Science.gov

Sample records for pool boiling system

  1. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  2. Boiling Performance of Antifreeze Solutions in a Saturate Pool Boiling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Kunihito; Kaminaga, Fumito

    Nucleate boiling of binary mixtures is of particular importance in a various industries. The purpose of the present study is to provide experimental data and prediction method for nucleate boiling heat transfer of anti-freeze solutions, Propylene-glycol (PG)/water and Ethylene-glycol (EG)/water. The pool nucleate boiling experiments were carried out under a saturated and atmospheric condition. The platinum wire of 0.3 mm diameter was used as the heating surface. The mole fractions of solutions are varied from 0.85 to 1. It was found that the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases with increasing fraction of anti-freeze to water. It was also shown that a small addition of propylene-glycol and ethylene-glycol also decreases the CHF value far below that of pure water. It is concluded that the correlation proposed by Fujita for several binary mixtures can well predict the heat transfer coefficients within almost ±5% accuracy for every concentration of present anti-freeze solutions.

  3. Design and test of a compact optics system for the pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Laubenthal, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The experiment described seeks to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. The vehicle for accomplishing this is an investigation, including tests to be conducted in microgravity and coupled with appropriate analyses, of the heat transfer and vapor bubble dynamics associated with nucleation, bubble growth/collapse and subsequent motion, considering the interrelations between buoyancy, momentum and surface tension which will govern the motion of the vapor and surrounding liquid, as a function of the heating rate at the heat transfer surface and the temperature level and distribution in the bulk liquid. The experiment is designed to be contained within the confines of a Get-Away-Special Canister (GAS Can) installed in the bay of the space shuttle. When the shuttle reaches orbit, the experiment will be turned on and testing will proceed automatically. In the proposed Pool Boiling Experiment a pool of liquid, initially at a precisely defined pressure and temperature, will be subjected to a step imposed heat flux from a semitransparent thin-film heater forming part of one wall of the container such that boiling is initiated and maintained for a defined period of time at a constant pressure level. Transient measurements of the heater surface and fluid temperatures near the surface will be made, noting especially the conditions at the onset of boiling, along with motion photography of the boiling process in two simultaneous views, from beneath the heating surface and from the side. The conduct of the experiment and the data acquisition will be completely automated and self-contained. For the initial flight, a total of nine tests are proposed, with three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling. The design process used in the development and check-out of the compact photographic/optics system for the Pool Boiling Experiment is documented.

  4. Transient pool boiling in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, J. S.; Merte, H., Jr.; Keller, R. B.; Kirk, K.

    1992-01-01

    Transient nucleate pool boiling experiments using R113 are conducted for short times in microgravity and in earth gravity with different heater surface orientations and subcoolings. The heating surface is a transparent gold film sputtered on a quartz substrate, which simultaneously provides surface temperature measurements and permits viewing of the boiling process from beneath. For the microgravity experiments, which have uniform initial temperatures and no fluid motion, the temperature distribution in the R 113 at the moment of boiling inception is known. High speed cameras with views both across and through the heating surface record the boiling spread across the heater surface, which is classified into six distinct categories.

  5. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  6. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many Earthbound applications, such as steam-generation power plants, petroleum, and other chemical plants. Also, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  7. Conceptual design for spacelab pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J. H.; Peck, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A pool boiling heat transfer experiment to be incorporated with a larger two-phase flow experiment on Spacelab was designed to confirm (or alter) the results of earth-normal gravity experiments which indicate that the hydrodynamic peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes vanish at very low gravity. Twelve small sealed test cells containing water, methanol or Freon 113 and cylindrical heaters of various sizes are to be built. Each cell will be subjected to one or more 45 sec tests in which the surface heat flux on the heaters is increased linearly until the surface temperature reaches a limiting value of 500 C. The entire boiling process will be photographed in slow-motion. Boiling curves will be constructed from thermocouple and electric input data, for comparison with the motion picture records. The conduct of the experiment will require no more than a few hours of operator time.

  8. Visualization study on pool boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamei, Shuya; Hirata, Masaru

    1991-04-01

    The visualized boiling phenomena were observed by means of high speed photographic shadowgraphy using a rotating prism camera (nac HIGH SPEED CAMERA model-16HD) with the speed of about 3500 frames per second. The photographs show that pool boiling heat transfer phenomena are varied for the boiling curve based on the experiments. Experiments have been carried out to investigate pool boiling heat transfer phenomena on a horizontal thin filament in subcooled and saturated distilled water. The experiments were performed for atmospheric pressure,for filament diameters of about 0.3 mm, for region of natural convection to film boiling. The color-film made by high speed movie camera are converted to high speed color video-tape. It is convenient to edit and show the tape for visualization with teaching the students. The high speed color video showed that the successive motion and shape of bubbles during their process of detachment varied with increasing heat flux on the heated surface of a filament. From these results, it was confirmed that the high speed phenomena of boiling by the slow motion video pictures could be estimated clearly.

  9. Effects of heater and heating methods on pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.M.; Lee, D.J. )

    1989-10-01

    In a pool boiling from an electrically-heated wire, there are three modes of boiling: nucleate, film, and coexisting nucleate and film boiling. These are shown. In this work, the effects of the physical properties of heating wires on steady-state pool boiling have been investigated analytically. The cases of constant voltage heating and constant current heating have been solved.

  10. Electrohydrodynamic Pool Boiling in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Stahl, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research is concerned with studying the effects of applied electric fields on pool boiling in a reduced-gravity environment. Experiments are conducted at the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec Drop tower using a drop rig constructed at UC Davis. In the experiments, a platinum wire is heated while immersed in saturated liquid refrigerants (FC-72 and FC-87), or water, causing vapor formation at the wire surface. Electric fields are applied between the wire surface and an outer screen electrode that surrounds the wire. Preliminary normal-gravity experiments with water have demonstrated that applied electric fields generated by the rig electronics can influence boiling characteristics. Reduced-gravity experiments will be performed in the summer of 1996. The experiments will provide fundamental data on electric field strengths required to disrupt film boiling (for various wire heat generation input rates) in reduced gravity for a cylindrical geometry. The experiments should also shed light on the roles of characteristic bubble generation times and charge relaxation times in determining the effects of electric fields on pool boiling. Normal-gravity comparison experiments will also be performed.

  11. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  12. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-02-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  13. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  14. Sub-Cooled Pool Boiling Enhancement with Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Elliott Charles

    Phase-change heat transfer is an important process used in many engineering thermal designs. Boiling is an important phase change phenomena as it is a common heat transfer process in many thermal systems. Phase change processes are critical to thermodynamic cycles as most closed loop systems have an evaporator, in which the phase change process occurs. There are many applications/processes in which engineers employ the advantages of boiling heat transfer, as they seek to improve heat transfer performance. Recent research efforts have experimentally shown that nanofluids can have significantly better heat transfer properties than those of the pure base fluids, such as water. The objective of this study is to improve the boiling curve of de-ionized water by adding aluminum oxide nanoparticles in 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3% and 0.4% wt concentrations in a sub-cooled pool boiling apparatus. Enhancement to the boiling curve can be quantified in two ways: (i) the similar heat fluxes of de-ionized water at smaller excess temperature, indicating similar quantity of heat removal at lower temperatures and (ii) greater heat fluxes than de-ionized water at similar excess temperatures indicating better heat transfer at similar excess temperatures. In the same fashion, the secondary objective is to increase the convective heat transfer coefficient due to boiling by adding different concentrations of aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

  15. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  16. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  17. A fundamental study of nucleate pool boiling under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, and the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  18. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  19. Pool and flow boiling in variable and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As is well known, boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer in that high heat flux levels are possible with relatively small temperature differences. Its optimal application requires that the process be adequately understood. A measure of the understanding of any physical event lies in the ability to predict its behavior in terms of the relevant parameters. Despite many years of research the predictability of boiling is currently possible only for quite specialized circumstances, e.g., the critical heat flux and film boiling for the pool boiling case, and then only with special geometries. Variable gravity down to microgravity provides the opportunity to test this understanding, but possibly more important, by changing the dimensional and time scales involved permits more detailed observations of elements involved in the boiling process, and perhaps discloses phenomena heretofore unknown. The focus here is on nucleate boiling although, as will be demonstrated below, under but certain circumstances in microgravity it can take place concurrently with the dryout process. In the presence of earth gravity or forced convection effects, the latter process is usually referred to as film boiling. However, no vapor film as such forms with pool boiling in microgravity, only dryout. Initial results are presented here for pool boiling in microgravity, and were made possible at such an early date by the availability of the Get-Away-Specials (GAS). Also presented here are some results of ground testing of a flow loop for the study of low velocity boiling, eventually to take place also in microgravity. In the interim, variable buoyancy normal to the heater surface is achieved by rotation of the entire loop relative to earth gravity. Of course, this is at the expense of varying the buoyancy parallel to the heater surface. Two questions which must be resolved early in the study of flow boiling in microgravity are (1) the lower limits of liquid flow velocity where buoyancy

  20. Electrical design of payload G-534: The Pool Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Payload G-534, the Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE), is a Get Away Special that is scheduled to fly on the shuttle in 1992. This paper will give a brief overall description of the experiment with the main discussion being the electrical design with a detailed description of the power system and interface to the GAS electronics. The batteries used and their interface to the experiment Power Control Unit (PCU) and GAS electronics will be examined. The design philosophy for the PCU will be discussed in detail. The criteria for selection of fuses, relays, power semiconductors and other electrical components along with grounding and shielding policy for the entire experiment will be presented. The intent of this paper is to discuss the use of military tested parts and basic design guidelines to build a quality experiment for minimal additional cost.

  1. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  2. Experimental study of surfactant effects on pool boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ying Liang Tzan; Yu Min Yang )

    1990-02-01

    In the first part of this work, nucleate boiling of aqueous solutions of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) over relatively wide ranges of concentration and heat flux was carried out in a pool boiling apparatus. The experimental results show that a small amount of surface active additive makes the nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient h considerably higher, and that there is an optimum additive concentration for higher heat fluxes. Beyond this optimum point, further increase in additive concentration makes h lower. In the second part of this work, nucleate boiling heat transfer rate for n-propanol-water binary mixtures with various amounts of sodium lauryl sulfate were measured in the same pool boiling apparatus. The importance of the mass diffusion effect, which is caused by preferential evaporation of the more volatile component at the vapor-liquid interface on the boiling of the binary mixture, has been confirmed. However, it is shown that the effect exerted by the addition of a surfactant dominates over the mass diffusion effect in dilute binary mixtures.

  3. Transient nucleate pool boiling in microgravity: Some initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.; Lee, H. S.; Ervin, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Variable gravity provides an opportunity to test the understanding of phenomena which are considered to depend on buoyancy, such as nucleate pool boiling. The active fundamental research in nucleate boiling has sought to determine the mechanisms or physical processes responsible for its high effectiveness, manifested by the high heat flux levels possible with relatively low temperature differences. Earlier research on nucleate pool boiling at high gravity levels under steady conditions demonstrated quantitatively that the heat transfer is degraded as the buoyancy normal to the heater surfaced increases. Correspondingly, it was later shown, qualitatively for short periods of time only, that nucleate boiling heat transfer is enhanced as the buoyancy normal to the heater surface is reduced. It can be deduced that nucleate pool boiling can be sustained as a quasi-steady process provided that some means is available to remove the vapor generated from the immediate vicinity of the heater surface. One of the objectives of the research, the initial results of which are presented here, is to quantify the heat transfer associated with boiling in microgravity. Some quantitative results of nucleate pool boiling in high quality microgravity (a/g approximately 10(exp -5)) of 5s duration, obtained in an evacuated drop tower, are presented here. These experiments were conducted as precursors of longer term space experiments. A transient heating technique is used, in which the heater surface is a transparent gold film sputtered on a qua rtz substrate, simultaneously providing the mean surface temperature from resistance thermometry and viewing of the boiling process both from beneath and across the surface. The measurement of the transient mean heater surface temperature permits the computation, by numerical means, of the transient mean heat transfer coefficient. The preliminary data obtained demonstrates that a quasi-steady boiling process can occur in microgravity if the bulk

  4. A high-fidelity approach towards simulation of pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad; Radcliff, Thomas; Soteriou, Marios; Alahyari, Abbas A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change. The particular focus is to develop a simulation technique that is capable of predicting the heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics of nucleate boiling and the transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution addressing a critical need to design enhanced boiling heat transfer surfaces. The macro-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The micro-scale of the microlayer, which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation near the wall, is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the sub-grid surface roughness is represented stochastically through probabilistic density functions and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is then represented based on the thermodynamics of nucleation process. This combination of deterministic CFD, local approximation, and stochastic representation allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against experimental measurements as well as reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface orientations. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement feature design on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  5. Some parameter boundaries governing microgravity pool boiling modes.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman

    2006-09-01

    Pool boiling experiments were conducted in microgravity on five space shuttle flights, using a flat plate heater consisting of a semitransparent thin gold film deposited on a quartz substrate that also acted as a resistance thermometer. The test fluid was R-113, and the vapor bubble behavior at the heater surface was photographed from beneath as well as from the side. Each flight consisted of a matrix of three levels of imposed heat flux and three levels of initial bulk liquid subcooling. In many of the total of 45 experiments, steady nucleate boiling was observed from 16-mm movie films, where a large vapor bubble formed and remained slightly removed from the heater surface, with small vapor bubbles growing on the heater surface, and on contact coalescing with the large bubble. Computations of the forces associated with the momentum transfer in this process, which counters the Marangoni convection effects tending to impel the large bubble toward the heater surface, have been completed for all cases where applicable. The modes of pool boiling observed with successive increases in levels of heat flux in microgravity are categorized as: (i) minimum or incipient nucleate boiling; (ii) nucleate boiling with vigorous motion of the bubbles adjacent and parallel to the heater surface, impelled by Marangoni convection effects; (iii) nucleate boiling followed by coalescence with a neighboring large vapor bubble; (iv) partial dryout of the heater surface, in parallel with nucleate boiling; (v) complete dryout. The boundaries between these modes are delineated graphically as a function of the imposed heat flux and initial bulk liquid subcooling, together with the levels of the forces holding the large bubbles, acting as vapor reservoirs, away from the heater surface for the steady nucleate boiling mode. PMID:17124149

  6. Assessment of a magnet system combining the advantages of cable-in-conduit forced-flow and pool-boiling magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Felker, B.; Chaplin, M.

    1993-10-06

    This paper presents an idea for a magnet system that could be used to advantage in tokamaks and other fusion engineering devices. Higher performance designs, specifically newer tokamaks such as those for the international Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) use Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) forced flow coils to advantage to meet field and current density requirements. Pool boiling magnets lack structural integrity to resist high magnetic forces since helium cooling areas must surround each conductor. A second problem is that any leak can threaten the voltage standoff integrity of the magnet system. This is because a leak can result in low-pressure helium gas becoming trapped by limited conductance in the magnet bundle and low-pressure helium has poor dielectric strength. The system proposed here is basically a CICC system, with it`s inherent advantages, but bathed in higher pressure supercritical helium to eliminate the leak and voltage break-down problems. Schemes to simplify helium coolant plumbing with the proposed system are discussed. A brief historical review of related magnet systems is included. The advantages and disadvantages of using higher pressure, supercritical helium in combination with solid electrical insulation in a CICC system are discussed. Related electrical data from some previous works are compiled and discussed.

  7. Mechanisms of steady-state nucleate pool boiling in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sung

    2002-10-01

    Research on nucleate pool boiling in microgravity using R-113 as a working fluid was conducted using a five-second drop tower and five space flights at a/g approximately 10(-4). A 19 x 38-mm flat gold film heater was used that allowed cine camera viewing both from the side and the bottom of the heater. It was concluded that for both subcooled and saturated liquids long-term steady-state pool boiling can take place in reduced gravity, but the effectiveness of the boiling heat transfer appears to depend on the heater geometry and on the size and the properties of fluids. Heat transfer is enhanced at lower heat flux levels and the CHF increases as the subcooling increases. It was found that several mechanisms are responsible for the steady-state nucleate pool boiling in the absence of buoyancy. The mechanisms considered here are defined and summarized as bubble removal, bubble coalescence, thermocapillary flow, bubble migration, and latent heat transport. PMID:12446341

  8. Combined roles of buoyancy and orientation in nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents results obtained during pool boiling from flat surfaces over body force levels of a/g = -1 to 0 to 20 for LN2 and R-113 under steady and transient conditions. Pyrex and metal surfaces are used. Particular attention is given to the case where the effective gravity is perpendicular to the heating surface. At the lower levels of heat flux with nucleate boiling, the heater surface superheat first increases and then decreases as the body force increases above a/g = 1. This is due to the greater contribution of nonboiling convection.

  9. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement. PMID:21711754

  10. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Craig; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-Wen; McKrell, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement. PMID:21711754

  11. A new regime of nucleate boiling in microsphere mesostructures: Jumping pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. S.; Makarov, P. G.; El Bouz, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied a new regime of nucleate boiling in distilled water on substrates representing mesostructures of monodisperse and/or polydisperse microspheres made of various materials. It is experimentally established that, under some conditions of nucleate boiling, there appear "jumping pool boiling" regimes in which bubbles do not reach the surface of underheated liquid. In addition, bubbles may capture a certain number of microspheres, lift them up to some height, and then sink together down to the vessel bottom. Alternatively, microspheres may trap a certain number of bubbles, float up toward the evaporating surface, and then (without reaching the surface) sink back to the bottom layer where the nucleate bubbling takes place. Subregimes of this boiling mechanism involving microspheres of various densities and dimensions have also been observed.

  12. Environmental qualification testing of the prototype pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, J. Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The prototype Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) flew on the STS-47 mission in September 1992. This report describes the purpose of the experiment and the environmental qualification testing program that was used to prove the integrity of the prototype hardware. Component and box level vibration and thermal cycling tests were performed to give an early level of confidence in the hardware designs. At the system level, vibration, thermal extreme soaks, and thermal vacuum cycling tests were performed to qualify the complete design for the expected shuttle environment. The system level vibration testing included three axis sine sweeps and random inputs. The system level hot and cold soak tests demonstrated the hardware's capability to operate over a wide range of temperatures and gave the project team a wider latitude in determining which shuttle thermal altitudes were compatible with the experiment. The system level thermal vacuum cycling tests demonstrated the hardware's capability to operate in a convection free environment. A unique environmental chamber was designed and fabricated by the PBE team and allowed most of the environmental testing to be performed within the project's laboratory. The completion of the test program gave the project team high confidence in the hardware's ability to function as designed during flight.

  13. Evaluation of commercial enhanced tubes in pool boiling: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.; Bergles, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    In support of a study of shellside boiling with enhanced tubes, a pool boiling apparatus was developed and used to test single tubes with various structured boiling surfaces in R-113. The basic design of the tube-bundle test section was carried out and certain critical design features were tested experimentally. Copper tubes, 3/4 in. o.d. and 4 in. long, were selected with 1/4 in. diameter cartridge heaters. Four thermocouples were inserted in 3/32 in. diameter, 2 in. long holes. The pool boiling characteristics of a plain tube agree well with previous tests. Wolverine Turbo-B tubes with small, medium, and large features performed identically for a heat flux greater than 20 kW/m/sup 2/. For lower heat flux, however, the Turbo-B S was slightly superior. In general, the Wolverine Turbo-B tubes had more favorable boiling characteristics than the single Wieland Gewa-T tube that was tested. The test procedure is deemed entirely adequate for screening enhanced tubes to see which ones should be used in the tube-bundle test section. Three different ways of mounting the tubes were tested in R-113 at 65/degree/C and 5 bar gage pressure. As all three constructions sealed well, the simplest design is recommended in which a snap ring fixes the tube to the wall and an O-ring seals against the pressure. The general design features of the tube bundle test chamber are also presented. 14 refs.

  14. Nucleate pool boiling in the long duration low gravity environment of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.; Meserole, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study of nucleate pool boiling performed in the low gravity environment of the space shuttle. Photographic observations of pool boiling in Freon 113 were obtained during the 'Tank Pressure Control Experiment,' flown on the Space Transportation System, STS-43 in August 1991. Nucleate boiling data from large (relative to bubble size) flat heating surfaces (0.1046 by 0.0742 m) was obtained at very low heat fluxes (0.22 to 1.19 kW/sq m). The system pressure and the bulk liquid subcooling varied in the range of 40 to 60 kPa and 3 to 5 C respectively. Thirty-eight boiling tests, each of 10-min duration for a given heat flux, were conducted. Measurements included the heater power, heater surface temperature, the liquid temperature and the system pressure as functions of heating time. Video data of the first 2 min of heating was recorded for each test. In some tests the video clearly shows the inception of boiling and the growth and departure of bubbles from the surface during the first 2 min of heating. In the absence of video data, the heater temperature variation during heating shows the inception of boiling and stable nucleate boiling. During the stable nucleate boiling, the wall superheat varied between 2.8 to 3.8 C for heat fluxes in the range of 0.95 to 1.19 kW/sq m. The wall superheat at the inception of boiling varied between 2 to 13 C.

  15. Nucleate pool boiling in the long duration low gravity environment of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.; Meserole, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study of nucleate pool boiling performed in the low gravity environment of the space shuttle. Photographic observations of pool boiling in Freon 113 were obtained during the 'Tank Pressure Control Experiment', flown on the Space Transportation System STS-43 in August 1991. Nucleate boiling data from large (relative to bubble size) flat heating surfaces (0.1046 by 0.0742 m) was obtained at very low heat fluxes (0.22 to 1.19 kw/so m). The system pressure and the bulk liquid subcooling varied in the range of 40 to 60 kPa and 3 to 5 C respectively. Thirty-eight boiling tests, each of 10 min duration for a given heat flux, were conducted. Measurements included the heater power, heater surface temperature, the liquid temperature and the system pressure as functions of heating time. Video data of the first 2 min of heating was recorded for each test. In some tests the video clearly shows the inception of boiling and the growth and departure of bubbles from the surface during the first 2 min of heating. In the absence of video data, the heater temperature variation during heating shows the inception of boiling and stable nucleate boiling. During the stable nucleate boiling, the wall superheat varied between 2.8 to 3.8 C for heat fluxes in the range of 0.95 to 1.19 kw/so m. The wall superheat at the inception of boiling varied between 2 to 13 C.

