported. This patient, who was not immunocompromised, had had acute cystitis for two weeks. Many intracytoplasmic inclusions were observed in urinary sediment smears stained by the Papanicolaou method. Electron microscopic examination showed virus particles, presumed to be human polyomavirus, in the nuclei of the degenerated urothelial cells. A DNA sequence of the BK virus was detected in 200-300 urothelial cells in Papanicolaou stained smears by the polymerase chain reaction. BK virus is an unusual cause of symptomatic cystitis in a healthy child. Images PMID:8408709

  6. Enhanced K(+) secretion in dextran sulfate-induced colitis reflects upregulation of large conductance apical K(+) channels (BK; Kcnma1).

    PubMed

    Kanthesh, Basalingappa M; Sandle, Geoffrey I; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M

    2013-11-01

    Defective colonic Na(+) and Cl(-) absorption is a feature of active ulcerative colitis (UC), but little is known about changes in colonic K(+) transport. We therefore investigated colonic K(+) transport in a rat model of dextran sulfate-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in rat distal colon using 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Short-circuit current (Isc, indicating electrogenic ion transport) and (86)Rb (K(+) surrogate) fluxes were measured in colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers under voltage-clamp conditions in the presence of mucosal orthovanadate (a P-type ATPase inhibitor). Serum aldosterone was measured by immunoassay. Control animals exhibited zero net K(+) flux. By contrast, DSS-treated animals exhibited active K(+) secretion, which was inhibited by 98, 76, and 22% by Ba(2+) (nonspecific K(+) channel blocker), iberiotoxin (IbTX; BK channel blocker), and TRAM-34 (IK channel blocker), respectively. Apical BK channel α-subunit mRNA abundance and protein expression, and serum aldosterone levels in DSS-treated animals, were enhanced 6-, 3-, and 6-fold respectively, compared with controls. Increasing intracellular Ca(2+) with carbachol (CCH), or intracellular cAMP with forskolin (FSK), stimulated both active Cl(-) secretion and active K(+) secretion in controls but had no or little effect in DSS-treated animals. In DSS-induced colitis, active K(+) secretion involves upregulation of apical BK channel expression, which may be aldosterone-dependent, whereas Cl(-) secretion is diminished. Since similar ion transport abnormalities occur in patients with UC, diarrhea in this disease may reflect increased colonic K(+) secretion (rather than increased Cl(-) secretion), as well as defective Na(+) and Cl(-) absorption. PMID:23986198

  7. Genetic analysis of polyomavirus large T nuclear localization: nuclear localization is required for productive association with pRb family members.

    PubMed Central

    Howes, S H; Bockus, B J; Schaffhausen, B S

    1996-01-01

    Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) is a multifunctional nuclear protein. LT has two nuclear localization signals (NLS2), one spanning residues 189 to 195 (NLS1) and another spanning residues 280 to 286 (NLS2). Site-directed mutagenesis showed that each signal contains at least two critical residues. The possibility of connections between NLSs and adjacent phosphorylations has attracted much attention. Cytoplasmic LT (CyT) mutants were underphosphorylated, particularly at sites adjacent to NLS2. However, since a nuclear LT bearing an inactivated NLS2 was phosphorylated normally at adjacent sites, the signal was not directly required for phosphorylation. Conversely, LT could be translocated to the nucleus via NLS2 even when the adjacent phosphorylation sites were deleted. CyT was examined to probe the importance of LT localization. CyT was unable to perform LT functions related to interactions with retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (pRb) family members. Hence, CyT was unable to immortalize primary cells or to transactivate an E2F-responsive promoter. Consistent with these findings, CyT, though capable of binding pRb in vitro, did not cause relocalization of pRb in cells. Assays of transactivation of the simian virus 40 late promoter and of the human c-fos promoter showed that defects of CyT were not limited to functions dependent on pRb interactions. PMID:8648692

  8. A cornucopia of human polyomaviruses.

    PubMed

    DeCaprio, James A; Garcea, Robert L

    2013-04-01

    During the past 6 years, focused virus hunting has led to the discovery of nine new human polyomaviruses, including Merkel cell polyomavirus, which has been linked to Merkel cell carcinoma, a lethal skin cell cancer. The discovery of so many new and highly divergent human polyomaviruses raises key questions regarding their evolution, tropism, latency, reactivation, immune evasion and contribution to disease. This Review describes the similarities and differences among the new human polyomaviruses and discusses how these viruses might interact with their human host. PMID:23474680

  9. A cornucopia of human polyomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    DeCaprio, James A.; Garcea, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    During the past 6 years, focused virus hunting has led to the discovery of nine new human polyomaviruses, including Merkel cell polyomavirus, which has been linked to Merkel cell carcinoma, a lethal skin cell cancer. The discovery of so many new and highly divergent human polyomaviruses raises key questions regarding their evolution, tropism, latency, reactivation, immune evasion and contribution to disease. This Review describes the similarities and differences among the new human polyomaviruses and discusses how these viruses might interact with their human host. PMID:23474680

  10. Complete Sequence of the Smallest Polyomavirus Genome, Giant Guitarfish (Rhynchobatus djiddensis) Polyomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Dill, Jennifer A; Ng, Terry F F; Camus, Alvin C

    2016-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are known to infect mammals and birds. Deep sequencing and metagenomic analysis identified the first polyomavirus from a cartilaginous fish, the giant guitarfish (Rhynchobatus djiddensis). Giant guitarfish polyomavirus 1 (GfPyV1) has typical polyomavirus genome organization, but is the smallest polyomavirus genome (3.96 kb) described to date. PMID:27198025

  11. Complete Sequence of the Smallest Polyomavirus Genome, Giant Guitarfish (Rhynchobatus djiddensis) Polyomavirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are known to infect mammals and birds. Deep sequencing and metagenomic analysis identified the first polyomavirus from a cartilaginous fish, the giant guitarfish (Rhynchobatus djiddensis). Giant guitarfish polyomavirus 1 (GfPyV1) has typical polyomavirus genome organization, but is the smallest polyomavirus genome (3.96 kb) described to date. PMID:27198025

  12. Detection of polyomavirus simian virus 40 tumor antigen DNA in AIDS-related systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilchez, Regis A.; Lednicky, John A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (S-NHL) is a common malignancy during HIV infection, and it is hypothesized that infectious agents may be involved in the etiology. Epstein-Barr virus DNA is found in <40% of patients with AIDS-related S-NHL, suggesting that other oncogenic viruses, such as polyomaviruses, may play a role in pathogenesis. We analyzed AIDS-related S-NHL samples, NHL samples from HIV-negative patients, peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected and -uninfected patients without NHL, and lymph nodes without tumors from HIV-infected patients. Specimens were examined by polymerase chain reaction analysis with use of primers specific for an N-terminal region of the oncoprotein large tumor antigen ( T-ag ) gene conserved among all three polyomaviruses (simian virus 40 [SV40], JC virus, and BK virus). Polyomavirus T-ag DNA sequences, proven to be SV40-specific, were detected more frequently in AIDS-related S-NHL samples (6 of 26) than in peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 69; p =.0001), NHL samples from HIV-negative patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 10; p =.09), or lymph nodes (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 7; p =.16). Sequences of C-terminal T-ag DNA from SV40 were amplified from two AIDS-related S-NHL samples. Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences were detected in 38% (10 of 26) AIDS-related S-NHL samples, 50% (5 of 10) HIV-negative S-NHL samples, and 57% (4 of 7) lymph nodes. None of the S-NHL samples were positive for both Epstein-Barr virus DNA and SV40 DNA. Further studies of the possible role of SV40 in the pathogenesis of S-NHL are warranted.

  13. Polyomaviruses and disease: is there more to know than viremia and viruria?

    PubMed Central

    Nickeleit, Volker; Singh, Harsharan K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Polyomavirus nephropathy (PVN) mainly caused by BK virus (BKV) remains the most common productive viral infection of the kidney. Over the past decade, clinical interest often focused on BK viremia and viruria as the diagnostic mainstays of patient management. The purpose of this review is to discuss viral nephropathy in the context of BK viremia and viruria and new strategies to optimize diagnostic accuracy and patient management. The emerging roles of polyomaviruses in oncogenesis, salivary gland disease, and post-bone marrow transplantation as well as novel Polyomavirus strains are highlighted. Recent findings Areas of investigation include proposals by the Banff working group on the classification of PVN and studies on PVN progression and resolution, including the role cellular immune responses may play during reconstitution injury. New noninvasive strategies to optimize the diagnosis of PVN, that is, the urinary ‘polyomavirus-haufen’ test and mRNA expression levels for BKV in the urine, hold great promise to accurately identify patients with viral nephropathy. Tools are now available to separate ‘presumptive’ from ‘definitive’ disease in various patient cohorts including individuals post-bone marrow transplantation. Recent observations also point to a currently underrecognized role of polyomaviruses in oncogenesis post-transplantation and salivary gland disease in patients with HIV-AIDS. Summary This review summarizes recent studies on PVN and the significance of the BKV strain in disease. Current paradigms for patient management post-(renal) transplantation are discussed in the setting of new observations. Issues that still require clarification and further validation are highlighted. PMID:25933251

  14. Large $N$ approach to kaon decays and mixing 28 years later: $$\\Delta I = 1/2$$ rule, $$\\hat B_K$$ and $$\\Delta M_K$$

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Gérard, Jean -Marc; Bardeen, William A.

    2014-05-20

    We review and update our results for K → π π decays and K⁰- K¯⁰ mixing obtained by us in the 1980s within an approach based on the dual representation of QCD as a theory of weakly interacting mesons for large N colours. In our analytic approach the dynamics behind the enhancement of ReA0 and suppression of ReA2, the so-called ΔI = 1/2 rule for K → π π decays, has a simple structure: the usual octet enhancement through quark-gluon renormalization group evolution down to the scales O(1 GeV) is continued as a meson evolution down to zero momentum scalesmore » at which the factorization of hadronic matrix elements is at work. The inclusion of lowest-lying vector meson contributions in addition to the pseudoscalar ones and of Wilson coefficients in a momentum scheme improves significantly the matching between quark-gluon and meson evolutions. In particular, the anomalous dimension matrix governing the meson evolution exhibits the structure of the known anomalous dimension matrix in the quark-gluon evolution. The recent results on ReA2 and ReA0 from the RBC-UKQC collaboration give support for our approach. In particular, the signs of the two main contractions found numerically by these authors follow uniquely from our analytic approach. At NLO in 1/N we obtain R = ReA0/ReA2= 16.0±1.5 which amounts to an order of magnitude enhancement over the strict large N limit value √2. QCD penguins contribute at 15% level to this result. We also find B^K = 0.73± 0.02, with the smallness of 1/N corrections to the large N value B^K = 3/4 resulting within our approach from an approximate cancellation between pseudoscalar and vector meson one-loop contributions. We summarize the status of ΔMK in this approach.« less

  15. Characterization of Self-Assembled Virus-Like Particles of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Iwasaki, Kenji; Katano, Harutaka; Kataoka, Michiyo; Nagata, Noriyo; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP) with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV). The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1–70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV. PMID:25671590

  16. Peptide toxins and small-molecule blockers of BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mu; Liu, San-ling; Sun, Pei-bei; Pan, Hao; Tian, Chang-lin; Zhang, Long-hua

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels play important roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability and the control of smooth muscle contractions. BK channels can be activated by changes in both the membrane potential and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Here, we provide an overview of the structural and pharmacological properties of BK channel blockers. First, the properties of different venom peptide toxins from scorpions and snakes are described, with a focus on their characteristic structural motifs, including their disulfide bond formation pattern, the binding interface between the toxin and BK channel, and the functional consequence of the blockage of BK channels by these toxins. Then, some representative non-peptide blockers of BK channels are also described, including their molecular formula and pharmacological effects on BK channels. The detailed categorization and descriptions of these BK channel blockers will provide mechanistic insights into the blockade of BK channels. The structures of peptide toxins and non-peptide compounds could provide templates for the design of new channel blockers, and facilitate the optimization of lead compounds for further therapeutic applications in neurological disorders or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26725735

  17. Peptide toxins and small-molecule blockers of BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mu; Liu, San-ling; Sun, Pei-bei; Pan, Hao; Tian, Chang-lin; Zhang, Long-hua

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels play important roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability and the control of smooth muscle contractions. BK channels can be activated by changes in both the membrane potential and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Here, we provide an overview of the structural and pharmacological properties of BK channel blockers. First, the properties of different venom peptide toxins from scorpions and snakes are described, with a focus on their characteristic structural motifs, including their disulfide bond formation pattern, the binding interface between the toxin and BK channel, and the functional consequence of the blockage of BK channels by these toxins. Then, some representative non-peptide blockers of BK channels are also described, including their molecular formula and pharmacological effects on BK channels. The detailed categorization and descriptions of these BK channel blockers will provide mechanistic insights into the blockade of BK channels. The structures of peptide toxins and non-peptide compounds could provide templates for the design of new channel blockers, and facilitate the optimization of lead compounds for further therapeutic applications in neurological disorders or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26725735

  18. Serological Cross-Reactivity between Merkel Cell Polyomavirus and Two Closely Related Chimpanzee Polyomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Jérôme T. J.; Liais, Etienne; Potier, Romain; Mazzoni, Elisa; Tognon, Mauro; Coursaget, Pierre; Touzé, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on the major capsid protein sequence indicate that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) and chimpanzee polyomaviruses (PtvPyV1, PtvPyV2), and similarly Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV) and the orangutan polyomavirus (OraPyV1) are closely related. The existence of cross-reactivity between these polyomaviruses was therefore investigated. The findings indicated serological identity between the two chimpanzee polyomaviruses investigated and a high level of cross-reactivity with Merkel cell polyomavirus. In contrast, cross-reactivity was not observed between TSPyV and OraPyV1. Furthermore, specific antibodies to chimpanzee polyomaviruses were detected in chimpanzee sera by pre-incubation of sera with the different antigens, but not in human sera. PMID:24816721

  19. Coronary arterial BK channel dysfunction exacerbates ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tong; Jiang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2016-09-01

    The large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, abundantly expressed in coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs), play a pivotal role in regulating coronary circulation. A large body of evidence indicates that coronary arterial BK channel function is diminished in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, the consequence of coronary BK channel dysfunction in diabetes is not clear. We hypothesized that impaired coronary BK channel function exacerbates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Combining patch-clamp techniques and cellular biological approaches, we found that diabetes facilitated the colocalization of angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptors and BK channel α-subunits (BK-α), but not BK channel β1-subunits (BK-β1), in the caveolae of coronary SMCs. This caveolar compartmentation in vascular SMCs not only enhanced Ang II-mediated inhibition of BK-α but also produced a physical disassociation between BK-α and BK-β1, leading to increased infarct size in diabetic hearts. Most importantly, genetic ablation of caveolae integrity or pharmacological activation of coronary BK channels protected the cardiac function of diabetic mice from experimental I/R injury in both in vivo and ex vivo preparations. Our results demonstrate a vascular ionic mechanism underlying the poor outcome of myocardial injury in diabetes. Hence, activation of coronary BK channels may serve as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular complications of diabetes. PMID:27574914

  20. The Ancient Evolutionary History of Polyomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Christopher B.; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Peretti, Alberto; Geoghegan, Eileen M.; Tisza, Michael J.; An, Ping; Katz, Joshua P.; Pipas, James M.; McBride, Alison A.; Camus, Alvin C.; McDermott, Alexa J.; Dill, Jennifer A.; Delwart, Eric; Ng, Terry F. F.; Farkas, Kata; Austin, Charlotte; Kraberger, Simona; Davison, William; Pastrana, Diana V.; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of DNA tumor viruses that are known to infect mammals and birds. To investigate the deeper evolutionary history of the family, we used a combination of viral metagenomics, bioinformatics, and structural modeling approaches to identify and characterize polyomavirus sequences associated with fish and arthropods. Analyses drawing upon the divergent new sequences indicate that polyomaviruses have been gradually co-evolving with their animal hosts for at least half a billion years. Phylogenetic analyses of individual polyomavirus genes suggest that some modern polyomavirus species arose after ancient recombination events involving distantly related polyomavirus lineages. The improved evolutionary model provides a useful platform for developing a more accurate taxonomic classification system for the viral family Polyomaviridae. PMID:27093155

  1. The Ancient Evolutionary History of Polyomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Buck, Christopher B; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Peretti, Alberto; Geoghegan, Eileen M; Tisza, Michael J; An, Ping; Katz, Joshua P; Pipas, James M; McBride, Alison A; Camus, Alvin C; McDermott, Alexa J; Dill, Jennifer A; Delwart, Eric; Ng, Terry F F; Farkas, Kata; Austin, Charlotte; Kraberger, Simona; Davison, William; Pastrana, Diana V; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of DNA tumor viruses that are known to infect mammals and birds. To investigate the deeper evolutionary history of the family, we used a combination of viral metagenomics, bioinformatics, and structural modeling approaches to identify and characterize polyomavirus sequences associated with fish and arthropods. Analyses drawing upon the divergent new sequences indicate that polyomaviruses have been gradually co-evolving with their animal hosts for at least half a billion years. Phylogenetic analyses of individual polyomavirus genes suggest that some modern polyomavirus species arose after ancient recombination events involving distantly related polyomavirus lineages. The improved evolutionary model provides a useful platform for developing a more accurate taxonomic classification system for the viral family Polyomaviridae. PMID:27093155

  2. Discovery of a New Human Polyomavirus Associated with Trichodysplasia Spinulosa in an Immunocompromized Patient

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, Els; Janssens, René W. A.; Lauber, Chris; Bouwes Bavinck, Jan Nico; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Feltkamp, Mariet C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The Polyomaviridae constitute a family of small DNA viruses infecting a variety of hosts. In humans, polyomaviruses can cause infections of the central nervous system, urinary tract, skin, and possibly the respiratory tract. Here we report the identification of a new human polyomavirus in plucked facial spines of a heart transplant patient with trichodysplasia spinulosa, a rare skin disease exclusively seen in immunocompromized patients. The trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSV) genome was amplified through rolling-circle amplification and consists of a 5232-nucleotide circular DNA organized similarly to known polyomaviruses. Two putative “early” (small and large T antigen) and three putative “late” (VP1, VP2, VP3) genes were identified. The TSV large T antigen contains several domains (e.g. J-domain) and motifs (e.g. HPDKGG, pRb family-binding, zinc finger) described for other polyomaviruses and potentially involved in cellular transformation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship of TSV with the Bornean orangutan polyomavirus and, more distantly, the Merkel cell polyomavirus that is found integrated in Merkel cell carcinomas of the skin. The presence of TSV in the affected patient's skin was confirmed by newly designed quantitative TSV-specific PCR, indicative of a viral load of 105 copies per cell. After topical cidofovir treatment, the lesions largely resolved coinciding with a reduction in TSV load. PCR screening demonstrated a 4% prevalence of TSV in an unrelated group of immunosuppressed transplant recipients without apparent disease. In conclusion, a new human polyomavirus was discovered and identified as the possible cause of trichodysplasia spinulosa in immunocompromized patients. The presence of TSV also in clinically unaffected individuals suggests frequent virus transmission causing subclinical, probably latent infections. Further studies have to reveal the impact of TSV infection in relation to other populations

  3. Small Tumor Antigen of Polyomaviruses: Role in Viral Life Cycle and Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Kamel; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Safak, Mahmut

    2009-01-01

    The regulatory proteins of polyomaviruses, including small and large T antigens, play important roles, not only in the viral life cycle but also in virus-induced cell transformation. Unlike many other tumor viruses, the transforming proteins of polyomaviruses have no cellular homologs but rather exert their effects mostly by interacting with cellular proteins that control fundamental processes in the regulation of cell proliferation and the cell cycle. Thus, they have proven to be valuable tools to identify specific signaling pathways involved in tumor progression. Elucidation of these pathways using polyomavirus transforming proteins as tools is critically important in understanding fundamental regulatory mechanisms and hence to develop effective therapeutic strategies against cancer. In this short review, we will focus on the structural and functional features of one polyomavirus transforming protein, that is, the small t-antigen of the human neurotropic JC virus (JCV) and the simian virus, SV40. PMID:18022798

  4. Prevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus in Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duncavage, Eric J; Zehnbauer, Barbara A; Pfeifer, John D

    2009-04-01

    It has recently been shown that Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare and often lethal cutaneous malignancy, frequently harbors a novel clonally integrated polyomavirus aptly named Merkel cell polyomavirus. We aimed to study the prevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus in cases of Merkel cell carcinoma, using specimens from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. In our archives we identified 41 cases of Merkel cell carcinoma (from 29 different patients). Of these, 20 cases were primary cutaneous tumors, 4 were local recurrences, and 17 were metastases. PCR using two previously published primer sets, LT1 (440 bp amplicon) and LT3 (308 bp amplicon), as well as a novel primer set MCVPS1 (109 bp amplicon), was performed on all cases. Selected PCR products were sequenced to confirm amplicon identity. In addition, the MCVPS1 products were digested with BamH1, yielding an 83 bp product. Amplifiable DNA was recovered in all 41 study cases. The detection rate of Merkel cell polyomavirus for each of the three primer sets was 22 of 29 patients (76%) for MCVPS1, 12 of 29 (41%) for LT3, and 8 of 29 (28%) for LT1. The variation between primer set detection rates was largely due to poor DNA quality, as supported by poor amplification of the higher molecular weight markers in size control ladder products and the fact that all cases that were positive by LT1 and LT3 were positive by MCVPS1. Our findings provide further evidence to link Merkel cell polyomavirus with a possible role in the oncogenesis of Merkel cell carcinoma. On a more practical level, our paraffin-optimized primer set may be used as an ancillary test to confirm the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma in the clinical setting or for screening other rare tumor types for the causative virus, especially those tumor types that are underrepresented in frozen tissue repositories. PMID:19252474

  5. JC polyomavirus nephropathy confirmed by using an in-house polymerase chain reaction method.

    PubMed

    Querido, S; Jorge, C; Sousa, H; Birne, R; Matias, P; Weigert, A; Adragão, T; Bruges, M; Ramos, S; Santos, M; Paixão, P; Curran, M D; Machado, D

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of an isolated JC virus (JCV) infection, without co-infection by polyoma BK virus (BKV), associated with nephropathy 4 years after kidney transplantation. Clinical suspicion followed the observation of a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and a renal allograft biopsy revealing polyomavirus-associated tubulointerstitial nephritis and positivity for SV40. An in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, targeting the presence of JCV and the absence of BKV in biopsy tissue, confirmed diagnosis. Thirteen months after diagnosis, and following therapeutic measures, eGFR remains stable. PMID:26215933

  6. Transient versus Persistent BK Viremia and Long-Term Outcomes after Kidney and Kidney–Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Elfadawy, Nissreen; Schold, Jesse D.; Srinivas, Titte R.; Poggio, Emilio; Fatica, Richard; Avery, Robin; Mossad, Sherif B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The objective was to study the long-term impact of transient versus persistent BK viremia on kidney transplant outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In total, 609 recipients who underwent kidney transplant from 2007 to 2011 were screened at months 1–12 for the occurrence of polyomavirus BK viremia; 130 patients (21.7%) developed BK viremia during the first year post-transplant. BK viremia patients were classified according to duration of infection (more or less than 3 months), and BK viral loads (more or less than 10,000 copies/ml) were classified as transient low viremia (n=42), transient high viremia (n=18), persistent low viremia (n=23), and persistent high viremia (n=47). All patients were followed a median of 36 (3–66) months. The rates of BK polyomavirus–associated nephropathy, acute rejection, and 1-year graft function were compared with the polyomavirus BK–negative control group. Results Patient and graft survival were not significantly different among the groups. Graft function (creatinine; milligrams per deciliter) at 1 year was significantly worse in the persistent high viremia (1.75±0.6) and transient high viremia (1.85±0.7) groups compared with aviremic controls (1.47±0.4; P=0.01 and P=0.01, respectively). The incidence of BK polyomavirus–associated nephropathy was limited to the persistent high viremia group (1.3%, P<0.001). The transient high viremia (50%) and persistent high viremia (34%) groups showed significantly (P=0.01) increased incidence of acute rejection versus aviremic controls (21.5%), transient low viremia (19%), or persistent low viremia (17.3%) groups. Conclusion Low viral load BK viremia, either transient or persistent, was not associated with long-term transplant outcomes. Persistent high viremia was associated with a greater risk for BK polyomavirus–associated nephropathy and subsequent graft dysfunction. Although transient high viremia was not associated with BK

  7. Interacting influence of diuretics and diet on BK channel-regulated K homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Donghai; Cornelius, Ryan J; Sansom, Steven C

    2014-04-01

    Large conductance, Ca-activated K channels (BK) are abundantly located in cells of vasculature, glomerulus, and distal nephron, where they are involved in maintaining blood volume, blood pressure, and K homeostasis. In mesangial cells and smooth muscle cells of vessels, the BK-α pore associates with BK-β1 subunits and regulates contraction in a Ca-mediated feedback manner. The BK-β1 also resides in connecting tubule cells of the nephron. BK-β1 knockout mice (β1KO) exhibit fluid retention, hypertension, and compromised K handling. The BK-α/β4 resides in acid/base transporting intercalated cells (IC) of the distal nephron, where they mediate K secretion in mammals on a high K, alkaline diet. BK-α expression in IC is increased by a high K diet via aldosterone. The BK-β4 subunit and alkaline urine are necessary for the luminal expression and function of BK-α in mouse IC. In distal nephron cells, membrane BK-α expression is inhibited by WNK4 in in vitro expression systems, indicating a role in the hyperkalemic phenotype in patients with familial hyperkalemic hypertension type 2 (FHHt2). β1KO and BK-β4 knockout mice (β4KO) are hypertensive because of exaggerated epithelial Na channels (ENaC) mediated Na retention in an effort to secrete K via only renal outer medullary K channels (ROMK). BK hypertension is resistant to thiazides and furosemide, and would be more amenable to ENaC and aldosterone inhibiting drugs. Activators of BK-α/β1 or BK-α/β4 might be effective blood pressure lowering agents for a subset of hypertensive patients. Inhibitors of renal BK would effectively spare K in patients with Bartter Syndrome, a renal K wasting disease. PMID:24721651

  8. Specific rolling circle amplification of low-copy human polyomaviruses BKV, HPyV6, HPyV7, TSPyV, and STLPyV.

    PubMed

    Rockett, Rebecca; Barraclough, Katherine A; Isbel, Nicole M; Dudley, Kevin J; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P; Bialasiewicz, Seweryn

    2015-04-01

    Eleven new human polyomaviruses have been recently discovered, yet for most of these viruses, little is known of their biology and clinical impact. Rolling circle amplification (RCA) is an ideal method for the amplification of the circular polyomavirus genome due to its high fidelity amplification of circular DNA. In this study, a modified RCA method was developed to selectively amplify a range of polyomavirus genomes. Initial evaluation showed a multiplexed temperature-graded reaction profile gave the best yield and sensitivity in amplifying BK polyomavirus in a background of human DNA, with up to 1 × 10(8)-fold increases in viral genomes from as little as 10 genome copies per reaction. Furthermore, the method proved to be more sensitive and provided a 200-fold greater yield than that of random hexamers based standard RCA. Application of the method to other novel human polyomaviruses showed successful amplification of TSPyV, HPyV6, HPyV7, and STLPyV from low-viral load positive clinical samples, with viral genome enrichment ranging from 1 × 10(8) up to 1 × 10(10). This directed RCA method can be applied to selectively amplify other low-copy polyomaviral genomes from a background of competing non-specific DNA, and is a useful tool in further research into the rapidly expanding Polyomaviridae family. PMID:25698464

  9. Oncogenic Papillomavirus and Polyomavirus in Water Environments: Is There a Potential for Waterborne Transmission?

    PubMed

    Fratini, M; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses through contact with sewage-contaminated water environments can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses. Gastrointestinal symptoms are the most commonly encountered manifestations of waterborne viral illness. Respiratory diseases, neurological diseases and paralysis can also occur. Whether viral infections resulting in health outcomes like cancer might also be transmitted by the waterborne route is unknown. Recently, viruses belonging to two oncogenic groups-Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) and Human Polyomaviruses (HPyVs)-have been detected in urban sewages worldwide. The latter have also been identified in other water environments. HPVs are epitheliotropic viruses responsible for several diseases of skin and mucosae, from common warts to squamous intraepithelial lesions that can either heal or progress to invasive carcinoma of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus or oropharynx. Human PyVs infect different tissues and organs, causing infections that are usually subclinical in immunocompetent individuals but can be serious in immunocompromised hosts. These pathogens belong to a family of DNA tumour viruses. Merkel cell polyomavirus, a HPyV identified in recent years, has attracted much attention due to its link with a rare and aggressive form of human cancer. Merkel cell carcinoma, the incidence of which has tripled over the past two decades. JC polyomavirus and BK polyomavirus are also potentially oncogenic. The observed abundance and wide dissemination of HPVs and HPyVs in water environments strongly suggest the need to shed light on the fate of these viruses in water environments and to elucidate their potential for waterborne transmission. Such information is essential for the improvement of wastewater management programs in terms of both sewage treatment and water quality surveillance. PMID:24293168

  10. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV) family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future. PMID:26184314

  11. Mapping of the amino-terminal half of polyomavirus middle-T antigen indicates that this region is the binding domain for pp60c-src.

