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Sample records for polyvinyl siloxane impression

  1. The dimensional accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials using two different impression techniques: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Nirmala; Nandeeshwar, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: To evaluate and compare the linear dimensional changes of the three representative polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials and to compare the accuracy of single mix with double mix impression technique. Methodology: A study mold was prepared according to revised American Dental Association specification number 19 for nonaqueous elastic dental impression materials. Three PVS impression materials selected were Elite-HD, Imprint™ II Garant, Aquasil Ultra Heavy. Two impression techniques used were single mix and double mix impression technique. A total of 60 specimens were made and after 24 h the specimens were measured using profile projector. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance analysis and significant differences were separated using Student's Newman–Keul's test. Results: When all the three study group impression materials were compared for double mix technique, the statistically significant difference was found only between Imprint™ II Garantand Elite-HD (P < 0.05). Similarly, using single mix technique, statistically significant difference were found between Elite-HD and Imprint™ II Garant (P < 0.05) and also between Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD (P < 0.05). When the linear dimensional accuracy of all three impression material in double mix impression technique and single mix impression technique were compared with the control group, Imprint™ II Garant showed the values more nearing to the values of master die, followed by Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD respectively. Conclusion: Among the impression materials Imprint™ II Garant showed least dimensional change. Among the impression techniques, double mix impression technique showed the better results. PMID:26929515

  2. Comparative evaluation of dimensional accuracy of different polyvinyl siloxane putty-wash impression techniques-in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Ramandeep; Railkar, Bhargavi; Musani, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dimensional accuracy when making impressions is crucial to the quality of fixed prosthodontic treatment, and the impression technique is a critical factor affecting this accuracy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of the casts obtained from one step double mix, two step double mix polyvinyl siloxane putty- wash impression techniques using three different spacer thicknesses (0.5mm, 1mm and 1.5mm), in order to determine the impression technique that displays the maximum linear dimensional accuracy. Materials & Methods: A Mild steel model with 2 abutment preparations was fabricated, and impressions were made 15 times with each technique. All impressions were made with an addition-reaction silicone impression material (Express, 3M ESPE) and customarily made perforated metal trays. The 1-step putty/light-body impressions were made with simultaneous use of putty and light-body materials. The 2-step putty/light-body impressions were made with 0.5-mm, 1mm and 1.5mm-thick metal-prefabricated spacer caps. The accuracy of the 4 different impression techniques was assessed by measuring 7 dimensions (intra- and inter abutment) (20-μm accuracy) on stone casts poured from the impressions of the mild steel model. The data were analyzed by one sample‘t’ test. Results: The stone dies obtained with all the techniques had significantly larger or smaller dimensions as compared to those of the mild steel model (P<0.05). The order for highest to lowest deviation from the mild steel model was: single step putty/light body, 2-step putty/light body with 0.5mm spacer thickness, 2-step putty/light body1.5mm spacer thickness, and 2-step putty/light body with 1mm spacer thickness. Significant differences among all of the groups for both absolute dimensions of the stone dies, and their standard deviations from the master model (P<0.05), were noted. Conclusions: The 2-step putty/light-body impression technique with 1mm spacer thickness was

  3. Evaluation of surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability and gypsum compatibility of monophase polyvinyl-siloxane and polyether elastomeric impression materials under dry and moist conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Atluri, Kaleswararao; Putcha, Madhu Sudhan; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Kumar, N. Suman; Tadi, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to compare polyvinyl-siloxane (PVS) monophase and polyether (PE) monophase materials under dry and moist conditions for properties such as surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability, and gypsum compatibility. Materials and Methods: Surface detail reproduction was evaluated using two criteria. Dimensional stability was evaluated according to American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 19. Gypsum compatibility was assessed by two criteria. All the samples were evaluated, and the data obtained were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-square tests. Results: When surface detail reproduction was evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19, both the groups under the two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. When evaluated macroscopically both the groups showed statistically significant difference. Results for dimensional stability showed that the deviation from standard was significant among the two groups, where Aquasil group showed significantly more deviation compared to Impregum group (P < 0.001). Two conditions also showed significant difference, with moist conditions showing significantly more deviation compared to dry condition (P < 0.001). The results of gypsum compatibility when evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19 and by giving grades to the casts for both the groups and under two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. Conclusion: Regarding dimensional stability, both impregum and aquasil performed better in dry condition than in moist; impregum performed better than aquasil in both the conditions. When tested for surface detail reproduction according to ADA specification, under dry and moist conditions both of them performed almost equally. When tested according to macroscopic evaluation, impregum and aquasil performed significantly better in dry condition compared to moist condition. In dry

  4. Effects of sulfur-based hemostatic agents and gingival retraction cords handled with latex gloves on the polymerization of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Carlos Eduardo Palhares; GUEDES, Carlos Gramani

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the possible interactions between three addition silicone materials (Express®, Aquasil Ultra® and Adsil®), three hemostatic agents (ferric sulfate, StatGel FS®; aluminum sulfate, GelCord®; and aluminum chloride, Hemostop®) and gingival retraction cords previously handled with latex gloves to determine whether direct contact with medicaments or indirect contamination by latex in conditions similar to those found in clinical practice inhibit or affect the setting of the impression materials. Material and Methods A portable device for the simultaneous test of several specimens was specifically developed for this study. Polymerization inhibition was analyzed by examination of the impressions and the molded surface. Ten trials were performed for each addition silicone material used in the study, at a total of 240 study samples. Results All the samples tested (N=240) were nonreactive regardless of the type of combination used. Conclusions Aluminum sulfate, ferric sulfate and aluminum chloride hemostatic solutions did not show any inhibitory potential on the addition silicone samples under study, and there were no changes in polymerization as a result of contact between addition silicone and retraction cords handled with latex gloves. PMID:22230998

  5. Polyvinyl siloxane: novel material for external nasal splinting.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, N K; Rathnaprabhu, V; Ramesh, S; Parameswaran, A

    2016-01-01

    External nasal splinting is performed routinely after nasal bone fracture reductions, osteotomies, and rhinoplasties. Materials commonly used include plaster of Paris (POP), thermoplastic splints, self-adhesive padded aluminium splints, and Orthoplast, among many others. The disadvantages of these materials are described in this paper, and polyvinyl siloxane is recommended as an effective and more readily available alternative material to counter these pitfalls. PMID:26454773

  6. Wettability of nonaqueous elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Chai, J Y; Yeung, T C

    1991-01-01

    The wettability of eight nonaqueous elastomeric impression materials was studied by comparing their contact angles. The materials included three polyethers (one of which was light activated), three hydrophilic poly(vinyl siloxanes), one conventional poly(vinyl siloxane), and one poly(vinyl siloxane) putty. Extracted teeth were prepared to approximate the roughness of a tooth preparation. Contact angles were measured at different time intervals after the start of mixing but were not shown to be significant. The nonhydrophilic poly(vinyl siloxane) materials and the poly(vinyl siloxane) putty were found to be significantly less wettable. PMID:1817528

  7. “Evaluation of the Effect of Ultraviolet Disinfection on Dimensional Stability of the Polyvinyl Silioxane Impressions.” an in-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Godbole, Surekha R; Dahane, Trupti M; Nimonkar, Sharayu V

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infection control is an important concept in the present day practice of dentistry. The prosthodontists are at an added risk of transmission because of the infection spreading through the contaminated lab equipments while working in the lab. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of UV light disinfection on dimensional stability of polyvinyl siloxane impressions. Materials and Methods : Impressions were made in perforated custom tray. After polymerization of impression, half the samples were disinfected in UV light and remaining samples were not subjected to disinfection and poured in die stone which served as control group. Linear dimensions were measured on the cast with travelling microscope of 0.001accuracy. Result : The result showed that UV light disinfectant showed no significant dimensional changes on impressions. Conclusion: Hence, it can be safely used to disinfect impressions in clinical prosthodontic procedures. PMID:25386528

  8. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  9. A Technique to Transfer the Emergence Profile Contours of a Provisional Implant Crown to the Definitive Impression.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karnik; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes a method to create a proper emergence profile and accurately transfer it to the definitive impression, using an indirectly fabricated modified impression post. A provisional screwretained crown was indexed with a polyvinyl siloxane material. An autopolymerizing acrylic resin was used to modify an impression post on the polyvinyl siloxane index, which was then screwed onto the implant for the definitive impression after proper soft tissue healing. The indirectly fabricated modified impression post helped to transfer the contours to the definitive impression with minimal soft tissue irritation. PMID:27004296

  10. Effect of surfactant on surface hardness of dental stone and investment casts produced from polyvinyl siloxane duplicating materials.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Attalah; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2008-06-01

    Polyvinylsiloxane duplicating materials are typically treated with a topical surfactant before pouring dental models, but the use of topical surfactants in the dental laboratory may affect the surface hardness of the resultant models. The effect of two different topical surfactants on surface hardness of two dental stones (FujiRock and Dentstone) and one phosphate bonded investment material (Croform WB) produced from polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) dental laboratory duplicating moulds was investigated. Topical surfactants affected the surface hardness of FujiRock, Dentstone and Croform WB investment material. Surface hardness of FujiRock increased with Wax-Mate surfactant. However, surface hardness of Croform WB investment material decreased with both topical surfactants. PMID:18637383

  11. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization. PMID:22379308

  12. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  13. Hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset and set films of one polyether and six polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials using high-resolution drop shape analysis at drop ages of 1 and 3 seconds. All unset PVS materials were very hydrophobic initially but showed different kinetics of hydrophilization. In contrast, the unset polyether was more hydrophilic initially but lacked distinct hydrophilization. All impression materials showed statistically significant contact angle differences between unset and set surfaces (P < .05). Dependent on the drop age, two PVS materials reached or exceeded the hydrophilicity of the polyether (P < .05). It can be concluded that studies on the wetting behavior of elastomeric impression materials should consider both the experimental drop age and set and unset material surfaces. PMID:21209992

  14. Effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Rismanchian, Mansor; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Bajoghli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different factors such as impression techniques and materials can affect the passive fit between the superstructure and implant. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts. Materials and Methods: Four internal hex implants (Biohorizons Ø4 mm) were placed on a metal maxillary model perpendicular to the horizontal plane in maxillary lateral incisors, right canine and left first premolar areas. Three impression techniques including open tray, closed tray using ball top screw abutments and closed tray using short impression copings and two impression materials (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane) were evaluated (n = 60). The changes in distances between implant analogues in mediolateral (x) and anteroposterior (y) directions and analogue angles in x/z and y/z directions in the horizontal plane on the definitive casts were measured by coordinate measuring machine. The data were analyzed by multivariate two-way analysis of variance and one sample t-test (α = 0.05). Results: No statistical significant differences were observed between different impression techniques and materials. However, deviation and distortion of definitive casts had a significant difference with the master model when short impression copings and polyvinyl siloxane impression material were used (P < 0.05). In open tray technique, there was a significant difference in the rotation of analogs compared with the master model with both impression materials (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There was no difference between open and closed tray impression techniques; however, less distortion and deviation were observed in the open tray technique. In the closed tray impression technique, ball top screw was more accurate than short impression copings. PMID:25878678

  15. Effect of disinfection of custom tray materials on adhesive properties of several impression material systems.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G A; Vermilyea, S G; Agar, J R

    1994-12-01

    The effects of impression tray disinfection procedures on the bond strength of impression-material adhesives to two types of resin trays were evaluated with a tensile test. Autopolymerizing acrylic resin and a visible light-curing resin were formed into one-half inch cubes. A screw eye was attached to each cube before polymerization. Perforated trays were fabricated with stops to maintain an even one-eighth inch of impression material over the resin block. Hooks on the opposite side permitted attachment of the metal plate to a mechanical testing machine. Before adhesive was applied, one third of the resin specimens were immersed in a 1:213 iodophor solution; one third in a 10% sodium hypochlorite solution, and one third were kept in the "as fabricated" condition. Polysulfide, polyether, and polyvinyl siloxane impression material-adhesive systems were evaluated. The resin-impression material-metal plate couples were attached to a mechanical testing machine and tensile forces were applied at a separation rate of 5 inches per minute. Mean values for adhesive strength ranged from 3.49 kg/cm2 for the autopolymerizing acrylic resin/iodophor/polyether combination to 10.55 kg/cm2 for the autopolymerizing acrylic resin/untreated/polyvinyl siloxane combination. Differences were detected among materials and disinfecting procedure. Clinically, disinfection of resin trays may adversely affect retention of the impression material to the tray. PMID:7853264

  16. An Investigation into the Accuracy of Two Currently Available Dental Impression Materials in the Construction of Cobalt-Chromium Frameworks for Removable Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Rajesh Kumar; Friel, Tim; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. Scans of casts derived from (1) alginate and (2) addition-cured polyvinylsiloxane impressions were superposed on to a control. The differences within and between groups were compared at fixed landmarks. The investigation revealed a high degree of scan coincidence within and between groups. However, certain features, such as undercuts, resulted in a lower degree of scan coincidence. Irreversible hydrocolloid appears to be a viable alternative to addition-cured polyvinyl-siloxane as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. PMID:26415334

  17. Effect of the impression margin thickness on the linear accuracy of impression and stone dies: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Naveen, Y G; Patil, Raghunath

    2013-03-01

    The space available for impression material in gingival sulcus immediately after the removal of retraction cord has been found to be 0.3-0.4 mm. However after 40 s only 0.2 mm of the retracted space is available. This is of concern when impression of multiple abutments is to be made. Hence a study was planned to determine the minimum width of the retracted sulcus necessary to obtain a good impression. Five metal dies were machined to accurately fit a stainless steel block with a square cavity in the center with spaces, 1 mm deep and of varying widths (0.11-0.3 mm) away from the block. Polyvinyl siloxane impressions were made and poured using a high strength stone. Using traveling microscope, length and widths of abutment, impression and die were measured and compared for linear accuracy and completeness of impression. Results showed 1.5-3 times greater mean distortion and larger coefficient of variance in the 0.11 mm group than in the wider sulcular groups. ANOVA test for distortion also showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). 75 % of impressions in 0.11 mm group were defective compared to less than 25 % of impressions in other width groups. It is not always possible to predictably obtain accurate impressions in sulcus width of 0.11 mm or lesser. Dimensionally accurate and defect free impressions were obtained in sulcus width of 0.15 mm and wider. Hence clinicians must choose retraction methods to obtain a width greater than 0.35 mm. Further immediate loading of the impression material after cord removal may improve accuracy. PMID:24431701

  18. Accuracy of different impression materials in parallel and nonparallel implants

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ansarifard, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: A precise impression is mandatory to obtain passive fit in implant-supported prostheses. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three impression materials in both parallel and nonparallel implant positions. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two partial dentate maxillary acrylic models with four implant analogues in canines and lateral incisors areas were used. One model was simulating the parallel condition and the other nonparallel one, in which implants were tilted 30° bucally and 20° in either mesial or distal directions. Thirty stone casts were made from each model using polyether (Impregum), additional silicone (Monopren) and vinyl siloxanether (Identium), with open tray technique. The distortion values in three-dimensions (X, Y and Z-axis) were measured by coordinate measuring machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Results: Under parallel condition, all the materials showed comparable, accurate casts (P = 0.74). In the presence of angulated implants, while Monopren showed more accurate results compared to Impregum (P = 0.01), Identium yielded almost similar results to those produced by Impregum (P = 0.27) and Monopren (P = 0.26). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, in parallel conditions, the type of impression material cannot affect the accuracy of the implant impressions; however, in nonparallel conditions, polyvinyl siloxane is shown to be a better choice, followed by vinyl siloxanether and polyether respectively. PMID:26288620

  19. Impression materials in fixed prosthodontics: influence of choice on clinical procedure.

    PubMed

    Hamalian, Techkouhie A; Nasr, Elie; Chidiac, José J

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to review impression materials used for fabricating fixed restorations in dentistry. Their compositions, properties, advantages, and disadvantages are presented and compared. How these properties influence clinical decisions is also described. This review helps the clinician choose which material is more suitable for a specific case. A broad search of the published literature was performed using Medline to identify pertinent current articles. Textbooks, the Internet, and manufacturers' literature were also used to supplement this information. It is limited to impression materials used in fixed prosthodontics. The review gives basic knowledge of ideal impression material properties and discusses traditional and, primarily, more recently developed products, such as polyethers, poly(vinyl siloxane), polysulfides, and condensation silicone materials. Clear advantages and disadvantages for these impression materials are provided along with the role that compositional variations have on the outcome of the impression. This should enable clinicians and technicians to easily identify the important physical properties of each type of impression material and their primary clinical indications. PMID:21284760

  20. Effect of splinting in accuracy of two implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; de Matos Moraes, Fernanda; Castanharo, Sabrina Maria; Del'Acqua, Marcelo Antonialli; de Assis Mollo, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Because there is no consensus in the literature about the need for a splint between copings, the aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the accuracy of 2 impression techniques for implant-supported prostheses. A master cast was fabricated with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework. Two groups with 5 casts each were formed: Group 1 (squared impression copings with no splint: S) and Group 2 (splinted squared impression copings, using metal drill burs and Pattern resin: SS). The impression material used was polyvinyl siloxane with open trays for standard preparation of the casts. For each cast, the framework was positioned, and a titanium screw was tightened with 10 N·cm torque in analog A, after which measurements of the abutment-framework interface gaps were performed at analogs C and D. This process was repeated for analog D. These measurements were analyzed using software. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence interval of 95% was used to analyze the data. Significant differences were detected between S and SS in relation to the master cast (P ≤ 0.05). The median values of the abutment-framework interface gaps were as follows: master cast: 39.64 μm; squared impression copings with no splint: 205.86 μm; splinted squared impression copings: 99.19 μm. Under the limitations of this study, the technique presented for Group 2 produces better results compared with the technique used for Group 1. PMID:25506658

  1. Polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Novel polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups (PISOX) were prepared by the reaction of functionalized siloxane compounds with hydroxy containing polyimides (PIOH). The pendent siloxane groups on the polyimide backbone offer distinct advantages such as lowering the dielectric constant and moisture resistance and enhanced atomic oxygen resistance. The siloxane containing polyimides are potentially useful as protective silicon oxide coatings and are useful for a variety of applications where atomic oxygen resistance is needed.

  2. Acetylene-Terminated Polyimide Siloxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Maudgal, Shubba

    1987-01-01

    Siloxane-containing addition polyimides yield toughened high-temperature adhesives and matrix resins. Addition polyimide made by reaction of aromatic tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride with aromatic diamine in presence of ethynyl-substituted aromatic monoamine. Acetylene-terminated siloxane imide cured by heating to yield acetylene-terminated polyimide siloxane.

  3. Oligosilane-siloxane nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Waymouth, R.M.; Opperman, K.A.; Beach, J.V.

    1996-10-01

    Zirconocene-catalyzed a-bond metathesis of phenylsilane is a mild and convenient way to generate synthetically versatile oligophenylsilane [Si(H)(Ph)]{sub n} (n {approx} 33). Free radical-initiated hydrosilation of alkoxysilanes RSiMe{sub x}(OEt){sub y} (R = allyl; x = 0, y = 3; x = 1, y = 2; x = 2, y = 1) at the oligophenylsilane Si-H bonds, followed by sol-gel hydrolysis-polycondensation, yields novel siloxanes containing the intact oligosilane chromophore. The sol-gel precursors and resulting siloxane materials have been characterized by solution and solid state multinuclear NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies and elemental analysis, and their bulk properties assessed by scanning electron microscopy, thermal and nitrogen sorption surface area analyses. The new materials` molecular and bulk properties, and the significance of processing and siloxane content on these properties, will be discussed.

  4. Siloxane-modified polyethersulfideimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Harold D.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1987-01-01

    BDSDA/APB, a novel linear polyethersulfideimide, was synthesized using siloxane units as flexible linkages in the backbone in an attempt to improve use properties and processability. The effect of these flexible linkages on molecular weight buildup, flexural strength and modulus, glass transition temperature, and melt-flow properties was determined.

  5. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001). Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  6. Good Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Geraldine; Pulsifer, Mary

    1986-01-01

    An art activity featuring ballerinas in classic poses and costumes was extended by a visit to an exhibit on Edgar Degas. Hearing impaired students shared their impressions of another traveling exhibit with French students via computers. (CL)

  7. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Obligin, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional groups. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  8. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.T.; Obligin, A.S.

    1989-10-31

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional group. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  9. First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coen, Frank

    1969-01-01

    The unreliability of first impressions and subjective judgments is the subject of both Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Lionel Trilling's "Of This Time, Of That Place"; consequently, the works are worthwhile parallel studies for high school students. Austen, by means of irony and subtle characterization, dramatizes the need for constant…

  10. Comparison of dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced from scanned impressions and scanned stone casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subeihi, Haitham

    Introduction: Digital models of dental arches play a more and more important role in dentistry. A digital dental model can be generated by directly scanning intraoral structures, by scanning a conventional impression of oral structures or by scanning a stone cast poured from the conventional impression. An accurate digital scan model is a fundamental part for the fabrication of dental restorations. Aims: 1. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions versus scanning of stone casts. 2. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions made of three different materials (polyvinyl siloxane, polyether or vinyl polyether silicone). Methods and Materials: This laboratory study included taking addition silicone, polyether and vinyl polyether silicone impressions from an epoxy reference model that was created from an original typodont. Teeth number 28 and 30 on the typodont with a missing tooth number 29 were prepared for a metal-ceramic three-unit fixed dental prosthesis with tooth #29 being a pontic. After tooth preparation, an epoxy resin reference model was fabricated by duplicating the typodont quadrant that included the tooth preparations. From this reference model 12 polyvinyl siloxane impressions, 12 polyether impressions and 12 vinyl polyether silicone impressions were made. All 36 impressions were scanned before pouring them with dental stone. The 36 dental stone casts were, in turn, scanned to produce digital models. A reference digital model was made by scanning the reference model. Six groups of digital models were produced. Three groups were made by scanning of the impressions obtained with the three different materials, the other three groups involved the scanning of the dental casts that resulted from pouring the impressions made with the three different materials. Groups of digital models were compared using Root Mean

  11. Dinosaur Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Philippe

    1998-09-01

    Perhaps you are a paleontologist or have always wondered what it is like to be one. Or you are fascinated by fossils and like to read about the origins and natural history of dinosaurs. Or maybe you are an avid traveler and reader of travelogues. If you are any of these things, then this book is for you. Originally published in 1994 in French, Dinosaur Impressions is the engaging account of thirty years of travel and paleontological exploration by Philippe Taquet, one of the world's most noted paleontologists. Dr. Taquet takes the reader on a surprisingly far-flung tour ranging from the Provence countryside to the Niger desert, from the Brazilian bush to the Mongolian Steppes, and from the Laos jungle to the Moroccan mountains in search of dinosaur bones and what they have to tell us about a vanished world. With wry humor and lively anecdotes, Dr. Taquet retraces the history of paleontological research, along the way discussing the latest theories of dinosaur existence and extinction. Elegantly translated by Kevin Padian, Dinosaur Impressions provides a unique, thoughtful perspective not often encountered in American- and English-language works. This insightful, first-hand account of an exceptional career is also a travelogue par excellence that will enthrall enthusiasts and general readers alike. Philippe Taquet is the Director of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and is a member of the French Academy of Sciences. Kevin Padian is a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and Curator of the Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the editor of The Beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs (Cambridge, 1986) and The Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs (1997).

  12. Polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The incorporation of siloxane units into the backbone of aromatic polyimides has been shown to impart certain advantages over the unmodified polyimides. These include enhanced solubility, lower moisture adsorption, lower dielectric constant, improved toughness and surface modification. Also, when exposed to an atomic oxygen environment these materials form an in-situ silicate (SiO2) surface coating which protects the underlying material from further erosion. These unique advantages make polyimide-siloxanes useful in a variety of electronic and aerospace applications. As part of an effort on high performance polymeric materials for potential aerospace applications, polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups are under study. These materials were prepared by reacting a functionalized siloxane compound with polyimides containing benzhydrol groups. Thin films of the polymers exhibited glass transition temperatures ranging from 167 to 235 C. Tensile strengths and moduli measured at 23 C ranged from 11 to 14 ksi and 250 to 450 ksi, respectively. The dielectric constant was lowered substantially from that of the unmodified polyimide.

  13. Permeation of substituted silanes and siloxanes through selected gloves and protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G O; Priante, S J; Strong, M; Anderson, D; Fallon-Carine, J

    2000-01-01

    Testing of the permeation resistance of eight glove and suit barriers against commercially available substituted silanes and siloxanes was performed using the ASTM F739-96 standard test method. In addition to barrier performance to the pure organosilanes, the permeation rates of the hydrolysis product (usually ethanol or methanol) were investigated. The silanes and siloxanes used as the challenge agents were N-2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane; 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane; 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane; ethyltriacetoxysilane; 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane; 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyldisilazane; hexamethyldisiloxane; 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane; methyltriacetoxysilane (50%)/ethyltriacetoxysilane (50%); methyltrimethoxysilane; methyltris(methylethylketoxime)silane; phenyltrimethoxysilane; polydimethyl siloxanes (PS 340); octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4); tetraethoxysilane; tetramethoxysilane; 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl disiloxane; triethoxysilane; trimethoxysilane; vinyltrimethoxysilane; and vinyltris(methylethylketoxime)silane. Protective gloves tested were nitrile rubber, neoprene rubber, butyl rubber, 4H laminate, and polyvinyl chloride. Garments tested included Tyvek/Saranex 23P, CPF 2, and Responder, all made by Kappler Safety Group. In all cases the protective suit materials lasted 8 hours or more. The only glove that lasted 8 hours against all chemicals was the 4H laminate. The polyvinyl chloride glove lasted 10 min to 8 hours or more depending on the chemical. The nitrile, neoprene, and butyl rubber gloves lasted from 53 min to 8 hours or more depending on the chemical. The alcohol permeation was similar to the organosilicon compounds. The suit materials and the butyl glove all lasted more than 8 hours for both methanol and ethanol. PMID:11071423

  14. Siloxane containing polyimides with improved processability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, Shubha; St. Clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    Siloxane containing polyimides were prepared in an effort to improve processability of linear aromatic polyimides and toughness of addition curing imide oligomers. Linear aromatic polyimides were endcapped with varying proportions of a silane; a diaminosiloxane was copolymerized with an aromatic diamine; polyimide oligomers were endcapped with reactive groups; and acetylene terminated siloxane-containing oligomers were blended with linear siloxane-containing polyimides. The resins were used to prepare moldings, titanium to titanium adhesive bonds, and graphite reinforced composites. In each case, physical properties and other characteristics were compared to those of chemically similar polyimides with no siloxane incorporation. The resins, in most cases, performed better at room temperature than the corresponding polyimide. At elevated temperatures, for high siloxane content, the performance deteriorated.

  15. TOWARD MINIMALLY ADHESIVE SURFACES UTILIZING SILOXANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three types of siloxane-based network polymers have been investigated for their surface properties towards potential applications as minimally adhesive coatings. A filled poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer, RTV it, has been studied to determine surface weldability and stabil...

  16. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, T; Tsokas, K

    1990-01-01

    A review of the literature on elastomeric impression materials, is presented in this paper. The article mentions the composition and the most important properties of the elastomeric impression materials used in dental practice. The clinical significance of these materials, physical and mechanical properties are also emphasized. In addition some new elastomeric impression materials with improved properties and a new (experimental) light-cured impression material, are mentioned. Another part of this article is the biocompatibility of these materials. In the end the great significance of handling is outlined. PMID:2130039

  17. Polyimides That Contain Pendent Siloxane Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; St. Clair, Terry L.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    Polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups (PISOXs) synthesized from polyimides containing hydroxy groups (PIOHs) according to either of two alternative approaches. Addition of pendent siloxane groups to polyimide decreases dielectric constant, and decreases absorption of moisture: these changes in properties advantageous in some electronic applications. Also enhance resistance to atomic oxygen in that they undergo slight degradation to form thin protective silicon oxide coats when exposed to atomic oxygen.

  18. ETI: Our first impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2000-06-01

    Despite scant or ambiguous information, people are capable of developing comprehensive and detailed impressions. Consequently, if the detection of an electromagnetically-active civilization is announced, many people will rapidly form impressions of what the extraterrestrials and their civilization are "like". First impressions are crucial, not only because of their immediate psychological, social, and political consequences on Earth, but because they can influence the future of interstellar communication. Initial impressions will rest less on hard data than on the nature and tone of the "evidence" that is gleaned from the transmission; the interpretation and dissemination of this evidence; and the hard wiring, psychological programming, cultural conditioning, and social influence processes that shape human perception. We consider how dispositional inferences, implicit theories of personality, negatively toned or adverse information, physical appearance, prior expectations, the confirmation bias, and thinking and unthinking approaches to attitude formation are likely to affect human impressions of ETI.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization, Topographical Modification, and Surface Properties of Copoly(Imide Siloxane)s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Atkins, Brad M.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Novel copoly(imide siloxane)s were synthesized from commercially available aminopropyl terminated siloxane oligomers, aromatic dianhydrides, and diamines. This synthetic approach produced copolymers with well-defined siloxane blocks linked with imide units in a random fashion. The copoly(amide acid)s were characterized by solution viscosity and subsequently used to cast thin films followed by thermal imidization in an inert atmosphere. Thin films were characterized using contact angle goniometry, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, confocal and optical microscopy, and tensile testing. Adhesion of micronsized particles was determined quantitatively using a sonication device. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) moieties lowered the copolymer surface energy due to migration of siloxane moieties to the film s surface, resulting in a notable reduction in particle adhesion. A further reduction in particle adhesion was achieved by introducing topographical features on a scale of several to tens of microns by a laser ablation technique.

  20. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  1. 40 CFR 721.10119 - Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10119 Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (PMN P-05-673) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10119 - Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10119 Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (PMN P-05-673) is subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10119 - Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10119 Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (PMN P-05-673) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9515 - Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane... Substances § 721.9515 Aminofunctional alkoxy alkyl siloxane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... siloxane (PMN P-96-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10119 - Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10119 Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (PMN P-05-673) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10119 - Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10119 Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (PMN P-05-673) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. Self-assembling particle-siloxane coatings for superhydrophobic concrete.

    PubMed

    Flores-Vivian, Ismael; Hejazi, Vahid; Kozhukhova, Marina I; Nosonovsky, Michael; Sobolev, Konstantin

    2013-12-26

    We report here, for the first time in the literature, a method to synthesize hydrophobic and superhydrophobic concrete. Concrete is normally a hydrophilic material, which significantly reduces the durability of concrete structures and pavements. To synthesize water-repellent concrete, hydrophobic emulsions were fabricated and applied on portland cement mortar tiles. The emulsion was enriched with the polymethyl-hydrogen siloxane oil hydrophobic agent as well as metakaolin (MK) or silica fume (SF) to induce the microroughness and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers to create hierarchical surfaces. Various emulsion types were investigated by using different mixing procedures, and single- and double-layer hydrophobic coatings were applied. The emulsions and coatings were characterized with optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and their wetting properties, including the water contact angle (CA) and roll-off angle, were measured. A theoretical model for coated and non-coated concrete, which can be generalized for other types of materials, was developed to predict the effect of surface roughness and composition on the CA. An optimized distance between the aggregates was found where the CA has the highest value. The maximal CA measured was 156° for the specimen with PVA fibers treated with MK based emulsion. Since water penetration is the main factor leading to concrete deterioration, hydrophobic water-repellent concretes have much longer durability then regular concretes and can have a broad range of applications in civil and materials engineering. PMID:24245777

  15. Direct Human Contact with Siloxanes (Silicones) – Safety or Risk Part 1. Characteristics of Siloxanes (Silicones)

    PubMed Central

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna; Jamrógiewicz, Marzena; Szymkowska, Katarzyna; Krenczkowska, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Siloxanes are commonly known as silicones. They belong to the organosilicon compounds and are exclusively obtained by synthesis. Their chemical structure determines a range of physicochemical properties which were recognized as unique. Due to the susceptibility to chemical modifications, ability to create short, long or complex polymer particles, siloxanes found an application in many areas of human life. Siloxanes differ in particle size, molecular weight, shape and chemical groups. As a result, this determines the different physico-chemical properties, that directly affect the safety or the risk of their use. The areas that can be a source of danger to human health will be commented in this paper. PMID:27303296

  16. Evidence for a sedimentary siloxane horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Pellenbarg, R.E.; Tevault, D.E.

    1986-07-01

    Selected samples from two Puget Sound sediment cores have been analyzed for poly(organo)siloxanes(silicones). One core was 60 years old at 30-cm depth (ages by lead-210 dating) and showed no evidence for silicones there. The second, 15 years old at depth, exhibited silicones at depth. Clearly shown is evidence for a siloxane horizon in theses two cores, with the presence of the horizon directly related to the fact that silicones have been in widespread use only since World War II. All samples were analyzed by solvent extraction and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. 10 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  17. Copoly(Imide Siloxane) Abhesive Materials with Varied Siloxane Oligomer Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Atkins, Brad M.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of PDMS moieties into a polyimide matrix lowered the surface energy resulting in enhanced adhesive interactions. Polyimide siloxane materials were generated using amine-terminated PDMS oligomers of different lengths to study changes in surface migration behavior, phase segregation, mechanical, thermal, and optical properties. These materials were characterized using contact angle goniometry, tensile testing, and differential scanning calorimetry. The surface migration behavior of the PDMS component depended upon the siloxane molecular weight as indicated by distinct relationships between PDMS chain length and advancing water contact angles. Similar correlations were observed for percent elongation values obtained from tensile testing, while the addition of PDMS reduced the modulus. High fidelity topographical modification via laser ablation patterning further reduced the polyimide siloxane surface energy. Initial particulate adhesion testing experiments demonstrated that polyimide siloxane materials exhibited greater abhesive interactions relative to their respective homopolyimides.

  18. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, S; Folkman, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2011-04-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are in common use. The impression taken should be highly precise, thus, requiring specific care when manipulatingthese materials. There are 4 groups of elastomers; polysulfide, condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether; each differ in their setting mechanism and their physical and chemical properties. This review elaborates the major properties of elastomers and its implications on their use. The impression material is inserted into the patient's mouth in a viscous state and transforms into viscoelastic state, upon withdrawal, influencing the residual deformation. The requirements are minimal residual deformation or maximal elastic recovery. As the mouth is a wet environment a major consideration is hydrophilicity. The wettability which is estimated by measuring either the contact angle of a droplet of water and the substrate post setting or the contact angle of a droplet of impression material and the wet tooth pre setting, determines the interaction of the material with both mouth fluids and gypsum. As the primary end target is to obtain a model depicting accurately the oral details, an attention to the impressions' compatibility with gypsum should also be given. Many studies were conducted to get a thorough understanding of the hydrophilic properties of each material, and the mechanism utilized, such as surfactants in hydrophilic PVS. Polyether is the only material that is truly hydrophilic; it exhibits the lowest contact angle, during and after setting. Recent studies show that during setting the Polyether hydrophilicity is increased compared to the condition after setting. Dimensional stability, a crucial property of the impression, is affected by the physical and chemical attributes of the material, such as its tear strength. Polysulfide has the highest tear strength. Tear Strength is affected by two major parameters, viscosity, a built-in property, and how fast the impression is pulled out of the mouth, the

  19. Neurological Impress Method plus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, James; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of these two studies was to redirect interest to the Neurological Impress Method, a multisensory approach to reading instruction that occurs between a teacher and a student, which has been largely forgotten in mainstream and special education circles over the past decades. In addition to its emphasis on oral reading, we included a…

  20. Copoly(imide siloxane) Abhesive Materials with Varied Siloxane Oligomer Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christoper J.; Atkins, Brad M.; Lin, Yi; Belcher, Marcus A.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, low surface energy copoly(imide siloxane)s were synthesized with various siloxane segment lengths. Characterization of these materials revealed that domain formation of the low surface energy component within the matrix was more prevalent for longer siloxane segments as indicated by increased opacity, decreased mechanical properties, and variation of the Tg. Incorporation of siloxanes lowered the polymer s surface energy as indicated by water contact angle values. Topographical modification of these materials by laser ablation patterning further reduced the surface energy, even generating superhydrophobic surfaces. Combined, the contact angle data and particle adhesion testing indicated that copoly(imide siloxane) materials may provide greater mitigation to particulate adhesion than polyimide materials alone. These enhanced surface properties for abhesive applications did result in a reduction of the tensile moduli of the copolymers. It is possible that lower siloxane loading levels would result in retention of the mechanical properties of the polyimide while still affording abhesive surface properties. This hypothesis is currently being investigated. Laser ablation patterning offers further reduction in particle retention as the available surface area for particle adhesion is reduced. Pattern variation and size dependencies are currently being evaluated. For the purposes of lunar dust adhesion mitigation, it is likely that this approach, termed passive due to the lack of input from an external energy source, would not be sufficient to mitigate surface contamination or clean contaminated surfaces for some lunar applications. It is feasible to combine these materials with active mitigation strategies - methods that utilize input from external energy sources - would broaden the applicability of such materials for abhesive purposes. Collaborative efforts along these lines have been initiated with researchers at NASA Kennedy Space Center where experiments

  1. Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Aromatic Siloxane Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwick, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    Silphenylene-siloxane polymers can be prepared by a condensation reaction of a diol 1,4-bis(hydroxydimethylsilyl)benzene and a silane bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane. Using a stepwise condensation technique, a polymer (R=CH3) with a molecular weight in excess of 1.0 x 1 million has been produced. The polymer exhibits increased thermal stability, compared to a methyl siloxane polymer without the aromatic phenyl ring in the backbone. The use of bis(dimethylamino)methylvinylsilane should allow for ready crosslinking at the vinyl sites (R=-CH=CH2) introduced into the backbone. However, under the conditions of the reaction system a high molecular weight polymer was not obtained or the polymer underwent a crosslinking process during the synthesis.

  2. New interpenetrating network type siloxane polymer electrolyte.

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, B.; Hyung, Y.-E.; Vissers, D. R.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering

    2002-11-01

    An interpenetrating network (IPN), comb-type, siloxane-based solid polymer electrolyte solid polymer electrolyte was prepared and its electrochemical properties were evaluated. The cross-linking reaction conditions were established from accelerated rate calorimetry studies. An IPN solid ploymer electrolyte with 60 wt % of the comb-shaped siloxane showed an ionic conductivity of greater than 5x10{sup -4} S/cm at 37 C, with a wide electrochemical stability window of up to 4.5 V vs. lithium. A Li metal/solid polymer electrolyte/LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cell showed promising discharge capacities above 130 mAh/g and good cycling performance.

  3. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  4. Relevance of an organic solvent for absorption of siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Leila; Tatin, Romuald; Couvert, Annabelle

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of siloxanes exist but the most abundant in biogas are Hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) and Octamethyltrisiloxane (L3) as linear siloxanes and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) as a cyclic siloxane. In order to remove volatile organic compound from biogas, different processes can be used. A promising process for siloxane removal is their absorption in an organic solvent. In this work, three oils were tested to absorb the selected siloxanes: silicone oil 47V20, Seriola 1510 and Polyalphaolefin. Initially, the characterization of these oils was realized by measuring their viscosities and densities, depending on temperature. The second time, the absorption capacity of the siloxanes by selected oils was characterized through the determination of their Henry's constants, but also owing to the implementation of a wet-wall column. Both Henry's constants and removal efficiencies in continuous regime revealed that silicone oil (47V20) can be considered as the most efficient oil among the three selected siloxanes. Moreover, the cyclic siloxane (D4) showed more affinity with oils than linear siloxanes. Silicone oil 47V20 appeared to be the best oil (intermediate price 14 euro/L, low viscosity, low volatility, chemical inertness (no corrosion) and resistance to high and low temperatures). PMID:24600877

  5. Substance Use as Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Mark J.; Getz, J. Greg

    1996-01-01

    Examines the function of substance use as an impression management tactic. Introductory psychology students (n=377) responded to a survey instrument measuring self-monitoring, perceived success in impression management, interaction anxiety, and self-esteem. Results suggest that alcohol use may serve an impression management function. (JPS)

  6. Dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that many impression materials are available to the veterinary dentist. They each have different inherent properties, handling characteristics, and indications for use. A thorough understanding of these concepts is essential if the veterinarian and laboratory technician are to produce meaningful and accurate reproductions of oral structures. New products are constantly being introduced to the dental market, with fantastic claims for ease of use and reproduction of detail. The reader is urged to seek independent research findings when assessing such claims, and make decisions founded in the highest possible levels of evidence. PMID:24006720

  7. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nanoparticles (generic). 721.10120 Section 721.10120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nanoparticles (generic). 721.10120 Section 721.10120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. Fouling-release and chemical activity effects of a siloxane-based material on tunicates.

    PubMed

    Filip, Natalia; Pustam, Amanda; Ells, Veronica; Grosicki, Kathleen M T; Yang, Jin; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Smith-Palmer, Truis; Wyeth, Russell C

    2016-05-01

    The antifouling performance of a siloxane-based elastomeric impression material (EIM) was compared to that of two silicone fouling-release coatings, Intersleek 757 and RTV-11. In field immersion trials, the EIM caused the greatest reduction in fouling by the solitary tunicate Ciona intestinalis and caused the longest delay in the progression of fouling by two species of colonial tunicate. However, in pseudobarnacle adhesion tests, the EIM had higher attachment strengths. Further laboratory analyses showed that the EIM leached alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) that were toxic to C. intestinalis larvae. The EIM thus showed the longest duration of chemical activity measured to date for a siloxane-based coating (4 months), supporting investigations of fouling-release coatings that release targeted biocides. However, due to potential widespread effects of APEs, the current EIM formulation should not be considered as an environmentally-safe antifoulant. Thus, the data also emphasize consideration of both immediate and long-term effects of potentially toxic constituents released from fouling-release coatings. PMID:26986763

  10. Kinetic investigation of the solvation of lithium salts in siloxanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Wang, H. H.; Vissers, D. R.; Zhang, L.; West, R.; Lyons, L. J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Wisconsin; Grinnell Coll.

    2008-02-14

    The solvation of lithium salts in siloxanes was investigated with the aim to understand the key barriers that limit the ionic conductivity of siloxane-based electrolytes. The conductivity and kinetic data were measured for electrolytes with different salts, different salt concentrations, and solvents. The results show that both the conductivity and the kinetics of ionic transportation were greatly impacted by the specific interactions between ions and the solvent molecules. The high content of ion pairs in the electrolytes can be one of the main reasons for the low ionic conductivity observed in the siloxane-based electrolytes.

  11. Ultrahigh molecular weight aromatic siloxane polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwick, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    The condensation of a diol with a silane in toluene yields a silphenylene-siloxane polymer. The reaction of stiochiometric amounts of the diol and silane produced products with molecular weights in the range 2.0 - 6.0 x 10 to the 5th power. The molecular weight of the product was greatly increased by a multistep technique. The methodology for synthesis of high molecular weight polymers using a two step procedure was refined. Polymers with weight average molecular weights in excess of 1.0 x 10 to the 6th power produced by this method. Two more reactive silanes, bis(pyrrolidinyl)dimethylsilane and bis(gamma butyrolactam)dimethylsilane, are compared with the dimethyleminodimethylsilane in ability to advance the molecular weight of the prepolymer. The polymers produced are characterized by intrinsic viscosity in tetrahydrofuran. Weight and number average molecular weights and polydispersity are determined by gel permeation chromatography.

  12. Structure property behavior of polyimide siloxane segmented copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, C. A.; Summers, J. D.; Bott, R. H.; Taylor, L. T.; Ward, T. C.

    1987-01-01

    Procedures were developed for preparing soluble fully imidized polyimide-polydimethyl siloxane segmented copolymers of wide ranging compositions. At low siloxane levels, the materails behave as modified polyimides. At higher concentrations, the materials are analogous to thermoplastic elastomers. Characterization by dynamic mechanical and thermal analysis methods will be reported along with an assesment of the bulk mechanical properties and the surface behavior. The surface behavior is particularly interesting since the materials can be tailored to have siloxane surfaces even at rather low siloxane contents. This influences a number of properties such as the coefficient of friction and, importanly, the degradation of these materials under aggressive oxygen environments (e.g., atomic oxygen, oxygen plasma).