  16. A New Theory of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Arbitrary Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer rates specific to nucleate pool boiling under various conditions are determined by the dynamics of vapour bubbles that are originated and grow at nucleation sites of a superheated surface. A new dynamic theory of these bubbles has been recently developed on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. In contrast to other existing models based on empirically postulated equations for bubble growth and motion, this theory does not contain unwarrantable assumptions, and both the equations are rigorously derived within the framework of a unified approach. The conclusions of the theory are drastically different from those of the conventional models. The bubbles are shown to detach themselves under combined action of buoyancy and a surface tension force that is proven to add to buoyancy in bubble detachment, but not the other way round as is commonly presumed. The theory ensures a sound understanding of a number of so far unexplained phenomena, such as effect caused by gravity level and surface tension on the bubble growth rate and dependence of the bubble characteristics at detachment on the liquid thermophysical parameters and relevant temperature differences. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in a satisfactory qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. When being applied to heat transfer at nucleate pool boiling, this bubble dynamic theory offers an opportunity to considerably improve the main formulae that are generally used to correlate experimental findings and to design boiling heat removal in various industrial applications. Moreover, the theory makes possible to pose and study a great deal of new problems of essential impact in practice. Two such problems are considered in detail. One problem concerns the development of a principally novel physical model for the first crisis of boiling. This model allows for evaluating critical boiling heat fluxes under various conditions, and in particular at different

  17. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  18. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  19. Nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in aqueous surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Vivek Mahadeorao

    Saturated, nucleate pool boiling in aqueous surfactant solutions is investigated experimentally. Also, the role of Marangoni convection, driven both by temperature and surfactant concentration gradients at the vapor-liquid interface of a nucleating bubble is computationally explored. Experimental measurements of dynamic and equilibrium sigma using the maximum bubble pressure method indicate dynamic sigma to be higher than the corresponding equilibrium value, both at room and elevated temperatures. Also, nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100, Triton X-305) show larger sigma depression than anionic surfactants (SDS, SLES), and a normalized representation of their dynamic adsorption isotherms is shown to be helpful in generalizing the surfactant effectiveness to reduce surface tension. The dynamic sigma has a primary role in the modification of bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer, and is dictated by the adsorption kinetics of the surfactant molecules at boiling temperatures. In general, an enhancement in heat transfer is observed, which is characterized by an early incipience and an optimum boiling performance at or around the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant. The optimum performances, typically in the fully developed boiling regime ( q''w > 100 kW/m2), show a reverse trend with respect to surfactant molecular weights M, i.e., higher molecular weight additives promote lower enhancement. Normalized boiling performance using the respective solution's dynamic sigma correlates heat transfer coefficient by M-0.5 for anionics and M 0 for nonionics. This has been shown to be brought about by the surfactant concentration and its interfacial activity in a concentration sublayer around the growing vapor bubble, which governs the bubble growth behavior through the mechanism of dynamic sigma. The ionic nature of the surfactant influences the thickness and molecular makeup of the enveloping sublayer, thereby affecting the bubble dynamics and boiling heat

  20. A depletable micro-layer model for nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yohei; Niceno, Bojan

    2015-11-01

    A depletable micro-layer model has been developed for the simulation of nucleate pool boiling within the framework of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling using an interface-tracking method. A micro-layer model is required for the CFD simulation to take into account vaporization from the thin liquid film - called the micro-layer - existing beneath a growing vapor bubble on a hot surface. In our model, the thickness of the micro-layer is a variable defined at each discretized fluid cell adjacent to the heat-transfer surface; the layer decreases due to vaporization, and can finally disappear. Compared to existing micro-region models, most of them based on the concept of contact-line evaporation, as originally proposed by Stephan and Busse, and by Lay and Dhir, our model incorporates simplified modeling ideas, but can nonetheless predict the temperature field beneath the growing bubble accurately. The model proposed in this paper has been validated against measurements of pool boiling in water at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, the bubble principal dimensions and the temperature distribution over the heat-transfer surface are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Characteristics of Pool Boiling on Graphite-Copper Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2002-01-01

    Nucleate pool boiling performance of different liquids on graphite-copper composite (Gr-Cu) surfaces has been experimentally studied and modeled. Both highly wetting fluids, such as freon-113 and pentane, and a moderately wetting fluid (water) were tested on the Gr-Cu surfaces with different graphite-fiber volume fractions to reveal the enhancement effects of the composite surfaces on the nucleate pool boiling. Results of the experiments show that the graphite-fiber volume fraction has an optimum value. The Gr-Cu composite surface with 25 percent graphite-fiber volume (f=0.25) has a maximum enhancement effect on the nucleate boiling heat transfer comparing to the pure copper surface. For the highly wetting fluid, the nucleate boiling heat transfer is generally enhanced on the Gr- Cu composite surfaces by 3 to 6 times shown. In the low heat flux region, the enhancement is over 6 times, but in the high heat flux region, the enhancement is reduced to about 40%. For the moderately wetting fluid (water), stronger enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer is achieved on the composite surface. It shown the experimental results in which one observes the nucleate boiling heat transfer enhancement of 5 to 10 times in the low heat flux region and an enhancement of 3 to 5 times in the high heat flux region. Photographs of bubble departure during the initial stage of nucleate boiling indicate that the bubbles detached from the composite surface are much smaller in diameter than those detached from the pure copper surface. Typical photographs are presented.It shows that the bubbles departed from the composite surface have diameters of only O(0.1) mm, while those departed from the pure copper surface have diameters of O(1) mm. It is also found that the bubbles depart from the composite surface at a much higher frequency, thus forming vapor columns. These two phenomena combined with high thermal conductivity of the graphite fiber are considered the mechanisms for such a

  2. The Isolated Bubble Regime in Pool Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We consider an isolated bubble boiling regime in which vapour bubbles are intermittently produced at a prearranged set of nucleation site on an upward facing overheated wall plane. In this boiling regime, the bubbles depart from the wall and move as separate entities. Except in the matter of rise velocity, the bubbles do not interfere and are independent of one another. However, the rise velocity is dependent on bubble volume concentration in the bulk. Heat transfer properties specific to this regime cannot be described without bubble detachment size, and we apply our previously developed dynamic theory of vapour bubble growth and detachment to determine this size. Bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled. Two limiting cases of bubble evolution are considered: the one in which buoyancy prevails in promoting bubble detachment and the one in which surface tension prevails. We prove termination of the isolated regime of pool nucleate boiling to result from one of the four possible causes, depending on relevant parameters values. The first cause consists in the fact that the upward flow of rising bubbles hampers the downward liquid flow, and under certain conditions, prevents the liquid from coming to the wall in an amount that would be sufficient to compensate for vapour removal from the wall. The second cause is due to the lateral coalescence of growing bubbles that are attached to their corresponding nucleation sites, with ensuing generation of larger bubbles and extended vapour patches near the wall. The other two causes involve longitudinal coalescence either 1) immediately in the wall vicinity, accompanied by the establishment of the multiple bubble boiling regime, or 2) in the bulk, with the formation of vapour columns. The longitudinal coalescence in the bulk is shown to be the most important cause. The critical wall temperature and the heat flux density associated with isolated bubble regime termination are found to be functions of the physical and

  3. Visualization of pool boiling from complex surfaces with internal tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of boiling heat transfer for a system of connected narrow horizontal and vertical tunnels. These extended surfaces, named narrow tunnel structure (NTS), can be applied to electronic element cooling. The experiments were carried out with ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The tunnel external covers were manufactured out of 0.1 mm thick perforated copper foil (hole diameters 0.5 mm), sintered with the mini-fins, formed on the vertical side of the 10 mm high rectangular fins and horizontal inter-fin surface. Visualization studies were conducted with a transparent structured model of joined narrow tunnels limited with the perforated foil. The visualization investigations aimed to formulate assumptions for the boiling model through distinguishing boiling types and defining all phases of bubble growth.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  5. Enhanced pool boiling heat transfer on mini- and micro- structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The surfaces used for investigating nucleate pool boiling for four working fluids had mini- and micro-fins of variable configurations, cross-sections and pitches, restrained by perforated foil or mesh cloth with various pore/opening diameters. Unique enhanced structures on these surfaces formed a system of interconnected horizontal and vertical tunnels. Four structured surfaces were proposed, each being a system of subsurface tunnels connected to 10 and 5 mm fins or 1 and 0.5 mm mini-fins. Measurement results for boiling water, ethanol, Fluorinert FC-72 and R-123 from more than 60 samples constituted the database used to verify the proposed theoretical models. These models were based on the results from the visualization studies, including internal visualization allowing observation of bubble nucleation, growth and displacement inside the tunnels, and on the analysis of existing boiling models for mini- and micro-structures.

  6. The influence of oil on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindler, Klaus; Hahne, Erich

    2009-05-01

    The influence of various oil contents in R134a is investigated for nucleate pool boiling on copper tubes either sandblasted or with enhanced heating surfaces (GEWA-B tube). Polyolester oils (POE) (Reniso Triton) with medium viscosity 55 cSt (SE55) and high viscosity 170 cSt (SE170) were used. Heat transfer coefficients were obtained for boiling temperatures between -28.6 and +20.1°C. The oil content varied from 0 to 5% mass fraction. For the sandblasted tube and the SE55 oil the heat transfer coefficients for the refrigerant/oil-mixture can be higher or lower than those for the pure refrigerant, depending on oil mass fraction, boiling temperature and heat flux. In some cases the highest heat transfer coefficients were obtained at a mass fraction of 3%. For the 170 cSt oil there is a clear decrease in heat transfer for all variations except for a heat flux 4,000 W/m2 and -10.1°C at 0.5% oil content. The heat transfer coefficients are compared to those in the literature for a smooth stainless steel tube and a platinum wire. For the enhanced tube and 55 cSt oil the heat transfer coefficients are clearly below those for pure refrigerant in all cases. The experimental results for the sandblasted tube are compared with the correlation by Jensen and Jackman. The calculated values are within +20 and -40% for the medium viscosity oil and between +50% and -40% for the high viscosity oil. A correlation for predicting oil-degradation effects on enhanced surfaces does not exist.

  7. Pool boiling of nanoparticle-modified surface with interlaced wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chin-Chi; Su, Tsung-Wen; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the pool boiling heat transfer under heating surfaces with various interlaced wettability. Nano-silica particles were used as the coating element to vary the interlaced wettability of the surface. The experimental results revealed that when the wettability of a surface is uniform, the critical heat flux increases with the more wettable surface; however, when the wettability of a surface is modified interlacedly, regardless of whether the modified region becomes more hydrophilic or hydrophobic, the critical heat flux is consistently higher than that of the isotropic surface. In addition, this study observed that critical heat flux was higher when the contact angle difference between the plain surface and the modified region was smaller.

  8. Pool boiling of nanoparticle-modified surface with interlaced wettability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the pool boiling heat transfer under heating surfaces with various interlaced wettability. Nano-silica particles were used as the coating element to vary the interlaced wettability of the surface. The experimental results revealed that when the wettability of a surface is uniform, the critical heat flux increases with the more wettable surface; however, when the wettability of a surface is modified interlacedly, regardless of whether the modified region becomes more hydrophilic or hydrophobic, the critical heat flux is consistently higher than that of the isotropic surface. In addition, this study observed that critical heat flux was higher when the contact angle difference between the plain surface and the modified region was smaller. PMID:22607462

  9. Peak pool boiling heat flux in viscous liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The stability of a gas jet in a surrounding viscous liquid is studied. An expression is developed for the critical velocity at which the jet becomes unstable in a returning viscous liquid. The stability analysis is made to correspond with the geometrical configuration of gas jets and liquid columns similar to those observed near the peak pool boiling heat flux. The critical velocity of the gas jet is then used to obtain the functional form of the peak heat flux on flat plates and cylindrical heaters. The expressions are compared with original observations of the peak heat flux in very viscous liquids on flat plate, and cylindrical, heaters at both earth-normal, and elevated, gravities.

  10. Momentum effects in steady nucleate pool boiling during microgravity.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman

    2004-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments were conducted in microgravity on five space shuttle flights, using a flat plate heater consisting of a semitransparent thin gold film deposited on a quartz substrate that also acted as a resistance thermometer. The test fluid was R-113, and the vapor bubble behavior at the heater surface was photographed from beneath as well as from the side. Each flight consisted of a matrix of three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling. In 26 of the total of 45 experiments conditions of steady-state pool boiling were achieved under certain combinations of heat flux and liquid subcooling. In many of the 26 cases, it was observed from the 16-mm movie films that a large vapor bubble formed, remaining slightly removed from the heater surface, and that subsequent vapor bubbles nucleate and grow on the heater surface. Coalescence occurs upon making contact with the large bubble, which thus acts as a vapor reservoir. Recently, measurements of the frequencies and sizes of the small vapor bubbles as they coalesced with the large bubble permitted computation of the associated momentum transfer. The transient forces obtained are presented here. Where these arise from the conversion of the surface energy in the small vapor bubble to kinetic energy acting away from the solid heater surface, they counter the Marangoni convection due to the temperature gradients normal to the heater surface. This Marangoni convection would otherwise impel the large vapor bubble toward the heater surface and result in dryout and unsteady heat transfer. PMID:15644357

  11. Experimental analysis of nanofluid pool boiling heat transfer in copper bead packed porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Ji

    2016-07-01

    Coupling the nanofluid as working fluid and the copper beads packed porous structure on heating surface were employed to enhance the pool boiling heat transfer by changing the fluid properties with the adjunction of nanoparticles in liquid and altering the heating surface with a bead porous layer. Due to the higher thermal conductivity, the copper beads served as an extended heating surface and the boiling nucleation sites rose, but the flow resistance increased. The CuO-water and SiO2-water nanofluids as well as the pure water were respectively employed as working fluids in the pool boiling experiments. Comparing with the base fluid of water, the higher thermal conductivity and lower surface tension occur in the nanofluids and those favor the boiling heat transfer, but the higher viscosity and density of nanofluids serve as deteriorative factors. So, the concentration region of the nanofluids should be chosen properly. The maximum relative error between the collected experimental data of the pure water on a flat surface and the theoretical prediction of pool boiling using the Rohsenow correlation was less than 12 %. The comparisons of the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics were also conducted between the pure water and the nanofluids respectively on the horizontal flat surface and on the heating surface packed with a copper bead porous layer. Besides, the boiling bubble generation, integration and departure have a great affect on the pool boiling and were recorded with a camera in the bead stacked porous structures at different heat flux.

  12. Transition from Pool to Flow Boiling: The Effect of Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, Vijay K.

    2004-01-01

    Applications of boiling heat transfer in space can be found in the areas of thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life support fluids, and for cooling of electronic packages for power systems associated with various instrumentation and control systems. Recent interest in exploration of Mars and other planets, and the concepts of in-situ resource utiliLation on Mars highlights the need to understand the effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at gravity levels varying from 1>= g/g(sub e) >=10(exp -6). The objective of the proposed work was to develop a mechanistic understanding of nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under low and micro-gravity conditions when the velocity of the imposed flow is small. For pool boiling, the effect of reduced gravity is to stretch both the length scale as well as the time scale for the boiling process. At high flow velocities, the inertia of the liquid determines the time and the length scales and as such the gravitational acceleration plays little role. However, at low velocities and at low gravity levels both liquid inertia and buoyancy are of equal importance. At present, we have little understanding of the interacting roles of gravity and liquid inertia on the nucleate boiling process. Little data that has been reported in the literature does not have much practical value in that it can not serve as a basis for design of heat exchange components to be used in space. Both experimental and complete numerical simulations of the low velocity, low-gravity nucleate boiling process were carried out. A building block type of approach was used in that first the growth and detachment process of a single bubble and flow and heat transfer associated with the sliding motion of the bubble over the heater surface after detachment was studied. Liquid subcooling and flow velocity were varied parametrically. The experiments were conducted at 1 g(sub e

  13. Extended hydrodynamic theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linehard, J. H.; Dhir, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of the extreme pool boiling heat fluxes is expanded to embrace a variety of problems that have not previously been analyzed. These problems include the prediction of the peak heat flux on a variety of finite heaters, the influence of viscosity on the Taylor and Helmoltz instability mechanisms with application to film boiling and to the peak heat flux in viscous liquids, the formalization of the analogy between high-current-density electrolysis and boiling, and the description of boiling in the low-gravity limit. The predictions are verified with a large number of new data.

  14. Pool Boiling of Ethanol-Water mixture on Nano-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, Alexander; Sahu, Rakesh; Sinha-Ray, Sumit; Sinha-Ray, Suman

    2015-03-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of pool boiling of ethanol-water mixtures on nano-textured surfaces was studied. A comparison of pool boiling on bare copper surface with pool boiling on surfaces covered by copper-plated supersonically-blown nanofibers revealed a significant increase in the heat flux in the latter case. Namely, the heat flux on the nano-textured surfaces was about 3-8 times higher than that on the bare copper surfaces, while the surface temperature due to the nano-texture would be lower by about 10 °C at the same heat flux. The significant positive effect of the nano-texture is due to the fact that it facilitates bubble nucleation. Some preliminary results of numerical modeling of boiling process in the framework of the Cahn-Hilliard approach are discussed and several examples of the predictions are given. Supported by NASA, Grant No. NNX13AQ77G.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The goal of our research is to experimentally investigate the potential of EHD and the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions.

  16. An experimental apparatus to study nucleate pool boiling of R-114 and oil mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasabun, M.

    1984-12-01

    In order to study the nucleate pool-boiling performance of R-114pen1 refrigerant and R-114-oil mixtures from enhanced evaporator tube surfaces, an experimental apparatus was designed, constructed and instrumented. The evaporator was made of a T-shaped Pyrex glass container. Boiling occurred from a smooth, hard-copper tube, 15.9 mm in outer diameter, 12.7 mm in inside diameter and 431.8 mm in length. The tube was heated using a cartridge heater, and was instrumented with 8 thermocouples to measure the wall temperature. A Hewlett-Packard 3497A data acquisition/control unit and a 9826A computer were used to collect and process data. The condenser was cooled by an ethylene glycol-water mixture, which was maintained at about -17 C by means of an R-12 refrigeration system. Nine data runs were completed to de-bug the experimental apparatus and to check for reproducibility. During all data runs, especially at higher heat fluxes (greater than 10 kW/sqm), large temperature variations were observed along and around the active boiling length of the test tube. The data were compared with data found in the literature and reasonable agreement was obtained.

  17. A high-fidelity approach towards heat transfer prediction of pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad; Alahyari, Abbas; Radcliff, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change with an unprecedented fidelity and cost. The particular focus is to predict the heat transfer coefficient of pool-boiling regime and its transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution. The large-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The small-scale of the microlayer which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the surface roughness and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is represented based on thermodynamics of nucleation process which allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the model's prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface alignment. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement features on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  18. X ray observations of boiling sodium in a reflux-pool-boiler solar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. B.; Stoker, G. C.; Thompson, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    X ray observations of boiling sodium in a 75-kW sub t reflux-pool-boiler solar receiver operating at up to 800 C were carried out. Both cinematographic and quantitative observations were made. From the cinematography, the pool free surface was observed before and during the start of boiling. During boiling, the free surface rose out of the field of view, and chaotic motion was observed. From the quantitative observations, void fraction in pencil-like probe volumes was inferred, using a linear array of detectors. Useful data were obtained from three of the eight probe volumes. Information from the other volumes was masked by scattered radiation. During boiling, time-averaged void fractions ranged from 0.6 to 0.8. During hot restarts, void fractions near unity occurred and persisted for up to 1/2 second.

  19. Comparative studies of pool boiling heat transfer with nano-fluids on porous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Gengwen; Li, Ji

    2015-12-01

    Characteristics and regime of pool boiling on copper porous coating and polished surface are studied experimentally for two working medium (Al2O3 and CuO nano-fluids). The highlights of this work are that the combination of nano-fluids and porous surface is used to explore the heat transfer performance and the conducted visual experiments can provide an insight in the enhancement of boiling heat transfer with this combination.

  20. Particulate fouling during the pool boiling heat transfer of MWCNT nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, H. Sheng; Fan, Jian R.; Hu, Ya C.; Hong, Rong H.

    2012-05-01

    Pool boiling of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanofluid was conducted to investigate fouling of a copper surface with a diameter of 12 mm. At low heat flux the fouling curve takes the shape of saw tooth with an asymptotic value. When boiling stretches, dispersant, Gum Arabic fails, MWCNT particles deposit on the heating wall completely. Progressively increasing the heat flux, depositing accelerates, superheat and fouling resistance increase drastically.

  1. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, J.S.; Merte, H. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = {+-} 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = {+-} 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = {minus}1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  2. Experiment on nucleate pool boiling in microgravity by using transparent heating surface - Analysis of surface heat transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, C.; Kawanami, O.; Asada, Y.; Wada, Y.; Nagayasu, T.; Shinmoto, Y.; Ohta, H.; Kabov, O.; Queeckers, P.; Chikov, S.; Straub, J.

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of mechanisms in nucleate boiling under microgravity conditions is essential for the development of the cooling systems handling a large amount of waste heat. A transparent heating surface with multiple arrays of 88 thin film temperature sensors and mini-heaters was developed for the clarification of boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity. To investigate gravity effects on the microlayer behaviors and corresponding local heat transfer coefficients, images of liquid-vapor behaviors underneath attached bubbles and local heat transfer data were simultaneously obtained in microgravity pool boiling. The present paper reports the analysis of the data measured during the ESA parabolic flight campaign. It was found that the liquid-vapor behaviors were strongly affected by the direction and the level of residual gravity. Various patterns of liquid-vapor behaviours and corresponding enhancement or deterioration of the heat transfer are observed.

  3. Electrical design of Space Shuttle payload G-534: The pool boiling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1993-05-01

    Payload G-534, the Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE), is a Get Away Special (GAS) payload that flew on the Space Shuttle Spacelab Mission J (STS 47) on September 19-21, 1992. This paper will give a brief overall description of the experiment with the main discussion being the electrical design with a detailed description of the power system and interface to the GAS electronics. The batteries used and their interface to the experiment Power Control Unit (PCU) and GAS electronics will be examined. The design philosophy for the PCU will be discussed in detail. The criteria for selection of fuses, relays, power semiconductors, and other electrical components along with grounding and shielding policy for the entire experiment are presented. The intent of this paper is to discuss the use of military tested parts and basic design guidelines to build a quality experiment for minimal additional cost.

  4. Electrical design of Space Shuttle payload G-534: The pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Payload G-534, the Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE), is a Get Away Special (GAS) payload that flew on the Space Shuttle Spacelab Mission J (STS 47) on September 19-21, 1992. This paper will give a brief overall description of the experiment with the main discussion being the electrical design with a detailed description of the power system and interface to the GAS electronics. The batteries used and their interface to the experiment Power Control Unit (PCU) and GAS electronics will be examined. The design philosophy for the PCU will be discussed in detail. The criteria for selection of fuses, relays, power semiconductors, and other electrical components along with grounding and shielding policy for the entire experiment are presented. The intent of this paper is to discuss the use of military tested parts and basic design guidelines to build a quality experiment for minimal additional cost.

  5. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-10-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  6. Variation of superheat with subcooling in nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, R. L.; Merte, H., Jr.; Ulucakli, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is presented that explains the variation of superheat with subcooling that has been observed by a number of researchers investigating nucleate boiling heat transfer at constant heat flux. It is shown that superheat initially increases with increasing subcooling near saturated conditions because of the way in which changes in active site density and average bubble frequency with increasing subcooling affect the rate of heat removal from the heater surface by enthalpy transport and microlayer evaporation. As subcooling increases further, natural convection begins to play an increasingly important role in the heat transfer process. Ultimately, natural convection is able to accommodate the entire imposed heat flux, after which superheat decreases as subcooling increases. The success of the analysis in explaining the variation of superheat with subcooling suggests that the rate of the heat removal from the heater surface is completely determined by the mechanisms of enthalpy transport, natural convection, and microlayer evaporation.