    PubMed Central

    Markland, W; Smith, A E

    1987-01-01

    The majority of the carboxy-terminal half of polyomavirus middle-T antigen has been variously mutated and, with the exception of the putative membrane-binding domain (amino acids 394 to 415), was found to be largely dispensible for the transforming activity of the protein. A comparison of the small-T antigen amino acid sequences (equivalent to the region of middle-T encoded by exon 1) of simian virus 40, BK virus, polyomavirus, and a recently described hamster papovavirus highlighted regions of potential interest in mapping functions to the amino-terminal half of polyomavirus middle-T antigen. The regions of interest include amino acids 168 to 191 (previously investigated by this group [S. H. Cheng, W. Markland, A. F. Markham, and A. E. Smith, EMBO J. 5:325-334, 1986]), two cysteine-rich clusters (amino acids 120 to 125 and 148 to 153), and amino acids 92 to 117 (within the limits of the previously described hr-t mutant, SD15). Point mutations, multiple point mutations, and deletions were made by site-specific and site-directed mutagenesis within the cysteine-rich clusters and residues 92 to 117. Studies of the transforming ability of the altered middle-T species demonstrated that this activity is highly sensitive to amino acid changes. All four regions (as defined above) within the amino-terminal half of middle-T have now been studied in detail. The phenotype of the mutants is predominantly transformation defective, and the corresponding variant middle-T species are characterized by being either totally or severely handicapped in the ability to associate actively with pp60c-src. Whether the mutations affect the regions of interaction between middle-T and pp60c-src or simply interfere with the overall conformation of this domain is not known. However, there would appear to be a conformational constraint on this portion of the molecule with regard to its interaction with pp60c-src and by extension to the ability of the middle-T species to transform. Images PMID

  12. EC decay of 244Bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodaye, Suparna; Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sharma, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.; Palit, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    Berkelium isotopes have been produced in 11B-induced reaction on 238U. The EC decay of 244Bk → 244Cm has been studied by carrying out the single and coincidence measurements of the γ-rays emitted during the de-excitation of the 244Cm levels. Radiochemical separations have been carried out to minimize the contribution from the fission products and target. The new half-life of 244Bk is obtained as 5.02 ± 0.03 h, which is close to the theoretically calculated value. The relative intensities of the decay γ-rays have been re-evaluated. Based on the coincidence measurements, a tentative partial level scheme for 244Bk → 244Cm decay has been proposed.

  13. Biophysics of BK Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, A; Olcese, R

    2016-01-01

    BK channels are universal regulators of cell excitability, given their exceptional unitary conductance selective for K(+), joint activation mechanism by membrane depolarization and intracellular [Ca(2+)] elevation, and broad expression pattern. In this chapter, we discuss the structural basis and operational principles of their activation, or gating, by membrane potential and calcium. We also discuss how the two activation mechanisms interact to culminate in channel opening. As members of the voltage-gated potassium channel superfamily, BK channels are discussed in the context of archetypal family members, in terms of similarities that help us understand their function, but also seminal structural and biophysical differences that confer unique functional properties. PMID:27238260

  14. Novel Polyomaviruses of Nonhuman Primates: Genetic and Serological Predictors for the Existence of Multiple Unknown Polyomaviruses within the Human Population

    PubMed Central

    Scuda, Nelly; Madinda, Nadege Freda; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Adjogoua, Edgard Valerie; Wevers, Diana; Hofmann, Jörg; Cameron, Kenneth N.; Leendertz, Siv Aina J.; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Robbins, Martha; Boesch, Christophe; Jarvis, Michael A.; Moens, Ugo; Mugisha, Lawrence; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small non-enveloped DNA viruses that encode oncogenes and have been associated, to greater or lesser extent, with human disease and cancer. Currently, twelve polyomaviruses are known to circulate within the human population. To further examine the diversity of human polyomaviruses, we have utilized a combinatorial approach comprised of initial degenerate primer-based PCR identification and phylogenetic analysis of nonhuman primate (NHP) polyomavirus species, followed by polyomavirus-specific serological analysis of human sera. Using this approach we identified twenty novel NHP polyomaviruses: nine in great apes (six in chimpanzees, two in gorillas and one in orangutan), five in Old World monkeys and six in New World monkeys. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that only four of the nine chimpanzee polyomaviruses (six novel and three previously identified) had known close human counterparts. To determine whether the remaining chimpanzee polyomaviruses had potential human counterparts, the major viral capsid proteins (VP1) of four chimpanzee polyomaviruses were expressed in E. coli for use as antigens in enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Human serum/plasma samples from both Côte d'Ivoire and Germany showed frequent seropositivity for the four viruses. Antibody pre-adsorption-based ELISA excluded the possibility that reactivities resulted from binding to known human polyomaviruses. Together, these results support the existence of additional polyomaviruses circulating within the human population that are genetically and serologically related to existing chimpanzee polyomaviruses. PMID:23818846

  15. Modulation of BK Channel Function by Auxiliary Beta and Gamma Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q.; Yan, J.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and displays diverse biophysical or pharmacological characteristics. This diversity is in part conferred by channel modulation with different regulatory auxiliary subunits. To date, two distinct classes of BK channel auxiliary subunits have been identified: β subunits and γ subunits. Modulation of BK channels by the four auxiliary β (β1–β4) subunits has been well established and intensively investigated over the past two decades. The auxiliary γ subunits, however, were identified only very recently, which adds a new dimension to BK channel regulation and improves our understanding of the physiological functions of BK channels in various tissues and cell types. This chapter will review the current understanding of BK channel modulation by auxiliary β and γ subunits, especially the latest findings. PMID:27238261

  16. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Rodig, Scott J; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; DoRosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J; Laga, Alvaro C; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T; Cooper, Dylan J; Kupper, Thomas S; Wang, Linda C; DeCaprio, James A

    2012-12-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T antigen by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we expanded the repertoire of quantitative PCR primers specific for MCPyV to improve the detection of viral DNA in MCC. Here we report that a novel monoclonal antibody detected MCPyV large T antigen expression in 56 of 58 (97%) unique MCC tumors. PCR analysis specifically detected viral DNA in all 60 unique MCC tumors tested. We also detected inactivating point substitution mutations of TP53 in the two MCC specimens that lacked large T antigen expression and in only 1 of 56 tumors positive for large T antigen. These results indicate that MCPyV is present in MCC tumors more frequently than previously reported and that mutations in TP53 tend to occur in MCC tumors that fail to express MCPyV large T antigen. PMID:23114601

  17. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rodig, Scott J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; DoRosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J.; Laga, Alvaro C.; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T.; Cooper, Dylan J.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Wang, Linda C.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T antigen by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we expanded the repertoire of quantitative PCR primers specific for MCPyV to improve the detection of viral DNA in MCC. Here we report that a novel monoclonal antibody detected MCPyV large T antigen expression in 56 of 58 (97%) unique MCC tumors. PCR analysis specifically detected viral DNA in all 60 unique MCC tumors tested. We also detected inactivating point substitution mutations of TP53 in the two MCC specimens that lacked large T antigen expression and in only 1 of 56 tumors positive for large T antigen. These results indicate that MCPyV is present in MCC tumors more frequently than previously reported and that mutations in TP53 tend to occur in MCC tumors that fail to express MCPyV large T antigen. PMID:23114601

  18. BK Channels Reveal Novel Phosphate Sensitivity in SNr Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Juan Juan; Chen, Lianwan; Duan, Xuezhi; Song, Xueqin; Su, Wenting; Zhang, Peng; Li, Li; Bai, Shuyun; Sun, Yingchun; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    Whether large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels are present in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) is a matter of debate. Using the patch-clamp technique, we examined the functional expression of BK channels in neurons of the SNr and showed that the channels were activated or inhibited by internal high-energy phosphates (IHEPs) at positive and negative membrane potentials, respectively. SNr neurons showed membrane potential hyperpolarization under glucose-deprivation conditions which was attenuated by paxilline, a specific BK channel blocker. In addition, Fluo-3 fluorescence recording detected an increase in the level of internal free calcium ([Ca2+]i) during ischemic hyperpolarization. These results confirm that BK channels are present in SNr neurons and indicate that their unique IHEP sensitivity is requisite in neuronal ischemic responses. Bearing in mind that the KATP channel blocker tolbutamide also attenuated the hyperpolarization, we suggest that BK channels may play a protective role in the basal ganglia by modulating the excitability of SNr neurons along with KATP channels under ischemic stresses. PMID:23284908

  19. A Preliminary Study Into the Significance of Intrarenal Reflux in BK Virus Nephropathy After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, Kunio; Honda, Kazuho; Koike, Junki; Hattori, Motoshi; Fuchinoue, Shouhei; Tanabe, Kazunari; Oda, Hideaki; Nagashima, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Background The BK virus typically colonizes the lower urinary tract and is the causative agent in BK virus nephropathy (BKVN), which can progress to allograft dysfunction and graft loss. Urinary reflux in kidney allografts is induced by vesicoureteral reflux or disturbances in intrarenal reflux (IRR), believed to be associated with BKVN. This study was designed to elucidate the relationship between BKVN and IRR. Methods We examined 30 renal transplant recipients histologically diagnosed with BKVN using anti-Simian virus 40 immunohistochemistry and 60 clinically matched control recipients. The BKVN patients were divided into stable (n = 12) and progressive (n = 18) groups according to allograft kidney function 1 year after diagnosis. Histological rejection scores according to the pathological classification of rejection in renal allografts (Banff classification), histological BKVN stages, and histological polyomavirus load levels (pvl) proposed by the Banff working group were evaluated. The IRR was quantified by histological reflux scores defined with retention and reflux of immunostained Tamm-Horsfall protein in renal tubules and glomeruli. Results Higher reflux scores were observed in the BKVN group compared with that in the control group. No differences in clinical parameters were observed between the BKVN and control groups. Reflux scores and pvl were significantly higher in the progressive group than in the stable BKVN group with no significant difference in BK stage observed between groups. Reflux scores were found to be significantly correlated with pvl. Conclusions Our preliminary study suggested that IRR might be a predisposing and prognostic factor in BKVN.

  20. Human polyomavirus in pregnancy. A model for the study of defence mechanisms to virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D V; Gardner, S D; Mulholland, C; Fridiksdottir, V; Porter, A A; Lilford, R; Valdimarsson, H

    1983-08-01

    We have carried out a longitudinal study of human polyomavirus infection in 71 pregnant women and correlated the virological findings with changes in the defence system in the same patients. As reactivation of human polyomaviruses generally occurred late in the second trimester it was possible to distinguish between the immunological changes which preceded the onset of reactivation and those which were secondary to the infection. Evidence of reactivation was detected in 26 women; all had high or rising antibody titres against BK or JC virus, but only five of these developed viruria. A positive correlation was observed between a high monocyte count in early pregnancy and subsequent virus reactivation. The virus excretors had significantly lower neutrophil counts than the women who had no evidence of virus reactivation. In contrast, women with serological evidence of virus activity but no viruria has significantly higher neutrophil counts than the non-activators. They also had stronger lymphocyte responses to PHA than the virus excretors. Virus activators were found to have a significant lymphopenia in the third trimester compared to the non-activators. High antibody levels did not appear to inhibit virus excretion. These findings suggest that monocytosis may predispose to reactivation of human polyomaviruses in pregnancy. On the other hand, ability to contain the virus once it has been activated, was associated with neutrophilia, and relatively vigorous in vitro reactivity of lymphocytes to PHA. Persistent lymphopenia was probably secondary to virus reactivation. The model on which this study is based could be adapted to investigate the causes of reactivation of other viruses. It may also help to identify risk factors in patients who are particularly susceptible to infection with opportunistic viruses. PMID:6309442

  1. First Detection of Human Papillomaviruses and Human Polyomaviruses in River Waters in Italy.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, M; Petricca, S; Libera, S Della; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2015-12-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses is possible through contact with contaminated water environments and can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses, including gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, ocular, and skin infections. Recently, the occurrence in water environments of two groups of human viruses-both known with oncogenic potential, human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) and papillomaviruses (HPVs)-has been reported worldwide. These viruses, responsible for highly prevalent infections worldwide, have recently been proposed as potentially emerging waterborne pathogens. The objective of the present study was to examine the occurrence of HPyVs and HPVs in surface waters, by monitoring two rivers in Northwestern Italy, by nested PCR assays and sequencing. HPyVs (JC, BK, and Merkel cell polyomavirus) were detected in 10/25 (40%) samples. HPVs (HPV8, 17, 21, 25, 32, 80, 99, 105, and putative new HPVs) were identified in 14/25 (56%) river samples. The number of HPV DNA copies in waters was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first detection and quantification of HPVs in surface waters. The possibility that HPyVs and HPVs can be transmitted by the waterborne route deserves to be explored in future studies. PMID:26049729

  2. Innate Immunity and BK Virus: Prospective Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Yaghobi, Ramin; Dabiri, Shahriar

    2016-03-01

    Recent information demonstrated that BK virus reactivation is a dominant complication after kidney transplantation, which occurs because of immunosuppression. BK virus reactivation is the main reason of transplanted kidney losing. Immune response against BK virus is the major inhibitor of the virus reactivation. Therefore, improving our knowledge regarding the main parameters that fight against BK viruses can shed light on to direct new treatment strategies to suppress BK infection. Innate immunity consists of numerous cell systems and also soluble molecules, which not only suppress virus replication, but also activate adaptive immunity to eradicate the infection. Additionally, it appears that immune responses against reactivated BK virus are the main reasons for induction of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKAN). Thus, improving our knowledge regarding the parameters and detailed mechanisms of innate immunity and also the status of innate immunity of the patients with BK virus reactivation and its complications can introduce new prospective strategies to either prevent or as therapy of the complication. Therefore, this review was aimed to collate the most recent data regarding the roles played by innate immunity against BK virus and also the status of innate immunity in the patients with reactivation BK virus and BKAN. PMID:26752693

  3. Polyomavirus and Naturally Occuring Neuroglial Tumors in Raccoons (Procyon Lotor).

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Patricia A; Brostoff, Terza; Church, Molly E; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Woolard, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Polyomavirus (PyV) infections are widespread in human populations and, although generally associated with silent persistence, rarely cause severe disease. Among diseases convincingly associated with natural PyV infections of humans, there are remarkably different tissue tropisms and outcomes, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, transient or progressive nephropathy, and cancer. The variable character and unpredictable outcomes of infection attest to large gaps in our basic understanding of PyV biology. In particular, the rich history of research demonstrating the oncogenic potential of PyVs in laboratory animals begs the question of why cancer is not more often associated with infection. Raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV), discovered in 2010, is consistently identified in neuroglial tumors in free-ranging raccoons in the western United States. Exposure to RacPyV is widespread, and RacPyV is detected in tissues of raccoons without tumors. Studying the relationship of RacPyV with its natural host is a unique opportunity to uncover cogent cellular targets and protein interactions between the virus and its host. Our hypothesis is that RacPyV, as an intact episome, alters cellular pathways within neural progenitor cells and drives oncogenesis. PMID:26912716

  4. Large $N$ approach to kaon decays and mixing 28 years later: $\\Delta I = 1/2$ rule, $\\hat B_K$ and $\\Delta M_K$

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Gérard, Jean -Marc; Bardeen, William A.

    2014-05-20

    We review and update our results for K → π π decays and K⁰- K¯⁰ mixing obtained by us in the 1980s within an approach based on the dual representation of QCD as a theory of weakly interacting mesons for large N colours. In our analytic approach the dynamics behind the enhancement of ReA0 and suppression of ReA2, the so-called ΔI = 1/2 rule for K → π π decays, has a simple structure: the usual octet enhancement through quark-gluon renormalization group evolution down to the scales O(1 GeV) is continued as a meson evolution down to zero momentum scales at which the factorization of hadronic matrix elements is at work. The inclusion of lowest-lying vector meson contributions in addition to the pseudoscalar ones and of Wilson coefficients in a momentum scheme improves significantly the matching between quark-gluon and meson evolutions. In particular, the anomalous dimension matrix governing the meson evolution exhibits the structure of the known anomalous dimension matrix in the quark-gluon evolution. The recent results on ReA2 and ReA0 from the RBC-UKQC collaboration give support for our approach. In particular, the signs of the two main contractions found numerically by these authors follow uniquely from our analytic approach. At NLO in 1/N we obtain R = ReA0/ReA2= 16.0±1.5 which amounts to an order of magnitude enhancement over the strict large N limit value √2. QCD penguins contribute at 15% level to this result. We also find B^K = 0.73± 0.02, with the smallness of 1/N corrections to the large N value B^K = 3/4 resulting within our approach from an approximate cancellation between pseudoscalar and vector meson one-loop contributions. We summarize the status of ΔMK in this approach.

  5. Unique inner pore properties of BK channels revealed by quaternary ammonium block.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyan; Aldrich, Richard W

    2004-07-01

    Potassium channels have a very wide distribution of single-channel conductance, with BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels having by far the largest. Even though crystallographic views of K(+) channel pores have become available, the structural basis underlying BK channels' large conductance has not been completely understood. In this study we use intracellularly applied quaternary ammonium compounds to probe the pore of BK channels. We show that molecules as large as decyltriethylammonium (C(10)) and tetrabutylammonium (TBA) have much faster block and unblock rates in BK channels when compared with any other tested K(+) channel types. Additionally, our results suggest that at repolarization large QA molecules may be trapped inside blocked BK channels without slowing the overall process of deactivation. Based on these findings we propose that BK channels may differ from other K(+) channels in its geometrical design at the inner mouth, with an enlarged cavity and inner pore providing less spatially restricted access to the cytoplasmic solution. These features could potentially contribute to the large conductance of BK channels. PMID:15197222

  6. BK virus encephalopathy and sclerosing vasculopathy in a patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Darbinyan, Armine; Major, Eugene O; Morgello, Susan; Holland, Steven; Ryschkewitsch, Caroline; Monaco, Maria Chiara; Naidich, Thomas P; Bederson, Joshua; Malaczynska, Joanna; Ye, Fei; Gordon, Ronald; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Fowkes, Mary; Tsankova, Nadejda M

    2016-01-01

    Human BK polyomavirus (BKV) is reactivated under conditions of immunosuppression leading most commonly to nephropathy or cystitis; its tropism for the brain is rare and poorly understood. We present a unique case of BKV-associated encephalopathy in a man with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and immunodeficiency (HED-ID) due to IKK-gamma (NEMO) mutation, who developed progressive neurological symptoms. Brain biopsy demonstrated polyomavirus infection of gray and white matter, with predominant involvement of cortex and distinct neuronal tropism, in addition to limited demyelination and oligodendroglial inclusions. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated polyoma T-antigen in neurons and glia, but expression of VP1 capsid protein only in glia. PCR analysis on both brain biopsy tissue and cerebrospinal fluid detected high levels of BKV DNA. Sequencing studies further identified novel BKV variant and disclosed unique rearrangements in the noncoding control region of the viral DNA (BKVN NCCR). Neuropathological analysis also demonstrated an unusual form of obliterative fibrosing vasculopathy in the subcortical white matter with abnormal lysosomal accumulations, possibly related to the patient's underlying ectodermal dysplasia. Our report provides the first neuropathological description of HED-ID due to NEMO mutation, and expands the diversity of neurological presentations of BKV infection in brain, underscoring the importance of its consideration in immunodeficient patients with unexplained encephalopathy. We also document novel BKVN NCCR rearrangements that may be associated with the unique neuronal tropism in this patient. PMID:27411570

  7. Different behaviour of BK-virus infection in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Umbro, Ilaria; Tinti, Francesca; Muiesan, Paolo; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2016-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKV) infects up to 90% of the general population. After primary infection, occurring early during childhood, a state of non-replicative infection is established in the reno-urinary tract, without complications for immunocompetent hosts. In immunocompromised individuals, particularly transplanted patients, asymptomatic BKV viremia and/or viruria can be observed. Renal grafts may also be sources of infection as BKV prefers kidneys rather than other solid organs for transplantation such as the liver. The mechanism behind the higher incidence of BKV infection in kidney transplant patients, compared to liver or heart transplantation, is unclear and the prevalence of BKV infection in non-renal solid organ transplants has not been yet thoroughly investigated. We evaluated the prevalence of Polyomavirus BK infection among liver transplant recipients. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms BKV infection AND liver transplant recipients; BKV AND non-renal solid organ transplant*; BKV infection AND immunosuppression; the search was limited to title/abstract and English-language articles published from 2000, to March 2015. Eleven relevant studies suggest that the prevalence of BKV viruria and/or viremia among liver transplant recipients is less than that reported in kidney or heart transplant recipients, except when chronic kidney disease (CKD) is present at the same time. Data also suggest that viruric and viremic patients have higher levels of serum creatinine than BKV negative patients. Moreover, no specific immunosuppressive drugs are associated with the onset of BKV nephropathy. The comorbidity of transplantation and CKD could play a major role in promoting BKV replication. PMID:26819520

  8. Knockout of the BK β4-subunit promotes a functional coupling of BK channels and ryanodine receptors that mediate a fAHP-induced increase in excitability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Bugay, Vladislav; Ling, Ling; Chuang, Hui-Hsui; Jaffe, David B; Brenner, Robert

    2016-08-01

    BK channels are large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels with diverse properties. Knockout of the accessory BK β4-subunit in hippocampus dentate gyrus granule neurons causes BK channels to change properties from slow-gated type II channels to fast-gated type I channels that sharpen the action potential, increase the fast afterhyperpolarization (fAHP) amplitude, and increase spike frequency. Here we studied the calcium channels that contribute to fast-gated BK channel activation and increased excitability of β4 knockout neurons. By using pharmacological blockers during current-clamp recording, we find that BK channel activation during the fAHP is dependent on ryanodine receptor activation. In contrast, L-type calcium channel blocker (nifedipine) affects the BK channel-dependent repolarization phase of the action potential but has no effect on the fAHP. Reducing BK channel activation during the repolarization phase with nifedipine, or during the fAHP with ryanodine, indicated that it is the BK-mediated increase of the fAHP that confers proexcitatory effects. The proexcitatory role of the fAHP was corroborated using dynamic current clamp. Increase or decrease of the fAHP amplitude during spiking revealed an inverse relationship between fAHP amplitude and interspike interval. Finally, we show that the seizure-prone ryanodine receptor gain-of-function (R2474S) knockin mice have an unaltered repolarization phase but larger fAHP and increased AP frequency compared with their control littermates. In summary, these results indicate that an important role of the β4-subunit is to reduce ryanodine receptor-BK channel functional coupling during the fAHP component of the action potential, thereby decreasing excitability of dentate gyrus neurons. PMID:27146987