  13. Experimental studies of siloxane polymers and their elastomeric networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chung Mien

    1992-12-31

    Siloxane polymers have been investigated systematically for the purpose of a greater understanding of the structure-property relationships in terms of their synthesis, polymer blends and rubber elasticity of their crosslinked networks. This study includes a variety of topological structures: linear, cyclic and crosslinked networks of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and poly(dimethylco-methylphenylsiloxane) copolymers. Siloxane polymers with a narrow molecular weight distribution were prepared by a series of well-characterized organometallic polymerizations. The reaction conditions and mechanisms for preparing polyorganosiloxane chains and networks using organotin catalyst and promoters were discussed. Experimental evidence shows that formamide was one of the best additives to improve the reactivity of the tin dicarboxylate catalyst, which seems to suggest that the nucleophilic function of the additive was on the Sn atom. Since the PDMS and PMPS are immiscible under most conditions, the miscibility and phase behavior of siloxane blends were studied by a static light scattering t technique. THe influence of molar mass, the topological effect of cyclic and linear structures, the end-group effect, and the configurational isomerism effect on miscibility were examined. Silicon networks of PDMS, PMPS and their copolymers were prepared at room temperature using the crosslinked siloxane homopolymer and copolymer networks at equilibrium swelling in organic solvents and in liquid siloxane oligomers were investigated as function of crosslinking density and composition variation. The resulting interaction parameters for PDMS and PMPS from the swollen siloxane networks in siloxane oligomers individually were compared with those from measurements of the corresponding blend systems. Moreover, the stress-strain behavior of the siloxane polymer networks undergoing uniaxial deformation were evaluated by a stress-strain experiment.

  14. Statistical analysis of barefoot impressions.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Robert B; Pressman, Irwin S; Chen, Sanping; Petersen, Peter H; Pressman, Ari E

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of the shapes of barefoot impressions from an individual with footprints or shoes linked to a crime may be useful as a means of including or excluding that individual as possibly being at the scene of a crime. The question of the distinguishability of a person's barefoot print arises frequently. This study indicates that measurements taken from the outlines of inked footprint impressions show a great degree of variability between donors and a great degree of similarity for multiple impressions taken from the same donor. The normality of the set of measurements on footprint outlines that we have selected for this study is confirmed. A statistical justification for the use of the product rule on individual statistical precisions is developed. PMID:12570199

  15. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  20. [Characteristics of domestically produced siloxane elastomer for making elastic gingival prosthetic device].

    PubMed

    Riakhovskiĭ, A N; Poiurovskaia, I Ia; Kirillova, E V

    2006-01-01

    Gingival prosthetics effectively eliminates esthetic and phonetic disturbances in cases of pronounced gingival recession. Technology for making elastic gingival prosthetic devices of domestically produced siloxane elastomer composition with microwave siloxane vulcanization is described as well as the technique for making combined gingival prosthetics of siloxane composition and colorless plastic. PMID:16482030

  1. Enzymatic synthesis of lignin-siloxane hybrid functional polymers.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Kudanga, Tukayi; Fischer, Roman; Eichinger, Reinhard; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2012-02-01

    This study combines the properties of siloxanes and lignin polymers to produce hybrid functional polymers that can be used as adhesives, coating materials, and/or multifunctionalized thin-coating films. Lignin-silica hybrid copolymers were synthesized by using a sol-gel process. Laccases from Trametes hirsuta were used to oxidize lignosulphonates to enhance their reactivity towards siloxanes and then were incorporated into siloxane precursors undergoing a sol-gel process. In vitro copolymerization studies using pure lignin monomers with aminosilanes or ethoxytrimethylsilane and analysis by ²⁹Si NMR spectroscopy revealed hybrid products. Except for kraft lignin, an increase in lignin concentration positively affected the tensile strength in all samples. Similarly, the viscosity generally increased in all samples with increasing lignin concentration and also affected the curing time. PMID:21751391

  2. Diffusion of low molecular weight siloxane from bulk to surface

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, H.; Kuroyagi, T.; Mirley, C.L.; Ronzello, J.; Boggs, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Silicone-based materials for outdoor insulators have the advantage that low molecular weight (LMW) components migrate through the material and coat the surface, thereby restoring hydrophobicity over a period of hours. By measuring the infrared (IR) absorption of siloxane migrating to the silicone surface through a thin carbon coating, the aspect of the LMW siloxane migration was observed as a real time plot and the time constant of the migration was calculated. According to the time dependence of IR-absorbance, the migration mostly saturated within only 12 hours after the carbon coating was applied. Also, the time constant showed a dependence on the concentration of added filler in the silicone samples.

  3. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  4. Eyeblinks in formation of impressions.

    PubMed

    Omori, Y; Miyata, Y

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of frequency of one's eyeblinks on creating a personal impression. The subjects, 102 males and 127 females, ages 15 to 60 years, rated on a 7-point semantic differential scale a rarely blinking person or a frequently blinking person described on a question-sheet. A factor analysis of the ratings yielded three factors, interpreted as Nervousness, Unfriendliness, and Lack of intelligence. The frequently blinking person was rated as more nervous and less intelligent than the rarely blinking person. Present results provided evidence that frequency of eyeblinks may play an important role on the formation of impressions. Further implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:8902035

  5. Preparation and characterization of siloxane-containing thermoplastic polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Copolyimides and homopolyimides of bis(gamma-aminopropyl)tetramethyldisiloxane and 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone have been prepared with benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride. The properties of the copolyimides were compared with those of the homopolyimides to assess the effect of incorporation of siloxane groups in the backbone. Applications of the polymers as adhesives and mouldings are discussed.

  6. Acetylene (ethynyl) terminated polyimide siloxane and process for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, T. L.; ASI primers applied over ste (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Siloxane containing addition polyimides having improved physical property characteristics of flexibility, drape, tack, and toughness and the process for preparing and utilizing the same are disclosed. The novelty of this invention appears to reside in the composition and process of preparing addition type polyimides useful as structural adhesives as well as composite matrix materials and the process of preparing the same.

  7. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  8. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  9. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  10. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  11. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  12. Intraoral Digital Impression Technique: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ting-Shu, Su; Jian, Sun

    2015-06-01

    With the techniques of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) being applied in the field of prosthodontics, a concept of intraoral digital impressions was put forward in the early 1980s. It has drawn comprehensive attention from dentists and has been used for dental prosthesis fabrication in a number of cases. This new digital impression technique is expected to bring about absolute digitization to the mode of prosthodontics. A few published articles have indicated that dental prostheses fabricated from intraoral digital impressions have exhibited remarkable advantages over those from conventional impressions in several respects. The present review discusses intraoral digital impression techniques in terms of the following aspects: (1) categories and principles of intraoral digital impression devices currently available; (2) operating characteristics of the devices; and (3) comparison of the manipulation, accuracy, and repeatability between intraoral digital impression and conventional impression. PMID:25220390

  13. Safe human exposure limits for airborne linear siloxanes during spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    García, Hector D.; McMullin, Tami S.; Tobin, Joseph M.; James, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low molecular weight siloxanes are used in industrial processes and consumer products, and their vapors have been detected in the atmospheres of the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for siloxane vapors to protect astronaut health. Since publication of these original SMACs, new studies and new risk assessment approaches have been published that warrant re-examination of the SMACs. Objective To reevaluate SMACs published for octamethyltrisiloxane (L3) for exposures ranging from 1 hour to 180 days, to develop a 1000-day SMAC, and to expand the applicability of those values to the family of linear siloxanes. Methods A literature review was conducted to identify studies conducted since the SMACs for L3 were set in 1994. The updated data were reviewed to determine the sensitive toxicity endpoints, and current risk assessment approaches and methods for dosimetric adjustments were evaluated. Results Recent data were used to update the original 1-hour, 24-hour, 30-day, and 180-day SMACs for L3, and a 1000-day SMAC was developed to protect crewmembers during future exploration beyond Earth orbit. Group SMACs for the linear siloxane family, including hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), L3, decamethyltetrasiloxane (L4), and dodecamethylpentasiloxane (L5), were set for exposures of 1-hour to 1000 days. Conclusion New SMACs, based on acute pulmonary and neurotoxicity at high doses only achievable with L2 and potential liver effects following longer-term exposures to L2 and L3, were established to protect crewmembers from the adverse effects of exposure to linear siloxanes. PMID:24255951

  14. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  17. Fogging in Polyvinyl Toluene Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Richard J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hurlbut, Charles; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ramey, Ashley; Smola, Richard

    2015-02-01

    It has been observed that large polyvinyl toluene (PVT)-based gamma ray detectors can suffer internal “fogging” when exposed to outdoor environmental conditions over long periods of time. When observed, this change results in reduced light collection by photomultiplier tubes connected to the PVT. Investigation of the physical cause of these changes has been explored, and a root cause identified. Water penetration into the PVT from hot, high-humidity conditions results in reversible internal water condensation at room temperature, and permanent micro-fracturing of the PVT at very low environmental temperatures. Mitigation procedures and methods are being investigated.

  18. 76 FR 13660 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... 4, 2010 (75 FR 61175). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on January 25, 2011, and all persons... COMMISSION Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... United States is materially injured by reason of imports from Taiwan of polyvinyl alcohol, provided...

  19. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels for iontohporesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Prasanta; Alam, Asif Ali; Arora, Neha; Tibarewala, Dewaki Nandan; Basak, Piyali

    2013-06-01

    Transdermal therapeutic systems propound controlled release of active ingredients through the skin into the systemic circulation in a predictive manner. Drugs administered through these systems escape first-pass metabolism and maintain a steady state scenario similar to a continuous intravenous infusion for up to several days. The iontophoresis deal with the systemic delivery of the bioactive agents (drug) by applying an electric current. It is basically an injection without the needle. The iontophoretic system requires a gel-based matrix to accommodate the bioactive agent. Hydrogels have been used by many investigators in controlled-release drug delivery systems because of their good tissue compatibility and easy manipulation of swelling level and, thereby, solute permeability. In this work we have prepared polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel. We have cross linked polyvinyl alcohol chemically with Glutaraldehyde with different wt%. FTIR study reveals the chemical changes during cross linking. Swelling in water, is done to have an idea about drug loading and drug release from the membrane. After drug loading to the hydrogels, we have studied the drug release property of the hydrogels using salicylic acid as a model drug.

  20. Ultra-high molecular weight silphenylene-siloxane polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.; Hundley, N. H.; Ludwick, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Silphenylene-siloxane copolymers with molecular weights above one million were prepared using a two stage polymerization technique. The technique was successfully scaled up to produce 50 grams of this high polymer in a single run. The reactive monomer approach was also investigated using the following aminosilanes: bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane, N,N-bis(pyrrolidinyl)dimethylsilane and N,N-bis(gamma-butyrolactam)dimethylsilane). Thermal analyses were performed in both air and nitrogen. The experimental polymers decomposed at 540 to 562 C, as opposed to 408 to 426 C for commercial silicones. Differential scanning calorimetry showed a glass transition (Tg) at -50 to -55 C for the silphenylene-siloxane copolymer while the commercial silicones had Tg's at -96 to -112 C.

  1. Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Silphenylene/Siloxane Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundley, N. H.; Patterson, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastomers enhance thermal and mechancial properties. Capable of performing in extreme thermal/oxidative environments and having molecular weights above 10 to the sixth power prepared and analyzed in laboratory experiments. Made of methylvinylsilphenylene-siloxane terpolymers, new materials amenable to conventional silicone-processing technology. Similarly formulated commercial methyl-vinyl silicones, vulcanized elastomers exhibit enhance thermal/oxidative stability and equivalent or superior mechanical properties.

  2. The occurrence and fate of siloxanes in wastewater treatment plant in Harbin, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Wen-Long; Sun, Shao-Jing; Qi, Hong; Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Zhu, Ning-Zheng; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and fate of four cyclic (D3 to D6) and 10 linear (L5 to L14) siloxanes were investigated in influent and effluent wastewater, sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and surrounding air and soil within the WWTP in Harbin, Northeast China. The mean concentrations of total siloxanes in influent and effluent were 4780 and 997 ng/L and in excess sludge and aerobic sludge were 25.1 and 32.3 μg/g dw, respectively. The concentrations in air and soil within the WWTP were 243 ng/m(3) and 4960 ng/g dw, respectively. A similar composition profile of siloxanes in influent and sludge suggests their same source. Seasonal variation with concentration was comprehensively studied. It was found that temperature and rainfall are the two important factors for the seasonal variation of siloxanes. Adsorption with sewage sludge was the major way for the removal of siloxanes during the municipal wastewater treatment process. Overall, on a daily basis, the mass loading of the Σsiloxanes into the WWTP, out of the WWTP with the effluent and sludge, were estimated to be 3.0, 0.6 and 1.3 kg, respectively. In general, 21 % of siloxanes were discharged into the receiving body (Songhua River), 43 % of siloxanes were absorbed on sludge, and 36 % of siloxanes were lost during the whole process of WWTP. PMID:27023806

  3. Photoinduced Bending of Self-Assembled Azobenzene-Siloxane Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sufang; Matsukawa, Kimihiro; Miyata, Takashi; Okubo, Tatsuya; Kuroda, Kazuyuki; Shimojima, Atsushi

    2015-12-16

    A novel azobenzene-siloxane hybrid material displaying photoinduced macroscopic motions has been prepared by one-step organosilane self-assembly. Two types of alkoxysilane precursors with either pendant or bridging azobenzene groups were synthesized via thiol-ene click reactions. Hybrid films with well-ordered lamellar structures were obtained by hydrolysis and polycondensation of these precursors. The film with solely pendant azobenzene groups showed reversible and rapid d-spacing variation upon UV-vis irradiation, which was induced by the trans-cis isomerization of azobenzene moieties. The flexible, free-standing film obtained by co-condensation of two types of precursors showed reversible bending-unbending motions upon UV-vis irradiation. The partial cross-linking between the siloxane layers by bridging azobenzene groups was crucial for photoinduced distortion of the film. This film possesses high elastic modulus, good thermal stability, and shows large amplitude of photoinduced bending-unbending over a wide temperature range. This is the first report on photoinduced macroscopic motions of azobenzene-containing siloxane-based materials. These materials possess great potential for applications in smart devices and energy conversion systems. PMID:26575345

  4. Novel Low-Temperature Poss-Containing Siloxane Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Kiri, Neha N.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2008-01-01

    One route to increased aircraft performance is through the use of flexible, shape-changeable aerodynamics effectors. However, state of the art materials are not flexible or durable enough over the required broad temperature range. Mixed siloxanes were crosslinked by polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) producing novel materials that remained flexible and elastic from -55 to 94 C. POSS molecules were chemically modified to generate homogeneous distributions within the siloxane matrix. High resolution scanning electron microscope (HRSEM) images indicated homogenous POSS distribution up to 0.8 wt %. Above the solubility limit, POSS aggregates could be seen both macroscopically and via SEM (approx.60-120 nm). Tensile tests were performed to determine Young s modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at break over the range of temperatures associated with transonic aircraft use (-55 to 94 C; -65 to 200 F). The siloxane materials developed here maintained flexibility at -55 C, where previous candidate materials failed. At room temperature, films could be elongated up to 250 % before rupturing. At -55 and 94 C, however, films could be elongated up to 400 % and 125 %, respectively.

  5. Characterization of high performance randomly segmented poly(urethane siloxane) and poly(imide siloxane) block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doǧan, Türkan; Baydoǧan, Nilgün; Köken, Nesrin

    2016-03-01

    Poly(imide siloxane) block copolymers with the same polydimethlysiloxane(APPS) were prepared by using 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) and Benzofenon-3,3,4,4-tetrakarboksilik dianhydride(BTDA) to compose the polyimide hard block. APPS and BTDA composed the polysiloxane soft block. The length of polysiloxane soft blocks increased with increasing the length of polyimide hard block. Copolymerization of soft and hard segments were determined by using this method. Copolymer structures could be obtained by holding constant hard block segments and by adjusting and increasing soft block segments. Thus, more flexible randomly segmented poly(imide siloxane) block copolymers can be obtained. These composed structure as flexible and high performance copolymers were characterized by FT-IR and evaluated. The structures were tested mechanically to detect their elastic recovery property as flexible material. The characterization of the samples enabled to examine flexible substrates in order to use in solar cell, aerospace applications and microelectronic devices.

  6. From hydrophobic to superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic siloxanes by thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Manoudis, Panagiotis N; Zurba, Andreea; Lampakis, Dimitrios

    2014-11-11

    The cross-influence effects of treatment temperature and time on the wettability of a siloxane elastomer is investigated in detail, through static and tilt contact angle measurements. The material is heated at 400, 500, 600, 650, 700, and 800 °C for various periods, ranging from 1 to 300 s. The siloxane surface is subjected to multiple wettability transitions with treatment time: from intrinsic hydrophobicity to superhydrophobicity (and water repellency) and then through intermediate stages (hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity) to superhydrophilicity. For the time scale used herein (1-300 s), this scenario is recorded for treatment at 650, 700, and 800 °C. For treatment at lower temperatures (400, 500, and 600 °C) only the first transition, from intrinsic hydrophobicity to superhydrophobicity, is recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR), and micro-Raman spectroscopies are employed to correlate the aforementioned wettability transitions with structural and chemical changes of the siloxane surface, developed during thermal treatment. It is shown that the first transition from intrinsic hydrophobicity to superhydrophobicity is accompanied by a severe surface-structure evolution that increases surface roughness. Once superhydrophobicity is achieved, the surface structure reaches a saturation point and it is not subjected to any other change with further thermal treatment. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the intensity of the O-H/C-H peaks increases/decreases with treatment time, and Raman measurements show that the C-Si-C vibrations gradually disappear with treatment time. The evaporation of a droplet resting on a superhydrophobic, water-repellent siloxane surface, which was produced after appropriate thermal treatment, is monitored. It is shown that droplet evaporation initially follows the constant contact area mode. At later evaporation stages, a transition to the constant contact angle mode is recorded. Finally, it is

  7. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact..., in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The polyvinyl alcohol film is...

  8. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  9. A Teacher's Impressions of the Soviet Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Anne

    1987-01-01

    Reports the impressions of an 11th-grade world cultures teacher who visited European Russia and Uzbekistan in August, 1985. Ten major impressions are detailed, among them are (1) the poverty, (2) the sloppiness, (3) the pervasive presence of Lenin, and (4) the cultural importance of the Babushka, the Russian word for grandmother. (JDH)

  10. A nationwide survey and emission estimates of cyclic and linear siloxanes through sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggyu; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Song, Geum-Ju; Ra, Kongtae; Lee, Won-Chan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-11-01

    Siloxanes are widely used in various industrial applications as well as in personal care products. Despite their widespread use and potential toxic effects, few studies have reported on the occurrence of siloxanes in the environment. In this study, we determined the concentrations of 5 cyclic and 15 linear siloxanes in sludge collected from 40 representative wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea. Total concentrations of 20 siloxanessiloxane) in sludge ranged from 0.05 to 142 (mean: 45.7) μg/g dry weight, similar to the concentrations reported in European countries but higher than those reported in China. The concentrations of siloxanes in sludge from domestic WWTPs were significantly (p<0.01) higher than those from industrial WWTPs, indicating higher consumption of siloxanes in various personal care products (e.g. shampoos and conditioners). The major siloxane compounds found in sludge were decamethylcyclopentasilane (D5), docosamethyldecasiloxane (L10) and dodecamethylcyclohexasilane (D6), which collectively accounted for, on average, 62% of the Σsiloxane concentrations. Non-parametric multidimensional scaling ordination of the profiles of siloxanes indicated the existence of different usage patterns of siloxanes between industrial and household activities. Multiple linear regression analysis of siloxane concentrations and WWTP characteristics suggested that D5, D6 and linear siloxane concentrations in sludge were positively correlated with population served by a WWTP. Environmental emission fluxes of cyclic and linear siloxanes through sludge disposal in Korea were 14,800 and 18,500 kg/year, respectively. This is the first report describing occurrence and environmental emission of siloxanes through sludge in Korea. PMID:25127445

  11. Development of novel cycloaliphatic siloxanes for thermal and UV-curable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Ruby

    Siloxanes have been extensively used as additives to modulate surface properties such as surface tension, hydrophobicity/hydrophobicity, and adhesion, etc. Although, polydimethyl -siloxane and polydiphenylsiloxane are the most commonly used siloxanes, the properties are at extremes in terms of glass transition temperature and flexibility. It is proposed that the ability to control the properties in between the these extremes can be provided by cycloaliphatic substitutions at the siloxane backbone. It is expected that this substitution might work due to the intermediate backbone rigidity. In order to achieve the above objectives, a synthetic route was developed to prepare cycloaliphatic (cyclopentane and cyclohexane) silane monomers followed by subsequent polymerization and functionalizations to obtain glycidyl epoxy, aliphatic amine and methacrylate telechelic siloxanes. The siloxanes were either thermally or UV-cured depending on end functionalizations. Chemical characterization of monomers, oligomers and polymers were performed using 1H, 13C, 29Si-NMR, FT-IR and GPC. The curing kinetics of photo-induced reactions were investigated through photo-differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC). The oxygen permeability, mechanical, coatings, and release properties of siloxanes were studied as a function of the backbone substitutions. The mechanical, coatings and released properties of cycloaliphatic siloxanes improved with respect to polydimethylsiloxanes. The thermal analysis of the cured films were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Viscoelastic properties of the cured siloxanes due to the variation of substitution at the siloxane backbone were measured using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The cycloaliphatic substituted siloxanes showed an increased glass transition temperature and permeability but reduced crosslink density, conversion, and rate of curing with respect to polydimethylsiloxanes. Hybrids of siloxanes were prepared with

  12. Computational benchmark for calculation of silane and siloxane thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Cypryk, Marek; Gostyński, Bartłomiej

    2016-01-01

    Geometries of model chlorosilanes, R3SiCl, silanols, R3SiOH, and disiloxanes, (R3Si)2O, R = H, Me, as well as the thermochemistry of the reactions involving these species were modeled using 11 common density functionals in combination with five basis sets to examine the accuracy and applicability of various theoretical methods in organosilicon chemistry. As the model reactions, the proton affinities of silanols and siloxanes, hydrolysis of chlorosilanes and condensation of silanols to siloxanes were considered. As the reference values, experimental bonding parameters and reaction enthalpies were used wherever available. Where there are no experimental data, W1 and CBS-QB3 values were used instead. For the gas phase conditions, excellent agreement between theoretical CBS-QB3 and W1 and experimental thermochemical values was observed. All DFT methods also give acceptable values and the precision of various functionals used was comparable. No significant advantage of newer more advanced functionals over 'classical' B3LYP and PBEPBE ones was noted. The accuracy of the results was improved significantly when triple-zeta basis sets were used for energy calculations, instead of double-zeta ones. The accuracy of calculations for the reactions in water solution within the SCRF model was inferior compared to the gas phase. However, by careful estimation of corrections to the ΔHsolv and ΔGsolv of H(+) and HCl, reasonable values of thermodynamic quantities for the discussed reactions can be obtained. PMID:26781663

  13. Degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by siloxane in biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ji-Sung; Kim, Da-Yeong; Hwang, Sun-Mi; Seo, Min Ho; Seo, Dong-Jun; Yang, Seung Yong; Han, Chan Hui; Jung, Yong-Min; Guim, Hwanuk; Nahm, Kee Suk; Yoon, Young-Gi; Kim, Tae-Young

    2016-06-01

    We studied the degradation and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) level by injection of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) as a representative siloxane, which has been found in many industrial and personal products. Specifically, i) GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the ring-opening polymerization of D4 could result in the formation of various linear and cyclic siloxanes in both electrodes of MEA; ii) post-test analysis revealed that the transformed siloxanes were transported from the anode to the cathode via free-volumes in the polymer membrane; iii) RDE measurement and DFT calculation revealed that D4 was not directly responsible for the electrocatalytic activity of Pt; iv) electrochemical analysis demonstrated that the residual methyl groups of siloxane and various siloxanes did not hinder the proton transport in the polymer membrane; and v) siloxanes accumulated in the primary and secondary pores with the exception of an external surface of carbon, causing an increase in the oxygen reactant's resistance and resulting in a decrease of the cell performance. In addition, we confirmed that injection of D4 did not affect the carbon corrosion adversely because the siloxane had little influence on water sorption in the catalyst layer.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  16. Selectivity and limitations of carbon sorption tubes for capturing siloxanes in biogas during field sampling.

    PubMed

    Tansel, Berrin; Surita, Sharon C

    2016-06-01

    Siloxane levels in biogas can jeopardize the warranties of the engines used at the biogas to energy facilities. The chemical structure of siloxanes consists of silicon and oxygen atoms, alternating in position, with hydrocarbon groups attached to the silicon side chain. Siloxanes can be either in cyclic (D) or linear (L) configuration and referred with a letter corresponding to their structure followed by a number corresponding to the number of silicon atoms present. When siloxanes are burned, the hydrocarbon fraction is lost and silicon is converted to silicates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of activated carbon gas samplers for quantitative analysis of siloxanes in biogas samples. Biogas samples were collected from a landfill and an anaerobic digester using multiple carbon sorbent tubes assembled in series. One set of samples was collected for 30min (sampling 6-L gas), and the second set was collected for 60min (sampling 12-L gas). Carbon particles were thermally desorbed and analyzed by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The results showed that biogas sampling using a single tube would not adequately capture octamethyltrisiloxane (L3), hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6). Even with 4 tubes were used in series, D5 was not captured effectively. The single sorbent tube sampling method was adequate only for capturing trimethylsilanol (TMS) and hexamethyldisiloxane (L2). Affinity of siloxanes for activated carbon decreased with increasing molecular weight. Using multiple carbon sorbent tubes in series can be an appropriate method for developing a standard procedure for determining siloxane levels for low molecular weight siloxanes (up to D3). Appropriate quality assurance and quality control procedures should be developed for adequately quantifying the levels of the higher molecular weight siloxanes in biogas with sorbent tubes

  17. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  18. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Aswini; Bhat, Vinaya; Nair, K Chandrasekheran; Suresh, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar) for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review. PMID:27621540

  19. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  3. Structure-property relationships in silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Derzon, D.K.; Wang, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    The simultaneous formation of a filler phase and a polymer matrix via in situ sol-gel techniques provides silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials of high strength. This study concentrates on the effects of temperature and relative humidity on a trimodal polymer system in an attempt to accelerate the reaction as well as evaluate subtle process- structure-property relations. It was found that successful process acceleration is only viable for high humidity systems when using the tin(IV) catalyst dibutyltin dilaurate. Processes involving low humidity were found to be very temperature and time dependent. Bimodal systems were investigated and demonstrated that the presence of a short-chain component led to enhanced material strength. This part of the study also revealed a link between the particle size and population density and the optimization of material properties.

  4. Preparation and characterization of a siloxane containing bismaleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    A novel siloxane containing bismaleimide has been prepared by reacting maleic anhydride, benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and bis(gamma-aminopropyl)tetramethyldisiloxane. Characterization of this monomer was done by comparing its nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (NMR) to those of model compounds. Solubility of the prepolymer was tested in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents. Films were cast from solution as well as by melt processing and a cure cycle was determined. Infrared spectrum (IR) of the resulting film was obtained. Thermal polymerization was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal properties of the cured resin were followed by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), torsional braid analysis (TBA) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Thermomechanical analysis (TMA) was used to study the effect of postcure on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the resin. Adhesive strength of the resin was obtained at ambient temperature.

  5. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications. PMID:21417413

  6. Nanostructured Self-Assembling Systems Based on Functional Poly(Urethane/Siloxane)S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, Yuri

    Novel hybride organo-inorganic systems based on urethane-, urea-crown ether- and siloxane-containing monomers and oligomers have been developed by sol-gel method. Structure-properties relationships were discussed.

  7. Poly(imide-siloxane) segmented copolymer structural adhesives prepared by bulk and solution thermal imidization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bott, R. H.; Summers, J. D.; Arnold, C. A.; Blankenship, C. P., Jr.; Taylor, L. T.

    1988-01-01

    The improved properties that have been demonstrated through thermal solution imidization in the case of polyimides and poly(imide-siloxane) segmented copolymers suggests significant potential for application of these new materials. Specifically, the enhancement in solubility, moisture reduction, and processability observed through this solution technique is quite dramatic. Previous work has shown that the presence of low amounts of siloxane does not detract significantly from the lap shear strength of these materials to titanium in the case of bulk thermal imidization synthesis. In addition, the siloxane incorporation results in the added advantage of resistance to hot, wet environments. This added durability is presumably due to the hydrophobic siloxane segments preventing the uptake of water at the critical interphase between the adhesive and the adherend. This paper discusses the extension of this work to the solution imidization synthesis technique recently developed in our laboratory. Results dealing with the absolute bond strengths as well as durability and failure surface analysis will be presented.

  8. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching. PMID:23313600

  9. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  10. A new class of high performance protective coatings for the rail industry based on siloxane technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, C.G.; Woods, J.J.

    1995-12-01

    A novel new class of protective coatings has been developed which is based on the hybridization of inorganic siloxane polymers with organic epoxy polymers. These coatings exhibit the corrosion resistance of an epoxy and weathering resistance superior to the best aliphatic polyurethane. As a result, traditional high performance 3-coat inorganic zinc/epoxy/polyurethane coatings can be replaced with 2-coat zinc/epoxy siloxane coatings with significant savings in applied cost.

  11. Giving the wrong impression: food and beverage brand impressions delivered to youth through popular movies

    PubMed Central

    Skatrud-Mickelson, Monica; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Sutherland, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Marketing on television showcases less-healthful options, with emerging research suggesting movies promote similar products. Given the obesity epidemic, understanding advertising to youth should be a public health imperative. The objective of this study was to estimate youth impressions to food and beverages delivered through movies. Methods Impressions were calculated by dividing US receipts annually into average movie ticket prices, then multiplying this by the number of brand appearances. Examination by ratings, product types and ages were conducted by Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests. Results Youth in the USA saw over 3 billion food, beverage or food–retail establishment (FRE) impressions on average, annually from 1996 to 2005. Those aged 12–18 viewed over half of all impressions, with PG-13-rated movies containing 61.5% of impressions. There were no significant trends in brand appearances by food, beverage or FRE impressions over the decade, although there was a decreasing trend in R-rated impressions for both foods (P< 0.01) and beverages (P< 0.01), but not FREs (P= 0.08). Conclusions Movies promote billions of food and beverage impressions annually to youth. Given the public health crisis of obesity, future research should further investigate these trends, as well as the potential association of these unhealthy exposures in youth. PMID:22076600

  12. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. Aim To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. Materials and Methods To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean

  13. Facial feedback effects on impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ohira, H; Kurono, K

    1993-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine effects of facial expressions upon social cognitive processes in which the impression of another person is formed. In each experiment, 30 female college students were induced to display or conceal their facial reactions to a hypothetical target person whose behaviors were mildly hostile (Exp. 1) or mildly friendly (Exp. 2), or their facial expressions were not manipulated. Displaying the facial expressions shifted the impression into the congruent directions with hedonic values corresponding to the facial expressions. Concealing the facial expressions, however, did not influence impression formation. Also, the positive-negative asymmetry was observed in the facial feedback effects, that is, the negative facial expression had a stronger effect on social cognition than the positive one. PMID:8170774

  14. Comparative study of dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques using addition silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Penaflor, C F; Semacio, R C; De Las Alas, L T; Uy, H G

    1998-01-01

    This study compared dimensional accuracy of the single, double with spacer, double with cut-out and double mix impression technique using addition silicone impression material. A typhodont containing Ivorine teeth model with six (6) full-crown tooth preparations were used as the positive control. Two stone replication models for each impression technique were made as test materials. Accuracy of the techniques were assessed by measuring four dimensions on the stone dies poured from the impression of the Ivorine teeth model. Results indicated that most of the measurements for the height, width and diameter slightly decreased and a few increased compared with the Ivorine teeth model. The double with cut-out and double mix technique presents the least difference from the master model as compared to the two latter impression techniques. PMID:10202524

  15. Pressures involved in making upper edentulous impressions.

    PubMed

    Rihani, A

    1981-12-01

    A study was made of the pressures exerted on the upper denture-bearing area in three patients each with a different type of palatal vault. A method of measuring the relative pressures in different regions of the upper denture bearing area was devised. These pressures were registered with the use of manometers while making an impression in close fitting acrylic resin special trays. The results indicated that the main pressure regions during impression making were near the center of the palate and these pressures diminished toward the buccal borders. PMID:7028974

  16. [Digital implant impression taking - an overview].

    PubMed

    Mahl, Dominik; Glenz, Fabienne; Marinello, Carlo P

    2014-01-01

    In dentist's daily practice, intraoral scanning systems are increased. Besides scanning of prepared teeth, also implants could be scanned intraorally. This clinical report describes the step-by-step techniques to scan digitally intraoral implants with two intraoral scanners (Lava™ C.O.S., 3M Espe and the CEREC AC connected with inLab MC XL, Sirona) for generating implant suprastructures without the use of impression materials, dental stone or implant impression copings. Different workflows, possibilities and limits by scanning dental implants are demonstrated. PMID:24585419

  17. Impression Testing of Self-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Huber, Amy

    2005-01-01

    As part of the BIOSANT program (biologically-inspired smart nanotechnology), scientists at NASA-Langley have identified a "self-healing" plastic that spontaneously closes the hole left by the passage of a bullet. To understand and generalize the phenomenon in question, the mechanical properties responsible for this ability are being explored. Low-rate impression testing was chosen to characterize post-yield material properties, and it turned out that materials that heal following ballistic puncture also show up to 80% healing of the low-rate impression. Preliminary results on the effects of temperature and rate of puncture are presented.

  18. The Trouble with Applicant Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Steven M.; Kirkwood, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that applicant impression management (AIM) is more harmful to employment interviewing than is currently suspected. Offers a conceptual model of AIM that is consistent with employment interviewing practice. Presents and critiques three arguments used to defend AIM. Examines a model for helping employers conduct interviews that minimize the…

  19. Personality Impressions Elicited by Accented English Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallois, Cynthia; Callan, Victor J.

    1981-01-01

    Australian born male and female students listened to tapes of accented English speech and were asked to relate their impressions and judgments of the speakers' personalities. Results indicated that the nationality and sex of the speakers were factors which influenced the judgments made about them by the Australian students. (Author/APM)

  20. Additivity of Clothing Cues in First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Sharron J.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of information integration was used to predict that in first impression situations, clothing/physical appearance cues have differential importance depending upon the type of judgment elicited. Female college students (N=104) viewed and responded to slides of colored line drawings of female stimulus persons. Multiple regression of data…

  1. Patterns of Vocalization and Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Donald P.; Bouma, Gary D.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive behavior that accompanies verbal exchange. It specifically describes a set of experiments designed to isolate an important subset of interactive behavior, the vocal (as opposed to the verbal) and to relate this information to a wide range of social impressions resulting from verbal exchange. (Available from…

  2. Impressive Subcutaneous Calcifications in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    DIMA, Alina; BERZEA, Ioana; BAICUS, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis cutis was commonly described in long-term dermatomyositis or systemic sclerosis, being rarely reported in other connective tissue diseases. We report the case of a 65-years old woman with an only 5-years history of systemic lupus erythematosus, who presents with multiple, impressive subcutaneous calcified masses and biological normal serum calcium and phosphate levels. PMID:26225152

  3. A Modified Impress Method for Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Russell W., Jr.

    A modified impress approach to teaching reading has been successfully used in a program involving first grade students. The program was multisensory and included aural, oral, visual, and kinesthetic learning experiences gained through listening, group discussions, dramatic play, art activities, audience reading, and recorded oral reading. These…

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of novel siloxane-methacrylate monomers used as dentin adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xueping; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to synthesize two new siloxane-methacrylate (SM) monomers for application in dentin adhesives and to investigate the influence of different functionality of the siloxane-containing monomers on the adhesive photopolymerization, water sorption, and mechanical properties. Materials and method Two siloxane-methacrylate monomers (SM1 and SM2) with four and eight methacrylate groups were synthesized. Dentin adhesives containing BisGMA, HEMA and the siloxane-methacrylate monomers were photo-polymerized. The experimental adhesives were compared with the control adhesive (HEMA/BisGMA 45/55 w/w) and characterized with regard to degree of conversion (DC), water miscibility of the liquid resin, water sorption and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Results The experimental adhesives exhibited improved water miscibility as compared to the control. When cured in the presence of 12 wt % water to simulate the wet environment of the mouth, the SM-containing adhesives showed DC comparable to the control. The experimental adhesives showed higher rubbery modulus than the control under dry conditions. Under wet conditions, the mechanical properties of the formulations containing SM monomer with increased functionality were comparable with the control, even with more water sorption. Significance The concentration and functionality of the newly synthesized siloxane-methacrylate monomers affected the water miscibility, water sorption and mechanical properties of the adhesives. The experimental adhesives show improved water compatibility compared with the control. The mechanical properties were enhanced with an increase of the functionality of the siloxane-containing monomers. The results provide critical structure/property relationships and important information for future development of durable, versatile siloxane-containing dentin adhesives. PMID:24993811

  5. A novel chemically selective siloxane polymer for chemical vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong; Bi, Juan

    2010-10-01

    A new hydrogen-bond acidic carbosiloxane polymer for quartz crystal microbalance sensors (QCMs) application was synthesized via O-alkylation, Claisen rearrange, hydrosilylation reaction and functionalized the polysiloxane with trifluoroacetone groups (TFA). The trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane was characterized by FT-IR and 1HNMR. And this novel siloxane polymer was coated onto AT-cut 8 MHz QCM sensors to investigate its gas sensitive responses to the organophosphorus nerve agent stimulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor as well as other interfering organic vapors. The research work indicated that frequency shifts of the trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane based QCM sensor to the DMMP vapor were completely linear, and with a regression coefficient of 0.9973 in the concentration range of 10-60 ppm. In addition, the sensitivity of the fabricated QCM sensors to DMMP was up to 10.64 Hz/ ppm, and much higher than the other interfering vapors, limits of detection (LODs) of the QCM sensors was 0.28 ppm, thus high selectivity to DMMP was demonstrated in this work.

  6. Formation mechanism of photo-induced nested wrinkles on siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazumasa; Tokudome, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-10-01

    Nested wrinkle structures, hierarchical surface wrinkles of different periodicities of sub-μm and tens-μm, have been fabricated on a siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film via a photo-induced surface polymerization of acrylamide. The formation mechanism of the nested wrinkle structures is examined based on a time-dependent structure observation and chemical composition analyses. In-situ observation of the evolving surface structure showed that sub-μm scale wrinkles first formed, subsequently the tens-μm scale ones did. In-situ FT-IR analysis indicated that the nested wrinkles formation took place along with the development of siloxane network of under layer. A cross sectional observation of the film revealed that the film was composed of three layers. FT-IR spectra of the film revealed that the surface and interior layers were polyacrylamide rich layer and siloxane-polymer rich layer, respectively. The intermediate layer formed as a diffusion layer by migration of acrylamide from interior to the surface. These three layers have different chemical compositions and therefore different mechanical characteristics, which allows the wrinkle formation. Shrinkage of siloxane-polymer interior layers, as a result of polycondensation of siloxane network, induced mechanical instabilities at interlayers, to form the nested wrinkle structures.

  7. Formation mechanism of photo-induced nested wrinkles on siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazumasa; Tokudome, Yasuaki Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-10-21

    Nested wrinkle structures, hierarchical surface wrinkles of different periodicities of sub-μm and tens-μm, have been fabricated on a siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film via a photo-induced surface polymerization of acrylamide. The formation mechanism of the nested wrinkle structures is examined based on a time-dependent structure observation and chemical composition analyses. In-situ observation of the evolving surface structure showed that sub-μm scale wrinkles first formed, subsequently the tens-μm scale ones did. In-situ FT-IR analysis indicated that the nested wrinkles formation took place along with the development of siloxane network of under layer. A cross sectional observation of the film revealed that the film was composed of three layers. FT-IR spectra of the film revealed that the surface and interior layers were polyacrylamide rich layer and siloxane-polymer rich layer, respectively. The intermediate layer formed as a diffusion layer by migration of acrylamide from interior to the surface. These three layers have different chemical compositions and therefore different mechanical characteristics, which allows the wrinkle formation. Shrinkage of siloxane-polymer interior layers, as a result of polycondensation of siloxane network, induced mechanical instabilities at interlayers, to form the nested wrinkle structures.

  8. ANIMAL ANALOGIES IN FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF FACES

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Wadlinger, Heather A.; Luevano, Victor X.; White, Benjamin M.; Xing, Cai; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Analogies between humans and animals based on facial resemblance have a long history. We report evidence for reverse anthropomorphism and the extension of facial stereotypes to lions, foxes, and dogs. In the stereotype extension, more positive traits were attributed to animals judged more attractive than con-specifics; more childlike traits were attributed to those judged more babyfaced. In the reverse anthropomorphism, human faces with more resemblance to lions, ascertained by connectionist modeling of facial metrics, were judged more dominant, cold, and shrewd, controlling attractiveness, babyfaceness, and sex. Faces with more resemblance to Labradors were judged warmer and less shrewd. Resemblance to foxes did not predict impressions. Results for lions and dogs were consistent with trait impressions of these animals and support the species overgeneralization hypothesis that evolutionarily adaptive reactions to particular animals are overgeneralized, with people perceived to have traits associated with animals their faces resemble. Other possible explanations are discussed. PMID:25339791

  9. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me... Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene...) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me... Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene...) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  18. [Complications Resulting from Taking Ear Impressions].

    PubMed

    Sugiuchi, Tomoko; Kodera, Kazuoki; Zusho, Hiroyuki; Asano, Yoshikazu; Kanesada, Keiko; Hayashida, Mitsuhiro; Kanaya, Koichiro; Tokumaru, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, we carried out a study in a large sample to understand the secondary injuries caused during the taking ear impressions for hearing aids. This study is a follow-up of previous research conducted in 1986 (285 medical institutions) and 1999 (98 medical institutions). We posted a questionnaire survey to the otolaryngology departments of 3,257 medical institutions. The response rate to the questionnaire was 62.9% (2,050 of the 3,257 institutions), and the results indicated that 301 of the 2050 institutions (14.7%) had experience with secondary injuries, with a total of 460 cases reported. In 342 of the 460 cases (74.3%), the secondary injuries occurred at hearing-aid dealerships, followed by 67 cases (14.6%) at affiliated medical institutions, and 51 cases (11.1%) in other locations, including other medical institutions, rehabilitation counseling centers, and educational institutions. The most common type of secondary injury (298 cases, 64.8%) was caused by the presence of foreign bodies in the ear, which in turn was a result of complications occurring during the removal of residual ear impression material. Of these 298 cases, 32 required excision of the foreign bodies and surgical intervention under general anesthesia. The remaining 10 cases exhibited isolated tympanic membrane perforation without foreign body-related complications. Furthermore, 146 cases (31.7%) developed bleeding and otitis externa following removal of the ear impression, and there were reports of cases with bleeding that required long-term outpatient care and treatment. Therefore, since retention of a foreign body in the ear and tympanic membrane perforation can occur even in patients without a history of surgery or prior otologic history, adjustment of hearing aids requires prior otorhinolaryngological examination. Furthermore, because of the risk of secondary injury when taking ear impressions, this procedure must be performed with caution under the guidance of an otolaryngologist. PMID

  19. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  20. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  1. The Importance of Subtextual Impression Management and Business Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Lillian H.; Lyden, Julie A.