  7. Comparison of pool boiling heat transfer for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Complex experimental investigations of boiling heat transfer on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil were performed. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS), narrow tunnel structures (NTS) and mini-fins with the copper wire net (NTS-L). The experiments were carried out with water, ethanol, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. The TS and NTS surfaces were manufactured out of perforated copper foil (hole diameters: 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 mm) sintered with the mini-fins, formed on the vertical side of the 5 and 10 mm high rectangular main fins and horizontal inter-fin surface. The NTS-L surfaces were formed by mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm height uniformly spaced on the base surface. The wire mesh with an aperture of 0.32, 0.4 and 0.5 mm sintered with the fin tips formed a system of connected perpendicular horizontal tunnels. The tunnel width was 0.6 - 1.0 - 1.5 mm and the depth was 0.5 or 1.0 mm. The effects of the Bond number and dimensionless parameters for three kinds of enhanced structures on heat transfer ratio at nucleate pool boiling were examined.

  8. Pool boiling on surfaces with mini-fins and micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    The experimental studies presented here focused on pool boiling heat transfer on mini-fin arrays, mini-fins with perforated covering and surfaces with micro-cavities. The experiments were carried out for water and fluorinert FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. Mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm in height were uniformly spaced on the base surface. The copper foil with holes of 0.1 mm in diameter (pitch 0.2/0.4 mm), sintered with the fin tips, formed a system of connected perpendicular and horizontal tunnels. The micro-cavities were obtained through spark erosion. The maximal depth of the craters of these cavities was 15 - 30 μm and depended on the parameters of the branding-pen settings. At medium and small heat fluxes, structures with mini-fins showed the best boiling heat transfer performance both for water and FC-72. At medium and high heat fluxes (above 70 kW/m2 for water and 25 kW/m2 for FC-72), surfaces with mini-fins without porous covering and micro-cavities produced the highest heat transfer coefficients. The surfaces obtained with spark erosion require a proper selection of geometrical parameters for particular liquids - smaller diameters of cavities are suitable for liquids with lower surface tension (FC-72).

  9. A molecular dynamics study of phobic/philic nano-patterning on pool boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ricardo; Guo, Zhixiong

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the pool boiling heat transfer of a liquid argon thin film on a flat, horizontal copper wall structured with vertical nanoscale pillars. The efficacy of phobic/philic nano-patterning for enhancing boiling heat transfer was scrutinized. Both nucleate and explosive boiling modes were considered. An error analysis demonstrated that the typical 2.5σ cutoff in MD simulations could under-predict heat flux by about 8.7 %, and 6σ cutoff was chosen here in order to maintain high accuracy. A new coordination number criterion was also introduced to better quantify evaporation characteristics. Results indicate that the argon-phobic/philic patterning tends to either have no effect, or decrease overall boiling heat flux, while the argon-philic nano-pillar/argon-philic wall shows the best heat transfer performance.

  10. CFD Simulations and Experimental Verification on Nucleate Pool Boiling of Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaobin, Zhang; Wei, Xiong; Jianye, Chen; Yuchen, Wang; Tang, K.

    To explore the mechanism of nucleate pool boiling of cryogenic fluids, an experimental apparatus was built to conduct a visualization study and verify the CFD boiling model. Apart from the general measurements of the super-heat and heat flux, the influences of super-heat on bubble departure diameters were specially analyzed. Based on the observations, the whole nucleate boiling process from bubble formation to departure from the heated wall can be divided into three stages: low heat flux stage; transitional stage; fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB) stage. CFD simulations with several existing correlations and the attained values from the experiments for the bubble diameter were finally conducted, and the results fitted well with the present experimental data.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1999-01-01

    In boiling high heat fluxes are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences, which make its use increasingly attractive in aerospace applications. The objective of the research is to develop ways to overcome specific problems associated with boiling in the low gravity environment by substituting the buoyancy force with the electric force to enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50, as compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. The goal of our research is to experimentally explore the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions, by visualizing the temperature distributions in the vicinity of the heated surface and around the bubble during boiling using real-time holographic interferometry (HI) combined with high-speed cinematography. In the first phase of the project the influence of the electric field on a single bubble is investigated. Pool boiling is simulated by injecting a single bubble through a nozzle into the subcooled liquid or into the thermal boundary layer developed along the flat heater surface. Since the exact location of bubble formation is known, the optical equipment can be aligned and focused accurately, which is an essential requirement for precision measurements of bubble shape, size and deformation, as well as the visualization of temperature fields by HI. The size of the bubble and the frequency of bubble departure can be controlled by suitable selection of nozzle diameter and mass flow rate of vapor. In this approach effects due to the presence of the electric field can be separated from effects caused by the temperature gradients in the thermal boundary layer. The influence of the thermal boundary layer can be investigated after activating the heater at a later stage of the research. For the visualization experiments a

  12. Heat Transfer Performances of Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2000-01-01

    Nucleate boiling, especially near the critical heat flux (CHF), can provide excellent economy along with high efficiency of heat transfer. However, the performance of nucleate boiling may deteriorate in a reduced gravity environment and the nucleate boiling usually has a potentially dangerous characteristic in CHF regime. That is, any slight overload can result in burnout of the boiling surface because the heat transfer will suddenly move into the film-boiling regime. Therefore, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer becomes more important in reduced gravity environments. Enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux can be reached using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface. Thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix, which is independent of gravity, will play an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. Experimental studies were performed on nucleate pool boiling of pentane on cooper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composite surfaces with various fiber volume concentrations for heat fluxes up to 35 W per square centimeter. It is revealed that a significant enhancement in boiling heat transfer performance on the composite surfaces is achieved, due to the presence of micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix. The onset of nucleate boiling (the isolated bubble regime) occurs at wall superheat of about 10 C for the Cu-Gr surface and 15 C for the Al-Gr surface, much lower than their respective pure metal surfaces. Transition from an isolated bubble regime to a coalesced bubble regime in boiling occurs at a superheat of

  13. Pool boiling of dielectric liquids on porous graphite and extended copper surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack L.

    This work investigated pool boiling of the dielectric liquids HFE-7100 and FC-72 on plane copper and porous graphite and on copper surfaces with corner pins. The work investigated the effects of surface orientation and liquid subcooling and, for the copper surfaces with corner pins, the effect of surface roughness. In addition, investigations were made studying the heat transfer by natural convection and nucleate boiling, as well as the effects of liquid subcooling (up to 30 K) and surface inclination (0°--upward facing, to 180°--downward facing) on nucleate boiling heat transfer and Critical Heat Flux (CHF). The results are applicable to direct immersion cooling by nucleate boiling of high power computer chips dissipating 50 - 100 W/cm2 while maintaining the junction temperature for the chips below the recommended values (˜85 °C). Pool boiling experiments are performed with degassed HFE-7100 and FC-72 liquids using uniformly heated 10 x 10 mm porous graphite and copper surfaces with corner pins. The measured footprint temperatures and thermal power removed from the surfaces are used to construct the pool boiling curves and determine the critical heat flux and corresponding surface superheat. Results are compared with those obtained on plane copper of same heated footprint area. The obtained CHF values are also compared with those reported in the open literature for plane, micro-porous, and macro-structured surfaces. Digital photographs and video are obtained to help explain and interpret the results. For the first time, natural convection correlations for dielectric liquids on plane, porous, and copper with corner pins developed. These correlations are important to electronic cooling in the stand-by mode when the heat dissipation by the chips is only a few watts. Results show that the power removed by natural convection from surfaces with corner pins is 67% more than from plane Si and Cu surfaces at the same surface superheat. Using porous graphite and copper

  14. Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

  15. Enhancement of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer to dilute binary mixtures using endothermic chemical reactions around the smoothed horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafraz, M. M.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Alavifazel, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Experimental studies on enhancing the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of binary dilute mixtures of water/glycerol, water/MEG (Mono-ethylene glycol) and water/DEG (di-ethylene glycol) have been carried out. Some particular endothermic chemical reactions related to ammonium salts were used to enhance the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient, simultaneously with occurrence of pool boiling heat transfer. Accordingly, 100 g of Ammonium nitrate, ammonium perborate and Ammonium sulfate were selected to dissolve into mixtures. High and extreme solution enthalpies of each of these ammonium salt powders are employed to reduce the surface temperature around the horizontal cylinder locally. Results demonstrated that presence of ammonium salts into the mixtures deteriorates the surface temperature of cylinder and as the result, higher pool boiling heat transfer coefficient is reported for tested solutions. Results are also reported and compared for different ammonium salts to find the influence of inducing different enthalpies of solution on pool boiling heat transfer coefficient. Obtained results also indicated that presence of endothermic reaction besides the pool boiling heat transfer enhances the heat transfer coefficients in comparison with nucleate pool boiling phenomenon solely.

  16. Transient Pool Boiling Critical Heat Flux of FC-72 Under Saturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fitri, Sutopo P.; Katsuya Fukuda; Qiusheng Liu; Jongdoc Park

    2006-07-01

    In this study, the steady-state and transient critical heat fluxes (CHFs) in pool boiling were measured on 1.0 mm diameter horizontal cylinders of gold and platinum heaters under saturated conditions due to transient heat inputs, Q{sub 0}exp(t/t), in a pool of Fluorinert FC-72. Heaters were heated by electric current with the periods, t, ranged from 10 ms to 20 s, and the pressures ranged from atmospheric up to around 1.2 MPa. The steady-state CHFs measured are dependent on pressure and almost agree with the values obtained by Kutateladze's correlation based on hydrodynamic instability (HI) model. It was considered that the boiling inception and the direct transition during the steady-state period occur by the pre-pressure of {approx}1.2 MPa. The trend of typical transient CHFs were clearly divided into the first, second, and third groups for long, short, and intermediate periods, respectively. The direct transition processes to film boiling without nucleate boiling for the short periods obtained from both heaters were confirmed due to the heterogeneous spontaneous nucleation (HSN) in flooded cavities on the cylinder surface. The empirical correlations to express each of corresponding CHFs measured on both heaters for the short periods are presented in this paper. (authors)

  17. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  18. Environmental qualification testing of payload G-534, the Pool Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, J. Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Payload G-534, the prototype Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE), is scheduled to fly on the STS-47 mission in September 1992. This paper describes the purpose of the experiment and the environmental qualification testing program that was used to prove the integrity of the hardware. Component and box level vibration and thermal cycling tests were performed to give an early level of confidence in the hardware designs. At the system level, vibration, thermal extreme soaks, and thermal vacuum cycling tests were performed to qualify the complete design for the expected shuttle environment. The system level vibration testing included three axis sine sweeps and random inputs. The system level hot and cold soak tests demonstrated the hardware's capability to operate over a wide range of temperatures and gave wider latitude in determining which shuttle thermal attitudes were compatible with the experiment. The system level thermal vacuum cycling tests demonstrated the hardware's capability to operate in a convection free environment. A unique environmental chamber was designed and fabricated by the PBE team and allowed most of the environmental testing to be performed within the hardware build laboratory. The completion of the test program gave the project team high confidence in the hardware's ability to function as designed during flight.

  19. Pool boiling thermal transport through micro-patterned metal superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Matthew; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Pool boiling thermal transport through horizontal superhydrophobic surfaces decorated with rib and post micro-patterns was explored experimentally. The pool consisted of a water reservoir heated from below by electric heaters embedded in an aluminum block. A test surface was located at the bottom of the pool and fixed to the block. Instrumentation allowed simultaneous measurement of heat flux through the test surface, test surface temperature, and pool water temperature. From these measurements, heat flux as a function of excess temperature (the difference between the test surface temperature and the water saturation temperature) was determined for each surface. Surface geometry was characterized by the cavity fraction (the ratio of projected cavity area to surface area on the test surface), distance between features, and microscale pattern geometry. The transition from nucleate to pool boiling was observed to occur at much lower excess temperatures for superhydrophobic surfaces than for hydrophobic surfaces, with greater deviation for larger cavity fraction. Heat flux versus excess temperature relationships are presented while exploring the influence of superhydrophobic surface microstructure on the thermal transport. NSF CBET-1235881.

  20. Measurement of Key Pool BOiling Parameters in nanofluids for Nuclerar Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, In C; Buongiorno, Jdacopo; Hu, Lin-wen; Wang, Hsin

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids, colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in a base fluid such as water, can afford very significant Critical Heat Flux (CHF) enhancement. Such engineered fluids potentially could be employed in reactors as advanced coolants in safety systems with significant safety and economic advantages. However, a satisfactory explanation of the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids is lacking. To close this gap, we have identified the important boiling parameters to be measured. These are the properties (e.g., density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, vaporization enthalpy, surface tension), hydrodynamic parameters (i.e., bubble size, bubble velocity, departure frequency, hot/dry spot dynamics) and surface conditions (i.e., contact angle, nucleation site density). We have also deployed a pool boiling facility in which many such parameters can be measured. The facility is equipped with a thin indium-tin-oxide heater deposited over a sapphire substrate. An infra-red high-speed camera and an optical probe are used to measure the temperature distribution on the heater and the hydrodynamics above the heater, respectively. The first data generated with this facility already provide some clue on the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids. Specifically, the progression to burnout in a pure fluid (ethanol in this case) is characterized by a smoothly-shaped and steadily-expanding hot spot. By contrast, in the ethanol-based nanofluid the hot spot pulsates and the progression to burnout lasts longer, although the nanofluid CHF is higher than the pure fluid CHF. The presence of a nanoparticle deposition layer on the heater surface seems to enhance wettability and aid hot spot dissipation, thus delaying burnout.

  1. Pool boiling of nanofluids on rough and porous coated tubes: experimental and correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.; Kaczmarczyk, Tomasz Z.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with pool boiling of water-Al2O3 and water- Cu nanofluids on rough and porous coated horizontal tubes. Commercially available stainless steel tubes having 10 mm outside diameter and 0.6 mm wall thickness were used to fabricate the test heater. The tube surface was roughed with emery paper 360 or polished with abrasive compound. Aluminium porous coatings of 0.15 mm thick with porosity of about 40% were produced by plasma spraying. The experiments were conducted under different absolute operating pressures, i.e., 200, 100, and 10 kPa. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.01, 0.1, and 1% by weight. Ultrasonic vibration was used in order to stabilize the dispersion of the nanoparticles. It was observed that independent of operating pressure and roughness of the stainless steel tubes addition of even small amount of nanoparticles augments heat transfer in comparison to boiling of distilled water. Contrary to rough tubes boiling heat transfer coefficient of tested nanofluids on porous coated tubes was lower compared to that for distilled water while boiling on porous coated tubes. A correlation equation for prediction of the average heat transfer coefficient during boiling of nanofluids on smooth, rough and porous coated tubes is proposed. The correlation includes all tested variables in dimensionless form and is valid for low heat flux, i.e., below 100 kW/m2.

  2. Pool boiling heat transfer of deionized and degassed water in packed-perforated copper beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Mao-Yu; Jang, Kuang-Jang; Ho, Ching-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Nucleate pool boiling with porous media made of perforated copper beads as the enhanced structure is conducted in saturated, deionized and degassed water. Data are taken at an atmospheric pressure (saturation temperature of 100 °C) and at heat fluxes from 4500 to 72,300 W/m2 while increasing the heat flux. The bead-packed structure is heated on the bottom. The layer of loose particles on the heated surface is free to move under the action of bulk liquid convection and vapor nucleation. The effects of the weight (number), size and layers of the free particles are experimentally explored using copper particles for different copper bead diameters which were 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm. The boiling enhancement is closely related to the particle weight, size and layers, and the heat flux applied. The results show that free particles are presented to have a distinct advantage in boiling heat transfer, resulting in an average increase in the heat transfer coefficient of 126 % relative to the flat plate without particles. In order to obtain insight into the fluid boiling phenomena, flow visualization is also made to observe the detailed fluid boiling characteristics of the copper particles present. The visualizations show that bubble nucleation preferentially occurs at the narrow corner cavities formed between the free particles and the heated surface.

  3. A study of subcooled pool boiling of water: contact area of boiling bubbles with a heating surface during a heating process.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Takahashi, Saika; Ohta, Haruhiko

    2004-11-01

    The contact area of bubbles with a transparent heating surface was optically measured during subcooled pool boiling of water on the ground. In the experiments, boiling bubbles were attached to the heating surface with a bubble holder and nearly reproduced the bubble behavior observed in low gravity. DC power was applied to the ITO heater and increased until the heater surface burned out. In quick heating, that is about 20 second until burnout and equal to the heating time during the low gravity period, the contact area was smaller than that for long time heating at the same heat flux. The experimental results suggest the reason why the critical heat flux in pool boiling is higher than the widely accepted predictions in microgravity. In a drop shaft experiment with constant heating, the contact area increased dramatically at the start of microgravity and became constant. Boiling bubbles coalesced and remained just over the heating surface. PMID:15644360

  4. Boils

    MedlinePlus

    ... the boil is very bad or comes back. Antibacterial soaps and creams cannot help much once a boil ... following may help prevent the spread of infection: Antibacterial soaps Antiseptic (germ-killing) washes Keeping clean (such as ...

  5. Pool boiling heat transfer of water/ γ-alumina micro-fluids around the horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhah, V.; Hormozi, F.

    2016-04-01

    A set of experiments was performed to quantify the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of water/ γ-alumina micro-fluids at mass concentration ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 % of micro-particles with mean size of 1-2 μm. To stabilize the prepared micro-fluid, pH control, stirring and adding the SDS as a surfactant were carried out. Also, thermal conductivity of micro-fluids are measured using KD2 decagon pro. Results showed that micro-fluids have relatively higher thermal conductivity rather than the base fluids. According to the results, there are two distinguishable heat transfer regions namely natural convection and nucleate boiling regions. Influence of some operating parameters such as heat flux, mass concentration of micro-particles and surface fouling resistance on the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient were experimentally studied and briefly discussed. Results demonstrated a significant deterioration of heat transfer coefficient of micro-fluids in comparison with the base fluid over the extended time (1000 min of operation) in nucleate boiling region, while in natural convection region, enhancement of heat transfer coefficient is registered. According to the results, heat transfer coefficient is strongly controlled by/ γ-alumina concentration due to the deposition of micro-particles on the heating section. Rectilinear changes of scale formation with time in term of fouling resistance were clearly seen at regions, where natural convection is a dominant heat transfer mechanism and also for higher heat fluxes at nucleate boiling heat transfer region.

  6. Theoretical modeling of CHF for near-saturated pool boiling and flow boiling from short heaters using the interfacial lift-off criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mudawar, I.; Galloway, J.E.; Gersey, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling and flow boiling were examined for near-saturated bulk conditions in order to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) trigger mechanism for each. Photographic studies of the wall region revealed features common to both situations. At fluxes below CHF, the vapor coalesces into a wavy layer which permits wetting only in wetting fronts, the portions of the liquid-vapor interface which contact the wall as a result of the interfacial waviness. Close examination of the interfacial features revealed the waves are generated from the lower edge of the heater in pool boiling and the heater`s upstream region in flow boiling. Wavelengths follow predictions based upon the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability criterion. Critical heat flux in both cases occurs when the pressure force exerted upon the interface due to interfacial curvature, which tends to preserve interfacial contact with the wall prior to CHF, is overcome by the momentum of vapor at the site of the first wetting front, causing the interface to lift away from the wall. It is shown this interfacial lift-off criterion facilitates accurate theoretical modeling of CHF in pool boiling and in flow boiling in both straight and curved channels.

  7. Alkali metal pool boiler life tests for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system to supply heat more uniformly to the heater head tubes. One issue with liquid metal pool boilers is unstable boiling. Stable boiling is obtained with an enhanced boiling surface containing nucleation sites that promote continuous boiling. Over longer time periods, it is possible that the boiling behavior of the system will change. An 800-h life test was conducted to verify that pool boiling with the chosen fluid/surface combination remains stable as the system ages. The apparatus uses NaK boiling on a - 100 + 140 stainless steel sintered porous layer, with the addition of a small amount of xenon. Pool boiling remained stable to the end of life test. The pool boiler life test included a total of 82 cold starts, to simulate startup each morning, and 60 warm restarts, to simulate cloud cover transients. The behavior of the cold and warm starts showed no significant changes during the life test. In the experiments, the fluid/surface combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  8. Alkali metal pool boiler life tests for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system to supply heat more uniformly to the heater head tubes. One issue with liquid metal pool boilers is unstable boiling. Stable boiling is obtained with an enhanced boiling surface containing nucleation sites that promote continuous boiling. Over longer time periods, it is possible that the boiling behavior of the system will change. An 800-h life test was conducted to verify that pool boiling with the chosen fluid/surface combination remains stable as the system ages. The apparatus uses NaK boiling on a - 100 + 140 stainless steel sintered porous layer, with the addition of a small amount of xenon. Pool boiling remained stable to the end of life test. The pool boiler life test included a total of 82 cold starts, to simulate startup each morning, and 60 warm restarts, to simulate cloud cover transients. The behavior of the cold and warm starts showed no significant changes during the life test. In the experiments, the fluid/surface combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  9. Induced convective enhancement of the critical heat flux from partially heated horizontal flat plates in saturated pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bockwoldt, T.S.; Jeter, S.M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Hartley, J.G. )

    1992-05-01

    Current developments in high-power electronics and other energy-intensive applications have accentuated the need for higher performance heat transfer. Nucleate boiling heat transfer is one of the most effective modes of heat transfer, with pool boiling being perhaps the simplest type of passive two-phase cooling. Unfortunately, the maximum heat flux attainable in nucleate pool boiling is limited by the relatively low critical heat flux at the onset of film boiling. Several methods have been suggested to enhance the critical heat flux. In particular, Costello et al. showed that the critical heat flux in saturated pool boiling could be enhanced by simply increasing the width of the pool while maintaining a fixed heater size. Elkassabgi and Lienhard examined the combined effects of immersion depth and pool size on the critical heat flux for a small-diameter horizontal cylinder in saturated pool boiling. No similar study for flat plate heaters appears in the literature. While as noted above the effect of heater appears in the literature. While as noted above the effect of heater appears in the literature. While as noted above the effect of heater size and immersion depth have been studied independently, no systematic investigation of the combined effects has been conducted previously. This paper presents the results of such a study.

  10. Enhancement of pool boiling from a vertical rod using guide disks

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.

    1992-11-01

    This report provides experimental and theoretical investigation of the boiling process which used a system of evenly spaced disks to constrain the path of bubbles from point origin to point of collapse. The experiments identified five distinct heat-transfer regimes, two of which (flange and strobe) are unique to this geometry and cannot be explained by conventional heat-transfer correlations. Bubble and wave models developed for flange and strobe boiling, respectively, predict these phenomena with reasonable success.