  9. BK channel β1 and β4 auxiliary subunits exert opposite influences on escalated ethanol drinking in dependent mice.

    PubMed

    Kreifeldt, Max; Le, David; Treistman, Steven N; Koob, George F; Contet, Candice

    2013-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels play a key role in the control of neuronal activity. Ethanol is a potent activator of BK channel gating, but how this action may impact ethanol drinking still remains poorly understood. Auxiliary β subunits are known to modulate ethanol-induced potentiation of BK currents. In the present study, we investigated whether BK β1 and β4 subunits influence voluntary ethanol consumption using knockout (KO) mice. In a first experiment, mice were first subjected to continuous two-bottle choice (2BC) and were then switched to intermittent 2BC, which progressively increased ethanol intake as previously described in wildtype mice. BK β1 or β4 subunit deficiency did not affect ethanol self-administration under either schedule of access. In a second experiment, mice were first trained to drink ethanol in a limited-access 2BC paradigm. BK β1 or β4 deletion did not affect baseline consumption. Weeks of 2BC were then alternated with weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) or air inhalation. As expected, a gradual escalation of ethanol drinking was observed in dependent wildtype mice, while intake remained stable in non-dependent wildtype mice. However, CIE exposure only produced a mild augmentation of ethanol consumption in BK β4 KO mice. Conversely, ethanol drinking increased after fewer CIE cycles in BK β1 KO mice than in wildtype mice. In conclusion, BK β1 or β4 did not influence voluntary ethanol drinking in non-dependent mice, regardless of the pattern of access to ethanol. However, deletion of BK β4 attenuated, while deletion of BK β1 accelerated, the escalation of ethanol drinking during withdrawal from CIE. Our data suggest that BK β1 and β4 subunits have an opposite influence on the negative reinforcing properties of ethanol withdrawal. Modulating the expression, distribution or interactions of BK channel auxiliary subunits may therefore represent a novel avenue for the treatment of alcoholism

  10. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  11. Replication-dependent transactivation of the polyomavirus late promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, K B; Roome, A J; Carmichael, G G

    1990-01-01

    When a plasmid containing the wild-type polyomavirus intergenic regulatory region fused to the bacterial cat gene was introduced into mouse NIH 3T3 cells along with a plasmid coding for the early viral proteins (T antigens), chloramphenicol transacetylase enzyme activity and mRNA levels were increased about 10-fold over levels observed in the absence of early proteins. To investigate this transactivation phenomenon further, 11 specific deletion mutant derivatives of the wild-type parent plasmid were constructed and studied. One mutant (NAL) with a minimal level of chloramphenicol transacetylase expression in the absence of T antigens was capable of being transactivated more than 40-fold. A number of other mutants, however, had little capacity for transactivation. Each of these mutants had in common a defect in large T-antigen-mediated DNA replication. Interestingly, one of the transactivation-defective mutants showed a basal late promoter activity fivefold higher than that of wild type and replicated in mouse cells in the absence of large T antigen. Subsequently, a small deletion abolishing viral DNA replication was introduced into those mutants capable of transactivation. The effect of the second deletion was to eliminate both replication and transactivation. Finally, wild-type and mutant constructs were transfected into Fisher rat F-111 cells in the presence or absence of early proteins. No transactivation or replication was ever observed in these cells. We concluded from these studies that the observed transactivation of the polyomavirus late promoter by one or more of the viral early proteins was due to either higher template concentration resulting from DNA replication or replication-associated changes in template conformation. Images PMID:2154625

  12. Presynaptic BK channels control transmitter release: physiological relevance and potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Griguoli, Marilena; Sgritta, Martina; Cherubini, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    BK channels are large conductance potassium channels characterized by four pore-forming α subunits, often co-assembled with auxiliary β and γ subunits to regulate Ca(2+) sensitivity, voltage dependence and gating properties. Abundantly expressed in the CNS, they have the peculiar characteristic of being activated by both voltage and intracellular calcium rise. The increase in intracellular calcium via voltage-dependent calcium channels (Cav ) during spiking triggers conformational changes and BK channel opening. This narrows the action potential and induces a fast after-hyperpolarization that shuts calcium channels. The tight coupling between BK and Cav channels at presynaptic active zones makes them particularly suitable for regulating calcium entry and neurotransmitter release. While in most synapses, BK channels exert a negative control on transmitter release under basal conditions, in others they do so only under pathological conditions, serving as an emergency brake to protect against hyperactivity. In particular cases, by interacting with other channels (i.e. limiting the activation of the delayed rectifier and the inactivation of Na(+) channels), BK channels induce spike shortening, increase in firing rate and transmitter release. Changes in transmitter release following BK channel dysfunction have been implicated in several neurological disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, mental retardation and autism. In particular, two mutations, one in the α and one in the β3 subunit, resulting in a gain of function have been associated with epilepsy. Hence, these discoveries have allowed identification of BK channels as new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26969302

  13. The Impact of BK Channels on Cellular Excitability Depends on their Subcellular Location

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Tobias; Stuart, Greg J.

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (or BK channels) fulfil a multitude of roles in the central nervous system. At the soma of many neuronal cell types they control the speed of action potential (AP) repolarization and therefore they can have an impact on neuronal excitability. Due to their presence in nerve terminals they also regulate transmitter release. BK channels have also been shown to be present in the dendrites of some neurons where they can regulate the magnitude and duration of dendritic spikes. Here, we investigate the impact of modulating the activation of BK channels at different locations on the cellular excitability of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We find that while somatic BK channels help to repolarize APs at the soma and mediate the fast after-hyperpolarization, dendritic BK channels are responsible for repolarization of dendritic calcium spikes and thereby regulate somatic AP burst firing. We found no evidence for a role of dendritic BK channels in the regulation of backpropagating AP amplitude or duration. These experiments highlight the diverse roles of BK channels in regulating neuronal excitability and indicate that their functional impact depends on their subcellular location.

  14. Prevalence of long-term BK and JC excretion in HIV-infected adults and lack of correlation with serological markers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, W A; Pillay, D; Johnson, M A; Hand, J F; Brown, D W

    1999-12-01

    The natural history of polyomavirus infection, and sensitivity of diagnostic assays remain unclear. A stratified group of 94 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients was studied for both virological and serological markers of active infection with both JC virus and BK virus. JC DNA was detected in the urine of 18 of 81 (22%) patients and BK DNA in 30 (37%) patients. Whilst patients with a low CD(4) cell count (P =.009), CD(4)/CD(8) ratio (P =.031) and beta2M concentration (P =.042) were significantly more likely to be excreting BK, JC excretion did not correlate with any of the immunological markers measured. Furthermore, when all the immunological factors were taken into account, there was no association between either BK or JC excretion and age of the patient (P =.149 for BK, P = 0.891 for JC). BK IgM antibody was detected in only 3 of 30 (10%) BK excretors. JC IgM was detected in 5 of 18 (27. 7%) JC excretors but also in 11 of 63 (17.5%) patients without demonstrable JC excretion. Therefore IgM was a very poor indicator of viruria. One year follow-up on a subset of patients showed that both DNA detection in urine and IgM antibody remain stable over many months despite falling CD(4) cell counts, and would indicate that events leading to enhanced viral production probably occur early after HIV infection. Replication of JC virus in the brain leading to the onset of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) could not be predicted using any of the markers studied. PMID:10534729

  15. Malawi Polyomavirus Is a Prevalent Human Virus That Interacts with Known Tumor Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Christian; Jung, Joonil; Primi, Blake; Wang, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandrasekhar; Duke, Fujiko; Marcelus, Christina; Cheng, Jingwei; Garcea, Robert L.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Malawi polyomavirus (MWPyV) is a recently identified human polyomavirus. Serology for MWPyV VP1 indicates that infection frequently occurs in childhood and reaches a prevalence of 75% in adults. The MWPyV small T antigen (ST) binds protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and the large T antigen (LT) binds pRb, p107, p130, and p53. However, the MWPyV LT was less stable than the simian virus 40 (SV40) LT and was unable to promote the growth of normal cells. This report confirms that MWPyV is a widespread human virus expressing T antigens with low transforming potential. PMID:25320321

  16. Malawi polyomavirus is a prevalent human virus that interacts with known tumor suppressors.

    PubMed

    Berrios, Christian; Jung, Joonil; Primi, Blake; Wang, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandrasekhar; Duke, Fujiko; Marcelus, Christina; Cheng, Jingwei; Garcea, Robert L; Meyerson, Matthew; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-01-01

    Malawi polyomavirus (MWPyV) is a recently identified human polyomavirus. Serology for MWPyV VP1 indicates that infection frequently occurs in childhood and reaches a prevalence of 75% in adults. The MWPyV small T antigen (ST) binds protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and the large T antigen (LT) binds pRb, p107, p130, and p53. However, the MWPyV LT was less stable than the simian virus 40 (SV40) LT and was unable to promote the growth of normal cells. This report confirms that MWPyV is a widespread human virus expressing T antigens with low transforming potential. PMID:25320321

  17. Detection of Human Polyomavirus 7 in human thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rennspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Keijzers, Marlies; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Haugg, Anke; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Christopher B.; De Baets, Marc H.; zur Hausen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the molecular genetics possibly underlying the pathogenesis of human thymoma have been extensively studied, its etiology remains poorly understood. Since murine polyomavirus consistently induces thymomas in mice, we assessed the presence of the novel human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors. Methods HPyV7-DNA Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA-PCR and immuno-histochemistry (IHC) were performed in 37 thymomas. Of these, 26 were previously diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). In addition, 20 thymic hyperplasias and 20 fetal thymic tissues were tested. Results HPyV7-FISH revealed specific nuclear hybridization signals within the neoplastic epithelial cells of 23 thymomas (62.2%). With some exceptions, the HPyV7-FISH data correlated with the HPyV7-DNA PCR. By IHC large T antigen (LTAg) expression of HPyV7 was detected, and double staining confirmed its expression in the neoplastic epithelial cells. Eighteen of the 26 MG-positive and 7 of the 11 MG-negative thymomas were HPyV7-positive. 40% of the 20 hyperplastic thymi were HPyV7-positive by PCR as confirmed by FISH and IHC in the follicular lymphocytes. All 20 fetal thymi tested HPyV7-negative. Conclusions The presence of HPyV7-DNA and LTAg expression in the majority of thymomas possibly link HPyV7 to human thymomagenesis. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the possible associations of HPyV7 and MG. PMID:25526237

  18. Modulation of BK channel voltage gating by different auxiliary β subunits

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Gustavo F.; Neely, Alan; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK) are regulated by a multiplicity of signals. The prevailing view is that different BK gating mechanisms converge to determine channel opening and that these gating mechanisms are allosterically coupled. In most instances the pore forming α subunit of BK is associated with one of four alternative β subunits that appear to target specific gating mechanisms to regulate the channel activity. In particular, β1 stabilizes the active configuration of the BK voltage sensor having a large effect on BK Ca2+ sensitivity. To determine the extent to which β subunits regulate the BK voltage sensor, we measured gating currents induced by the pore-forming BK α subunit alone and with the different β subunits expressed in Xenopus oocytes (β1, β2IR, β3b, and β4). We found that β1, β2, and β4 stabilize the BK voltage sensor in the active conformation. β3 has no effect on voltage sensor equilibrium. In addition, β4 decreases the apparent number of charges per voltage sensor. The decrease in the charge associated with the voltage sensor in α β4 channels explains most of their biophysical properties. For channels composed of the α subunit alone, gating charge increases slowly with pulse duration as expected if a significant fraction of this charge develops with a time course comparable to that of K+ current activation. In the presence of β1, β2, and β4 this slow component develops in advance of and much more rapidly than ion current activation, suggesting that BK channel opening proceeds in two steps. PMID:23112204

  19. Evaluating sewage-associated JCV and BKV polyomaviruses for sourcing human fecal pollution in a coastal river in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Wan, C; Goonetilleke, A; Gardner, T

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the host-sensitivity and host-specificity of JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV) polyomaviruses were evaluated by testing wastewater and fecal samples from nine host groups in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The JCV and BKV polyomaviruses were detected in 63 human wastewater samples collected from primary and secondary effluent, suggesting high sensitivity of these viruses in human wastewater. In the 81 animal wastewater and fecal samples tested, 80 were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) negative for the JCV and BKV markers. Only one sample (out of 81 animal wastewater and fecal samples) from pig wastewater was positive. Nonetheless, the overall host-specificity of these viruses to differentiate between human and animal wastewater and fecal samples was 0.99. To our knowledge, this is the first study in Australia that reports on the high specificity of JCV and BKV polyomaviruses. To evaluate the field application of these viral markers for detecting human fecal pollution, 20 environmental samples were collected from a coastal river. In the 20 samples tested, 15% (3/20) and 70% (14/20) samples exceeded the regulatory guidelines for Escherichia coli and enterococci levels for marine waters. In all, five (25%) samples were PCR positive for JCV and BKV, indicating the presence of human fecal pollution in the coastal river investigated. The results suggest that JCV and BKV detection using PCR could be a useful tool for identifying human-sourced fecal pollution in coastal waters. PMID:21043279

  20. Lipid regulation of BK channel function

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alex M.; Bukiya, Anna N.

    2014-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on lipid modulation of BK (MaxiK, BKCa) current by a direct interaction between lipid and the BK subunits and/or their immediate lipid environment. Direct lipid-BK protein interactions have been proposed for fatty and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, phosphoinositides and cholesterol, evidence for such action being less clear for other lipids. BK α (slo1) subunits are sufficient to support current perturbation by fatty and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, glycerophospholipids and cholesterol, while distinct BK β subunits seem necessary for current modulation by most steroids. Subunit domains or amino acids that participate in lipid action have been identified in a few cases: hslo1 Y318, cerebral artery smooth muscle (cbv1) R334,K335,K336, cbv1 seven cytosolic CRAC domains, slo1 STREX and β1 T169,L172,L173 for docosahexaenoic acid, PIP2, cholesterol, sulfatides, and cholane steroids, respectively. Whether these protein motifs directly bind lipids or rather transmit the energy of lipid binding to other areas and trigger protein conformation change remains unresolved. The impact of direct lipid-BK interaction on physiology is briefly discussed. PMID:25202277

  1. Small and middle T antigens contribute to lytic and abortive polyomavirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerler, H.; Salomon, C.

    1985-02-01

    Using three different polyomavirus hr-t mutants and two polyomavirus mlT mutants, the authors studied induction of S-phase by mutants and wild-type virus in quiescent mouse kidney cells, mouse 3T6 cells, and FR 3T3 cells. At different times after infection, they measured the proportion of T-antigen-positive cells, the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine, the proportion of DNA-synthesizing cells, and the increase in total DNA, RNA, and protein content of the cultures. In permissive mouse cells, they also determined the amount of viral DNA and the proportion of viral capsid-producing cells. In polyomavirus hr-t mutant-infected cultures, the onset of host DNA replication was delayed by several hours, and a smaller proportion of T-antigen-positive cells entered S-phase than in wild-type-infected cultures. Of the two polyomavirus mlT mutants studied, dl-23 behaved similarly to wild-type virus in many, but not all, parameters tested. The poorly replicating but well-transforming mutant dl-8 was able to induce S-phase, and (in permissive cells) progeny virus production, in only about one-third of the T-antigen-positive cells. From the experiments, the authors concluded that mutations affecting small and middle T-antigen cause a reduction in the proportion of cells responding to virus infection and a prolongation of the early phase, i.e., the period before cells center S-phase. In hr-t mutant-infected mouse 3T6 cells, production of viral DNA was <10% of that in wild-type-infected cultures; low hr-t progeny production in 3T6 cells was therefore largely due to poor viral DNA replication.

  2. Identification of an avian polyomavirus associated with Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae).

    PubMed

    Varsani, Arvind; Porzig, Elizabeth L; Jennings, Scott; Kraberger, Simona; Farkas, Kata; Julian, Laurel; Massaro, Melanie; Ballard, Grant; Ainley, David G

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about viruses associated with Antarctic animals, although they are probably widespread. We recovered a novel polyomavirus from Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) faecal matter sampled in a subcolony at Cape Royds, Ross Island, Antarctica. The 4988 nt Adélie penguin polyomavirus (AdPyV) has a typical polyomavirus genome organization with three ORFs that encoded capsid proteins on the one strand and two non-structural protein-coding ORFs on the complementary strand. The genome of AdPyV shared ~60 % pairwise identity with all avipolyomaviruses. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the large T-antigen (T-Ag) amino acid sequences showed that the T-Ag of AdPyV clustered with those of avipolyomaviruses, sharing between 48 and 52 % identities. Only three viruses associated with Adélie penguins have been identified at a genomic level, avian influenza virus subtype H11N2 from the Antarctic Peninsula and, respectively, Pygoscelis adeliae papillomavirus and AdPyV from capes Crozier and Royds on Ross Island. PMID:25537375

  3. Essential role for smooth muscle BK channels in alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengchong; Xi, Qi; Ahmed, Abu; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Dopico, Alejandro M.

    2004-12-01

    Binge drinking is associated with increased risk for cerebrovascular spasm and stroke. Acute exposure to ethanol at concentrations obtained during binge drinking constricts cerebral arteries in several species, including humans, but the mechanisms underlying this action are largely unknown. In a rodent model, we used fluorescence microscopy, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and pharmacological studies in intact cerebral arteries to pinpoint the molecular effectors of ethanol cerebrovascular constriction. Clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol elevated wall intracellular Ca2+ concentration and caused a reversible constriction of cerebral arteries (EC50 = 27 mM; Emax = 100 mM) that depended on voltage-gated Ca2+ entry into myocytes. However, ethanol did not directly increase voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in isolated myocytes. Constriction occurred because of an ethanol reduction in the frequency (-53%) and amplitude (-32%) of transient Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents. Ethanol inhibition of BK transients was caused by a reduction in Ca2+ spark frequency (-49%), a subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal that evokes the BK transients, and a direct inhibition of BK channel steady-state activity (-44%). In contrast, ethanol failed to modify Ca2+ waves, a major vasoconstrictor mechanism. Selective block of BK channels largely prevented ethanol constriction in pressurized arteries. This study pinpoints the Ca2+ spark/BK channel negative-feedback mechanism as the primary effector of ethanol vasoconstriction.

  4. Tamoxifen inhibits BK channels in chick cochlea without alterations in voltage-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mingjie; Duncan, R Keith

    2009-07-01

    Large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated, and voltage-gated potassium channels (BK, BK(Ca), or Maxi-K) play an important role in electrical tuning in nonmammalian vertebrate hair cells. Systematic changes in tuning frequency along the tonotopic axis largely result from variations in BK channel kinetics, but the molecular changes underpinning these functional variations remain unknown. Auxiliary beta(1) have been implicated in low-frequency tuning at the cochlear apex because these subunits dramatically slow channel kinetics. Tamoxifen (Tx), a (xeno)estrogen compound known to activate BK channels through the beta-subunit, was used to test for the functional presence of beta(1). The hypotheses were that Tx would activate the majority of BK channels in hair cells from the cochlear apex due to the presence of beta(1) and that the level of activation would exhibit a tonotopic gradient following the expression profile of beta(1). Outside-out patches of BK channels were excised from tall hair cells along the apical half of the chicken basilar papilla. In low-density patches, single-channel conductance was reduced and the averaged open probability was unaffected by Tx. In high-density patches, the amplitude of ensemble-averaged BK current was inhibited, whereas half-activation potential and activation kinetics were unaffected by Tx. In both cases, no tonotopic Tx-dependent activation of channel activity was observed. Therefore, contrary to the hypotheses, electrophysiological assessment suggests that molecular mechanisms other than auxiliary beta-subunits are involved in generating a tonotopic distribution of BK channel kinetics and electric tuning in chick basilar papilla. PMID:19439526

  5. Shear stress-induced volume decrease in C11-MDCK cells by BK-α/β4

    PubMed Central

    Holtzclaw, J. David; Liu, Liping; Grimm, P. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are expressed in principal cells (PC) and intercalated cells (IC) in mammalian nephrons as BK-α/β1 and BK-α/β4, respectively. IC, which protrude into the lumens of tubules, express substantially more BK than PC despite lacking sufficient Na-K-ATPase to support K secretion. We previously showed in mice that IC exhibit size reduction when experiencing high distal flows induced by a high-K diet. We therefore tested the hypothesis that BK-α/β4 are regulators of IC volume via a shear stress (τ)-induced, calcium-dependent mechanism, resulting in a reduction in intracellular K content. We determined by Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis that C11-Madin-Darby canine kidney cells contained a predominance of BK-α/β4. To determine the role of BK-α/β4 in τ-induced volume reduction, we exposed C11 cells to τ and measured K efflux by flame photometry and cell volume by calcein staining, which changes inversely to cell volume. With 10 dynes/cm2, calcein intensity significantly increased 39% and monovalent cationic content decreased significantly by 37% compared with static conditions. Furthermore, the shear-induced K loss from C11 was abolished by the reduction of extracellular calcium, addition of 5 mM TEA, or BK-β4 small interfering (si) RNA, but not by addition of nontarget siRNA. These results show that BK-α/β4 plays a role in shear-induced K loss from IC, suggesting that BK-α/β4 regulate IC volume during high-flow conditions. Furthermore, these results support the use of C11 cells as in vitro models for studying BK-related functions in IC of the kidney. PMID:20576683

  6. African great apes are naturally infected with polyomaviruses closely related to Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Leendertz, Fabian H; Scuda, Nelly; Cameron, Kenneth N; Kidega, Tonny; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Boesch, Christophe; Calvignac, Sébastien; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The oncogenic Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) infects humans worldwide, but little is known about the occurrence of viruses related to MCPyV in the closest phylogenetic relatives of humans, great apes. We analyzed samples from 30 wild chimpanzees and one captive gorilla and identified two new groups of polyomaviruses (PyVs). These new viruses are by far the closest relatives to MCPyV described to date, providing the first evidence of the natural occurrence of PyVs related to MCPyV in wild great apes. Similar to MCPyV, the prevalence of these viruses is relatively high (>30%). This, together with the fact that humans in West and Central Africa frequently hunt and butcher primates, may point toward further MCPyV-like strains spreading to, or already existing in, our species. PMID:21047967

  7. Detection of BK virus DNA in nasopharyngeal aspirates from children with respiratory infections but not in saliva from immunodeficient and immunocompetent adult patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sundsfjord, A; Spein, A R; Lucht, E; Flaegstad, T; Seternes, O M; Traavik, T

    1994-01-01

    Our understanding of important stages in the pathogenesis of the human polyomavirus BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV) infections is limited. In this context, nasopharyngeal aspirates from 201 children with respiratory diseases and saliva from 60 human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected adults and 10 healthy adult controls were collected and analyzed for the presence of BKV and JCV DNA by PCR. Neither BKV nor JCV DNA was detected in the saliva specimens. We demonstrated BKV DNA, but no infectious BKV, in 2 of 201 nasopharyngeal aspirates. Each sample contained one unique rearranged noncoding control region variant of BKV. The results indicate that (i) BKV and JCV are not regularly associated with respiratory infections in children requiring hospitalization, (ii) nasopharyngeal cells are not an important site for primary replication of human polyomavirus BKV and JCV, and (iii) the salivary glands and oropharyngeal cells seem not to be involved in BKV and JCV persistence. We propose that for the polyomaviruses BKV and JCV the alimentary tract should be considered as a portal of entrance to the human organism. Images PMID:8051277

  8. A Novel Polyomavirus (Goose Hemorrhagic Polyomavirus) Is the Agent of Hemorrhagic Nephritis Enteritis of Geese

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Jean-Luc; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Dubois, Luc; Vuillaume, Aimé; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Pingret, Jean-Luc

    2000-01-01

    We have identified the etiological agent of hemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of geese (HNEG), a fatal disease of European geese. HNEG has been recognized in almost all goose breeding areas, with an epizootic pattern, and up to now, the infectious agent has remained unknown. In order to identify the causative agent, infected tissues from HNEG-affected geese were inoculated to 1-day-old goslings, which then developed clinical signs typical of HNEG. Tissue homogenates from these birds were subjected to Freon extraction followed by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. The resulting main band was examined by electron microscopy and consisted of spherical, naked, papovavirus-like particles approximately 45 nm in diameter. The virus was isolated and propagated in goose kidney cell primary culture. Tissue- or culture-purified virus allowed the experimental reproduction of the disease in goslings. Random PCR amplification of viral nucleic acid produced a 1,175-bp fragment which was shown to be associated with field samples collected from geese affected by HNEG on commercial farms in France. Sequence analysis of the PCR product revealed a unique open reading frame, showing 63 to 72% amino acid similarity with the major capsid protein (VP1) of several polyomaviruses. Finally, based on phylogenetic analysis, we conclude that the causative agent of HNEG is closely related to but clearly distinct from other polyomaviruses; we thus have named this newly identified virus Goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus. PMID:10775588

  9. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  10. Low Na, High K Diet and the Role of Aldosterone in BK-Mediated K Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Ryan J.; Wen, Donghai; Li, Huaqing; Yuan, Yang; Wang-France, Jun; Warner, Paige C.; Sansom, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    A low Na, high K diet (LNaHK) is associated with a low rate of cardiovascular (CV) disease in many societies. Part of the benefit of LNaHK relies on its diuretic effects; however, the role of aldosterone (aldo) in the diuresis is not understood. LNaHK mice exhibit an increase in renal K secretion that is dependent on the large, Ca-activated K channel, (BK-α with accessory BK-β4; BK-α/β4). We hypothesized that aldo causes an osmotic diuresis by increasing BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion in LNaHK mice. We found that the plasma aldo concentration (P[aldo]) was elevated by 10-fold in LNaHK mice compared with control diet (Con) mice. We subjected LNaHK mice to either sham surgery (sham), adrenalectomy (ADX) with low aldo replacement (ADX-LA), or ADX with high aldo replacement (ADX-HA). Compared to sham, the urinary flow, K excretion rate, transtubular K gradient (TTKG), and BK-α and BK-β4 expressions, were decreased in ADX-LA, but not different in ADX-HA. BK-β4 knockout (β4KO) and WT mice exhibited similar K clearance and TTKG in the ADX-LA groups; however, in sham and ADX-HA, the K clearance and TTKG of β4KO were less than WT. In response to amiloride treatment, the osmolar clearance was increased in WT Con, decreased in WT LNaHK, and unchanged in β4KO LNaHK. These data show that the high P[aldo] of LNaHK mice is necessary to generate a high rate of BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion, which creates an osmotic diuresis that may contribute to a reduction in CV disease. PMID:25607984