    1998-01-01

    College students (n=265) reported their impressions of business faculty's personal appearance, body language, behavior, and office appearance. Findings indicate that impression management is useful for professors who want to convey credibility, authority, and interest in students. (JOW)

  2. Otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyong-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We report two extremely rare cases of otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material. The symptoms of patients with retained impression material are characteristic of the length of time the impression material is retained. In case 1 had a chronic discharge and granulation tissue of the middle ear, while case 2 presented with acute pain and dizziness. The management for retained impression material may require surgical interventions, which can be safely accomplished by standard otologic techniques. PMID:21862255

  3. Bonded Interactions in Silica Polymorphs, Silicates and Siloxane Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Cox, David F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2009-08-01

    Experimental model electron density distributions recorded for the silica polymorphs coesite and stishovite are comparable with electron density distributions calculated for a variety of silicates and siloxane molecules. The Si-O bond lengths and Si-O-Si angles calculated with first principles density functional theory methods as a function of pressure are also comparable with the bond lengths and angles observed for coesite and quartz within the experimental error. The similarity of the topological properties of the Si-O bonded interactions and the experimental and the geometry optimized structures for the silica polymorphs provides a basis for understanding the properties and crystal chemistry in terms of a molecular-based model. The agreement supports the argument that the bulk of the structural, physical and thermodynamic properties of the silica polymorphs are intrinsic properties of the molecular-like coordinated polyhedra such that the silica polymorphs can be pictured as ‘supermolecules’ of silica bound by the virtually same forces that bind the Si and O atoms in simple siloxane molecules. The topology of the electron density distribution is consistent with the assertion that the Si-O bonded interaction arises from the net electrostatic attraction exerted on the nuclei by the electron density accumulated between the Si and O atoms. The correlation between the Si-O bond length and Si-O-Si angle is ascribed to the progressive local concentration of the electron density in the nonbonded region of the O atom as the bond length increases and angle decreases rather then to bonded interactions involving the d-orbitals on Si. On the basis of the proximity of the bond critical point, rc, to the nodal surface of the Laplacian, (nabla)2ρ(rc), and the values of ρ(rc) and G(rc)/ρ(rc), the Si-O bond qualifies as an intermediate bonded interaction. For bonded interactions of intermediate character, (nabla

  4. Impression Management Training: Conceptualization and Application to Personal Selling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Dale G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of impression management, an individual's conscious attempt to exercise control over selected communicative behaviors and cues for purposes of making a desired impression. Provides a comprehensive conceptualization of the impression-management process, and demonstrates how this process can facilitate effective training of…

  5. Clinicians reaping benefits of new concepts in impressioning.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    While conventional elastomeric impression materials are still being used to generate excellent impressions, the future of impression-taking is undoubtedly with digital intraoral scanners. Advances in scanning systems are making this technology easier to use and more practical for dentists. PMID:25822643

  6. The Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): measuring agentic and communal forms of impression management.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, Sabrina A; Rogers, Katherine H; Paulhus, Delroy L

    2014-01-01

    Measures of impression management have yet to incorporate two-factor models of person perception. The 2 primary factors are often labeled agency and communion. In Study 1, we assembled a new measure of impression management—the Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): It comprises 2 subscales designed specifically to tap agentic and communal content. Both subscales showed adequate alpha reliabilities under both honest and faking conditions. In Study 2, the BIMI was cross-validated in a new sample: The subscales remained relatively independent, and their reliabilities remained solid. A coherent pattern of personality correlates also supported the validities of both subscales. In Study 3, the differential sensitivity of the 2 subscales was demonstrated by manipulating the job type in simulated job applications. Implications and applications of the BIMI are discussed. PMID:24328818

  7. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in urine on fabric.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Bleay, Steve; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2012-01-10

    A range of chemical techniques were utilised for the enhancement of footwear impressions deposited on a variety of fabric types of different colours with urine as a contaminant. A semi-automated stamping device was used to deliver test impressions at a set force to minimise the variability between impressions; multiple impressions were produced and enhanced by each reagent to determine the repeatability of the enhancement. Urine samples from different donors were analysed using a spectrofluorophotometer revealing differences between individuals. Results indicated that the enhancement of footwear impressions in urine was possible using amino acid staining techniques whereas protein stains failed to achieve successful enhancement. PMID:21813253

  8. Phoenix Makes an Impression on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the first impression dubbed Yeti and looking like a wide footprint -- made on the Martian soil by the Robotic Arm scoop on Sol 6, the sixth Martian day of the mission, (May 31, 2008).

    Touching the ground is the first step toward scooping up soil and ice and delivering the samples to the lander's experiments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Reliability of the impression replica technique.

    PubMed

    Falk, Anders; Vult von Steyern, Per; Fransson, Håkan; Thorén, Margareta Molin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the impression replica technique with a four-unit zirconia fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Marginal and internal fit were measured by repeatedly placing the FDP on an epoxy cast using light-body silicone material corresponding to cement. All measured marginal and internal fit points showed varying values. The greatest variations were seen at the most distal margin (33 μm) and at the distal abutment of the FDP (77 μm). The results showed that the technique gives moderate variations and is a useful method to evaluate marginal and internal fit. PMID:25822305

  10. Malleability of social impressions of hyperactive children.

    PubMed

    Granger, D A; Whalen, C K; Henker, B

    1993-12-01

    The role of adults' social cognitions in mediating judgments of hyperactive children's medication-related behavior change was explored. Two hundred eight-eight undergraduates observed two videotaped excerpts of a hyperactive "target" boy playing a group game with two peers. Each target was taking either methylphenidate (0.6 mg/kg) during both excerpts, placebo during both excerpts, methylphenidate first followed by placebo, or placebo first followed by methylphenidate. Adults' cumulative social evaluations of the child were assessed after they viewed both video segments. Results indicated that observers combined their perceptions of the two behavior samples into composite impressions using an equal-weight averaging algorithm. Even for children whose behavior improved, adults' ratings of undercontrolled behaviors continued to meet or, in some cases exceed, research cutoff scores used to identify hyperactive children. The findings suggest that the actual behaviors of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) play a more influential role in shaping interpersonal impressions than do perceiver social-cognitive processes such as primacy, recency, or integration biases. PMID:8126317

  11. A multiphase analysis of partitioning and hazard index characteristics of siloxanes in biosolids.

    PubMed

    Surita, Sharon C; Tansel, Berrin

    2014-04-01

    Siloxanes are widely used in personal care and industrial products due to their soft texture, low surface tension, thermal stability, antimicrobial and hydrophobic properties, among other characteristics. As a result, they are released to gas phase during waste decompositions and found in biogas at landfills and digester gas at wastewater treatment facilities. The objectives of this study were to investigate the release of siloxanes in aqueous and gaseous phase as well as in biosolids in a local wastewater treatment facility. The formation reactions were estimated using first order kinetics for commonly found siloxanes (L3, D3, D4, D5 and D6) during waste decomposition. Expected concentrations and the risk factors of exposure to siloxanes were evaluated based on the initial concentrations, partitioning characteristics and persistence parameter. D4 and D5 presented the highest initial gaseous phase concentrations of 5000 and 1800 μg/m(3) respectively. Based on first order kinetics, partition coefficients and initial concentrations, the hazards potentials were largest for D4 in both liquid phase and biosolids while D6 poses the highest risk in gaseous phase. PMID:24580825

  12. 77 FR 31008 - Enforceable Consent Agreement Development for Two Cyclic Siloxanes; Solicitation of Interested...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    .... Final Rule. 54 FR 818, January 10, 1989. 3. SEHSC. Memorandum from Karluss Thomas. Executive Director... the Dow Corning Corporation; Notice of Receipt and Availability of the MOU Data. 74 FR 38013, July 30... AGENCY Enforceable Consent Agreement Development for Two Cyclic Siloxanes; Solicitation of...

  13. Hydrogen-Bond Basic Siloxane Phosphonate Polymers for Surface Acoustic Wave (Saw) Sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor coated with a novel hydrogen-bond basic siloxane phosphonate SAW polymer gave excellent initial response and long-term performance when tested against phenol vapor and compared with polyethyleneimine (PEI), a conventional hydrogent-bond basic SAW polymer....

  14. 40 CFR 721.10484 - Siloxanes and Silicones, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10484 Siloxanes and Silicones, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. (a) Chemical substance and..., hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. 721.10484 Section 721.10484 Protection...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10484 - Siloxanes and Silicones, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10484 Siloxanes and Silicones, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. (a) Chemical substance and..., hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. 721.10484 Section 721.10484 Protection...

  16. Cyclic siloxanes in air, including identification of high levels in Chicago and distinct diurnal variation

    PubMed Central

    Yucuis, Rachel A.; Stanier, Charles O.; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2014-01-01

    The organosilicon compounds octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) are high production volume chemicals that are widely used in household goods and personal care products. Due to their prevalence and chemical characteristics, cyclic siloxanes are being assessed as possible persistent organic pollutants. D4, D5, and D6 were measured in indoor and outdoor air to quantify and compare siloxane concentrations and compound ratios depending on location type. Indoor air samples had a median concentration of 2200 ng m−3 for the sum of D4, D5, and D6. Outdoor sampling locations included downtown Chicago, Cedar Rapids, IA, and West Branch, IA, and had median sum siloxane levels of 280, 73, and 29 ng m−3 respectively. A diurnal trend is apparent in the samples taken in downtown Chicago. Nighttime samples had a median 2.7 times higher on average than daytime samples, which is due, in part, to the fluctuations of the planetary boundary layer. D5 was the dominant siloxane in both indoor and outdoor air. Ratios of D5 to D4 averaged 91 and 3.2 for indoor and outdoor air respectively. PMID:23541357

  17. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BLENDS OF PAMAM DENDRIMERS WITH POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) AND POLY(VINYL ACETATE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hybrid blends of poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers with two linear high polymers, poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and poly(vinyl acetate), PVAc, are reported. The interaction between the blend components was studied using dynamic mechanical analysis, xenon nuclear magnetic resonacne ...

  18. Orientation of cellulose nanowhiskers in polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvien, I.; Oksman, K.

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study was to align cellulose nanowhiskers in a polymer using a strong magnetic field and thereby obtain a unidirectional reinforced nanocomposite. Cellulose whiskers (2 wt. %) were incorporated in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix using solution casting with water as the solvent. The suspension was cast and the water was evaporated while a homogeneous magnetic field of 7 T was applied. Different microscopy investigations of prepared nanocomposites indicated that the cellulose whiskers were oriented perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis further strengthened the idea of alignment because the results showed that the dynamic modulus of the nanocomposite was around 2 GPa higher at room temperature in the aligned direction compared to the transverse direction.

  19. Poly(vinyl chloride) processes and products.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, R N

    1981-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) resins are produced by four basic processes: suspension, emulsion, bulk and solution polymerization. PVC suspensions resins are usually relatively dust-free and granular with varying degrees of particle porosity. PVC emulsion resins are small particle powders containing very little free monomer. Bulk PVC resins are similar to suspension PVC resins, though the particles tend to be more porous. Solution PVC resins are smaller in particle size than suspension PVC with high porosity particles containing essentially no free monomer. The variety of PVC resin products does not lend itself to broad generalizations concerning health hazards. In studying occupational hazards the particular PVC process and the product must be considered and identified in the study. PMID:7333230

  20. Survey of cyclic and linear siloxanes in sediment from the Songhua River and in sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants, Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zifeng; Qi, Hong; Ren, Nanqi; Li, Yifan; Gao, Dawen; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-02-01

    Siloxanes are used in a wide range of industrial applications, such as fuel additives, automotive polishes and waxes, and antifoaming agents, as well as in personal care products and biomedical devices. Despite the potential for environmental occurrence, few studies have reported sources and pathways of siloxanes in the environment. In this study, we determined concentrations of four cyclic siloxanes, namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D₄), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D₅), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D₆), and tetradecamethylcycloheptasiloxane (D₇) as well as 13 linear siloxanes (L₄ to L₁₆), in sediments sampled from the Songhua River and in sewage sludge sampled from treatment plants that discharge wastewater into the Songhua River in northeastern China. Siloxanes were found in all of the sediment samples at total concentrations (sum of all cyclic and linear siloxanes) as high as 2050 ng/g dry weight (dw). The respective total concentration ranges for cyclic (D₄, D₅, D₆, and D₇) and linear (L₄ to L₁₆) siloxanes in sewage sludge were 602 to 2360 and 98 to 3310 ng/g dw. Cyclic siloxanes were found at greater concentrations than linear siloxanes in sediment samples. However, the summed concentrations of linear siloxanes were higher than the summed concentrations of cyclic siloxanes in sludge samples. Among cyclic siloxanes, D₇ and D₅ were the dominant compounds in both sediment and sludge. Among linear siloxanes, L₁₀ and L₁₁ together accounted for 55% of the total concentrations in sludge samples, and L₆ accounted for 30% of the total concentration in sediment samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document concentrations and compositions of organosiloxanes in sediments and sewage sludge from China. PMID:21072629

  1. Impression Management in Survey Responding: Easier for Collectivists or Individualists?

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Hila; Shavitt, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments indicate that when individualists and collectivists engage in impression management on self-reports, they do so through different psychological mechanism s. Collectivists do so through a relatively automatic process. Thus, they can impression manage even when cognitively busy. Individualists impression manage through a more effortful process. Therefore, they can do so only when the situation permits effortful processing. These findings highlight distinct conditions under which social norms may influence consumer self-reports across cultures. PMID:23175618

  2. The fungicidal effect of ultraviolet light on impression materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Nahara, Y.; Tamamoto, M.; Hamada, T. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on fungi and impression materials were tested. UV light (250 microW/cm2) killed most Candida organisms (10(3) cells/ml) within 5 minutes. UV light (8000 microW/cm2) killed most C. albicans (10(7) cells/ml) within 2 minutes of exposure. The effect of UV light on dimensional change and surface roughness of impression materials (irreversible hydrocolloid, agar, and silicone rubber) was tested. The results showed that neither dimensional change nor surface roughness of the impression materials were affected. The results of this study indicate that UV light disinfects impression materials that are contaminated with Candida organisms.

  3. Physicochemical studies on polyurethane/siloxane cross-linked films for hydrophobic surfaces by the sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Seeni Meera, Kamal Mohamed; Murali Sankar, Rajavelu; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2013-03-01

    A series of castor oil based polyurethane/siloxane cross-linked films were prepared using castor oil, isophorone diisocyanate, and 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane by the sol-gel process. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra reveal the cross-linking interaction between polyurethane and siloxane moieties, thereby shifting the peak position of characteristic N-H and C═O groups to higher wavenumber. (29)Si (silica) solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were used to prove the formation of siloxane network linkage in the polyurethane system, thereby analyzing the Si environment present in the polyurethane/siloxane cross-linked films. The activation energy values at two stages (Tmax1 and Tmax2) for the degradation of polyurethane films were increased with increasing silane ratio. The calculated activation energy values for the higher silane ratio (1.5) are 136 and 170 kJ/mol at Tmax1 and Tmax2, respectively. From contact angle measurements, we observed that increasing siloxane cross-linking increased the hydrophobicity of the films. The optical transmittance obtained from ultraviolet-visible spectra indicated that the film samples are transparent in the region 300-800 nm. The moisture sorption/desorption isotherm curve shows a characteristic behavior of type III isotherm corresponds to hydrophobic materials. Dynamic mechanical studies show that the increase in storage modulus reveals siloxane cross-linking gives rigidity to the films. Atomic force microscopic images show that the introduction of siloxane changes the surface roughness of the polyurethane films. It is found that the siloxane cross-linking can be used to obtain hydrophobic surface films having good thermal stability and optical transmittance. PMID:23394610

  4. Effects of Music on Image Impression and Relationship between Impression and Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Keiko; Mitsukura, Yasue

    Auditory information plays an integral role in AV media because even identical images are perceived differently when they are matched with different music. However, we now present a few studies in which the changes in subjective perceptions were analyzed on the basis of the physical properties of the perceived items. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of music on image impression in terms of the physical properties of images. In this paper, we first elucidate the changes in subjective impressions when the image is presented by itself and when it is presented with music. Secondly, to clarify the relation between the impression of an image or music and physical properties, we compare the different image or music perceptions with each other and also compare their respective physical properties, which include color information, structural information, and frequency characteristics. As a result, the color information of an image containing green or saturation colors and the power of the music were strongly correlated with adjectives expressing activity. Moreover, the entropy of saturation correlated with words expressing spatial extent.

  5. Downplaying Positive Impressions: Compensation Between Warmth and Competence in Impression Management

    PubMed Central

    Holoien, Deborah Son; Fiske, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    The compensation effect demonstrates a negative relationship between the dimensions of warmth and competence in impression formation in comparative contexts. However, does compensation between warmth and competence extend to impression management? Two studies examined whether people actively downplay their warmth in order to appear competent and downplay their competence in order to appear warm. In Studies 1a and 1b, participants selected words pretested to be high or low in warmth and competence to include in an e-mail message to people they wanted to impress. As predicted, participants downplayed their competence when they wanted to appear warm (Study 1a) and downplayed their warmth when they wanted to appear competent (Study 1b). In Studies 2a and 2b, compensation also occurred when participants introduced themselves to another person, as evidenced by the questions they selected to answer about themselves, their self-reported goals, and their open-ended introductions. Compensation occurred uniquely between warmth and competence and not for other dimensions, such as healthiness (Study 2a) and political interest (Study 2b), which suggests that the compensation effect extends beyond a mere zero-sum exchange between dimensions. PMID:24550571

  6. A technique for verifying and correcting a milled polyurethane definitive cast for nonsegmental implant restoration in an edentulous jaw.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Metz, Michael J; Morton, Dean

    2014-09-01

    This report describes a technique that uses an acrylic resin verification device and polyvinyl siloxane impression to verify and correct the analog position in a milled polyurethane definitive cast with removable periimplant soft tissue replica for a nonsegmental implant restoration in an edentulous jaw. PMID:24836533

  7. Characterization of full-scale carbon contactors for siloxane removal from biogas using online Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, C A; Martin, B D; Simms, N; McAdam, E J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, online Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to generate the first comprehensive characterization of full-scale carbon contactors for siloxane removal from biogas. Using FTIR, two clear operational regions within the exhaustion cycle were evidenced: an initial period of pseudo-steady state where the outlet siloxane concentration was consistently below the proposed siloxane limits; and a second period characterized by a progressive rise in outlet siloxane concentration during and after breakthrough. Due to the sharp breakthrough front identified, existing detection methods (which comprise field sampling coupled with laboratory-based chromatographic determination) are insufficiently responsive to define breakthrough, thus carbon contactors currently remain in service while providing limited protection to the combined heat and power engine. Integration of the exhaustion cycle to breakthrough identified average specific media capacities of 8.5-21.5 gsiloxane kg(-1)GAC, which are lower than that has been reported for vapour phase granular activated carbon (GAC). Further speciation of the biogas phase identified co-separation of organic compounds (alkanes and aromatics), which will inevitably reduce siloxane capacity. However, comparison of the five full-scale contactors identified that greater media capacity was accessible through operating contactors at velocities sufficient to diminish axial dispersion effects. In addition to enabling significant insight into gas phase GAC contactors, the use of FTIR for online control of GAC for siloxane removal is also presented. PMID:25413112

  8. Contribution of siloxanes to COD loading at wastewater treatment plants: phase transfer, removal, and fate at different treatment units.

    PubMed

    Surita, Sharon C; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-03-01

    Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) are entering to waste stream in increasing quantities due to their increasing use in personal care products (i.e., shampoos, creams). The cVMSs have high vapor pressures and low solubilities and are mostly transferred into the gaseous phase via volatilization; however, some are sorbed onto biosolids. The purpose of this study was to track and estimate the phase transfer (water, solids, gas), fate, and contribution to COD loading of selected siloxanes (D4, D5 and D6) which are the most commonly found cVMSs in the wastewater systems. Removal efficiencies of the wastewater treatment units were evaluated based on the partitioning characteristics of the cVMSs in gas, liquid, and biosolids phases. The contributions of the siloxanes present in the influent and effluent were estimated in terms of COD levels based on the theoretical oxygen demand (ThOD) of the siloxanes. Siloxanes constitute approximately 39 and 0.001mgL(-1) of the COD in the influents and effluent. Oxidation systems showed higher removal efficiencies based COD loading in comparison to the removal efficiencies achieved aeration tanks and filtration systems. Treatment systems effectively remove the siloxanes from the aqueous phase with over 94% efficiency. About 50% of the siloxanes entering to the wastewater treatment plant accumulate in biosolids. PMID:25528947

  9. Graphene oxide - Polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite based electrode material for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Pranav Bhagwan; Shukla, Shobha; Saxena, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    Supercapacitors are high capacitive energy storage devices and find applications where rapid bursts of power are required. Thus materials offering high specific capacitance are of fundamental interest in development of these electrochemical devices. Graphene oxide based nanocomposites are mechanically robust and have interesting electronic properties. These form potential electrode materials efficient for charge storage in supercapacitors. In this perspective, we investigate low cost graphene oxide based nanocomposites as electrode material for supercapacitor. Nanocomposites of graphene oxide and polyvinyl alcohol were synthesized in solution phase by integrating graphene oxide as filler in polyvinyl alcohol matrix. Structural and optical characterizations suggest the formation of graphene oxide and polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposites. These nanocomposites were found to have high specific capacitance, were cyclable, ecofriendly and economical. Our studies suggest that nanocomposites prepared by adding 0.5% wt/wt of graphene oxide in polyvinyl alcohol can be used an efficient electrode material for supercapacitors.

  10. Polyvinyl alcohol cross-linked with two aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Rieker, L. L.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A film forming polyvinyl alcohol resin is admixed, in aqueous solution, with a dialdehyde crosslinking agent which is capable of crosslinking the polyvinyl alcohol resin and a water soluble acid aldehyde containing a reactive aldehyde group capable of reacting with hydroxyl groups in the polyvinyl alcohol resin and an ionizable acid hydrogen atom. The dialdehyde is present in an amount sufficient to react with from 1 to 20% by weight of the theoretical amount required to react with all of the hydroxyl groups of the polyvinyl alcohol. The amount of acid aldehyde is from 1 to 50% by weight, same basis, and is sufficient to reduce the pH of the aqueous admixture to 5 or less. The admixture is then formed into a desired physical shape, such as by casting a sheet or film, and the shaped material is then heated to simultaneously dry and crosslink the article.

  11. In Situ Cross-Linking of Polyvinyl Alcohol Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Shu, L. C.; May, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Films or impregnated matrices readily made from aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution. Controlled thickness films made by casting precise quantities of aqueous polymer solution on smooth surface, allowing water to evaporate and then removing film. Composite separators formed in similar fashion by impregnating cloth matrix with polyvinyl alcohol solution and drying composite. Insoluble thin hydrophilic membranes made from aqueous systems, and use of undesirable organic solvents not required.

  12. Impression Cytology of the Lid Wiper Area.

    PubMed

    Muntz, Alex; van Doorn, Kevin; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Jones, Lyndon W

    2016-01-01

    Few reports on the cellular anatomy of the lid wiper (LW) area of the inner eyelid exist and only one report makes use of cytological methods. The optimization of a method of collecting, staining and imaging cells from the LW region using impression cytology (IC) is described in this study. Cells are collected from the inner surface of the upper eyelid of human subjects using hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes, and stained with cytological dyes to reveal the presence of goblet cells, mucins, cell nuclei and various degrees of pre- and para-keratinization. Immunocytochemical dyes show cell esterase activity and compromised cell membranes by the use of a confocal scanning laser microscope. Up to 100 microscopic digital images are captured for each sample and stitched into a high-resolution, large scale image of the entire IC span. We demonstrate a higher sensitivity of IC than reported before, appropriate for identifying cellular morphologies and metabolic activity in the LW area. To our knowledge, this is the first time this selection of fluorescent dyes was used to image LW IC membranes. This protocol will be effective in future studies to reveal undocumented details of the LW area, such as assessing cellular particularities of contact lens wearers or patients with dry eye or lid wiper epitheliopathy. PMID:27584693

  13. Impression Management by Association: Construction and Validation of a Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Martha C.; Kacmar, K. Michele

    2001-01-01

    Impression management (managing associations with others to create a favorable impression) using such tactics as boasting, blurring, blaring, and burying was examined using factor and validity analyses of data from the Image Management by Association Scale. The scale satisfactorily represented the four tactics, although burying and blaring needed…

  14. Impression Management and the Control of Social Anxieties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rowland S.

    Impression management refers to the concept that people engaged in interaction will attempt to control the image of themselves that others form. This provides a foundation for social interaction, giving others information about who we are and what to expect from us. A central concern of impression management is the manner in which we are evaluated…

  15. Observing and Understanding Children's Social Interactions. An Impression Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, J. Amos

    1994-01-01

    Describes ways of observing and interpreting children's peer social behavior based on the impression management perspective, which focuses on the social construction of a child's individual self-concept. Suggests that teachers and caregivers can use impression management strategies to observe and promote prosocial development in young children.…

  16. Impressions of College Intructors: Stability and Change in Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the topic of stability and change in classroom impressions research is not new, there remain unanswered questions about what impressions are stable, when they are likely to change, and for whom they are likely to change over the course of a semester. My research will begin to answer those questions. My research took place in four college…

  17. Impression Creep Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Naveena; Vijayanand, D.

    2013-02-01

    Impression creep tests have been carried out at 923 K on 316LN SS containing 0.07, 0.14, and 0.22 wt.% nitrogen, under different applied stress levels. It was observed that the impression creep depth versus time curves were similar to the creep curves obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. The impression creep curves were characterized by a loading strain and primary and secondary creep stages similar to uniaxial creep curves. The tertiary stage observed in uniaxial creep curves was absent. The steady-state impression velocity was found to increase with increasing applied stress. The equivalent steady-state creep rates calculated from impression velocities were found to be in good agreement with the steady-state creep rates obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. Equivalence between applied stress and steady-state impression velocity with uniaxial creep stress and steady-state creep rate, respectively, has been established based on the laws of mechanics for time-dependent plasticity. It was found that impression velocity was sensitive to the variation in nitrogen content in the steel; impression velocity decreased with increasing nitrogen content, and the results obtained in this study were in agreement with those obtained from uniaxial creep tests.

  18. Impression Management: The Web Presence of College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Joanne Cardin

    2013-01-01

    Leadership profile pages on organizational websites have become staged opportunities for impression management. This research uses content analysis to examine the strategies of assertive impression management used to construct the leadership Web presence of the 70 presidents of national public universities, as identified in the "US News and…

  19. Read Two Impress: An Intervention for Disfluent Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase; Rasinski, Timothy; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a research-based method to increase students' reading fluency. The method is called Read Two Impress, which is derived from the Neurological Impress Method and the method of repeated readings. The authors provide step-by-step procedures to effectively implement the reading fluency intervention. Previous research indicates that…

  20. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  1. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  2. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  3. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  4. A Study of Peer Tutors Using the Neurological Impress Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.

    A study investigated the efficacy of using the neurological impress method in peer tutoring during reading instruction. The neurological impress reading method is a unison reading procedure in which the student and teacher or tutor read aloud simultaneously and quickly, with the student placed slightly in front of the teacher so that the teacher's…

  5. Synthesis and solution imidization studies of soluble poly(imide siloxane) segmented copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, J. D.; Arnold, C. A.; Bott, R. H.; Taylor, L. T.; Ward, T. C.

    1987-01-01

    Soluble metalinked poly(imide siloxane) segmented copolymers were synthesized utilizing a THF/NMP cosolvent system. The presence of dual solvent makes it possibled to reach high molecular weight in the amid acid stage. Incorporation of siloxanes at about 10 weight percent or higher enables the materials to be fully soluble in a range of polar solvents even after imidization. Imidization may be achieved either by conventional thermal methods on cast amic acid films or in appropriate solvent/azeotroping-agent systems employing moderate temperatures. The imidization procedure has been followed by FT-IR and NMR studies. FT-IR studies show the solution imidization follows first order kinetics and proceeds to about 96 percent completion. NMR studies of the isolated products show residual amic acid may be present after solution imidization, but only at very low levels. Properties of the solution imidized materials compared well with those obtained from samples imidized as thin films.

  6. Non-toxic liquid scintillators with high light output based on phenyl-substituted siloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Carturan, S. M.; Degerlier, M.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Quaranta, A.

    2015-04-01

    The work describes the development of a new class of liquid scintillators based on polysiloxane liquid compounds. These materials are characterized by low toxicity, chemical inertness, very low volatility and low flammability, allowing their use without concerns even at high temperatures in vacuum. In this view different polysiloxane based liquids have been tested, with variable content and distribution of phenyl lateral substituents and added with suitable dyes, namely 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and Lumogen Violet (LV). Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in order to study the emission feature of the various compounds and to investigate the spectral matching between siloxane solvents and dissolved primary dyes. Scintillation efficiency towards 60Co and 137Cs gamma rays, relative to commercial liquid scintillator (EJ-309), has been measured and the results have been related to the energy transfer and energy migration mechanism from monomer and excimer forming sites in liquid siloxanes.

  7. Insights into siloxane removal from biogas in biotrickling filters via process mapping-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Soreanu, Gabriela

    2016-03-01

    Data process mapping using response surface methodology (RSM)-based computational techniques is performed in this study for the diagnosis of a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter applied for siloxane (i.e. octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5)) removal from biogas. A mathematical model describing the process performance (i.e. Si removal efficiency, %) was obtained as a function of key operating parameters (e.g biogas flowrate, D4 and D5 concentration). The contour plots and the response surfaces generated for the obtained objective function indicate a minimization trend in siloxane removal performance, however a maximum performance of approximately 60% Si removal efficiency was recorded. Analysis of the process mapping results provides indicators of improvement to biological system performance. PMID:26745382

  8. Mitigating the effect of siloxanes on internal combustion engines using landfill gasses

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2015-01-06

    A waste gas combustion method that includes providing a combustible fuel source, in which the combustible fuel source is composed of at least methane and siloxane gas. A sodium source or magnesium source is mixed with the combustible fuel source. Combustion of the siloxane gas of the combustible fuel source produces a silicon containing product. The sodium source or magnesium source reacts with the silicon containing product to provide a sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or a magnesium containing silicate. By producing the sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or the magnesium containing silicate, or magnesium source for precipitating particulate silica instead of hard coating, the method may reduce or eliminate the formation of silica deposits within the combustion chamber and the exhaust components of the internal combustion engine.

  9. Mitigating the effect of siloxanes on internal combustion engines using landfill gasses

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2014-01-21

    A waste gas combustion method that includes providing a combustible fuel source, in which the combustible fuel source is composed of at least methane and siloxane gas. A sodium source or magnesium source is mixed with the combustible fuel source. Combustion of the siloxane gas of the combustible fuel source produces a silicon containing product. The sodium source or magnesium source reacts with the silicon containing product to provide a sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or a magnesium containing silicate. By producing the sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or the magnesium containing silicate, or magnesium source for precipitating particulate silica instead of hard coating, the method may reduce or eliminate the formation of silica deposits within the combustion chamber and the exhaust components of the internal combustion engine.

  10. Using double-poured alginate impressions to fabricate bleaching trays.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Powe, A

    1998-01-01

    Esthetic and diagnostic treatment often requires two casts of one arch, one for baseline and one for alterations (diagnostic wax-up, bleaching tray, occlusal analysis). The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts generated from a second pour of a properly handled alginate impression with first-poured casts. A maxillary dentoform was indexed with six reference spaces (#8-15, 9-2, 2-15, and incisal-to-gingival of #3, 9, 14). Irreversible hydrocolloid (Jeltrate) impressions were made in perforated steel trays by a single investigator. Impression material was spatulated for 1 minute. The seated impression and dentoform were wrapped in a damp paper towel to simulate intraoral conditions, and allowed to set for 2 minutes. Upon separation, the impression was stored in a damp towel for 5 minutes. The impression was poured in cast stone (Microstone) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The stone-filled impression was immediately rewrapped in a damp paper towel and allowed to set for 45 minutes at room temperature. Upon removal of the stone, the impression was rinsed with cold water, shaken dry, and repoured in the same manner. Ten impressions were made: the first five impressions were poured to make casts for Group A, then repoured as described above for casts for Group B. The remaining five impressions were poured once to make casts for Group C. The six spaces of each cast were measured three times in random order using a dial caliper and the space average calculated for the cast. At each space, analysis of variance showed no significant difference among Groups A, B, or C (P < 0.05). When alginate impressions that have been poured with cast stone are kept moist during stone setting and repoured within 45 minutes, two casts can be generated from one impression with the same degree of accuracy as two casts made from taking two separate impressions, providing the alginate does not tear during first cast removal. PMID:9656923

  11. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R

    2015-04-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion. PMID:26015714

  12. Dynamic surface tension and adsorption kinetics of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianlong; Qu, Wenshan; Li, Zhe

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant was measured by using the maximum bubble pressure method. By using the classical Ward and Tordai equation, the diffusion coefficient for each bulk surfactant concentration was calculated. The results show that at the initial adsorption stage and at the end of the adsorption process, the dynamic surface tension data were all consistent with this diffusion-controlled mechanism. Their diffusion coefficient was slightly lower than that for conventional hydrocarbon surfactants.

  13. Synthesis and properties of dicationic ionic liquids containing a siloxane structural moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, L. M.; Krasovskiy, V. G.; Chernikova, E. A.; Kapustin, G. I.; Kustov, L. M.; Koroteev, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Five new ionic liquids formed by doubly charged cations containing a siloxane moiety and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide anion are synthesized and characterized. Their thermal stability is studied by means of TGA; melting points (glass transition temperatures) and densities are measured. The temperature dependences of kinematic viscosity of the obtained ionic liquids are presented along with their approximations by the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher equation.

  14. Effect of siloxane spacer length on organosilicon bi-quaternary ammonium amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chuanming; Cui, Yuezhi; Yang, Pengfei; Zhang, Huayong; Mao, Dejiang; Cui, Xiao; Li, Junying

    2015-04-01

    A series of organosilicon Bola-form bi-quaternary ammonium amphiphiles, [OH5C3(C2H5)2N+-(CH2)3-Si(CH2)3-O-(Si(CH3)2O)n-Si(CH2)3⋯(CH2)3-N+(C2H5)2C3H5O]Cl2- (SinN2Cl2, n=0, 4, 6, 8), with the same headgroups and different length of hydrophobic linkage has been synthesized. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of each amphiphiles was determined by equilibrium surface tension. With the increased length of hydrophobic siloxane spacer, the CMC values follow the order of Si8N2Cl2siloxane spacer and its internal oxygen atom, which make the molecular stretch free. The antimicrobial property of Si4N2Cl2 is more effective than others below the concentration of CMC, while the antimicrobial property of Si8N2Cl2 is more effective above the concentration of CMC, which indicated that both the adsorbability in formation of micellar and the hydrophobicity arising from the different length of siloxane spacer are important to inhibit microbe. Moreover, their wetting ability has been characterized by contact angles on various material surfaces. It shows that the higher weight of lipophilic siloxane spacer leads to lower contact angels. PMID:25794442

  15. Neural correlates of self-deception and impression-management.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Tom F D; Burgess, Jenny; Wilkinson, Iain D; Hunter, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Self-deception and impression-management comprise two types of deceptive, but generally socially acceptable behaviours, which are common in everyday life as well as being present in a number of psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish and dissociate the 'normal' brain substrates of self-deception and impression-management. Twenty healthy participants underwent fMRI scanning at 3T whilst completing the 'Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding' test under two conditions: 'fake good', giving the most desirable impression possible and 'fake bad' giving an undesirable impression. Impression-management scores were more malleable to manipulation via 'faking' than self-deception scores. Response times to self-deception questions and 'fake bad' instructions were significantly longer than to impression-management questions and 'fake good' instructions respectively. Self-deception and impression-management manipulation and 'faking bad' were associated with activation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Impression-management manipulation was additionally associated with activation of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior middle temporal gyrus. 'Faking bad' was additionally associated with activation of right vlPFC, left temporo-parietal junction and right cerebellum. There were no supra-threshold activations associated with 'faking good'. Our neuroimaging data suggest that manipulating self-deception and impression-management and more specifically 'faking bad' engages a common network comprising mPFC and left vlPFC. Shorter response times and lack of dissociable neural activations suggests that 'faking good', particularly when it comes to impression-management, may be our most practiced 'default' mode. PMID:25527112

  16. The effect of amphiphilic siloxane oligomers on fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Emily C; Xie, Yan; Loli, Bree; Dargaville, Tim R; Leavesley, David I; George, Graeme A; Upton, Zee

    2010-11-01

    The formation of hypertrophic scars (HSF) is a frequent medical outcome of wound repair and often requires further therapy with treatments such as silicone gel sheets (SGS) or apoptosis-inducing agents, including bleomycin. Although widely used, knowledge regarding SGS and their mode of action is limited. Preliminary research has shown that small amounts of amphiphilic silicone present in SGS have the ability to move into skin during treatment. We demonstrate herein that a commercially available analogue of these amphiphilic siloxane species, the rake copolymer GP226, decreases collagen synthesis on exposure to cultures of fibroblasts derived from HSF. By size exclusion chromatography, GP226 was found to be a mixture of siloxane species, containing five fractions of different molecular weight. By studies of collagen production, cell viability and proliferation, it was revealed that a low molecular weight fraction (fraction IV) was the most active, reducing the number of viable cells present after treatment and thereby reducing collagen production as a result. On exposure of fraction IV to human keratinocytes, viability and proliferation were also significantly affected. HSF undergoing apoptosis after application of fraction IV were also detected via real-time microscopy and by using the TUNEL assay. Taken together, these data suggests that these amphiphilic siloxanes could be potential non-invasive substitutes to apoptotic-inducing chemical agents that are currently used as scar treatments. PMID:20725963

  17. 6LiF oleic acid capped nanoparticles entrapment in siloxanes for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Marchi, T.; Gramegna, F.; Cinausero, M.; Quaranta, A.; Palma, M. Dalla

    2016-07-01

    The good light output of siloxane based scintillators as displayed under γ-rays and α particles has been exploited here to obtain clear and reliable response toward thermal neutrons. Sensitization towards thermal neutrons has been pursued by adding 6LiF, in form of nanoparticles. Aiming at the enhancement of compatibility between the inorganic nanoparticles and the low polarity, siloxane based surrounding medium, oleic acid-capped 6LiF nanoparticles have been synthesized by thermal decomposition of Li trifluoroacetate. Thin pellets siloxane scintillator maintained their optical transmittance up to weight load of 2% of 6Li. Thin samples with increasing 6Li concentration and thicker ones with fixed 6Li amount have been prepared and tested with several sources (α, γ-rays, moderated neutrons). Light output as high as 80% of EJ212 under α irradiation was measured with thin samples, and negligible changes have been observed as a result of 6LiF addition. In case of thick samples, severe light loss has been observed, as induced by opacity. Nevertheless, thermal neutrons detection has been assessed and the data have been compared with GS20, based on Li glass, taken as a reference material.

  18. Occurrence and fate of volatile siloxanes in a municipal wastewater treatment plant of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Shi, Yali; Cai, Yaqi

    2013-02-01

    The occurrence and fate of four cyclic and two linear volatile siloxanes were studied in a municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), Beijing City, China. Aqueous and sludge samples were analyzed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the studied WWTP, four cyclic analogs (D3-D6) had significantly higher concentrations and frequencies than the two linear analogs [Octamethyltrisiloxane (L3) and Decamethyltetrasiloxane (L4)], with inputs into the WWTP ranging from 78.2 to 387.7 kg/year. Removal efficiencies of volatile cyclic siloxanes in two parallel secondary treatment processes ranged from 59.3 to 92.7%. For volatile cyclic siloxanes, relative fractions of mass loss by adsorption to sludge ranged from 8.3 to 53.0%, and their adsorption capacities were significantly affected by the dissolved organic matter. Besides adsorption, they were eliminated mainly in anaerobic units (44.4-84.3%). Through in vitro biodegradation experiments, we concluded that in the anaerobic compartments, Hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3) and Dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) were eliminated mostly by volatilization, while Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) may be eliminated by both volatilization and degradation. Furthermore, microbe catalysis hydrolysis was identified as one of the main degradation pathways for D4 and D5 in anaerobic compartments. PMID:23182664

  19. Hydrothermal carbonization of poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Woszidlo, S; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization in subcritical water at 180-260 °C. Dehydrochlorination increased with increasing reaction temperature. The release of chlorine was almost quantitative above ∼235 °C. The fraction of organic carbon (OC) recovered in the hydrochar decreased with increasing operating temperature from 93% at 180 °C to 75% at 250 °C. A wide array of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be detected in the aqueous phase, but their combined concentration amounted to only ∼140 μg g(-1) PVC-substrate at 240 °C. A pathway for the formation of cyclic hydrocarbons and O-functionalized organics was proposed. Chlorinated hydrocarbons including chlorophenols could only be identified at trace levels (low ppb). Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) could not be detected. The sorption potential of the hydrochar turned out to be very low, in particular for polar organic pollutants. Our results provide strong evidence that hydrothermal carbonization of household organic wastes which can be tied to co-discarded PVC-plastic residues is environmentally sound regarding the formation of toxic organic products. Following these findings, hydrothermal treatment of PVC-waste beyond operating temperatures of ∼235 °C to allow complete release of organic chlorine should be further pursued. PMID:25150971

  20. Heat resistance poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, F.; Makuuchi, K.; Darwis, D.; Iriawan, T.; Razzak, M. T.; Rosiak, Janusz M.

    1995-08-01

    Six methods were used to evaluate the heat resistance of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel prepared by a combination of electron beam irradiation and acetalization of PVA. The physical properties of the hydrogel depended on the degree of acetilization which was affected by content of water in PVA sheet of acetalization in formaldehyde solution at 60°C. It was found that the optimum water content was 20-30%. The acetalized PVA sheet gave maximum tensile strength in electron beams irradiation at 100 kGy. The tensile strength of the hydrogel film increased to 20 MPa from 14 MPa by the irradiation. Heat resistance of the hydrogel was evaluated by measuring the mechanical properties after sterilization in a steam autoclave at 121°C for 90 min. The tensile strength decreased to 10 MPa whereas the elongation at break increased to 300%. The tackiness of the hydrogel was improved by radiation grafting of acrylic acid. Wholesomeness of the hydrogel as a wound dressing was evaluated by attaching to a burn or wound of the back skin of marmots. Advantages of the hydrogel over a gauze dressing were homogeneous adhesion to the affected parts, easy removal without damage to renewed skin and slightly faster rate of reconstruction of the injured skin.

  1. Piezoresistive Properties of Polyvinyl Chloride Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprakci, Hatice Aylin Karahan

    Textile based sensors provide an interface between the user and the electronic system by converting any type of physiological or environmental signal into electrical signals. Common applications include health monitoring, rehabilitation, multimedia, and surveillance. In this research we demonstrate fabrication of piezoresistive sensors on textile fabrics through application of a screen-printed conductive nanocomposite layer of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), and carbon nanofiber (CNF). In order to understand the behavior of conductive plastisol, morphological, mechanical and electrical properties of composite films were investigated for different molecular weights of PVC. Homogeneous filler dispersion and good filler/polymer interphase were observed without any dominant filler orientation. Mechanical and electrical properties were found to be affected by CNF, plasticizer content and matrix molecular weight. CNFs were found to provide substantial bridging in the matrix and enhance strength. These nanostructured composite sensors were found to be sensitive under different levels of strain which can be monitored by change in electrical resistance. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of piezoresistive sensors on textile fabrics through application of a screen-printed conductive nanocomposite layer of conductive plastisol. Conductive plastisol was found to show good adhesion to fabric with homogeneous CNF distribution. As in composite films, samples were found to show negative piezoresistance at different levels of strain. Strain level and filler concentration were found to affect the piezoresistive behavior and sensitivity of the printed sensors.

  2. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Poco, J.F.; Ives, B.H.

    1986-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microspheres, having a size range of approx.150- to 250-..mu..m diameter with 1- to 5-..mu..m wall thickness, have been fabricated using a solution droplet technique. The spheres were developed for possible use on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. PVA, a polymer chosen based on earlier survey work carried out at KMS Fusion, Inc., has good strength, low hydrogen permeability, is optically transparent, and water soluble. The latter property makes it safe and easy to use in our droplet generator system. A unique dual-orifice droplet generator was used to prepare the spheres. The droplet generator operating conditions and the column processing parameters were chosen using results from our 1-D model calculations as a guide. The polymer microsphere model is an extension of the model we developed to support the glass sphere production. After preparation, the spheres were physically characterized for surface quality, sphericity, wall thickness (and uniformity), and size. We also determined the buckling pressure for both uncoated and CH-coated spheres. Radiation stability to beta decay (from tritium) was evaluated by exposing the spheres to a 7-keV electron beam. The results from these and other physical property measurements are presented in this report.