  11. Enhancement of pool boiling from a vertical rod using guide disks

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides experimental and theoretical investigation of the boiling process which used a system of evenly spaced disks to constrain the path of bubbles from point origin to point of collapse. The experiments identified five distinct heat-transfer regimes, two of which (flange and strobe) are unique to this geometry and cannot be explained by conventional heat-transfer correlations. Bubble and wave models developed for flange and strobe boiling, respectively, predict these phenomena with reasonable success.

  12. Bubble Behavior in Subcooled Pool Boiling of Water under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Suzuki, Motohiro; Takahash, Saika; Kawamura, Hirosi; Abe, Yoshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    Subcooled pool boiling of water was conducted in reduced gravity performed by a parabolic flight of aircraft and a drop-shaft facility. A small stainless steel plate was physically burned out in the subcooled water by AC electric power during the parabolic flight. Boiling bubbles grew with increasing heating power but did not detached from the heating surface. The burnout heat fluxes obtained were 200 ~ 400 percent higher than the existing theories. In the ground experiment, boiling bubbles were attached to the heating surface with a flat plate placed over the heating surface, and the experiment was performed by the same heating procedure as practiced under the reduced gravity. Same burnout heat fluxes as under the reduced gravity were obtained by adjusting the plate clearance to the heating surface. As the heating time extended longer than the reduced gravity duration, the burnout heat fluxes decreased gradually and became constant. Contact area of bubbles with heating surface was observed using a transparent heating surface in microgravity performed by a drop-shaft facility. The contact area of bubbles increased significantly at the start of microgravity. It is suggested by the experimental results that the boiling bubbles expand rapidly in the high heat flux region and the rapid evaporation of liquid layer remained between the bubbles and the heating surface raises up the critical heat flux higher than the existing theories in microgravity.

  13. Critical Heat Flux in Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Yang, Wen-Jei; Chao, David F.; Chao, David F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A study is conducted on high heat-flux pool boiling of pentane on micro-configured composite surfaces. The boiling surfaces are copper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composites with a fiber volume concentration of 50%. The micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix contribute to a substantial enhancement in boiling heat-transfer performance. Correlation equations are obtained for both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes, utilizing a mathematical model based on a metal-graphite, two-tier configuration with the aid of experimental data. A new model to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) on the composites is proposed to explain the fundamental aspects of the boiling phenomena. Three different factors affecting the CHF are considered in the model. Two of them are expected to become the main agents driving vapor volume detachment under microgravity conditions, using the metal-graphite composite surfaces as the heating surface and using liquids with an unusual Marangoni effect as the working fluid.

  14. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, David W.; Guzik, Monica C.

    2014-03-01

    A computational model of the cryogenic boil-off reduction system being developed by NASA as part of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer technology maturation project has been applied to a range of propellant storage tanks sizes for high-performing in-space cryogenic propulsion applications. This effort focuses on the scaling of multi-layer insulation (MLI), cryocoolers, broad area cooling shields, radiators, solar arrays, and tanks for liquid hydrogen propellant storage tanks ranging from 2 to 10 m in diameter. Component scaling equations were incorporated into the Cryogenic Analysis Tool, a spreadsheet-based tool used to perform system-level parametric studies. The primary addition to the evolution of this updated tool is the integration of a scaling method for reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocoolers, as well as the development and inclusion of Self-Supporting Multi-Layer Insulation. Mass, power, and sizing relationships are traded parametrically to establish the appropriate loiter period beyond which this boil-off reduction system application reduces mass. The projected benefit compares passive thermal control to active thermal control, where active thermal control is evaluated for reduced boil-off with a 90 K shield, zero boil-off with a single heat interception stage at the tank wall, and zero boil-off with a second interception stage at a 90 K shield. Parametric studies show a benefit over passive storage at loiter durations under one month, in addition to showing a benefit for two-stage zero boil-off in terms of reducing power and mass as compared to single stage zero boil-off. Furthermore, active cooling reduces the effect of varied multi-layer insulation performance, which, historically, has been shown to be significant.

  15. Pool film boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen. [for SSME turbopump ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving a saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 inch diameter spheres which were immersed in LN2. Additional results are presented for a stationary 2 inch diameter sphere quenched in LN2, which were obtained with a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus. The speed of the rotational tests varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere.

  16. Hydrodynamic prediction of peak pool-boiling heat fluxes from finite bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J. H.; Dhir, V. K.

    1972-01-01

    Previous theoretical models are considered, giving attention to the original formulation proposed by Zuber (1959), an infinite horizontal flat plate, a horizontal cylinder, and a sphere. Some general features of any hydrodynamic prediction are inferred by examining the characteristics of the models. It is found possible to eliminate the need for observed values of the vapor-blanket thickness. The concepts obtained are utilized in the derivation of expressions for the prediction of the peak pool-boiling heat flux in the case of some new configurations.

  17. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaji, Masuo; Suyama, Takayuki; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    An experimental study on enhancement of nucleate pool boiling heat tranfer by placing a sponge metal close to a plain heated surface was conducted in order to improve the heat transfer performance of the high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. The sponge metal has three dimensional porous mesh framework like sponge. Boiling curves of water under the atmospheric pressure were compared with those of lithium bromide aqueous solution of mass concentration 55 to 58%. Heat transfer characteristics were improved by 2 to3 times both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution when the sponge metal was placed on the heated surface with and without cleareance. Three kinds of sponge metals were used for lithium bromide aqueous solution under the reduced pressure (24 kPa). At lower heat fluxes,#6 sponge metal which has the finest mesh and the lowest porosity shows excellent results. At high heat fluxes, however,it causes deterioration of heat transfer. Over the wide range of heat fluxes,# 4 sponge metal was found to be most suitable and the optimal clearence was determined as 0.5 mm. The sponge metal is of good practical use as a device to enhance the boiling, since no special manufacturing is required for placing it on the heated surface.

  18. Pool boiling with high heat flux enabled by a porous artery structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lizhan; Zhang, Lianpei; Lin, Guiping; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    A porous artery structure utilizing the concept of "phase separation and modulation" is proposed to enhance the critical heat flux of pool boiling. A series of experiments were conducted on a range of test articles in which multiple rectangular arteries were machined directly into the top surface of a 10.0 mm diameter copper rod. The arteries were then covered by a 2.0 mm thickness microporous copper plate through silver brazing. The pool wall was fabricated from transparent Pyrex glass to allow a visualization study, and water was used as the working fluid. Experimental results confirmed that the porous artery structure provided individual flow paths for the liquid supply and vapor venting, and avoided the detrimental effects of the liquid/vapor counter flow. As a result, a maximum heat flux of 610 W/cm2 over a heating area of 0.78 cm2 was achieved with no indication of dryout, prior to reaching the heater design temperature limit. Following the experimental tests, the mechanisms responsible for the boiling critical heat flux and performance enhancement of the porous artery structure were analyzed.

  19. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  20. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to the high specific impulse that can be achieved using engines suitable for moving 10's to 100's of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several days. The losses can be greatly reduced by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and by the integration of self-supporting multi-layer insulation. The active thermal control technology under development is the integration of the reverse turbo- Brayton cycle cryocooler to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling network of tubes coupled to a shield in the tank insulation and to the tank wall itself. Also, the self-supporting insulation technology was utilized under the shield to obtain needed tank applied LH2 performance. These elements were recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a series of three tests, two that reduced LH2 boil-off and one to eliminate LO2 boil-off. This test series was conducted in a vacuum chamber that replicated the vacuum of space and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. The test results show that LH2 boil-off was reduced 60% by the cryocooler system operating at 90K and that robust LO2 zero boil-off storage, including full tank pressure control was achieved.

  1. Reduced Boil-Off System Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is currently developing cryogenic propellant storage and transfer systems for future space exploration and scientific discovery missions by addressing the need to raise the technology readiness level of cryogenic fluid management technologies. Cryogenic propellants are baselined in many propulsion systems due to their inherently high specific impulse; however, their low boiling points can cause substantial boil-off losses over time. Recent efforts such as the Reduced Boil-off Testing and the Active Thermal Control Scaling Study provide important information on the benefit of an active cooling system applied to LH2 propellant storage. Findings show that zero-boil off technologies can reduce overall mass in LH2 storage systems when low Earth orbit loiter periods extend beyond two months. A significant part of this mass reduction is realized by integrating two stages of cooling: a 20 K stage to intercept heat at the tank surface, and a 90 K stage to reduce the heat entering the less efficient 20 K stage. A missing element in previous studies, which is addressed in this paper, is the development of a direct method for sizing the 90 K cooling stage. Such a method requires calculation of the heat entering both the 90 K and 20 K stages as compared to the overall system masses, and is reliant upon the temperature distribution, performance, and unique design characteristics of the system in question. By utilizing the known conductance of a system without active thermal control, the heat being intercepted by a 90 K stage can be calculated to find the resultant lift and mass of each active thermal control stage. Integral to this is the thermal conductance of the cooling straps and the broad area cooling shield, key parts of the 90 K stage. Additionally, a trade study is performed to show the ability of the 90 K cooling stage to reduce the lift on the 20 K cryocooler stage, which is considerably less developed and efficient than 90 K cryocoolers.

  2. Visualization study of nucleate pool boiling of liquid nitrogen with quasi-steady heat input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Chen, Jianye; Xiong, Wei; Jin, Tao

    2015-12-01

    A visualization experimental device has been built to investigate the bubble behaviors in the nucleate pool boiling of cryogenic fluids at atmospheric pressure. The general morphologies of the bubbles are analyzed based on the captured films using a high-speed camera. The bubble behaviors leaving the wall at different heat flux can be divided into three regimes (low heat flux regime, fully developed nucleate boiling regime and intermediate regime) according to the availability of bubble parameters. In the low heat flux regime, the bubble is discrete and the interactive effects are ignorable. In the fully developed nucleate boiling regime close to CHF, the bubbles depart in the form of bubble cluster with a neck. In the intermediate regime, the interactive effect between the bubbles is significant and the bubbles follow a random pattern neither discretely nor as cluster neck. The information about the bubble departure diameter, the detachment frequency and the number density of activated sites are specially investigated. These data are used to evaluate the existing semi-empirical correlations widely applied to either the room-temperature or cryogenic fluids. It is found that the Kim's correlation for the departure diameter predicts a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results in the isolated bubble regime. For the predictions of the detachment frequency, the correlation by Katto and Yokoya is recommended after comparison. The relation between the diameter and frequency can also be well determined by the correlation proposed by Mcfadden et al. The number density of active sites for liquid nitrogen still can be considered to be linearly proportional to ΔTm as it is for water, except that the exponent absolute m is much smaller.

  3. Role of ions in pool boiling heat transfer of pure and silica nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanova, Denitsa; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2005-12-01

    Heat transfer in silica nanofluids at different acidity and base is measured for various ionic concentrations in a pool boiling experiment. Nanosilica suspension increases the critical heat flux 3 times compared to conventional fluids. The 10-nm particles possess a thicker double diffuse layer compared to 20-nm particles. The catalytic properties of nanofluids decrease in the presence of salts, allowing the particles to cluster and minimize the potential increase in heat transfer. Nanofluids in a strong electrolyte, i.e., in high ionic concentration, allow a higher critical heat flux than in buffer solutions because of the difference in surface area. The formation and surface structure of the deposition affect the thermal properties of the liquid.

  4. Generalized multidemensional propagation velocity equations for pool-boiling superconducting windings

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, E.H.; O'Loughlin, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Several finite difference, finite element detailed analyses of propagation velocities in up to three dimensions in pool-boiling windings have been conducted for different electromagnetic and cryogenic environments. Likewise, a few full scale simulated winding and magnet tests have measured propagation velocities. These velocity data have been correlated in terms of winding thermophysical parameters. This analysis expresses longitudinal and transverse propagation velocities in the form of power function regression equations for a wide variety of windings and electromagnetic and thermohydraulic environments. The generalized velocity equations are considered applicable to well-ventilated, monolithic conductor windings. These design equations are used piecewise in a gross finite difference mode as functions of field to predict the rate of normal zone growth during quench conditions. A further check of the validity of these predictions is available through total predicted quench durations correlated with actual quench durations of large magnets.

  5. Pool boiling heat transfer from vertical heater array in liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C.J.; Sehmbey, M.S.; Chow, L.C.; Hahn, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    The heat transfer from an array of discrete sources is expected to differ from the behavior of a single heat source due to the interaction between the flow induced by individual heat sources. This study details the results from experiments conducted to study the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics from a vertical heater array with flush-mounted heat sources. The lower heaters were found to enhance the heat transfer from upper heaters. The bubble pumped convection due to the lower heaters enhanced the preboiling heat transfer coefficient at the upper heater by as much as 700%. The critical heat flux from the upper heaters was also enhanced up to 15%. Correlations are presented for both these effects. 21 refs.

  6. Thermal singularity and contact line motion in pool boiling: Effects of substrate wettability.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M T; Qian, Tiezheng

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] is employed to model the growth of a single vapor bubble in a superheated liquid on a flat homogeneous substrate. The bubble spreading dynamics in the pool boiling regime has been numerically investigated for one-component van der Waals fluids close to the critical point, with a focus on the effect of the substrate wettability on bubble growth and contact line motion. The substrate wettability is found to control the apparent contact angle and the rate of bubble growth (the rate of total evaporation), through which the contact line speed is determined. An approximate expression is derived for the contact line speed, showing good agreement with the simulation results. This demonstrates that the contact line speed is primarily governed by (1) the circular shape of interface (for slow bubble growth), (2) the constant apparent contact angle, and (3) the constant bubble growth rate. It follows that the contact line speed has a sensitive dependence on the substrate wettability via the apparent contact angle which also determines the bubble growth rate. Compared to hydrophilic surfaces, hydrophobic surfaces give rise to a thinner shape of bubble and a higher rate of total evaporation, which combine to result in a much faster contact line speed. This can be linked to the earlier formation of a vapor film and hence the onset of boiling crisis. PMID:27078445

  7. Thermal singularity and contact line motion in pool boiling: Effects of substrate wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. T.; Qian, Tiezheng

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.036304] is employed to model the growth of a single vapor bubble in a superheated liquid on a flat homogeneous substrate. The bubble spreading dynamics in the pool boiling regime has been numerically investigated for one-component van der Waals fluids close to the critical point, with a focus on the effect of the substrate wettability on bubble growth and contact line motion. The substrate wettability is found to control the apparent contact angle and the rate of bubble growth (the rate of total evaporation), through which the contact line speed is determined. An approximate expression is derived for the contact line speed, showing good agreement with the simulation results. This demonstrates that the contact line speed is primarily governed by (1) the circular shape of interface (for slow bubble growth), (2) the constant apparent contact angle, and (3) the constant bubble growth rate. It follows that the contact line speed has a sensitive dependence on the substrate wettability via the apparent contact angle which also determines the bubble growth rate. Compared to hydrophilic surfaces, hydrophobic surfaces give rise to a thinner shape of bubble and a higher rate of total evaporation, which combine to result in a much faster contact line speed. This can be linked to the earlier formation of a vapor film and hence the onset of boiling crisis.

  8. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  9. Bubble Behavior and Heat Transfer of Nucleate Pool Boiling on Micro-Pin-Finned Surface in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jin-Jia; Xue, Yan-Fang; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Li, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Nucleate pool boiling on micro-pin-finned surface structure is proposed for efficiently cooling electronic components with high heat flux in microgravity, and was verified by experiments performed utilizing the drop tower Beijing. Micro-pin-fins with the dimensions of 50 × 60 μm2 (thickness × height) and the space of 50 μm were fabricated on the chip surface by the dry etching technique. FC-72 was used as the working fluid. Nucleate pool boiling of FC-72 on a smooth surface was also tested for comparison. Unlike much obvious deterioration of heat transfer of nucleate pool boiling on the smooth surface in microgravity, constant heater surface temperature of nucleate pool boiling for the micro-pin-finned surface was observed, even though a large coalesced bubble completely covered the surface under microgravity condition. The performance of high efficient heat transfer on micro-pin-finned surface is independent of the gravity, which stems from the sufficient supply of fresh liquid to the heater surface due to the capillary forces.

  10. Transient pool boiling heat transfer due to increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Sakurai, A.

    1995-09-01

    Understanding of transient boiling phenomenon caused by increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures is necessary to predict correctly a severe accident due to a power burst in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. Transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}, on a 1.2 mm diameter horizontal cylinder in a pool of saturated and subcooled water for exponential heat inputs, q{sub o}e{sup t/T}, with periods, {tau}, ranging from about 2 ms to 20 s at pressures from atmospheric up to 2063 kPa for water subcoolings from 0 to about 80 K were measured to obtain the extended data base to investigate the effect of high subcoolings on steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}. Two main mechanisms of q{sub max} exist depending on the exponential periods at low subcoolings. One is due to the time lag of the hydrodynamic instability which starts at steady-state maximum heat flux on fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), and the other is due to the heterogenous spontaneous nucleations (HSN) in flooded cavities which coexist with vapor bubbles growing up from active cavities. The shortest period corresponding to the maximum q{sub max} for long period range belonging to the former mechanism becomes longer and the q{sub max}mechanism for long period range shifts to that due the HSN on FDNB with the increase of subcooling and pressure. The longest period corresponding to the minimum q{sub max} for the short period range belonging to the latter mechanism becomes shorter with the increase in saturated pressure. On the contrary, the longest period becomes longer with the increase in subcooling at high pressures. Correlations for steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes were presented for a wide range of pressure and subcooling.

  11. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Control of Bubble Motion in Microgravity Using Electric Fields - BCOEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle; Acquaviva, Tom; Coho, Bill; Grant, Nechelle; Nahra, Henry; Sankaran, Subramanian; Taylor, Al; Julian, Ed; Robinson, Dale; VanZandt, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The BCOEL project focuses on improving pool boiling heat transfer and bubble control in microgravity by exposing the fluid to electric fields. The electric fields induce a body force that can replace gravity in the low gravity environment, and enhance bubble removal from thc heated surface. A better understanding of microgravity effects on boiling with and without electric fields is critical to the proper design of the phase-change-heat-removal equipment for use in space-based applications. The microgravity experiments will focus on the visualization of bubble formation and shape during boiling. Heat fluxes on the boiling surface will be measured, and, together with the measured driving temperature differences, used to plot boiling curvcs for different electric field magnitudes. Bubble formation and boiling processes were found to be extremely sensitive to g-jitter. The duration of the experimental run is critical in order to achieve steady state in microgravity experiments. The International Space Station provides conditions suitable for such experiments. The experimental appararus to be used in the study is described in the paper. The apparatus will be tested in the KC-135 first, and microgravity experiments will be conducted on board of the International Space Station using the Microgravity Science Glovebox as the experimental platform.

  12. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Control of Bubble Motion in Microgravity Using Electric Fields (BCOEL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle; Acquaviva, Tom; Coho, Bill; Grant, Nechelle; Nahra, Henry; Taylor, Al; Julian, Ed; Robinson, Dale; VanZandt, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The BCOEL project focuses on improving pool boiling heat transfer and bubble control in microgravity by exposing the fluid to electric fields. The electric fields induce a body force that can replace gravity in the low gravity environment, and enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. A better understanding of microgravity effects on boiling with and without electric fields is critical to the proper design of the phase-change-heat-removal equipment for use in spacebased applications. The microgravity experiments will focus on the visualization of bubble formation and shape during boiling. Heat fluxes on the boiling surface will be measured, and, together with the measured driving temperature differences, used to plot boiling curves for different electric field magnitudes. Bubble formation and boiling processes were found to be extremely sensitive to g-jitter. The duration of the experimental run is critical in order to achieve steady state in microgravity experiments. The International Space Station provides conditions suitable for such experiments. The experimental apparatus to be used in the study is described in the paper. The apparatus will be tested in the KC-135 first, and microgravity experiments will be conducted on board of the International Space Station using the Microgravity Science Glovebox as the experimental platform.

  13. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages suitable for transporting 10s to 100s of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit and for their return. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several months. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler to control tank pressure. The active thermal control technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center, in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. Testing consisted of three passive tests with the active cryocooler system off, and 7 active tests, with the cryocooler powered up. The test matrix included zero boil-off tests performed at 90 full and 25 full, and several demonstrations at excess cooling capacity and reduced cooling capacity. From this, the tank pressure response with varied cryocooler power inputs was determined. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  14. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic flow in the liquid phase for a specific pool boiling scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühler, Leo

    2002-11-01

    In the EVOLVE concept for a nuclear fusion blanket a pool boiling scenario has been proposed where a number of permanent vertical vapour channels are formed in a horizontal layer of liquid lithium. Similar situations occur during laser beam welding where a relatively long vapour capillary is observed. The present analysis focuses on the flow of the electrically conducting liquid phase in the presence of a strong uniform horizontal magnetic field. The cross-section of vapour channels is circular if surface tension dominates magnetic forces. In the opposite case a stretching of the liquid vapour interface along magnetic field lines is observed and contours become possible where a major part of the interface is straight and aligned with the field. For strong magnetic fields the liquid flow exhibits several distinct subregions. Most of the liquid domain is occupied by inviscid cores. These are separated from each other by parallel layers that spread along the field lines which are tangential to the vapour channel. In one core, which is located between two parallel layers, the flow direction is preferentially oriented along magnetic field lines, while in the other cores the flow is perpendicular to the field.

  16. Experimental investigation and mechanism of critical heat flux enhancement in pool boiling heat transfer with nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamatchi, R.; Venkatachalapathy, S.; Nithya, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized from graphite using modified Hummer and chemical reduction methods. Various characterizations techniques are carried out to study the in-plane crystallite size, number of layers, presence of functional groups and surface morphology. Different concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.3 g/l of rGO/water nanofluids are prepared by dispersing the flakes in DI water. The colloidal stability of 0.3 g/l concentration is measured after 5 days using Zetasizer and found to be stable. The rGO/water nanofluids are then used to study the effect on the enhancement of critical heat flux (CHF) in pool boiling heat transfer. Results indicate an enhancement in CHF ranging from 145 to 245 % for the tested concentrations. The mechanisms of CHF enhancement are analyzed based on surface wettability, surface roughness, and porous layer thickness. The macrolayer dryout model sufficiently supports the mechanism of CHF enhancement of thin wire with rGO deposits, which is not reported yet.