  11. Closed state-coupled C-type inactivation in BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiusheng; Li, Qin; Aldrich, Richard W

    2016-06-21

    Ion channels regulate ion flow by opening and closing their pore gates. K(+) channels commonly possess two pore gates, one at the intracellular end for fast channel activation/deactivation and the other at the selectivity filter for slow C-type inactivation/recovery. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel lacks a classic intracellular bundle-crossing activation gate and normally show no C-type inactivation. We hypothesized that the BK channel's activation gate may spatially overlap or coexist with the C-type inactivation gate at or near the selectivity filter. We induced C-type inactivation in BK channels and studied the relationship between activation/deactivation and C-type inactivation/recovery. We observed prominent slow C-type inactivation/recovery in BK channels by an extreme low concentration of extracellular K(+) together with a Y294E/K/Q/S or Y279F mutation whose equivalent in Shaker channels (T449E/K/D/Q/S or W434F) caused a greatly accelerated rate of C-type inactivation or constitutive C-inactivation. C-type inactivation in most K(+) channels occurs upon sustained membrane depolarization or channel opening and then recovers during hyperpolarized membrane potentials or channel closure. However, we found that the BK channel C-type inactivation occurred during hyperpolarized membrane potentials or with decreased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and recovered with depolarized membrane potentials or elevated [Ca(2+)]i Constitutively open mutation prevented BK channels from C-type inactivation. We concluded that BK channel C-type inactivation is closed state-dependent and that its extents and rates inversely correlate with channel-open probability. Because C-type inactivation can involve multiple conformational changes at the selectivity filter, we propose that the BK channel's normal closing may represent an early conformational stage of C-type inactivation. PMID:27298368

  12. BK Knockout by TALEN-Mediated Gene Targeting in Osteoblasts: KCNMA1 Determines the Proliferation and Differentiation of Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Hongya; Gao, Jianjun; Dong, Jibin; Tao, Jie; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels participate in many important physiological functions in excitable tissues such as neurons, cardiac and smooth muscles, whereas the knowledge of BK channels in bone tissues and osteoblasts remains elusive. To investigate the role of BK channels in osteoblasts, we used transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to establish a BK knockout cell line on rat ROS17/2.8 osteoblast, and detected the proliferation and mineralization of the BK-knockout cells. Our study found that the BK-knockout cells significantly decreased the ability of proliferation and mineralization as osteoblasts, compared to the wild type cells. The overall expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes in the BK-knockout cells was significantly lower than that in wild type osteoblast cells. The BK-knockout osteoblast cell line in our study displays a phenotype decrease in osteoblast function which can mimic the pathological state of osteoblast and thus provide a working cell line as a tool for study of osteoblast function and bone related diseases. PMID:27329042

  13. Allosteric interactions and the modular nature of the voltage- and Ca2+-activated (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Ramon; Morera, Francisco J; Zaelzer, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    The high conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel is one of the most broadly expressed channels in mammals. This channel is named BK for ‘big K’ because of its single-channel conductance that can be as large as 250 pS in 100 mm symmetrical K+. BK channels increase their activity by membrane depolarization or an increase in cytosolic Ca2+. One of the key features that defines the behaviour of BK channels is that neither Ca2+ nor voltage is strictly necessary for channel activation. This and several other observations led to the idea that both Ca2+ and voltage increase the open probability by an allosteric mechanism. In this type of mechanism, the processes of voltage sensor displacement, Ca2+ binding and pore opening are independent equilibria that interact allosterically with each other. These allosteric interactions in BK channels reside in the structural characteristics of the BK channel in the sense that voltage and Ca2+ sensors and the pore need to be contained in different structures or ‘modules’. Through electrophysiological, mutagenesis, biochemical and fluorescence studies these modules have been identified and, more important, some of the interactions between them have been unveiled. In this review, we have covered the main advances achieved during the last few years in the elucidation of the structure of the BK channel and how this is related with its function as an allosteric protein. PMID:20603335

  14. Detection of JC and BK viral genome in specimens of HIV-1 infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Degener, A M; Pietropaolo, V; Di Taranto, C; Rizzuti, V; Ameglio, F; Cordiali Fei, P; Caprilli, F; Capitanio, B; Sinibaldi, L; Orsi, N

    1997-04-01

    Human polyomaviruses JC and BK are ubiquitous in healthy human adults, persist as latent viruses and can be reactivated in the immunodeficient host giving different pathologies. Due to the experimental evidence of their potential oncogenicity and neurotropism, as well as to the enhanced viral production induced by co-infection with HIV-1, a possible role of these polyomaviruses has been suggested in AIDS-associated progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) and Kaposi's sarcoma. JCV and BKV DNA was detected by PCR in urine and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using primers specific for structural (VP1) and regulatory (R) regions. In HIV-positive subjects BKV and JCV sequences were found respectively in 8.1% and 31.6% of urine samples whereas in PBMC the positivity increased to 22.8% for JCV and in 51.1% for BKV. Our results indicated that, at DNA level, the presence of BKV and JCV in urine and PBMC was higher in HIV-1 positive subjects than in HIV-1 negative subjects and that, in contrast with JCV, BKV positivity was inversely related to blood CD4-level. Intravenous drug users (IVDU) showed significant increases in both BKV and JCV positivity, while an increased JCV viruria was found in homo-bisexuals compared to heterosexuals. The high prevalence of viral DNA in PBMC of both healthy and HIV-positive individuals agrees with the hypothesis that lymphocytes may represent a viral latency site permitting the establishment of virus persistence in affected organs, or a vehicle for the spread of the infection to different tissues. PMID:9208421

  15. Sequences flanking the pentanucleotide T-antigen binding sites in the polyomavirus core origin help determine selectivity of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Li, B L; Hock, M; Wang, E; Folk, W R

    1995-01-01

    Replication of the genomes of the polyomaviruses requires two virus-specified elements, the cis-acting origin of DNA replication, with its auxiliary DNA elements, and the trans-acting viral large tumor antigen (T antigen). Appropriate interactions between them initiate the assembly of a replication complex which, together with cellular proteins, is responsible for primer synthesis and DNA chain elongation. The organization of cis-acting elements within the origins of the polyomaviruses which replicate in mammalian cells is conserved; however, these origins are sufficiently distinct that the T antigen of one virus may function inefficiently or not at all to initiate replication at the origin of another virus. We have studied the basis for such replication selectivity between the murine polyomavirus T antigen and the primate lymphotropic polyomavirus origin. The murine polyomavirus T antigen is capable of carrying out the early steps of the assembly of an initiation complex at the lymphotropic papovavirus origin, including binding to and deformation of origin sequences in vitro. However, the T antigen inefficiently unwinds the origin, and unwinding is influenced by sequences flanking the T antigen pentanucleotide binding sites on the late side of the viral core origin. These same sequences contribute to the replication selectivity observed in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that the inefficient unwinding is the cause of the replication defect. These observations suggest a mechanism by which origins of DNA replication can evolve replication selectivity and by which the function of diverse cellular origins might be temporally activated during the S phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. PMID:7494263

  16. Novel Polyomavirus Detected in the Feces of a Chimpanzee by Nested Broad-Spectrum PCR

    PubMed Central

    Johne, Reimar; Enderlein, Dirk; Nieper, Hermann; Müller, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    In order to screen for new polyomaviruses in samples derived from various animal species, degenerated PCR primer pairs were constructed. By using a nested PCR protocol, the sensitive detection of nine different polyomavirus genomes was demonstrated. The screening of field samples revealed the presence of a new polyomavirus, tentatively designated chimpanzee polyomavirus (ChPyV), in the feces of a juvenile chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Analysis of the region encoding the major capsid protein VP1 revealed a unique insertion in the EF loop of the protein and showed that ChPyV is a distinct virus related to the monkey polyomavirus B-lymphotropic polyomavirus and the human polyomavirus JC polyomavirus. PMID:15731285

  17. Novel polyomavirus detected in the feces of a chimpanzee by nested broad-spectrum PCR.

    PubMed

    Johne, Reimar; Enderlein, Dirk; Nieper, Hermann; Müller, Hermann

    2005-03-01

    In order to screen for new polyomaviruses in samples derived from various animal species, degenerated PCR primer pairs were constructed. By using a nested PCR protocol, the sensitive detection of nine different polyomavirus genomes was demonstrated. The screening of field samples revealed the presence of a new polyomavirus, tentatively designated chimpanzee polyomavirus (ChPyV), in the feces of a juvenile chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Analysis of the region encoding the major capsid protein VP1 revealed a unique insertion in the EF loop of the protein and showed that ChPyV is a distinct virus related to the monkey polyomavirus B-lymphotropic polyomavirus and the human polyomavirus JC polyomavirus. PMID:15731285

  18. Western blot analysis of BK channel β1‐subunit expression should be interpreted cautiously when using commercially available antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Fernandes, Roxanne; Kadrofske, Mark M.; Lockwood, Lizbeth R.; Galligan, James J.; Xu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Large conductance Ca2+‐activated K+ (BK) channels consist of pore‐forming α‐ and accessory β‐subunits. There are four β‐subunit subtypes (β1–β4), BK β1‐subunit is specific for smooth muscle cells (SMC). Reduced BK β1‐subunit expression is associated with SMC dysfunction in animal models of human disease, because downregulation of BK β1‐subunit reduces channel activity and increases SMC contractility. Several anti‐BK β1‐subunit antibodies are commercially available; however, the specificity of most antibodies has not been tested or confirmed in the tissues from BK β1‐subunit knockout (KO) mice. In this study, we tested the specificity and sensitivity of six commercially available antibodies from five manufacturers. We performed western blot analysis on BK β1‐subunit enriched tissues (mesenteric arteries and colons) and non‐SM tissue (cortex of kidney) from wild‐type (WT) and BK β1‐KO mice. We found that antibodies either detected protein bands of the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from both WT and BK β1‐KO mice or failed to detect protein bands at the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from WT mice, suggesting that these antibodies may lack specificity for the BK β1‐subunit. The absence of BK β1‐subunit mRNA expression in arteries, colons, and kidneys from BK β1‐KO mice was confirmed by RT‐PCR analysis. We conclude that these commercially available antibodies might not be reliable tools for studying BK β1‐subunit expression in murine tissues under the denaturing conditions that we have used. Data obtained using commercially available antibodies should be interpreted cautiously. Our studies underscore the importance of proper negative controls in western blot analyses. PMID:25355855

  19. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Yolima P.; Granados, Sara T.; Latorre, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM) and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BK) is unique among the superfamily of K+ channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K+ channels) and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K+ conductance domains (RCK domains), where the Ca2+-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3, and β4) and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous, and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above. PMID:25346693

  20. Two classes of regulatory subunits coassemble in the same BK channel and independently regulate gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J.

    2015-09-01

    High resolution proteomics increasingly reveals that most native ion channels are assembled in macromolecular complexes. However, whether different partners have additive or cooperative functional effects, or whether some combinations of proteins may preclude assembly of others are largely unexplored topics. The large conductance Ca2+-and-voltage activated potassium channel (BK) is well-suited to discern nuanced differences in regulation arising from combinations of subunits. Here we examine whether assembly of two different classes of regulatory proteins, β and γ, in BK channels is exclusive or independent. Our results show that both γ1 and up to four β2-subunits can coexist in the same functional BK complex, with the gating shift caused by β2-subunits largely additive with that produced by the γ1-subunit(s). The multiplicity of β:γ combinations that can participate in a BK complex therefore allow a range of BK channels with distinct functional properties tuned by the specific stoichiometry of the contributing subunits.

  1. Evaluating the BK 21 Program. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seong, Somi; Popper, Steven W.; Goldman, Charles A.; Evans, David K.; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    The Brain Korea 21 program (BK21), an effort to improve Korean universities and research, has attracted a great deal of attention in Korea, producing the need to understand how well the program is meeting its goals. RAND developed a logic model for identifying program goals and dynamics, suggested quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods,…

  2. Blocking the BK Channel Impedes Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Elizabeth A.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Big-K[superscript +] conductance (BK)-channel mediated fast afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) following action potentials are reduced after eyeblink conditioning. Blocking BK channels with paxilline increases evoked firing frequency in vitro and spontaneous pyramidal activity in vivo. To examine how increased excitability after BK-channel blockade…

  3. p53 targets simian virus 40 large T antigen for acetylation by CBP.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Danielle L; Kung, Andrew L; DeCaprio, James A

    2004-08-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (T Ag) interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 and the transcriptional coactivators CBP and p300. Binding of these cellular proteins in a ternary complex has been implicated in T Ag-mediated transformation. It has been suggested that the ability of CBP/p300 to modulate p53 function underlies p53's regulation of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we provide further evidence that CBP activity may be mediated through its synergistic action with p53. We demonstrate that SV40 T Ag is acetylated in vivo in a p53-dependent manner and T Ag acetylation is largely mediated by CBP. The acetylation of T Ag is dependent on its interaction with p53 and on p53's interaction with CBP. We have mapped the site of acetylation on T Ag to the C-terminal lysine residue 697. This acetylation site is conserved between the T antigens of the human polyomaviruses JC and BK, which are also known to interact with p53. We show that both JC and BK T antigens are also acetylated at corresponding sites in vivo. While other proteins are known to be acetylated by CBP/p300, none are known to depend on p53 for acetylation. T Ag acetylation may provide a regulatory mechanism for T Ag binding to a cellular factor or play a role in another aspect of T Ag function. PMID:15254196

  4. Cell cycle control of polyomavirus-induced transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H H; Fluck, M M

    1993-01-01

    The cell cycle dependence of polyomavirus transformation was analyzed in infections of nonpermissive Fischer rat (FR3T3) cells released from G0. A 5- to 100-fold (average, ca. 20-fold) difference in relative frequency of transformation was found for cells infected in the early G1 phase of the cell cycle compared with cells infected in G2. Differences in the relative level of early viral gene expression in those two cell populations were equivalent to those obtained for transformation frequencies. The difference in transformation potential was accounted for only in part by a cell cycle control of viral adsorption (2- to 15-fold effect). Furthermore, in cells infected in the early G1 phase, viral gene expression was induced as a big synchronous burst of large transcripts of variable sizes, delayed till the G1 phase of the cell cycle after that in which infection took place. Thus, the results demonstrate that the abortive infection cycle of G0-released FR3T3 cells is cell cycle regulated at least at two steps: adsorption and another early step, nuclear transport, decapsidation, up to or including the transcription of the viral early genes. The cell cycle regulation of these steps results in a similar regulation of the abortive and stable transformation processes, although it is more pronounced for the latter. A model implicating c-fos and c-jun is proposed. Images PMID:8383223

  5. JC polyomavirus in the aetiology and pathophysiology of glial tumours.

    PubMed

    Eftimov, Tihomir; Enchev, Yavor; Tsekov, Iliya; Simeonov, Plamen; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Encheva, Elitsa

    2016-01-01

    Glial brain tumours with their poor prognosis, limited treatment modalities and unclear detailed pathophysiology represent a significant health concern. The purpose of the current study was to investigate and describe the possible role of the human polyomavirus JC as an underlying cancerogenic or co-cancerogenic factor in the complex processes of glial tumour induction and development. Samples from 101 patients with glial tumours were obtained during neurosurgical tumour resection. Small tissue pieces were taken from several areas of the histologically verified solid tumour core. Biopsies were used for DNA extraction and subsequent amplification reactions of sequences from the JC viral genome. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for detection and quantification of its non-coding control region (NCCR) and gene encoding the regulatory protein Large T antigen (LT). An average of 37.6% of all patients was found to be LT positive, whereas only 6.9% tested positive for NCCR. The analysis of the results demonstrated significant variance between the determined LT prevalence and the rate for NCCR, with a low starting copy number in all positive samples and threshold cycles in the range of 36 to 42 representing viral load in the range from 10 to 1000 copies/μl. The results most probably indicate incomplete JC viral replication. Under such conditions, mutations in the host cell genome may be accumulated due to interference of the virus with the host cell machinery, and eventually malignant transformation may occur. PMID:26560882

  6. Single-channel kinetics of BK (Slo1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yanyan; Magleby, Karl L.

    2014-01-01

    Single-channel kinetics has proven a powerful tool to reveal information about the gating mechanisms that control the opening and closing of ion channels. This introductory review focuses on the gating of large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK or Slo1) channels at the single-channel level. It starts with single-channel current records and progresses to presentation and analysis of single-channel data and the development of gating mechanisms in terms of discrete state Markov (DSM) models. The DSM models are formulated in terms of the tetrameric modular structure of BK channels, consisting of a central transmembrane pore-gate domain (PGD) attached to four surrounding transmembrane voltage sensing domains (VSD) and a large intracellular cytosolic domain (CTD), also referred to as the gating ring. The modular structure and data analysis shows that the Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating considered separately can each be approximated by 10-state two-tiered models with five closed states on the upper tier and five open states on the lower tier. The modular structure and joint Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating are consistent with a 50 state two-tiered model with 25 closed states on the upper tier and 25 open states on the lower tier. Adding an additional tier of brief closed (flicker states) to the 10-state or 50-state models improved the description of the gating. For fixed experimental conditions a channel would gate in only a subset of the potential number of states. The detected number of states and the correlations between adjacent interval durations are consistent with the tiered models. The examined models can account for the single-channel kinetics and the bursting behavior of gating. Ca2+ and voltage activate BK channels by predominantly increasing the effective opening rate of the channel with a smaller decrease in the effective closing rate. Ca2+ and depolarization thus activate by mainly destabilizing the closed states. PMID:25653620

  7. Central role of the BK channel in urinary bladder smooth muscle physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The physiological functions of the urinary bladder are to store and periodically expel urine. These tasks are facilitated by the contraction and relaxation of the urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM), also known as detrusor smooth muscle, which comprises the bladder wall. The large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK, BKCa, MaxiK, Slo1, or KCa1.1) channel is highly expressed in UBSM and is arguably the most important physiologically relevant K+ channel that regulates UBSM function. Its significance arises from the fact that the BK channel is the only K+ channel that is activated by increases in both voltage and intracellular Ca2+. The BK channels control UBSM excitability and contractility by maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping the repolarization phase of the spontaneous action potentials that determine UBSM spontaneous rhythmic contractility. In UBSM, these channels have complex regulatory mechanisms involving integrated intracellular Ca2+ signals, protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and close functional interactions with muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors. BK channel dysfunction is implicated in some forms of bladder pathologies, such as detrusor overactivity, and related overactive bladder. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the functional role of UBSM BK channels under normal and pathophysiological conditions and provides new insight toward the BK channels as targets for pharmacological or genetic control of UBSM function. Modulation of UBSM BK channels can occur by directly or indirectly targeting their regulatory mechanisms, which has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches for bladder dysfunction, such as overactive bladder and detrusor underactivity. PMID:24990859

  8. Acid-sensing ion channels interact with and inhibit BK K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Petroff, Elena Yermolaieva; Price, Margaret P.; Snitsarev, Vladislav; Gong, Huiyu; Korovkina, Victoria; Abboud, Francois M.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are neuronal non-voltage-gated cation channels that are activated when extracellular pH falls. They contribute to sensory function and nociception in the peripheral nervous system, and in the brain they contribute to synaptic plasticity and fear responses. Some of the physiologic consequences of disrupting ASIC genes in mice suggested that ASIC channels might modulate neuronal function by mechanisms in addition to their H+-evoked opening. Within ASIC channel's large extracellular domain, we identified sequence resembling that in scorpion toxins that inhibit K+ channels. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that ASIC channels might inhibit K+ channel function by coexpressing ASIC1a and the high-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel. We found that ASIC1a associated with BK channels and inhibited their current. Reducing extracellular pH disrupted the association and relieved the inhibition. BK channels, in turn, altered the kinetics of ASIC1a current. In addition to BK, ASIC1a inhibited voltage-gated Kv1.3 channels. Other ASIC channels also inhibited BK, although acidosis-dependent relief of inhibition varied. These results reveal a mechanism of ion channel interaction and reciprocal regulation. Finding that a reduced pH activated ASIC1a and relieved BK inhibition suggests that extracellular protons may enhance the activity of channels with opposing effects on membrane voltage. The wide and varied expression patterns of ASICs, BK, and related K+ channels suggest broad opportunities for this signaling system to alter neuronal function. PMID:18287010

  9. TRPV1 channels are functionally coupled with BK(mSlo1) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Yongfeng; Hou, Panpan; Yan, Zonghe; Kong, Wenjuan; Liu, Beiying; Li, Xia; Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuexuan; Qin, Feng; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel is a nonselective cation channel activated by a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, such as temperature (≥42 °C), capsaicin, a pungent compound in hot chili peppers, and allyl isothiocyanate. Large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels regulate the electric activities and neurotransmitter releases in excitable cells, responding to changes in membrane potentials and elevation of cytosolic calcium ions (Ca(2+)). However, it is unknown whether the TRPV1 channels are coupled with the BK channels. Using patch-clamp recording combined with an infrared laser device, we found that BK channels could be activated at 0 mV by a Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels not the intracellular calcium stores in submilliseconds. The local calcium concentration around BK is estimated over 10 μM. The crosstalk could be affected by 10 mM BAPTA, whereas 5 mM EGTA was ineffectual. Fluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments also showed that BK and TRPV1 were able to form a TRPV1-BK complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRPV1-BK coupling also occurs in dosal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which plays a critical physiological role in regulating the "pain" signal transduction pathway in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:24147119

  10. The role of the BK channel in ethanol response behaviors: evidence from model organism and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Bettinger, Jill C.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant public health problem. Understanding the molecular effects of ethanol is important for the identification of at risk individuals, as well as the development of novel pharmacotherapies. The large conductance calcium sensitive potassium (BK) channel has emerged as an important player in the behavioral response to ethanol in genetic studies in several model organisms and in humans. The BK channel, slo-1, was identified in a forward genetics screen as a major ethanol target in C. elegans for the effects of ethanol on locomotion and egg-laying behaviors. Regulation of the expression of the BK channel, slo, in Drosophila underlies the development of rapid tolerance to ethanol and benzyl alcohol sedation. Rodent expression studies of the BK-encoding KCNMA1 gene have identified regulation of mRNA levels in response to ethanol exposure, and knock out studies in mice have demonstrated that the β subunits of the BK channel, β1 and β4, can modulate ethanol sensitivity of the channel in electrophysiological preparations, and can influence drinking behavior. In human genetics studies, both KCNMA1 and the genes encoding β subunits of the BK channel have been associated with alcohol dependence. This review describes the genetic data for a role for BK channels in mediating behavioral responses to ethanol across these species. PMID:25249984

  11. Similar enhancement of BK(Ca) channel function despite different aerobic exercise frequency in aging cerebrovascular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Liu, B; Xiang, S; Shi, L

    2016-07-18

    Aerobic exercise showed beneficial influence on cardiovascular systems in aging, and mechanisms underlying vascular adaption remain unclear. Large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels play critical roles in regulating cellular excitability and vascular tone. This study determined the effects of aerobic exercise on aging-associated functional changes in BK(Ca) channels in cerebrovascular myocytes, Male Wistar rats aged 20-22 months were randomly assigned to sedentary (O-SED), low training frequency (O-EXL), and high training frequency group (O-EXH). Young rats were used as control. Compared to young rats, whole-cell BK(Ca) current was decreased, and amplitude of spontaneous transient outward currents were reduced. The open probability and Ca(2+)/voltage sensitivity of single BK(Ca) channel were declined in O-SED, accompanied with a reduction of tamoxifen-induced BK(Ca) activation; the mean open time of BK(Ca) channels was shortened whereas close time was prolonged. Aerobic exercise training markedly alleviated the aging-associated decline independent of training frequency. Exercise three times rather than five times weekly may be a time and cost-saving training volume required to offer beneficial effects to offset the functional declines of BK(Ca) during aging. PMID:27070745

  12. Conopeptide Vt3.1 Preferentially Inhibits BK Potassium Channels Containing β4 Subunits via Electrostatic Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Chang, Shan; Yang, Longjin; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Yang, Xiao; Moller, Alyssa; Wang, Chunguang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Chi, Chengwu; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    BK channel β subunits (β1–β4) modulate the function of channels formed by slo1 subunits to produce tissue-specific phenotypes. The molecular mechanism of how the homologous β subunits differentially alter BK channel functions and the role of different BK channel functions in various physiologic processes remain unclear. By studying channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we show a novel disulfide-cross-linked dimer conopeptide, Vt3.1 that preferentially inhibits BK channels containing the β4 subunit, which is most abundantly expressed in brain and important for neuronal functions. Vt3.1 inhibits the currents by a maximum of 71%, shifts the G-V relation by 45 mV approximately half-saturation concentrations, and alters both open and closed time of single channel activities, indicating that the toxin alters voltage dependence of the channel. Vt3.1 contains basic residues and inhibits voltage-dependent activation by electrostatic interactions with acidic residues in the extracellular loops of the slo1 and β4 subunits. These results suggest a large interaction surface between the slo1 subunit of BK channels and the β4 subunit, providing structural insight into the molecular interactions between slo1 and β4 subunits. The results also suggest that Vt3.1 is an excellent tool for studying β subunit modulation of BK channels and for understanding the physiological roles of BK channels in neurophysiology. PMID:24398688

  13. Tuning the mechanosensitivity of a BK channel by changing the linker length.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hucheng; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    Some large-conductance Ca(2+) and voltage-activated K(+)(BK) channels are activated by membrane stretch. However, the mechanism of mechano-gating of the BK channels is still not well understood. Previous studies have led to the proposal that the linker-gating ring complex functions as a passive spring, transducing the force generated by intracellular Ca(2+) to the gate to open the channel. This raises the question as to whether membrane stretch is also transmitted to the gate of mechanosensitive (MS) BK channels via the linker-gating complex. To study this, we changed the linker length in the stretch-activated BK channel (SAKCaC), and examined the effect of membrane stretch on the gating of the resultant mutant channels. Shortening the linker increased, whereas extending the linker reduced, the channel mechanosensitivity both in the presence and in the absence of intracellular Ca(2+). However, the voltage and Ca(2+) sensitivities were not significantly altered by membrane stretch. Furthermore, the SAKCaC became less sensitive to membrane stretch at relatively high intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations or membrane depolarization. These observations suggest that once the channel is in the open-state conformation, tension on the spring is partially released and membrane stretch is less effective. Our results are consistent with the idea that membrane stretch is transferred to the gate via the linker-gating ring complex of the MS BK channels. PMID:18663377