  3. Differences in volatile methyl siloxane (VMS) profiles in biogas from landfills and anaerobic digesters and energetics of VMS transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tansel, Berrin Surita, Sharon C.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the 62% and 27% if siloxanes, respectively. • In landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were TMSOH (58%) followed by D4 (17%). • Methane utilization may be a possible mechanism for TMSOH formation in the landfills. • The geometric configurations of D4 and D5 molecules make them very stable. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to compare the types and levels of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) present in biogas generated in the anaerobic digesters and landfills, evaluate the energetics of siloxane transformations under anaerobic conditions, compare the conditions in anaerobic digesters and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills which result in differences in siloxane compositions. Biogas samples were collected at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant and South Dade Landfill in Miami, Florida. In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the bulk of total siloxanes (62% and 27%, respectively) whereas in the landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) (58%) followed by D4 (17%). Presence of high levels of TMSOH in the landfill gas indicates that methane utilization may be a possible reaction mechanism for TMSOH formation. The free energy change for transformation of D5 and D4 to TMSOH either by hydrogen or methane utilization are thermodynamically favorable. Either hydrogen or methane should be present at relatively high concentrations for TMSOH formation which explains the high levels present in the landfill gas. The high bond energy and bond distance of the Si–O bond, in view of the atomic sizes of Si and O atoms, indicate that Si atoms can provide a barrier, making it difficult to break the Si–O bonds especially for molecules with specific geometric configurations such as D4 and D5 where oxygen atoms are positioned inside the frame formed by the large Si atoms which are surrounded by the methyl groups.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of novel polysiloxanes. I. Telechelic cyanate esters. II. Hindered alkyl siloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhidong

    Two aspects of novel polysiloxane chemistry have been explored in this work: (1) the synthesis and characterization of polysiloxanes functionalized with terminal cyanate ester groups for use as low flammability impact modifiers for commercial phenolic cyanate ester resins (CERs) and (2) the synthesis and characterization of polydiethylsiloxane and polycyclotetramethylenesiloxane. CERs have been proposed as a potentially useful matrix material for commercial aircraft manufacture. However, commercial CERs do not currently have the appropriate fracture toughness for practical applications. Prior studies have shown that siloxanes offer excellent flame suppression and can improve the CERs impact properties. In this work, a series of new siloxanes terminated with cyanate-reactive groups, including bis[1,3-(4--cyanatophenyl)]-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (11), alpha,o-(4-cyanatophenyl) oligodimethylsiloxane (12), and alpha,o-(4-cyanatophenyl) oligo(dimethyl- co-diphenylsiloxane) (13), have been synthesized from corresponding diphenols. The intermediates and products were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR, GC-MS, and GPC. To synthesize the diphenols, a new route to synthesize disiloxane terminated with THP protected diphenols (dimer) was established. The synthesized dimer was used to equilibrate with D4 and/or D4'' to make desired siloxane oligomers. The mechanism of the equilibration of the dimer with D4 were studied. The synthesized CER monomers were polymerized by a cyclotrimerization reaction. The cured compound 11 is a brittle solid with Tg of 274°C. The cured 12 (oligodimethyl-siloxane) and 13 (oligodimethylsiloxane- co-diphenylsiloxane) are elastomers with Tg of -110°C and -8°C, respectively. The curing processes and intermediates were studied by dynamic and isothermal differential scanning calorimetry, GPC, IR and 13C NMR. The synthesized CER monomers were used as impact modifiers to blend and co-cure with the commercial CERs, Primaset PT-30. SEM shows

  5. Social Relevance Enhances Memory for Impressions in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Brittany S.; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults have difficulty retrieving contextual material over items alone. Recent research suggests this deficit can be reduced by adding emotional context, allowing for the possibility that memory for social impressions may show less age-related decline than memory for other types of contextual information. Two studies investigated how orienting to social or self-relevant aspects of information contributed to the learning and retrieval of impressions in young and older adults. Participants encoded impressions of others in conditions varying in the use of self-reference (Experiment 1) and interpersonal meaningfulness (Experiment 2), and completed memory tasks requiring the retrieval of specific traits. For both experiments, age groups remembered similar numbers of impressions. In Experiment 1, using more self-relevant encoding contexts increased memory for impressions over orienting to stimuli in a non-social way, regardless of age. In Experiment 2, older adults had enhanced memory for impressions presented in an interpersonally meaningful relative to a personally irrelevant way, whereas young adults were unaffected by this manipulation. The results provide evidence that increasing social relevance ameliorates age differences in memory for impressions, and enhances older adults’ ability to successfully retrieve contextual information. PMID:22364168

  6. Replication techniques with new dental impression materials in combination with different negative impression materials.

    PubMed

    Pameijer, C H

    1979-01-01

    New materials and new techniques have enabled the fabrication of more reliable and more accurate replicas. Not only is the reproduction of detail of importance, but the expertise required from the operator and the time involved to produce a replica are considered key factors. For various reasons a reliable and reproducible replication technique for scanning electron microscopy offers many advantages. Recently a new dental precision impression material has been introduced, which in combination with low viscosity resins has produced superior results over other techniques. This combination processed by means of a centrifugal casting machine has produced replicas which could easily be compared to a standard test die at magnifications up to 3000 X. More in depth testing will have to be performed to establish whether these materials can be universally applied to a broad spectrum of replication problems. The combination Reprosil/Spurr low viscosity imbedding medium yielded replicas of high quality which can be made with simple equipment and without possessing special skills. Centrifugation of the positive replication material into the negative impression virtually eliminated the entrapment of airbubbles. PMID:392716

  7. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity. PMID:25090148

  8. Consumer impressions of Tender Select beef.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Meade, M K; Reagan, J O; Byrnes, B L; Koohmaraie, M

    2001-10-01

    With the recent development of technology to classify beef for tenderness, it is now possible for packers and retailers to market brands of beef known to be consistently tender. The present experiment was conducted to determine consumer impressions of Tender Select, a model beef brand comprised of cuts from tender U.S. Select carcasses. A telephone survey was conducted in metropolitan Denver, CO, to recruit consumers (n = 1,036) for this study. Consumers who met minimal limits for household income, age, and beef consumption were invited to participate in a beef shopping and usage study in a local supermarket. Point-of-purchase material was developed that described Tender Select as "the only steak guaranteed tender and lean." When shown a copy of the Tender Select concept card, 89% of participating consumers (n = 759) indicated that they would definitely or probably buy that product. Of those consumers that said they would buy the product, 35% indicated that their purchases of Tender Select would be in addition to their current fresh meat purchases. Most consumers (54.1%) indicated that if Tender Select was available at their grocery store, 1 or 2 of their next 10 purchases of beef cuts would be Tender Select. Sixty-five percent of consumers indicated that if a grocery store carried a line of beef cuts guaranteed to be tender, they would buy all of their beef at that store. Both strip loins from 104 U.S. Select beef carcasses, representing a broad range (8.7 to 43.4 kg; CV = 42%) in slice shear force (SSF) at 14 d postmortem, were used to determine the effect of SSF classification on consumer satisfaction and the correlation among trained sensory panel descriptive attribute ratings and in-home consumer ratings of beef longissimus steaks. Both trained sensory panelists and consumers rated low-SSF steaks higher than the high-SSF steaks for all traits (P < 0.001). All consumer traits (like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, flavor amount, and overall satisfaction

  9. Development of on-line FTIR spectroscopy for siloxane detection in biogas to enhance carbon contactor management.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, C A; Vale, P; Brown, A S; Simms, N J; McAdam, E J

    2015-08-15

    Activated carbon filters are used to limit engine damage by siloxanes when biogas is utilised to provide electricity. However, carbon filter siloxane removal performance is poorly understood as until recently, it had not been possible to measure siloxanes on-line. In this study, on-line Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was developed to measure siloxane concentration in real biogas both upstream (86.1-157.5mg m(-3)) and downstream (2.2-4.3mg m(-3)) of activated carbon filters. The FTIR provided reasonable precision upstream of the carbon vessel with a root mean square error of 10% using partial least squares analysis. However, positive interference from volatile organic carbons was observed in downstream gas measurements limiting precision at the outlet to an RMSE of 1.5mg m(-3) (47.8%). Importantly, a limit of detection of 3.2mg m(-3) was identified which is below the recommended siloxane limit and evidences the applicability of on-line FTIR for this application. PMID:25966392

  10. Indirect method of base adaptation against supporting element of tooth root for a partial overdenture prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won-suk; Park, Ju-mi

    2014-08-01

    The base of a partial overdenture prosthesis should be fitted intraorally against the supporting element of a tooth root. Chairside relining is a common method; however, an autopolymerizing acrylic resin presents high porosity when polymerized intraorally. This article describes an indirect method where an impression is made with a silicone occlusion registration material to create a replica of the supporting elements of the residual ridge and the tooth root in a high-viscosity polyvinyl siloxane impression material. PMID:24412183

  11. Managing Impression Formation in Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean

    2001-01-01

    Offers suggestions for online instructors regarding verbal and nonverbal impression management. The recommendations should facilitate computer mediated teacher-student or manager-client interactions and help develop constructive relationships that promote learning and productivity. (EV)

  12. Persons who most impress gifted youth: a replication.

    PubMed

    Karnes, F A; McGinnis, J C

    1994-06-01

    A replication of a study of the persons who most impressed gifted youth was conducted with 95 students enrolled in a summer residential program for the gifted. Students were asked to indicate the person who most impressed them and to include the reason(s) for choosing that person. The most frequently chosen category of individuals was family members (61.1%), then a tie between persons in the world of arts and culture and persons doing a specific job (8.4%), another tie between comrades and sports stars (6.3%), followed by political or historical figures (4.2%), themselves (3.2%), and moral and religious personalities (2.1%). Consistent with the 1982 study by Karnes and Lee, most impressive to these students were family members and least impressive moral and religious personalities. PMID:8058865

  13. Electronic evaluation for video commercials by impression index.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Hu, Sanqing; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Babiloni, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    How to evaluate the effect of commercials is significantly important in neuromarketing. In this paper, we proposed an electronic way to evaluate the influence of video commercials on consumers by impression index. The impression index combines both the memorization and attention index during consumers observing video commercials by tracking the EEG activity. It extracts features from scalp EEG to evaluate the effectiveness of video commercials in terms of time-frequency-space domain. And, the general global field power was used as an impression index for evaluation of video commercial scenes as time series. Results of experiment demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to track variations of the cerebral activity related to cognitive task such as observing video commercials, and help to judge whether the scene in video commercials is impressive or not by EEG signals. PMID:24427225

  14. Simplified custom impression post for implant-supported restorations.

    PubMed

    Patras, Michael; Martin, William

    2016-05-01

    The esthetic outcome of an implant-supported restoration is greatly influenced by the relationship between the contours of the definitive prosthesis and the periimplant tissues. In this clinical technique, an implant analog holder and autopolymerizing acrylic resin were used to accurately register the soft-tissue transition zone created by the interim restoration and transfer it to the impression post during the definitive impression. PMID:26774317

  15. Auditory and visual spatial impression: Recent studies of three auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Andy; Cabrera, Densil

    2004-10-01

    Auditory spatial impression is widely studied for its contribution to auditorium acoustical quality. By contrast, visual spatial impression in auditoria has received relatively little attention in formal studies. This paper reports results from a series of experiments investigating the auditory and visual spatial impression of concert auditoria. For auditory stimuli, a fragment of an anechoic recording of orchestral music was convolved with calibrated binaural impulse responses, which had been made with the dummy head microphone at a wide range of positions in three auditoria and the sound source on the stage. For visual stimuli, greyscale photographs were used, taken at the same positions in the three auditoria, with a visual target on the stage. Subjective experiments were conducted with auditory stimuli alone, visual stimuli alone, and visual and auditory stimuli combined. In these experiments, subjects rated apparent source width, listener envelopment, intimacy and source distance (auditory stimuli), and spaciousness, envelopment, stage dominance, intimacy and target distance (visual stimuli). Results show target distance to be of primary importance in auditory and visual spatial impression-thereby providing a basis for covariance between some attributes of auditory and visual spatial impression. Nevertheless, some attributes of spatial impression diverge between the senses.

  16. Comparison of two impression techniques for auricular prosthesis: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kasim; Mani, U M; Seenivasan, M K; Vaidhyanathan, A K; Veeravalli, P T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the accuracy of a new impression technique, the triple-layer impression technique (TLIT), with the conventional impression technique (CIT) to fabricate an auricular prosthesis. Fifteen male subjects (aged 22-45 yr) were selected. Ten markings were made on the subject's ear (super aurale [sa], sub aurale [sba], pre aurale [pra], post aurale [poa], A, A1, B, B1, C, and C1) and five measurements (sa-sba, pra-poa, A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1) were made. Custom-made trays were used to record impression in CIT and TLIT. Impressions were made using alginate, and models were cast with type IV gypsum product. Markings were transferred on the cast. Measurements were rechecked on the models. Distribution analysis of difference in measurements between the two impression techniques and the subject's actual values was evaluated. Sign test was used to analyze the statistical significance. Statistically significant differences were found in measurements A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1 between the two techniques when compared with the subject's actual dimensions (p < 0.01). TLIT was found to produce accurate models when compared with CIT. The TLIT used in the study was cost effective, less technique sensitive, and tailor made to reduce chairside orientation time during wax try-in appointments for rehabilitating patients, especially those with unilateral auricular defects. PMID:24458893

  17. Complexes of polyvinyl alcohol with insoluble inorganic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosanov, I. Yu.; Bulina, N. V.; Gerasimov, K. B.

    2013-10-01

    Hybrid materials of polyvinyl alcohol-hydroxides/oxides of Be, Mg, Zn, Cd, B, Al, Cr, and Fe have been obtained. The studies have been carried out by the methods of optical spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and synchronous thermal analysis. Interpretation of experimental data is presented, presuming that, in systems with zinc, boron, aluminum, chromium, and iron hydroxides/oxides, interpolymeric complexes of polyvinyl alcohol with corresponding polymeric inorganic compounds are formed. They belong to a new class of materials with unusual structure containing chains of inorganic polymers isolated in the organic matrix.

  18. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  19. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., may not exceed: (i) 2000 ppm for polyvinyl chloride dispersion resins, excluding latex resins; (ii... exceed: (i) 2 g/kg (4 lb/ton) product from the stripper(s) for dispersion polyvinyl chloride resins... dispersion polyvinyl chloride resins, excluding latex resins, with the product determined on a dry...

  20. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., may not exceed: (i) 2000 ppm for polyvinyl chloride dispersion resins, excluding latex resins; (ii... exceed: (i) 2 g/kg (4 lb/ton) product from the stripper(s) for dispersion polyvinyl chloride resins... dispersion polyvinyl chloride resins, excluding latex resins, with the product determined on a dry...

  1. Semipermeable thin-film membranes comprising siloxane, alkoxysilyl and aryloxysilyl oligomers and copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, Walter C.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1988-01-01

    Novel semiperimeable membranes and thin film composite (TFC) gas separation membranes useful in the separation of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, lower hydrocarbons, and other gases are disclosed. The novel semipermeable membranes comprise the polycondensation reaction product of two complementary polyfunctional compounds, each having at least two functional groups that are mutually reactive in a condensation polymerization reaction, and at least one of which is selected from siloxanes, alkoxsilyls and aryloxysilyls. The TFC membrane comprises a microporous polymeric support, the surface of which has the novel semipermeable film formed thereon, preferably by interfacial polymerization.

  2. Semipermeable thin-film membranes comprising siloxane, alkoxysilyl and aryloxysilyl oligomers and copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, W.C.; Friesen, D.T.

    1988-11-01

    Novel semipermeable membranes and thin film composite (TFC) gas separation membranes useful in the separation of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, lower hydrocarbons, and other gases are disclosed. The novel semipermeable membranes comprise the polycondensation reaction product of two complementary polyfunctional compounds, each having at least two functional groups that are mutually reactive in a condensation polymerization reaction, and at least one of which is selected from siloxanes, alkoxsilyls and aryloxysilyls. The TFC membrane comprises a microporous polymeric support, the surface of which has the novel semipermeable film formed thereon, preferably by interfacial polymerization.

  3. NHC-catalyzed dehydrogenative self-coupling of diphenylsilane: A facile synthesis of octaphenylcyclotetra(siloxane)

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Abigail; Gawley, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    A unique application of the CuIPr N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) to the dehydrogenative self-coupling of diphenylsilane has been discovered. This transformation is carried out open to air at room temperature, yielding octaphenylcyclotetra(siloxane) quantitatively in one hour. This preparation constitutes a significant improvement over existing methods for the preparation of this compound and demonstrates a novel mode of reactivity for CuIPr. The diphenylsilanone tetramer is the precursor to a number of industrially significant polymers. PMID:22058577

  4. An experimental and modeling study of the thermal decomposition of siloxanes on alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoc, Alexandru Catalin

    Siloxanes are contaminants in biogas produced at wastewater treatment plants and landfills. Siloxanes need to be removed to below 0.01 ppm (vol/vol) Si equivalent before biogas can be used as a fuel in solid oxide fuel cells without damaging them. In engines, the tolerance is no higher than 9.1 ppm (vol/vol) Si equivalent. Thermal decomposition in a packed bed of gamma alumina is a method that can remove siloxanes to the requisite tolerances. The kinetics of the decomposition reaction have not been previously studied and a kinetic model is necessary to design adsorption beds. Experiments with synthetic biogas and packed beds of activated gamma alumina were conducted to provide data to which kinetic models were fitted. The synthetic biogas used was a mixture of carbon dioxide and methane contaminated with octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) at concentrations between 32.3 and 72.7 ppm (vol/vol) Si equivalent. The alumina mass, contact times, and temperatures investigated were 0.0700 g, 5.0 to 8.0 ms, and 307 to 384 °C, respectively. The experiments consisted of exposing a heated bed of alumina, initially free of siloxanes, to a stream of synthetic biogas of constant D4 concentration and monitoring the bed exit D4 concentration. Eleven out of the twelve breakthrough curves obtained were adequately predicted by a model that assumed a first order surface reaction, shrinking core particle kinetics, and plug flow in the bed. There were no statistically significant correlations between quality of fit (sum of weighted squares residuals) and concentration, contact time, or temperature in these eleven experiments. The model was not adequate in predicting the breakthrough curve from the experiment at 307 °C and thus should only be used to predict breakthrough curves at temperatures between 333 and 384 °C. The estimated model parameters were 2.10 for intraparticle tortuosity, 406,000 m3˙m -2˙s-1 for Arrhenius pre-exponential factor, and 81.4 kJ˙mor-1 for activation energy.

  5. Formulation/cure technology for ultrahigh molecular weight silphenylene-siloxane polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundley, N. H.; Patterson, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular weights above one million were achieved for methylvinylsilphenylene-siloxane terpolymers using a two-stage polymerization technique which was successfully scaled up to 200 grams. The resulting polymer was vulcanized by two different formulations and compared to an identically formulated commercial methylvinyl silicone on the basis of ultimate strength, Young's modulus, percent elongation at failure, and tear strength. Relative thermal/oxidative stabilities of the elastomers were assessed by gradient and isothermal thermogravimetric analyses performed in both air and nitrogen. The experimental elastomer exhibited enhanced thermal/oxidative stability and possed equivalent or superior mechanical properties. The effect of variations in prepolymer molecular weight on mechanical properties was also investigated.

  6. A survey of cyclic and linear siloxanes in indoor dust and their implications for human exposures in twelve countries.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tri Manh; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Minh, Tu Binh; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-05-01

    Siloxanes are used widely in a variety of consumer products, including cosmetics, personal care products, medical and electrical devices, cookware, and building materials. Nevertheless, little is known on the occurrence of siloxanes in indoor dust. In this survey, five cyclic (D3-D7) and 11 linear (L4-L14) siloxanes were determined in 310 indoor dust samples collected from 12 countries. Dust samples collected from Greece contained the highest concentrations of total cyclic siloxanes (TCSi), ranging from 118 to 25,100ng/g (median: 1380), and total linear siloxanes (TLSi), ranging from 129 to 4990ng/g (median: 772). The median total siloxane (TSi) concentrations in dust samples from 12 countries were in the following decreasing order: Greece (2970ng/g), Kuwait (2400), South Korea (1810), Japan (1500), the USA (1220), China (1070), Romania (538), Colombia (230), Vietnam (206), Saudi Arabia (132), India (116), and Pakistan (68.3). TLSi concentrations as high as 42,800ng/g (Kuwait) and TCSi concentrations as high as 25,000ng/g (Greece) were found in indoor dust samples. Among the 16 siloxanes determined, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) was found at the highest concentration in dust samples from all countries, except for Japan and South Korea, with a predominance of L11; Kuwait, with L10; and Pakistan and Romania, with L12. The composition profiles of 16 siloxanes in dust samples varied by country. TCSi accounted for a major proportion of TSi concentrations in dust collected from Colombia (90%), India (80%) and Saudi Arabia (70%), whereas TLSi predominated in samples collected from Japan (89%), Kuwait (85%), and South Korea (78%). Based on the measured median TSi concentrations in indoor dust, we estimated human exposure doses through indoor dust ingestion for various age groups. The exposure doses ranged from 0.27 to 11.9ng/kg-bw/d for toddlers and 0.06 to 2.48ng/kg-bw/d for adults. PMID:25749636

  7. Lifting bloody footwear impressions using alginate casts followed by chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Sarena; Izraeli, Elad; Shor, Yaron; Domb, Avi

    2013-05-01

    A method for lifting bloody footwear impressions using alginate casts and enhancing the lifted impressions with amido black is presented. On rough or dark substrates, background interferences may conceal significant details of footwear impressions. Illumination with alternative light sources and chemically enhancing the bloody footwear impressions may reveal additional details, but sometimes, lifting footwear impressions prior to enhancing is the only way to expose hidden details (by using blood reagents not adequate on the original). Several cast formulations were tested for lifting the footwear impressions. The best results were achieved using Aroma fine®. Enhancement of the footwear impressions was attempted with several reagents prior to lifting, during the casting process, and on the lifted footwear impressions. Applying amido black to footwear impressions lifted with alginate produced the sharpest and most detailed footwear impressions. Alginate castings followed by chemical enhancement with amido black may produce high-quality footwear impressions for comparison. PMID:23488772

  8. EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL ADDITIVES FROM POLYVINYL CHLORIDE POLYMER EXTRUSION PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model to predict worker inhalation exposure due to off-gassing of additives during polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extrusion processing. ata on off-gassing of additives were reviewed in the literature, the off-gassing at normal PVC processing temperatures was stud...

  9. 75 FR 15726 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... September 15, 2004 (69 FR 55653). The conference was held in Washington, DC, on September 28, 2004, and all....\\3\\ Notice of that determination was published on October 29, 2004. 69 FR 63177. The Commission... COMMISSION Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in...

  10. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  11. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  12. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  13. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  14. Anammox sludge immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel carriers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the use of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogels to encapsulate slow-growing anammox bacteria for deammonification treatment of wastewater. The cryogel pellets were prepared by a freezing-thawing procedure at -8 oC. On average, pellets contained 11.8 mg TSS/g-pellet of enriched anamm...

  15. Prefabricated stock trays for impression of auricular region.

    PubMed

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G N; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N

    2010-06-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impressions of auricle, of patients of different morphology were made with plastic funnels of different shape and size ensuring at least 6 mm of space between the anatomical part and inner surface of funnel and master cast was obtained. Subsequent adaptation of wax was done and fabrications of stock stainless steel trays were done. A standardized stock tray for making of auricular impressions was developed. From this innovative technical procedure it is possible to get an accurate impression of auricular defects now by the use of prefabricated stock trays rather than the cumbersome conventional method. PMID:21629455

  16. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ames, Daniel L; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-12-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent, and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  17. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  18. Enhancing the authenticity of assessments through grounding in first impressions.

    PubMed

    Humă, Bogdana

    2015-09-01

    This article examines first impressions through a discursive and interactional lens. Until now, social psychologists have studied first impressions in laboratory conditions, in isolation from their natural environment, thus overseeing their discursive roles as devices for managing situated interactional concerns. I examine fragments of text and talk in which individuals spontaneously invoke first impressions of other persons as part of assessment activities in settings where the authenticity of speakers' stances might be threatened: (1) in activities with inbuilt evaluative components and (2) in sequential contexts where recipients have been withholding affiliation to speakers' actions. I discuss the relationship between authenticity, as a type of credibility issue related to intersubjective trouble, and the characteristics of first impression assessments, which render them useful for dealing with this specific credibility concern. I identify four features of first impression assessments which make them effective in enhancing authenticity: witness positioning (Potter, 1996, Representing reality: Discourse, rhetoric and social construction, Sage, London), (dis)location in time and space, automaticity, and extreme formulations (Edwards, 2003, Analyzing race talk: Multidisciplinary perspectives on the research interview, Cambridge University Press, New York). PMID:25346466

  19. Similarity to the self influences cortical recruitment during impression formation.

    PubMed

    Leshikar, Eric D; Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2016-04-01

    Prior work has shown that whether or not someone is similar to the self influences person memory--a type of self-reference effect for others. In this study, we were interested in understanding the neural regions supporting the generation of impressions and subsequent memory for targets who vary in similarity to the self. Participants underwent fMRI scanning while forming positive or negative impressions of face-behavior pairs. We tested participants' memory for their generated impressions and then back-sorted the impression trials (encoding) into different levels of self-similarity (high, medium, low) using a self-similarity posttest that came after recognition. Extending prior behavioral work, our data confirmed our hypothesis that memory would be highest for self-similar others and lowest for self-dissimilar others. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity increased with self-similarity (high > medium > low) to targets, regardless of later memory for them. An analysis of regions supporting impression memory revealed a double dissociation within medial temporal lobe regions: for similar others, amygdala recruitment supported memory, whereas for dissimilar others, hippocampal activation supported memory. These results suggest that self-similarity influences evaluation and memory for targets but also affects the underlying neural resources engaged when thinking about others who vary in self-similarity. PMID:26558615

  20. Formation mechanism and anticorrosive properties of thin siloxane films on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Petrunin, M.A.; Nazarov, A.P.; Mikhailovski, Yu.N.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of different ethoxysilanes on Al was studied. It was established that during polymolecular adsorption of ethoxysilanes from the vapor phase on aluminum the first monolayer is adsorbed irreversibly with adsorption van der Waals bonds between silane molecules and the aluminum surface. The covalent bonding of silanes with the surface (Al-O-Si bonds) occurs in the presence of adsorbed water on the aluminum surface. The presence of a silane monolayer on Al decreases water adsorption on the surface, and inhibits hydration of the oxide metal film. The formation of a negatively charged siloxane film on the aluminum surface inhibits local metal corrosion, and a positively charged layer activates it in chloride containing media. The formation of the surface siloxane polymer by the modification of metals inhibits the metal dissolution under polymer coatings. It is caused by silane chemisorption and negative charging of the metal surface. The presence of negatively charged groups causes difficulties of an electrostatic character for the migration of aggressive ions to the metal surface.

  1. Solvent effects on silica domain growth in silica/siloxane composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Bates, S.E.; Black, E.P.; Schaefer, D.W.; Beaucage, W.G.; Lee, M.K.; Moore, P.A.; Burns, G.T.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of solvent addition on the phase separation, mechanical Properties and thermal stability of silica/siloxane composite materials prepared by in situ reinforcement was examined. The addition of a solvent enhances the miscibility of the reinforcement precursor, a partial hydrolyzate of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS-PH), with the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. As a result, the phase separation at the micron level, termed the large-scale structure, diminished in size. This decrease in particle size resulting from the addition of moderate amounts of solvent was accompanied by an improvement in the mechanical properties. However, solvent addition in the excess of 50 weight percent led to a decrease in mechanical properties even though the large-scale structure continued to diminish in size. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) was used to examine the Angstrom level or small-scale structure. This small-scale structure was only affected by the presence of solvent, not the amount. The silica/siloxane composite materials showed the same thermal transition temperatures as the original PDMS material.

  2. Study of zwitterionic sulfopropylbetaine containing reactive siloxanes for application in antibacterial materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Mo, Yangmiao; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-07-01

    Antibacterial agents receive a great deal of attention around the world due to the interesting academic problems of how to combat bacteria and of the beneficial health, social and economic effects of successful agents. Scientists are actively developing new antibacterial agents for biomaterial applications. This paper reports the novel antibacterial agent siloxane sulfopropylbetaine (SSPB), which contains reactive alkoxysilane groups. The structure and properties of SSPB were systematically investigated, with the results showing that SSPB contains both quaternary ammonium compounds and reactive siloxane groups. SSPB has good antibacterial activity against both Escherichia coli (E. coli, 8099) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, ATCC 6538). The minimal inhibition concentration is 70 μmol/ml SSPB against both E. coli and S. aureus. In addition, the SSPB antibacterial agent can be used in both weak acid and weak alkaline environments, functioning within the wide pH range of 4.0-9.0. The SSPB-modified glass surface killed 99.96% of both S. aureus and E. coli organisms within 24 h. No significant decrease was observed in this antibacterial activity after 20 washes. Moreover, SSPB does not induce a skin reaction and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is an ideal candidate for future applications as a safe, environmentally friendly antibacterial agent. PMID:21450443

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell anode degradation by the effect of siloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Hossein; Lanzini, Andrea; Diethelm, Stefan; Papurello, Davide; Van herle, Jan; Lualdi, Matteo; Gutzon Larsen, Jørgen; Santarelli, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Lifetime and durability issues connected with Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology are strongly related to the amount of contaminants that reach the stack. In this study the focus is on organic silicon compounds (siloxanes) and their highly detrimental effects on the performance of SOFC Ni-YSZ anodes. The involved mechanism of degradation is clarified and quantified through several test runs and subsequent post-mortem analysis on tested samples. In particular, experiments on both Ni anode-supported single cells and 11-cell- stacks are performed, co-feeding D4-siloxane (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, C8H24O4Si4) as model compound for the organic silicon species which are generally found in sewage biogas. High degradation rates are observed already at ppb(v) level of contaminant in the fuel stream. Post-test analysis revealed that Si (as silica) is mostly deposited at the inlet of the fuel channel on both the interconnect and the anode side of the cell suggesting a relatively fast condensation-type process. Deposition of the Si was found on the interconnect and on the anode contact layer, throughout the anode support and the three phase boundary in the anode, correlating with the observed increase of polarization losses from the EIS analysis of tested cells.

  4. Triblock siloxane copolymer surfactant: template for spherical mesoporous silica with a hexagonal pore ordering.

    PubMed

    Stébé, M J; Emo, M; Forny-Le Follotec, A; Metlas-Komunjer, L; Pezron, I; Blin, J L

    2013-02-01

    Ordered mesoporous silica materials with a spherical morphology have been prepared for the first time through the cooperative templating mechanism (CTM) by using a silicone triblock copolymer as template. The behavior of the pure siloxane copolymer amphiphile in water was first investigated. A direct micellar phase (L(1)) and a hexagonal (H(1)) liquid crystal were found. The determination of the structural parameters by SAXS measurements leads us to conclude that in the hexagonal liquid crystal phase a part of the ethylene oxide group is not hydrated as observed for the micelles. Mesoporous materials were then synthesized from the cooperative templating mechanism. The recovered materials were characterized by SAXS measurements, nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results clearly evidence that one can control the morphology and the nanostructuring of the resulting material by modifying the synthesis parameters. Actually, highly ordered mesoporous materials with a spherical morphology have been obtained with a siloxane copolymer/tetramethoxysilane molar ratio of 0.10 after hydrothermal treatment at 100 °C. Our study also supports the fact that the interactions between micelles and the hydrolyzed precursor are one of the key parameters governing the formation of ordered mesostructures through the cooperative templating mechanism. Indeed, we have demonstrated that when the interactions between micelles are important, only wormhole-like structures are recovered. PMID:23305163

  5. Facile Patterning of Ag Nanowires Network by Micro-Contact Printing of Siloxane.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-09-01

    A simple, low-cost, scalable patterning method has been demonstrated for chemically welded Ag nanowires (AgNWs) network. The chemically welded network of AgNWs on substrates has been patterned by modified microcontact printing (μCP). As an ink for the μCP, uncured high-viscosity siloxane polymer has been applied. Using elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp that has been replicated from micromachined Si master mold by metal-assisted chemical etching, the printed siloxane ink materials have been cured by simple UV/ozone exposure for 3 min, which acts as an etch barrier in ensuing wet-removal of exposed AgNWs network. The proposed patterning technique has no limitation in the choice of substrates and pattern shape, in addition to high resolution. The patterned AgNWs network electrodes have shown excellent optical, electrical, and mechanical performances, such as high flexibility (up to ∼10%) and stretchability (up to 40%). Finally, the patterned AgNWs network electrodes have been applied as a transparent heater, which can be used for rapid raindrop removal or deicing of car windows and outside mirrors. This can be a valuable help for driving safety under harsh weather conditions. PMID:27548278

  6. Perylenediimide functionalized bridged-siloxane nanoparticles for bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Hemali; Binion, Jenna; McKee, Aaron; Scardino, Debra Jo; Hammer, Nathan I

    2012-08-01

    Perylenediimide functionalized bridged siloxane nanoparticles were prepared by direct hydrolysis and condensation of a perylenediimide silane precursor in the presence of a catalytic amount of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The sizes of the particles were controlled by adjusting organotrialkoxysilane, base, and TEOS concentrations. Using this modified Stöber method, we were able to incorporate a higher load of organic content (∼70%) into the siloxane core compared to typical organically modified Stöber silica nanoparticles. The size, shape, and surface morphology of these functionalized particles were visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Their compositions were confirmed by FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis, and elemental analysis. The photovoltaic performance of these nanohybrids in the poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer matrix was evaluated. The device made from a sample annealed at 150 °C showed reasonably good photovoltaic performance with a power conversion efficiency of 1.56% under standard test conditions of AM 1.5G spectra at an illumination intensity of 100 mW cm(-2). PMID:22714661

  7. Harmony between Colors and Fragrances: Effect on Dimensions of Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kumiko; Saito, Miho

    The objective of this study is to extract dimensions in impressions of colors and fragrances, and to examine their harmonious relationship. Experiment A: One hundred subjects were requested to describe their impressions of eight fragrances, and to select harmonious/disharmonious colors from color charts. Experiment B: One hundred subjects described their impression of 18 colors and each color's degree of harmonization with each of the eight fragrances. In addition, we combined the results of Experiment A and Experiment B, and conducted several analyses. The factor analysis revealed the MILD factor and CLEAR factor for the dimensions of each fragrance, color, and combination of color and fragrance. The multiple regression analysis revealed the following tendency: the smaller the distance between colors and fragrances on the dimensions, the greater is the rise in harmony; conversely, the greater the distance, the greater is the disharmony.

  8. [Consistency of zinc oxide-eugenol impression materials].

    PubMed

    Gomes, W L; Santos, J F; Muench, A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work was investigate the consistency of three zinc oxide-eugenol impression pastes, considering its flow. Flow tests were performed based on the AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION-Specification no 16. Setting time was based at that one when should be applied the load to get considered disc diameter; the values were obtained graphically. Considering the results it was possible to conclude: a) the first two materials (Equalizing and Horus) present high initial flow, which however drops down earlier on the second one; b) both materials may be used with non compressive impression technic but the second one has shorter working time; c) the third material (Lysanda) as it presents lower flow and faster setting time, may be used with compressive impression technic. PMID:2135423

  9. A Sensitive Measurement for Estimating Impressions of Image-Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mie; Matouge, Shingo; Mori, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Noboru; Kasuga, Masao

    We have investigated Kansei Content that appeals maker's intention to viewer's kansei. An SD method is a very good way to evaluate subjective impression of image-contents. However, because the SD method is performed after subjects view the image-contents, it is difficult to examine impression of detailed scenes of the image-contents in real time. To measure viewer's impression of the image-contents in real time, we have developed a Taikan sensor. With the Taikan sensor, we investigate relations among the image-contents, the grip strength and the body temperature. We also explore the interface of the Taikan sensor to use it easily. In our experiment, a horror movie is used that largely affects emotion of the subjects. Our results show that there is a possibility that the grip strength increases when the subjects view a strained scene and that it is easy to use the Taikan sensor without its circle base that is originally installed.

  10. Forming impressions: effects of facial expression and gender stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Hack, Tay

    2014-04-01

    The present study of 138 participants explored how facial expressions and gender stereotypes influence impressions. It was predicted that images of smiling women would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting warmth, and that images of non-smiling men would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting competence. As predicted, smiling female faces were rated as more warm; however, contrary to prediction, perceived competence of male faces was not affected by facial expression. Participants' female stereotype endorsement was a significant predictor for evaluations of female faces; those who ascribed more strongly to traditional female stereotypes reported the most positive impressions of female faces displaying a smiling expression. However, a similar effect was not found for images of men; endorsement of traditional male stereotypes did not predict participants' impressions of male faces. PMID:24897907

  11. Valuing Women in Management: An Impression Management Perspective of Gender Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William L., III; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Applies a model of impression management to explore the process whereby women in organizations present themselves to others and the impressions they create. Devotes particular attention to how these impressions influence women's experiences in organizations. Suggests future research direction for clarifying the impact of gender impression and…

  12. Does immediate dentin sealing influence the polymerization of impression materials?

    PubMed Central

    Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Steiger, Arno Kieling; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the following study is to evaluate the interaction between the resin materials used in immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques and impression materials with two different techniques to eliminate the oxygen-inhibition layer. Materials and Methods: The occlusal dentin surface of 35 human molars was exposed. The teeth were used in two Groups: Group 1 – Impression with Express XT; Group 2 – Impression with Impregum. Groups 1 and 2 were divided into 14 subgroups: Groups 1a and 2a – Control groups; 1b and 2b – IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); 1c and 2c – IDS with CSE + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; 1d and 2d – IDS with CSE + alcohol; 1e and 2e – IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F (PLF); 1f and 2f – IDS with CSE and PLF + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; and 1g and 2g – IDS with CSE and PLF + alcohol. Five teeth were used in each experimental group, and the tooth surface was photographed using a digital camera. Results: Small quantity of unpolymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF in Groups 1b and 1e. Groups 1c and 1d prevented the interaction. Small quantity of polymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF for Groups 2b and 2e. The same interaction was observed for Groups 2c and 2d. For Groups 2c and 2f, no interactions were observed. Conclusion: Resin materials interacted with impression materials. The application of glycerin jelly and alcohol prevented the interaction of CSE with Express XT and PLF with Impregum; however, these treatments were not completely effective in preventing the interaction of CSE with Impregum and PLF with Express XT. PMID:25202218

  13. 40 CFR 721.10482 - Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with silica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10482 Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with silica. (a) Chemical substance and... vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with silica. 721.10482 Section 721.10482 Protection...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10483 - Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. 721.10483 Section 721.10483... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10483 Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica....

  15. 40 CFR 721.10483 - Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. 721.10483 Section 721.10483... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10483 Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica....

  16. 40 CFR 721.10482 - Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with silica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10482 Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with silica. (a) Chemical substance and... vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with silica. 721.10482 Section 721.10482 Protection...

  17. pH-Dependent rectification in redox polymers: Characterization of electrode-confined siloxane polymers containing naphthoquinone and benzylviologen subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Palmore, G.T.R.; Smith, D.K.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1997-04-03

    This paper describes the electrochemical characterization of electrode-confined siloxane polymers that contain both naphthoquinone (NQ) and benzylviologen (BV{sup 2}{sup +}) subunits. These `homopolymers,` abbreviated (NQ-BV{sup 3+}){sub n} and (NQ-BV-BV{sup 5+}){sub n}, are derived from monomers, 2-chloro-3-[[2-(dimethyl[[[N`-[[4-(trimethoxysilyl)phenyl]methyl]-4, 4`-bipyridiniumyl]methyl]phenyl]methyl]ammonium)-ethyl]amino]-1,4-naphthoquinone, 1a, and 2-chloro-3-[[2-(dimethyl[[[[[[[[N`-[N`-[[4-(trimethoxysilyl)phenyl]methy]-4,4`-bipyridiniumyl]methyl]-phenyl]methyl]-4, 4`-bipyridiniumyl]methyl]phenyl]methyl]ammonium)ethyl]amino]-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2a, respectively. Particular to these types of surface-confined homopolymers is the ability to `trap` charge at low pH in the form of reduced quinone. The flexibility of these monolayers apparently allows direct contact of the NQ subunit with the electrode surface. Less flexible and more robust surface-confined polymers, abbreviated (NQ-BV{sup 3+}/siloxane){sub n} and (NQH{sub 2}-BV-BV{sup 5+}siloxane){sub n}, can be prepared by copolymerization of 1a or 2a with 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane. Charge trapped in (NQH{sub 2}-BV{sup 3+}/siloxane){sub n} or (NQH{sub 2}-BV-BV{sup 5+}/siloxane){sub n} can be released and delivered to the surface of the electrode via chemical mediation or by an increase in solution pH. 26 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  19. Method for creating stomatal impressions directly onto archivable microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stomatal density has been shown to be a primary determinant of water use efficiency, limitation to CO2 assimilation rate and yield. Widely used methods of stomatal impressioning sample small regions of the leaf, are labor intensive, or do not yield stable archivable samples for potentially revisitin...

  20. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas. PMID:26693227

  1. Making an Impression: YA Authors and Their Influential Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenbach, Brooke; Kaywell, Joan F.

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts significant moments from online interviews these authors conducted with Young Adult (YA) authors concerning the teachers who left a lasting impression on them and assisted them in finding their voice and unique writing abilities. S. E. Hinton, Walter Dean Myers, Erin Gruwell, Chris Crutcher, and other popular YA authors…

  2. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Richard J. W.; Sutherland, Clare A. M.; Young, Andrew W.; Hartley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable “ambient” face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters’ impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features. PMID:25071197

  3. First Impressions: Gait Cues Drive Reliable Trait Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, John C.; Vuong, Quoc C.; Atkinson, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances.…

  4. Alkaptonuria Presenting with Impressive Osteoarticular Changes and Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Roca, Bernardino; Roca, Manuel; Monferrer, Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria, or ochronosis, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, causes an excess of homogentisic acid that results in dark pigmentation, calcification, and inflammation of cartilaginous and other tissues. Cardiovascular complications are also typical of the disease. We report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with impressive osteoarticular changes and aortic stenosis associated with alkaptonuria. PMID:27169295

  5. Shared impression formation in the cognitively interdependent dyad.

    PubMed

    Ruscher, Janet B; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost

    2003-09-01

    We examined the role of cognitive interdependence in determining how close friends form shared impressions of another person. Cognitive interdependence should provide a processing advantage, such that close friends are more efficient in forming shared impressions and are more successful at doing so. Under normal circumstances, the conversations of close friends should be marked by little necessity to make explicit requests for information, mutual recognition of who currently is controlling the flow of conversation, and willingness to express differences in opinion. Given these advantages, close friends also should be able to form complex shared impressions that go beyond mere one-sided stereotypic judgments and that instead resolve apparent discrepancies in the target's personality. However, if the cognitive interdependence system is disrupted by mutual distraction, these advantages should attenuate or even reverse. Dyads of varying degrees of closeness were mutually distracted or not while discussing their impressions of another female college student. Results supported predictions and are discussed with reference to how cognitive interdependence may help close dyads function within their mutual social networks. PMID:14567845

  6. Temporary Employment and Perceived Employability: Mediation by Impression Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cuyper, Nele; De Witte, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Perceived employability (PE) has been advanced as the upcoming resource for career development, particularly for temporary workers. The question is how temporary workers become employable. Our hypothesis is that temporary workers more than permanent workers use impression management to become employable, both on the internal and the external labor…

  7. How Sexual Orientation and Physical Attractiveness Affect Impressions of Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elman, Donald; And Others

    Stereotyped impressions of male homosexuals and the underlying importance of sexuality in social attraction and perceptions were investigated. Male (N=80) and female (N=80) college students responded to either an attractive or an unattractive photo of a male stimulus person, who was identified to half of the subjects as a homosexual. Compared to…

  8. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Richard J W; Sutherland, Clare A M; Young, Andrew W; Hartley, Tom

    2014-08-12

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable "ambient" face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters' impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features. PMID:25071197

  9. The impact of motivation on race-based impression formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Cardenas-Iniguez, Carlos; Correll, Joshua; Cloutier, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Affective biases toward racial out-group members, characterized by White perceivers' negative evaluations of Black individuals, prevail in U.S. culture. Such affective associations have been found to guide race-based impression formation. Accordingly, individuals may strive to resolve inconsistencies when perceiving targets violating their expectations. The current study focuses on the impact of evaluative incongruence on the activity of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - a brain region previously shown to support impression formation. When asking participants to form impressions of positively and negatively evaluated Black and White individuals, we found preferential dmPFC activity in response to individuals paired with information that violates race-based affective associations. Importantly, individual differences in internal motivation to respond without prejudice (IMS) were found to shape the extent to which dmPFC activity indexes the interactive effects of race and affective associations during impression formation. Specifically, preferential dmPFC activity in response to evaluatively incongruent targets (i.e., Black-positive & White-negative) was present among participants with lower, but not those with higher, levels of IMS. Implications and future directions are discussed in the context of dmPFC involvement in social cognition. PMID:26302673

  10. Using Teacher Impression Journals to Improve Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, SeonYeong; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Meyer, Lori E.; Favazza, Paddy C.; Mouzourou, Chryso; van Luling, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of "Teacher Impression Journals" during a larger study that examined the efficacy of an intervention program designed to promote kindergarteners' positive attitudes toward peers with disabilities (i.e., the "Special Friends" program). The journals were designed to gather information about…

  11. DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE SOUTH END OF THE ABOVE-GROUND PORTION. NOTE STEP DOWN TO THE STEEL PLATE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Impressions of Counselors as a Function of Counselor Physical Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jean A.