  17. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Johnson, W. L.; Feller, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration plans due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for long duration missions. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler temperature to control tank pressure. The technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  18. Zero boil-off system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Johnson, W. L.; Feller, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration plans due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for long duration missions. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler temperature to control tank pressure. The technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  19. Pool boiling enhancement through bubble induced convective liquid flow in feeder microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Bubbles departing from the nucleation sites induce a liquid flow from the bulk to the heated surface during pool boiling. Alternating the nucleating regions with non-nucleating regions facilitates separate liquid-vapor pathways for departing vapor bubbles and returning liquid. We explored an additional enhancement through liquid feeder channels on the heater surface directing the returning liquid towards the nucleating region. The nucleating bubbles were confined to the nucleating region as the returning liquid flow induced strong convective currents over the non-nucleating regions. In the best performing configuration, the nucleating regions were 0.5 mm wide, separated by non-nucleating regions of width 2.125 mm, which corresponded to the bubble departure diameter. The non-nucleating regions contained 0.5 mm wide feeder channels directing liquid towards the nucleating region. High speed images indicated distinct vapor columns over the nucleating regions with liquid channeled through the feeder channels. At higher heat fluxes, the strong liquid currents established over the feeder channels suppressed any undesirable nucleation in them keeping the separated vapor-liquid pathways functional. This enhancement technique resulted in a critical heat flux of 394 W/cm2 at a wall superheat of 5.5 °C which translated to a heat transfer coefficient of 713 kW/m2 °C. The additional surface area and high heat transfer coefficient due to microchannel flow in feeder channels, and the unobstructed surface available for the bubbles to expand over the prime heat transfer surface area before departing were seen to be responsible for their superior performance.

  20. Acoustic field interaction with a boiling system under terrestrial gravity and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sitter, J S; Snyder, T J; Chung, J N; Marston, P L

    1998-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments from a platinum wire heater in FC-72 liquid were conducted under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, both with and without the presence of a high-intensity acoustic standing wave within the fluid. The purpose of this research was to study the interaction between an acoustic field and a pool boiling system in normal gravity and microgravity. The absence of buoyancy in microgravity complicates the process of boiling. The acoustic force on a vapor bubble generated from a heated wire in a standing wave was shown to be able to play the role of buoyancy in microgravity. The microgravity environment was achieved with 0.6 and 2.1-s drop towers. The sound was transmitted through the fluid medium by means of a half wavelength sonic transducer driven at 10.18 kHz. At high enough acoustic pressure amplitudes cavitation and streaming began playing an important role in vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. Several different fixed heat fluxes were chosen for the microgravity experiment and the effects of acoustics on the surface temperature of the heater were recorded and the vapor bubble movement was filmed. Video images of the pool boiling processes and heat transfer data are presented. PMID:9821335

  1. Pool boiling of enhanced heat transfer surfaces in refrigerant-oil mixtures and aqueous calcium sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Curcio, L.A.; Somerscales, E.F.

    1994-08-01

    Pool boiling data of structured surfaces in R113/3GS oil mixtures show a general decrease in heat transfer with oil concentration, degradation in performance of all surfaces at 10% oil, no change in enhancement of the structured surfaces over plain surface, and restoration of performance of the enhanced surfaces upon cleaning in denatured alcohol. Fouling data of structured surfaces in pool boiling of sat. aq. CaSO{sub 4} solution show that effects of fouling (wall superheat changes, deposit weight) are more pronounced at 80 kW/m{sup 2} than at 10 kW/m{sup 2} heat flux; precipitation fouling show an effect within the first 2 h exposure. High flux surfaces have lower deposition weight than other surfaces; thus the deposition rate may depend strongly on wall superheat. The numerous nucleation sites of the enhanced surfaces provide more turbulent motion near the boiling surface than for the plain surface; thus the removal rate should be greater for an enhanced surface, although no removal of a deposit was ever observed.

  2. Radioisotope Power System Pool Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusick, Jeffrey J.; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for NASA deep space science missions have historically used static thermoelectric-based designs because they are highly reliable, and their radioisotope heat sources can be passively cooled throughout the mission life cycle. Recently, a significant effort to develop a dynamic RPS, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), was conducted by NASA and the Department of Energy, because Stirling based designs offer energy conversion efficiencies four times higher than heritage thermoelectric designs; and the efficiency would proportionately reduce the amount of radioisotope fuel needed for the same power output. However, the long term reliability of a Stirling based design is a concern compared to thermoelectric designs, because for certain Stirling system architectures the radioisotope heat sources must be actively cooled via the dynamic operation of Stirling converters throughout the mission life cycle. To address this reliability concern, a new dynamic Stirling cycle RPS architecture is proposed called the RPS Pool Concept.

  3. Pool boiling of water-Al2O3 and water-Cu nanofluids on horizontal smooth tubes.

    PubMed

    Cieslinski, Janusz T; Kaczmarczyk, Tomasz Z

    2011-01-01

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer during pool boiling of two nanofluids, i.e., water-Al2O3 and water-Cu has been carried out. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.01%, 0.1%, and 1% by weight. The horizontal smooth copper and stainless steel tubes having 10 mm OD and 0.6 mm wall thickness formed test heater. The experiments have been performed to establish the influence of nanofluids concentration as well as tube surface material on heat transfer characteristics at atmospheric pressure. The results indicate that independent of concentration nanoparticle material (Al2O3 and Cu) has almost no influence on heat transfer coefficient while boiling of water-Al2O3 or water-Cu nanofluids on smooth copper tube. It seems that heater material did not affect the boiling heat transfer in 0.1 wt.% water-Cu nanofluid, nevertheless independent of concentration, distinctly higher heat transfer coefficient was recorded for stainless steel tube than for copper tube for the same heat flux density. PMID:21711741

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of the surface temperature and heat flux for saturated pool nucleate boiling at lower heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, C.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.

    1993-10-01

    The spatial and temporal variations of local surface temperature and heat flux for saturated pool nucleate boiling are investigated parametrically using a numerical model. The numerical model consisted of solving the three-dimensional transient heat conduction equation within the heater subjected to nucleate boiling over its upper surface. The surface topography model to distribute the cavities over the boiling surface used a Monte Carlo scheme. All cavities were assumed to be conical in shape. The cavity radii are obtained using an exponential probability density function with a known mean value. Local surface temperatures showed significant spatial and temporal variations, depending upon the surface topography and the heater material and thickness. However, the surface-averaged temperature showed practically no temporal variation. The temporal variations in local temperatures caused the surface-averaged heat flux to vary significantly. The temporal variations in the surface-averaged heat flux were similar for smooth and rough and thick and thin copper and nickel plates. Results indicated that the use of a classical energy balance equation to evaluate the surface heat flux must consider the spatial variation of the temperature. Results also showed that any thermocouple embedded beneath the surface of the heater does not follow the temporal variations at the surface.

  5. Migration of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The migration characteristics of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling were investigated experimentally. Four types of carbon nanotubes with the outside diameters from 15 to 80 nm and the lengths from 1.5 to 10 μm were used in the experiments. The refrigerants include R113, R141b and n-pentane. The oil concentration is from 0 to 10 wt.%, the heat flux is from 10 to 100 kW·m-2, and the initial liquid-level height is from 1.3 to 3.4 cm. The experimental results indicate that the migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the increase of the outside diameter or the length of carbon nanotube. For the fixed type of carbon nanotube, the migration ratio decreases with the increase of the oil concentration or the heat flux, and increases with the increase of the initial liquid-level height. The migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the decrease of dynamic viscosity of refrigerant or the increase of liquid phase density of refrigerant. A model for predicting the migration ratio of carbon nanotubes in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling is proposed, and the predictions agree with 92% of the experimental data within a deviation of ±20%. PMID:21711730

  6. Migration of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao

    2011-01-01

    The migration characteristics of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling were investigated experimentally. Four types of carbon nanotubes with the outside diameters from 15 to 80 nm and the lengths from 1.5 to 10 μm were used in the experiments. The refrigerants include R113, R141b and n-pentane. The oil concentration is from 0 to 10 wt.%, the heat flux is from 10 to 100 kW·m-2, and the initial liquid-level height is from 1.3 to 3.4 cm. The experimental results indicate that the migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the increase of the outside diameter or the length of carbon nanotube. For the fixed type of carbon nanotube, the migration ratio decreases with the increase of the oil concentration or the heat flux, and increases with the increase of the initial liquid-level height. The migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the decrease of dynamic viscosity of refrigerant or the increase of liquid phase density of refrigerant. A model for predicting the migration ratio of carbon nanotubes in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling is proposed, and the predictions agree with 92% of the experimental data within a deviation of ±20%. PMID:21711730

  7. Review of nucleation and incipient boiling under pool and forced convection conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of liquid-vapor nucleation is given. The result of thermodynamic equilibrium across curved liquid-vapor interfaces is presented. The extension of this to include the interaction with idealizations of surface cavities is made to demonstrate how superheat requirements for nucleation will be affected by surface roughness, flow velocity and buoyancy. Experimental measurements of high liquid superheats and nucleation delay times are presented as examples of homogeneous nucleation. Examples of nucleation and boiling on smooth glass substrates and on metal surfaces with various surface roughnesses are presented.

  8. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  9. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  10. The effect of Bond number on pool boiling for mini-fin surfaces and different working fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strąk, Ewelina; Pastuszko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Experimental nucleate pool boiling data were collected for structures in the form of extended surfaces sintered with perforated foil. The article describes experimental investigations for two kinds of surfaces: smooth and mini-fins with sintered perforated foil (MFP). The MFP surfaces were manufactured out of perforated copper foil (pore diameters: 0.05 - 0.3 mm) sintered with the mini-fins, uniformly spaced on the base surface. The experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure for four kinds of the fluids: water, ethanol, FC-72 and Novec 649. The results for these working fluids were compared in terms of the Bond number and other dimensionless parameters. For all working fluids, the heat transfer coefficients obtained for the MFP surfaces were from 2 to 5 times higher than those for the smooth surface. Using a regression analysis with reference to selected physical properties and several characteristic dimensions, it was possible to develop a correlation for the Nusselt number.

  11. Pool boiling of R-114/oil mixtures from single tubes and tube bundles. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1987-09-01

    An apparatus was designed, fabricated, and operated for the testing of horizontal tube bundles for boiling of R-114 with various concentrations of oil. Preliminary data were taken on the top tube in the bundle, with and without the other tubes in operation. Results showed up to a 37% increase in the boiling heat-transfer coefficient as a result of the favorable bundle effect. In a separate single-tube apparatus, three enhanced tubes were tested at a saturation temperature of 2.2 C with oil mass concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 3, 6 and 10%. The tubes were: 1) a finned tube with 1024 fins per meter, 2) a finned tube with 1575 fins per meter and 3) a Turbo-B tube. These tubes resulted in enhancement ratios in pure refrigerant of 2.8, 3.8 and 5.2, respectively, at a practical heat flux of 30 kW/sq. meter. With 3% oil, these ratios were decreased to 2.6, 3.5 and 5, while with 10% oil, these ratios were further reduced to 2.6, 3.2 and 4.7, respectively. Based on these results, the use of Turbo-B tubes is expected to result in significant savings in weight and size of evaporators over the finned tubes presently in use on board some naval vessels.

  12. Subcooled Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Microgravity: Terrier-improved Orion Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Benton, John; Kucner, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A microscale heater array was used to study boiling in earth gravity and microgravity. The heater array consisted of 96 serpentine heaters on a quartz substrate. Each heater was 0.27 square millimeters. Electronic feedback loops kept each heater's temperature at a specified value. The University of Maryland constructed an experiment for the Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket that was delivered to NASA Wallops and flown. About 200 s of high quality microgravity and heat transfer data were obtained. The VCR malfunctioned, and no video was acquired. Subsequently, the test package was redesigned to fly on the KC-135 to obtain both data and video. The pressure was held at atmospheric pressure and the bulk temperature was about 20 C. The wall temperature was varied from 85 to 65 C. Results show that gravity has little effect on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble was surrounded by smaller bubbles, which eventually merged with the primary bubble. This bubble was formed by smaller bubbles coalescing, but had a constant size for a given superheat, indicating a balance between evaporation at the base and condensation on the cap. Most of the heaters under the bubble indicated low heat transfer, suggesting dryout at those heaters. High heat transfer occurred at the contact line surrounding the primary bubble. Marangoni convection formed a "jet" of fluid into the bulk fluid that forced the bubble onto the heater.

  13. Viscous hydrodynamic instability theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.

    1972-01-01

    Liquid viscosity was included in the Bellman-Pennington theory of the Taylor wave in a liquid vapor interface. Predictions of the most susceptible wavelength, and of the wave frequency, were made as a function of a liquid viscosity parameter and the Bond number. The stability of a gas jet in a viscous liquid was studied and the result is used to predict the peak heat flux on large horizontal heaters. Experimental measurements of the dominant Taylor wave and its growth rate were made during the film boiling of cyclohexanol on cylindrical heaters. The results bear out the predictions quite well. The thickness of the vapor blanket surrounding a cylindrical heater was measured and a correlation suggested. The effect of large fluxes of vapor volume on the dominant wavelength was also noted. Theoretical results of the peak heat flux are compared with the experimental data, and the effect of finite geometry of flat plate heaters on the peak heat flux is also discussed.

  14. Design of a pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.; Kesseli, J.

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding a heat transport system to more uniformly supply heat to the heater head tubes. One heat transport system with favorable characteristics is an alkali metal pool boiler. An alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system was designed for a 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS). Solar energy concentrated on the absorber dome boils a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium. The alkali metal vapors condense on the heater head tubes, supplying the Stirling engine with a uniform heat flux at a constant temperature. Boiling stability is achieved with the use of an enhanced boiling surface and noncondensible gas.

  15. Design of a pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.; Kesseli, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding a heat transport system to more uniformly supply heat to the heater head tubes. One heat transport system with favorable characteristics is an alkali metal pool boiler. An alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system was designed for a 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS). Solar energy concentrated on the absorber dome boils a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium. The alkali metal vapors condense on the heater head tubes, supplying the Stirling engine with a uniform heat flux at a constant temperature. Boiling stability is achieved with the use of an enhanced boiling surface and noncondensible gas.

  16. Experimental study of debris-bed coolability under pool-boiling conditions. [PWR; BWR; LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Catton, I.; Dhir, V.K.; Somerton, C.W.

    1983-05-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted into the dryout of a bed of inductively heated particles cooled by an overlying liquid pool. Particles of diameters 4763 ..mu..m, 3175 ..mu..m, 1588 ..mu..m, and 589-787 ..mu..m have been used. Acetone and water have been used as the coolant with bed heights varying from 5 to 40 cm. Results are presented in terms of the dryout heat as a function of bed height. It has been found that the ratio of the overlying liquid pool height to the particulate bed height can influence the dryout heat flux. Comparison with other experimetal studies was good and a comparison with proposed theoretical models was also made.

  17. Dynamical Behavior of Discrete Bubble and Heat Transfer of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Short-Term Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Fu

    2012-07-01

    Boiling in microgravity is an increasing significant subject of investigation. Motivation for the study comes not only from many potential space applications due to its high efficiency to transfer high heat flux with liquid-vapor phase change, but also from powerful platform of microgravity to reveal the mechanism of heat transfer underneath the phenomenon of boiling. In the present paper, the growth of a discrete bubble during nucleate pool boiling and heat transfer in short-term microgravity is studied experimentally utilizing the drop tower Beijing. A P-doped N-type square silicon chip with the dimensions of 10x10x0.5 mm ^{3} was used as the heater. Two 0.25-mm diameters copper wires for power supply was soldered to the side surfaces of the chip at the opposite ends. The normal resistant of the chip is 75 Ω. The chip was heated by using Joule effect. A D.C. power supply of constant current was used to input energy to the heater element. A 0.12-mm diameter, T-type thermocouple adhered on the centre of the backside of the chip was used for the measurement of wall temperature, while two other T-type thermocouples were used for the bulk liquid temperature. FC-72 was used as working fluid. The concentration of air was determined by using Henry law as 0.0046 moles gas/mole liquid. The pressure and the bulk liquid temperature in the boiling chamber were nominally 102.0 kPa and 12.0 °C, respectively. The shapes of the bubbles were recorded using a high speed camera at a speed of 250 fps with a shutter speed of 1/2000 s. Based on the image manipulation, the effective diameter of the discrete bubble is obtained. The experiments were conducted utilizing the drop tower Beijing, which can provide a short-term microgravity condition. The residual gravity of 10 ^{-2 ... -3} g _{0} can be maintained throughout the short duration of 3.6 s. To avoid the influence of natural convection in normal gravity environment, the heating switched on at the release of the drop capsule

  18. Evaluation of the Safety Systems in the Next Generation Boiling Water Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ling

    The thesis evaluates the safety systems in the next generation boiling water reactor by analyzing the main steam line break loss of coolant accident performed in the Purdue university multi-dimensional test assembly (PUMA). RELAP5 code simulations, both for the PUMA main steam line break (MSLB) case and for the simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) MSLB case have been utilized to compare with the experiment data. The comparison shows that RELAP5 is capable to perform the safety analysis for SBWR. The comparison also validates the three-level scaling methodology applied to the design of the PUMA facility. The PUMA suppression pool mixing and condensation test data have been studied to give the detailed understanding on this important local phenomenon. A simple one dimensional integral model, which can reasonably simulate the mixing process inside suppression pool have been developed and the comparison between the model prediction and the experiment data demonstrates the model can be utilized for analyzing the suppression pool mixing process.

  19. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, James L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-11-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400°C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385°C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415°C, 330 bar. A 400°C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500°C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor.

  20. Characteristics of Transient Boiling Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Monde, Masanori; Mitsutake, Y.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, one dimensional inverse heat conduction solution is used for a measurement of pool boiling curve. The experiments are performed under atmospheric pressure for copper, brass, carbon steel and gold. Boiling curves, including unsteady transition boiling region, are found can be traced fairly well from a simple experiment system by solving inverse heat conduction solution. Boiling curves for steady heating and transient heating, for heating process and cooling process are compared. Surface behavior around CHF point, transition boiling and film-boiling regions are observed by using a high-speed camera. The results show the practicability of the inverse heat conduction solution in tracing boiling curve and thereby supply us a new way in boiling heat transfer research. (authors)

  1. Reversed boiling curve phenomenon on surfaces with interlaced wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Chiu, W. C.; Kuo, L. S.; Chen, P. H.

    2014-10-01

    We experimentally investigated the effects of contact angle difference of heterogeneous wettability surfaces on pool boiling. For surfaces exhibiting heterogeneous wettability, this study determined that the pool boiling curve experiences a superheat decrease in some regions before the system achieves the critical heat flux. In addition, oscillation of the vapor column and bubble transverse motions on the heterogeneous wettability coated surface were observed.

  2. The Effect of Coating Thickness and Roughness of Nucleate Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on Nanoparticle Coated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudev; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-04-01

    The influence of coating thickness and surface roughness on pool boiling heat transfer is experimentally studied over a range of surface roughness values with varied coating thickness with water at atmospheric pressure. Test surfaces used in this experiment are namely, untreated surface (Ra = 0.0899 µm), polished surface (Ra = 0.0493 µm), TiO2 nanoparticle coated surface with a roughness (Ra) ranging from 0.0338 to 0.289 µm. The surfaces were characterized with respect to contact angle, surface roughness and coating thickness. The contact angle, surface roughness and coating thickness were measured by sessile drop method, optical surface profiler and instrument thickness monitor respectively. Heat fluxes observed ranged from 52.63 to 144.73 W/cm2. Different trends were observed in the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) with respect to the surface roughness and coating thickness values on the same set of heat flux. The HTC was found to increase with increasing the roughness values for untreated and polish surface but nanoparticle coated surfaces displayed different trend in HTCs. The HTC was found to increase with increasing coating thickness with all wall superheat.

  3. Thermal behavior of aqueous iron oxide nano-fluid as a coolant on a flat disc heater under the pool boiling condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, E.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Sarafraz, M. M.; Hormozi, F.; Nikkhah, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper experimentally focuses on the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics of gamma Fe3O4 aqueous nano-fluids on a flat disc heater. The nano-fluid used in this research was prepared using two-step method and was stabilized using nonylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactant, pH setting, and sonication process as well. Influence of different operating parameters such as heat flux (0-1546 kW/m2), mass concentration of nano-fluids (weight concentration 0.1-0.3 %), bubble formation, critical heat flux (1170 kW/m2 for water, 1230 kW/m2 (wt% = 0.1), 1320 kW/m2 (wt% = 0.2), 1450 kW/m2 (wt% = 0.3) and fouling on pool boiling heat transfer coefficient of nano-fluid as a thermal performance index were experimentally investigated and briefly discussed. Results demonstrated that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing the mass concentration and the applied heat flux. In addition, the rate of bubble formation is significantly intensified at higher heat fluxes and subsequently, larger bubbles detach the surface due to the intensification of bubble coalescence. In terms of fouling formation, it can be stated that fouling of nano-fluids is a strong function of time and rate of deposition is increased over the extended time while the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient was not decreased over the time, as porous deposited layer on the surface are detached from the surface by bubble interactions. In terms of critical heat flux, capillary action of the deposited layer was found to be the main reason responsible for increasing the critical heat flux as liquid is stored inside the porous deposited layer, which enhances the surface toleration against the critical heat flux crisis.

  4. Energy pooling upconversion in organic molecular systems.

    PubMed

    LaCount, Michael D; Weingarten, Daniel; Hu, Nan; Shaheen, Sean E; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Walba, David M; Lusk, Mark T

    2015-04-30

    A combination of molecular quantum electrodynamics, perturbation theory, and ab initio calculations was used to create a computational methodology capable of estimating the rate of three-body singlet upconversion in organic molecular assemblies. The approach was applied to quantify the conditions under which such relaxation rates, known as energy pooling, become meaningful for two test systems, stilbene-fluorescein and hexabenzocoronene-oligothiophene. Both exhibit low intramolecular conversion, but intermolecular configurations exist in which pooling efficiency is at least 90% when placed in competition with more conventional relaxation pathways. For stilbene-fluorescein, the results are consistent with data generated in an earlier experimental investigation. Exercising these model systems facilitated the development of a set of design rules for the optimization of energy pooling. PMID:25793313

  5. EHD enhancement of pool and in-tube boiling of alternate refrigerants. Final report, 15 January 1993--15 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ohadi, M.M.; Dessiatoun, S.; Singh, A.; Fanni, M.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) is an active heat transfer augmentation technique which utilizes the effect of secondary motions generated through the application of an electrostatic potential to a dielectric fluid. Net result is better momentum and heat transfer between the fluid and the heat transfer wall through destabilization of the thermal boundary layer and better mixing of the fluid adjacent to the heat transfer surface. EHD enhancement of refrigerant/refrigerant oil mixtures heat transfer using the Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) technique is the subject of a three-year experimental investigation in a project funded by the US Department of Energy, effective June 1, 1993. For the interim period between November 1992 and June 1993 when the DOE funds became available, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute (ARTI) provided partial funding for our EHD research program with the aim of accomplishing three major tasks: (1) conduct a comprehensive search of the literature on EHD-enhanced, in-tube and external boiling heat transfer enhancement of alternate refrigerants; (2) Design, fabricate, and instrument an in-tube, EHD-enhanced boiling/condensation test rig and perform preliminary testing of the setup; (3) conduct experiments and document new findings on EHD-enhanced external boiling of alternate refrigerants/refrigerant mixtures in an existing pool boiling test rig apparatus. Description of Tasks performed are described and results are discussed.

  6. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. King

    2000-06-19

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous

  7. Pool power control in remelting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Melgaard, David K.; Beaman, Joseph J.