  14. Extrapolating microdomain Ca2+ dynamics using BK channels as a Ca2+ sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Panpan; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Haowen; Yuchi, Ming; Zhang, Guohui; Wu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenping; Ding, Mingyue; Cui, Jianming; Wu, Zhengxing; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiuping

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ ions play crucial roles in mediating physiological and pathophysiological processes, yet Ca2+ dynamics local to the Ca2+ source, either from influx via calcium permeable ion channels on plasmic membrane or release from internal Ca2+ stores, is difficult to delineate. Large-conductance calcium-activated K+ (BK-type) channels, abundantly distribute in excitable cells and often localize to the proximity of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), spatially enabling the coupling of the intracellular Ca2+ signal to the channel gating to regulate membrane excitability and spike firing patterns. Here we utilized the sensitivity and dynamic range of BK to explore non-uniform Ca2+ local transients in the microdomain of VGCCs. Accordingly, we applied flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ to activate BK channels and determine their intrinsic sensitivity to Ca2+. We found that uncaging Ca2+ activated biphasic BK currents with fast and slow components (time constants being τf ≈ 0.2 ms and τs ≈ 10 ms), which can be accounted for by biphasic Ca2+ transients following light photolysis. We estimated the Ca2+-binding rate constant kb (≈1.8 × 108 M−1s−1) for mSlo1 and further developed a model in which BK channels act as a calcium sensor capable of quantitatively predicting local microdomain Ca2+ transients in the vicinity of VGCCs during action potentials. PMID:26776352

  15. Extrapolating microdomain Ca(2+) dynamics using BK channels as a Ca(2+) sensor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Panpan; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Haowen; Yuchi, Ming; Zhang, Guohui; Wu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenping; Ding, Mingyue; Cui, Jianming; Wu, Zhengxing; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiuping

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) ions play crucial roles in mediating physiological and pathophysiological processes, yet Ca(2+) dynamics local to the Ca(2+) source, either from influx via calcium permeable ion channels on plasmic membrane or release from internal Ca(2+) stores, is difficult to delineate. Large-conductance calcium-activated K(+) (BK-type) channels, abundantly distribute in excitable cells and often localize to the proximity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs), spatially enabling the coupling of the intracellular Ca(2+) signal to the channel gating to regulate membrane excitability and spike firing patterns. Here we utilized the sensitivity and dynamic range of BK to explore non-uniform Ca(2+) local transients in the microdomain of VGCCs. Accordingly, we applied flash photolysis of caged Ca(2+) to activate BK channels and determine their intrinsic sensitivity to Ca(2+). We found that uncaging Ca(2+) activated biphasic BK currents with fast and slow components (time constants being τf ≈ 0.2 ms and τs ≈ 10 ms), which can be accounted for by biphasic Ca(2+) transients following light photolysis. We estimated the Ca(2+)-binding rate constant kb (≈1.8 × 10(8)  M(-1) s(-1)) for mSlo1 and further developed a model in which BK channels act as a calcium sensor capable of quantitatively predicting local microdomain Ca(2+) transients in the vicinity of VGCCs during action potentials. PMID:26776352

  16. Smooth muscle BK channel activity influences blood pressure independent of vascular tone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Gregor; Faulhaber, Jörg; Seniuk, Anika; Ehmke, Heimo; Pongs, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is an important determinant of vascular tone and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Both activities depend on the ancillary BKβ1 subunit. To determine the significance of smooth muscle BK channel activity for blood pressure regulation, we investigated the potential link between changes in arterial tone and altered blood pressure in BKβ1 knockout (BKβ1−/−) mice from three different genetically defined strains. While vascular tone was consistently increased in all BKβ1−/− mice independent of genetic background, BKβ1−/− strains exhibited increased (strain A), unaltered (strain B) or decreased (strain C) mean arterial blood pressures compared to their corresponding BKβ1+/+ controls. In agreement with previous data on aldosterone regulation by renal/adrenal BK channel function, BKβ1−/− strain A mice have increased plasma aldosterone and increased blood pressure. Consistently, blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors by spironolactone treatment reversibly restored the elevated blood pressure to the BKβ1+/+ strain A level. In contrast, loss of BKβ1 did not affect plasma aldosterone in strain C mice. Smooth muscle-restricted restoration of BKβ1 expression increased blood pressure in BKβ1−/− strain C mice, implying that impaired smooth muscle BK channel activity lowers blood pressure in these animals. We conclude that BK channel activity directly affects vascular tone but influences blood pressure independent of this effect via different pathways. PMID:24687584

  17. The regulation of BK channel activity by pre- and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Barry D.; Braun, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels represent an important pathway for the outward flux of K+ ions from the intracellular compartment in response to membrane depolarization, and/or an elevation in cytosolic free [Ca2+]. They are functionally expressed in a range of mammalian tissues (e.g., nerve and smooth muscles), where they can either enhance or dampen membrane excitability. The diversity of BK channel activity results from the considerable alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational modification (e.g., phosphorylation) of key domains within the pore-forming α subunit of the channel complex. Most of these modifications are regulated by distinct upstream cell signaling pathways that influence the structure and/or gating properties of the holo-channel and ultimately, cellular function. The channel complex may also contain auxiliary subunits that further affect channel gating and behavior, often in a tissue-specific manner. Recent studies in human and animal models have provided strong evidence that abnormal BK channel expression/function contributes to a range of pathologies in nerve and smooth muscle. By targeting the upstream regulatory events modulating BK channel behavior, it may be possible to therapeutically intervene and alter BK channel expression/function in a beneficial manner. PMID:25202279

  18. Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Siebrasse, Erica A.; Nguyen, Nang L.; Willby, Melisa J.; Erdman, Dean D.; Menegus, Marilyn A.

    2016-01-01

    WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) was detected in a bone marrow transplant recipient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome who died in 2001. Crystalline lattices of polyomavirus-like particles were observed in the patient’s lung by electron microscopy. WUPyV was detected in the lung and other tissues by real-time quantitative PCR and identified in the lung and trachea by immunohistochemistry. A subset of WUPyV-positive cells in the lung had morphologic features of macrophages. Although the role of WUPyV as a human pathogen remains unclear, these results clearly demonstrate evidence for infection of respiratory tract tissues in this patient. PMID:26691850

  19. Collinearly-improved BK evolution meets the HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancu, E.; Madrigal, J. D.; Mueller, A. H.; Soyez, G.; Triantafyllopoulos, D. N.

    2015-11-01

    In a previous publication, we have established a collinearly-improved version of the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation, which resums to all orders the radiative corrections enhanced by large double transverse logarithms. Here, we study the relevance of this equation as a tool for phenomenology, by confronting it to the HERA data. To that aim, we first improve the perturbative accuracy of our resummation, by including two classes of single-logarithmic corrections: those generated by the first non-singular terms in the DGLAP splitting functions and those expressing the one-loop running of the QCD coupling. The equation thus obtained includes all the next-to-leading order corrections to the BK equation which are enhanced by (single or double) collinear logarithms. We then use numerical solutions to this equation to fit the HERA data for the electron-proton reduced cross-section at small Bjorken x. We obtain good quality fits for physically acceptable initial conditions. Our best fit, which shows a good stability up to virtualities as large as Q2 = 400 GeV2 for the exchanged photon, uses as an initial condition the running-coupling version of the McLerran-Venugopalan model, with the QCD coupling running according to the smallest dipole prescription.

  20. Gaia15aao is ASASSN-15bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, L.

    2015-02-01

    The supernova Gaia15aao reported in ATEL #7014 was first discovered by the ASAS-SN group as ASASSN-15bk on 2015-01-19.62 (ATEL #6979) and classified spectroscopically (ATEL #6988) on 2015-01-25. Gaia observation from 2015-01-12 preceded ASASSN's detection by about a week, however, the actual discovery in the Gaia data happened on 2015-01-26.

  1. Convergent evolution of alternative splices at domain boundaries of the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anthony A; Aldrich, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread mechanism for generating transcript diversity in higher eukaryotic genomes. The alternative splices of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel have been the subject of a good deal of experimental functional characterization in the Arthropoda, Chordata, and Nematoda phyla. In this review, we examine a list of splices of the BK channel by manual curation of Unigene clusters mapped to mouse, human, chicken, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes. We find that BK alternative splices do not appear to be conserved across phyla. Despite this lack of conservation, splices occur in both vertebrates and invertebrates at identical regions of the channel at experimentally established domain boundaries. The fact that, across phyla, unique splices occur at experimentally established domain boundaries suggests a prominent role for the convergent evolution of alternative splices that produce functional changes via changes in interdomain communication. PMID:18694345

  2. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1–specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J.; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M.; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show “recognition holes”; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  3. JC Polyomavirus Infection of Primary Human Renal Epithelial Cells Is Controlled by a Type I IFN-Induced Response

    PubMed Central

    Assetta, Benedetta; De Cecco, Marco; O’Hara, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The JC and BK human polyomaviruses (JCPyV and BKPyV, respectively) establish lifelong persistent infections in the kidney. In immunosuppressed individuals, JCPyV causes progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, and BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVN). In this study, we compared JCPyV and BKPyV infections in primary human renal proximal tubule epithelial (HRPTE) cells. JCPyV established a persistent infection, but BKPyV killed the cells in 15 days. To identify the cellular factors responsible for controlling JCPyV infection and promoting viral persistence, we profiled the transcriptomes of JCPyV- and BKPyV-infected cells at several time points postinfection. We found that infection with both viruses induced interferon production but that interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) were only activated in the JCPyV-infected cells. Phosphorylated STAT1 and IRF9, which are responsible for inducing ISGs, translocated to the nucleus of JCPyV-infected cells but did not in BKPyV-infected cells. In BKPyV-infected cells, two critical suppressors of cytokine signaling, SOCS3 and SOCS1, were induced. Infection with BKPyV but not JCPyV caused reorganization of PML bodies that are associated with inactivating antiviral responses. Blockade of the interferon receptor and neutralization of soluble interferon alpha (IFN-α) and IFN-β partially alleviated the block to JCPyV infection, leading to enhanced infectivity. Our results show that a type I IFN response contributes to the establishment of persistent infection by JCPyV in HRPTE cells. PMID:27381292

  4. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1-specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2015-09-23

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show "recognition holes"; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  5. Association of renal adenocarcinoma and BK virus nephropathy post transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Yehuda; Somers, Gino Rene; Francis, David Michael; Jones, Colin Lindsay

    2004-04-01

    While most BK virus infections are asymptomatic, immunosuppression has been associated with BK virus reactivation and impaired graft function or ureteric ulceration in renal transplant patients and hemorrhagic cystitis in bone marrow transplant patients. Oncogenicity is also postulated and this is the first report of a child with a carcinoma of the donor renal pelvis following BK virus allograft nephropathy. Removal of the primary tumor and cessation of immunosuppression led to regression of secondary tumors and a return to health. PMID:14986088

  6. [Sequencing and analysis of the complete genome sequence of WU polyomavirus in Fuzhou, China].

    PubMed

    Xiu, Wen-qiong; Shen, Xiao-na; Liu, Guang-hua; Xie, Jian-feng; Kang, Yu-lan; Wang, Mei-ai; Zhang, Wen-qing; Weng, Qi-zhu; Yan, Yan-sheng

    2011-03-01

    WU polyomavirus (WUPyV), a new member of the genus Polyomavirus in the family Polyomaviridae, is recently found in patients with respiratory tract infections. In our study, the complete genome of the two WUPyV isolates (FZ18, FZTF) were sequenced and deposited in GenBank (accession nos. FJ890981, FJ890982). The two sequences of the WUPyV isolates in this study varied little from each other. Compared with other complete genome sequences of WUPyV in GenBank (strain B0, S1-S4, CLFF, accession nos. EF444549, EF444550, EF444551, EF444552, EF444553, EU296475 respectively), the sequence length in nucleotides is 5228bp, 1bp shorter than the known sequences. The deleted base pair was at nucleotide position 4536 in the non-coding region of large T antigen (LTAg). The genome of the WUPyV encoded for five proteins. They were three capsid proteins: VP2, VP1, VP3 and LTAg, small T antigen (STAg), respectively. To investigate whether these nucleotide sequences had any unique features, we compared the genome sequence of the 2 WUPyV isolates in Fuzhou, China to those documented in the GenBank database by using PHYLIP software version 3.65 and the neighbor-joining method. The 2 WUPyV strains in our study were clustered together. Strain FZTF was more closed to the reference strain B0 of Australian than strain FZ18. PMID:21528542

  7. Depletion of CpG Dinucleotides in Papillomaviruses and Polyomaviruses: A Role for Divergent Evolutionary Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are small ds-DNA viruses infecting a wide-range of vertebrate hosts. Evidence supporting co-evolution of the virus with the host does not fully explain the evolutionary path of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Studies analyzing CpG dinucleotide frequencies in virus genomes have provided interesting insights on virus evolution. CpG dinucleotide depletion has not been extensively studied among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We sought to analyze the relative abundance of dinucleotides and the relative roles of evolutionary pressures in papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Methods We studied 127 full-length sequences from papillomaviruses and 56 full-length sequences from polyomaviruses. We analyzed the relative abundance of dinucleotides, effective codon number (ENC), differences in synonymous codon usage. We examined the association, if any, between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We also investigated the contribution of mutational pressure and translational selection to the evolution of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Results All papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are CpG depleted. Interestingly, the evolutionary lineage of the infected host determines the extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. CpG dinucleotide depletion was more pronounced among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses infecting human and other mammals as compared to those infecting birds. Our findings demonstrate that CpG depletion among papillomaviruses is linked to mutational pressure; while CpG depletion among polyomaviruses is linked to translational selection. We also present evidence that suggests methylation of CpG dinucleotides may explain, at least in part, the depletion of CpG dinucleotides among papillomaviruses but not polyomaviruses. Conclusions The extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses is linked to the

  8. Banff Initiative for Quality Assurance in Transplantation (BIFQUIT): Reproducibility of Polyomavirus Immunohistochemistry in Kidney Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Benjamin; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Chan, Samantha; Zeng, Gang; Regele, Heinz; Kushner, Yael B.; Colvin, Robert B.; Reeve, Jeff; Mengel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry is the gold standard for diagnosing (positive versus negative) polyomavirus BK (BKV) nephropathy and has the potential for disease staging based on staining intensity and quantification of infected cells. This multicenter trial evaluated the reproducibility of BKV immunohistochemistry among 81 pathologists at 60 institutions. Participants stained tissue microarray slides and scored them for staining intensity and percentage of positive nuclei. Staining protocol details and evaluation scores were collected online. Slides were returned for centralized panel re-evaluation and kappa statistics were calculated. Individual assessment of staining intensity and percentage was more reproducible than combined scoring. Inter-institutional reproducibility was moderate for staining intensity (κ=0.49) and percentage (κ=0.42), fair for combined (κ=0.25), and best for simple positive/negative scoring (κ=0.63). Inter-observer reproducibility was substantial for intensity (κ=0.74), percentage (κ=0.66), and positive/negative (κ=0.67), and moderate for combined scoring (κ=0.43). Inter-laboratory reproducibility was fair for intensity (κ=0.37), percentage (κ=0.40), and combined (κ=0.24), but substantial for positive/negative scoring (κ=0.78). BKV RNA copies/cell correlated with staining intensity (r=0.56) and percentage (r=0.62). These results indicate that BKV immunohistochemistry is reproducible between observers but scoring should be simplified to a single-feature schema. Standardization of tissue processing and staining protocols would further improve inter-laboratory reproducibility. PMID:25091177

  9. AN ECHO OF SUPERNOVA 2008bk

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2013-08-01

    I have discovered a prominent light echo around the low-luminosity Type II-plateau supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, seen in archival images obtained with the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The echo is a partial ring, brighter to the north and east than to the south and west. The analysis of the echo I present suggests that it is due to the SN light pulse scattered by a sheet, or sheets, of dust located Almost-Equal-To 15 pc from the SN. The composition of the dust is assumed to be of standard Galactic diffuse interstellar grains. The visual extinction of the dust responsible for the echo is A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.05 mag in addition to the extinction due to the Galactic foreground toward the host galaxy. That the SN experienced much less overall extinction implies that it is seen through a less dense portion of the interstellar medium in its environment. The late-time HST photometry of SN 2008bk also clearly demonstrates that the progenitor star has vanished.

  10. SUPERNOVA 2008bk AND ITS RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; and others

    2012-01-15

    We have obtained limited photometric and spectroscopic data for supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, primarily at {approx}> 150 days after explosion. We find that it is a Type II-Plateau (II-P) SN that most closely resembles the low-luminosity SN 1999br in NGC 4900. Given the overall similarity between the observed light curves and colors of SNe 2008bk and 1999br, we infer that the total visual extinction to SN 2008bk (A{sub V} = 0.065 mag) must be almost entirely due to the Galactic foreground, similar to what has been assumed for SN 1999br. We confirm the identification of the putative red supergiant (RSG) progenitor star of the SN in high-quality g'r'i' images we had obtained in 2007 at the Gemini-South 8 m telescope. Little ambiguity exists in this progenitor identification, qualifying it as the best example to date, next to the identification of the star Sk -69 Degree-Sign 202 as the progenitor of SN 1987A. From a combination of photometry of the Gemini images with that of archival, pre-SN, Very Large Telescope JHK{sub s} images, we derive an accurate observed spectral energy distribution (SED) for the progenitor. We find from nebular strong-intensity emission-line indices for several H II regions near the SN that the metallicity in the environment is likely subsolar (Z Almost-Equal-To 0.6 Z{sub Sun }). The observed SED of the star agrees quite well with synthetic SEDs obtained from model RSG atmospheres with effective temperature T{sub eff} = 3600 {+-} 50 K. We find, therefore, that the star had a bolometric luminosity with respect to the Sun of log (L{sub bol}/L{sub Sun} ) = 4.57 {+-} 0.06 and radius R{sub *} = 496 {+-} 34 R{sub Sun} at {approx}6 months prior to explosion. Comparing the progenitor's properties with theoretical massive-star evolutionary models, we conclude that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass in the range of 8-8.5 M{sub Sun }. This mass is consistent with, albeit at the low end of, the inferred range of initial masses for SN II

  11. Molecular characterization and sequence analysis of polyomavirus strains isolated from needle biopsy specimens of kidney allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Boldorini, R; Omodeo-Zorini, E; Suno, A; Benigni, E; Nebuloni, M; Garino, E; Fortunato, M; Monga, G; Mazzucco, G

    2001-10-01

    We retrospectively examined 29 renal allograft biopsy specimens from 42 kidney transplant recipients by means of molecular biologic techniques (nested polymerase chain reaction), immunohistochemical analysis (anti-SV40 antibody), and histologic examination to evaluate the presence of polyomaviruses (PVs), viral genotypes, genomic mutations, and their pathologic significance. PV genomes were found in six cases (21%); restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis characterized 4 as JC virus (JCV) and 2 as BK virus (BKV). The latter also were positively stained immunohistochemically and showed histologically typical intranuclear viral inclusions; JCV cases were negative. DNA sequence analysis revealed only minor changes in the 4 JCV cases (3 archetypes and 1 JCV type 3, not associated with a known pathogenic genotype) but identified 2 specific variants in the BKV isolates (AS and WW strains). Given the different histologic findings (mixed inflammatory infiltration in the AS and no inflammation in the WW strain), we speculate that different BKV strains may cause differential damage in transplanted kidneys. Finally, the negative histologic and immunohistochemical JCV results, as well as the absence of viral mutations, indicate that JCV renal infection is latent in transplant recipients. PMID:11601133

  12. The dynamics of herpesvirus and polyomavirus reactivation and shedding in healthy adults: a 14-month longitudinal study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Lednicky, John A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; White, Zoe S.; Peng, RongSheng; Liu, Zhensheng; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Smith, E. O'Brian; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Humans are infected with viruses that establish long-term persistent infections. To address whether immunocompetent individuals control virus reactivation globally or independently and to identify patterns of sporadic reactivation, we monitored herpesviruses and polyomaviruses in 30 adults, over 14 months. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA was quantitated in saliva and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), cytomegalovirus (CMV) was assayed in urine, and JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV) DNAs were assayed in urine and PBMCs. All individuals shed EBV in saliva, whereas 67% had >or=1 blood sample positive for EBV. Levels of EBV varied widely. CMV shedding occurred infrequently but occurred more commonly in younger individuals (P<.03). JCV and BKV virurias were 46.7% and 0%, respectively. JCV shedding was age dependent and occurred commonly in individuals >or=40 years old (P<.03). Seasonal variation was observed in shedding of EBV and JCV, but there was no correlation among shedding of EBV, CMV, and JCV (P>.50). Thus, adults independently control persistent viruses, which display discordant, sporadic reactivations.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Bovine Polyomavirus Type 1 from Aborted Cattle, Isolated in Belgium in 2014.

    PubMed

    Van Borm, Steven; Rosseel, Toon; Behaeghel, Isabelle; Saulmont, Marc; Delooz, Laurent; Petitjean, Thierry; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Vandenbussche, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The complete and fully annotated genome sequence of a bovine polyomavirus type 1 (BPyV/BEL/1/2014) from aborted cattle was assembled from a metagenomics data set. The 4,697-bp circular dsDNA genome contains 6 protein-coding genes. Bovine polyomavirus is unlikely to be causally related to the abortion cases. PMID:26941154

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bovine Polyomavirus Type 1 from Aborted Cattle, Isolated in Belgium in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Rosseel, Toon; Behaeghel, Isabelle; Saulmont, Marc; Delooz, Laurent; Petitjean, Thierry; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Vandenbussche, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The complete and fully annotated genome sequence of a bovine polyomavirus type 1 (BPyV/BEL/1/2014) from aborted cattle was assembled from a metagenomics data set. The 4,697-bp circular dsDNA genome contains 6 protein-coding genes. Bovine polyomavirus is unlikely to be causally related to the abortion cases. PMID:26941154

  15. Osteopenia Due to Enhanced Cathepsin K Release by BK Channel Ablation in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Kabagema, Clement; Flockerzie, Katarina; Kuscher, Gerd Marten; Stuehmer, Walter; Neuhuber, Winfried; Ruth, Peter; Alves, Frauke; Sausbier, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Background The process of bone resorption by osteoclasts is regulated by Cathepsin K, the lysosomal collagenase responsible for the degradation of the organic bone matrix during bone remodeling. Recently, Cathepsin K was regarded as a potential target for therapeutic intervention of osteoporosis. However, mechanisms leading to osteopenia, which is much more common in young female population and often appears to be the clinical pre-stage of idiopathic osteoporosis, still remain to be elucidated, and molecular targets need to be identified. Methodology/Principal Findings We found, that in juvenile bone the large conductance, voltage and Ca2+-activated (BK) K+ channel, which links membrane depolarization and local increases in cytosolic calcium to hyperpolarizing K+ outward currents, is exclusively expressed in osteoclasts. In juvenile BK-deficient (BK−/−) female mice, plasma Cathepsin K levels were elevated two-fold when compared to wild-type littermates. This increase was linked to an osteopenic phenotype with reduced bone mineral density in long bones and enhanced porosity of trabecular meshwork in BK−/− vertebrae as demonstrated by high-resolution flat-panel volume computed tomography and micro-CT. However, plasma levels of sRANKL, osteoprotegerin, estrogene, Ca2+ and triiodthyronine as well as osteoclastogenesis were not altered in BK−/− females. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that the BK channel controls resorptive osteoclast activity by regulating Cathepsin K release. Targeted deletion of BK channel in mice resulted in an osteoclast-autonomous osteopenia, becoming apparent in juvenile females. Thus, the BK−/− mouse-line represents a new model for juvenile osteopenia, and revealed the BK channel as putative new target for therapeutic controlling of osteoclast activity. PMID:21695131

  16. β1-subunit-induced structural rearrangements of the Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan P; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Hyde, H Clark; Zaelzer, Cristian A; Aguayo, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Luk, Louis Y P; Kent, Stephen B H; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D; Bezanilla, Francisco; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-06-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels are involved in a large variety of physiological processes. Regulatory β-subunits are one of the mechanisms responsible for creating BK channel diversity fundamental to the adequate function of many tissues. However, little is known about the structure of its voltage sensor domain. Here, we present the external architectural details of BK channels using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). We used a genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tag (LBT) to bind terbium as a LRET donor and a fluorophore-labeled iberiotoxin as the LRET acceptor for measurements of distances within the BK channel structure in a living cell. By introducing LBTs in the extracellular region of the α- or β1-subunit, we determined (i) a basic extracellular map of the BK channel, (ii) β1-subunit-induced rearrangements of the voltage sensor in α-subunits, and (iii) the relative position of the β1-subunit within the α/β1-subunit complex. PMID:27217576

  17. BK nephropathy in pediatric hematopoeitic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Priya S; Finn, Laura S; Englund, Janet A; Sanders, Jean E; Hingorani, Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    BK nephropathy is a known cause of renal insufficiency in kidney transplant recipients. Activation of the polyoma virus may also occur in the native kidneys of non-renal allograft recipients. BK nephropathy has only been reported in a few patients after hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HCT), most being adult patients, and the single reported pediatric case had evidence of hemorrhagic cystitis. The response to anti-viral therapy also seems to differ widely. Here, we describe two cases of BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of HCT recipients exposed to high levels of immunosuppression due to graft-versus-host-disease. Neither of our patients had any evidence of hemorrhagic cystitis. We present definitive renal pathology and detailed chronological evidence of the rising serum creatinine with simultaneous serum and urine BK PCR titers. In one of our cases, anti-viral therapy did not seem beneficial as documented by continued renal dysfunction and serum/urine BK PCR titers. Based on our report, intense immunosuppression in pediatric HCT recipients seems to be involved in the activation of BK virus and BK nephropathy should be suspected even in the absence of hematuria in HCT recipients with unexplained renal dysfunction. PMID:19067914

  18. Goose Hemorrhagic polyomavirus detection in geese using real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Leon, Olivier; Corrand, Léni; Bich, Tran Ngoc; Le Minor, Odile; Lemaire, Mylène; Guérin, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-01

    Goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) is the viral agent of hemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of geese (HNEG), a lethal disease of goslings. Although death is the most common outcome, geese that recover from HNEG are persistently infected. Here, we present the development of real-time SYBR Green real-time PCR targeted to GHPV and its use to assess the prevalence of GHPV infection in French geese flocks. When compared with classical end-point PCR, real-time PCR revealed a much better sensitivity and equivalent specificity. Real-time PCR could, therefore, be considered a gold standard for the detection of GHPV. Results of field investigations evidenced a very high prevalence of GHPV infections in French geese, largely associated with healthy carriage. PMID:24597124

  19. Discovery of a polyomavirus in European badgers (Meles meles) and the evolution of host range in the family Polyomaviridae

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Sarah C.; Murphy, Aisling A.; Cotten, Matthew; Palser, Anne L.; Benson, Phillip; Lesellier, Sandrine; Gormley, Eamonn; Richomme, Céline; Grierson, Sylvia; Bhuachalla, Deirdre Ni; Chambers, Mark; Kellam, Paul; Boschiroli, María-Laura

    2015-01-01

    Polyomaviruses infect a diverse range of mammalian and avian hosts, and are associated with a variety of symptoms. However, it is unknown whether the viruses are found in all mammalian families and the evolutionary history of the polyomaviruses is still unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a novel polyomavirus in the European badger (Meles meles), which to our knowledge represents the first polyomavirus to be characterized in the family Mustelidae, and within a European carnivoran. Although the virus was discovered serendipitously in the supernatant of a cell culture inoculated with badger material, we subsequently confirmed its presence in wild badgers. The European badger polyomavirus was tentatively named Meles meles polyomavirus 1 (MmelPyV1). The genome is 5187 bp long and encodes proteins typical of polyomaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses including all known polyomavirus genomes consistently group MmelPyV1 with California sea lion polyomavirus 1 across all regions of the genome. Further evolutionary analyses revealed phylogenetic discordance amongst polyomavirus genome regions, possibly arising from evolutionary rate heterogeneity, and a complex association between polyomavirus phylogeny and host taxonomic groups. PMID:25626684

  20. Discovery of a polyomavirus in European badgers (Meles meles) and the evolution of host range in the family Polyomaviridae.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sarah C; Murphy, Aisling A; Cotten, Matthew; Palser, Anne L; Benson, Phillip; Lesellier, Sandrine; Gormley, Eamonn; Richomme, Céline; Grierson, Sylvia; Bhuachalla, Deirdre Ni; Chambers, Mark; Kellam, Paul; Boschiroli, María-Laura; Ehlers, Bernhard; Jarvis, Michael A; Pybus, Oliver G

    2015-06-01

    Polyomaviruses infect a diverse range of mammalian and avian hosts, and are associated with a variety of symptoms. However, it is unknown whether the viruses are found in all mammalian families and the evolutionary history of the polyomaviruses is still unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a novel polyomavirus in the European badger (Meles meles), which to our knowledge represents the first polyomavirus to be characterized in the family Mustelidae, and within a European carnivoran. Although the virus was discovered serendipitously in the supernatant of a cell culture inoculated with badger material, we subsequently confirmed its presence in wild badgers. The European badger polyomavirus was tentatively named Meles meles polyomavirus 1 (MmelPyV1). The genome is 5187 bp long and encodes proteins typical of polyomaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses including all known polyomavirus genomes consistently group MmelPyV1 with California sea lion polyomavirus 1 across all regions of the genome. Further evolutionary analyses revealed phylogenetic discordance amongst polyomavirus genome regions, possibly arising from evolutionary rate heterogeneity, and a complex association between polyomavirus phylogeny and host taxonomic groups. PMID:25626684

  1. Clinical significance of quantitative and qualitative detection of BK and JC virus in blood and urine of renal transplantation recipients

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liangwei; Qu, Qingshan; Jiang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate value of quantitative and qualitative detection of BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV) in timely diagnosing polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) occurring inrenal transplantation recipients. Methods: We collected 306 cases of urine specimen and 310 cases of blood specimen from 306 patients who underwent renal transplant. Levels of BKV and JCV in blood and urine were detected using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Detection rate of BKV DNA was 33.3% (102/306) in urine and 34.8% (108/310); while that of JCV DNA was 30.7% (94/306) and 33.5% (104/310) respectively. The lowest detectable limit of BCK and JCV detection for patients who underwent renal transplant was 2×103 copies/ml, suggesting high specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: Real-time quantitative PCR is able to monitor BCV and JCV in renal transplant recipients in a convenient and rapid way, thus it is beneficial for early discovery, diagnosis and treatment of PVAN. PMID:27182256

  2. Haemorrhagic cystitis due to BK virus in a child with ALL on standard chemotherapy without stem cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Samin; Yazdi, Mohammad Kaji; Parvin, Mahmoud; Zohrehbandian, Farahnaz; Azma, Roxana

    2013-01-01

    The BK virus (BKV) is a nonenveloped double-stranded DNA virus of the polyomavirus family that primarily affects immunocompromised people. BKV infects humans at an early age. Initial infections with BKV are mainly asymptomatic and usually remain latent in the brain, peripheral blood, kidneys, and urothelium. Following the primary infection, viruses persist indefinitely as ‘latent’ infections of the kidney and urinary system because the virus is urotheliotropic. Reactivation of the virus infections occurs in individuals with severe immunosuppression states such as kidney and stem cell transplantation and rarely in pregnancy. In this line, BKV has been implicated as a common cause of late-onset haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in patients who have undergone stem cell transplantation. In contrast, reports of BKV-associated diseases in nontransplant paediatric patients are almost exclusively in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Herein, we report the first case of a child with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed BKV-associated HC without receiving stem cell transplantation while on standard maintenance chemotherapy. PMID:24062808

  3. Restricted Protein Phosphatase 2A Targeting by Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Shuda, Masahiro; Camacho, Carlos J.; Gamper, Armin M.; Thant, Mamie; Chang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is a newly discovered human cancer virus encoding a small T (sT) oncoprotein. We performed MCV sT FLAG-affinity purification followed by mass spectroscopy (MS) analysis, which identified several protein phosphatases (PP), including PP2A A and C subunits and PP4C, as potential cellular interacting proteins. PP2A targeting is critical for the transforming properties of nonhuman polyomaviruses, such as simian virus 40 (SV40), but is not required for MCV sT-induced rodent cell transformation. We compared similarities and differences in PP2A binding between MCV and SV40 sT. While SV40 sT coimmunopurified with subunits PP2A Aα and PP2A C, MCV sT coimmunopurified with PP2A Aα, PP2A Aβ, and PP2A C. Scanning alanine mutagenesis at 29 sites across the MCV sT protein revealed that PP2A-binding domains lie on the opposite molecular surface from a previously described large T stabilization domain (LSD) loop that binds E3 ligases, such as Fbw7. MCV sT-PP2A interactions can be functionally distinguished by mutagenesis from MCV sT LSD-dependent 4E-BP1 hyperphosphorylation and viral DNA replication enhancement. MCV sT has a restricted range for PP2A B subunit substitution, inhibiting only the assembly of B56α into the phosphatase holoenzyme. In contrast, SV40 sT inhibits the assembly of B55α, B56α and B56ε into PP2A. We conclude that MCV sT is required for Merkel cell carcinoma growth, but its in vitro transforming activity depends on LSD interactions rather than PP2A targeting. IMPORTANCE Merkel cell polyomavirus is a newly discovered human cancer virus that promotes cancer, in part, through expression of its small T (sT) oncoprotein. Animal polyomavirus sT oncoproteins have been found to cause experimental tumors by blocking the activities of a group of phosphatases called protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Our structural analysis reveals that MCV sT also displaces the B subunit of PP2A to inhibit PP2A activity. MCV sT, however, only

  4. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate. PMID:25705194

  5. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca2+ activated BK channels, a K+ channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate. PMID:25705194

  6. HLA-A2, HLA-B44 and HLA-DR15 are associated with lower risk of BK viremia

    PubMed Central

    Masutani, Kosuke; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Randhawa, Parmjeet

    2013-01-01

    Background Human leucocyte antigens (HLAs) modulate immunity to polyomavirus BK (BKV). Identification of HLAs that alter the course of infection will facilitate risk stratification, and customization of pre-emptive intervention strategies. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study with 998 kidney transplant patients with BKV infection status confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical parameters and donor–recipient matching for specific HLAs were examined in relation to occurrence of viremia. An emphasis was placed on donor–recipient matching rather than the actual frequency of specific HLA-alleles, since a successful immune response requires sharing of HLAs between a virus-infected target cell and the anti-viral effector cell. Results Using multivariate statistics, low risk of BK viremia was associated with matching of HLA-A2 [hazard ratio (HR) 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28–0.85], HLA-B44 (HR 0.31, 95% CI 0.076–0.85) and HLA-DR15 (HR 0.35, 95% CI 0.084–0.93) (P < 0.05), whereas high risk of viremia was associated with male gender (HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.46–4.09, P < 0.001). Conclusions HLAs that associated with a lower predisposition to the development of BK viremia have been identified. Evaluation of donor–recipient mismatching for these HLAs could potentially be used to (i) fine tune virus screening strategies for BKV in individual patients and (ii) facilitate discovery of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II binding peptides that can elicit clinically meaningful BKV-specific immunity. PMID:24084328

  7. The BK channel: a vital link between cellular calcium and electrical signaling.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Brad S

    2012-12-01

    Large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels (BK channels) constitute an key physiological link between cellular Ca²⁺ signaling and electrical signaling at the plasma membrane. Thus these channels are critical to the control of action potential firing and neurotransmitter release in several types of neurons, as well as the dynamic control of smooth muscle tone in resistance arteries, airway, and bladder. Recent advances in our understanding of K⁺ channel structure and function have led to new insight toward the molecular mechanisms of opening and closing (gating) of these channels. Here we will focus on mechanisms of BK channel gating by Ca²⁺, transmembrane voltage, and auxiliary subunit proteins. PMID:22996175

  8. Lessons in Signaling and Tumorigenesis from Polyomavirus Middle T Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Fluck, Michele M.; Schaffhausen, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The small DNA tumor viruses have provided a very long-lived source of insights into many aspects of the life cycle of eukaryotic cells. In recent years, the emphasis has been on cancer-related signaling. Here we review murine polyomavirus middle T antigen, its mechanisms, and its downstream pathways of transformation. We concentrate on the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse, one of the most studied models of breast cancer, which permits the examination of in situ tumor progression from hyperplasia to metastasis. PMID:19721090

  9. Comparisons between Murine Polyomavirus and Simian Virus 40 Show Significant Differences in Small T Antigen Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida; Hwang, Justin H.; Choe, Jennifer Kean; Roberts, Thomas M.; Schaffhausen, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    Although members of a virus family produce similar gene products, those products may have quite different functions. Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT), for example, targets p53 directly, but murine polyomavirus LT does not. SV40 small T antigen (SVST) has received considerable attention because of its ability to contribute to transformation of human cells. Here, we show that there are major differences between SVST and polyomavirus small T antigen (POLST) in their effects on differentiation, transformation, and cell survival. Both SVST and POLST induce cell cycle progression. However, POLST also inhibits differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and C2C12 myoblasts. Additionally, POLST induces apoptosis of mouse embryo fibroblasts. SVST reduces the proapoptotic transcriptional activity of FOXO1 through phosphorylation. On the other hand, SVST complements large T antigen and Ras for the transformation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs), but POLST does not. Mechanistically, the differences between SVST and POLST may lie in utilization of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). POLST binds both Aα and Aβ scaffolding subunits of PP2A while SVST binds only Aα. Knockdown of Aβ could mimic POLST-induced apoptosis. The two small T antigens can target different proteins for dephosphorylation. POLST binds and dephosphorylates substrates, such as lipins, that SVST does not. PMID:21835797

  10. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  11. Inhibition of intestinal motility by the putative BK(Ca) channel opener LDD175.

    PubMed

    Dela Peña, Ike Campomayor; Yoon, Seo Young; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Geum Seon; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Yong Chul; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2009-03-01

    LDD175 (4-chloro-7-trifluoromethyl-10H-benzo[4,5]furo[3,2-b]indole-1-carboxylic acid) is a benzofuroindole compound characterized previously as a potent opener of the large conductance calcium activated (BK(Ca)) channels. Activators of the BK(Ca) channels are potential therapies for smooth muscle hyperactivity disorders. The present study investigates the influence of LDD175 on the mechanical activity of the ileum smooth muscle. LDD175 inhibited spontaneous contractions of the ileum in a concentration-dependent manner (pEC(50)=5.9 +/- 0.1) (E (max)=96 +/- 1.0% at 100 muM, n=3). It also remarkably inhibited contractions due to acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC(50)=5.3 +/- 0.1)(E (max)=97.7 +/- 2.3%, n=6) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) (pEC(50)=5.5 +/- 0.1) (E (max)=83.3 +/- 6.0%, n=6). In strips precontracted by 20 mM KCl, LDD175 significantly reduced the contractions yielding a pEC(50) of 6.1 +/- 0.1 and E (max) of 96.6 +/- 0.9%, (n=6). In 60 mM KCl, a concentration-dependent inhibition was observed with respective pEC(50) and E (max) values of 4.1 +/- 0.1 and 50.8 +/- 5.0% (n=3). BK(Ca) channel blockers iberiotoxin (IbTX) and tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA, 1 mM) attenuated the relaxative effect of LDD175 but not barium chloride (BaCl(2)), and glibenclamide (K(IR) and K(ATP) channel blockers, respectively). These data demonstrate the antispasmodic activity of LDD175 attributable to the potentiation of the BK(Ca) channels. PMID:19387586

  12. BK channel inactivation gates daytime excitability in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Joshua P.; Montgomery, Jenna R.; Meredith, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation is an intrinsic property of several voltage-dependent ion channels, closing the conduction pathway during membrane depolarization and dynamically regulating neuronal activity. BK K+ channels undergo N-type inactivation via their β2 subunit, but the physiological significance is not clear. Here, we report that inactivating BK currents predominate during the day in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the brain's intrinsic clock circuit, reducing steady-state current levels. At night inactivation is diminished, resulting in larger BK currents. Loss of β2 eliminates inactivation, abolishing the diurnal variation in both BK current magnitude and SCN firing, and disrupting behavioural rhythmicity. Selective restoration of inactivation via the β2 N-terminal ‘ball-and-chain' domain rescues BK current levels and firing rate, unexpectedly contributing to the subthreshold membrane properties that shift SCN neurons into the daytime ‘upstate'. Our study reveals the clock employs inactivation gating as a biophysical switch to set the diurnal variation in suprachiasmatic nucleus excitability that underlies circadian rhythm. PMID:26940770

  13. Requirement for functional BK channels in maintaining oscillation in venomotor tone revealed by species differences in expression of the β1 accessory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Kandlikar, Sachin S; Westcott, Erika B; Fink, Gregory D; Galligan, James J

    2011-01-01

    We determined the possible role of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels in regulation of venous tone in small capacitance veins and blood pressure. In rat mesenteric venous smooth muscle cells (MV SMC), BK channel α- and β1-subunits were co-expressed, unitary BK currents were detected, and single channel currents were sensitive to voltage and [Ca2+]i. Rat MV SMCs displayed Ca2+ sparks and iberiotoxin (IBTX)-sensitive spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs). Under resting conditions in vitro, rat MV exhibited nifedipine-sensitive spontaneous oscillatory constrictions. Blockade of BK channels by paxilline and Ca2+ sparks by ryanodine constricted rat MV. Nifedipine caused venodilation and blocked paxilline-, KCl (20 mM) and BayK 8644-induced contraction. Acute inhibition of BK channels with IBTX in vivo increased blood pressure and reduced venous capacitance, measured as an increase in mean circulatory filling pressure in conscious rats. BK channel α-subunits and L-type Ca2+ channel α1-C subunits are expressed in murine MV. However, these channels are not functional as murine MV lacked nifedipine-sensitive basal tone and rhythmic constrictions. Murine MV were also insensitive to paxilline, ryanodine, KCl and BayK8644, consistent with our previous studies showing that murine MV do not have BK β1-subunits. These data show that not only there are species-dependent properties in ion channel control of venomotor tone, but also that BK channels are required for rhythmic oscillations in venous tone. PMID:21885988

  14. BK channel activation by tungstate requires the β1 subunit extracellular loop residues essential to modulate voltage sensor function and channel gating.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana I; Valverde, Miguel A; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2014-07-01

    Tungstate, a compound with antidiabetic, antiobesity, and antihypertensive properties, activates the large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channel containing either β1 or β4 subunits. The BK activation by tungstate is Mg(2+)-dependent and promotes arterial vasodilation, but only in precontracted mouse arteries expressing β1. In this study, we further explored how the β1 subunit participates in tungstate activation of BK channels. Activation of heterologously expressed human BKαβ1 channels in inside-out patches is fully dependent on the Mg(2+) sensitivity of the BK α channel subunit even at high (10 μM) cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Alanine mutagenesis of β1 extracellular residues Y74 or S104, which destabilize the active voltage sensor, greatly decreased the tungstate-induced left-shift of the BKαβ1 G-V curves in either the absence or presence of physiologically relevant cytosolic Ca(2+) levels (10 μM). The weakened tungstate activation of the BKαβ1Y74A and BKαβ1S104A mutant channels was not related to decreased Mg(2+) sensitivity. These results, together with previously published reports, support the idea that the putative binding site for tungstate-mediated BK channel activation is located in the pore-forming α channel subunit, around the Mg(2+) binding site. The role of β1 in tungstate-induced channel activation seems to rely on its interaction with the BK α subunit to modulate channel activity. Loop residues that are essential for the regulation of voltage sensor activation and gating of the BK channel are also relevant for BK activation by tungstate. PMID:24158430

  15. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction. PMID:22945504

  16. Intrinsic Electrostatic Potential in the BK Channel Pore: Role in Determining Single Channel Conductance and Block

    PubMed Central

    Carvacho, Ingrid; Gonzalez, Wendy; Torres, Yolima P.; Brauchi, Sebastian; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D.; Latorre, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    The internal vestibule of large-conductance Ca2+ voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels contains a ring of eight negative charges not present in K+ channels of lower conductance (Glu386 and Glu389 in hSlo) that modulates channel conductance through an electrostatic mechanism (Brelidze, T.I., X. Niu, and K.L. Magleby. 2003. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 100:9017–9022). In BK channels there are also two acidic amino acid residues in an extracellular loop (Asp326 and Glu329 in hSlo). To determine the electrostatic influence of these charges on channel conductance, we expressed wild-type BK channels and mutants E386N/E389N, D326N, E329Q, and D326N/E329Q channels on Xenopus laevis oocytes, and measured the expressed currents under patch clamp. Contribution of E329 to the conductance is negligible and single channel conductance of D326N/E329Q channels measured at 0 mV in symmetrical 110 mM K+ was 18% lower than the control. Current–voltage curves displayed weak outward rectification for D326N and the double mutant. The conductance differences between the mutants and wild-type BK were caused by an electrostatic effect since they were enhanced at low K+ (30 mM) and vanished at high K+ (1 M K+). We determine the electrostatic potential change, Δφ, caused by the charge neutralization using TEA+ block for the extracellular charges and Ba2+ for intracellular charges. We measured 13 ± 2 mV for Δφ at the TEA+ site when turning off the extracellular charges, and 17 ± 2 mV for the Δφ at the Ba2+ site when the intracellular charges were turned off. To understand the electrostatic effect of charge neutralizations, we determined Δφ using a BK channel molecular model embedded in a lipid bilayer and solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The model explains the experimental results adequately and, in particular, gives an economical explanation to the differential effect on the conductance of the neutralization of charges D326 and E329. PMID:18227273

  17. Immunity to Polyomavirus Infection: The Polyoma Virus-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Phillip A.; Lukacher, Aron E.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2009-01-01

    A ubiquitous clinically silent murine pathogen, polyoma virus has enjoyed long-term co-evolution with the mouse, a highly tractable and genetically and immunologically informative small animal model. Thus, polyoma virus has provided a valuable experimental construct to decipher the host immune mechanisms that come into play to control systemic low-level persistent viral infections. Impaired immunosurveillance for infected cells puts the murine host at risk both to injury resulting from excessive direct virus cytolysis and development of virus-induced tumors. In this review, we present our current understanding of the multifaceted immune response invoked by the mouse to maintain détente with this potentially deleterious persistent natural pathogen, and discuss implications of these studies for therapeutic interventions for human polyomavirus infection. PMID:19505652

  18. How Polyomaviruses Exploit the ERAD Machinery to Cause Infection.

    PubMed

    Dupzyk, Allison; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    To infect cells, polyomavirus (PyV) traffics from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it hijacks elements of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to penetrate the ER membrane and reach the cytosol. From the cytosol, the virus transports to the nucleus, enabling transcription and replication of the viral genome that leads to lytic infection or cellular transformation. How PyV exploits the ERAD machinery to cross the ER membrane and access the cytosol, a decisive infection step, remains enigmatic. However, recent studies have slowly unraveled many aspects of this process. These emerging insights should advance our efforts to develop more effective therapies against PyV-induced human diseases. PMID:27589785

  19. Prokineticins and Merkel cell polyomavirus infection in Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lauttia, S; Sihto, H; Kavola, H; Koljonen, V; Böhling, T; Joensuu, H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prokineticin-1 (PROK1) and prokineticin-2 (PROK2) are chemokine-like proteins that may influence cancer growth by regulating host defence and angiogenesis. Their significance in viral infection-associated cancer is incompletely understood. We studied prokineticins in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a skin cancer linked with Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) infection. Methods: Carcinoma cell expression of PROK1 and PROK2 and their receptors (PROKR1 and PROKR2) was investigated with immunohistochemistry, and tumour PROK1 and PROK2 mRNA content with quantitative PCR from 98 MCCs. Subsets of tumour infiltrating leukocytes were identified using immunohistochemistry. Results: Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive MCCs had higher than the median PROK2 mRNA content, whereas MCPyV-negative MCCs contained frequently PROK1 mRNA. Cancers with high tumour PROK2 mRNA content had high counts of tumour infiltrating macrophages (CD68+ and CD163+ cells). Patients with higher than the median PROK2 mRNA content had 44.9% 5-year survival compared with 23.5% among those with a smaller content (hazard ratio (HR): 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.34–0.84; P=0.005), whereas the presence of PROK1 mRNA in tumour was associated with unfavourable survival (P=0.052). Conclusions: The results suggest that prokineticins are associated with MCPyV infection and participate in regulation of the immune response in MCC, and may influence outcome of MCC patients. PMID:24496457

  20. Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSV) and Merkel cell polyomavirus: correlation between humoral and cellular immunity stronger with TSV.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kantele, Anu; Järvinen, Tommi; Chen, Tingting; Kavola, Heli; Sadeghi, Mohammadreza; Hedman, Klaus; Franssila, Rauli

    2012-01-01

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCV) is a common infectious agent likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of most Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC). Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSV), which exhibit high seroprevalence in general population, has been detected in trichodysplasia spinulosa (TS) skin lesions suggesting an etiological role for this disease. Previous studies have shown strong MCV-specific T-cell responses, while no data exist on T-cell immunity against TSV. In order to characterize Th-cell immunity against TSV, and to allow comparisons with the MCV-specific Th-cell immunity, we studied TSV-specific proliferation, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-13, and MCV-specific IFN-γ and IL-10 responses in 51 healthy volunteers, and in one MCC patient. Recombinant TSV and MCV VP1 virus-like particles (VLPs) were used as antigens. A significant correlation was found between virus-specific Th-cell and antibody responses with TSV; with MCV it proved weaker. Despite significant homology in amino acid sequences, Th-cell crossreactivity was not evident between these viruses. Some subjects seronegative to both TSV and MCV exhibited Th-cell responses to both viruses. The agent initially priming these Th-cells remains an enigma. As CD8(+) cells specific to MCV T-Ag oncoprotein clearly provide an important defense against established MCC, the MCV VP1-specific Th-cells may, by suppressing MCV replication with antiviral cytokines such as IFN-γ, significantly contribute to preventing the full process of oncogenesis. PMID:23029236

  1. Oxytocin hyperpolarizes cultured duodenum myenteric intrinsic primary afferent neurons by opening BK(Ca) channels through IP₃ pathway.