    1978-01-01

    Research assessed the effects of counselor physical attractiveness and inter-actions between attractiveness and counselor subject sex. It is suggested that sex of counselor and client may play a more important role independently and in conjunction with attractiveness than does attractiveness alone in influencing impressions and expectations.…

  13. Impressions of a Middle Grades STEM Integration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohlmann, Micah; Moore, Tamara J.; McClelland, J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of one Minnesota middle school that implemented a year-long integrated STEM program with the cooperation of graduate student fellows from a local university. The authors, two of whom were among the graduate students involved in the project, describe their impressions of the program, share some lessons they…

  14. Trophic transfer of methyl siloxanes in the marine food web from coastal area of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongliang; Zhang, Zifeng; Wang, Chaoqun; Hong, Wen-Jun; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Yi-Fan

    2015-03-01

    Methyl siloxanes, which belong to organic silicon compounds and have linear and cyclic structures, are of particular concern because of their potential characteristic of persistent, bioaccumulated, toxic, and ecological harm. This study investigated the trophic transfer of four cyclic methyl siloxanes (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6), and tetradecamethylcycloheptasiloxane (D7)) in a marine food web from coastal area of Northern China. Trophic magnification of D4, D5, D6, and D7 were assessed as the slope of lipid equivalent concentrations regressed against trophic levels of marine food web configurations. A significant positive correlation (R = 0.44, p < 0.0001) was found between lipid normalized D5 concentrations and trophic levels in organisms, showing the trophic magnification potential of this chemical in the marine food web. The trophic magnification factor (TMF) of D5 was estimated to be 1.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.41-2.24, 99.8% probability of the observing TMF > 1). Such a significant link, however, was not found for D4 (R = 0.14 and p = 0.16), D6 (R = 0.01 and p = 0.92), and D7 (R = -0.15 and p = 0.12); and the estimated values of TMFs (95% CI, probability of the observing TMF > 1) were 1.16 (0.94-1.44, 94.7%), 1.01 (0.84-1.22, 66.9%) and 0.85 (0.69-1.04, 48.6%) for D4, D6, and D7, respectively. The TMF value for the legacy contaminant BDE-99 was also estimated as a benchmark, and a significant positive correlation (R = 0.65, p < 0.0001) was found between lipid normalized concentrations and trophic levels in organisms. The TMF value of BDE-99 was 3.27 (95% CI: 2.49-4.30, 99.7% probability of the observing TMF > 1), showing the strong magnification in marine food webs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the trophic magnification of methyl siloxanes in China, which provided important information for trophic transformation of these compounds in marine

  15. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C.; Sheibley, D. W.; Philipp, W. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A film-forming polyvinyl alcohol polymer is mixed with a polyaldehyde-polysaccharide cross-linking agent having at least two monosaccharide units and a plurality of aldehyde groups per molecule, perferably an average of at least one aldehyde group per monosaccharide units. The cross-linking agent, such as a polydialdehyde starch, is used in an amount of about 2.5 to 20% of the theoretical amount required to cross-link all of the available hydroxyl groups of the polyvinyl alcohol polymer. Reaction between the polymer and cross-linking agent is effected in aqueous acidic solution to produce the cross-linked polymer. The polymer product has low electrical resistivity and other properties rendering it suitable for making separators for alkaline batteries.

  16. Liquid-phase-deposited siloxane-based capping layers for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Veith-Wolf, Boris; Wang, Jianhui; Hannu-Kuure, Milja; Chen, Ning; Hadzic, Admir; Williams, Paul; Leivo, Jarkko; Karkkainen, Ari; Schmidt, Jan

    2015-02-02

    We apply non-vacuum processing to deposit dielectric capping layers on top of ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) films, used for the rear surface passivation of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. We examine various siloxane-based liquid-phase-deposited (LPD) materials. Our optimized AlO{sub x}/LPD stacks show an excellent thermal and chemical stability against aluminum metal paste, as demonstrated by measured surface recombination velocities below 10 cm/s on 1.3 Ωcm p-type silicon wafers after firing in a belt-line furnace with screen-printed aluminum paste on top. Implementation of the optimized LPD layers into an industrial-type screen-printing solar cell process results in energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.8% on p-type Czochralski silicon.

  17. Interfacial enhancement of polypropylene composites modified with sorbitol derivatives and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyńska-Mizera, Monika; Dutkiewicz, Michał; Sterzyński, Tomasz; Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura

    2015-12-01

    Composites based on polypropylene (iPP) modified with a sorbitol derivative (NX8000) and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin (SiOPh) containing maleated polypropylene (MAPP) as compatibilizer were prepared by melt extrusion. Calorimetric investigations were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), whereas the morphological and mechanical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and static tensile tests. DSC measurements revealed no influence of SiOPh and a slight effect of MAPP addition on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene. Additionally, the introduction of MAPP into the iPP+NX8000+SiOPh composites increased plastic properties of the samples. All the above was attributed to the compatibilizing effect of MAPP which improved interfacial adhesion between iPP, NX8000 and SiOPh. This phenomenon was also confirmed by the SEM images illustrating more homogenous distribution of the filler in the compatibilized samples.

  18. Thermal neutron detection by entrapping 6LiF nanocrystals in siloxane scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carturan, S. M.; Marchi, T.; Maggioni, G.; Gramegna, F.; Degerlier, M.; Cinausero, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Quaranta, A.

    2015-06-01

    Exploiting the long experience in design and production of scintillating mixtures based on siloxane matrices with combinations of primary dye and waveshifter, a first set of 6LiF loaded scintillator disks has been produced. The synthesis is herein described and reported, as well as preliminary results on their light response towards thermal neutrons. The preservation of transparency and mechanical integrity of the scintillator material is challenging when introducing the inorganic salt LiF which is a "foreign body" to the organic polysiloxane host matrix Different strategies such as synthesis of nanoparticles and surface functionalization have been pursued to succeed in the entrapment of the neutron converter whilst maintaining moderate light output, optical transparency and flexibility of the base scintillator.

  19. Liquid-phase-deposited siloxane-based capping layers for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veith-Wolf, Boris; Wang, Jianhui; Hannu-Kuure, Milja; Chen, Ning; Hadzic, Admir; Williams, Paul; Leivo, Jarkko; Karkkainen, Ari; Schmidt, Jan

    2015-02-01

    We apply non-vacuum processing to deposit dielectric capping layers on top of ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (AlOx) films, used for the rear surface passivation of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. We examine various siloxane-based liquid-phase-deposited (LPD) materials. Our optimized AlOx/LPD stacks show an excellent thermal and chemical stability against aluminum metal paste, as demonstrated by measured surface recombination velocities below 10 cm/s on 1.3 Ωcm p-type silicon wafers after firing in a belt-line furnace with screen-printed aluminum paste on top. Implementation of the optimized LPD layers into an industrial-type screen-printing solar cell process results in energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.8% on p-type Czochralski silicon.

  20. Interfacial enhancement of polypropylene composites modified with sorbitol derivatives and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrzyńska-Mizera, Monika Sterzyński, Tomasz; Dutkiewicz, Michał; Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura

    2015-12-17

    Composites based on polypropylene (iPP) modified with a sorbitol derivative (NX8000) and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin (SiOPh) containing maleated polypropylene (MAPP) as compatibilizer were prepared by melt extrusion. Calorimetric investigations were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), whereas the morphological and mechanical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and static tensile tests. DSC measurements revealed no influence of SiOPh and a slight effect of MAPP addition on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene. Additionally, the introduction of MAPP into the iPP+NX8000+SiOPh composites increased plastic properties of the samples. All the above was attributed to the compatibilizing effect of MAPP which improved interfacial adhesion between iPP, NX8000 and SiOPh. This phenomenon was also confirmed by the SEM images illustrating more homogenous distribution of the filler in the compatibilized samples.

  1. Thermally and oxidatively stable carborane-siloxane-acetylenic-based thermosetting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, L.J. Jr.; Keller, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    Inorganic-organic hybrid polymers that can be pyrolyzed to generate new ceramics are of current interest as a route to high temperature materials. Ceramics have desirable thermal stabilities, but are difficult to process. Inorganic-organic hybrid polymers as ceramic precursors combine organic`s ease of processability with inorganic`s desirable thermal and oxidative stability. Carborane-siloxane-acetylenic-based polymers are an application of this approach. The synthesis, characterization and thermooxidative properties of poly(butadiyne-1,7,bis(tetramethyldisiloxyl)-m-carborane) (polymer 2) is described. Polymer 2 is a viscous dark brown polymer that is soluble in most organic solvents making it was to process. Thermal crosslinking of acetylenic groups generates a thermoset which in turn can be pyrolyzed to ceramic material. Thermal and thermo-oxidative characterization is by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Cure studies of larger samples are also presented.

  2. Surface properties and wear performances of siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Bettuelli, Michela; Trabattoni, Silvia; Fagnola, Matteo; Tavazzi, Silvia; Introzzi, Laura; Farris, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    The low surface roughness of disposable contact lenses made of a new siloxane-hydrogel loaded with hyaluronic acid is reported, as studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Before the wear, the surface is characterized by out-of-plane and sharp structures, with maximum height of about 10 nm. After a wear of 8 h, evidence of two typical morphologies is provided and discussed. One morphology (sharp type) has a similar aspect as the unworn lenses with a slight increase in both the height and the number of the sharp peaks. The other morphology (smooth type) is characterized by troughs and bumpy structures. Wettability and clinical performances are also discussed, the latter deduced by the ocular-surface-disease index (OSDI). The main finding arising from this work is the indication of correlation between the change of the OSDI before and after wear and the lens surface characteristics obtained by AFM. PMID:23559566

  3. Wear effects on microscopic morphology and hyaluronan uptake in siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Tavazzi, Silvia; Tonveronachi, Martina; Fagnola, Matteo; Cozza, Federica; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Borghesi, Alessandro; Ascagni, Miriam; Farris, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was a comparison between new and worn siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses in terms of microscopic structure, surface morphology, and loading of hyaluronan. The analyses were performed by scanning electron microscopy, with the support of the freeze-drying technique, and by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Along the depth profile of new lenses, a thin porous top layer was observed, which corresponds to the region of hyaluronan penetration inside well-defined channels. The time evolution was followed from one day to two weeks of daily wear, when a completely different scenario was found. Clear experimental evidence of a buggy surface was observed with several crests and regions of swelling, which could be filled by the hyaluronan solution. The modifications are attributed to the progressive relaxation of the structure of the polymeric network. PMID:25251841

  4. Transparent and robust siloxane-based hybrid lamella film as a water vapor barrier coating.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Hara, Takaaki; Abe, Risa; Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-11-12

    Water vapor barriers are important in various application fields, such as food packaging and sealants in electronic devices. Polymer/clay composites are well-studied water vapor barrier materials, but their transparency and mechanical strength degrade with increasing clay loading. Herein, we demonstrate films with good water vapor barrier properties, high transparency, and mechanical/thermal stability. Water vapor barrier films were prepared by the solution crystallization of siloxane hybrid lamellae. The films consist of highly crystallized organic/inorganic hybrid lamellae, which provide high transparency, hardness, and thermal stability and inhibit the permeation of water vapor. The water permeability of a 6 μm thick hybrid film is comparable to that of a 200 μm thick silicon rubber film. PMID:25296395

  5. Accessing siloxane functionalized polynorbornenes via vinyl-addition polymerization for CO2 separation membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori; Long, Brian K.; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Hong, Eunice; Maroon, Christopher R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, the vinyl addition polymerization of norbornylbased monomers bearing polar functional groups is often problematic, leading to low molecular weight polymers in poor yield. Herein, we provide proof-of-principle evidence that addition-type homopolymers of siloxane substituted norbornyl-based monomers may be readily synthesized using the catalyst trans-[Ni(C6F5)2(SbPh3)2]. Polymerizations using this catalyst reached moderate to high conversion in just 5 min of polymerization and produced siloxanesubstituted polymers with molecular weights exceeding 100 kg/mol. These polymers showed excellent thermal stability (Td ≥ 362 °C) and were cast into membranes that displayed high CO2 permeability and enhanced CO2/N2 selectivity as compared to related materials.

  6. An Investigation of Siloxane Cross-linked Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin/Copolymer Composites for Potential Orthopedic Applications().

    PubMed

    Dyke, Jason Christopher; Knight, Kelly Jane; Zhou, Huaxing; Chiu, Chi-Kai; Ko, Ching-Chang; You, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Causes of bone deficiency are numerous, but biomimetic alloplastic grafts provide an alternative to repair tissue naturally. Previously, a hydroxyapatite-gelatin modified siloxane (HAp-Gemosil) composite was prepared by cross-linking (N, N'-bis[(3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylene diamine (enTMOS) around the HAp-Gel nanocomposite particles, to mimic the natural composition and properties of bone. However, the tensile strength remained too low for many orthopedic applications. It was hypothesized that incorporating a polymer chain into the composite could help improve long range interaction. Furthermore, designing this polymer to interact with the enTMOS siloxane cross-linked matrix would provide improved adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic composite, and improve mechanical properties. To this end, copolymers of L-Lactide (LLA), and a novel alkyne derivatized trimethylene carbonate, propargyl carbonate (PC), were synthesized. Incorporation of PC during copolymerization affects properties of copolymers such as molecular weight, T(g), and % PC incorporation. More importantly, PC monomers bear a synthetic handle, allowing copolymers to undergo post-polymerization functionalization with graft monomers to specifically tailor the properties of the final composite. For our investigation, P(LLA-co-PC) copolymers were functionalized by an azido-silane (AS) via copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) through terminal alkyne on PC monomers. The new functionalized polymer, P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) was blended with HAp-Gemosil, with the azido-silane linking the copolymer to the silsesquioxane matrix within the final composite.These HAp-Gemosil/P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) composites were subjected to mechanical and biological testing, and the results were compared with those from the HAp-Gemosil composites. This study revealed that incorporating a cross-linkable polymer served to increase the flexural strength of the composite by 50%, while maintaining the biocompatibility of HAp

  7. An Investigation of Siloxane Cross-linked Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin/Copolymer Composites for Potential Orthopedic Applications†

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, Jason Christopher; Knight, Kelly Jane; Zhou, Huaxing; Chiu, Chi-Kai; Ko, Ching-Chang; You, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Causes of bone deficiency are numerous, but biomimetic alloplastic grafts provide an alternative to repair tissue naturally. Previously, a hydroxyapatite-gelatin modified siloxane (HAp-Gemosil) composite was prepared by cross-linking (N, N′-bis[(3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylene diamine (enTMOS) around the HAp-Gel nanocomposite particles, to mimic the natural composition and properties of bone. However, the tensile strength remained too low for many orthopedic applications. It was hypothesized that incorporating a polymer chain into the composite could help improve long range interaction. Furthermore, designing this polymer to interact with the enTMOS siloxane cross-linked matrix would provide improved adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic composite, and improve mechanical properties. To this end, copolymers of L-Lactide (LLA), and a novel alkyne derivatized trimethylene carbonate, propargyl carbonate (PC), were synthesized. Incorporation of PC during copolymerization affects properties of copolymers such as molecular weight, Tg, and % PC incorporation. More importantly, PC monomers bear a synthetic handle, allowing copolymers to undergo post-polymerization functionalization with graft monomers to specifically tailor the properties of the final composite. For our investigation, P(LLA-co-PC) copolymers were functionalized by an azido-silane (AS) via copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) through terminal alkyne on PC monomers. The new functionalized polymer, P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) was blended with HAp-Gemosil, with the azido-silane linking the copolymer to the silsesquioxane matrix within the final composite. These HAp-Gemosil/P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) composites were subjected to mechanical and biological testing, and the results were compared with those from the HAp-Gemosil composites. This study revealed that incorporating a cross-linkable polymer served to increase the flexural strength of the composite by 50%, while maintaining the biocompatibility of

  8. DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL, POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATE), POLYVINYL BUTYRAL RESIN AND POLYIMIDE AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R

    2008-01-01

    Performance of materials and their compatibility determine the size of the electrical insulation in power equipment. For this reason dielectric properties of electrical insulation materials are needed for low temperature power applications. In this work we report the dielectric properties of four polymers: polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polyvinyl butyral resin (PVB), and polyimide (PI--Kapton\\textregistered). The dielectric measurements are performed with an electrical impedance analyzer in the frequency domain. The impedances are recorded in a cryocooler in the temperature range from 45K to 350K. The dielectric breakdown characteristics of the polymers are measured in a liquid nitrogen bath at atmospheric pressure. It is observed that PI and \\pmma\\ dissolved in toluene have the lowest dielectric losses for temperatures lower than $100\\ \\kelvin$. \\Blx\\ and PI have the smallest spread in their breakdown strength data.

  9. Presence of Siloxanes in the Biogas of a Wastewater Treatment Plant Separation in Condensates and Influence of the Dose of Iron Chloride on its Elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Mariano, García; Daniel, Prats; Arturo, Trapote

    2015-12-21

    The siloxanes present in the biogas produced during anaerobic digestion damage the mechanism of cogeneration equipment and, consequently, negatively affect the energy valorization process. For this reason, the detection and elimination of these silicon-derived chemical compounds are a priority in the management of cogeneration facilities. In this regard, the objectives of this paper are, firstly, to characterize the siloxanes in the biogas and, secondly, to qualitatively evaluate the influence of the dose of iron chloride on its elimination. The research was performed at the Rincón de León Wastewater Treatment Plant (Alicante, Spain). The outflow biogas of the digesters and of the pressurized gasometers was sampled and analyzed. The results obtained made it possible to demonstrate, firstly, the absence of linear siloxanes and that, of the cyclic siloxanes, the predominant type was decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, and, secondly, that the addition of iron chloride in the digesters significantly reduces the siloxane content in the biogas. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the process of compression of the biogas, with the elimination of condensates, also produces significant reductions in the concentration of siloxanes in the biogas.

  10. Formation of Linear Polyenes in Thermal Dehydration of Polyvinyl Alcohol, Catalyzed by Phosphotungstic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain linear polyenes in polyvinyl alcohol films via acid-catalyzed thermal dehydration of the polyvinyl alcohol, we used phosphotungstic acid as the catalyst: a safe and heat-stable solid chemical compound. We established that phosphotungstic acid, introduced as solid nanoparticles into polyvinyl alcohol films, is a more effective dehydration catalyst than hydrochloric acid, since in contrast to HCl it does not evaporate from the film during heat treatment.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Plastic Deformation During Impression Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveena; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Mathew, M. D.

    2015-04-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis of plastic deformation associated with impression creep deformation of 316LN stainless steel was carried out. An axisymmetric FE model of 10 × 10 × 10 mm specimen with 1-mm-diameter rigid cylindrical flat punch was developed. FE simulation of impression creep deformation was performed by assuming elastic-plastic-power-law creep deformation behavior. Evolution of the stress with time under the punch during elastic, plastic, and creep processes was analyzed. The onset of plastic deformation was found to occur at a nominal stress about 1.12 times the yield stress of the material. The size of the developed plastic zone was predicted to be about three times the radius of the punch. The material flow behavior and the pile-up on specimen surface have been modeled.

  12. First impressions: gait cues drive reliable trait judgements.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, John C; Vuong, Quoc C; Atkinson, Anthony P

    2012-09-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances. Across three studies, we assessed the reliability of trait judgements of point-light walkers and identified motion-related visual cues driving observers' judgements. The findings confirm that observers make reliable, albeit inaccurate, trait judgements, and these were linked to a small number of motion components derived from a Principal Component Analysis of the motion data. Parametric manipulation of the motion components linearly affected trait ratings, providing strong evidence that the visual cues captured by these components drive observers' trait judgements. Subsequent analyses suggest that reliability of trait ratings was driven by impressions of emotion, attractiveness and masculinity. PMID:22717166

  13. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  14. Laboratory assessment of impression accuracy by clinical simulation.

    PubMed

    Wassell, R W; Abuasi, H A

    1992-04-01

    Some laboratory tests of impression material accuracy mimic the clinical situation (simulatory) while others attempt to quantify a material's individual properties. This review concentrates on simulatory testing and aims to give a classification of the numerous tests available. Measurements can be made of the impression itself or the resulting cast. Cast measurements are divided into those made of individual dies and those made of interdie relations. Contact measurement techniques have the advantage of simplicity but are potentially inaccurate because of die abrasion. Non-contact techniques can overcome the abrasion problem but the measurements, especially those made in three dimensions, may be difficult to interpret. Nevertheless, providing that care is taken to avoid parallax error non-contact methods are preferable as experimental variables are easier to control. Where measurements are made of individual dies these should include the die width across the finishing line, as occlusal width measurements provide only limited information. A new concept of 'differential die distortion' (dimensional difference from the master model in one plane minus the dimensional difference in the perpendicular plane) provides a clinically relevant method of interpreting dimensional changes. Where measurements are made between dies movement of the individual dies within the master model must be prevented. Many of the test methods can be criticized as providing clinically unrealistic master models/dies or impression trays. Phantom head typodonts form a useful basis for the morphology of master models providing that undercuts are standardized and the master model temperature adequately controlled. PMID:1564180

  15. Application of microwave irradiation for the removal of polychlorinated biphenyls from siloxane transformer and hydrocarbon engine oils.

    PubMed

    Antonetti, Claudia; Licursi, Domenico; Raspolli Galletti, Anna Maria; Martinelli, Marco; Tellini, Filippo; Valentini, Giorgio; Gambineri, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    The removal of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) both from siloxane transformer oil and hydrocarbon engine oil was investigated through the application of microwave (MW) irradiation and a reaction system based on polyethyleneglycol (PEG) and potassium hydroxide. The influence of the main reaction parameters (MW irradiation time, molecular weight of PEG, amount of added reactants and temperature) on the dechlorination behavior was studied. Promising performances were reached, allowing about 50% of dechlorination under the best experimental conditions, together time and energy saving compared to conventional heating systems. Moreover, an interesting dechlorination degree (up to 32%) was achieved for siloxane transformer oil when MW irradiation was employed as the unique driving force. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time in which MW irradiation is tested as the single driving force for the dechlorination of these two types of PCB-contaminated oils. PMID:27281539

  16. Thermally Stable Siloxane Hybrid Matrix with Low Dielectric Loss for Copper-Clad Laminates for High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Ho; Lim, Young-Woo; Kim, Yun Hyeok; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-04-01

    We report vinyl-phenyl siloxane hybrid material (VPH) that can be used as a matrix for copper-clad laminates (CCLs) for high-frequency applications. The CCLs, with a VPH matrix fabricated via radical polymerization of resin blend consisting of sol-gel-derived linear vinyl oligosiloxane and bulky siloxane monomer, phenyltris(trimethylsiloxy)silane, achieve low dielectric constant (Dk) and dissipation factor (Df). The CCLs with the VPH matrix exhibit excellent dielectric performance (Dk = 2.75, Df = 0.0015 at 1 GHz) with stability in wide frequency range (1 MHz to 10 GHz) and at high temperature (up to 275 °C). Also, the VPH shows good flame resistance without any additives. These results suggest the potential of the VPH for use in high-speed IC boards. PMID:26982015

  17. Synthesis of ethers by GaBr3 -catalyzed reduction of carboxylic acid esters and lactones by siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Ursula; Metzger, Jürgen O

    2014-02-01

    Ethers were synthesized by reduction of the respective esters catalyzed by gallium bromide (GaBr3 ) and using siloxanes, preferentially 1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane, as reductant. Methyl oleate, triglycerides, that is, tributyrine and glyceryl triundec-10-enoate as well as γ- and δ-lactones were converted into the respective ethers in high to moderate yields. γ-Lactones were reduced with high selectivity in the presence of a methyl ester functionality. The reduction has been carried out at room temperature or moderately elevated temperature of up to 60 °C using stoichiometric amounts of the reductant and 0.005-0.01 equiv of GaBr3 as catalyst per ester functionality without any solvent added. After a reaction time of 1-4 h the conversion of the substrate was 100 %. The product was separated from polymeric siloxanes formed as coupled product by simple distillation. PMID:24488681

  18. The Role of Profanity and Sex Variables in Interpersonal Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marshall M.; Saine, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to identify areas of research which may increase under standing of the relationship between speaker profanity and impression formation. Provides an experimental test of the predicted interrelationships between profanity, sex variables, and impression formation. (MH)

  19. Characterization and impression creep testing of silicon aluminum oxynitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Kevin M.

    2005-11-01

    Three Yb-containing SiAlON materials were studied for potential use as hot section components in advanced microturbine engines. Two of the materials consisted of equiaxed alpha-SiAlON grains, elongated beta-SiAlON grains, and an amorphous intergranular phase containing a relatively large amount of Yb. The third material consisted of alpha- and beta-SiAlON grains with equiaxed morphologies and virtually no intergranular phase. An instrument was designed and constructed for impression creep testing of the YbSiAlON materials. Uniaxial compression creep experiments were also performed for comparison. In compression creep, the SiAlON materials exhibited activation energies that were similar to those of other SiAlONs reports in the literature, and stress exponents that were approximately 1. In impression creep, the SiAlONs tested exhibited activation energies similar to those reported in the literature for SiAlONs tested in uniaxial compression and tension. However, the SiAlON composition with equiaxed beta-SiAlON grains showed an exaggerated activation energy due to a change in creep mechanism above 1340°C. The measured stress exponents in impression creep were approximately 2. The stress state present below the punch in impression creep caused dilation to occur in the grain structure. The dilation results in an increase in the volume of the multi-grain junctions, and an increased dependence of strain rate on stress. The enlarged multi-grain junctions can become filled with the intergranular glassy phase. These large pockets of the glassy phase can enable an additional creep mechanism whereby the equiaxed grains slide past each other viscously. All of the SiAlONs developed an additional volume of the intergranular glassy phase during creep testing. A microstructure containing elongated beta-SiAlON grains is most effective in enhancing creep performance of the Yb-SiAlON materials tested. The impression creep data for the Yb-SiAlON materials can be related to the

  20. Oxidation of siloxanes during biogas combustion and nanotoxicity of Si-based particles released to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tansel, Berrin; Surita, Sharon C

    2014-01-01

    Siloxanes have been detected in the biogas produced at municipal solid waste landfills and wastewater treatment plants. When oxidized, siloxanes are converted to silicon oxides. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the transformation of siloxanes and potential nanotoxicity of Si-based particles released to the atmosphere from the gas engines which utilize biogas. Data available from nanotoxicity studies were used to assess the potential health risks associated with the inhalation exposure to Si-based nanoparticles. Silicon dioxide formed from siloxanes can range from 5 nm to about 100 nm in diameter depending on the combustion temperature and particle clustering characteristics. In general, silicon dioxide particles formed during from combustion process are typically 40-70 nm in diameter and can be described as fibrous dusts and as carcinogenic, mutagenic, astmagenic or reproductive toxic (CMAR) nanoparticles. Nanoparticles deposit in the upper respiratory system, conducting airways, and the alveoli. Size ranges between 5 and 50 nm show effective deposition in the alveoli where toxic effects are higher. In this study the quantities for the SiO₂ formed and release during combustion of biogas were estimated based on biogas utilization characteristics (gas compositions, temperature). The exposure to Si-based particles and potential effects in humans were analyzed in relation to their particle size, release rates and availability in the atmosphere. The analyses showed that about 54.5 and 73 kg/yr of SiO₂ can be released during combustion of biogas containing D4 and D5 at 14.1 mg/m(3) (1 ppm) and 15.1 mg/m(3) (1ppm), respectively, per MW energy yield. PMID:24355797

  1. A Comparative Study on Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement of PMMA-Siloxane-Silica Anticorrosive Coatings.

    PubMed

    Harb, Samarah V; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V; Knowles, Kevin M; Hammer, Peter

    2016-06-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene oxide (GO) have been used to reinforce PMMA-siloxane-silica nanocomposites considered to be promising candidates for environmentally compliant anticorrosive coatings. The organic-inorganic hybrids were prepared by benzoyl peroxide (BPO)-induced polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) covalently bonded through 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPTS) to silica domains formed by hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide nanosheets were dispersed by surfactant addition and in a water/ethanol solution, respectively. These were added to PMMA-siloxane-silica hybrids at a carbon (CNT or GO) to silicon (TEOS and MPTS) molar ratio of 0.05% in two different matrices, both prepared at BPO/MMA molar ratios of 0.01 and 0.05. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed very smooth, homogeneous, and defect-free surfaces of approximately 3-7 μm thick coatings deposited onto A1020 carbon steel by dip coating. Mechanical testing and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed that both additives CNT and GO improved the scratch resistance, adhesion, wear resistance, and thermal stability of PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings. Results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution, discussed in terms of equivalent circuits, showed that the reinforced hybrid coatings act as a very efficient anticorrosive barrier with an impedance modulus up to 1 GΩ cm(2), approximately 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of bare carbon steel. In the case of GO addition, the high corrosion resistance was maintained for more than 6 months in saline medium. These results suggest that both carbon nanostructures can be used as structural reinforcement agents, improving the thermal and mechanical resistance of high performance anticorrosive PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings and thus extending their application range to abrasive environments. PMID:27266403

  2. Continuous microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride and compatibilization of polyvinyl chloride and polylactide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavesh

    This dissertation focuses on overcoming existing limitations of WPCs which prevent them from realizing their full market potential. These limitations include: (i) lack of a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and its composites using supercritical fluids to reduce the high density of the WPCs, (ii) need for an efficient coupling agent for WPCs to overcome the poor compatibility between wood and plastic, and (iii) unproven use of wood as a filler for the biopolymer polylactide (PLA) to make "green" composites. These limitations were addressed through experimentation to develop a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming, and through surface modification of wood flour using natural coupling agents. The effects of wood flour, acrylic modifier and plasticizer content on the rheological properties of PVC based WPCs were studied using an extrusion capillary rheometer and a two-level factorial design. Wood flour content and acrylic modifier content were the major factors affecting the die swell ratio. Addition of plasticizer decreased the true viscosity of unfilled and filled PVC, irrespective of the acrylic modifier content. However, the addition of acrylic modifier significantly increased the viscosity of unfilled PVC but decreased the composite viscosity. Results of the rheological study were used to set baseline conditions for the continuous extrusion foaming of PVC WPCs using supercritical CO 2. Effects of material composition and processing conditions on the morphology of foamed samples were investigated. Foamed samples were produced using various material compositions and processing conditions, but steady-state conditions could not be obtained for PVC. Thus the relationships could not be determined. Incompatibility between wood flour and PVC was the focus of another study. The natural polymers chitin and chitosan were used as novel coupling agents to improve interfacial adhesion between the polymer matrix

  3. Do first impressions count? Frailty judged by initial clinical impression predicts medium-term mortality in vascular surgical patients.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, B R; Batterham, A M; Hollingsworth, A C; Durrand, J W; Danjoux, G R

    2016-06-01

    Recognising frailty during pre-operative assessment is important. Frail patients experience higher mortality rates and are less likely to return to baseline functional status following the physiological insult of surgery. We evaluated the association between an initial clinical impression of frailty and all-cause mortality in 392 patients attending our vascular pre-operative assessment clinic. Prevalence of frailty assessed by the initial clinical impression was 30.6% (95% CI 26.0-35.2%). There were 133 deaths in 392 patients over a median follow-up period of 4 years. Using Cox regression, adjusted for age, sex, revised cardiac risk index and surgery (yes/no), the hazard ratio for mortality for frail vs. not-frail was 2.14 (95% CI 1.51-3.05). The time to 20% mortality was 16 months in the frail group and 33 months in the not-frail group. The initial clinical impression is a useful screening tool to identify frail patients in pre-operative assessment. PMID:27018374

  4. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in (gamma)-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2005-02-03

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters such as transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  5. Solid State NMR Measurements for Preliminary Lifetime Assessments in gamma-Irradiated and Thermally Aged Siloxane Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Herberg, J L; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S

    2004-11-29

    Siloxanes have a wide variety of applications throughout the aerospace industry which take advantage of their exceptional insulating and adhesive properties and general resilience. They also offer a wide range of tailorable engineering properties with changes in composition and filler content. They are, however, subject to degradation in radiatively and thermally harsh environments. We are using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to investigate changes in network and interfacial structure in siloxane elastomers and their correlations to changes in engineering performance in a series of degraded materials. NMR parameters such as transverse ( T{sub 2}) relaxation times, cross relaxation rates, and residual dipolar coupling constants provide excellent probes of changes crosslink density and motional dynamics of the polymers caused by multi-mechanism degradation. The results of NMR studies on aged siloxanes are being used in conjunction with other mechanical tests to provide insight into component failure and degradation kinetics necessary for preliminary lifetime assessments of these materials as well as into the structure-property relationships of the polymers. NMR and MRI results obtained both from high resolution NMR spectrometers as well as low resolution benchtop NMR screening tools will be presented.

  6. Determination of siloxanes and VOC in landfill gas and sewage gas by canister sampling and GC-MS/AES analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigkofler, M.; Niessner, R.

    1999-10-15

    Biogases such as landfill gas and sewage gas undergo a combustion process which is generating electric energy. Since several trace compounds such as siloxanes (also halogenated and sulfur compounds) are known to cause severe problems to these gas combustion engines, they are of particular interest. In this work, a new technique for sampling, identification, and quantification of siloxanes and volatile organic carbon (VOC) in landfill gas and sewage gas is presented. After sample collection using evacuated stainless steel canisters biogas was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy (GC-MS/AES). Using gas canisters, the sampling process was simplified (no vacuum pump needed), and multiple analysis was possible. The simultaneous application of MSD and AED allowed a rapid screening of silicon compounds in the complex biogases. Individual substances were identified independently both by MSD analysis and by determination of their elemental constitution. Quantification of trace compounds was achieved using a 30 component external standard containing siloxanes, organochlorine and organosulfur compounds, alkanes, terpenes, and aromatic compounds. Precision, linearity, and detection limits have been studied. In real samples, concentrations of silicon containing compounds (trimethylsilanol, hexamethyldisiloxane, octamethyltrisiloxane, decamethyltetrasiloxane, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane, octamethylcyclotetrasilioxane, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane) in the mg/m{sub 3} range have been observed.

  7. Comparison of laboratory and field testing performance evaluations of siloxane-polyurethane fouling-release marine coatings.

    PubMed

    Stafslien, Shane J; Sommer, Stacy; Webster, Dean C; Bodkhe, Rajan; Pieper, Robert; Daniels, Justin; Vander Wal, Lyndsi; Callow, Maureen C; Callow, James A; Ralston, Emily; Swain, Geoff; Brewer, Lenora; Wendt, Dean; Dickinson, Gary H; Lim, Chin-Sing; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming

    2016-09-01

    A series of eight novel siloxane-polyurethane fouling-release (FR) coatings were assessed for their FR performance in both the laboratory and in the field. Laboratory analysis included adhesion assessments of bacteria, microalgae, macroalgal spores, adult barnacles and pseudobarnacles using high-throughput screening techniques, while field evaluations were conducted in accordance with standardized testing methods at three different ocean testing sites over the course of six-months exposure. The data collected were subjected to statistical analysis in order to identify potential correlations. In general, there was good agreement between the laboratory screening assays and the field assessments, with both regimes clearly distinguishing the siloxane-polyurethane compositions comprising monofunctional poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) (m-PDMS) as possessing superior, broad-spectrum FR properties compared to those prepared with difunctional PDMS (d-PDMS). Of the seven laboratory screening techniques, the Cellulophaga lytica biofilm retraction and reattached barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) adhesion assays were shown to be the most predictive of broad-spectrum field performance. PMID:27494780

  8. Computer-Mediated Impression Formation: A Test of the Sticky Cues Model Using Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Heide, Brandon Lee

    2009-01-01

    This research offers a model of online impression formation that explains how different impression-bearing cues may carry more or less informational value. This research considers the possibility that impression-bearing cues have greater informational value when those cues are distinctive and are task-relevant. This research refers to such cues as…

  9. Electrical and Thermal Properties of Polyvinyl Acetal Based Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Pace, Marshall O

    2009-10-01

    A water chemistry procedure is used to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles which can later be blended with a polymer to form a nanodielectric. The synthesized nanoparticles are dispersed in two grades of polyvinyl acetal (commercially available under the trade names BX-L and KS-10, manufactured by SEKISUI Chemicals). Nanocomposite materials were prepared with 15 and 33 wt% titanium dioxide. The variation of the glass transition temperature with increasing filler weight fraction is presented. The dielectric breakdown strengths of the nanodielectric samples are reported. The presented results can be employed to optimize the dielectric properties of the studied nanocomposites for potential use in cryogenic high voltage applications.

  10. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  11. Memristive learning and memory functions in polyvinyl alcohol polymer memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yan; Liu, Yi; Xia, Yidong; Gao, Xu; Xu, Bo; Wang, Suidong; Yin, Jiang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2014-07-01

    Polymer based memristive devices can offer simplicity in fabrication and at the same time promise functionalities for artificial neural applications. In this work, inherent learning and memory functions have been achieved in polymer memristive devices employing Polyvinyl Alcohol. The change in conduction in such polymer devices strongly depends on the pulse amplitude, duration and time interval. Through repetitive stimuli training, temporary short-term memory can transfer into consolidated long-term memory. These behaviors bear remarkable similarities to certain learning and memory functions of biological systems.

  12. Nanodielectric system for cryogenic applications: Barium titanate filled polyvinyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Duckworth, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    In the current study the focus is on dielectric properties (as a function of frequency and temperature) of a polymeric composite system composed of polyvinyl alcohol and barium titanate nano powder. In the investigations, the temperature range is between 50-295 K, and the frequency range is between $20\\ \\hertz-1\\ \\mega\\hertz$. Polarization and conduction processes are investigated in the linear regime. Dielectric breakdown strengths of samples are also reported. The materials presented have potential to be implemented in cryogenic capacitor or field grading applications.

  13. Starch-polyvinyl alcohol cast film-performance and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liang; Imam, S.H.; Stein, T.M.

    1996-10-01

    Starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) cast films were prepared in the absence of plasticizer. Their physical and biodegradable properties were examined. Moisture absorption by the films was similar to that of PVOH at low humidity and increased linearly as the relative humidity increased. The tensile strength of the films decreased with increased humidity and did not display significant improvement with increased PVOH content. Higher PVOH content improved elongation when the relative humidity was 80% or higher. Biodegradation studies revealed that the presence of PVOH in the films slowed the rate of degradation.

  14. Corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusada, Kentaro

    The objective of this study is to evaluate corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments. Al5052-H3 and Al6061-T6 were selected as substrates, and HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13 developed in the Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory were selected for the siloxane ceramic/polymer coatings. The HCLCoat11 is a quasi-ceramic coating that has little to no hydrocarbons in its structure. The HCLCoat13 is formulated to incorporate more hydrocarbons to improve adhesion to substrate surfaces with less active functionalities. In this study, two major corrosion evaluation methods were used, which were the polarization test and the immersion test. The polarization tests provided theoretical corrosion rates (mg/dm 2/day) of bare, HCLCoat11-coated, and HCLCoat13-coated aluminum alloys in aerated 3.15wt% sodium chloride solution. From these results, the HCLCoat13-coated Al5052-H3 was found to have the lowest corrosion rate which was 0.073mdd. The next lowest corrosion rate was 0.166mdd of the HCLCoat11-coated Al5052-H3. Corrosion initiation was found to occur at preexisting breaches (pores) in the films by optical microscopy and SEM analysis. The HCLCoat11 film had many preexisting breaches of 1-2microm in diameter, while the HCLCoat13 film had much fewer preexisting breaches of less than 1microm in diameter. However, the immersion tests showed that the seawater immersion made HCLCoat13 film break away while the HCLCoat11 film did not apparently degrade, indicating that the HCLCoat11 film is more durable against seawater than the HCLCoat13. Raman spectroscopy revealed that there was some degradation of HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13. For the HCLCoat11 film, the structure relaxation of Si-O-Si linkages was observed. On the other hand, seawater generated C-H-S bonds in the HCLCoat13 film resulting in the degradation of the film. In addition, it was found that the HCLCoat11 coating had anti-fouling properties due to its high water contact

  15. Full arch scans: conventional versus digital impressions--an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ender, A; Mehl, A

    2011-01-01

    The digital intraoral impression has become a central part of the CAD/CAM technique. The objective of the present study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of digital impressions of the full arch with that of conventional impressions on the in-vitro model. For this purpose, a master model was acquired with a new reference scanning process, the measuring trueness of which was +/- 4.1 microm and the precision +/- 2.5 microm. On the one hand, conventional impressions and then plaster models (n = 5) were produced from this master model, and on the other hand, digital impressions were made with the Cerec AC Bluecam and the Lava COS system (each n = 5). The plaster models were also scanned with the reference scanner. The available data records were superimposed and the differences determined. The deviation from the master model defines the trueness of the impression method. The deviations of the models among one another demonstrate the precision of the method. The trueness of the impressions was 55 +/- 21.8 microm in the conventional impression group, for digital impressions with Cerec Bluecam it was 49 +/- 14.2 microm and for digital impressions with Lava COS 40.3 +/- 14.1 microm. The precision was 61.3 +/- 17.9 microm for conventional impression with Impregum, 30.9 +/- 7.1 microm for digital impression with the Cerec Bluecam and 60.1 +/- 31.3 microm for digital impression with Lava COS. These in-vitro results show that accuracy of the digital impression is similar to that of the conventional impression. These results will have to be confirmed in further clinical studies. PMID:21657122

  16. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator...) Reactor. The following requirements apply to reactors: (1) The concentration of vinyl chloride in each... is not to exceed 0.02 g vinyl chloride/kg (0.04 lb vinyl chloride/ton) of polyvinyl chloride...

  17. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator...) Reactor. The following requirements apply to reactors: (1) The concentration of vinyl chloride in each... is not to exceed 0.02 g vinyl chloride/kg (0.04 lb vinyl chloride/ton) of polyvinyl chloride...

  18. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator...) Reactor. The following requirements apply to reactors: (1) The concentration of vinyl chloride in each... is not to exceed 0.02 g vinyl chloride/kg (0.04 lb vinyl chloride/ton) of polyvinyl chloride...

  19. 77 FR 14342 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To Request Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... antidumping duty order on polyvinyl alcohol from Taiwan. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 77 FR 12559 (March 1, 2012... International Trade Administration Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To...

  20. 75 FR 38079 - Postponement of Preliminary Determination of Antidumping Duty Investigation: Polyvinyl Alcohol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...-Dumping Duty Investigation: Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan, 69 FR 59204 (October 4, 2004). On October 22... From Taiwan; Determination, 75 FR 15726 (March 30, 2010). The ITC notified the Department of its...: Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration,...

  1. 76 FR 42613 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Polyvinyl Chloride and Copolymers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Polyvinyl Chloride and Copolymers Production is being extended for 14 days. DATES: Comments. The public comment period for the proposed rule published May 20, 2011 (76 FR... Polyvinyl Chloride and Copolymers Production; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental...