    2011-12-13

    An apparatus for and method of controlling a remelting furnace comprising adjusting current supplied to an electrode based upon a predetermined pool power reference value and adjusting the electrode drive speed based upon the predetermined pool power reference value.

  8. Dryout and Rewetting in the Pool Boiling Experiment Flown on STS-72 (PBE-2 B) and STS-77 (PBE-2 A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.; Lee, Ho Sung; Keller, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the microgravity of space in which a pool of liquid (R-113), initially at a precisely defined pressure and temperature, is subjected to a step imposed heat flux from a semi-transparent thin-film heater forming part of one wall of the container such that boiling is initiated and maintained for a defined period of time at a constant pressure level. A total of nine tests were conducted at three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling in each of the two space experiments in a GAS canister on the STS-77, -72, respectively. Three (3) modes of propagation of boiling across the heater surface and subsequent vapor bubble growths were observed, in addition to the two (2) modes observed in the previous microgravity pool boiling space flights on STS-47, -57, and -60. Of particular interest were the extremely dynamic or "explosive" growths, which were determined to be the consequence of the large increase in the liquid-vapor interface area associated with the appearance of a corrugated or rough interface. Predictions of circumstances for its onset have been carried out. Assumptions were necessary regarding the character of disturbances necessary for the instabilities to grow. Also, a new vapor bubble phenomena was observed in which small vapor bubbles migrated toward a larger bubble, eventually coalescing with this larger bubble. The heat transfer was enhanced approximately 30% as a result of these migrating bubbles, which is believed to be a vapor bubble manifestation of Marangoni convection and/or molecular momentum effects, sometimes referred to as vapor recoil. The circumstances of heat flux and liquid subcooling necessary to produce heater surface dryout for an initially stagnant liquid subjected to an imposed heat flux have been more closely identified.

  9. The Gibbs Energy Basis and Construction of Boiling Point Diagrams in Binary Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman O.

    2004-01-01

    An illustration of how excess Gibbs energies of the components in binary systems can be used to construct boiling point diagrams is given. The underlying causes of the various types of behavior of the systems in terms of intermolecular forces and the method of calculating the coexisting liquid and vapor compositions in boiling point diagrams with…

  10. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  11. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  12. Performance Study and Dynamic Optimization Design for Thread Pool Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dongping Xu

    2004-12-19

    Thread pools have been widely used by many multithreaded applications. However, the determination of the pool size according to the application behavior still remains problematic. To automate this process, in this thesis we have developed a set of performance metrics for quantitatively analyzing thread pool performance. For our experiments, we built a thread pool system which provides a general framework for thread pool research. Based on this simulation environment, we studied the performance impact brought by the thread pool on different multithreaded applications. Additionally, the correlations between internal characterizations of thread pools and their throughput were also examined. We then proposed and evaluated a heuristic algorithm to dynamically determine the optimal thread pool size. The simulation results show that this approach is effective in improving overall application performance.

  13. Heat transfer and bubble detachment in subcooled pool boiling from a downward-facing microheater array in a nonuniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zan; Herman, Cila; Kim, Jungho

    2009-04-01

    The effects of a nonuniform electric field on vapor bubble detachment and heat transfer in subcooled pool boiling from a microheater array are investigated. The heater array faced downward to simulate a -1 g gravity condition and to eliminate the dominant masking effect of the buoyancy force. Experiments were conducted at different subcooling levels for various wall temperatures and electric field magnitudes. A dielectric fluid, FC-72, was used as the working fluid at ambient pressure. The array of 3 x 3 independently controlled microheaters was maintained at constant temperature and the rate of heat transfer from each heater was measured. Bubble images were recorded using a high-speed camera. The electric field was applied between the horizontal downward-facing microheater array, which was grounded, and a spherical, off-axis electrode beneath it. Boiling heat transfer results with and without the electric field are presented in this study. In the absence of the nonuniform electric field, compared to the same bulk fluid temperature and wall superheat settings in the +1 g situation, a much larger primary bubble was formed on the heater array, due to the coalescence of the secondary bubbles that nucleated on the heater array. The vapor bubble remained on the heater array surface and no bubble detachment was observed. With the nonuniform electric field applied, bubbles were lifted and sheared off from the heater array surface. The electric field was able to break up the primary bubble into several smaller bubbles--considerably greater heat transfer enhancement was measured than under similar conditions in +1 g. PMID:19426316

  14. Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1987-02-01

    Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550/sup 0/C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600/sup 0/C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test.

  15. Pool heating system on island brings year-round enjoyment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Bahamas is not generally thought of as a place in need of pool heating. However, the remote Bahamian island of Treasure Cay is actually situated north of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Pool temperatures drop during the winter, thus shortening the swimming season. The Beach Villas Homeowners Association of Treasure Cay investigated pool-heating options some time ago. Energy on Treasure Cay is expensive - about 25 cents/kWh - making cost a major concern for the association as they evaluated their choices. An electric heat pump was rule out as it would place too great a burden on the electricity load of the remote island. Heating the pool with propane gas was deemed far too costly. After evaluating each of these heating methods on the basis of economics, energy efficiency, and comfort, the association concluded that solar would be the best method. They selected a solar pool heating system manufactured by FAFCO, Inc. and installed by SUNWORKS in Ft. Lauderdale. The system requires virtually no daily maintenance, and there have been no problems with the system since its installation. In addition to being trouble-free, the FAFCO solar pool heater has saved Treasure Cay a great deal of money. The equipment cost about $9,500; lumber, PVC, and labor brought the total cost to $13,000. By comparison, a propane-gas system would have cost $4,000 but would have generated a yearly gas bill of $12,000. Therefore, payback on the system began immediately upon installation.

  16. A Novel Role of Three Dimensional Graphene Foam to Prevent Heater Failure during Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Chibeom; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyungdae; Kaviany, Massoud; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel boiling heat transfer (NBHT) in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspended in water (RGO colloid) near critical heat flux (CHF), which is traditionally the dangerous limitation of nucleate boiling heat transfer because of heater failure. When the heat flux reaches the maximum value (CHF) in RGO colloid pool boiling, the wall temperature increases gradually and slowly with an almost constant heat flux, contrary to the rapid wall temperature increase found during water pool boiling. The gained time by NBHT would provide the safer margin of the heat transfer and the amazing impact on the thermal system as the first report of graphene application. In addition, the CHF and boiling heat transfer performance also increase. This novel boiling phenomenon can effectively prevent heater failure because of the role played by the self-assembled three-dimensional foam-like graphene network (SFG). PMID:23743619

  17. A novel role of three dimensional graphene foam to prevent heater failure during boiling.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Chibeom; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyungdae; Kaviany, Massoud; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel boiling heat transfer (NBHT) in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspended in water (RGO colloid) near critical heat flux (CHF), which is traditionally the dangerous limitation of nucleate boiling heat transfer because of heater failure. When the heat flux reaches the maximum value (CHF) in RGO colloid pool boiling, the wall temperature increases gradually and slowly with an almost constant heat flux, contrary to the rapid wall temperature increase found during water pool boiling. The gained time by NBHT would provide the safer margin of the heat transfer and the amazing impact on the thermal system as the first report of graphene application. In addition, the CHF and boiling heat transfer performance also increase. This novel boiling phenomenon can effectively prevent heater failure because of the role played by the self-assembled three-dimensional foam-like graphene network (SFG). PMID:23743619

  18. An analysis of natural convection film boiling from spheres using the spherical coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, C.P.; Leong, K.C.; Tan, H.S.

    1995-11-01

    The problem of natural convection film boiling on a sphere was analyzed by solving the momentum and energy equations in spherical coordinates. These solutions were compared to the analytical model of Frederking and Clark based on the Cartesian coordinate system, empirical correlation of Frederking and Clark and recent experimental data of Tso et al. for boiling in various refrigerants and liquid nitrogen. For the average Nusselt number, good agreement with Frederking and Clark`s model was obtained. Results using spherical coordinates yield a limiting value of 2 for the average Nusselt number near a modified Rayleigh number of 1 which could not be extracted from Frederking and Clark`s model.

  19. Evaluation on environment-friendly refrigerants with similar normal boiling points in ejector refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Shen, S. Q.; Li, D. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the "hypothetical throat area" theory and the "constant-pressure mixing" theory, a thermodynamic model for ejector was set up by introducing the real properties of refrigerants. Refrigerants which have similar normal boiling points with each other may act as replacement to each other in substitute progress. In this paper, eight environment-friendly refrigerants were divided into 4 pairs for study according to their normal boiling point. In each refrigerant pair, the entrainment ratios of ejector, system COP, pump power et al. of refrigerants were compared and analyzed. Lastly, the performances of the transcritical and subcritical ejector refrigeration cycles with propylene were calculated and compared.

  20. Experimental study of void behavior in a suppression pool of a boiling water reactor during the blowdown period of a loss of coolant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassame, Somboon

    The possible failure of an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) train due to a large amount of entrained gas in the ECCS pump suction piping in a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is one of the potential engineering problems faced in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) power plant. To analyze potential gas intrusion into the ECCS pump suction piping, the study of void behavior in the Suppression Pool (SP) during the LOCA is necessary. The void fraction distribution and void penetration are considered as the key parameters in the problem analysis. Two sets of experiments, namely, steady-state tests and transient tests were conducted using the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly for ESBWR application (PUMA-E) to study void behavior in the SP during the blowdown. The design of the test apparatus used is based on the scaling analysis from a prototypical BWR containment (MARK-I) with consideration of the downcomer size, the SP water level, and the downcomer water submergence depth. Several instruments were installed to obtain the required experimental data, such as inlet gas volumetric flow, void fraction, pressure, and temperature. For the steady-state tests, the air was injected through a downcomer pipe in the SP in order to simulate the physical phenomena in the SP during the initial blowdown of LOCA. Thirty tests were performed with two different downcomer sizes (0.076 and 0.102 m), various air volumetric flow rates or flux (0.003 to 0.153 m3/s or 0.5 to 24.7 m/s), initial downcomer void conditions (fully filled with water, partially void, and completely void) and air velocity ramp rates (one to two seconds). Two phases of the experiment were observed, namely, the initial phase and the quasi-steady phase. The initial phase produced the maximum void penetration depth; and the quasi-steady phase showed less void penetration with oscillation in the void penetration. The air volumetric flow rate was found to have a minor effect on the void fraction

  1. The Parable of the Boiled System Safety Professional: Drift to Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, C. Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Recall from the Parable of the Boiled Frog, that tossing a frog into boiling water causes the frog to jump out and hop away while placing a frog in suitable temperature water and slowly bringing the water to a boil results in the frog boiling due to not being aware of the slowly increasing danger, theoretically, of course. System safety professionals must guard against allowing dangers to creep unnoticed into their projects and be ever alert to notice signs of impending problems. People have used various phrases related to the idea, most notably, latent conditions, James Reason in Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents (1, pp 10-11), Drift to Failure, Sydney Dekker (2, pp 82-86) in Resilience Engineering: Chronicling the Emergence of Confused Consensus in Resilience Engineering: Concepts and Precepts, Hollnagel, Woods and Leveson, and normalization of deviance, Diane Vaughan in The Challenger Launch Decision: Risky Technology, Culture, and Deviance at NASA (3). Reason also said, If eternal vigilance is the price of liberty, then chronic unease is the price of safety (1, p 37). Our challenge as system safety professionals is to be aware of the emergence of signals that warn us of slowly eroding safety margins. This paper will discuss how system safety professionals might better perform in that regard.

  2. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  3. The Frog-Boiling Attack: Limitations of Anomaly Detection for Secure Network Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan-Tin, Eric; Feldman, Daniel; Hopper, Nicholas; Kim, Yongdae

    A network coordinate system assigns Euclidean “virtual” coordinates to every node in a network to allow easy estimation of network latency between pairs of nodes that have never contacted each other. These systems have been implemented in a variety of applications, most notably the popular Azureus/Vuze BitTorrent client. Zage and Nita-Rotaru (CCS 2007) and independently, Kaafar et al. (SIGCOMM 2007), demonstrated that several widely-cited network coordinate systems are prone to simple attacks, and proposed mechanisms to defeat these attacks using outlier detection to filter out adversarial inputs. We propose a new attack, Frog-Boiling, that defeats anomaly-detection based defenses in the context of network coordinate systems, and demonstrate empirically that Frog-Boiling is more disruptive than the previously known attacks. Our results suggest that a new approach is needed to solve this problem: outlier detection alone cannot be used to secure network coordinate systems.

  4. Carbon dynamics in peatland pool systems: the role of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Amy; Heal, Kate; McLeod, Andy; Dinsmore, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    Open-water pools are widespread in peatlands and are considered to represent biogeochemical hotspots within the peatland landscape. However the contribution of pool systems to wider peatland C cycling has not been quantified fully and there is a lack of knowledge of the role of photochemical processes in such environments. In this study, light exposure experiments were conducted in two contrasting pools to test the reactivity of aquatic C. The first study site was located at Cross Lochs (CL), Forsinard, in the Flow Country of Northern Scotland, in a 412 m2 pool characterised by low dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (˜15 mg C L‑1). The second site was located at Red Moss of Balerno (RM), a raised bog in central Scotland, in a 48 m2 pool with high DOC concentrations (˜35 mg C L‑1). Experiments took place over 9 days in situ at each pool in mid-summer 2015, with 500 mL water samples contained in bags transparent to sunlight and in opaque control bags. After field exposure, optical, chemical and stable C isotope analyses were conducted on the samples. Significant differences in biogeochemical cycling of DOC were detected between the two systems, with DOC losses as a percentage of the total C pool 15% higher at RM than at CL after light exposure. The mean DOC concentration of light exposed samples at RM declined steeply initially, with 83% observed DOC degradation occurring by day 3 of the experiment. Total losses of 7.9 mg DOC L‑1were observed in light exposed samples at RM, along with decreasing E4:E6 ratios, suggesting that material remaining at the end of the experiment was humified. Depletion of DOC was positively correlated with production of CO2 at both sites, with concentrations of up to 4.3 mg CO2-C L‑1 recorded at RM. Stable C isotope signatures at both sites were altered under light treatment, as demonstrated by the production of enriched δ13C-DOC (+0.46 ‰ relative to opaque bags) and depleted δ13C-DIC (-0.97 ‰ relative to opaque

  5. Film boiling of R-11 on liquid metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An interesting problem is the effect of an immiscible liquid heating surface on the process of film boiling. Such surfaces raise questions concerning interface stability to disturbances, effects of gas bubbling, and vapor explosions in layered systems. The specific motivation for this study was to investigate film boiling from a liquid surface with application to cooling of molten reactor core debris by an overlying pool of reactor coolant. To investigate this phenomenon, and apparatus consisting of a nominal six-inch diameter steel vessel to hold the liquid metal and boiling fluid was constructed; coolant reservoirs, heaters, controllers, and allied instrumentation were attached. A transient energy balance was performed on the liquid metal pool by a submerged assembly of microthermocouples in the liquid metal and an array of thermocouples on the wall of the test vessel. The thermocouple data were used to determine the boiling heat flux as well as the boiling superheat. On an average basis, the deviation between the prediction of the Berenson model and the experimental data was less than one percent when Berenson was corrected for thermal radiation effects. Evidence from visualization tests of R-11 in film boiling over molten metal pools to superheats in excess of 600 K supports this conclusion. 13 refs.

  6. Zero Boil-Off System Design and Thermal Analysis of the Bimodal Thermal Nuclear Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.

    2006-01-20

    Mars exploration studies at NASA are evaluating vehicles that incorporate Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion which use a high temperature nuclear fission reactor and hydrogen to produce thermal propulsion. The hydrogen propellant is to be stored in liquid state for periods up to 18 months. To prevent boil-off of the liquid hydrogen, a system of passive and active components are needed to prevent heat from entering the tanks and to remove any heat that does. This report describes the design of the system components used for the BNTR Crew Transfer Vehicle and the thermal analysis performed. The results show that Zero Boil-Off (ZBO) can be achieved with the electrical power allocated for the ZBO system.

  7. Application of neutron radiography to visualization of cryogenic fluid boiling two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Asano, Hitoshi; Fujii, Terushige; Ushiro, Toshihiko; Iwatani, Junji; Murata, Yutaka; Mochiki, Koh-ichi; Taguchi, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito; Tsuruno, Akira

    1996-02-01

    Liquid nitrogen boiling two-phase flows in a metallic container and in a heat exchanger were visualized by real-time thermal neutron radiography at JRR-3M at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and image processed by the Musashi dynamic image processing system. Boiling phenomena in a pool and boiling two-phase flow in an aluminum plate fin type heat exchanger were visualized. It was shown that neutron radiography was applicable to visualization of cryogenic boiling two-phase flow and the designs of cryogenic heat exchangers.

  8. Regulation of power pools and system operators: An international comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J. Jr.; Tenenbaum, B.; Woolf, F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper focuses on the governance and regulation of power pools outside the United States. The current governance and regulatory arrangements for four power pools, as developed in pool documents and government regulations and laws, are compared and contrasted. The power pools analyzed are located in England and Wales, Australia, Canada, and Scandinavia. Topics discussed in relation to these pools are the effects of structure on governance, how each pool has dealt with a number of basic governance decisions, how the pools monitor the markets, ways in which regulators and other institutions control pools, and self-governance issues.

  9. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  10. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  11. Boils (Furunculosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... resulting from the deep infection of a hair follicle. The infection is usually caused by a type ... germ gain entry into and infect the hair follicle, resulting in a boil. Boils may resolve with ...

  12. Pool boiler reflux solar receiver for Stirling dish-electric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of competitive, modular bulk electric power from the sun may be greatly enhanced by the use of a reflux heat pipe receiver to combine a heat engine such as Stirling with a paraboloidal dish concentrator. This combination represents a potential improvement over previous successful demonstrations of dish-electric technology in terms of enhanced performance, lower cost, longer life, and greater flexibility in engine design. There are, however, important issues and unknowns which must be addressed to determine engineering feasibility of these devices. In the pool boiler reflux receiver, concentrated solar radiation causes liquid metal (sodium or potassium) to boil. The vapor flows to the engine heater heads, where it condenses and releases the latent heat. The condensate is returned to the receiver absorber pool by gravity (refluxing). This is essentially an adaptation of heat pipe technology to the peculiar requirements of concentrated solar flux, and provides many advantages over conventional heated tube receiver technology. Boiling theory indicates that long-term stable boiling of liquid metal may be difficult to achieve. Laboratory scale experiments have been performed. Initial tests confirmed that boiling is unstable in a baseline boiler. Boiling stability was established after the addition of ''artificial cavities'' to the heated surface, and successful boiling of sodium was demonstrated for 100 hours. Other stabilizing influences may have been present, and will be discussed. The flux and geometry closely simulated a real receiver. The results of these tests are presented, along with the design of a full scale receiver for on-sun testing and considerations for long term operation. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  13. The Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) for the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; Chao, David; Vergilii, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Boiling is an effective means of cooling by removing heat from surfaces through vaporization of a working fluid. It is also affected by both the magnitude and direction of gravity. By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy n the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. The Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) is being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox. This facility will conduct two pool boiling studies. The first study the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment (MABE) uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 mm and 7.0 mm in size, to measure localized hear fluxes while operating at a constant temperature. The other experiment, the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment (NPBX) uses a 85 mm diameter heater wafer that has been "seeded" with five individually-controlled nucleation sites to study bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence and departure. The BXF uses normal-perfluorohexane as the test fluid and will operate between pressures of 60 to 244 Pa. and temperatures of 35 to 60 C. Both sets of experimental heaters are highly instrumented. Pressure and bulk fluid temperature measurements will be made with standard rate video. A high speed video system will be used to visualize the boiling process through the bottom of the MABE heater arrays. The BXF is currently scheduled to fly on Utilization Flight-13A.1 to the ISS with facility integration into the MSG and operation during Increment 15

  14. Tunable molten oxide pool assisted plasma-melter vitrification systems

    DOEpatents

    Titus, Charles H.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides tunable waste conversion systems and apparatus which have the advantage of highly robust operation and which provide complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The systems provide the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced use or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a net energy or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production. Methods and apparatus for converting metals, non-glass forming waste streams and low-ash producing inorganics into a useful gas are also provided. The methods and apparatus for such conversion include the use of a molten oxide pool having predetermined electrical, thermal and physical

  15. Boiling Fluids Behave Quite Differently in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boiling process is really different in space, since the vapor phase of a boiling liquid does not rise via buoyancy. Spacecraft and Earth-based systems use boiling to efficiently remove large am...

  16. Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling---Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktinol, Eduardo

    Due to the complex nature of the subprocesses involved in nucleate boiling, it has not been possible to develop comprehensive models or correlations despite decades of accumulated data and analysis. Complications such as the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid further confound attempts at modeling nucleate boiling. Moreover, existing empirical correlations may not be suitable for new applications, especially with regards to varying gravity level. More recently, numerical simulations of the boiling process have proven to be capable of reliably predicting bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer by showing excellent agreement with experimental data. However, most simulations decouple the solid substrate by assuming constant wall temperature. In the present study complete numerical simulations of the boiling process are performed---including conjugate transient conduction in the solid substrate and the effects of dissolved gas in the liquid at different levels of gravity. Finite difference schemes are used to discretize the governing equations in the liquid, vapor, and solid phases. The interface between liquid and vapor phases is tracked by a level set method. An iterative procedure is used at the interface between the solid and fluid phases. Near the three-phase contact line, temperatures in the solid are observed to fluctuate significantly over short periods. The results show good agreement with the data available in the literature. The results also show that waiting and growth periods can be related directly to wall superheat. The functional relationship between waiting period and wall superheat is found to agree well with empirical correlations reported in the literature. For the case of a single bubble in subcooled nucleate boiling, the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid is found to cause noncondensables to accumulate at the top of the bubble where most condensation occurs. This results in reduced local saturation temperature and condensation rates

  17. Theoretical analysis of pressure-drop type instabilities in an upflow boiling system with an exit restriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Kakaç, S.; Liu, H. T.; Sarma, P. K.

    In this work, two-phase flow pressure-drop type instabilities in an upflow boiling system are studied theoretically. Dynamic simulations of the pressure-drop type instabilities require the knowledge of the steady state characteristics of the system in terms of the pressure drop versus the mass flow rate. In a boiling system with an exit restriction at the outlet of the boiling channel, the pressure drop through the system concentrates at the exit restriction. Therefore, the correlation of the pressure drop of the two-phase mixture flowing through the exit restriction (i.e. a sharp-edged orifice) is essential in the calculation of the total pressure drop of the system. A model for the exit restriction is developed and compared with the experimental results covering a wide range of vapor quality with different heat inputs and inlet subcoolings. The drift-flux model is adopted to predict the steady state characteristics of the boiling system. The dynamic oscillations of the quasi-static pressure-drop type instabilities in the boiling system are simulated and good predictions of the system stability boundary and oscillatory characteristics are obtained when compared with the experimental results.