    PubMed

    Che, Tongtong; Sun, Hui; Li, Jingxin; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Dexiao; Xue, Bing; Liu, Kejing; Zhang, Min; Kunze, Wolfgang; Liu, Chuanyong

    2012-05-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is clinically important in gut motility and constitutively reduces duodenum contractility. Intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs), whose physiological classification is as AH cells, are the 1st neurons of the peristaltic reflex pathway. We set out to investigate if this inhibitory effect is mediated by IPANs and to identify the ion channel(s) and intracellular signal transduction pathway that are involved in this effect. Myenteric neurons were isolated from the longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparation of rat duodenum and cultured for 16-24 h before electrophysiological recording in whole cell mode and AH cells identified by their electrophysiological characteristics. The cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺](i) ) of isolated neurons was measured using calcium imaging. The concentration of IP(3) in the LMMP and the OT secreted from the LMMP were measured using ELISA. The oxytocin receptor (OTR) and large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels, as well as the expression of OT and the IPAN marker calbindin 28 K, on the myenteric plexus neurons were localized using double-immunostaining techniques. We found that administration of OT (10⁻⁷ to 10⁻⁵ M) dose dependently hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the total outward current. The OTR antagonist atosiban or the BK(Ca) channel blocker iberiotoxin (IbTX) blocked the effects of OT suggesting that the increased outward current resulted from BK(Ca) channel opening. OTR and the BK(Ca) α subunit were co-expressed on a subset of myenteric neurons at the LMMP. NS1619 (10⁻⁵ M, a BK(Ca) channel activator) increased the outward current similar to the effect of OT. OT administration also increased [Ca²⁺](i) and the OT-evoked outward current was significantly attenuated by thapsigargin (10⁻⁶ M) or CdCl₂. The effect of OT on the BK(Ca) current was also blocked by pre-treatment with the IP₃ receptor antagonist 2-APB (10⁻⁴ M

  2. BK potassium channels facilitate high-frequency firing and cause early spike frequency adaptation in rat CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ning; Vervaeke, Koen; Storm, Johan F

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal potassium (K+) channels are usually regarded as largely inhibitory, i.e. reducing excitability. Here we show that BK-type calcium-activated K+ channels enhance high-frequency firing and cause early spike frequency adaptation in neurons. By combining slice electrophysiology and computational modelling, we investigated functions of BK channels in regulation of high-frequency firing in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. Blockade of BK channels by iberiotoxin (IbTX) selectively reduced the initial discharge frequency in response to strong depolarizing current injections, thus reducing the early spike frequency adaptation. IbTX also blocked the fast afterhyperpolarization (fAHP), slowed spike rise and decay, and elevated the spike threshold. Simulations with a computational model of a CA1 pyramidal cell confirmed that the BK channel-mediated rapid spike repolarization and fAHP limits activation of slower K+ channels (in particular the delayed rectifier potassium current (IDR)) and Na+ channel inactivation, whereas M-, sAHP- or SK-channels seem not to be important for the early facilitating effect. Since the BK current rapidly inactivates, its facilitating effect diminishes during the initial discharge, thus producing early spike frequency adaptation by an unconventional mechanism. This mechanism is highly frequency dependent. Thus, IbTX had virtually no effect at spike frequencies < 40 Hz. Furthermore, extracellular field recordings demonstrated (and model simulations supported) that BK channels contribute importantly to high-frequency burst firing in response to excitatory synaptic input to distal dendrites. These results strongly support the idea that BK channels play an important role for early high-frequency, rapidly adapting firing in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, thus promoting the type of bursting that is characteristic of these cells in vivo, during behaviour. PMID:17303637

  3. Does polyomavirus infection interfere with bladder cancer fluorescence in situ hybridization?

    PubMed

    Hossain, Deloar; Hull, David; Kalantarpour, Fatemeh; Maitlen, Rebecca; Qian, Junqi; Bostwick, David G

    2014-03-01

    Urine cytology is a proven and widely used screening tool for the detection of urothelial carcinoma. However, morphologic features of polyomavirus infected cells, characterized by nuclear inclusions (decoy cells) are a known source of diagnostic confusion with malignancy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now routinely used to support the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and monitor for recurrence. We sought to determine whether polyomavirus infection could result in positive FISH results (aneuploidy). This study deals with retrospective study of 100 polyomavirus-infected urine samples from patients with no history of urothelial carcinoma or organ transplantation. All cases were stained with Papanicolaou and acid hematoxylin stain. One slide from each sample was de-stained and FISH was performed using chromosome enumeration probes 3, 7, 17, and locus-specific probe 9p21. Adequate cells for FISH analysis (25 cells) were present in 81 cases; 19 cases were insufficient due to loss of cells during de-staining and FISH preparation process. All polyomavirus-infected cells (decoy cells) exhibited a normal chromosome pattern. Four cases were FISH positive, but there were no positive decoy cells. Decoy cells did not exhibit aneuploidy by FISH. The presence of decoy cells does not exclude the possibility of concurrent urothelial carcinoma. Acid hematoxylin stain appeared to supplement the Papanicolou stain in identifying and confirming the presence of polyomavirus infection. PMID:24006232

  4. Tumorigenic activity of Merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Megan E.; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lambert, Paul F.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contain wild type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiological role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  5. Tumorigenic activity of merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Megan E; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T; Lambert, Paul F; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-03-15

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contains wild-type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads, and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiologic role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  6. Emerging From the Unknown: Structural and Functional Features of Agnoprotein of Polyomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saribas, A Sami; Coric, Pascale; Hamazaspyan, Anahit; Davis, William; Axman, Rachael; White, Martyn K; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Childers, Wayne; Condra, Jon H; Bouaziz, Serge; Safak, Mahmut

    2016-10-01

    Agnoprotein is an important regulatory protein of polyomaviruses, including JCV, BKV, and SV40. In the absence of its expression, these viruses are unable to sustain their productive life cycle. It is a highly basic phosphoprotein that localizes mostly to the perinuclear area of infected cells, although a small amount of the protein is also found in nucleus. Much has been learned about the structure and function of this important regulatory protein in recent years. It forms highly stable dimers/oligomers in vitro and in vivo through its Leu/Ile/Phe-rich domain. Structural NMR studies revealed that this domain adopts an alpha-helix conformation and plays a critical role in the stability of the protein. It associates with cellular proteins, including YB-1, p53, Ku70, FEZ1, HP1α, PP2A, AP-3, PCNA, and α-SNAP; and viral proteins, including small t antigen, large T antigen, HIV-1 Tat, and JCV VP1; and significantly contributes the viral transcription and replication. This review summarizes the recent advances in the structural and functional properties of this important regulatory protein. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2115-2127, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26831433

  7. Clinical and pathological features of kidney transplant patients with concurrent polyomavirus nephropathy and rejection-associated endarteritis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Stephanie M; Chon, W James; Kim, Lisa; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinicopathologic features of concurrent polyomavirus nephropathy (PVN) and endarteritis due to rejection in renal allografts. METHODS: We searched our electronic records database for cases with transplant kidney biopsies demonstrating features of both PVN and acute rejection (AR). PVN was defined by the presence of typical viral cytopathic effect on routine sections and positive polyomavirus SV40 large-T antigen immunohistochemistry. AR was identified by endarteritis (v1 by Banff criteria). All cases were subjected to chart review in order to determine clinical presentation, treatment course and outcomes. Outcomes were recorded with a length of follow-up of at least one year or time to nephrectomy. RESULTS: Of 94 renal allograft recipients who developed PVN over an 11-year period at our institution, we identified 7 (7.4%) with viral cytopathic changes, SV40 large T antigen staining, and endarteritis in the same biopsy specimen, indicative of concurrent PVN and AR. Four arose after reduction of immunosuppression (IS) (for treatment of PVN in 3 and tuberculosis in 1), and 3 patients had no decrease of IS before developing simultaneous concurrent disease. Treatment consisted of reduced oral IS and leflunomide for PVN, and anti-rejection therapy. Three of 4 patients who developed endarteritis in the setting of reduced IS lost their grafts to rejection. All 3 patients with simultaneous PVN and endarteritis cleared viremia and were stable at 1 year of follow up. Patients with endarteritis and PVN arising in a background of reduced IS had more severe rejection and poorer outcome. CONCLUSION: Concurrent PVN and endarteritis may be more frequent than is currently appreciated and may occur with or without prior reduction of IS. PMID:26722657

  8. Identification of a Novel Cetacean Polyomavirus from a Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) with Tracheobronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; St. Leger, Judy A.; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Nilson, Erica; Sanchez-Leon, Maria; Liang, Eliza; Seimon, Tracie; Jain, Komal; Karesh, William; Daszak, Peter; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2013-01-01

    A female short-beaked common dolphin calf was found stranded in San Diego, California in October 2010, presenting with multifocal ulcerative lesions in the trachea and bronchi. Viral particles suggestive of polyomavirus were detected by EM, and subsequently confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Full genome sequencing (Ion Torrent) revealed a circular dsDNA genome of 5,159 bp that was shown to form a distinct lineage within the genus Polyomavirus based on phylogenetic analysis of the early and late transcriptomes. Viral infection and distribution in laryngeal mucosa was characterised using in-situ hybridisation, and apoptosis observed in the virus-infected region. These results demonstrate that polyomaviruses can be associated with respiratory disease in cetaceans, and expand our knowledge of their diversity and clinical significance in marine mammals. PMID:23874559

  9. Asymptomatic Primary Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infection among Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tolstov, Yanis L.; Knauer, Alycia; Chen, Jian Guo; Kensler, Thomas W.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Moore, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is a recently discovered virus that causes 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas. We examined data for 564 gay/bisexual male participants >18 years of age in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, and found that 447 (79.3%) were MCV-antibody positive at initial enrollment. Of the 117 MCV-seronegative men, 31 subsequently seroconverted over a 4-year follow-up period, corresponding to a 6.6% annual conversion rate. MCV immunoglobulin G levels remained detectable up to 25 years after exposure. No signs, symptoms, or routine diagnostic test results were associated with MCV infection, and no correlation between HIV infection or AIDS progression and MCV infection was noted. An initial correlation between chronic hepatitis B virus infection and MCV prevalence could not be confirmed among MCV seroconverters or in studies of a second hepatitis B virus–hyperendemic cohort from Qidong, China. In adults, MCV is typically an asymptomatic, common, and commensal viral infection that initiates rare cancers after virus (rather than host cell) mutations. PMID:21801612

  10. Diagnostic Assays for Polyomavirus JC and Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    White, Martyn K.; Sariyer, Ilker K.; Gordon, Jennifer; Delbue, Serena; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Berger, Joseph R.; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a devastating and often fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which effective therapies are lacking. It is caused by the replication of polyomavirus JC (JCV) in the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes leading to their cytolytic death and loss of myelin from the subcortical white matter. While the virus is very common in human populations worldwide, the incidence of the disease is very low and confined almost exclusively to individuals with some form of immunological dysfunction. However, the number of people who constitute the at-risk population is growing larger and includes individuals with HIV-1/AIDS and patients receiving immunomodulatory therapies such as multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab. Further adding to the public health significance of this disease are the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis of PML and the lack of useful biomarkers for PML progression. In this review, we examine the diagnostic assays that are available for different aspects of the JCV life cycle, their usefulness and drawbacks, and the prospects for improvements. PMID:26663440

  11. Hydroxyproline in the major capsid protein VP1 of polyomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, J.W.; Consigli, R.A.

    1989-06-01

    Amino acid analysis of (/sup 3/H)proline-labeled polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1 by two-dimensional paper chromatography of the acid-hydrolyzed protein revealed the presence of /sup 3/H-labeled hydroxyproline. Addition of the proline analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid to infected mouse kidney cell cultures prevented or greatly reduced hydroxylation of proline in VP1. Immunofluorescence analysis performed on infected cells over a time course of analog addition revealed that virus proteins were synthesized but that transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was impeded. A reduction in the assembly of progeny virions demonstrated by CsCl gradient purification of virus from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled infected cell cultures was found to correlate with the time of analog addition. These results suggest that incorporation of this proline analog into VP1, accompanied by reduction of the hydroxyproline content of the protein, influences the amount of virus progeny produced by affecting transport of VP1 to the cell nucleus for assembly into virus particles.

  12. Persistence and pathogenesis of the neurotropic polyomavirus JC

    PubMed Central

    Wollebo, Hassen S.; White, Martyn K.; Gordon, Jennifer; Berger, Joseph R.; Khalili, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological diseases of the CNS are underpinned by malfunctions of the immune system including disorders involving opportunistic infections. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a lethal CNS demyelinating disease caused by the human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV) and is found almost exclusively in individuals with immune disruption including HIV/AIDS, patients receiving therapeutic immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies to treat conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), transplant recipients, etc. Thus, the public health significance of this disease is high because of the number of individuals that constitute the at-risk population. The incidence of PML is very low whereas seroprevalence for virus is high suggesting infection by virus is very common and so it is thought that virus is restrained but it persists in an asymptomatic state that can only occasionally be disrupted to lead to viral reactivation and PML. When JCV actively replicates in oligodendrocytes and astrocytes of the CNS, it produces cytolysis leading to formation of demyelinated lesions with devastating consequences. Defining the molecular nature of persistence and events leading to reactivation of virus to cause PML has proved to be elusive. In this review, we examine the current state of knowledge of the JCV life cycle and mechanisms of pathogenesis. We will discuss the normal course of the JCV life cycle including transmission, primary infection, viremia and establishment of asymptomatic persistence as well as pathogenic events including migration of virus to the brain, reactivation from persistence, viral infection and replication in the glial cells of the CNS and escape from immunosurveillance. PMID:25623836

  13. Polymorphism in the assembly of polyomavirus capsid protein VP1.

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, D M; Caspar, D L; Garcea, R L

    1989-01-01

    Polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1, purified after expression of the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli, forms stable pentamers in low-ionic strength, neutral, or alkaline solutions. Electron microscopy showed that the pentamers, which correspond to viral capsomeres, can be self-assembled into a variety of polymorphic aggregates by lowering the pH, adding calcium, or raising the ionic strength. Some of the aggregates resembled the 500-A-diameter virus capsid, whereas other considerably larger or smaller capsids were also produced. The particular structures formed on transition to an environment favoring assembly depended on the pathway of the solvent changes as well as on the final conditions. Mass measurements from cryoelectron micrographs and image analysis of negatively stained specimens established that a distinctive 320-A-diameter particle consists of 24 close-packed pentamers arranged with octahedral symmetry. Comparison of this unexpected octahedral assembly with a 12-capsomere icosahedral aggregate and the 72-capsomere icosahedral virus capsid by computer graphics methods indicates that similar connections are made among trimers of pentamers in these shells of different size. The polymorphism in the assembly of VP1 pentamers can be related to the switching in bonding specificity required to build the virus capsid. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:2557933

  14. Up-Regulatory Effects of Curcumin on Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijing; Tao, Jie; Hei, Hongya; Li, Fangping; Wang, Yunman; Peng, Wen; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BK) are targets for research that explores therapeutic means to various diseases, owing to the roles of the channels in mediating multiple physiological processes in various cells and tissues. We investigated the pharmacological effects of curcumin, a compound isolated from the herb Curcuma longa, on BK channels. As recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp, curcumin increased BK (α) and BK (α+β1) currents in transfected HEK293 cells as well as the current density of BK in A7r5 smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. By incubating with curcumin for 24 hours, the current density of exogenous BK (α) in HEK293 cells and the endogenous BK in A7r5 cells were both enhanced notably, though the steady-state activation of the channels did not shift significantly, except for BK (α+β1). Curcumin up-regulated the BK protein expression without changing its mRNA level in A7r5 cells. The surface expression and the half-life of BK channels were also increased by curcumin in HEK293 cells. These effects of curcumin were abolished by MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Curcumin also increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, while inhibiting ERK by U0126 attenuated the curcumin-induced up-regulation of BK protein expression. We also observed that the curcumin-induced relaxation in the isolated rat aortic rings was significantly attenuated by paxilline, a BK channel specific blocker. These results show that curcumin enhances the activity of the BK channels by interacting with BK directly as well as enhancing BK protein expression through inhibiting proteasomal degradation and activating ERK signaling pathway. The findings suggest that curcumin is a potential BK channel activator and provide novel insight into its complicated pharmacological effects and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26672753

  15. Up-Regulatory Effects of Curcumin on Large Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Hongya; Li, Fangping; Wang, Yunman; Peng, Wen; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BK) are targets for research that explores therapeutic means to various diseases, owing to the roles of the channels in mediating multiple physiological processes in various cells and tissues. We investigated the pharmacological effects of curcumin, a compound isolated from the herb Curcuma longa, on BK channels. As recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp, curcumin increased BK (α) and BK (α+β1) currents in transfected HEK293 cells as well as the current density of BK in A7r5 smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. By incubating with curcumin for 24 hours, the current density of exogenous BK (α) in HEK293 cells and the endogenous BK in A7r5 cells were both enhanced notably, though the steady-state activation of the channels did not shift significantly, except for BK (α+β1). Curcumin up-regulated the BK protein expression without changing its mRNA level in A7r5 cells. The surface expression and the half-life of BK channels were also increased by curcumin in HEK293 cells. These effects of curcumin were abolished by MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Curcumin also increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, while inhibiting ERK by U0126 attenuated the curcumin-induced up-regulation of BK protein expression. We also observed that the curcumin-induced relaxation in the isolated rat aortic rings was significantly attenuated by paxilline, a BK channel specific blocker. These results show that curcumin enhances the activity of the BK channels by interacting with BK directly as well as enhancing BK protein expression through inhibiting proteasomal degradation and activating ERK signaling pathway. The findings suggest that curcumin is a potential BK channel activator and provide novel insight into its complicated pharmacological effects and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26672753

  16. Membrane stretch and cytoplasmic Ca2+ independently modulate stretch-activated BK channel activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hu-Cheng; Agula, Hasi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fa; Sokabe, Masahiro; Li, Lu-Ming

    2010-11-16

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are responsible for changes in chemical and physical signals such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and membrane potentials. Previously, we reported that a BK channel cloned from chick heart (SAKCaC) is activated by membrane stretch. Molecular cloning and subsequent functional characterization of SAKCaC have shown that both the membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) signal allosterically regulate the channel activity via the linker of the gating ring complex. Here we investigate how these two gating principles interact with each other. We found that stretch force activated SAKCaC in the absence of cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Lack of Ca(2+) bowl (a calcium binding motif) in SAKCaC diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent activation, but the mechanosensitivity of channel was intact. We also found that the abrogation of STREX (a proposed mechanosensing apparatus) in SAKCaC abolished the mechanosensitivity without altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of channels. These observations indicate that membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) could independently modulate SAKCaC activity. PMID:20673577

  17. Abnormal differentiation, hyperplasia and embryonic/perinatal lethality in BK5-T/t transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Schneider-Broussard, Robin; Hollowell, Debra; McArthur, Mark; Jeter, Collene R.; Benavides, Fernando; DiGiovanni, John; Tang, Dean G.

    2009-01-01

    The cell-of-origin has a great impact on the types of tumors that develop and the stem/progenitor cells have long been considered main targets of malignant transformation. The SV40 large T and small t antigens (T/t), have been targeted to multiple differentiated cellular compartments in transgenic mice. In most of these studies, transgenic animals develop tumors without apparent defects in animal development. In this study, we used the bovine keratin 5 (BK5) promoter to target the T/t antigens to stem/progenitor cell-containing cytokeratin 5 (CK5) cellular compartment. A transgene construct, BK5-T/t, was made and microinjected into the male pronucleus of FVB/N mouse oocytes. After implanting ∼1700 embryos, only 7 transgenics were obtained, including 4 embryos (E9.5, E13, E15, and E20) and 3 postnatal animals, which died at P1, P2, and P18, respectively. Immunohistological analysis revealed aberrant differentiation and prominent hyperplasia in several transgenic CK5 tissues, especially the upper digestive organs (tongue, oral mucosa, esophagus, and forestomach) and epidermis, the latter of which also showed focal dysplasia. Altogether, these results indicate that constitutive expression of the T/t antigens in CK5 cellular compartment results in abnormal epithelial differentiation and leads to embryonic/perinatal animal lethality. PMID:19272531

  18. How does the Merkel polyomavirus lead to a lethal cancer? Many answers, many questions, and a new mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Church, Candice; Nghiem, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), discovered in 2008, drives development of most Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) through several canonical mechanisms. A glaring gap in our knowledge remains the basis by which MCPyV, among all 12 human polyomaviruses, is the only one that causes cancer in humans. Moreover, initial attempts by numerous groups have failed to reproduce MCC in mice using oncoproteins from this polyomavirus. Verhaegen at al. report MCPyV small T antigen-expressing transgenic mice that now provide insight into in vivo transformation mechanisms. PMID:25882464

  19. Use of the baculovirus system to assemble polyomavirus capsid-like particles with different polyomavirus structural proteins: analysis of the recombinant assembled capsid-like particles.

    PubMed

    An, K; Gillock, E T; Sweat, J A; Reeves, W M; Consigli, R A

    1999-04-01

    The genes encoding the structural proteins (VP1, VP2 and VP3) of murine polyomavirus were cloned into the p2Bac dual multiple cloning site vector, individually or jointly, and the corresponding proteins were expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells by cotransfecting Sf9 cells with the constructed vector and the linear DNA of Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV). Recombinant capsid-like particles could be purified 5 days post-infection from Sf9 cells infected with AcMNPV-VP1, with or without the involvement of minor protein (VP2 or VP3). Although VP2 and VP3 alone could not generate recombinant particles, they became incorporated into these particles when expressed with VP1 in Sf9 cells. Recombinant particles with different polyomavirus structural protein(s) were obtained by using different combined expression of these proteins in Sf9 cells. Cellular DNA of 5 kbp in size was packaged in all of the recombinant particles, which showed the same diameter as that of native virions. Agarose gel electrophoresis indicated that DNA packaged in these recombinant particles had a different pattern than that of native virions. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the VP1 species of recombinant particles showed more VP1 species than those of the native virions from mouse cells, and an additional species of VP1 when VP2 was co-expressed with VP1. The recombinant particles were also compared for their ability to compete for polyomavirus infection. The competition assay indicated that the recombinant particles containing VP2 were the most efficient in inhibiting the native polyomavirus infection of 3T6 cells. PMID:10211971

  20. Two-quasiparticle states in {sup 250}Bk studied by decay scheme and transfer reaction spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Koenig, Z. M.; McHarris, Wm. C.; Yates, S. W.

    2008-05-15

    Two-quasiparticle states in {sup 250}Bk were investigated with decay scheme studies and the single-neutron transfer reaction {sup 249}Bk(d,p){sup 250}Bk. Mass-separated sources of {sup 254}Es were used for {alpha} singles and {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence measurements. These studies, plus previous studies of {sup 254}Es{sup m} {alpha} decay and the {sup 249}Bk(n,{gamma}) reaction, provide spins and parities of the observed levels. The transfer reaction {sup 249}Bk(d,p){sup 250}Bk was used to deduce neutron single-particle components of the observed bands. Six pairs of singlet and triplet states, formed by the coupling of proton and neutron one-quasiparticle states, were identified. The splitting energies between the triplet and singlet states were found to be in agreement with previous calculations.

  1. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus.

  2. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  3. Interspecific adaptation by binary choice at de novo polyomavirus T antigen site through accelerated codon-constrained Val-Ala toggling within an intrinsically disordered region

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Chris; Kazem, Siamaque; Kravchenko, Alexander A.; Feltkamp, Mariet C.W.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    It is common knowledge that conserved residues evolve slowly. We challenge generality of this central tenet of molecular biology by describing the fast evolution of a conserved nucleotide position that is located in the overlap of two open reading frames (ORFs) of polyomaviruses. The de novo ORF is expressed through either the ALTO protein or the Middle T antigen (MT/ALTO), while the ancestral ORF encodes the N-terminal domain of helicase-containing Large T (LT) antigen. In the latter domain the conserved Cys codon of the LXCXE pRB-binding motif constrains codon evolution in the overlapping MT/ALTO ORF to a binary choice between Val and Ala codons, termed here as codon-constrained Val-Ala (COCO-VA) toggling. We found the rate of COCO-VA toggling to approach the speciation rate and to be significantly accelerated compared to the baseline rate of chance substitution in a large monophyletic lineage including all viruses encoding MT/ALTO and three others. Importantly, the COCO-VA site is located in a short linear motif (SLiM) of an intrinsically disordered region, a typical characteristic of adaptive responders. These findings provide evidence that the COCO-VA toggling is under positive selection in many polyomaviruses, implying its critical role in interspecific adaptation, which is unprecedented for conserved residues. PMID:25904630

  4. WU and KI Polyomaviruses in Respiratory Samples from Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Angela P.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Wright, Nancy L.; Englund, Janet A.; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Data are limited regarding 2 new human polyomaviruses, KI polyomavirus (KIPyV) and WU polyomavirus (WUPyV), in immunocompromised patients. We used real-time PCR to test for these and 12 respiratory viruses in 2,732 nasal wash samples collected during the first year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from 222 patients. Specimens were collected weekly until day 100; then at least every 3 months. One year after hematopoietic cell transplantation, the cumulative incidence estimate was 26% for KIPyV and 8% for WUPyV. Age <20 years predicted detection of KIPyV (hazard ratio [HR] 4.6) and WUPyV (HR 4.4), and detection of a respiratory virus in the previous 2 weeks predicted KIPyV detection (HR 3.4). Sputum production and wheezing were associated with detection of KIPyV in the past week and WUPyV in the past month. There were no associations with polyomavirus detection and acute graft versus host disease, cytomegalovirus reactivation, neutropenia, lymphopenia, hospitalization, or death. PMID:23017213

  5. Acquisition of Human Polyomaviruses in the First 18 Months of Life

    PubMed Central

    Bialasiewicz, Seweryn; Mhango, Lebogang; Gaydon, Jane; Holding, Rebecca; Whiley, David M.; Lambert, Stephen B.; Ware, Robert S.; Nissen, Michael D.; Grimwood, Keith; Sloots, Theo P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the presence of 4 human polyomaviruses (PyVs) (WU, KI, Merkel cell, and Malawi) in respiratory specimens from a community-based birth cohort. These viruses typically were acquired when children were ≈1 year of age. We provide evidence that WU, KI, and Malawi, but not Merkel cell PyVs, might have a role in respiratory infections. PMID:25626138

  6. Nucleotides in the polyomavirus enhancer that control viral transcription and DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W J; Berger, S L; Triezenberg, S J; Folk, W R

    1987-01-01

    The polyomavirus enhancer is required in cis for high-level expression of the viral early region and for replication of the viral genome. We introduced multiple mutations in the enhancer which reduced transcription and DNA replication. Polyomaviruses with these mutant enhancers formed very small plaques in whole mouse embryo cells. Revertants of the viral mutants were isolated and characterized. Reversion occurred by any of the following events: restoration of guanosines at nucleotide (nt) 5134 and nt 5140 within the adenovirus 5 E1A enhancer core AGGAAGTGACT; acquisition of an A----G mutation at nt 5258, which is the same mutation that enables polyomavirus to grow in embryonal carcinoma F9 cells; duplication of mutated sequences between nt 5146 and 5292 (including sequences homologous with immunoglobulin G, simian virus 40, and bovine papillomavirus enhancer elements). Reversion restored both the replicative and transcriptional functions of the viruses. Revertants that acquired the F9 mutation at nt 5258 grew at least 20-fold better than the original mutant in whole mouse embryo cells, but replicated only marginally better than the original mutant in 3T6 cells. Viruses with a reversion of the mutation at nt 5140 replicated equally well in both types of cells. Since individual nucleotides in the polyomavirus enhancer simultaneously altered DNA replication and transcription in specific cell types, it is likely that these processes rely upon a common element, such as an enhancer-binding protein. Images PMID:3037332