  2. Wettability changes in polyether impression materials subjected to immersion disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shweta; Kamat, Giridhar; Shetty, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Disinfection of impression materials prevents cross-contamination; however, the disinfectants may alter the wettability property. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the wettability changes of polyether impression material after immersing in four different chemical disinfectant solutions for a period of 10 min and 30 min, respectively. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 samples of polyether dental impression material (Impregum soft, 3MESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were randomly divided into nine groups with five specimens each. Each specimen was disc shaped, flat of 32 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness. The samples were immersed in four disinfectant solutions: 2% Glutaraldehyde, 5% sodium hypochlorite, 0.05% iodophor, and 5.25% phenol for 10 min and 30 min, respectively. The control was without disinfection. Wettability of the samples was assessed by measuring the contact angle by using the Telescopic Goniometer. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (Fisher's test) and Tukey's post hoc test for multiple comparisons at 5% level of significance. Results: The contact angle of 20.21° ± 0.22° were recorded in the control samples. After 10 min, the samples that were immersed in 5% sodium hypochlorite and 5.25% phenol showed significant statistical increase in the contact angle as compared to the control (P < 0.001). After 30 min of disinfection, only the samples immersed in 0.05% iodophor showed there were no significant changes in the contact angle, whereas the other disinfectants significantly increased the contact angle and decreased the wettability of the polyether material. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, 2% glutaraldehyde proved safe for 10 min of immersion disinfection while 0.05% iodophor holds promise as an effective disinfectant without affecting the wettability of the material. PMID:24130593

  3. Preparation and application of low molecular weight poly(vinyl chloride). III mechanical properties of blended poly(vinyl chloride)

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kikuo; Maehala, Takashi; Mitani, Katsuo; Mizutani, Yukio )

    1993-11-05

    The blending effect of poly(vinyl chloride) with relatively higher molecular weight (HMW-PVC) and relatively lower molecular weight (LMW-PVC) has been investigated by measuring various mechanical properties: melt properties, tensile strength, tensile modulus, and impact strength. The blended PVC has slightly improved melt properties in comparison with the HMW-PVC used. The tensile strength of the blended PVC is related to the weight-average polymerization degree (Pw) of LMW-PVC and the LMW-PVC content. At the LMW-PVC content of 20%, the tensile strength of blended PVC is a maximum: approximately 58 MPa.

  4. Digital impression-taking: Fundamentals and benefits in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The digital era has burst into our offices in a big way. 3D camera technology has improved, enabling us to record our impressions and the occlusion in a digital format file. This file can then be used to make set-ups and manufacture orthodontic devices. Like any new technology, it needs to be studied and understood in order to grasp it fully and master the information and digital flow which can be generated between one's office and any external party involved in treatment, such as laboratories or other colleagues. PMID:27080602

  5. Sectional impression tray and sectional denture for a microstomia patient.

    PubMed

    Colvenkar, Shreya S

    2010-02-01

    Microstomia presents a unique challenge to the patient. Patients with microstomia who must wear removable dental prostheses often face the difficulty of being unable to insert or remove the prosthesis because of the constricted opening of the oral cavity. A completely edentulous patient, who developed microstomia along with Raynaud's phenomenon induced by scleroderma, is presented. This clinical report describes a quick and easy method for fabrication of a sectional custom impression tray connected by press button and a sectional complete denture retained by magnets. A sectional denture that provides ease in placement and removal can be successfully used in clinical practice for treatment of microstomia patients. PMID:19895427

  6. Basilar Invagination, Basilar Impression, and Platybasia: Clinical and Imaging Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; McVige, Jennifer; Mechtler, Laszlo

    2016-08-01

    The congenital and acquired deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), such as basilar invagination, basilar impression, or platybasia, can present in the form of slowly progressive or acute neurologic deterioration. In many cases, an insidious headache is the only symptom and can be a diagnostic challenge for the neurologist. Proper imaging studies as well as recognizing often associated neurologic or systemic conditions are required for early diagnosis and effective therapy. In the current report, the primary focus will be on clinical aspects of these CVJ abnormalities; the pathologic and radiologic aspects, such as developmental and pathophysiologic background or radiographic analysis, will be discussed briefly, confined to clinically relevant data. PMID:27344347

  7. Design, Implementation, and Opening to the Public of an Impression-Based Music Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Tadahiko; Ohta, Kimiko

    Impression-based music retrieval helps users in finding musical pieces that suit their preferences, feelings, or mental states from the huge volume of a music database. We have therefore developed an impression-based music retrieval system that enables this. Users are asked to select one or more pairs of impression words from the multiple pairs presented by the system and estimate each of the selected pairs on a seven-step scale in order to input their impressions into the system. For instance, if they want to locate musical pieces that will create a happy impression, they should check the radio button ``Happy'' in the impression scale, ``Very happy -- Happy -- A little happy -- Neutral -- A little sad -- Sad -- Very sad,'' where a pair of impression words with a seven-step scale is called an ``impression scale'' in this paper. The system would measure the distance between the impressions of every musical piece in a user-specified music database and the impressions inputted by the user, and determine candidate musical pieces to be presented as retrieval results. In this paper, we define the form of vectors that numerically express impressions of musical pieces, and propose a method of generating such a vector from a musical piece. The most significant attribute of this method is that it uses n-gram statistics of information on pitch, strength, and length of every tone in that musical piece as features extracted from it. We also present the results of evaluating the performance of the system.

  8. Remembering first impressions: Effects of intentionality and diagnosticity on subsequent memory

    PubMed Central

    Gilron, Roee; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    People rely on first impressions every day as an important tool to interpret social behavior. While research is beginning to reveal the neural underpinnings of first impressions, particularly through understanding the role of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), little is known about the way in which first impressions are encoded into memory. This is surprising because first impressions are relevant from a social perspective for future interactions, requiring that they be transferred to memory. The present study used a subsequent memory paradigm to test the conditions under which the dmPFC is implicated in the encoding of first impressions. We found that intentionally forming impressions engages the dmPFC more than incidentally forming impressions and that this engagement supports the encoding of remembered impressions. In addition, we found that diagnostic information, which more readily lends itself to forming trait impressions, engages the dmPFC more than neutral information. These results indicate that the neural system subserving memory for impressions is sensitive to consciously formed impressions. The results also suggest a distinction between a social memory system and other explicit memory systems governed by the medial temporal lobes. PMID:22139633

  9. A comparison of dimensional accuracy between three different addition cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Forrester-Baker, L; Seymour, K G; Samarawickrama, D; Zou, L; Cherukara, G; Patel, M

    2005-06-01

    Ten impressions of a metal implant abutment were made with each of three addition-cured silicone impression materials. Using the technique of co-ordinate metrology, the shoulder region of the abutment and corresponding regions of both impressions and dies made from these impressions were scanned and measured. Comparison of these measurements indicated that the mean dimension measured from the shoulder region for each group of impression materials was significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. However, when these impressions were cast in a gypsum based die material, none of the measured dimensions taken from the casts were significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. Thus, any change in measured dimensions occurring during impression making, was compensated for in some way by the casting process. PMID:16011234

  10. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found. PMID:26929957

  11. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 3: amino acid staining.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Savage, Kathleen; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2013-03-01

    Enhancement of footwear impressions, using ninhydrin or ninhydrin analogues is not considered common practice and such techniques are generally used to target amino acids present in fingermarks where the reaction gives rise to colour and possibly fluorescence. Ninhydrin and two of its analogues were used for the enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on various types, colours and porosities of fabric. Test footwear impressions on fabric were prepared using a specifically built rig to minimise the variability between each impression. Ninhydrin enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on light coloured fabric yielded good enhancement results, however the contrast was weak or non-existent on dark coloured fabrics. Other ninhydrin analogues which have the advantage of fluorescence failed to enhance the impressions in blood on all fabrics. The sequential treatment of impressions in blood on fabric with other blood enhancing reagents (e.g. protein stains and heme reagents) was also investigated. PMID:23380056

  12. Micro-fabricated polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) surfaces regulate the development of marine microbial biofilm communities.

    PubMed

    Ling, Gee Chong; Low, Min Hui; Erken, Martina; Longford, Sharon; Nielsen, Shaun; Poole, Andrew J; Steinberg, Peter; McDougald, Diane; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    This study explored an antifouling (AF) concept based on deployment of microfabricated polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) surfaces with 1-10 μm periodicity corrugated topographies in temperate marine waters. The effect of the surfaces on the development of microbial biofilms over 28 days and during different seasons, including both summer and winter, was examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as well as terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) analysis for phylogenetic fingerprinting. The microscale topography significantly impacted biofilm development by altering the attachment pattern and reducing microcolony formation on the 1, 2 and 4 μm PDMS surfaces. Also, field deployments over 28 days showed a significant reduction in biovolume on the 4 and 10 μm PDMS surfaces despite altered environmental conditions. The microfabricated PDMS surfaces further significantly impacted on the community composition of the biofilms, as revealed by changes in T-RF profiles, at different stages of development. Moreover, altered biofilm resistance was demonstrated by exposing pre-established biofilms on 10 μm micro-fabricated surfaces to enhanced flagellate predation by a heterotrophic protist, Rhynchomonas nasuta. Pronounced changes in the overall marine microbial biofilm development as well as community composition warrant exploring substratum modification for marine AF applications. PMID:24558964

  13. The effect of temperature on the electric conductivity of poly(dimethyl siloxane) ferromagnetic gel.

    PubMed

    Kubisz, L; Skumiel, A; Hornowski, T; Szlaferek, A; Pankowski, E

    2008-05-21

    In this paper the influence of temperature on the electrical conductivity of a ferromagnetic gel is investigated. The material used was poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) gel which contained randomly distributed magnetite nanosized particles. The electrical conductivity was measured by means of the two-point dc method. During the heating of the PDMS in the temperature range of 295-460 K the electrical conductivity increased from about 2 × 10(-12) to 2 × 10(-8) S m(-1). A study of the current-temperature dependence obtained during subsequent heating runs revealed two subranges of temperature characterized by different activation energies. The presence of these subranges could be explained either by the liberation of two different types of charge carrier or by the increase in the degree of polymer cross-linking. In the upper temperature subrange (420-460 K) both types of charge carrier probably contribute to the electrical conductivity of PDMS ferromagnetic gel. PMID:21694247

  14. Occurrence and seasonality of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes in Arctic air.

    PubMed

    Krogseth, Ingjerd S; Kierkegaard, Amelie; McLachlan, Michael S; Breivik, Knut; Hansen, Kaj M; Schlabach, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) are present in technical applications and personal care products. They are predicted to undergo long-range atmospheric transport, but measurements of cVMS in remote areas remain scarce. An active air sampling method for decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) was further evaluated to include hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6). Air samples were collected at the Zeppelin observatory in the remote Arctic (79° N, 12° E) with an average sampling time of 81 ± 23 h in late summer (August-October) and 25 ± 10 h in early winter (November-December) 2011. The average concentrations of D5 and D6 in late summer were 0.73 ± 0.31 and 0.23 ± 0.17 ng/m(3), respectively, and 2.94 ± 0.46 and 0.45 ± 0.18 ng/m(3) in early winter, respectively. Detection of D5 and D6 in the Arctic atmosphere confirms their long-range atmospheric transport. The D5 measurements agreed well with predictions from a Eulerian atmospheric chemistry-transport model, and seasonal variability was explained by the seasonality in the OH radical concentrations. These results extend our understanding of the atmospheric fate of D5 to high latitudes, but question the levels of D3 and D4 that have previously been measured at Zeppelin with passive air samplers. PMID:23194257

  15. Optical and mechanical behaviors of glassy silicone networks derived from linear siloxane precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heejun; Seo, Wooram; Kim, Hyungsun; Lee, Yoonjoo; Kim, Younghee

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-based inorganic polymers are promising materials as matrix materials for glass fiber composites because of their good process ability, transparency, and thermal property. In this study, for utilization as a matrix precursor for a glass-fiber-reinforced composite, glassy silicone networks were prepared via hydrosilylation of linear/pendant Si-H polysiloxanes and the C=C bonds of viny-lterminated linear/cyclic polysiloxanes. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of the cross-linked states, and a thermal analysis was performed. To assess the mechanical properties of the glassy silicone networks, we performed nanoindentation and 4-point bending tests. Cross-linked networks derived from siloxane polymers are thermally and optically more stable at high temperatures. Different cross-linking agents led to final networks with different properties due to differences in the molecular weights and structures. After stepped postcuring, the Young's modulus and the hardness of the glassy silicone networks increased; however, the brittleness also increased. The characteristics of the cross-linking agent played an important role in the functional glassy silicone networks.

  16. Ether and siloxane functionalized ionic liquids and their mixtures as electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Santosh N; Tiwari, Aarti; Nagaiah, Tharamani C; Mandal, Debaprasad

    2016-06-28

    The present study deals with an investigation of two novel imidazolium ionic liquids bearing ether-ether (1O2O2-Im-2O1) or ether-siloxane (1O2O2-Im-1SiOSi) functionalities with TFSI anion and their mixtures with propylene carbonate as electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries. The electrochemical stability and conductivity of these novel ILs were analyzed by electrochemical studies, such as cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and impedance measurements. The applicability of these ILs as electrolytes in Li-ion batteries was studied in the presence of a high concentration of LiTFSI (1 mol kg(-1) electrolyte) and the ether-ether IL was shown to possess a high electrochemical stability window (ESW) of 5.9 V and good conductivity of 2.2 mS cm(-1). The electrochemical stability and conductivity were further complimented by self-diffusion of different ions using pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR, viscosity and thermal properties like TGA and DSC analysis. More importantly, we explored the effect of temperature on the electrochemical stability and conductivity of these ILs by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:27004982

  17. Synthesis of a novel multi N-halamines siloxane precursor and its antimicrobial activity on cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Xu, Yan; Cai, Lu; Zang, Xiong; Li, Zhanxiong

    2014-09-01

    A novel N-halamine siloxane antibacterial precursor N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-N‧- (N″‧-heptylcarbamido-N″-ethyl)-butanediamide (TSHCEB) was synthesized and characterized in this study. The compound was then tethered to the surface of cotton fabrics through covalent ether linkages, followed by exposure to dilute sodium hypochlorite solutions to confer the cotton fabrics antibacterial property. The chemical structure of the monomer was confirmed by FTIR, 1H NMR and MS, and the surface of the treated cotton fabrics was characterized by FTIR, TGA, SEM, and XPS analysis. The antimicrobial cotton materials were then challenged with Gram-negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538). Results showed that it provided excellent antimicrobial properties against E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus via direct contacting for 2-15 min. The controlled release of diverse chlorines was proved by inhibition zone. The chlorine bonded to the coating was stable under standard washing test and routine storage, stability toward UVA irradiation was also investigated, and the lost chlorine could be regenerated by rechlorination. The new N-halamine antibacterial precursor can provide superior antibacterial property within a short contact time.

  18. Microscopic observation of unworn siloxane-hydrogel soft contact lenses by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Méijome, José M; López-Alemany, Antonio; Almeida, José B; Parafita, Manuel A; Refojo, Miguel F

    2006-02-01

    In the present study, samples of lotrafilcon A, balafilcon A, and galyfilcon A contact lenses were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in tapping mode at areas ranging from 0.25 to 400 microm2. Mean roughness (Ra), root-mean-square roughness (Rms) and maximum roughness (Rmax) in nanometers were obtained for the three lens materials at different magnifications. The three contact lenses showed significantly different surface topography. However, roughness values were dependent of the surface area to be analyzed. For a 1 microm2 area, statistics revealed a significantly more irregular surface of balafilcon A (Ra = 6.44 nm; Rms = 8.30 nm; Rmax = 96.82 nm) compared with lotrafilcon A (Ra = 2.40 nm; Rms = 3.19 nm; Rmax = 40.89 nm) and galyfilcon A (Ra = 1.40 nm; Rms = 1.79 nm; Rmax = 15.33 nm). Ra and Rms were the most consistent parameters, with Rmax presenting more variability for larger surface areas. The higher roughness of balafilcon A is attributed to the plasma oxidation treatment used to improve wettability. Conversely, galyfilcon A displays a smoother surface. Present observations could have implications in clinical aspects of siloxane-hydrogel contact lens wear such as lens spoliation, resistance to bacterial adhesion, or mechanical interaction with the ocular surface. PMID:16184533

  19. Nonfunctionalized Polydimethyl Siloxane Superhydrophobic Surfaces Based on Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Polizos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Aytug, Tolga; Kidder, Michelle; Messman, Jamie M; Sauers, Isidor

    2011-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces based on polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) were fabricated using a 50:50 PDM-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blend. PDMS was mixed with PEG, and incomplete phase separation yielded a hierarchic structure. The phase-separated mixture was annealed at a temperature close to the crystallization temperature of the PEG. The PEG crystals were formed isothermally at the PDMS/PEG interface, leading to an engineered surface with PDMS spherulites. The resulting roughness of the surface was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The PDMS spherulites, a few micrometers in diameter observed from SEM images, were found to have an undulated (rippled) surface with nanometer-sized features. The combination of micrometer- and nanometer-sized surface features created a fractal surface and increased the water contact angle (WCA) of PDMS more than 60, resulting in a superhydrophobic PDMS surface with WCA of >160 degrees. The active surface layer for the superhydrophobicity was approximately 100 mu m thick, illustrating that the material had bulk superhydrophobicity compared to conventional fluorocarbon or fluorinated coated rough surfaces. Theoretical analysis of the fractal surface indicates that the constructed surface has a fractal dimension of 2.5, which corresponds to the Apollonian sphere packing.

  20. Novel gelatin siloxane nanoparticles decorated by Tat peptide as vectors for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zu-yong; Zhao, Yang; Ren, Lei; Jin, Li-hua; Sun, Li-ping; Yin, Pei; Zhang, Ya-fei; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2008-11-01

    In principle, the technique of gene delivery involves taking complete or parts of genes that can code specific messages and delivering them to selected cells in the body. Such a transfer of plasmid DNA into mammalian cells has posed major challenges for gene therapy. A series of gelatin-siloxane nanoparticles (GS NPs) with controlled size and surface charge were synthesized through a two-step sol-gel process. In order to increase the efficiency of cellular uptake, HIV-derived Tat peptide was further grafted to GS NPs. In vitro co-location and endocytosis inhibition experiments suggested that the as-synthesized TG NPs may enter HeLa cells via a combined pathway of lipid-raft- and receptor-dependent endocytosis, and only cause little cell damage. Moreover, this study shows the encapsulation of a plasmid DNA in TG NPs to be obtained as a non-viral gene vector. This kind of encapsulation provides complete protection to the plasmid DNA from the external DNase and serum environment, and generates the hope that the resulting formulation can be developed into a potential vector for effective gene delivery. In order to check this potential, the reporter gene pSVβ-gal was encapsulated, and in vitro transfection efficiency of this system was found to be nearly 130% compared to the commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine™.

  1. Nanocomposite hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering: mesoporous silica nanofibers interlinked with siloxane derived polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Buchtová, Nela; Réthoré, Gildas; Boyer, Cécile; Guicheux, Jérôme; Rambaud, Frédéric; Vallé, Karine; Belleville, Philippe; Sanchez, Clément; Chauvet, Olivier; Weiss, Pierre; Le Bideau, Jean

    2013-08-01

    Injectable materials for mini-invasive surgery of cartilage are synthesized and thoroughly studied. The concept of these hybrid materials is based on providing high enough mechanical performances along with a good medium for chondrocytes proliferation. The unusual nanocomposite hydrogels presented herein are based on siloxane derived hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (Si-HPMC) interlinked with mesoporous silica nanofibers. The mandatory homogeneity of the nanocomposites is checked by fluorescent methods, which show that the silica nanofibres dispersion is realized down to nanometric scale, suggesting an efficient immobilization of the silica nanofibres onto the Si-HPMC scaffold. Such dispersion and immobilization are reached thanks to the chemical affinity between the hydrophilic silica nanofibers and the pendant silanolate groups of the Si-HPMC chains. Tuning the amount of nanocharges allows tuning the resulting mechanical features of these injectable biocompatible hybrid hydrogels. hASC stem cells and SW1353 chondrocytic cells viability is checked within the nanocomposite hydrogels up to 3 wt% of silica nanofibers. PMID:23666665

  2. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  3. Effect of siloxane emissions and water vapor on the determination of methanol emissions from a batch chemical manufacturing facility: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, K.R.; Traister, M.

    1996-12-31

    To identify potential emissions of HAPs, a batch chemical manufacturing facility in western New York conducted stationary source testing of a blending operation to determine emissions of methyl alcohol from the process. NIOSH Method 2000 was used to quantify emissions. The 1-hour blending operation applies a siloxane-containing spray to coat powdered materials that are mixed under controlled conditions. The siloxane reacts slowly with residual moisture in the powdered materials to form a triol. This reaction theoretically evolves and releases trace amounts of methyl alcohol. Initial source testing of methyl alcohol emissions indicated that approximately 0.002 kg/s were released, far exceeding expectations. Additional investigations were conducted. A review of NIOSH Method 2000 indicated that no interferences were known to occur, but the siloxane manufacturer said that siloxane would also react with the silica gel to form methyl alcohol. In addition, it was theorized that water vapor in the air stream was reacting with the siloxane spray to form methyl alcohol. 1 tab.

  4. Nanocomposites of ZnS and poly-(dimethyl)-block-(phenyl)siloxane as a new high-refractive-index polymer media

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe a new and original method to obtain transparent, siloxane-based composites, with high refractive index (up to 1.68). The method is based on the decomposition of Zn-siloxane, mixed with a poly-(dimethyl)-block-(phenyl)siloxane matrix in different ratios. It was found that after treatment of such mixed metal-containing polymer blend with H2S, the nanoparticles of ZnS are formed, with the size in a 1- to 5-nm range, which allow effective increase of the refractive index of the nanocomposite mixture with poly-(dimethyl)-block-(phenyl)siloxane without loss of film transparency. We succeded to increase the refractive index from 1.54 (pure matrix) up to 1.68 (composite with a ZnS content of 4.6 vol.%). The siloxane-based compositions are optically transparent, which makes it possible to use them as light-emitting diodes or solar cell sealants or adhesives. PMID:22401650

  5. Impression formation in children: influence of gender and expectancy.

    PubMed

    McAninch, C B; Manolis, M B; Milich, R; Harris, M J

    1993-10-01

    The effect of expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information on subsequent impression formation and recall of a target peer was examined. 64 boys and 50 girls (ages 8 to 12) were given an expectancy that a stimulus child was either shy or outgoing. Subjects rated the target on several dimensions (e.g., friendly, shy) and then watched a videotape of a boy or girl confederate acting out a script containing both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information. Subjects then rated the target child again and freely recalled as much of what the target said as they could remember. Results revealed that when children are presented with both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information, impression formation appears largely attribute based, and the influence of the initial expectancy appears mitigated. However, ratings of liking appeared to be more influenced by the initial expectancy than by subsequent behavioral information. In addition, the results indicated that many of Maccoby's conclusions regarding the effects of gender on social interactions also apply to children's social information processing, indicating a strong bias toward same-sex peers. PMID:8222885

  6. Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Involvement in Initial Negative Aesthetic Impression Formation

    PubMed Central

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Rosselló, Jaume; Flexas, Albert; Moratti, Stephan; Maestú, Fernando; Marty, Gisèle; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that aesthetic appreciation is related with activity in several different brain regions. The identification of the neural correlates of beauty or liking ratings has been the focus of most prior studies. Not much attention has been directed towards the fact that humans are surrounded by objects that lead them to experience aesthetic indifference or leave them with a negative aesthetic impression. Here we explore the neural substrate of such experiences. Given the neuroimaging techniques that have been used, little is known about the temporal features of such brain activity. By means of magnetoencephalography we registered the moment at which brain activity differed while participants viewed images they considered to be beautiful or not. Results show that the first differential activity appears between 300 and 400 ms after stimulus onset. During this period activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) was greater while participants rated visual stimuli as not beautiful than when they rated them as beautiful. We argue that this activity is associated with an initial negative aesthetic impression formation, driven by the relative hedonic value of stimuli regarded as not beautiful. Additionally, our results contribute to the understanding of the nature of the functional roles of the lOFC. PMID:22675517

  7. Chemical enhancement of soil based footwear impressions on fabric.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Dawson, Lorna; Daéid, Niamh Nic

    2012-06-10

    This study investigates the enhancement of footwear impressions prepared with soils from different locations on a variety of fabric surfaces with different morphology. Preliminary experiments using seventeen techniques were carried out and the best responding reagents were evaluated further. Results indicated that the soils investigated (a cross-section of soils from Scotland) are more likely to respond to reagents that target iron ions rather than calcium, aluminium or phosphorus ions. Furthermore, the concentration of iron and soil pH did not appear to have an effect on the performance of the enhancement techniques. For the techniques tested, colour enhancement was observed on all light coloured substrates while enhancement on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leatherette was limited due to poor contrast with the background. Of the chemical enhancement reagents tested, 2,2'-dipyridil was a suitable replacement for the more common enhancement technique using potassium thiocyanate. The main advantages are the use of less toxic and flammable solvents and improved clarity and sharpness of the enhanced impression. The surface morphology of the fabrics did not have a significant effect on the enhancement ability of the reagents apart from a slight tendency for diffusion to occur on less porous fabrics such as polyester and nylon/lycra blends. PMID:22153620

  8. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior. PMID:27217118

  9. Three dimensional visualization and comparison of impressions on fired bullets.

    PubMed

    Banno, Atsuhiko; Masuda, Tomohito; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2004-03-10

    Currently, optical devices, such as microscopes and CCD cameras, are utilized for identification of bullets and tool marks in the field of forensic science. While these optical methods are easily manageable and effective, they are under great influence of illumination condition. In other words, appearances of striations through these optical devices have possibility to be changed by lighting condition. Besides these appearance-based approaches, we can utilize three dimensional (3D) geometric data of tool marks that are free from lighting condition. In this study, we focused on 3D geometric data of landmark impressions on fired bullets for identification. We obtained the 3D surface data of tool marks by a confocal microscope and reconstructed virtual impressions on a PC monitor from the geometric data. Furthermore, the 3D data are exploited to numerical matching of two surface shapes. We also visualized the difference of two shapes. In order to do this, two surface models are aligned automatically. In this process, pairings of correspondent points on both surfaces are determined. Distance analysis between these pairs leads to a shape comparison. Since comparison results are visualized, they are intuitive and easily perceptive. PMID:15036444

  10. Fertilizing ROSES through the STEM: Interdisciplinary Modules as Pre-service Research Experiences for Secondary STEM Educators (IMPRESS-Ed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Wiita, P. J.; Benoit, M.; Magee, N.

    2013-01-01

    IMPRESS-Ed is a program designed to provide authentic summer research experiences in the space, earth, and atmospheric sciences for pre-service K-12 educators at Long Island University (LIU) and The College of New Jersey (TCNJ). In 2011 and 2012, the program involved five students and took place over eight weeks with recruitment occurring during the preceding academic year. The program was divided into two modules: A common core module and an individual mentored research experience. The common module consisted of three units focusing on data-driven pedagogical approaches in astrophysics, tectonophysics, and atmospheric science, respectively. The common module also featured training sessions in observational astronomy, and use of a 3D geowall and state of the art planetarium. Participants in the program are also offered the opportunity to utilize the available TCNJ facilities with their future students. The individual mentored research module matched student interests with potential projects. All five students demonstrated strong gains in earth and space science literacy compared to a baseline measurement. Each student also reported gaining confidence to incorporate data and research-driven instruction in the space and earth sciences into the K-12 STEM classroom setting. All five research projects were also quite successful: several of the students plan to continue research during the academic year and two students are presenting research findings as first authors here at AAS. Other research results are likely to be presented at this year's American Geophysical Union meeting.

  11. Valence processing of first impressions in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chi-Lin; Wang, Min-Ying; Hu, Jon-Fan

    2016-05-25

    Previous studies have suggested that the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) plays a central role in processing first impressions; however, little is known about how dmPFC processes different valences of first impressions. Moreover, it is still unclear as to whether the dmPFC shows lateralization or only induces different levels of activation when processing positive and negative impressions. To address these questions in the present study, the brain activities for the impression judgments expressed by participants were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. For each real facial picture, participants were asked to evaluate their first impressions on a scale from 'bad' to 'good' using a keyboard. The results showed that although the right dmPFC has a higher sensitivity in processing impressions, both the hemispheres of dmPFC showed a significant trend where the activation of positive impressions was higher than the negative ones. Accordingly, it is proposed that the dmPFC acts as a single mechanism responsible for delineating the processing of first impressions rather than two lateralized systems. Therefore, a 'positivity dominance hypothesis' is also proposed, which states that dmPFC in both hemispheres have a higher sensitivity and priority for positive impressions than negative ones. The present study provides valuable findings with respect to the role of the dmPFC in the processes of first impression formation. PMID:27035730

  12. Ultraviolet light stable and transparent sol-gel methyl siloxane hybrid material for UV light-emitting diode (UV LED) encapsulant.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun-Young; Kim, YongHo; Kim, HweaYoon; Kim, YuBae; Jin, Jungho; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2015-01-21

    An ultraviolet (UV) transparent and stable methyl-siloxane hybrid material was prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The transparency and stability of a UV-LED encapsulant is an important issue because it affects UV light extraction efficiency and long-term reliability. We introduced a novel concept for UV-LED encapsulation using a thermally curable oligosiloxane resin. The encapsulant was fabricated by a hydrosilylation of hydrogen-methyl oligosiloxane resin and vinyl-methyl siloxane resin, and showed a comparable transmittance to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in the UVB (∼300 nm) region. Most remarkably, the methyl-siloxane hybrid materials exhibited long-term UV stability under light soaking in UVB (∼300 nm) for 1000 h. PMID:25564875

  13. Polyvinyl chloride meat-wrapping film study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervort, R.

    1988-01-01

    As a result of worker complaints in the Baltimore, Maryland area, potential health hazards associated with the use of polyvinyl-chloride film for wrapping meat were reviewed. Fumes generated during the meat-wrapping process were causing concern among the workers as they experienced respiratory irritation and distress. It appeared that only some of the meat wrappers experienced difficulty, only some of the rolls of film-produced irritations in the affected workers, and affected workers had prior histories of respiratory difficulties. Fumes were generated during hot-wire film cutting. The amount of fume generated depended significantly on the care taken during the operation. If the dispensing machines were improperly adjusted, large amounts of fumes could be obtained during the cutting process. The author concludes that the amounts of these chemicals released during this operation does not constitute a health hazard to the employees. It may be necessary, however, to remove persons with prior respiratory irritation from this particular job location.

  14. Silver Nanoparticle Fabrication by Laser Ablation in Polyvinyl Alcohol Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimah Mohamed., K.; Mahmoud Goodarz, Naseri; Amir, Reza Sadrolhosseini; Arash, Dehzangi; Ahmad, Kamalianfar; Elias, B. Saion; Reza, Zamiri; Hossein Abastabar, Ahangar; Burhanuddin, Y. Majlis

    2014-07-01

    A laser ablation technique is applied for synthesis of silver nanoparticles in different concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) aqueous solution. The ablation of high pure silver plate in the solution is carried out by a nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG pulsed laser. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy are implemented to explore the particles sizes. The effects of PVA concentrations on the absorbance of the silver nanoparticles are studied as well, by using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The preparation process is carried out for deionized water as a reference sample. The comparison of the obtained results with the reference sample shows that the formation efficiency of nanoparticles in PVA is much higher and the sizes of particles are also smaller.

  15. Early malfunction of polyvinyl alcohol membrane of septal occluder.

    PubMed

    Ramoğlu, Mehmet G; Uçar, Tayfun; Tutar, Ercan

    2016-03-01

    Percutaneous device closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) is now considered the choice of treatment. Numerous devices with advantages/disadvantages are currently available and under development. Cardia Ultrasept II ASD occluder has a nitinol frame covered with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) membrane. Here, a well-documented case of early malfunction of PVA membrane detected in the first week of implantation in a 4-year-old male patient, who underwent an uneventful device closure with 20 mm Cardia Ultrasept II ASD Occluder, is presented. One week after implantation left-to-right shunt through the device was detected and the explantation of device revealed PVA membrane with multiple perforations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26106065

  16. Vitrification of Polyvinyl Chloride Waste from Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Jiawei; Choi, Kwansik; Yang, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Myung-Chan; Song, Myung-Jae

    2000-02-15

    Vitrification is considered as an economical and safe treatment technology for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated from nuclear power plants (NPPs). Korea is in the process of preparing for its first ever vitrification plant to handle LLW from its NPPs. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) has the largest volume of dry active wastes and is the main waste stream to treat. Glass formulation development for PVC waste is the focus of study. The minimum additive waste stabilization approach has been utilized in vitrification. It was found that glasses can incorporate a high content of PVC ash (up to 50 wt%), which results in a large volume reduction. A glass frit, KEP-A, was developed to vitrify PVC waste after the optimization of waste loading, melt viscosity, melting temperature, and chemical durability. The KEP-A could satisfactorily vitrify PVC with a waste loading of 30 to 50 wt%. The PVC-frit was tolerant of variations in waste composition.

  17. Exposure to chemical additives from polyvinyl chloride polymer extrusion processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, C.S.

    1989-12-01

    The report presents a model to predict worker inhalation exposure due to off-gassing of additives during polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extrusion processing. Data on off-gassing of additives were reviewed in the literature, the off-gassing at normal PVC processing temperatures was studied in the laboratory, process variables were estimated from an equipment manufacturer survey, and worker-activities and possible exposure sources were observed in an industrial survey. The purpose of the study was to develop a theoretical model to predict worker inhalation exposure to additives used during PVC extrusion processing. A model to estimate the generation rate of the additive from the polymer extrudate was derived from the mass transport equations governing diffusion. The mass flow rate, initial additive volatile weight fraction, off-gassing time, diffusivity, and slab thickness are required to determine the generation rate from the model.

  18. Micropatterning of silver nanoclusters embedded in polyvinyl alcohol films.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Nazanin; Kunwar, Puskal; Hassinen, Jukka; Ras, Robin H A; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Direct laser writing has been utilized to fabricate highly photostable fluorescent nanocluster microstructures in an organic polymer poly(methacrylic acid), where the carboxyl functional group is reported to play a vital role in nanocluster stabilization. In this Letter, we demonstrate that not only the polymer containing the carboxyl functional group, but also the polymer comprising the hydroxyl group, namely polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), can act as an appropriate stabilizer matrix for laser-induced synthesis and patterning of silver nanoclusters. The as-formed nanoclusters in the PVA film exhibit broadband emission and photostability comparable to the nanoclusters formed in the poly(methacrylic acid) polymer. As PVA is a widely used, nontoxic, biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, the technique of patterning fluorescent nanoclusters in PVA thin films is expected to find numerous applications in fields like fluorescence imaging, biolabeling, and sensing. PMID:27472635

  19. Friction loss in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Ojima, J

    1996-01-01

    In order to design proper ductwork for a local exhaust system, airflow characteristics were investigated in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). A linear decrease in static pressure was observed downstream at points from the opening of the VU pipes (JIS K 6741) located at distances greater than 10 times the pipe diameter, for velocities ranging between 10.18-36.91 m/s. Roughness inside pipes with small diameters was found to be 0.0042-0.0056 mm and the friction factor was calculated on the basis of Colebrook's equation for an airflow transition zone. An extended friction chart was then constructed on the basis of the roughness value and the friction factor. This chart can be applied when designing a local exhaust system with the ducts of diameters ranging from 40 to 900 mm. The friction loss of the PVC pipe was found to be approximately 2/3 of that of a galvanized steel pipe. PMID:8768669

  20. End-of-life of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) model comparing the waste management options for starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymers including landfill, anaerobic digestion (AD), industrial composting and home composting. The ranking of biological treatment routes for starch-PVOH biopolymer wastes depended on their chemical compositions. AD represents the optimum choice for starch-PVOH biopolymer containing N and S elements in global warming potential (GWP(100)), acidification and eutrophication but not on the remaining impact categories, where home composting was shown to be a better option due to its low energy and resource inputs. For those starch-PVOH biopolymers with zero N and S contents home composting delivered the best environmental performance amongst biological treatment routes in most impact categories (except for GWP(100)). The landfill scenario performed generally well due largely to the 100-year time horizon and efficient energy recovery system modeled but this good performance is highly sensitive to assumptions adopted in landfill model. PMID:23131650

  1. Dancing on coke: smuggling cocaine dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Maudens, Kristof E; Lambert, Willy E; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Risseeuw, Martijn D P; Van hee, Paul; Covaci, Adrian; Neels, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Recent trends suggest that cocaine smugglers have become more and more inventive to avoid seizures of large amounts of cocaine transported between countries. We report a case of a mail parcel containing a dance pad which was seized at the Customs Department of Brussels Airport, Belgium. After investigation, the inside of the dance pad was found to contain a thick polymer, which tested positive for cocaine. Analysis was performed using a routine colorimetric swipe test, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The polymer was identified as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and contained 18% cocaine, corresponding to a street value of € 20,000. Laboratory experiments showed that cocaine could be easily extracted from the PVA matrix. This case report reveals a new smuggling technique for the transportation of large amounts of cocaine from one country to another. PMID:22040352

  2. Evaluation of a Polyvinyl Toluene Neutron Counter Array

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to simulate the performance of a neutron detector array for empirical configuration optimization and preliminary algorithm evaluation. Utilizing a compact array of borated Polyvinyl Toluene light pipes and Photomultiplier Tubes, pulse shape analysis, standard spectral histogramming, and multiplicity counting can enable neutron measurements for multiple applications. Results demonstrate that analysis with Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) can be used to obtain a better understanding of field measurement results and aid in algorithm development for unfolding in conjunction with detector optimization. Use of a handheld neutron spectrometer has promise of widespread applicability. By correlating MCNP results with empirical measurements, substantial confidence can be placed on predicting detector response to sufficiently similar spectral sources under alternate experimental configurations. In addition, use of the detector has substantial promise for operational health physics applications.

  3. Polyvinyl alcohol coating of polystyrene inertial confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annamalai, P.; Lee, M. C.; Crawley, R. L.; Downs, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target made of polystyrene is first levitated in an acoustic field. The surface of the target is then etched using an appropriate solution (e.g., cyclohexane) to enhance the wetting characteristics. A specially prepared polyvinyl alcohol solution is atomized using an acoustic atomizer and deposited on the surface of the target. The solution is air dried to form a thin coating (2 microns) on the target (outside diameter of about 350-850 microns). Thicker coatings are obtained by repeated applications of the coating solutions. Preliminary results indicate that uniform coatings may be achievable on the targets with a background surface smoothness in the order of 1000 A.

  4. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1982-01-01

    Cross-linking methods were investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. The pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide - zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  5. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1983-01-01

    Cross-linking methods have been investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. Then pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide-zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  6. Growth characteristics of selected fungi on polyvinyl film

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, W.T.; Davidson, P.M.

    1986-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if plasticized polyvinyl chloride film would support the growth of any of nine species of fungi. The film was suspended in distilled water with no nutrients or with glucose or ammonium sulfate. Spores of each of the test species were inoculated into the suspension medium, and the mixture was incubated at 30/sup 0/C for up to 18 weeks. Most species were found to be capable of utilizing the film for carbon or nitrogen when the other nutrient was supplied. Only two species, Aspergillus fischeri and Paecilomyces sp., were found to be capable of utilizing components of the film without added nutrients. Components of the polyvinyl chloride film were then incorporated into mineral salts medium to determine if these components could serve as carbon sources in the presence of ammonium nitrate. The only component found to be utilized by all the fungi as a carbon source was epoxidized oil, a plasticizer-stabilizer. Calcium-zinc stearate was an available carbon source for all except the Penicillium and Verticillium strains. The only other component utilized was a stearamide, which was metabolized solely by the Aspergillus sp. Only the stearamide contained enough nitrogen to serve as a primary source in the film. The compound, however, did not support growth of fungi in the presence of glucose. It was theorized that either the nitrogen of the stearamide was more readily available to the fungi in the whole film due to the presence of trace nutrients or the nitrogen was supplied by exogenous sources.

  7. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from DFT Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; Hock, Adam S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activity of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. The molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.

  8. Influence of Variations in Liquid-Crystalline Content upon the Self-Assembly Behavior of Siloxane-Based Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Verploegen,E.; Zhang, T.; Murlo, N.; Hammond, P.

    2008-01-01

    A series of well-defined smectic side chain liquid-crystalline (LC) block copolymers with a low glass transition (Tg) siloxane block has been synthesized via anionic polymerization; these systems consist of a glassy polystyrene block and a unique low glass transition temperature LC block based on poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) to which six different LCs have been synthesized and attached. The synthesis techniques used provide systematic control over covalent LC side chain content, allowing for a range of morphologies to be obtained from a single block copolymer backbone during a one-step LC attachment reaction. Variations in the LC structure and content significantly affect the morphology of the LC mesophase, allowing the smectic-to-isotropic transition temperature to be tuned from room temperature up to 150 C. There are two key driving forces in the self-assembly behavior of these materials that are significantly affected by the LC content. The first is the segmental interaction parameter (?) between the blocks, which is a function of the amount of LC attached to the siloxane block. The attachment percent of the LCs to the siloxane block determines the packing density, which affects the stability of the LC mesophase and its interactions with the inter-material dividing surface. The self-assembled morphologies are characterized as a function of LC content and the mechanisms for the observed behavior are detailed. Additional insights into the interactions between the LC and block copolymer mesophases are gained by investigating the morphologies in response to mechanical deformation. The elastic modulus of this system can be tailored over several orders of magnitude by controlling the LC content, and the thermo-mechanical behavior is also highly dependent. The ability to precisely control the degree of LC functionalization enables the custom design and tailoring of material properties for specific applications such as electro-mechanical, damping, and mechano

  9. Impressions of the Meson Spectrum: Hybrids & Exotics, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    It has long been expected that the spectrum of hadrons in QCD would be far richer and extensive than experiment has so far revealed. While there have been experimental hints of this richness for some time, it is really only in the last few years that dramatic progress has been seen in the exploration both experimentally and in calculations on the lattice. Precision studies enabled by new technology both with detectors and high performance computations are converging on an understanding of the spectrum in strong coupling QCD. These methodologies are laying the foundation for a decade of potential discovery that electro and photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab, which when combined with key results on B and charmonium decays from both e+e- and pp colliders, should turn mere impressions of the light meson spectrum into a high definition picture.

  10. Neuro-impressions: interpreting the nature of human creativity

    PubMed Central

    Siler, Todd Lael

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the creative process is essential for realizing human potential. Over the past four decades, the author has explored this subject through his brain-inspired drawings, paintings, symbolic sculptures, and experimental art installations that present myriad impressions of human creativity. These impressionistic artworks interpret rather than illustrate the complexities of the creative process. They draw insights from empirical studies that correlate how human beings create, learn, remember, innovate, and communicate. In addition to offering fresh aesthetic experiences, this metaphorical art raises fundamental questions concerning the deep connections between the brain and its creations. The author describes his artworks as embodiments of everyday observations about the neuropsychology of creativity, and its all-purpose applications for stimulating and accelerating innovation. PMID:23091455

  11. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    PubMed

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing. PMID:24950389

  12. Study on impression smears of hepatic coccidiosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sivajothi, S; Reddy, B Sudhakara; Rayulu, V C

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic coccidiosis is a contagious and lethal disease condition in rabbits. The disease was recorded in six rabbits suffering with watery diarrhoea. Clinically, affected rabbits showed decreased growth rate, anorexia, debilitation, diarrhea and rough hair coat. Examination of the faecal samples revealed the presence of unsporulated oocysts of Eimeria spp. After sporulation Eimeria stiedae oocysts were identified. Postmortem examination revealed hepatomegaly with presence of discrete yellowish-white nodules on the surface of the liver. Impression smears from the liver revealed the presence of numerous developmental stages of E. stiedae corresponding with the stage of the liver lesion and also represent the histological changes of the liver. Rabbits were treated with a combination of sulphaquinoxaline and diaveridine for five days. PMID:27605807

  13. Effects of Exposure to Advertisements on Audience Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Mie; Kasuga, Masao; Nagao, Yoshihide; Shono, Toru; Norose, Yuka; Oku, Ritsuya; Nogami, Akira; Miyazawa, Yoshitaka

    This study investigated effects of listening and/or watching commercial-messages (CMs) on audience impressions. We carried out experiments of TV advertisements presentation in conditions of audio only, video only, and audio-video. As results, we confirmed the following two effects: image-multiple effect, that is, the audience brings to mind various images that are not directly expressed in the content, and marking-up effect, that is, the audience concentrates on some images that are directly expressed in the content. The image-multiple effect, in particular, strongly appeared under the audio only condition. Next, we investigated changes in the following seven subjective responses; usage image, experience, familiarity, exclusiveness, feeling at home, affection, and willingness to buy, after exposure to advertisements under conditions of audio only and audio-video. As a result, noting that the image-multiple effect became stronger as the evaluation scores of the responses increased.