  18. Aging assessment of the boiling-water reactor (BWR) standby liquid control system

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, R.D.; Johnson, A.B.; Buckley, G.D.; Larson, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of the standby liquid control (SLC) system used in boiling-water reactors. The study was based on detailed reviews of SLC system component and operating experience information obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Database System, the Nuclear Document System, Licensee Event Reports, and other databases. Sources dealing with sodium pentaborate, borates, boric acid, and the effects of environment and corrosion in the SLC system were reviewed to characterize chemical properties and corrosion characteristics of borated solutions. The leading aging degradation concern to date appears to be setpoint drift in relief valves, which has been discovered during routine surveillance and is thought to be caused by mechanical wear. Degradation was also observed in pump seals and internal valves. In general, however, the results of the Phase I study suggest that age-related degradation of SLC systems has not been serious.

  19. Aging assessment of the boiling-water reactor (BWR) standby liquid control system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, R.D.; Johnson, A.B.; Buckley, G.D.; Larson, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of the standby liquid control (SLC) system used in boiling-water reactors. The study was based on detailed reviews of SLC system component and operating experience information obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Database System, the Nuclear Document System, Licensee Event Reports, and other databases. Sources dealing with sodium pentaborate, borates, boric acid, and the effects of environment and corrosion in the SLC system were reviewed to characterize chemical properties and corrosion characteristics of borated solutions. The leading aging degradation concern to date appears to be setpoint drift in relief valves, which has been discovered during routine surveillance and is thought to be caused by mechanical wear. Degradation was also observed in pump seals and internal valves. In general, however, the results of the Phase I study suggest that age-related degradation of SLC systems has not been serious.

  20. A Low Cost, Self Acting, Liquid Hydrogen Boil-Off Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Joy W.; Sharp, Kirk V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a prototype liquid hydrogen boll-off recovery system. Perform analyses to finalize recovery system cycle, design detail components, fabricate hardware, and conduct sub-component, component, and system level tests leading to the delivery of a prototype system. The design point and off-design analyses identified cycle improvements to increase the robustness of the system by adding a by-pass heat exchanger. Based on the design, analysis, and testing conducted, the recovery system will liquefy 31% of the gaseous boil off from a liquid hydrogen storage tank. All components, including a high speed, miniature turbocompressor, were designed and manufacturing drawings were created. All hardware was fabricated and tests were conducted in air, helium, and hydrogen. Testing validated the design, except for the turbocompressor. A rotor-to-stator clearance issue was discovered as a result of a concentricity tolerance stack-up.

  1. System for monitoring of energy release in the core of a boiling-water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Leshchenko, Yu.I.; Sadulin, V.P.; Semidotskii, I.I.

    1988-06-01

    Results are discussed from an investigation into a system for the physical monitoring of energy release in the core of the VK-50 boiling water reactor. Movable self-powered detectors are used in this system as energy-release neutron detectors. Rhodium serves as the emitter in these detectors. A number of parameters for these detectors were experimentally measured; they include the ratio of the instantaneous current to the activation current, the coefficients of relative sensitivity of the detectors to neutrons, and the effective cross sections for the interaction of /sup 103/Rh with thermal and epithermal neutrons. Computer simulation of the system and detectors is discussed. The system can monitor absolute energy distribution in the fuel assemblies under reactor conditions. The system is independent of thermotechnical measurements with an instrument to determine energy release in the reactor core.

  2. Design of inventory pools in spare part support operation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Daniel Y.; Tseng, Mitchell M.; Cheung, Raymond K.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of a spare part support operation is to fulfill the part request order with different service contracts in the agreed response time. With this objective to achieve different service targets for multiple service contracts and the considerations of inventory investment, it is not only important to determine the inventory policy but also to design the structure of inventory pools and the order fulfilment strategies. In this research, we focused on two types of inventory pools: multiple inventory pool (MIP) and consolidated inventory pool (CIP). The idea of MIP is to maintain separated inventory pools based on the types of service contract, while CIP solely maintains a single inventory pool regardless of service contract. Our research aims to design the inventory pool analytically and propose reserve strategies to manage the order fulfilment risks in CIP. Mathematical models and simulation experiments would be applied for analysis and evaluation.

  3. Experimental investigation into effects of ultrasonic vibration on pool boiling heat transfer performance of horizontal low-finned U-tube in TiO2/R141b nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tong-Bou; Wang, Zi-Long

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed into the pool boiling heat transfer performance of a low-finned U-tube immersed in TiO2/R141b nanofluid with four different nanoparticle loadings (0, 0.0001, 0.001, and 0.01 vol%). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry results revealed that some of the TiO2 nanoparticles adhered to the heated surface during boiling, and therefore increased the thermal resistance. The heat transfer performance of the nanofluids with particle loadings of 0.0001, 0.001 and 0.01 vol% was thus found to be reduced by around 10, 20 and 50 %, respectively, compared to that of pure R141b refrigerant. Accordingly, an ultrasonic vibration crusher was used to inhibit the formation of the TiO2 nano-sorption layer on the U-tube surface. The ultrasonic vibration suppressed the deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles and improved the heat transfer performance of the nanofluids as a result. Of the four working fluids, the nanofluid with a particle loading of 0.0001 vol% yielded the optimal heat transfer performance (i.e., a heat transfer coefficient around 30 % higher than that of pure R141b refrigerant.)

  4. Thermoplastic fusion bonding using a pressure-assisted boiling point control system.

    PubMed

    Park, Taehyun; Song, In-Hyouk; Park, Daniel S; You, Byoung Hee; Murphy, Michael C

    2012-08-21

    A novel thermoplastic fusion bonding method using a pressure-assisted boiling point (PABP) control system was developed to apply precise temperatures and pressures during bonding. Hot embossed polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) components containing microchannels were sealed using the PABP system. Very low aspect ratio structures (AR = 1/100, 10 μm in depth and 1000 μm in width) were successfully sealed without collapse or deformation. The integrity and strength of the bonds on the sealed PMMA devices were evaluated using leakage and rupture tests; no leaks were detected and failure during the rupture tests occurred at pressures greater than 496 kPa. The PABP system was used to seal 3D shaped flexible PMMA devices successfully. PMID:22728966

  5. Fundamental study of molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizota, Hirohisa; Nagashima, Yoshiaki; Obana, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system has been developed. The molten pool depth distribution is evaluated by comparing the times taken by the ultrasonic wave to propagate through a molten pool and a solid-phase and through only the solid-phase near the molten pool. Maximum molten pool depths on a flat type-304 stainless-steel plate, formed with a gas tungsten arc welding machine for different welding currents from 70 to 150 A, were derived within an error of ±0.5 mm.

  6. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  7. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

  8. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  9. Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Studied Under Reduced-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling is known to be a very efficient mode of heat transfer, and as such, it is employed in component cooling and in various energy-conversion systems. In space, boiling heat transfer may be used in thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, and on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life-support fluids. Recent interest in the exploration of Mars and other planets and in the concept of in situ resource utilization on the Martian and Lunar surfaces highlights the need to understand how gravity levels varying from the Earth's gravity to microgravity (1g = or > g/g(sub e) = or > 10(exp -6)g) affect boiling heat transfer. Because of the complex nature of the boiling process, no generalized prediction or procedure has been developed to describe the boiling heat transfer coefficient, particularly at reduced gravity levels. Recently, Professor Vijay K. Dhir of the University of California at Los Angeles proposed a novel building-block approach to investigate the boiling phenomena in low-gravity to microgravity environments. This approach experimentally investigates the complete process of bubble inception, growth, and departure for single bubbles formed at a well-defined and controllable nucleation site. Principal investigator Professor Vijay K. Dhir, with support from researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is performing a series of pool boiling experiments in the low-gravity environments of the KC 135 microgravity aircraft s parabolic flight to investigate the inception, growth, departure, and merger of bubbles from single- and multiple-nucleation sites as a function of the wall superheat and the liquid subcooling. Silicon wafers with single and multiple cavities of known characteristics are being used as test surfaces. Water and PF5060 (an inert liquid) were chosen as test liquids so that the role of surface wettability and the magnitude of the effect of interfacial tension on boiling in reduced

  10. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  11. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  12. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  13. Fuzzy Pool Balance: An algorithm to achieve a two dimensional balance in distribute storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenjing; Chen, Gang

    2014-06-01

    The limitation of scheduling modules and the gradual addition of disk pools in distributed storage systems often result in imbalances among their disk pools in terms of both disk usage and file count. This can cause various problems to the storage system such as single point of failure, low system throughput and imbalanced resource utilization and system loads. An algorithm named Fuzzy Pool Balance (FPB) is proposed here to solve this problem. The input of FPB is the current file distribution among disk pools and the output is a file migration plan indicating what files are to be migrated to which pools. FPB uses an array to classify the files by their sizes. The file classification array is dynamically calculated with a defined threshold named Tmax that defines the allowed pool disk usage deviations. File classification is the basis of file migration. FPB also defines the Immigration Pool (IP) and Emigration Pool (EP) according to the pool disk usage and File Quantity Ratio (FQR) that indicates the percentage of each category of files in each disk pool, so files with higher FQR in an EP will be migrated to IP(s) with a lower FQR of this file category. To verify this algorithm, we implemented FPB on an ATLAS Tier2 dCache production system. The results show that FPB can achieve a very good balance in both free space and file counts, and adjusting the threshold value Tmax and the correction factor to the average FQR can achieve a tradeoff between free space and file count.

  14. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral

  15. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  16. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The ultimate objective of basic studies of flow boiling in microgravity is to improve the understanding of the processes involved, as manifested by the ability to predict its behavior. This is not yet the case for boiling heat transfer even in earth gravity, despite the considerable research activity over the past 30 years. The elements that constitute the nucleate boiling process - nucleation, growth, motion, and collapse of the vapor bubbles (if the bulk liquid is subcooled) - are common to both pool and flow boiling. It is well known that the imposition of bulk liquid motion affects the vapor bubble behavior relative to pool boiling, but does not appear to significantly influence the heat transfer. Indeed, it has been recommended in the past that empirical correlations or experimental data of pool boiling be used for design purposes with forced convection nucleate boiling. It is anticipated that such will most certainly not be possible for boiling in microgravity, based on observations made with pool boiling in microgravity. In earth gravity buoyancy will act to remove the vapor bubbles from the vicinity of the heater surface regardless of how much the imposed bulk velocity is reduced, depending, of course, on the geometry of the system. Vapor bubbles have been observed to dramatically increase in size in pool boiling in microgravity, and the heat flux at which dryout took place was reduced considerably below what is generally termed the critical heat flux (CHF) in earth gravity, depending on the bulk liquid subcooling. However, at heat flux levels below dryout, the nucleate pool boiling process was enhanced considerably over that in earth gravity, in spite of the large vapor bubbles formed in microgravity and perhaps as a consequence. These large vapor bubbles tended to remain in the vicinity of the heater surface, and the enhanced heat transfer appeared to be associated with the presence of what variously has been referred to as a liquid microlayer between the

  17. Local jet impingement boiling heat transfer with R113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D. W.; Ma, C. F.

    An experimental study was performed to characterize the boiling heat transfer of impinging circular submerged jets on simulated microelectronic chips with a nominal area of 5 mm × 5 mm. The heat transfer modes included natural convection, partially developed nucleate boiling, fully developed nucleate boiling and critical heat flux. The study included the effects of jet parameters and fluid subcooling on the nucleate boiling. The results showed that the nucleate boiling data varied only with fluid subcooling regardless of jet parameters and that both the pool and impingement nucleate boiling curves at the same subcooling condition were well correlated. The high heat flux portions of the boiling curves with jet exit velocities greater than 10 m/s were corrected for the elevated saturation temperature. A new expression was developed with an interpolation method to construct the partially developed nucleate boiling curve.

  18. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  19. Saguaro: A distributed operating system based on pools of servicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, G. R.; Schlichting, R. D.

    1985-03-01

    The progress achieved during the first year of the integrated Saguaro distributed operating system project is presented. The major accomplishments were the completion of the initial design and preliminary implementation of several system components, the subsequent refinement of the user interface and the file system, and the investigation into the use of a universal type system to type data and specify interfaces in the operating system.

  20. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  1. System seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type LMFBR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.C.; Wu, T.S.; Cha, B.K.; Burelbach, J.; Seidensticker, R.

    1984-01-01

    The system seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) plant is presented. In this primary system, the reactor core is supported in a way which differs significantly from that used in previous designs. The analytical model developed for this study is a three-dimensional finite element model including one-half of the primary system cut along the plane of symmetry. The model includes the deck and deck mounted components,the reactor vessel, the core support structure, the core barrel, the radial neutron shield, the redan, and the conical support skirt. The sodium contained in the primary system is treated as a lumped mass appropriately distributed among various components. The significant seismic behavior as well as the advantages of this primary system design are discussed in detail.

  2. In situ observations of weld pool solidification using transparent metal-analog systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, R.; David, S. A.; Eshelman, M. A.; Vitek, J. M.; Babu, S. S.; Hong, T.; DebRoy, T.

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of weld solidification were observed in situ using a laser welding process on transparent organic materials systems. Succinonitrile was used to simulate a pure metal system and succinonitrile with 1.2 wt. % acetone was used to simulate an alloy system. Observed weld pool shapes in succinonitrile were in good agreement with theoretical heat transfer calculations. The dynamics of weld pool shape in the succinonitrile-acetone system were related to complex interactions between grain orientation, grain selection, and dendrite orientations, which depend strongly on welding speed. An increase in welding speed leads to a transition from a steady-state to a nonsteady-state weld pool shape. Several other phenomena, including epitaxial growth, grain selection process, grain boundary melting, and porosity formation, were also observed.

  3. Analysis of an open-air swimming pool solar heating system by using an experimentally validated TRNSYS model

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, Elisa; Martinez, Pedro J.

    2010-01-15

    In the case of private outdoor swimming pools, seldom larger than 100 m{sup 2}, conventional auxiliary heating systems are being installed less and less. Solar heating is an option to extend the swimming season. The temperature evolution of an open-air swimming pool highly depends on the wind speed directly on the water surface, which at the same time is influenced by the surroundings of the pool. In this paper, the TRNSYS model of a private open-air pool with a 50-m{sup 2} surface was validated by registering the water temperature evolution and the meteorological data at the pool site. Evaporation is the main component of energy loss in swimming pools. Six different sets of constants found in literature were considered to evaluate the evaporative heat transfer coefficient with the purpose of finding the most suitable one for the TRNSYS pool model. In order to do that, the evolution of the pool water temperature predicted by the TRNSYS pool model was compared with the experimentally registered one. The simulation with TRNSYS of the total system, including the swimming pool and the absorber circuit integrated into the existing filter circuit, provided information regarding the increase of the pool temperature for different collector areas during the swimming season. This knowledge, together with the economic costs, support the decision about the absorber field size. (author)

  4. Modeling step-pool systems in steep streams by a cellular automaton sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saletti, M.; Molnar, P.; Hassan, M. A.; Zimmermann, A. E.; Fraccarollo, L.

    2013-12-01

    Alluvial step-pool systems in gravel-bed rivers have been widely studied in the last decades in both field and flume experiments. The focus has been on step formation, the geometry of step-pool sequences, the spatial and temporal variation in step properties, and the hydraulics of flow over steps. Scientists have focused on the conditions under which step-pool sequences form, remain stable and eventually collapse (Church and Zimmermann, 2007; Curran 2007). Step-pool systems are usually stable for very long periods, in which the macro-morphology does not change, even if single step-pool units may change during small flood events. Step structures typically collapse during intense flood events, with return times of 20÷50 years. These breakdown events produce an avalanche-like pulse of sediment and a rearrangement in the channel morphology. Despite a rich literature on the processes of step formation and collapse, the modeling thereof is still in its infancy. It has been proposed by Church and Zimmermann (2007) that step formation is ruled mainly by random location of big boulders along the channel--these grains act as keystones which block smaller particles and create a channel-spanning step. The nonlinear threshold-driven processes of jamming and collapse, together with the stochastic nature of bedload transport and the random location of the keystones, makes it impossible to model the step-pool system in a deterministic way. Instead, we hypothesize that step-pool systems during intense sediment transport events behave like open, dynamical and dissipative systems close to a critical state, and we adopt the modeling framework of self-organized criticality (Bak et al., 1988) in this description. To test our hypothesis we developed a cellular automaton model based on ideas of the simple sandpile model in 1-D and 2-D. Grains are added at the top of a channel randomly, they pass through the channel and form bed structures, and ultimately exit the channel at the

  5. Design, Construction, and Qualification of a Microscale Heater Array for Use in Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, T. D.; Kim, J.; Kalkur, T. S.

    1998-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer is an efficient means of heat transfer because a large amount of heat can be removed from a surface using a relatively small temperature difference between the surface and the bulk liquid. However, the mechanisms that govern boiling heat transfer are not well understood. Measurements of wall temperature and heat flux near the wall would add to the database of knowledge which is necessary to understand the mechanisms of nucleate boiling. A heater array has been developed which contains 96 heater elements within a 2.5 mm square area. The temperature of each heater element is held constant by an electronic control system similar to a hot-wire anemometer. The voltage that is being applied to each heater element can be measured and digitized using a high-speed A/D converter, and this digital information can be compiled into a series of heat-flux maps. Information for up to 10,000 heat flux maps can be obtained each second. The heater control system, the A/D system and the heater array construction are described in detail. Results are presented which show that this is an effective method of measuring the local heat flux during nucleate and transition boiling. Heat flux maps are obtained for pool boiling in FC-72 on a horizontal surface. Local heat flux variations are shown to be three to six times larger than variations in the spatially averaged heat flux.

  6. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  7. How Does Water Boil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Insight into the boiling of water is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The process is initiated by the spontaneous formation of small vacuum cavities in liquid water. By themselves, these defects are very short lived. If, however, several cavities occur at close distances, they are likely to merge into larger vacuum holes. At the liquid-vapor interfaces, single or small groups of water molecules tend to leave the liquid surface. Once the system is propagated beyond the transition state, these evaporation events outnumber the competing reintegration into the hydrogen-bonded network.

  8. 76 FR 22444 - Privacy Act; System of Records: State-52, Parking Permit and Car Pool Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ...Notice is hereby given that the Department of State proposes to amend an existing system of records, Parking Permit and Car Pool Records, State-52, pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (5 U.S.C. 552a) and Office of Management and Budget Circular No. A-130, Appendix I. The Department's report was filed with the Office of Management and Budget on March 29, 2011. It......

  9. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  10. Sample distillation/graphitization system for carbon pool analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, J. W.; Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; DeTurck, T. M.; Treacy, D. J.; Coffin, R. B.

    2000-10-01

    A facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC, has been developed to extract, trap, cryogenically distill and graphitize carbon from a suite of organic and inorganic carbon pools for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The system was developed to investigate carbon pools associated with the formation and stability of methane hydrates. However, since the carbon compounds found in hydrate fields are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, this apparatus is applicable to a number of oceanographic and environmental sample types. Targeted pools are dissolved methane, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), solid organic matrices (e.g., seston, tissue and sediments), biomarkers and short chained (C 1-C 5) hydrocarbons from methane hydrates. In most instances, the extraction, distillation and graphitization events are continuous within the system, thus, minimizing the possibility of fractionation or contamination during sample processing. A variety of methods are employed to extract carbon compounds and convert them to CO 2 for graphitization. Dissolved methane and DIC from the same sample are sparged and cryogenically separated before the methane is oxidized in a high temperature oxygen stream. DOC is oxidized to CO 2 by 1200 W ultraviolet photo-oxidation lamp, and solids oxidized in sealed, evacuated tubes. Hydrocarbons liberated from the disassociation of gas hydrates are cryogenically separated with a cryogenic temperature control unit, and biomarkers separated and concentrated by preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). With this system, up to 20 samples, standards or blanks can be processed per day.

  11. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement. PMID:21711794

  12. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jacqueline; Brutin, David; Tadrist, Lounes

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement. PMID:21711794

  13. Film boiling heat transfer from a sphere in natural and forced convection of freon-113

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, D.; Orozco, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer fluxes were measured on a 3.84-cm hollow copper sphere, in both forced convection and pool boiling, as a function of angular position in Freon 113. This paper reports on forced-convection tests run at speeds of 0.5 to 1.9 m/s. These tests were conducted in the stable film boiling region of the boiling curve. Significant heat transfer rates were measured in the vapor wake region of the sphere for flow film boiling. Video observations of the boiling process revealed that the flow film boiling vapor removal mechanism consisted of periodic formation and detachment of a vapor wake in the rear of the sphere. For pool boiling it was found that the heated surface had a uniform rate of energy dissipation in the stable film boiling regime, whereas in forced convection the film boiling rate was dependent on angular position. Pool film boiling tests also showed multiple humps (more than one maximum heat flux) in the boiling curve when the liquid was subcooled.

  14. Cryogenic Boiling and Two-Phase Flow during Pipe Chilldown in Earth and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kun; Ji, Yan; Chung, J. N.; Shyy, Wei

    2008-01-01

    For many industrial, medical and space technologies, cryogenic fluids play indispensable roles. An integral part of the cryogenic transport processes is the chilldown of the system components during initial applications. In this paper, we report experimental results for a chilldown process that is involved with the unsteady two-phase vapor-liquid flow and boiling heat transfer of the cryogen coupled with the transient heat conduction inside pipe walls. We have provided fundamental understanding on the physics of the two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer during cryogenic quenching through experimental observation, measurement and analysis. Based on the temperature measurement of the tube wall, the terrestrial cryogenic chilldown process is divided into three stages of film boiling, nucleate boiling and single-phase convection that bears a close similarity to the conventional pool boiling process. In earth gravity, cooling rate is non-uniform circumferentially due to a stratified flow pattern that gives rise to more cooling on the bottom wall by liquid filaments. In microgravity, there is no stratified flow and the absence of the gravitational force sends liquid filaments to the central core and replaces them by low thermal conductivity vapor that significantly reduces the heat transfer from the wall. Thus, the chilldown process is axisymmetric, but longer in microgravity.

  15. Response of mesoscale convective system (MCS) and cold pool formation to dust-radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waylonis, M. T.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the role of dust in the development of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) over the central-west Sahara, and how cold pools from the MCS feedback to dust emissions. Few studies have simulated the direct-radiative effects of dust on cloud development. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectrometer (MISR) Retrieved aerosol optical depth and Meteosat Second Generation dust enhancement product were used to examine a dust outbreak that occurred between 13 and 15 August 2005 and revealed that an moist intrusion into the Sahara caused a MCS to form and resulted in dust emission due to cold pool outflow from the MCS. A dust model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model was developed to include dust emissions, transport, dry and moist deposition, and radiation interactions and was used to simulate the case. Dust-radiation interactions were found to enhance convective strength through low-level heating, which increased convective available potential energy and low-level convergence. The increased intensity of the convection led to stronger and more widespread cold pool formation, which in turn emitted more dust into the atmosphere.