  7. Rapid Detection of Trichodysplasia Spinulosa-Associated Polyomavirus in Skin Biopsy Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Paulo Roberto P.; Pannuti, Cláudio Sérgio; Pierrotti, Ligia C.; David-Neto, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSV) is responsible for a rare skin cancer. Using metagenomic approaches, we determined the complete genome sequence of a TSV first detected in Brazil in spicules of an immunocompromised patient suspected to have trichodysplasia spinulosa. PMID:25059864

  8. Avian Polyomavirus Genome Sequences Recovered from Parrots in Captive Breeding Facilities in Poland.

    PubMed

    Dayaram, Anisha; Piasecki, Tomasz; Chrząstek, Klaudia; White, Robyn; Julian, Laurel; van Bysterveldt, Katherine; Varsani, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Eight genomes of avian polyomaviruses (APVs) were recovered and sequenced from deceased Psittacula eupatria, Psittacula krameri, and Melopsittacus undulatus from various breeding facilities in Poland. Of these APV-positive samples, six had previously tested positive for beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) and/or parrot hepatitis B virus (PHBV). PMID:26404592

  9. Avian Polyomavirus Genome Sequences Recovered from Parrots in Captive Breeding Facilities in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Dayaram, Anisha; Piasecki, Tomasz; Chrząstek, Klaudia; White, Robyn; Julian, Laurel; van Bysterveldt, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Eight genomes of avian polyomaviruses (APVs) were recovered and sequenced from deceased Psittacula eupatria, Psittacula krameri, and Melopsittacus undulatus from various breeding facilities in Poland. Of these APV-positive samples, six had previously tested positive for beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) and/or parrot hepatitis B virus (PHBV). PMID:26404592

  10. Two distinct effects of PIP2 underlie auxiliary subunit-dependent modulation of Slo1 BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Florian; Xu, Rong; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hou, Shangwei

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) plays a critical role in modulating the function of numerous ion channels, including large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-dependent K+ (BK, Slo1) channels. Slo1 BK channel complexes include four pore-forming Slo1 (α) subunits as well as various regulatory auxiliary subunits (β and γ) that are expressed in different tissues. We examined the molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying the effects of brain-derived PIP2 on human Slo1 BK channel complexes with different subunit compositions that were heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. PIP2 inhibited macroscopic currents through Slo1 channels without auxiliary subunits and through Slo1 + γ1 complexes. In contrast, PIP2 markedly increased macroscopic currents through Slo1 + β1 and Slo1 + β4 channel complexes and failed to alter macroscopic currents through Slo1 + β2 and Slo1 + β2 Δ2–19 channel complexes. Results obtained at various membrane potentials and divalent cation concentrations suggest that PIP2 promotes opening of the ion conduction gate in all channel types, regardless of the specific subunit composition. However, in the absence of β subunits positioned near the voltage-sensor domains (VSDs), as in Slo1 and probably Slo1 + γ1, PIP2 augments the negative surface charge on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, thereby shifting the voltage dependence of VSD-mediated activation in the positive direction. When β1 or β4 subunits occupy the space surrounding the VSDs, only the stimulatory effect of PIP2 is evident. The subunit compositions of native Slo1 BK channels differ in various cell types; thus, PIP2 may exert distinct tissue- and divalent cation–dependent modulatory influences. PMID:25825171

  11. Mice with Deficient BK Channel Function Show Impaired Prepulse Inhibition and Spatial Learning, but Normal Working and Spatial Reference Memory

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Erin; Ruettiger, Lukas; Ruth, Peter; Schmid, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in the large-conductance, voltage- and calcium activated potassium channels (BK channels) have been recently implicated in mental retardation, autism and schizophrenia which all come along with severe cognitive impairments. In the present study we investigate the effects of functional BK channel deletion on cognition using a genetic mouse model with a knock-out of the gene for the pore forming α-subunit of the channel. We tested the F1 generation of a hybrid SV129/C57BL6 mouse line in which the slo1 gene was deleted in both parent strains. We first evaluated hearing and motor function to establish the suitability of this model for cognitive testing. Auditory brain stem responses to click stimuli showed no threshold differences between knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Despite of muscular tremor, reduced grip force, and impaired gait, knockout mice exhibited normal locomotion. These findings allowed for testing of sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle reflex, as well as of working memory, spatial learning and memory in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze, respectively. Prepulse inhibition on the first day of testing was normal, but the knockout mice did not improve over the days of testing as their wild-type littermates did. Spontaneous alternation in the y-maze was normal as well, suggesting that the BK channel knock-out does not impair working memory. In the Morris water maze knock-out mice showed significantly slower acquisition of the task, but normal memory once the task was learned. Thus, we propose a crucial role of the BK channels in learning, but not in memory storage or recollection. PMID:24303038

  12. Treatment of experimental asthma using a single small molecule with anti-inflammatory and BK channel-activating properties

    PubMed Central

    Goldklang, Monica P.; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F.; Trischler, Jordis; Nkyimbeng, Takwi; Zakharov, Sergey I.; Shiomi, Takayuki; Zelonina, Tina; Marks, Andrew R.; D'Armiento, Jeanine M.; Marx, Steven O.

    2013-01-01

    Large conductance voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are highly expressed in airway smooth muscle (ASM). Utilizing the ovalbumin (OVA) and house dust mite (HDM) models of asthma in C57BL/6 mice, we demonstrate that systemic administration of the BK channel agonist rottlerin (5 μg/g) during the challenge period reduced methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) in OVA- and HDM-sensitized mice (47% decrease in peak airway resistance in OVA-asthma animals, P<0.01; 54% decrease in HDM-asthma animals, P<0.01) with a 35–40% reduction in inflammatory cells and 20–35% reduction in Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Intravenous rottlerin (5 μg/g) reduced AHR within 5 min in the OVA-asthma mice by 45% (P<0.01). With the use of an ex vivo lung slice technique, rottlerin relaxed acetylcholine-stimulated murine airway lumen area to 87 ± 4% of the precontracted area (P<0.01 vs. DMSO control). Rottlerin increased BK channel activity in human ASM cells (V50 shifted by 73.5±13.5 and 71.8±14.6 mV in control and asthmatic cells, respectively, both P<0.05 as compared with pretreatment) and reduced the frequency of acetylcholine-induced Ca2+ oscillations in murine ex vivo lung slices. These findings suggest that rottlerin, with both anti-inflammatory and ASM relaxation properties, may have benefit in treating asthma.—Goldklang, M. P., Perez-Zoghbi, J. F., Trischler, J., Nkyimbeng, T., Zakharov, S. I., Shiomi, T., Zelonina, T., Marks, A. R., D'Armiento, J. M., Marx, S. O. Treatment of experimental asthma using a single small molecule with anti-inflammatory and BK channel-activating properties. PMID:23995289

  13. Consequences of a subtle sialic acid modification on the murine polyomavirus receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, M; von der Lieth, C W; Stehling, P; Reutter, W; Pawlita, M

    1997-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are small, nonenveloped DNA tumor viruses with restricted host ranges. Virus binding to cell surface receptors is one determinant of viral tropism. Although murine polyomavirus is among the best characterized viruses, little is known about the sialic acid-containing receptor and its interaction with viral particles. By using nonradioactive virus binding assays as recently described for the B-lymphotropic papovavirus, murine polyomavirus particles were found to bind in a saturable and noncooperative manner to 25,000 receptors per 3T6 mouse fibroblast. The virus-receptor interaction at 4 degrees C was of high affinity (Kd = 1.8 x 10(-11) M), very fast (k1 = 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)), and stable (half-life = 38 min). Elongation of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid by biosynthetic modulation with synthetic precursor analogs has been shown for other polyomaviruses to influence both sialic acid-dependent binding and infection (O. T. Keppler, P. Stehling, M. Herrmann, H. Kayser, D. Grunow, W. Reutter, and M. Pawlita, J. Biol. Chem. 270:1308-1314, 1995). In 3T6 cells in which about one-third of the sialic acids were modified, infection and binding of polyomavirus particles were significantly reduced. The number of receptors per cell was decreased to 18,000, with the remaining receptors displaying the same affinity as in untreated cells. Molecular modeling studies based on the three-dimensional structure of a mouse polyomavirus-sialyllactose complex recently solved by T. Stehle and coworkers (T. Stehle, Y. W. Yan, T. L. Benjamin, and S. C. Harrison, Nature 369:160-163, 1994) were performed. They suggest that the elongation of the N-acyl side chain by a single methylene group leads to steric hinderence, with the peptide backbone of a loop walling the tip of the shallow sialic acid binding groove. This collision appears to be incompatible with functional binding. The data are taken as a basis to discuss possible features of the organization and topology of

  14. Internally applied endotoxin and the activation of BK channels in cerebral artery smooth muscle via a nitric oxide-like pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, L M; Mathers, D A

    1998-01-01

    In this study the role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the acute activation of large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK channels) by internally applied E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) was examined in vascular smooth muscle cells.Cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs) were enzymatically dispersed from the middle, posterior communicating and posterior cerebral arteries of adult Wistar rats and maintained at 4°C for 2–4 days before recording with standard patch-clamp techniques.Acute application of LPS (100 μg ml−1) to inside-out patches of CVSMC membrane isolated in a cell-free environment rapidly and reversibly increased the open probability, Po of BK channels in these patches by 3.3±0.30 fold.Acute application of the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 100 μM) to inside-out patches of CVSMC membrane, studied in the presence of intact cells, also reversibly increased Po, by some 1.8±0.2 fold over control.Kinetic analysis showed that both LPS and SNP increased Po by accelerating the rate of BK channel reopening, rather than by retarding the closure of open channels.Neither LPS nor SNP altered the reversal potential or conductance of BK channels.The NOS substrate L-arginine (1 μM) potentiated the acute activation of BK channels by LPS, while the synthetic enantiomer D-arginine (1 μM) inhibited the action of LPS on BK channels.The acute activation of BK channels by LPS was suppressed by pre-incubation of cells with Nω-nitro-L-arginine (50 μM) or Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1  mM), two competitive antagonists of nitric oxide synthases. Nω-nitro-D-arginine (50 μM), a poor inhibitor of NOS in in vitro assays, had no effect on BK channel activation by LPS.These results indicate that excised, inside-out patches of CVSMC membrane exhibit a NOS-like activity which is acutely activated when LPS is present at the cytoplasmic membrane surface. Possible relationships between this novel mechanism

  15. Mechanisms underlying activation of transient BK current in rabbit urethral smooth muscle cells and its modulation by IP3-generating agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Barry D.; Bradley, Eamonn; Large, Roddy; Sergeant, Gerard P.; McHale, Noel G.; Thornbury, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    We used the perforated patch-clamp technique at 37°C to investigate the mechanisms underlying the activation of a transient large-conductance K+ (tBK) current in rabbit urethral smooth muscle cells. The tBK current required an elevation of intracellular Ca2+, resulting from ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation via Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, triggered by Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ (CaV) channels. Carbachol inhibited tBK current by reducing Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release and altered the shape of spike complexes recorded under current-clamp conditions. The tBK currents were blocked by iberiotoxin and penitrem A (300 and 100 nM, respectively) and were also inhibited when external Ca2+ was removed or the CaV channel inhibitors nifedipine (10 μM) and Cd2+ (100 μM) were applied. The tBK current was inhibited by caffeine (10 mM), ryanodine (30 μM), and tetracaine (100 μM), suggesting that RyR-mediated Ca2+ release contributed to the activation of the tBK current. When IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) were blocked with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB, 100 μM), the amplitude of the tBK current was not reduced. However, when Ca2+ release via IP3Rs was evoked with phenylephrine (1 μM) or carbachol (1 μM), the tBK current was inhibited. The effect of carbachol was abolished when IP3Rs were blocked with 2-APB or by inhibition of muscarinic receptors with the M3 receptor antagonist 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (1 μM). Under current-clamp conditions, bursts of action potentials could be evoked with depolarizing current injection. Carbachol reduced the number and amplitude of spikes in each burst, and these effects were reduced in the presence of 2-APB. In the presence of ryanodine, the number and amplitude of spikes were also reduced, and carbachol was without further effect. These data suggest that IP3-generating agonists can modulate the electrical activity of rabbit urethral smooth muscle cells and may contribute to the effects of neurotransmitters on

  16. Exposure to raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) in free-ranging North American raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Church, M E; Dela Cruz, F N; Estrada, M; Leutenegger, C M; Pesavento, P A; Woolard, K D

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence that raccoon polyomavirus is causative for neuroglial brain tumors in the western United States. It is unknown if infection is limited to geographic locales where tumors have been reported or is widespread, like human polyomaviruses. We demonstrate raccoons in western, eastern and midwestern states have been exposed to RacPyV by detection of antibodies to capsid protein, VP1. While raccoons in eastern and midwestern states are seropositive, exposure is lower than in the western states. Additionally, across geographic areas seropositivity is higher in older as compared to younger raccoons, similar to polyomavirus exposure in humans. Serum titers are significantly higher in raccoons with tumors compared to raccoons without. Unlike polyomavirus-associated diseases in humans, we did not detect significant sequence variation between tumor and non-tumor tissue in raccoons with tumors compared to those without tumors. This warrants further investigation into co-morbid diseases or genetic susceptibility studies of the host. PMID:26802526

  17. The structure of avian polyomavirus reveals variably sized capsids, non-conserved inter-capsomere interactions, and a possible location of the minor capsid protein VP4

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Peter S.; Enderlein, Dirk; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Carter, Weston S.; Kawano, Masaaki; Xing Li; Swenson, Robert D.; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Cheng, R. Holland; Atwood, Walter J.; Johne, Reimar; Belnap, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Avian polyomavirus (APV) causes a fatal, multi-organ disease among several bird species. Using cryogenic electron microscopy and other biochemical techniques, we investigated the structure of APV and compared it to that of mammalian polyomaviruses, particularly JC polyomavirus and simian virus 40. The structure of the pentameric major capsid protein (VP1) is mostly conserved; however, APV VP1 has a unique, truncated C-terminus that eliminates an intercapsomere-connecting {beta}-hairpin observed in other polyomaviruses. We postulate that the terminal {beta}-hairpin locks other polyomavirus capsids in a stable conformation and that absence of the hairpin leads to the observed capsid size variation in APV. Plug-like density features were observed at the base of the VP1 pentamers, consistent with the known location of minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3. However, the plug density is more prominent in APV and may include VP4, a minor capsid protein unique to bird polyomaviruses.

  18. Serological cross-reactions between four polyomaviruses of birds using virus-like particles expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Anja; Gedvilaite, Alma; Reetz, Jochen; Rösler, Uwe; Müller, Hermann; Johne, Reimar

    2012-12-01

    Polyomaviruses are aetiological agents of fatal acute diseases in various bird species. Genomic analysis revealed that avian polyomavirus (APyV), crow polyomavirus (CPyV), finch polyomavirus (FPyV) and goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPyV) are closely related to each other, but nevertheless form separate viral species; however, their serological relationship was previously unknown. As only APyV can be grown efficiently in tissue culture, virus-like particles (VLPs) were generated by expression of the genomic regions encoding the major structural protein VP1 of these viruses in yeast; these were used to elicit type-specific antibodies in rabbits and as antigens in serological reactions. For increased VLP assembly, a nuclear-localization signal was introduced into APyV-VP1. VLPs derived from the VP1 of the monkey polyomavirus simian virus 40 served as control. APyV-, GHPyV- and CPyV-VLPs showed haemagglutinating activity with chicken and human erythrocytes. CPyV- and GHPyV-specific sera showed slight cross-reactions in immunoblotting, haemagglutination-inhibition assay and indirect ELISA. The FPyV-specific serum inhibited the haemagglutination activity of APyV-VLPs slightly and showed a weak cross-neutralizing activity against APyV in cell-culture tests. Generally, these data indicate that the four polyomaviruses of birds are serologically distinct. However, in accordance with genetic data, a relationship between CPyV and GHPyV as well as between APyV and FPyV is evident, and grouping into two different serogroups may be suggested. The haemagglutinating activity of APyV, CPyV and GHPyV may indicate similar receptor-binding mechanisms for these viruses. Our data could be useful for the development of vaccines against the polyomavirus-induced diseases in birds and for interpretation of diagnostic test results. PMID:22933666

  19. Human monocytes kill M-CSF-expressing glioma cells by BK channel activation.

    PubMed

    Hoa, Neil T; Zhang, Jian Gang; Delgado, Christina L; Myers, Michael P; Callahan, Linda L; Vandeusen, Gerald; Schiltz, Patric M; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2007-02-01

    In this study, human monocytes/macrophages were observed to kill human U251 glioma cells expressing membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) via a swelling and vacuolization process called paraptosis. Human monocytes responded to the mM-CSF-transduced U251 glioma cells, but not to viral vector control U251 glioma cells (U251-VV), by producing a respiratory burst within 20 min. Using patch clamp techniques, functional big potassium (BK) channels were observed on the membrane of the U251 glioma cell. It has been previously reported that oxygen indirectly regulates BK channel function. In this study, it was demonstrated that prolonged BK channel activation in response to the respiratory burst induced by monocytes initiates paraptosis in selected glioma cells. Forced BK channel opening within the glioma cells by BK channel activators (phloretin or pimaric acid) induced U251 glioma cell swelling and vacuolization occurred within 30 min. U251 glioma cell cytotoxicity, induced by using BK channel activators, required between 8 and 12 h. Swelling and vacuolization induced by phloretin and pimaric acid was prevented by iberiotoxin, a specific BK channel inhibitor. Confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated BK channels co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, the two targeted organelles affected in paraptosis. Iberiotoxin prevented monocytes from producing death in mM-CSF-expressing U251glioma cells in a 24 h assay. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism whereby monocytes can induce paraptosis via the disruption of internal potassium ion homeostasis. PMID:17318194

  20. BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after pediatric stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Beom; Cho, Bin; Kang, Jin Han

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common stem cell transplantation-related complication. The incidence of early-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is related to the pretransplant conditioning regimen, has decreased with the concomitant use of mesna and hyperhydration. However, late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is usually caused by the BK virus, continues to develop. Although the BK virus is the most common pathogenic microorganism of poststem cell transplantation late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, pediatricians outside the hemato-oncology and nephrology specialties tend to be unfamiliar with hemorrhagic cystitis and the BK virus. Moreover, no standard guidelines for the early diagnosis and treatment of BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after stem cell transplantation have been established. Here, we briefly introduce poststem cell transplantation BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:25653684

  1. BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after pediatric stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Beom; Kang, Jin Han

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common stem cell transplantation-related complication. The incidence of early-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is related to the pretransplant conditioning regimen, has decreased with the concomitant use of mesna and hyperhydration. However, late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, which is usually caused by the BK virus, continues to develop. Although the BK virus is the most common pathogenic microorganism of poststem cell transplantation late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis, pediatricians outside the hemato-oncology and nephrology specialties tend to be unfamiliar with hemorrhagic cystitis and the BK virus. Moreover, no standard guidelines for the early diagnosis and treatment of BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after stem cell transplantation have been established. Here, we briefly introduce poststem cell transplantation BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:25653684

  2. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  3. Search for the Decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; 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Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-11-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/- using 383 x 10;{6} BB[over ] events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fraction for this decay can be substantially enhanced in new physics models. The kinematics of the tau from the signal B decay are inferred from the K+, mu, and other B in the event, which is fully reconstructed in one of a variety of hadronic decay modes, allowing the signal B candidate to be fully reconstructed. We observe no excess of events over the expected background and set a limit of B(B+-->K+ tau mu)<7.7 x 10(-5) at 90% confidence level, where the branching fraction is for the sum of the K+ tau- mu+ and K+ tau+mu- final states. We use this result to improve a model-independent bound on the energy scale of flavor-changing new physics. PMID:18233132

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Human WU Polyomavirus Isolate Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dehority, Walter N.; Schwalm, Kurt C.; Young, Jesse M.; Gross, Stephen M.; Schroth, Gary P.; Young, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) isolate, NM040708, collected from a patient with an acute respiratory infection in New Mexico. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of NM040708 is 5,229 bp in length and differs from the WUPyV reference with accession no. NC_009539 by 6 nucleotides and 2 amino acids. PMID:27151782

  5. Antibodies to Merkel cell polyomavirus T-antigen oncoproteins reflect tumor burden in Merkel cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Kelly G.; Carter, Joseph J.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Cahill, Kevin W.; Iyer, Jayasri G.; Schrama, David; Becker, Juergen C.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Nghiem, Paul; Galloway, Denise A.

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is a common infectious agent that is likely involved in the etiology of most Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs). Serum antibodies recognizing the MCPyV capsid protein, VP1, are detectable at high titer in nearly all MCC patients, and remain stable over time. Although antibodies to the viral capsid indicate prior MCPyV infection, they provide limited clinical insight into MCC because they are also detected in more than half of the general population. We investigated whether antibodies recognizing MCPyV large and small tumor-associated antigens (T-Ags) would be more specifically associated with MCC. Among 530 population control subjects, these antibodies were present in only 0.9% and were of low titer. In contrast, among 205 MCC cases, 40.5% had serum IgG antibodies that recognize a portion of T-Ag shared between small and large T-Ags. Among cases, titers of T-Ag antibodies fell rapidly (approximately 8 fold/year) in patients whose cancer did not recur, while they rose rapidly in those with progressive disease. Importantly, in several patients who developed metastases, the rise in T-Ag titer preceded clinical detection of disease spread. These results suggest that antibodies recognizing T-Ag are relatively specifically associated with MCC, do not effectively protect against disease progression, and may serve as a clinically useful indicator of disease status. PMID:20959478

  6. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus: Molecular Insights into the Most Recently Discovered Human Tumour Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Wood, Jennifer J.; Knight, Laura M.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Adzahar, Noor Suhana; Nwogu, Nnenna; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A fifth of worldwide cancer cases have an infectious origin, with viral infection being the foremost. One such cancer is Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive skin malignancy. In 2008, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was discovered as the causative agent of MCC. It is found clonally integrated into the majority of MCC tumours, which require MCPyV oncoproteins to survive. Since its discovery, research has begun to reveal the molecular virology of MCPyV, as well as how it induces tumourigenesis. It is thought to be a common skin commensal, found at low levels in healthy individuals. Upon loss of immunosurveillance, MCPyV reactivates, and a heavy viral load is associated with MCC pathogenesis. Although MCPyV is in many ways similar to classical oncogenic polyomaviruses, such as SV40, subtle differences are beginning to emerge. These unique features highlight the singular position MCPyV has as the only human oncogenic polyomavirus, and open up new avenues for therapies against MCC. PMID:24978434

  7. Merkel cell polyomavirus: molecular insights into the most recently discovered human tumour virus.

    PubMed

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Wood, Jennifer J; Knight, Laura M; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Adzahar, Noor Suhana; Nwogu, Nnenna; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A fifth of worldwide cancer cases have an infectious origin, with viral infection being the foremost. One such cancer is Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive skin malignancy. In 2008, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was discovered as the causative agent of MCC. It is found clonally integrated into the majority of MCC tumours, which require MCPyV oncoproteins to survive. Since its discovery, research has begun to reveal the molecular virology of MCPyV, as well as how it induces tumourigenesis. It is thought to be a common skin commensal, found at low levels in healthy individuals. Upon loss of immunosurveillance, MCPyV reactivates, and a heavy viral load is associated with MCC pathogenesis. Although MCPyV is in many ways similar to classical oncogenic polyomaviruses, such as SV40, subtle differences are beginning to emerge. These unique features highlight the singular position MCPyV has as the only human oncogenic polyomavirus, and open up new avenues for therapies against MCC. PMID:24978434

  8. Decay Properties of New Isotopes 234Bk and 230Am, and Even-Even Nuclides 234Cm and 230Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Haba, Hiromitsu; Ideguchi, Eiji; Koura, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    A neutron-deficient berkelium isotope of 234Bk produced via 197Au(40Ar,3n) reaction and the daughter product of 230Am were newly identified. Alpha-decay energies of eleven 234Bk were found at 7.62-7.96 MeV, and six fission events that correlated with the α-decay of 234Bk were observed. The half-lives of 234Bk and 230Am were determined to be 19 - 4 + 6 s and 32 - 9 + 22 s, respectively. The 234Cm followed by the β-decay of 234Bk was also identified.

  9. Analysis of the vertices BsBK* and DsDK* with QCD Sum Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, A., Jr.; Osório Rodrigues, B.; Bracco, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we calculated the form factors and coupling constant of the vertex DsDK* using the QCD Sum Rules. The calculation of the form factors were performed for the cases D, Ds and K* off shell. Using the similarities between B and D mesons, we also calculated the form factors and coupling constant of the vertex BsBK*. The coupling constants of the vertices BsBK* and DsDK* were compared with each other through the Heavy Hadron Chiral Perturbation Theory(HHChPT). We found a difference of 19% between BsBK* and DsDK* coupling constants using the HHChPT relation.

  10. COINFECTION OF CALIFORNIA SEA LION ADENOVIRUS 1 AND A NOVEL POLYOMAVIRUS IN A HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL (NEOMONACHUS SCHAUINSLANDI).

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Doescher, Bethany; Kinsel, Michael; Lednicky, John; Loeb, Julia; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-06-01

    The Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) is an endangered species. Here, we present a clinical case of a 26-yr-old male Hawaiian monk seal (HMS) kept in an aquarium with a history of intermittent anorexia and evidence of renal disease. Histologic examination revealed eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions in the liver. Conventional nested PCR protocols were used to test for viruses, and it tested positive for adenovirus and polyomavirus, and negative for herpesvirus. The adenovirus partial polymerase gene is 100% homologous to that of California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1). CSLAdV-1 causes viral hepatitis in CSL, and has recently been reported in different species of otariids in an aquarium in Japan ( Otaria flavescens and Arctocephalus pusillus ) and a sequence from Spain has been submitted in NCBI as Otaria flavescens adenovirus-1. The polyomavirus in this animal is a novel virus, and is the first polyomavirus discovered in Hawaiian monk seals. This new virus is designated Hawaiian monk seal polyomavirus (HMSPyV-1), and is 83% homologous to California sea lion Polyomavirus-1 (CSLPyV-1). This is the first report of viral coinfection in a HMS and clinical significance in this case remains unclear but may be associated with advanced age. PMID:27468013