  14. Salaried general practice in Czechoslovakia: personal observations and impressions.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, B

    1993-01-01

    In 1991, a visit was undertaken, to the former Czechoslovakia, during which discussions were held with general practitioners. Some personal observations and impressions from the visit are presented. For four decades, salaried general practice was a feature of the Czechoslovakian health care system. Primary health care comprised three strands: paediatric services, an occupational health service and community general practitioner care. The main point of service delivery was the polyclinic which, although being large and impersonal, provided easy access to other primary and secondary services. General practitioners, over half of whom were women, had regular leave entitlement and predictable hours of work, out of hours work being provided through separate contracts based on primary care emergency centres. However, doctors were poorly paid compared with industrial workers. Following the 'velvet revolution' in 1989, all aspects of the health service have been subject to major review, and salaried general practice is likely to give way to a more entrepreneurial system. PMID:8251221

  15. Dynamics of conjunctival impression cytologic changes after vitamin A supplementation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Kumar, R; Ganguly, N K; Kumar, L; Verma, M; Walia, B N

    1997-06-01

    To investigate the chronological changes in conjunctival epithelium after supplementation with a massive oral dose of vitamin A, conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) with transfer was carried out repeatedly among 200 children aged 6-120 months in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Chandigarh (India). Significant conversion to normal CIC started 71-80 d after vitamin A supplementation and by 101-110 d conversion had taken place in all children. Compared with the placebo group, plasma retinol concentration at 100 d post-supplement was found to be significantly higher in the vitamin A-supplemented group P = 0.04. This study demonstrates that CIC responds to a massive oral dose of vitamin A 3-4 months after supplementation. These findings should guide future studies and evaluations in which CIC is used to assess response to vitamin A interventions. PMID:9227184

  16. Optical impression systems for CAD-CAM restorations.

    PubMed

    Galhano, Graziela Ávila Prado; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli

    2012-11-01

    Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing images can be taken through either direct or indirect imaging. For the indirect systems, the digitalization is obtained from the impression material or cast, and for the direct ones the image is taken directly from the mouth using intraoral scanners.The direct acquisition systems have been constantly improved because these are less invasive, quicker, and more precise than the conventional method. Besides, the digital images can be easily stored for a long time. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to describe and discuss based on the literature the main direct image acquisition systems available on the market: CEREC Bluecam (Sirona), Lava C.O.S. System (3M ESPE), iTero System (Cadent/Straumann), and E4D System (D4D Technologies). PMID:23172483

  17. Impression Creep Behavior of a Cast AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirian, F.; Mahmudi, R.

    2009-01-01

    The creep behavior of the cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated by impression testing. The tests were carried out under constant punching stress in the range 100 to 650 MPa, corresponding to 0.007 ≤ σ imp/ G ≤ 0.044, at temperatures in the range 425 to 570 K. Assuming a power-law relationship between the impression velocity and stress, depending on the testing temperature, stress exponents of 4.2 to 6.0 were obtained. When the experimental creep rates were normalized to the grain size and effective diffusion coefficient, a stress exponent of approximately 5 was obtained, which is in complete agreement with stress exponents determined by the conventional creep testing of the same material reported in the literature. Calculation of the activation energy showed a slight decrease in the activation energy with increasing stress such that the creep-activation energy of 122.9 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.020 decreases to 94.0 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.040. Based on the obtained stress exponents and activation energy data, it is proposed that dislocation climb is the controlling creep mechanism. However, due to the decreasing trend of creep-activation energy with stress, it is suggested that two parallel mechanisms of lattice and pipe-diffusion-controlled dislocation climb are competing. To elucidate the contribution of each mechanism to the overall creep deformation, the creep rates were calculated based on the effective activation energy. This yielded a criterion that showed that, in the high-stress regimes, the experimental activation energies fall in the range in which the operative creep mechanism is dislocation climb controlled by dislocation pipe diffusion. In the low-stress regime, however, the lattice-diffusion dislocation climb is dominant.

  18. In situ self cross-linking of polyvinyl alcohol battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Hsu, L. C.; Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A battery separator was produced from a polyvinyl alcohol sheet structure which was subjected to an in situ, self crosslinking process by selective oxidation of the 1,2 diol units present in the polyvinyl alcohol sheet structure. The 1,2 diol units were cleaved to form aldehyde end groups which subsequently crosslink through acetalization of the 1,3 diol units of the polyvinyl alcohol. Selective oxidation was achieved using a solution of a suitable oxidizing agent such as periodic acid or lead tetraacetate.

  19. Paper based colorimetric biosensing platform utilizing cross-linked siloxane as probe.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miao; Yang, Minghui; Zhou, Feimeng

    2014-05-15

    Paper based colorimetric biosensing platform utilizing cross-linked siloxane 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTMS) as probe was developed for the detection of a broad range of targets including H2O2, glucose and protein biomarker. APTMS was extensively used for the modification of filter papers to develop paper based analytical devices. We discovered when APTMS was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA), the resulting complex (APTMS-GA) displays brick-red color, and a visual color change was observed when the complex reacted with H2O2. By integrating the APTMS-GA complex with filter paper, the modified paper enables quantitative detection of H2O2 through the monitoring of the color intensity change of the paper via software Image J. Then, with the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) onto the modified paper, glucose can be detected through the detection of enzymatically generated H2O2. For protein biomarker prostate specific antigen (PSA) assay, we immobilized capture, not captured anti-PSA antibody (Ab1) onto the paper surface and using GOx modified gold nanorod (GNR) as detection anti-PSA antibody (Ab2) label. The detection of PSA was also achieved via the liberated H2O2 when the GOx label reacted with glucose. The results demonstrated the possibility of this paper based sensor for the detection of different analytes with wide linear range. The low cost and simplicity of this paper based sensor could be developed for "point-of-care" analysis and find wide application in different areas. PMID:24361420

  20. Amperometric biosensors for glucose, lactate, and glycolate based on oxidases and redox-modified siloxane polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, P.D.; Inagaki, Toru; Lee, Hung Sui; Skotheim, T.A.; Karan, Hiroko I.; Okamoto, Yoshi; Medgar Evers Coll., Brooklyn, NY . Div. of Natural Science and Mathematics; Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    Amperometric biosensors based on flavin-containing oxidases undergo several steps which produce a measurable current that is related to the concentration of substrate. In the initial step, the substrate converts the oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or flavin mononucleotide (FMN) into the reduced form (FADH{sub 2} or FMNH{sub 2}). Because these cofactors are located well within the enzyme molecule, direct electron transfer to the surface of a conventional electrode does not occur to a measurable degree. A common method of facilitating this electron transfer is to introduce oxygen into the system because it is the natural acceptor for the oxidases; the oxygen is reduced by the FADH{sub 2} or FMNH{sub 2} to hydrogen peroxide, which can then be detected electrochemically. The major drawback to this approach is the fact that oxidation of hydrogen peroxide requires a large overpotential, thus making these sensors susceptible to interference from electroactive species. To lower the necessary applied potential, several non-physiological redox couples have been employed to shuttle electrons between the flavin moieties and the electrode. For example, sensors based on the ferrocene/ferricinium redox couple and on electrodes consisting of conducting salts such as TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane) have previously been reported. Electron relays have also been attached directly to the enzyme molecule to facilitate electron transfer. More recently, these studies have been extended to include systems where the mediating redox species are covalently attached to polymers such as poly(pyrrole), poly(vinylpyridine), and poly(siloxane). The present paper describes the development of amperometric biosensors based on flavin-containing enzymes and this latter family of polymeric mediators. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Evaluation of adsorbents for volatile methyl siloxanes sampling based on the determination of their breakthrough volume.

    PubMed

    Lamaa, L; Ferronato, C; Fine, L; Jaber, F; Chovelon, J M

    2013-10-15

    Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) have been detected in many different atmospheres such as biogas, sewage sludge, landfill gas, gasoline and ambient air. In these different atmospheres, their presence can involve several contamination problems and negative effects in industrial processes, their identification and quantification become a real challenge. Up to now there is no standardized procedure for VMS quantification, the sampling step remaining the major obstacle. Sampling gas through sorbent tube followed by analysis on TD-GC-MS is one of the reliable possibilities. It gathers sampling and preconcentration in one step and allows discrimination between all VMS, despite the difficulty to choose the appropriate adsorbent in order to avoid loss of analytes during sampling. In this context, this work deals with the comparison of different types of adsorbents based on the determination of the VMS breakthrough volume (BV). Although Tenax TA is the most widely used adsorbent, experiments show low BV values for the lightest VMS. At 25°C, the BV of TMS and L2 are, respectively, 0.2 and 0.44 L g(-1) which can contribute to an underestimation in concentration during their quantification. Carbosieve SIII usually used for C2-C5, did not adsorb light VMS as it was expected, and breakthrough volume obtained for VMS are more than ten times less than the values obtained for Tenax. On other hand, Chromosorb 106 and Carboxen 1000 in association with Carbotrap C and Carbotrap proved to be appropriated for VMS sampling, due to the high breakthrough volumes obtained for the lightest compounds comparing to the other adsorbents. The BVs of TMS for Carboxen 1000 and Chromosorb 106 are 1.2 × 10(4) and 39 L g(-1), respectively, and 49 × 10(4) and 1142 L g(-1) for L2, respectively. PMID:24054678

  2. Development of Magnesium and Siloxane-Containing Vaterite and Its Composite Materials for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shinya; Obata, Akiko; Maeda, Hirotaka; Ota, Yoshio; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel biomaterials with Mg2+, Ca2+, and silicate ions releasability for bone regeneration is now in progress. Several inorganic ions have been reported to stimulate bone-forming cells. We featured Ca2+, silicate, and especially, Mg2+ ions as growth factors for osteoblasts. Various biomaterials, such as ceramic powders and organic–inorganic composites, that release the ions, have been developed and investigated for their cytocompatibilities in our previous work. Through the investigation, providing the three ions was found to be effective to activate osteogenic cells. Magnesium and siloxane-­containing vaterite was prepared by a carbonation process as an inorganic particle that can has the ability to simultaneously release Ca2+, silicate, and Mg2+ ions to biodegradable polymers. Poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA)- and bioactive PLLA-based composites containing vaterite coatings were discussed regarding their degradability and cytocompatibility using a metallic Mg substrate as Mg2+ ion source. PLLA/SiV composite film, which has a releasability of silicate ions besides Ca2+ ion, was coated on a pure Mg substrate to be compared with the PLLA/V coating. The degradability and releasability of inorganic ions were morphologically and quantitatively monitored in a cell culture medium. The bonding strength between the coatings and Mg substrates was one of the key factors to control Mg2+ ion release from the substrates. The cell culture tests were conducted using mouse osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cells); cellular morphology, proliferation, and differentiation on the materials were evaluated. The PLLA/V and PLLA/SiV coatings on Mg substrates were found to enhance the proliferation, especially the PLLA/SiV coating possessed a higher ability to induce the osteogenic differentiation of the cells. PMID:26697421

  3. Polydimethyl siloxane wet etching for three dimensional fabrication of microneedle array and high-aspect-ratio micropillars

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yu-Luen; Juang, Yi-Je

    2014-01-01

    Among various transdermal drug delivery (TDD) approaches, utilizing the microneedles (MNs) not only can penetrate the skin but also deliver the drug with reduced tissue damage, reduced pain, and no bleeding. However, the MNs with larger height are required to overcome the skin barrier for effective TDD. Unlike 2D patterning, etching polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) micropillars for fabrication of 3D microstructures is presented. The PDMS micropillars were first constructed by casting PDMS on the computer numerical control-machined cylindrical microwells, which then went through etching process to obtain the MNs for subsequent fabrication of polymer MNs or high aspect ratio micropillars. PMID:24803970

  4. Interpretation of appearance: the effect of facial features on first impressions and personality.

    PubMed

    Wolffhechel, Karin; Fagertun, Jens; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Majewski, Wiktor; Hemmingsen, Astrid Sofie; Larsen, Catrine Lohmann; Lorentzen, Sofie Katrine; Jarmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Appearance is known to influence social interactions, which in turn could potentially influence personality development. In this study we focus on discovering the relationship between self-reported personality traits, first impressions and facial characteristics. The results reveal that several personality traits can be read above chance from a face, and that facial features influence first impressions. Despite the former, our prediction model fails to reliably infer personality traits from either facial features or first impressions. First impressions, however, could be inferred more reliably from facial features. We have generated artificial, extreme faces visualising the characteristics having an effect on first impressions for several traits. Conclusively, we find a relationship between first impressions, some personality traits and facial features and consolidate that people on average assess a given face in a highly similar manner. PMID:25233221

  5. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality. PMID:27122422

  6. Interpretation of Appearance: The Effect of Facial Features on First Impressions and Personality

    PubMed Central

    Wolffhechel, Karin; Fagertun, Jens; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Majewski, Wiktor; Hemmingsen, Astrid Sofie; Larsen, Catrine Lohmann; Lorentzen, Sofie Katrine; Jarmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Appearance is known to influence social interactions, which in turn could potentially influence personality development. In this study we focus on discovering the relationship between self-reported personality traits, first impressions and facial characteristics. The results reveal that several personality traits can be read above chance from a face, and that facial features influence first impressions. Despite the former, our prediction model fails to reliably infer personality traits from either facial features or first impressions. First impressions, however, could be inferred more reliably from facial features. We have generated artificial, extreme faces visualising the characteristics having an effect on first impressions for several traits. Conclusively, we find a relationship between first impressions, some personality traits and facial features and consolidate that people on average assess a given face in a highly similar manner. PMID:25233221

  7. Evaluation of oral scanning in comparison to impression using three-dimensional registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogle-Kim, Yur-Chung; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Bormann, Therese; Beckmann, Felix; Jäger, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Crown and bridge restorations are one of the main treatment methods in fixed prosthodontics. The fabrication requires data on the patient's denture shape. This information is generally obtained as a hard copy from an impression mold. Alternatively, one can acquire the data electronically using oral optical three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques, which determine the surface of the denture. The aim of the study was to quantitatively compare the accuracy of three dimensional scanning with that of conventional impressions and give a statement how far the scanner provides a clinical alternative with equal or better precision. Data from 10 teeth were acquired in the dental office with a polyether impression material and an oral scanner. Data from the impressions were digitalized by means of micro computed tomography. The data were then 3D registered to identify the potential differences between impression and optical scan. We could demonstrate that the oral scanner's data and the conventional impressions are comparable.

  8. Digitization of dental alginate impression: Three-dimensional evaluation of point cloud.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Ri; Lee, Wan-Sun; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hea-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the digitization of alginate impressions by analyzing differences between the scan data of two types of impressions (alginate and rubber) taken from the master die and the scan data for the master die. The master die and impressions were digitized using a dental laser scanner (7 series, Dental Wings, Montreal, Canada). The crown portion of the abutment teeth in the digital data of 20 impressions was divided into three regions: cervical surface, middle surface, and occlusal surface. An independent t-test showed a significant difference (p<0.05) in the mean difference for each experimental group (alginate and rubber). One-way ANOVA and Tukey's honest significant difference test revealed a significant difference (p<0.05) among the three regions in the rubber impression. The results of this study also carefully suggest the possibility of digitization of alginate impressions in the future. PMID:26632232

  9. A Single Step Impression Technique of Flabby Ridges Using Monophase Polyvinylsiloxane Material: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Umesh Y.; Reddy, Vikram Simha; Hosi, Rushad Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Complete denture fabrication in clinically compromised situations such as flabby ridges is a challenging task for the clinician. Accurate impressioning of these tissues plays a major role in ensuring a well-fitting prosthesis. In this paper, the authors have proposed a newer technique of impression making of the flabby tissues using a combination of readily available newer and older materials to ensure an accurate and easy impression of these tissues. PMID:24872897

  10. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. RESULTS In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (P<.05). In three-dimensional analysis, the biggest difference was seen between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. CONCLUSION The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P<.05). The second premolar showed significantly bigger three-dimensional deviations than the second molar in the three-dimensional deviations (P>.05). PMID:26816576

  11. The effect of tray selection on the accuracy of elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G E; Johnson, G H; Drennon, D G

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of reproduction of stone casts made from impressions using different tray and impression materials. The tray materials used were an acrylic resin, a thermoplastic, and a plastic. The impression materials used were an additional silicone, a polyether, and a polysulfide. Impressions were made of a stainless steel master die that simulated crown preparations for a fixed partial denture and an acrylic resin model with cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks in stainless steel that typify clinical intra-arch distances. Impressions of the fixed partial denture simulation were made with all three impression materials and all three tray types. Impressions of the cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks were made by using all three tray types with only the addition reaction silicone impression material. Impressions were poured at 1 hour with a type IV dental stone. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA with a sample size of five. Results indicated that custom-made trays of acrylic resin and the thermoplastic material performed similarly regarding die accuracy and produced clinically acceptable casts. The stock plastic tray consistently produced casts with greater dimensional change than the two custom trays. PMID:2404101

  12. Properties of a new polyether urethane dimethacrylate photoinitiated elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Craig, R G; Hare, P H

    1990-01-01

    The photoinitiated impression material is supplied premixed as a light-bodied material in a light-tight plastic syringe and as a heavy-bodied material in a tube. The impression material has excellent physical, mechanical, and clinical qualities with noteworthy long working times, short setting times, dimensional stability, accuracy, high tear strength, good wettability, biocompatibility, and ease of cold disinfection without loss of quality. The impression material is also compatible with gypsum and silver or copper metallizing baths. Accurate casts can be obtained by means of either a double-impression technique or a double-mix technique. PMID:2295985

  13. Establishing versus preserving impressions: Predicting success in the multiple audience problem.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Austin Lee; Cottrell, Catherine A

    2015-12-01

    People sometimes seek to convey discrepant impressions of themselves to different audiences simultaneously. Research suggests people are generally successful in this "multiple audience problem." Adding to previous research, the current research sought to examine factors that may limit this success by measuring social anxiety and placing participants into situations requiring them to either establish or preserve multiple impressions simultaneously. In general, participants were more successful when preserving previously conveyed impressions than when establishing impressions for the first time. In contrast, social anxiety did not affect multiple audience success. In all, this research offers valuable insight into potential challenges that people face in many social situations. PMID:25581114

  14. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging. PMID:25244469

  15. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 2: peroxidase reagents.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen; Ciuksza, Tomasz; Nic Daéid, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the optimisation of peroxidase based enhancement techniques for footwear impressions made in blood on various fabric surfaces. Four different haem reagents: leuco crystal violet (LCV), leuco malachite green (LMG), fluorescein and luminol were used to enhance the blood contaminated impressions. The enhancement techniques in this study were used successfully to enhance the impressions in blood on light coloured surfaces, however, only fluorescent and/or chemiluminescent techniques allowed visualisation on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leather. Luminol was the only technique to enhance footwear impressions made in blood on all the fabrics investigated in this study. PMID:21889107

  16. The effect of a range of disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of some impression materials.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Al Jabra, O; Harrison, A; Vowles, R W; McNally, L

    2004-12-01

    In this study the dimensional accuracy of two model materials; dental stone and plaster of Paris, reproduced from three commonly used impression materials; alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone, retained by their adhesives in acrylic resin trays and exposed to four disinfectant solutions was evaluated. Ninety casts were used to investigate the effect of the four disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone impression material. For each impression material 30 impressions were taken, half were poured in dental stone and half in plaster of Paris. The disinfectants used were Dimenol, Perform-ID, MD-520, and Haz-tabs. Measurements were carried out using a High Precision Reflex Microscope. For the alginate impressions only those disinfected by 5-minute immersion in Haz-tabs solution and in full-strength MD 520 were not adversely affected by the disinfection treatment. All polyether impressions subjected to immersion disinfection exhibited a clinically acceptable expansion. Disinfected addition-cured silicone impressions produced very accurate stone casts. Those disinfected by spraying with fill-strength Dimenol produced casts that were very similar to those left as controls, but those treated by immersion disinfection exhibited negligible and clinically acceptable expansion. The results of the studied demonstrated that the various disinfection treatments had different effects on the impression materials. It is important that an appropriate disinfectant is used for each type of impression material. PMID:15691188

  17. Comparison of epoxy- and siloxane-based single-mode optical waveguides defined by direct-write lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmogi, Ahmed; Bosman, Erwin; Missinne, Jeroen; Van Steenberge, Geert

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of single-mode polymer optical waveguides at telecom and SOI compatible wavelengths; by making a comparison between an epoxy and a siloxane polymer waveguide material system (both commercially-available). The proposed waveguides can be used in short-reach optical interconnects targeting chip-to-chip communication on the interposer level or providing a coupling interface between single-mode optical fibers and photonic integrated circuits (PICs). This technology enables the integration of optoelectronic chips for photonic packaging purposes. First, the single-mode dimensions (4 × 4 μm2 and 5 × 5 μm2) for both materials at selected wavelengths (1.31 μm and 1.55 μm) were determined based on the refractive index measurements. Then, the waveguides were patterned by a direct-write lithography method. The fabricated waveguides show a high-quality surface with smooth sidewalls. The optical propagation losses were measured using the cut-back method. For the siloxane-based waveguides, the propagation losses were found to be 0.34 dB/cm and 1.36 dB/cm at 1.31 μm and 1.55 μm respectively while for the epoxy-based waveguides the losses were 0.49 dB/cm and 2.23 dB/cm at 1.31 μm and 1.55 μm respectively.

  18. Absorption of a linear (L2) and a cyclic (D4) siloxane using different oils: application to biogas treatment.

    PubMed

    Rojas Devia, Carolina; Subrenat, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobic volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS), such as hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), present a low solubility in water. An alternative treatment by absorption into hydrophobic absorbents was therefore studied. For this purpose, three different absorbents, motor oil, cutting oil and a water-cutting oil mixture, were selected with the aim of re-using a waste product. The set of experiments was carried out in a bubble column, where parameters such as inlet concentration, residence time and temperature were studied. The best performance for the removal of both siloxanes, in terms of absorption capacity, was observed for motor oil, particularly for D4. In fact, motor oil removal efficiency for D 4 was 80%, whereas for L2 it was 60%, indicating that D 4 is more easily absorbed than L2. In the case of water-cutting oil, this showed a mass transfer enhancement from the gas phase to the liquid phase compared with water alone. Furthermore, a removal efficiency of 70% was observed for D 4, showing that the addition of an oil fraction to a water system improves the absorption of VMS. These results show that VMS absorption into oils could be a promising way to achieve their abatement. PMID:24617070

  19. Polyvinyl alcohol foam-Gelfoam for therapeutic embolization: a synergistic mixture.

    PubMed

    Horton, J A; Marano, G D; Kerber, C W; Jenkins, J J; Davis, S

    1983-01-01

    Gelfoam and polyvinyl alcohol foam particles each have advantages and disadvantages for therapeutic embolization. It was theorized and confirmed that a mixture of the two retains the advantages and eliminates the disadvantages of each. Two mixtures were prepared, tested in animals, and used successfully in 14 patients. It was found that the mixtures of Gelfoam and polyvinyl alcohol foam particles fulfilled the expectations and needs for particulate embolic materials. PMID:6405592

  20. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (p<0.001). Precision of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  2. Psychotic patients' impressions of a person from written descriptions.

    PubMed

    Luchins, A S; Luchins, E H

    1984-02-01

    The present study examined the impressions of personality formed from written descriptions of behavior by over 200 hospitalized male schizophrenics, tested individually when they seemed in contact with reality. One description was of extrovert (E) behavior by a youth named Jim; another was of his introvert (I) behavior in similar settings. Combined communications gave one description immediately after the other. After 150 patients read one of the communications, they were generally willing and able to respond to a 36-item questionnaire about Jim. This also occurred when 96 patients were asked to answer it before any communication, on the basis of their expectations about Jim; 56 subsequently received a communication, followed by readministration of the questionnaire. Patients' responses, before or after the communications, revealed few pathological signs and, like those of normal Ss, could usually be classified as E or I. Patients had less differential effects, and far fewer I responses than normal Ss. Patients and normals showed preconceptions of Jim as extrovertive. Results were discussed in light of the projective hypothesis and other theories. PMID:6706109

  3. A video Clinical Global Impression (CGI) in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Pelissolo, Antoine; Rotge, Jean-Yves; Jaafari, Nematollah; Machefaux, Sebastien; Quentin, Solene; Bui, Eric; Bruno, Nicolas; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Polosan, Mircea; Baup, Nicolas; Papetti, François; Chéreau, Isabelle; Arbus, Christophe; Mallet, Luc; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas

    2011-03-30

    The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI) is frequently used in clinical research because of its face validity and ease of use but data on its reliability are scarce. Our goal was to estimate the reliability of the scale and compare reliability between face-to-face and video scoring. We analyzed 50 different video interviews recorded during 5 visits of a crossover trial to study the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Six specialized clinicians rated the CGI using these videos, providing 300 different ratings. The intraclass correlation was lower at inclusion (0.30 [0.13-0.50]) than at later visits (0.68 [0.61-0.80]). Reliability was not influenced by the patients' stimulation status. The mean of at least two independent evaluations of the video is needed to achieve an ICC greater than 0.8. The video CGI is a valid clinical outcome measure suitable for clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00169377). PMID:20621362

  4. Impression Cytology with Transfer in xerophthalmia and conjunctival diseases.

    PubMed

    Resnikoff, S; Luzeau, R; Filliard, G; Amedee-Manesme, O

    1992-11-01

    During a countrywide survey, we assessed the prevalence of clinical signs of xerophthalmia and of major conjunctival diseases in a randomized sample of 2,445 subjects representative of the population of the Republic of Djibouti. On a part of this sample, conjunctival Impression Cytology with Transfer (ICT) test and a plasma retinol determination were performed. Xerophthalmia as a public health problem was displayed by clinical signs (Bitot's spots, corneal scars among preschool children), low plasma retinol levels and ICT test results: 9.3% with deficient cytology in the rural area and 12.3% in the urban one (age-standardized rates). Results of ICT were related to age (p < 0.00001). Vitamin A deficiency was prevalent not only in preschool children but also up to 15 years. Moreover, ICT results are influenced by conjunctival diseases: compared to age-matched controls, there were more abnormal cytologies among patients with trachomatous inflammation (p = 0.025), conjunctivitis (p = 0.024) or Limbal Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis (p = 0.015). Thus ICT shouldn't be performed among children with conjunctival diseases. In the region under study conjunctival diseases had high rates of prevalence: 16.4% of trachomatous scarrings in the urban area (standardized rate), 8% of conjunctivitis among rural preschool children, and 5% of Limbal Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis among children between 5 and 14 years in both areas. PMID:1490836

  5. Lateral orbitofrontal cortex links social impressions to political choices.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chenjie; Stolle, Dietlind; Gidengil, Elisabeth; Fellows, Lesley K

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies of political behavior suggest that voting decisions can be influenced substantially by "first-impression" social attributions based on physical appearance. Separate lines of research have implicated the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the judgment of social traits on the one hand and economic decision-making on the other, making this region a plausible candidate for linking social attributions to voting decisions. Here, we asked whether OFC lesions in humans disrupted the ability to judge traits of political candidates or affected how these judgments influenced voting decisions. Seven patients with lateral OFC damage, 18 patients with frontal damage sparing the lateral OFC, and 53 matched healthy participants took part in a simulated election paradigm, in which they voted for real-life (but unknown) candidates based only on photographs of their faces. Consistent with previous work, attributions of "competence" and "attractiveness" based on candidate appearance predicted voting behavior in the healthy control group. Frontal damage did not affect substantially the ability to make competence or attractiveness judgments, but patients with damage to the lateral OFC differed from other groups in how they applied this information when voting. Only attractiveness ratings had any predictive power for voting choices after lateral OFC damage, whereas other frontal patients and healthy controls relied on information about both competence and attractiveness in making their choice. An intact lateral OFC may not be necessary for judgment of social traits based on physical appearance, but it seems to be crucial in applying this information in political decision-making. PMID:26041918

  6. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6170 Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6170 Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6170 Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

  12. Instructional Strategies for Achieving a Positive Impression in Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) Distance Education Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean W.

    With the rapid development of computer technology in recent years, distance education, and especially computer-mediated communication (CMC), has expanded very quickly. The application of computer technology in education presents many unanswered questions, including issues related to impression formation and impression management in…

  13. Impression Management in the Ethical Self-Presentation of Offenders Undergoing Presentence Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Terrill R.; Boik, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Ethical choices were assessed for offenders instructed to produce favorable versus unfavorable impressions. Pronounced impression management effects were obtained for prosocial and antisocial responses, and high scores on a dimension of change defined by these variables were related to sociopathic features on the MMPI. (Author)

  14. Speed Dating and the Presentation of Self: A Teaching Exercise in Impression Management and Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jeff A.; Tsitsos, William

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an in-class exercise for teaching theories of the presentation of self that is organized around two key concepts, impression management and impression formation. By highlighting the interpretive, interactive aspects of the presentation of self, this exercise is also useful for teaching the major principles of symbolic…

  15. Managing and Creating an Image in the Interview: The Role of Interviewee Initial Impressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swider, Brian W.; Barrick, Murray R.; Harris, T. Brad; Stoverink, Adam C.

    2011-01-01

    In employment interviews, individuals use impression management tactics to present themselves as suitable candidates to interviewers. However, not all impression management tactics, or the interviewees who employ them, are effective at positively influencing interview scores. Results of this study indicate that the relationship between impression…

  16. Older and younger adults' first impressions from faces: similar in agreement but different in positivity.

    PubMed

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Franklin, Robert G; Hillman, Suzanne; Boc, Henry

    2013-03-01

    People readily form first impressions from faces, with consensual judgments that have significant social consequences. Similar impressions are shown by children, young adults (YA), and people from diverse cultures. However, this is the first study to systematically investigate older adults' (OA) impressions. OA and YA showed similar levels of within-age agreement in their impressions of competence, health, hostility, and trustworthiness. Both groups also showed stronger within- than between-age agreement. Consistent with other evidence for age-related increases in positivity, OA showed more positive impressions of the health, hostility, and trustworthiness of faces. These effects tended to be strongest for the most negatively valenced faces, suggesting that they derive from OA lesser processing of negative cues rather than greater processing of positive cues. An own-age bias in impressions was limited to greater OA positivity in impressions of the hostility of older faces, but not younger ones. Although OA and YA differed in vision and executive function, only OA slower processing speed contributed to age differences in impression positivity. Positivity effects in OA have not been previously linked to processing speed, and research investigating possible explanations for this effect would be worthwhile. PMID:23276216

  17. "Leer-ics" or Lyrics: Teenage Impressions of Rock 'n' Roll.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinsky, Lorraine E.; Rosenbaum, Jill L.

    1987-01-01

    This study compared adults' impressions of rock music with those of teenagers and found vast differences. Youths reported hearing subjects relating to their lives such as "growing up" while adults heard more references to sex and violence. Perhaps the differing impressions reflect differences in learning, experience, and literary abilities. (VM)

  18. Impression Management Messages and Reactions to Organizational Reward Allocations: The Mediating Influence of Fairness and Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tata, Jasmine; Rhodes, Susan R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines relationships among impression-management messages, evaluations of reward allocations (fairness and responsibility), and reaction to rewards (anger, approval of manager, and overall job satisfaction). Finds that impression-management messages directly influence fairness and responsibility, and indirectly influence anger and approval. (SR)

  19. Fertilizing ROSES through the STEM: Interdisciplinary Modules as Pre-service Research Experiences for Secondary STEM Educators (IMPRESS-Ed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Kavic, M.; Benoit, M. H.; Wiita, P.

    2011-12-01

    IMPRESS-Ed is a program designed to provide authentic summer research experiences in the space, earth, and atmospheric sciences for pre-service K-12 educators at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ). In 2011, the program involved five students and took place over eight weeks with recruitment occurring during the preceding academic year. The program was divided into two modules: A common core module and an individual mentored research experience. The common module consisted of three units focusing on data-driven pedagogical approaches in astrophysics, tectonophysics, and atmospheric science, respectively. The common module also featured training sessions in observational astronomy, and use of a 3D geowall and state of the art planetarium. Participants in the program are also offered the opportunity to utilize the available TCNJ facilities with their future students. Given that a large number of graduates from the TCNJ take positions in local New Jersey schools, the opportunity to make use of these facilities at a future time would be of great significance to them and their future students. The individual mentored research module matched student interests with potential projects. Research led by M.H. Benoit analyzed gravity data from the NASA-GRACE mission to find lithospheric density contrasts beneath the eastern US. A student working with N.B. Magee used data from NASA satellites CALIPSO, CloudSat, and AQUA-MODIS to study the dynamics of convective cloud tops. Research projects led by M. Kavic performed simulations to investigate the possibility of detecting superconducting cosmic strings using radio observations and also designed and constructed a radio interferometer based on the NASA's Radio-Jove program. P. Wiita supervised a research project studying star-forming regions of active galaxies through analysis of images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and GALEX. The research program was also incorporated into the framework of the TCNJ Mentored Undergraduate Summer

  20. UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers prepared by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Ali, Shamshad; Khatri, Imran; Mayakrishnan, Gopiraman; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Ick-Soo

    2015-07-01

    We report UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers for potential application for recording and erasing quick response (QR) codes. We incorporate 1‧-3‧-dihydro-8-methoxy-1‧,3‧,3‧-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro [2H-1-benzopyran-2,2‧-(2H)-indole] (indole) and,3-dihydro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro [2H-indole-2,3‧-[3H] phenanthr [9,10-b] (1,4) oxazine] (oxazine) into PVA polymer matrix via electrospinning technique. The resultant nanofibers were measured for recording-erasing, photo-coloration and thermal reversibility. The rate of photo-coloration of PVA-indole nanofibers was five times higher than the PVA-oxazine nanofibers, whereas the thermal reversibility found to be more than twice as fast as PVA-oxazine nanofibers. Results showed that the resultant nanofibers have very good capability of recording QR codes multiple times. The FTIR spectroscopy and SEM were employed to characterize the electrospun nanofibers. The UV-responsive PVA nanofibers have great potentials as a light-driven nanomaterials incorporated within sensors, sensitive displays and in optical devices such as erasable and rewritable optical storage.

  1. Oil reclamation from waste plastics including polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Tadauchi, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of plant scaleup investigations for oil reclamation from waste plastics. The reclamation process examined was thermal decomposition of polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) under alkali addition and subsequent pressurization. Thermal analyses of the two plastics was performed, indicating that hydrogen chloride evolution occurs at around 300 C and decomposition of PP and oil formation occurs occures arount 450 C. A pilot plant was built and tested with PP and PVC pellets. In accordance with thermal analyses, the temperature of the pyrolysis chamber was raised in two steps. Pilot plant results were compared with bench-scale pilot plant and laboratory experiments. The oil reclamation ratio became smaller with an increase in the volume of the pyrolysis chamber due to temperature distributions and deposition of polymer-alkali residue. Molecular weight distributions of the recovered oil were similar for all three vessels. It was also found that the chlorine concentration in the organic chlorinated compounds in the reclaimed oil stayed below 1/30 that of the oil reclaimed from PVC decomposition without alkali in a laboratory flask-scale vessel.

  2. Evaluation of Phenylephrine Stability in Polyvinyl Chloride Bags

    PubMed Central

    Oldland, Alan R.; Kiser, Tyree H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Phenylephrine hydrochloride (HCl) is commonly used to maintain adequate blood pressure during shock and shocklike states. Phenylephrine is prepared in concentrated stock vials that require further dilution prior to administration. This study evaluated the physical and chemical stability of phenylephrine in extemporaneously prepared polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags. Methods: Phenylephrine HCl 10 mg/mL solution was diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride for injection to final concentrations of 200 µg/mL and 400 µg/mL and stored at room temperature (23°C-25°C) exposed to fluorescent light. Stability of phenylephrine HCl was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, 45, and 60. Results: Phenylephrine HCl 200 and 400 µg/mL solutions in PVC bags were physically stable during the entire 60-day study period. Phenylephrine HCl retained > 95% of the original concentration. Conclusion: Phenylephrine HCl diluted to 200 or 400 µg/mL with 0.9% sodium chloride for injection is both physically and chemically stable for a period of 60 days with ≤5% degradation when stored at room temperature and exposed to fluorescent lighting. PMID:24958958

  3. Preparation and flammability of poly(vinyl alcohol) composite aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2014-05-14

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH)-based aerogel composites with nanoscale silica, halloysite, montmorillonite (MMT), and laponite were prepared via a freeze-drying method. The PVOH/MMT and PVOH/laponite composites exhibit higher compressive moduli than the PVOH/SiO2 or PVOH/halloysite samples. Layered microstructures were observed for the samples except with PVOH/laponite, which showed irregular network morphologies. Thermogravimetric analysis of the aerogel samples showed increased thermal stability with the addition of nanofillers. The heat release measured by cone calorimetry, smoke release, and carbon monoxide production of the aerogel composites are all significantly decreased with the addition of nanofillers; these values are much lower than those for commercial expanded polystyrene foam. The fillers did not lead to obvious increases in the limiting oxygen index values, and the corresponding time to ignition values decrease. The ability to adjust the nanofiller levels in these foamlike aerogel composites allows for specific tuning of these products for fire safety. PMID:24731187

  4. Polyvinyl alcohol functionalized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salunkhe, A. B.; Khot, V. M.; Thorat, N. D.; Phadatare, M. R.; Sathish, C. I.; Dhawale, D. S.; Pawar, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoFe2O4 NPs) have been synthesized by combustion method. The surface of the CoFe2O4 NPs was modified with biocompatible polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). To investigate effect and nature of coating on the surface of CoFe2O4 NPs, the NPs were characterized X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) results demonstrate the monodispersed characteristics of CoFe2O4 NPs after surface modification with PVA. The decrease in contact angle from 162° to 50° with PVA coating on NPs indicates the transition from hydrophobic nature to hydrophilic. The Magnetic properties measurement system (MPMS) results show that the NPs have ferromagnetic behavior with high magnetization of 75.04 and 71.02 emu/g of uncoated and coated CoFe2O4 NPs respectively. These PVA coated NPs exhibit less toxicity over uncoated CoFe2O4 NPs up to 1.8 mg mL-1 when tested with mouse fibroblast L929 cell line.

  5. Poly(vinyl alcohol) gels as photoacoustic breast phantoms revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Heijblom, Michelle; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-07-01

    A popular phantom in photoacoustic imaging is poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel fabricated by freezing and thawing (F-T) aqueous solutions of PVA. The material possesses acoustic and optical properties similar to those of tissue. Earlier work characterized PVA gels in small test specimens where temperature distributions during F-T are relatively homogeneous. In this work, in breast-sized samples we observed substantial temperature differences between the shallow regions and the interior during the F-T procedure. We investigated whether spatial variations were also present in the acoustic and optical properties. The speed of sound, acoustic attenuation, and optical reduced scattering coefficients were measured on specimens sampled at various locations in a large phantom. In general, the properties matched values quoted for breast tissue. But while acoustic properties were relatively homogeneous, the reduced scattering was substantially different at the surface compared with the interior. We correlated these variations with gel microstructure inspected using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the phantom's reduced scattering spatial distribution matches the optical properties of the standard two-layer breast model used in x ray dosimetry. We conclude that large PVA samples prepared using the standard recipe make excellent breast tissue phantoms.

  6. Poly(vinyl alcohol) gels as photoacoustic breast phantoms revisited.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Heijblom, Michelle; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-07-01

    A popular phantom in photoacoustic imaging is poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel fabricated by freezing and thawing (F-T) aqueous solutions of PVA. The material possesses acoustic and optical properties similar to those of tissue. Earlier work characterized PVA gels in small test specimens where temperature distributions during F-T are relatively homogeneous. In this work, in breast-sized samples we observed substantial temperature differences between the shallow regions and the interior during the F-T procedure. We investigated whether spatial variations were also present in the acoustic and optical properties. The speed of sound, acoustic attenuation, and optical reduced scattering coefficients were measured on specimens sampled at various locations in a large phantom. In general, the properties matched values quoted for breast tissue. But while acoustic properties were relatively homogeneous, the reduced scattering was substantially different at the surface compared with the interior. We correlated these variations with gel microstructure inspected using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the phantom's reduced scattering spatial distribution matches the optical properties of the standard two-layer breast model used in x ray dosimetry. We conclude that large PVA samples prepared using the standard recipe make excellent breast tissue phantoms. PMID:21806259

  7. Electrospun chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol nanofibre mats for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-04-01

    Chitosan (CS) aqueous salt blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibre mats was prepared by electrospinning. CS was dissolved with hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in distilled water without the use of toxic or hazardous solvents. The CS aqueous salts were blended with PVA at different weight ratios, and the effect of the solution ratios was investigated. The morphologies and mechanical and swelling properties of the generated fibres were analysed. Indirect cytotoxicity studies indicated that the CS/PVA nanofibre mats were non-toxic to normal human fibroblast cells. The CS-HOBt/PVA and CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats demonstrated satisfactory antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and an in vivo wound healing test showed that the CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats performed better than gauze in decreasing acute wound size during the first week after tissue damage. In conclusion, the biodegradable, biocompatible and antibacterial CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats have potential for use as wound dressing materials. PMID:22925275

  8. Self Nucleation and Crystallization of Poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David; Cebe, Peggy

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a hydrophilic, biodegradable, semi-crystalline polymer with uses ranging from textiles to medicine. Film samples of PVA were investigated to assess crystallization and melting behavior during self-nucleation experiments, and thermal degradation, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, respectively. TG results show that degradation occurred at temperatures close to the observed peak melting temperature of 223 C. Using conventional DSC, PVA was heated at a rate of 10 C/min to various self-nucleation temperatures, Ts, within its melting range, briefly annealed, cooled and reheated. Three distinct crystallization regimes were observed upon cooling, depending upon self nucleation temperature. At low values of Ts, below 227 C, PVA only partially melts; residual crystal anneals while new, less perfect crystals form during cooling. Between 228 C and 234 C, PVA was found to crystallize exclusively by self-nucleation. For Ts above 235 C the PVA melts completely. Fast scanning chip-based calorimetry was used to heat and cool at 2000 K/s, to prevent degradation. Results of self nucleation experiments using fast scanning and conventional DSC will be compared. NSF DMR-1206010.

  9. A method for impregnating nylon transfer membranes with leucocrystal violet for enhancing and lifting bloody impressions.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Amy L; Brun-Conti, Leanora

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a quick and easy method for impregnating nylon transfer membranes with leucocrystal violet (LCV) for the purpose of lifting and enhancing impressions made in blood. A stamp that would simulate fine detail found in fingerprints or footwear was used to create impressions on a variety of substrates. Four different LCV formulations were tested to determine the effectiveness of the prepared membranes in lifting and enhancing the impressions. Further investigation involved the feasibility of using the LCV membranes in the field by studying the shelf life and storage of the impregnated membranes and the longevity of the lifted impressions. One of the formations studied demonstrated superior lifting and enhancing capabilities, as well as a prolonged shelf life and a resilience of the lifted impressions, thus proving LCV to be an extremely valuable technique. PMID:15171168

  10. Part-Digitizing System of Impression and Interocclusal Record for Complete Denture Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takashi; Goto, Takaharu; Yagi, Kazutomo; Kashiwabara, Toshiya; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have reported the application of digital technology to removable dentures, particularly for the process of impression and interocclusal recording for complete denture fabrication. This article describes a part-digitizing system of impression and interocclusal records for complete denture fabrication. The denture foundation area in an edentulous mouth, including the border areas and residual ridge, is outlined by tracing the surfaces with a 3-D pen-type digitizer. Specialized trays for final impressions and interocclusal records were generated using computer-aided design and manufactured using the digital data. Final impression and interocclusal records were carried out using these specialized trays. The computer-aided method using preliminary digital impressions and specialized trays would be feasible for clinical use for complete denture fabrication. PMID:26619371

  11. A Comparison of Various Fixatives for Casting Footwear Impressions in Sand at Crime Scenes.

    PubMed

    Battiest, Travis; Clutter, Susan W; McGill, David

    2016-05-01

    Footwear examination can provide an important link between the crime scene and the suspect. Casts have been taken from snow, soil, and sand substrates to assist with the examination and to accurately depict the impression. However, there has been some discrepancy on what kind of fixative, if any, should be used with impressions present in sand. This study tested four different fixatives on three sandy substrates. Eight gross characteristics were added to a boot sole, and thirty sand impressions were created in each substrate. Except for one control set that remained untreated, the impressions were treated with a fixative agent before casting. The ninety shoe casts were examined by a qualified footwear examiner and scored based on his ability to see the eight characteristics. The results indicated that pump-action hairspray was the most successful on play and construction sand, while beach sand impressions without any fixative scored highest. PMID:27122420

  12. Modification of Fixture Mount to be Used as an Impression Coping in Closely Placed Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anoop; K, Cauvery; Kumar, Pawan; Havale, Raghavendra

    2014-01-01

    An implant-level impression is often desired for designing and fabricating an implant-supported fixed restoration. This clinical report describes the use of modified press-fit metal implant fixture mount as an impression coping for making an impression of closely placed implants. The fixture mount is easier to manipulate, time saving and more comfortable for both the clinician and patient because the implant fixture mount is connected to the implant by pressing on instead of screwing. As compared to plastic press fit impression coping, metal fixture mount will not distort when modification of fixture mount are required in convergently or closely placed implants. It has the advantage of both the open-tray and closed-tray implant impression techniques. PMID:24959520

  13. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 1: protein stains.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen; Nic Daéid, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    A range of protein stains were utilised for the enhancement of footwear impressions on a variety of fabric types of different colours with blood as a contaminant. A semi-automated stamping device was used to deliver test impressions at a set force to minimise the variability between impressions; multiple impressions were produced and enhanced by each reagent to determine the repeatability of the enhancement. Results indicated that while most protein stains used in this study successfully enhanced impressions in blood on light coloured fabrics, background staining caused interference on natural fabrics. Enhancement on dark coloured fabrics was only achieved using fluorescent protein stains, as non-fluorescent protein stains provided poor contrast. A further comparison was performed with commercially available protein staining solutions and solutions prepared within the laboratory from the appropriate chemicals. Both solutions performed equally well, though it is recommended to use freshly prepared solutions whenever possible. PMID:21889106

  14. A novel method for the photographic recovery of fingermark impressions from ammunition cases using digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Porter, Glenn; Ebeyan, Robert; Crumlish, Charles; Renshaw, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    The photographic preservation of fingermark impression evidence found on ammunition cases remains problematic due to the cylindrical shape of the deposition substrate preventing complete capture of the impression in a single image. A novel method was developed for the photographic recovery of fingermarks from curved surfaces using digital imaging. The process involves the digital construction of a complete impression image made from several different images captured from multiple camera perspectives. Fingermark impressions deposited onto 9-mm and 0.22-caliber brass cartridge cases and a plastic 12-gauge shotgun shell were tested using various image parameters, including digital stitching method, number of images per 360° rotation of shell, image cropping, and overlap. The results suggest that this method may be successfully used to recover fingermark impression evidence from the surfaces of ammunition cases or other similar cylindrical surfaces. PMID:25537854

  15. The First Impression of Data Sent by Two Martian Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    ``Spirit'' at the Gusev crater near the dichotomy boundary sent a panoramic view, an image of the near ground and a very close view of a small spot analyzed by X-ray. The first impression of chaotic disposition of big and small rocks and sandy fragments is wrong. All scales images display striations in 4 directions probably due to intersecting undulations, besides, rock fragments are rather evenly distributed. This is not of surprise because many MOLA images show very regular patterns described earlier for intersecting wave processes on planetary surfaces [1]. The middle scale image shows angular rock fragments of various sizes protruding soil. There is an impression that the protruding blocks represent uplifted parts of a wave-woven surface of volcanic infilling , subsided parts being covered with sandy soil mainly of eolian origin. Such an interpretation is supported by the THEMIS image (released 23 Sept., 2003 in Internet) of a 22 km-diameter crater on Sirenum Fossae where wave structurized (volcanic?) material is gradually covered by eolian sediments leaving protruding high standing blocks (antinodes). The soil X-ray analysis shows high Si an Fe, some Al, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cl, S, minor Cu, Ni, Zn that should be expected for a mixed material at low/highland contact contaminated by an eolian stuff. ``Opportunity'' is the first highland landing and in this is its highest importance. It seems that long awaited light (in color and density) rock type without Fe [2, 3 & others] is in front of us. The leveled out white outcrops probably represent this kind of rocks (albitites, syenites). Eleveted K, Na, CL, S, Si and H20 (!) detected by gamma and neutron spectra can be explained by sodalite (hydrosodalite) and cancrinite group minerals present in nepheline syenites -- albitites and always accompanied by zeolites containing water. The high chemical dichotomy (and mantle fractionation) between lowlands and highlands is an important part of the wave planetology (Theorem 4 [3

  16. Cost of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for Coastal Oregon Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    1998-07-01

    The State of Oregon is using arc-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on reinforced concrete coastal bridges. The two lowest bids for four ICCP projects were averaged and converted to 1997 dollars. The total average cost for the ICCP projects was $51.63/ft2 ($555.51/m2) of protected concrete. The cathodic protection part of the ICCP projects average $14.08/ft2 ($151.47/m2), while zinc anode installation cost an average of $7.13/ft2 ($76.67/m2). Oregon's rugged and beautiful coastline is graced with a series of historical arched bridges designed by Conde B. McCullough. McCullough is the internationally recognized architect who designed many of the Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) bridges in the 1920s and 1930s. Many are listed on the National Historic Register. After the expense ($45m) and public outcry associated with the replacement of the historic Alsea Bay Bridge in Waldport, Oregon, the Oregon Department of Transportation began using impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) to extend the service life of reinforced concrete bridges. Figure 1 visually illustrates the need for such remediation. It shows exposed rebar from underneath the Brush Creek Bridge, which is very representative of the conditions found underneath many coastal Oregon bridges. Four ICCP projects have been funded, put out for bid, and completed. The four projects, their bid closing dates, and their completion dates are the Cape Creek Bridge (1990- 1992), the Yaquina Bay Bridge south arches (1991-1995), the Depoe Bay Bridge (1993-1997), and the Yaquina Bay Bridge south approach (1995-1997). The Cape Creek, Yaquina Bay, and Depoe Bay Bridges are shown in Figs. 2-4. Other ICCP projects are underway on the Oregon coast. In the ICCP systems, arc-sprayed zinc coatings on the concrete surface are anodes that protect the steel rebar. Accelerated laboratory studies at the Albany Research Center have predicted zinc anode service lives of

  17. Appearance-based first impressions and person memory.

    PubMed

    Bell, Raoul; Mieth, Laura; Buchner, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that people preferentially remember reputational information that is emotionally incongruent to their expectations, but it has left open the question of the generality of this effect. Three conflicting hypotheses were proposed: (a) The effect is restricted to information relevant to reciprocal social exchange. (b) The effect is most pronounced for emotional (approach-and-avoidance-relevant) information. (c) The effect is due to a general tendency of the cognitive system to attend to unexpected and novel information regardless of its (emotional) content. Here, we varied the type of to-be-remembered person information across experiments. To stimulate expectations, we selected faces whose facial appearance was rated as pleasant or disgusting (Experiments 1 and 2), as intelligent or unintelligent (Experiment 3), or as being that of a lawyer or a farmer (Experiment 4). These faces were paired with behavior descriptions that violated or confirmed these appearance-based 1st impressions. Source memory for the association between the faces and the descriptions was assessed with surprise memory tests. The results show that people are willing to form various social expectations based on facial appearance alone, and they support the hypothesis that the classification of the faces in the memory test is biased by schema-congruent guessing. Source memory was generally enhanced for information violating appearance-based social expectations. In sum, the results show that person memory is consistently affected by different kinds of social expectations, supporting the idea that the mechanisms determining memory performance generalize beyond exchange-relevant reputational and emotional information. PMID:24999709

  18. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users

    PubMed Central

    ISKELELI, Guzin; ARICI, Ceyhun; DEGER BILGEC, Mustafa; DEMIRKESEN, Cuyan; SERAP ARSLAN, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses. PMID:27350951

  19. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users.

    PubMed

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Arici, Ceyhun; Deger Bilgec, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Serap Arslan, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses. PMID:27350951

  20. Quantifying the lubricity of mechanically tough polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Ling, Doris; Bodugoz-Senturk, Hatice; Nanda, Salil; Braithwaite, Gavin; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2015-12-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels are biocompatible and can be used as synthetic articular cartilage. Their mechanical characteristics can be tailored by various techniques such as annealing or blending with other hydrophilic polymers. In this study, we quantified the coefficient of friction of various candidate polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels against cobalt-chrome alloy or swine cartilage using a new rheometer-based method. We investigated the coefficient of friction of polyvinyl alcohol-only hydrogels and blends with polyethylene glycol, polyacrylic acid, and polyacrylamide against swine cartilage and polished cobalt-chrome surfaces. The addition of the functional groups to polyvinyl alcohol, such as acrylamide (semi-interpenetrating network) and acrylic acid (blend), significantly reduced the coefficient of friction. The coefficient of friction of the polyvinyl alcohol-only hydrogel was measured as 0.4 ± 0.03 against cobalt-chrome alloy, and 0.09 ± 0.004 against cartilage, while those measurements for the polyvinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid blends and polyvinyl alcohol-polyacrylamide semi-interpenetrating network were 0.07 ± 0.01 and 0.1 ± 0.003 against cobalt-chrome alloy, and 0.03 ± 0.001 and 0.02 ± 0.001 against cartilage, respectively. There was no significant or minimal difference in the coefficient of friction between samples from different regions of the knee, or animals, or when the cartilage samples were frozen for 1 day or 2 days before testing. However, changing lubricant from deionized water to ionic media, for example, saline or simulated body fluid, increased the coefficient of friction significantly. PMID:26614798

  1. A technique to ensure the reproducibility of a cast post and core.

    PubMed

    Naas, Haitem M M; Dashti, Mohammad Hossein; Hashemian, Roxana; Hifeda, Nedda Y

    2014-12-01

    The post-and-core pattern duplication technique is a simple, cost-effective, and accurate method of ensuring the reproducibility of a cast post and core. An acrylic resin pattern is fabricated for an endodontically treated tooth. The post portion of the pattern is duplicated with a polyvinyl siloxane impression material in the lower compartment of a container. The core portion is then duplicated with a polyether impression material in the upper compartment. After the original pattern has been retrieved, the duplicate resin pattern is fabricated in the provided space. This technique will improve efficiency if damage or loss of the pattern or the actual cast post and core occurs. PMID:25156094

  2. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol breast phantoms for ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Isabela Miller; De Matheo, Lucas Lobianco; Costa Júnior, José Francisco Silva; Borba, Cecília de Melo; von Krüger, Marco Antonio; Infantosi, Antonio Fernando Catelli; Pereira, Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic phantoms are objects that mimic some features of biological tissues, allowing the study of their interactions with ultrasound (US). In the diagnostic-imaging field, breast phantoms are an important tool for testing performance and optimizing US systems, as well as for training medical professionals. This paper describes the design and manufacture of breast lesions by using polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) as the base material. Among the materials available for this study, PVCP was shown to be stable, durable, and easy to handle. Furthermore, it is a nontoxic, nonpolluting, and low-cost material. The breast's glandular tissue (image background) was simulated by adding graphite powder with a concentration of 1% to the base material. Mixing PVCP and graphite powder in differing concentrations allows one to simulate lesions with different echogenicity patterns (anechoic, hypoechoic, and hyperechoic). From this mixture, phantom materials were obtained with speed of sound varying from 1379.3 to 1397.9ms(-1) and an attenuation coefficient having values between 0.29 and 0.94dBcm(-1) for a frequency of 1MHz at 24°C. A single layer of carnauba wax was added to the lesion surface in order to evaluate its applicability for imaging. The images of the phantoms were acquired using commercial ultrasound equipment; a specialist rated the images, elaborating diagnoses representative of both benign and malignant lesions. The results indicated that it was possible to easily create a phantom by using low-cost materials, readily available in the market and stable at room temperature, as the basis of ultrasonic phantoms that reproduce the image characteristics of fatty breast tissue and typical lesions of the breast. PMID:27153374

  3. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aman; Singh, Vijay Pratap

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the most important steps is accurate impression making for fabrication of fixed partial denture. The two different putty-wash techniques that are commonly used are: (1) Putty-wash one-step technique, (2) putty-wash two-step technique. A uniform wash space is needed for an accurate impression. Nissan et al recommended the use of two-step technique for accurate impression making as there is uniform wash space for the light body material to polymerize. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts obtained from different putty-wash impression techniques using various spacer thickness. The critical factor that influences the accuracy of putty-wash impression techniques is the controlled wash bulk which is absent in one-step putty-wash impression technique and with polyethylene spacer was used. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Arora A, Singh VP. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):33-38. PMID:25206132

  4. Dimensional Changes of Alginate Dental Impression Materials-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thombare, Ram U

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentists are always looking ahead for more dimensionally stable material for accurate and successful fabrication of prosthesis in this competitive world. Arrival of newer materials and increased material market puts dentists in dilemma for selection of material. Aim The study evaluated the effect of variations in time of pour and temperature on dimensional stability of three brands of commercially available alginates. Materials and Methods Velplast, Marieflex & Zelgan alginate impression materials were evaluated by measuring dimensional accuracy of the master cast. A die was prepared and mounted on the apparatus for the ease of impression making. The prepared casts were categorized into five groups and made up of three brands of alginate impression material with variation in time of pour viz: immediate, 20&40 minutes interval and with varying temperature of 250C, 300C & 400C. Results Impressions showed least distortion at varying degrees of temperature for 20 minutes, but the values obtained by storing of alginate impressions for 20 minutes at 300C were found to be nearly accurate than the values obtained by storing of impression at 400C. However, storing showed shrinkage of impressions. Conclusion Marieflex showed better accuracy in comparison with other two materials. Maintenance of temperature and humidity play key role during storage & transport to prevent distortion. But the study suggests immediate pouring which will minimize the distortion. The manipulation instructions, temperature of mixing water, environment & water powder ratio also plays key role in minimizing the distortion. PMID:26436059

  5. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids

    PubMed Central

    Amalan, Arul; Ginjupalli, Kishore; Upadhya, Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Addition of disinfectant to irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials can eliminate the disinfection step to avoid dimensional changes associated with it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various disinfectant mixing liquids on the properties of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials. Materials and Methods: Four commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Zelgan, Vignette, Tropicalgin, and Algitex) were mixed with disinfectant liquid containing chlorhexidine (0.1 and 0.2%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.5%). After mixing with disinfectant liquids, materials were evaluated for pH changes during gelation, gelation time, flow, gel strength, permanent deformation and detail reproduction. Results: Significant changes in gelation time were observed in irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials upon mixing with disinfectant liquids. In general, chlorhexidine increased the gelation time, whereas sodium hypochlorite reduced it. However, no significant changes in the flow were observed both with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite. Gel strength was found to decrease when mixed with chlorhexidine, whereas an increase in gel strength was observed upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite. Permanent deformation of the most irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials was below the specification limit even after mixing with disinfectant liquids. Sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced the surface detail reproduction, whereas no change in detail reproduction was observed with chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions. PMID:23878566

  6. Polyvinyl alcohol-graft-polyethylene glycol hydrogels improve utility and biofunctionality of injectable collagen biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Ryan; Chan, Ben; Elliott, Keenan; Alnojeidi, Hatem; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Collagen-based materials have become a staple in both research and the clinic. In wound care, collagen-based materials comprise a core gamut of biological dressings and therapeutic strategies. In research, collagen-based materials are employed in everything from 3D cultures to bioprinting. Soluble collagen is well characterized to undergo fibrillation at neutral pH and 37 °C. To remain stable, a neutralized collagen solution must be maintained at 4 °C. These physical characteristics of collagen impose limitations on its utility. In our previous work, we identified that the incorporation of a simple polyvinyl alcohol:borate hydrogel could improve the rate of collagen gel fibrillation. In this work we sought to further investigate the interactions of polyvinyl alcohol blend variants, as surfactant-like polymers, in comparison with known non-polymer surfactants. To conduct our investigations scaffold variants were created using increasing concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol, differing combinations of polymers, and non-polymer surfactants Tweens 20 and 80, and TritonX-100. Activation energy for collagen fibrillation was found to significantly decrease in the presence of polyvinyl alcohols (p  <  0.01) at and above 0.4%w/v concentration. Further, addition of polyvinyl alcohol-graft-polyethylene glycol had the greatest enhancement (2.02 fold) on the fibrillation kinetics (p  <  0.01), wetting properties and the stability of the collagen scaffolds post-freeze drying. Our results demonstrated that the addition of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels to a collagen solution could stabilize collagen solution such that the solution could easily be lyophilized (at pH 7) and then reconstituted with water. Cells cultured in polyvinyl alcohol scaffolds also exhibited more organized F-actin, as well as a reduced abundance of pro-collagen and α-smooth actin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate for the first time that polyvinyl alcohol, preferably polyvinyl alcohol

  7. Surface alignment, anchoring transitions, optical properties, and topological defects in the thermotropic nematic phase of organo-siloxane tetrapodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Senyuk, Bohdan; Shin, Sung-Tae; Kohlmeier, Alexandra; Mehl, Georg H; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2014-01-21

    We perform optical, surface anchoring, and textural studies of an organo-siloxane "tetrapode" material in the broad temperature range of the nematic phase. The optical, structural, and topological features are compatible with the uniaxial nematic order rather than with the biaxial nematic order, in the entire nematic temperature range -25 °C < T < 46 °C studied. For homeotropic alignment, the material experiences surface anchoring transition, but the director can be realigned into an optically uniaxial texture by applying a sufficiently strong electric field. The topological features of textures in cylindrical capillaries, in spherical droplets and around colloidal inclusions are consistent with the uniaxial character of the long-range nematic order. In particular, we observe isolated surface point defects - boojums and bulk point defects - hedgehogs that can exist only in the uniaxial nematic liquid crystal. PMID:24651889

  8. Halloysite nanotube supported Ag nanoparticles heteroarchitectures as catalysts for polymerization of alkylsilanes to superhydrophobic silanol/siloxane composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Li, Xueyuan; Duan, Xuelan; Li, Guangjie; Wang, Jiaqiang

    2014-12-15

    Halloysite nanotube supported Ag nanoparticles heteroarchitectures have been prepared through a very simple electroless plating method. Robust Ag nanocrystals can be reproducibly fabricated by soaking halloysite nanotubes in ethanolic solutions of AgNO3 and butylamine. By simply adjusting the molar ratio of AgNO3 and butylamine, Ag nanoparticles with tunable size and quantity on halloysite nanotube are achieved. It reveals that the Ag nanoparticles are well-dispersed on the surface of halloysite nanotubes. The halloysite nanotube supported Ag nanoparticles heteroarchitectures can serve as active catalysts for the polymerization of an alkylsilane C18H37SiH3 with water to form silanol/siloxane composite microspheres and exhibit interesting superhydrophobicity ascribed to the micro/nanobinary structure. PMID:25268813

  9. New holographic polymeric composition based on plexiglass, polyvinyl butyral, and phenanthrenquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusevich, Vladislav; Tolstik, Elen; Kowarschik, Richard; Egorova, Elena; Matusevich, Yuri I.; Krul, Leonid

    2013-05-01

    The newly developed Plexiglas films containing polyvinyl butyral resins and phenanthrenequinone molecules as photosensitive dopant, which are proposed for the practical application as interlayer of laminated safety glass, are shown for the first time. The injection of the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate) into the polyvinyl butyral protective interlayer provides a homogenous distribution of the recording holographic medium in the layer and allows fixing the entire surface grating in the laminated glass. In addition, the original properties of polyvinyl butyral as a connecting material were preserved during manufacturing of the laminated glass. This allows a recording of holographic structures directly after baking of the laminated glass, thus reducing the destruction of the gratings due to the elevated temperatures. The diffractive structures in phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral polymeric layers with thicknesses of hundreds of microns are sealed between two panels of glass (so-called laminated glass) and are generated by illumination with an Argon-laser of 514 nm. Efficiently fixed and long-term stable holographic gratings recorded in the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral layer enable to produce transparent laminated glass with inserted diffractive elements, which can be used e.g. for Head-up Displays in automobile windshields or as holographic light concentrators for solar cells.

  10. System constants for the bis(cyanopropylsiloxane)-co-methylsilarylene HP-88 and poly(siloxane) Rtx-440 stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Kiridena, Waruna; Patchett, Cheryl C; Koziol, Wladyslaw W; Poole, Colin F

    2005-07-22

    The solvation parameter model is used to characterize the retention properties of the bis(cyanopropylsiloxane)-co-methylsilarylene, HP-88, and poly(siloxane), Rtx-440, stationary phases over the temperature range 60-140 degrees C. HP-88 is among the most cohesive, dipolar/polarizable and hydrogen-bond basic of stationary phases for open-tubular column gas chromatography. It has no hydrogen-bond acidity or capacity for electron lone pair interactions. It exhibits similar selectivity to the poly(cyanopropylsiloxane) stationary phase SP-2340. Rtx-440 is a low-polarity, low-cohesion stationary phase with a moderate capacity for dipolar/polarizable and hydrogen-bond base interactions. It has no hydrogen-bond acidity and possesses weak electron lone pair interactions. It has unique selectivity when compared against a system constants database for 28 common stationary phase compositions. Cluster analysis indicated that the poly(cyanopropylphenyldimethylsiloxane) stationary phase containing 6% cyanopropylphenylsiloxane monomer, DB-1301, the poly(dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) stationary phase containing 20% diphenylsiloxane monomer, Rtx-20, the poly(siloxane) stationary phase of unknown composition, DB-624, and DX-1 [a mixture of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and poly(ethylene glycol) 9:1] are the closest selectivity matches in the database. The selectivity of DB-1301 and Rtx-440 are very similar for solutes with weak hydrogen-bond acidity allowing one stationary phase to be substituted for the other with likely success. For strong hydrogen-bond acids, such as phenols, DB-1301 and Rtx-440 exhibit different selectivity. PMID:16038217

  11. The elastomers for complete denture impression: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Elie E.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the current trends in materials used for complete denture impression. Peer-reviewed articles, published in English and in French between 1954 and 2007, were identified through a MEDLINE search (Pubmed and Elsevier) and a hand search of relevant textbooks and annual publications. Emphasis was made on the characteristics of the elastomers, their manipulation, the different techniques used, and the quality of the impression obtained. The combination of excellent physical properties, handling characteristics, and unlimited dimensional stability assures the popularity of these impression materials. PMID:24151408

  12. Comparison of Different Final Impression Techniques for Management of Resorbed Mandibular Ridge: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhupender; Jayna, Manisha; Yadav, Harish; Suri, Shrey; Phogat, Shefali; Madan, Reshu

    2014-01-01

    The history of complete denture impression procedures has been influenced largely by the development of impression materials from which new techniques and ideas arose. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of complete dentures made by using different impression techniques like conventional, admixed, all green, and functional techniques. The results showed that there was significant difference in retention between the six techniques where functional technique showed the highest mean value of retention followed by elastomeric, all green, and admixed, while cocktail and green stick compound showed the lowest mean value. However, on clinical examination, the retention produced by the six techniques was satisfactory. PMID:25180105

  13. Examining the Moderating Effect of Appearance Impression Motivation on the Relationship between Perceived Physical Appearance and Social Physique Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amorose, Anthony J.; Hollembeak, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Despite the conceptual importance of impression motivation in predicting social anxiety (Leary & Kowalski, 1995; Schlenker & Leary, 1982), no research has tested the link between impression motivation specifically regarding one's physical appearance (appearance impression motivation, or AIM) and social physique anxiety (SPA). The purpose of this…

  14. The Use of Digital Impressions to Fabricate Tooth-Supported Partial Removable Dental Prostheses: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed; Sanchez, Eliana; Machado, Camilo

    2016-08-01

    Impression making is a critical step in the fabrication of a partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP). A technique is described for making final impressions to fabricate partial RDPs for Kennedy class III patients using a computer-aided design and computer-assisted manufacturing digital impression system. PMID:26371612

  15. Fabrication technique for a custom face mask for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Prehn, Ronald S; Colquitt, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The development of the positive airway pressure custom mask (TAP-PAP CM) has changed the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. The TAP-PAP CM is used in continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) and is fabricated from the impression of the face. This mask is then connected to a post screwed into the mechanism of the TAP3 (Thornton Anterior Positioner) oral appliance. This strapless CPAP face mask features an efficient and stable CPAP interface with mandibular stabilization (Hybrid Therapy). A technique with a 2-stage polyvinyl siloxane face impression is described that offers improvements over the established single-stage face impression. This 2-stage impression technique eliminates problems inherent in the single-stage face impression, including voids, compressed tissue, inadequate borders, and a rushed experience due to the setting time of the single stage. The result is a custom mask with an improved seal to the CPAP device. PMID:26774315

  16. A Consideration of Cognitive Complexity and Primacy - Recency Effects in Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petronko, Michael R.; Perin, Charles T.

    1970-01-01

    Classifies subjects as cognitively simple" or cognitively complex" and notes that the latter are much nore successful at reconciling inconsistent information than are the former, whose impressions are formed by the information which makes the greatest impact. (RW)

  17. The effect of anxiety on impression formation: affect-congruent or stereotypic biases?

    PubMed

    Curtis, Guy J; Locke, Vance

    2005-03-01

    Two classes of theories propose that anxious individuals will form either more affect-congruent or more stereotypic impressions of others. These theories' predictions are not mutually exclusive. Eighty-one participants were examined to determine if either class of theories was more descriptive of the effect of anxiety on impression formation or whether a theory combining elements of both was more appropriate. Anxious participants read behavioural descriptions about an Australian Aboriginal target that were stereotypic, non-stereotypic, threatening, and non-threatening, and rated the target on traits that corresponded to the behavioural descriptions. Anxious participants formed impressions that were more affect-congruent, but not more stereotypic, than those formed by control participants. This result was replicated in a field study with 61 participants who were waiting to see a dentist. Future studies should examine the cognitive mechanisms that influence and underlie anxious affect-congruent impression formation. PMID:15901392

  18. My Impressions of My American Colleagues. Reflections on My Ukranian Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasova, Olena; Megyeri, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    Presents a Ukrainian teacher's impressions of American English teaching, and an American high school English teacher's reflections about teaching English in the Ukraine. Notes the differences and similarities of teaching English in both countries. (SR)

  19. Social desirability scales as indicators of self-enhancement and impression management.

    PubMed

    Parmač Kovačić, Maja; Galić, Zvonimir; Jerneić, Željko

    2014-01-01

    This article presents 2 studies testing Paulhus's (2002) assumption that unconscious self-enhancement and conscious impression management represent separate processes of socially desirable responding (SDR) that can be observed within 2 content domains (egoistic and moralistic bias). In Study 1, we devised egoistic and moralistic SDR scales intended to measure self-enhancement in honest responding and impression management under demands for positive self-presentation. In Study 2, we correlated scores on these scales with external indicators of self-enhancement and impression management. In honest responding, both SDR scales most strongly correlated with self-enhancement indicators, whereas under demands for positive self-presentation they correlated more strongly with external measures of impression management. PMID:24837586

  20. Trait impressions as overgeneralized responses to adaptively significant facial qualities: evidence from connectionist modeling.

    PubMed

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Mignault, Alain; Andreoletti, Carrie

    2003-01-01

    Connectionist modeling experiments tested anomalous-face and baby-face overgeneralization hypotheses proposed to explain consensual trait impressions of faces. Activation of a neural network unit trained to respond to anomalous faces predicted impressions of normal adult faces varying in attractiveness as well as several elderly stereotypes. Activation of a neural network unit trained to respond to babies' faces predicted impressions of adults varying in babyfaceness as well as 1 elderly stereotype. Thus, similarities of normal adult faces to anomalous faces or babies' faces contribute to impressions of them quite apart from knowledge of overlapping social stereotypes. The evolutionary importance of appropriate responses to unfit individuals or babies is presumed to produce a strong response preparedness that is overgeneralized to faces resembling the unfit or babies. PMID:12788687

  1. 3D shape measurement of shoeprint impression with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjing

    2002-06-01

    The shoeprint impressions of suspect left at the crime scene can sometimes tell investigators what type of shoes to be looked for. These shoeprint impressions as one of the important evidence are useful in the detection of criminals. In this paper we propose a novel technique for identifying and analyzing the 3D characteristics of shoeprint impressions. We also design 3D shoeprint impression analysis system based on the combination the 3D shape measurement with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis. We give a detail discussion on the principle and configuration of the system. Laboratory experiments show the technique is efficient in the detection of shoeprint and in the offering the reference for judicial evidence.

  2. A study of local crankshaft-type mobility in vitreous polyvinyl chloride and polyacrylonitrile by the method of conformational probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalova, D. I.; Kolyadko, I. M.; Remizov, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Secondary relaxation transitions and local conformational dynamics in polyacrylonitrile and polyvinyl chloride were studied by the method of conformational probes. Relaxation transitions at 210 and 260 K (polyvinyl chloride) and 165 K (polyacrylonitrile) were explained by freezing of “crankshaft-type” motions.

  3. Characterization and application of chondroitin sulfate/polyvinyl alcohol nanofibres prepared by electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junxia; Zhou, Huitong; Akram, Muhammad Yasir; Mu, Xueyan; Nie, Jun; Ma, Guiping

    2016-06-01

    Composite nanofibres were prepared by electrospinning from a solution of chondroitin sulfate and polyvinyl alcohol. The chondroitin sulfate/polyvinyl alcohol (CS/PVA) mass ratios of 7/3 has a uniform and smooth morphology, and the average diameter of the nanofibres was 136nm. Combretastatin A-4 phosphate was loaded on the nanofibres and used as a model for testing drug release from the nanofibres crosslinked with glutaric dialdehyde. The morphology and structure of the nanofibres was determined using scanning electron microscopy. In order to assess their possible application to tissue engineering scaffolds, the toxicity and cytocompatibility of the nanofibres were tested by methylthiazolydiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. PMID:27083365

  4. Structural and electronic properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dabhi, Shweta Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    The first principles calculations have been carried out to investigate the structural, electronic band structure density of states along with the projected density of states for poly(vinyl alcohol). Our structural calculation suggests that the poly(vinyl alcohol) exhibits monoclinic structure. The calculated structural lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with available experimental values. The band structure calculations reveal that the direct and indirect band gaps are 5.55 eV and 5.363 eV respectively in accordance with experimental values.

  5. Effect of Hydroxyl Concentration on Chemical Sensitivity of Polyvinyl Alcohol/Carbon-Black Composite Chemiresistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Robert C.; Patel, Sanjay V.; Yelton, W. Graham

    1999-05-19

    The sensitivity and selectivity of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) / carbon black composite films have been found to vary depending upon the hydroxylation percentage ("-OH") of the polymer. These chemiresistors made from PVA films whose polymer backbone is 88% hydroxylated (PVA88) have a high sensitivity to water, while chemiresistors made from PVA75 have a higher sensitivity to methanol. The minor differences in polymer composition result in films with different Hildebrand volubility parameters. The relative responses of several different PVA-based chemiresistors to solvents with different volubility parameters are presented. In addition, polyvinyl acetate (PVAC) films with PVA88 are used in an array to distinguish the responses to methanol-water mixtures.

  6. The Effect of Disinfection by Spray Atomization on Dimensional Accuracy of Condensation Silicone Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Saleh Saber, Fariba; Abolfazli, Nader; Kohsoltani, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The condensation silicone impression materials are available, but there is little knowledge of their accuracy after disinfection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the disinfection by spray atomization on dimensional accuracy of condensation silicone impressions. Materials and methods Impressions were made on a stainless steel master model containing a simulated two complete crown preparation with an edentulous space interposed using Spidex® and Rapid® impression materials. 44 impressions were made with each material, of which 16 were disinfected with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 16 were disinfected with 10% iodophor and 12 were not disinfected. Three dimensional measurements of working casts, including interpreparation distance, height, and diameter, were calculated using a measuring microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. Dimensional changes (mm) between the disinfected and non-disinfected working casts were compared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to analyze the data (α=0.05). Results Disinfection of each condensation silicone material by spraying atomization with two different disinfectant material resulted in significant change in interpreparation distance (p<0.05). Changes in height and diameter were only significant in Spidex® impressions (p<0.05). Conclusion Significant changes in the mean dimensions were seen as a result of disinfection by spraying; however, the dimensional changes do not seem great enough to cause critical positional distortion of teeth when fixed partial denture restorations are made. PMID:23346339

  7. Effect of mixing techniques on bacterial attachment and disinfection time of polyether impression material

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Umut; Budak, Yasemin; Ruh, Emrah; Ocal, Yesim; Canay, Senay; Akyon, Yakut

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was 2-fold. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of mixing technique (hand-mixing or auto-mixing) on bacterial attachment to polyether impression materials. The second aim was to determine whether bacterial attachment to these materials was affected by length of exposure to disinfection solutions. Materials and Methods: Polyether impression material samples (n = 144) were prepared by hand-mixing or auto-mixing. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used in testing. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted and then disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated just after the polymerization of impression material and 30 min after polymerization. Differences in adherence of bacteria to the samples prepared by hand-mixing and to those prepared by auto-mixing were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. For evaluating the efficiency of the disinfectant, Kruskal-Wallis multiple comparisons test was used. Results: E. coli counts were higher in hand-mixed materials (P < 0.05); no other statistically significant differences were found between hand- and auto-mixed materials. According to the Kruskal-Wallis test, significant differences were found between the disinfection procedures (Z > 2.394). Conclusion: The methods used for mixing polyether impression material did not affect bacterial attachment to impression surfaces. In contrast, the disinfection procedure greatly affects decontamination of the impression surface. PMID:24966729

  8. Performance of dental impression materials: Benchmarking of materials and techniques by three-dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Heike; Graf, Michael R S; Kuhn, Katharina; Rupf-Köhler, Stephanie; Eirich, Alfred; Edelmann, Cornelia; Quaas, Sebastian; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2015-01-01

    Among other factors, the precision of dental impressions is an important and determining factor for the fit of dental restorations. The aim of this study was to examine the three-dimensional (3D) precision of gypsum dies made using a range of impression techniques and materials. Ten impressions of a steel canine were fabricated for each of the 24 material-method-combinations and poured with type 4 die stone. The dies were optically digitized, aligned to the CAD model of the steel canine, and 3D differences were calculated. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Depending on material and impression technique, the mean values had a range between +10.9/-10.0 µm (SD 2.8/2.3) and +16.5/-23.5 µm (SD 11.8/18.8). Qualitative analysis using colorcoded graphs showed a characteristic location of deviations for different impression techniques. Three-dimensional analysis provided a comprehensive picture of the achievable precision. Processing aspects and impression technique were of significant influence. PMID:25948142

  9. Single Stage Silicone Border Molded Closed Mouth Impression Technique-Part II.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E G R

    2011-09-01

    Functioning of a complete denture depends to a great extent on the impression technique. Several impression techniques have been described in the literature since the turn of this century when Greene [Clinical courses in dental prothesis, 1916] brothers introduced the first scientific system of recording dental impression. Advocates of each technique have their own claim of superiority over the other. The introduction of elastomeric impression materials [Skinner and Cooper, J Am Dent Assoc 51:523-536, 1955] has made possible new techniques of recording impression for complete denture construction. These rubber like materials are of two types; one has a polysulfide base and is popularily known as polysulfide rubber (Thiokol and Mercaptan). The other variety has a silicone base known as silicone rubber or silicone elastomer. Silicone elastomers are available in four different consistencies; a thin easy flowing light bodied material,a creamy medium bodied material, a highly viscous heavy bodied material and a kneadable putty material. This paper describes an active closed mouth impression technique with one stage border molding using putty silicone material as a substitute for low fusing compound. PMID:22942578

  10. Analytical application of poly{methyl[3-(2-hydroxy-3,4-difluoro)phenyl]propyl siloxane} as a QCM coating for DMMP detection.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liu, Zhongxiang; Du, Xiaosong; Jiang, Yadong; Xiao, Dan

    2008-07-30

    A new material-poly{methyl[3-(2-hydroxy-3,4-difluoro)phenyl]propyl siloxane}(PMDFPS) sensitive to toxic organophosphate vapor was synthesized with 2,3-difluorophenol, allyl bromide and poly (methyl hydrosiloxane) as raw materials, via O-alkylation, Claisen rearrange reaction and hydrosilylation reaction. This novel material was then coated on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to investigate its gas sensitive properties to the nerve agent simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor, as well as known interfering vapors. When tested with competing vapors, the sensor was more than 10 times sensitive to DMMP than to other interfering vapors. Thus, high selectivity of poly{methyl[3-(2-hydroxy-3,4-difluoro)phenyl]propyl siloxane} to DMMP was demonstrated. The poly{methyl[3-(2-hydroxy-3,4-difluoro)phenyl]propyl siloxane}-QCM sensor responded linearly to DMMP vapor with a slope of 14 Hz/ppm in the 1-50 ppm range with a detection limit of 0.21 ppm (S/N=3). PMID:18585342

  11. Synthesis and properties of a novel UV-cured fluorinated siloxane graft copolymer for improved surface, dielectric and tribological properties of epoxy acrylate coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenlong; Liu, Weiqu; Gao, Nan; Wang, Honglei; Su, Kui

    2013-11-01

    A novel functional fluorinated siloxane graft copolymer bearing with vinyl end-groups was synthesized from dihydroxypropyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), dicarboxyl terminated poly(2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluorobutyl acrylate) oligomer (CTHFA), 2,4-toluene diissocyanate (TDI) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The chemical structure was characterized by FT-IR and GPC. The effect of concentration of the vinyl-capped fluorosilicone graft copolymer (Vi-PFSi) on the surface, thermal properties, dielectric and tribological properties of UV-cured films was investigated. Contact angles and surface energies showed that the high hydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces were obtained by incorporation of Vi-PFSi at very low amount (0.5 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) evidenced that the fluorinated and siloxane moiety selectively migrated to the outermost surface of UV-cured film, thus reduced its surface energy from 45.42 to 15.40 mN/m2 without affecting its bulk properties. The morphology of fracture surface of modified film exhibited rough fracture surface only at the outermost surface, revealing fluorinated and siloxane groups migrated toward air-side surface. The dielectric constants decreased from 5.32 (1 MHz) for bisphenol-A epoxy methacrylate (EMA) to 2.82 (1 MHz) for modified film when the Vi-PFSi copolymer concentration increased from 0 to 0.8 wt%. Tribological results from abrasion tester suggested that the Vi-PFSi could obviously reduce the abrasion weight loss of modified films.

  12. Surficial Siloxane-to-Silanol Interconversion during Room-Temperature Hydration/Dehydration of Amorphous Silica Films Observed by ATR-IR and TIR-Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Warring, Suzanne L; Beattie, David A; McQuillan, A James

    2016-02-16

    Silica has been frequently studied using infrared and Raman spectroscopy due to its importance in many practical contexts where its surface chemistry plays a vital role. The majority of these studies have utilized chemical-vapor-deposited films in vacuo after high-temperature calcination. However, room-temperature hydration and dehydration of thin silica particle films has not been well characterized in spite of the importance of such films as substrates for polymer and surfactant adsorption. The present study has utilized ATR-IR spectroscopy and thin silica particle films exposed to varying humidity to clearly show reversible conversion between surface siloxanes and hydrogen-bonded silanols without the need for semiempirical peak deconvolution. The IR spectra from corresponding hydration experiments on deuterated silica films has confirmed the vibrational mode assignments. The variation of humidity over silica films formed from silica suspensions of differing pH gave IR spectra consistent with the change in the relative populations of siloxide to silanol surface groups. In addition, total internal reflection Raman spectroscopy has been used to provide further evidence of room-temperature dehydroxylation, with spectral evidence for the presence of three-membered siloxane rings when films are dehydrated under argon. The confirmation of room-temperature siloxane-to-silanol interconversion is expected to benefit understanding in many silica surface chemical contexts. PMID:26804934

  13. Corrosion resistance of siloxane-poly(methyl methacrylate) hybrid films modified with acetic acid on tin plate substrates: Influence of tetraethoxysilane addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunst, S. R.; Cardoso, H. R. P.; Oliveira, C. T.; Santana, J. A.; Sarmento, V. H. V.; Muller, I. L.; Malfatti, C. F.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of hybrid films. Tin plate was coated with a siloxane-poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid film prepared by sol-gel route with covalent bonds between the organic (PMMA) and inorganic (siloxane) phases obtained by hydrolysis and polycondensation of 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl) methacrylate (TMSM) and polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a thermic initiator. Hydrolysis reactions were catalyzed by acetic acid solution avoiding the use of chlorine or stronger acids in the film preparation. The effect of the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on the protective properties of the film was evaluated. The hydrophobicity of the film was determined by contact angle measurements, and the morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and profilometry. The local nanostructure was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electrochemical behavior of the films was assessed by open circuit potential monitoring, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in a 0.05 M NaCl solution. The mechanical behavior was evaluated by tribology. The results highlighted that the siloxane-PMMA hybrid films modified with acetic acid are promising anti-corrosive coatings that acts as an efficient diffusion barrier, protecting tin plates against corrosion. However, the coating properties were affected by the TEOS addition, which contributed for the thickness increase and irregular surface coverage.

  14. Antimicrobial Effect of An Essential Oil Blend on Surface-attached Salmonella on Polyvinyl Chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of drinking water lines for broilers are made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and surface attachment of Salmonella on the inner surface of water lines can be the initial stage of biofilm development. These biofilms can be the source of Salmonella infection in water lines and are known to re...

  15. Antimicrobial Effect of An Essential Oil Blend on Surface-attached Salmonella on Polyvinyl Chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is basic material for drinking water lines for chickens. Inner surface of PVC pipe can be susceptible to surface-attachment of Salmonella, the 1st stage of biofilm development. Biofilm which can cause Salmonella infection to chickens are known to have great resistance agains...

  16. Mechanical properties and biocompatibility of co-axially electrospun polyvinyl alcohol/maghemite.

    PubMed

    Ngadiman, Nor Hasrul Akhmal; Mohd Yusof, Noordin; Idris, Ani; Kurniawan, Denni

    2016-08-01

    Electrospinning is a simple and efficient process in producing nanofibers. To fabricate nanofibers made of a blend of two constituent materials, co-axial electrospinning method is an option. In this method, the constituent materials contained in separate barrels are simultaneously injected using two syringe nozzles arranged co-axially and the materials mix during the spraying process forming core and shell of the nanofibers. In this study, co-axial electrospinning method is used to fabricate nanofibers made of polyvinyl alcohol and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). The concentration of polyvinyl alcohol and amount of maghemite nanoparticle loading were varied, at 5 and 10 w/v% and at 1-10 v/v%, respectively. The mechanical properties (strength and Young's modulus), porosity, and biocompatibility properties (contact angle and cell viability) of the electrospun mats were evaluated, with the same mats fabricated by regular single-nozzle electrospinning method as the control. The co-axial electrospinning method is able to fabricate the expected polyvinyl alcohol/maghemite nanofiber mats. It was noticed that the polyvinyl alcohol/maghemite electrospun mats have lower mechanical properties (i.e. strength and stiffness) and porosity, more hydrophilicity (i.e. lower contact angle), and similar cell viability compared to the mats fabricated by single-nozzle electrospinning method. PMID:27194535

  17. 76 FR 30604 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Polyvinyl Chloride and Copolymers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 RIN 2060-AN33 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for..., the proposed rule, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Polyvinyl Chloride and... regarding the EPA's proposed national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants, including data,...

  18. Hybrid composite based on poly(vinyl alcohol) and fillers from renewable resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybrid composite laminates consisting of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as continuous phase (33% by weight) and lignocellulosic fillers, derived from sugarcane bagasse, apple and orange waste (22% by weight) were molded in a carver press in the presence of water and glycerol such as platicizers agents. Cor...

  19. Hybrid composite based on poly(vinyl alcohol) and fillers from renewable resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybrid composite laminates consisting of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as continuous phase and lignocellulosic fibres, derived from sugarcane bagasse, apple and orange waste were moulded in a carver press in the presence of water and glycerol such as platicizers agents. Corn starch was introduced as a bio...

  20. Boronic acid as an efficient anchor group for surface modification of solid polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Nishiyabu, Ryuhei; Shimizu, Ai

    2016-07-28

    We report the use of boronic acid as an anchor group for surface modification of solid polyvinyl alcohol (PVA); the surfaces of PVA microparticles, films, and nanofibers were chemically modified with boronic acid-appended fluorescent dyes through boronate esterification using a simple soaking technique in a short time under ambient conditions. PMID:27311634