  16. Application of reliability-centered maintenance to boiling water reactor emergency core cooling systems fault-tree analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.A.; Feltus, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) methods are applied to boiling water reactor plant-specific emergency core cooling system probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) fault trees. The RCM is a technique that is system function-based, for improving a preventive maintenance (PM) program, which is applied on a component basis. Many PM programs are based on time-directed maintenance tasks, while RCM methods focus on component condition-directed maintenance tasks. Stroke time test data for motor-operated valves (MOVs) are used to address three aspects concerning RCM: (a) to determine if MOV stroke time testing was useful as a condition-directed PM task; (b) to determine and compare the plant-specific MOV failure data from a broad RCM philosophy time period compared with a PM period and, also, compared with generic industry MOV failure data; and (c) to determine the effects and impact of the plant-specific MOV failure data on core damage frequency (CDF) and system unavailabilities for these emergency systems. The MOV stroke time test data from four emergency core cooling systems [i.e., high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI), reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC), low-pressure core spray (LPCS), and residual heat removal/low-pressure coolant injection (RHR/LPCI)] were gathered from Philadelphia Electric Company`s Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Units 2 and 3 between 1980 and 1992. The analyses showed that MOV stroke time testing was not a predictor for eminent failure and should be considered as a go/no-go test. The failure data from the broad RCM philosophy showed an improvement compared with the PM-period failure rates in the emergency core cooling system MOVs. Also, the plant-specific MOV failure rates for both maintenance philosophies were shown to be lower than the generic industry estimates.

  17. How does surface wettability influence nucleate boiling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Caney, Nadia; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    Although the boiling process has been a major subject of research for several decades, its physics still remain unclear and require further investigation. This study aims at highlighting the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nanocoating techniques were used to vary the water contact angle from 20° to 110° by modifying nanoscale surface topography and chemistry. The experimental results obtained disagree with the predictions of the classical models. A new approach of nucleation mechanism is established to clarify the nexus between the surface wettability and the nucleate boiling heat transfer. In this approach, we introduce the concept of macro- and micro-contact angles to explain the observed phenomenon. To cite this article: H.T. Phan et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  18. A rule-based expert system for automatic control rod pattern generation for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.S.; Lin, C. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on an expert system for generating control rod patterns that has been developed. The knowledge is transformed into IF-THEN rules. The inference engine uses the Rete pattern matching algorithm to match facts, and rule premises and conflict resolution strategies to make the system function intelligently. A forward-chaining mechanism is adopted in the inference engine. The system is implemented in the Common Lisp programming language. The three-dimensional core simulation model performs the core status and burnup calculations. The system is successfully demonstrated by generating control rod programming for the 2894-MW (thermal) Kuosheng nuclear power plant in Taiwan. The computing time is tremendously reduced compared to programs using mathematical methods.

  19. Cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: pooled analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenjie; Chen, Min; Liu, Jia; Hagen, Ferry; Ms, Abdullah; Al-Hatmi; Zhang, Peilian; Guo, Yun; Boekhout, Teun; Deng, Danqi; Xu, Jianping; Pan, Weihua; Liao, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an important fungal infection among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We conducted a pooled analysis and systematic review to describe the epidemiological and clinical profile of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. From two hospitals in China and nine literature databases, cases and prevalence data were collected for pooled analysis and meta-analysis, respectively. Categorical variables of cases were compared using a χ(2)-test on the statistical program of SAS. A multiple regression analysis was performed to ascertain independent predictors significantly correlated with prognosis. Meta-analysis was conducted by the statistical program of R. The prevalence of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients was 0.5%. Patients were predominantly females and adults. A prednisone equivalent of more than 30 mg/day before infection was associated with higher mortality (odds ratio (OR)=9.69 (1.54, 60.73)). In all, 36.8-38.9% patients showed low lupus activity when they developed the crytococcal infection. Moreover, 38.2% of the patients were misdiagnosed. The estimated case-fatality rate was 23.6%. Our results suggest that more emphasis should be placed to further understand lupus-related cryptococcal meningitis and to develop better prophylaxis and management strategies to combat this condition. PMID:27599471

  20. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

  1. A high-sensitivity magnetocardiography system with a divided gradiometer array inside a low boil-off Dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Yu, K. K.; Kim, J. M.; Kwon, H.; Kim, K.

    2009-11-01

    We fabricated a low-noise 64-channel first-order axial gradiometer system for measuring magnetocardiography (MCG) signals. The key technical features of the system are the compact structure of the gradiometer, division of the sensor array plate, direct mounting of the sensor plates into the Dewar bottom, reduced neck diameter of the liquid He Dewar, and compact readout electronics. To make the refill interval of liquid He longer, the distance between the compensation coil of the gradiometer and the input coil pads of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) was reduced to 20 mm. By using direct ultrasonic bonding of Nb wires between the pickup coil wires and input coil pads, the superconductive connection structure became simple. The baseline of the first-order gradiometer is 70 mm, a little longer than for typical conventional axial gradiometers, to provide a larger signal amplitude for deep sources. The 64-channel gradiometer array consists of four blocks, and each block is fixed separately onto the bottom of the Dewar. The neck diameter of the He Dewar (192 mm) is smaller than the bottom diameter (280 mm) in which the gradiometers are distributed. The average boil-off rate of the Dewar is 3 l per day when the 64-channel system is in operation every day. Double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) having large flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients were used to operate SQUIDs via compact electronics. The magnetically shielded room (MSR) has a wall thickness of 80 mm, and consists of two layers of permalloy and one layer of aluminum. When the 64-channel system was installed inside the MSR, the field noise level of the system was about 3.5 fTrms Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz. MCG measurements with high signal quality were done successfully using the developed system. In addition to the parameter analysis method, we developed software for the three-dimensional imaging of the myocardial current on a realistic image of the heart based on the anatomical image of the

  2. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  3. Gas chemistry, boiling and phase segregation in a geothermal system, Hellisheidi, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Samuel; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Arnórsson, Stefán; Stefánsson, Andri

    2014-01-01

    The geochemistry of aquifer fluids of the Hellisheidi geothermal system, southwest Iceland, was studied. Based on samples of vapor and liquid from well discharge fluids, the aquifer fluid compositions at the depth of the geothermal system were reconstructed taking into account the highly variable degree of excess well discharge enthalpy, where the enthalpy of the discharge is significantly higher than that of vapor-saturated liquid at the measured aquifer temperature. Decreasing concentrations of non-volatile components such as Si in the total well discharge suggest that the main cause of elevated discharge enthalpies is liquid-vapor phase segregation, i.e. the retention of liquid in the aquifer rock due to its adhesion onto mineral surfaces. Moreover, the slightly lower than equilibrium calculated concentrations of H2 and H2S in some of the hottest and highest-enthalpy wells is considered to be caused by conductive heat transfer from the rocks to the fluids. Alternatively, the cause may lie in the selection of the phase segregation conditions. The calculated concentrations of volatile species in the aquifer fluid are very sensitive to the assumed phase segregation conditions while non-volatiles are not greatly affected by this model parameter. In general, the level of uncertainty does not contradict previous findings of a close approach to fluid-mineral equilibrium at aquifer temperatures above 250 °C. The CO2 concentrations were observed to fall below equilibrium with respect to the most likely mineral buffers, suggesting a possible source control. Elevated H2 concentrations indicate a small equilibrium vapor fraction in aquifer fluids (∼0.2% by mass or ∼3% by volume). Previous conceptual models of the Hengill volcanic area (e.g. Bödvarsson et al., 1990) have implied a central magmatic heat source underlying the Hengill central volcano. Instead, a new conceptual model of the Hellisheidi system is proposed that features two main regions of fluid upflow

  4. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  5. Transition to Film Boiling in Microgravity: Influence of Subcooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Fu; Li, Jing; Yan, Na; Wang, Shuang-Feng

    2010-07-01

    The transition process to film pool boiling in microgravity is studied experimentally aboard the Chinese recoverable satellite SJ-8. A quasi-steady heating method is adopted, in which the heating voltage is controlled to increase exponentially with time. Small, primary bubbles are formed and slid on the surface, which coalesce with each other to form a large coalesced bubble. Two ways are observed for the transition from nucleate to film boiling at different subcoolings. At high subcooling, the coalesced bubble with a smooth surface grows slowly. It is then difficult for the coalesced bubble to cover the whole heater surface, resulting in a special region of transition boiling in which nucleate boiling and local dry areas can coexist. In contrast, strong oscillation of the coalesced bubble surface at low subcooling may cause rewetting of local dry areas and activation of more nucleate sites, resulting in an abrupt transition to film boiling.

  6. Bubble departure in the direct-contact boiling field with a continuous liquid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoguchi, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-15

    Behavior of vapor bubbles was experimentally investigated in the boiling field where a volatile liquid layer of per-fluorocarbon PF5050 (boiling point 306K) was directly in contact with an immiscible hot liquid layer of water above it. Heat was supplied to the continuous liquid-liquid interface by the impingement of the downward hot water jet. Vapor bubbles were generated not only from this continuous interface but from a large number of PF5050 droplets floating on it. According to precise observation, incipience of boiling did not occur at the liquid-liquid interface but in the PF5050 liquid close to the interface in both cases of continuous and dispersed interfaces. As a result, the bubbles broke up the thin PF5050 liquid film above them and rose up into the water layer. This bubble departure phenomenon, which does not occur in the ordinary pool boiling field on the solid heating wall, is very important to evaluate the heat transfer performance in the present direct-contact boiling system. For modeling this behavior, sizes of the bubbles were measured at the moment just after they were released into the water pool. Volumes of the bubbles were larger in the case of departing from the continuous liquid-liquid interface than from the droplets. This tendency could be explained by taking into account the buoyancy force acting on unit area of the thin PF5050 liquid film above the bubble before departure, which was one of the most important parameters for the liquid film breakdown. (author)

  7. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    PubMed Central

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  8. Energy Storage for Power Systems Applications: A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Guo, Xinxin; Tuffner, Francis K.

    2010-04-01

    Wind production, which has expanded rapidly in recent years, could be an important element in the future efficient management of the electric power system; however, wind energy generation is uncontrollable and intermittent in nature. Thus, while wind power represents a significant opportunity to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), integrating high levels of wind resources into the power system will bring great challenges to generation scheduling and in the provision of ancillary services. This report addresses several key questions in the broader discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid. More specifically, it addresses the following questions: a) how much total reserve or balancing requirements are necessary to accommodate the simulated expansion of intermittent renewable energy resources during the 2019 time horizon, and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting load balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP).

  9. Bubble Dynamics, Two-Phase Flow, and Boiling Heat Transfer in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains two independent sections. Part one is titled "Terrestrial and Microgravity Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical heat flux phenomenon in an acoustic standing wave." Terrestrial and microgravity pool boiling heat transfer experiments were performed in the presence of a standing acoustic wave from a platinum wire resistance heater using degassed FC-72 Fluorinert liquid. The sound wave was created by driving a half wavelength resonator at a frequency of 10.15 kHz. Microgravity conditions were created using the 2.1 second drop tower on the campus of Washington State University. Burnout of the heater wire, often encountered with heat flux controlled systems, was avoided by using a constant temperature controller to regulate the heater wire temperature. The amplitude of the acoustic standing wave was increased from 28 kPa to over 70 kPa and these pressure measurements were made using a hydrophone fabricated with a small piezoelectric ceramic. Cavitation incurred during experiments at higher acoustic amplitudes contributed to the vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. The heater wire was positioned at three different locations within the acoustic field: the acoustic node, antinode, and halfway between these locations. Complete boiling curves are presented to show how the applied acoustic field enhanced boiling heat transfer and increased critical heat flux in microgravity and terrestrial environments. Video images provide information on the interaction between the vapor bubbles and the acoustic field. Part two is titled, "Design and qualification of a microscale heater array for use in boiling heat transfer." This part is summarized herein. Boiling heat transfer is an efficient means of heat transfer because a large amount of heat can be removed from a surface using a relatively small temperature difference between the surface and the bulk liquid. However, the mechanisms that govern boiling heat transfer are not well understood. Measurements of

  10. Aspects of subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoff, S.G.

    1997-12-31

    Subcooled boiling boiling refers to boiling from a solid surface where the bulk liquid temperature is below the saturation temperature (subcooled). Two classes are considered: (1) nucleate boiling, where, for large subcoolings, individual bubbles grow and collapse while remaining attached to the solid wall, and (2) film boiling, where a continuous vapor film separates the solid from the bulk liquid. One mechanism by which subcooled nucleate boiling results in very large surface heat transfer coefficient is thought to be latent heat transport within the bubble, resulting from simultaneous evaporation from a thin residual liquid layer at the bubble base, and condensation at the polar bubble cap. Another is the increased liquid microconvection around the oscillating bubble. Two related problems have been attacked. One is the rupture of a thin liquid film subject to attractive and repulsive dispersion forces, leading to the formation of mesoscopic drops, which then coalesce and evaporate. Another is the liquid motion in the vicinity of an oscillating contact line, where the bubble wall is idealized as a wedge of constant angle sliding on the solid wall. The subcooled film boiling problem has been attacked by deriving a general long-range nonlinear evolution equation for the local thickness of the vapor layer. Linear and weakly-nonlinear stability results have been obtained. A number of other related problems have been attacked.

  11. Legionella species colonization of water distribution systems, pools and air conditioning systems in cruise ships and ferries

    PubMed Central

    Goutziana, Georgia; Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Karanika, Maria; Kavagias, Antonios; Stathakis, Nikolaos E; Gourgoulianis, Kostantinos; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Background Legionnaires' disease continues to be a public health concern in passenger ships. This study was scheduled in order to investigate Legionella spp. colonization of water distribution systems (WDS), recreational pools, and air-conditioning systems on board ferries and cruise ships in an attempt to identify risk factors for Legionella spp. colonization associated with ship water systems and water characteristics. Methods Water systems of 21 ferries and 10 cruise ships including WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were investigated for the presence of Legionella spp. Results The 133 samples collected from the 10 cruise ships WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were negative for Legionella spp. Of the 21 ferries WDS examined, 14 (66.7%) were legionellae-positive. A total of 276 samples were collected from WDS and air conditioning systems. Legionella spp. was isolated from 37.8% of the hot water samples and 17.5% of the cold water samples. Of the total 96 positive isolates, 87 (90.6%) were L. pneumophila. Legionella spp. colonization was positively associated with ship age. The temperature of the hot water samples was negatively associated with colonization of L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 and that of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14. Increases in pH ≥7.8 and total plate count ≥400 CFU/L, correlated positively with the counts of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14 and Legionella spp. respectively. Free chlorine of ≥0.2 mg/L inhibited colonization of Legionella spp. Conclusion WDS of ferries can be heavily colonized by Legionella spp. and may present a risk of Legionnaires' disease for passengers and crew members. Guidelines and advising of Legionnaires' disease prevention regarding ferries are needed, in particular for operators and crew members. PMID:19025638

  12. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm

  13. Mixed convection and solidification in a simplified metal pool of an ESR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Chiou, Kuo-Chang

    1991-10-01

    The mixed convection induced by buoyancy and free-surface velocity and the associated solidification phenomena of molten metal in a cylindrical container, which is employed to simulate the metal pool of ESR system, are numerically studied. When the buoyancy effect and the effect due to free-surface velocity augment each other, the unicellular fluid motion is strengthened, which makes the molten metal solidify most slowly in the upper corner near the side wall. When they are opposing each other, a double-cell flow structure exists, with the cooling effect confined within the right lower region which is mainly driven by buoyancy. The molten metal in the left upper region, which is mainly driven by the free-surface velocity, then assumes a rather high temperature.

  14. Summary Results of the Neptun Boil-Off Experiments to Investigate the Accuracy and Cooling Influence of LOFT Cladding-Surface Thermocouples (System 00)

    SciTech Connect

    E. L. Tolman S. N. Aksan

    1981-10-01

    Nine boil-off experiments were conducted in the Swiss NEPTUN Facility primarily to obtain experimental data for assessing the perturbation effects of LOFT thermocouples during simulated small-break core uncovery conditions. The data will also be useful in assessing computer model capability to predict thermal hydraulic response data for this type of experiment. System parameters that were varied for these experiments included heater rod power, system pressure, and initial coolant subcooling. The experiments showed that the LOFT thermocouples do not cause a significant cooling influence in the rods to which they are attached. Furthermore, the accuracy of the LOFT thermocouples is within 20 K at the peak cladding temperature zone.

  15. Enhanced Boiling on Micro-Configured Composite Surfaces Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chai, An-Ti

    1999-01-01

    In order to accommodate the growing thermal management needs of future space platforms, several two-phase active thermal control systems (ATCSs) have evolved and were included in the designs of space stations. Compared to the pumped single-phase liquid loops used in the conventional Space Transportation System and Spacelab, ATCSs offer significant benefits that may be realized by adopting a two-phase fluid-loop system. Alternately, dynamic power systems (DPSs), based on the Rankine cycle, seem inevitably to be required to supply the electrical power requirements of expanding space activities. Boiling heat transfer is one of the key technologies for both ATCSs and DPSs. Nucleate boiling near critical heat flux (CHF) can transport very large thermal loads with much smaller device size and much lower pumping power. However, boiling performance deteriorates in a reduced gravity environment and operation in the CHF regime is precarious because any slight overload will cause the heat transfer to suddenly move to the film boiling regime, which in turn, will result in burnout of the heat transfer surfaces. New materials, such as micro-configured metal-graphite composites, can provide a solution for boiling enhancement. It has been shown experimentally that this type of material manifests outstanding boiling heat transfer performance and their CHF is also extended to higher values. Due to the high thermal conductivity of graphite fiber (up to 1,200 W/m-K in the fiber direction), the composite surfaces are non-isothermal during the boiling process. The composite surfaces are believed to have a much wider safe operating region (a more uniform boiling curve in the CHF regime) because non-isothermal surfaces have been found to be less sensitive to variations of wall superheat in the CHF regime. The thermocapillary forces formed by the temperature difference between the fiber tips and the metal matrix play a more important role than the buoyancy in the bubble detachment, for the

  16. Explosive Boiling at Very Low Heat Fluxes: A Microgravity Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents experimental observations of explosive boiling from a large (relative to bubble sizes) flat heating surface at very low heat fluxes in microgravity. The explosive boiling is characterized as either a rapid growth of vapor mass over the entire heating surface due to the flashing of superheated liquid or a violent boiling spread following the appearance of single bubbles on the heating surface. Pool boiling data with saturated Freon 113 was obtained in the microgravity environment of the space shuttle. The unique features of the experimental results are the sustainability of high liquid superheat for long periods and the occurrence of explosive boiling at low heat fluxes (0.2 to 1.2 kW/sq m). For a heat flux of 1.0 kW/sq m a wall superheat of 17.9 degrees C was attained in ten minutes of heating. This was followed by an explosive boiling accompanied with a pressure spike and a violent bulk liquid motion. However, at this heat flux the vapor blanketing the heating surface could not be sustained. Stable nucleate boiling continued following the explosive boiling.

  17. Odd-Boiled Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, Kenneth; Scheman, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    At a Shabbat lunch in Madrid not long ago, the conversation turned to the question of boiling eggs. One of the guests mentioned that a Dutch rabbi he knew had heard that in order to make it more likely that boiled eggs be kosher, you should add an egg to the pot if the number you began with was even. According to the laws of Kashruth, Jews may not…

  18. Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C E; Moreno, J B; Diver, R B; Moss, T A

    1992-06-01

    The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90% when operated at full power and 800{degree}C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

  19. Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraka, C. E.; Moreno, J. B.; Diver, R. B.; Moss, T. A.

    1992-06-01

    The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW(sub t) sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW(sub t) parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90 percent when operated at full power and 800 C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

  20. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The prestart thermal conditioning of the hardware in LOX (liquid oxygen) systems involve heat transfer between LOX and metal where boiling plays a large role. Information is easily found on nucleate boiling, maximum heat flux, minimum heat flux and film boiling for common fluids like water. After looking at these standard correlations it was felt more data was needed for the cool down side transition boiling for the LN2 and LOX. In particular interest is the film boiling values, the temperature at which transition begins and the slope as peak heat flux is approached. The ultimate goal is an array of boiling heat transfer coefficient as a function of surface temperature which can be used in the chilldown model of the feed system, engine and bleed system for X-34. The first experiment consisted of an actual MC-1 LOX Impeller which had been machined backwards, that was instrumented with 17 surface thermocouples and submerged in liquid nitrogen. The thermocouples were installed on metal thicknesses varying from the thin inducer to the thick hub.

  1. Thermosyphon boiling in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    The thermal characteristics of ebullient cooling systems for VHSIC and VLSI microelectronic component thermal control are studied by experimentally and analytically investigating boiling heat transfer from a pair of flat, closely spaced, isoflux plates immersed in saturated water. A theoretical model for liquid flow rate through the channel is developed and used as a basis for correlating the rate of heat transfer from the channel walls. Experimental results for wall temperature as a function of axial location, heat flux, and plate spacing are presented. The finding that the wall superheat at constant imposed heat flux decreases as the channel is narrowed is explained with the aid of a boiling thermosiphon analysis which yields the mass flux through the channel.

  2. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  3. A 'big five' scoring system for the item pool of the adjective check list.

    PubMed

    FormyDuval, D L; Williams, J E; Patterson, D J; Fogle, E E

    1995-08-01

    The item pool of the Adjective Check List (ACL; Gough & Heilbrun, 1980) is widely used as a means of capturing the personal characteristics associated with various target groups (e.g., women vs. men, young adults vs. old adults). The purpose of this research was to develop a system for scoring the ACL items in terms of the five-factor model of personality. In Study 1, five groups of introductory psychology students served as judges, with each group of approximately 100 persons rating the 300 ACL items for one of the five factors. The ratings of each factor were highly reliable. When corrected for favorability, the intercorrelations among the five factors were quite low, as expected, except for the positive correlation of Openness and Extraversion. Good convergence was found between our ratings and the indicative and counterindicative items identified by John's (1989) graduate student judges. In Study 2, convergent validity was demonstrated between the five-factor scores obtained from self-descriptive ACLs and corresponding factor scores obtained from Costa and McCrae's NEO-PI-R and NEO-FFI instruments (Costa & McCrae, 1992). Data from earlier cross-cultural studies of gender and age stereotypes were rescored using the new ACL-FF system to illustrate its potential utility as a research tool. PMID:16367646

  4. Lifeguard Training: Principles and Administration. A Manual for Developing and Administering Lifeguard Systems for Pools and Beaches. Second Edition, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Gordon T., Ed.; Hill, Rolland, Ed.

    This manual for developing and administering lifeguard systems for pools and beaches is divided into three sections. Section 1, "Personnel," suggests prerequisites for lifeguard training, personal health, fitness and inservice training, and preventive lifeguarding. Section 2, "Operations," discusses the following: a) water conditions of surf…

  5. Effect of boiling surface vibration on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alangar, Sathyabhama

    2016-03-01

    Experimental investigation of effect of forced vertical surface vibration on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of saturated water at atmospheric pressure is presented in this paper. Vertical vibration was induced externally to the circular copper test surface on which boiling took place, using a vibration exciter. Frequency was varied in the range 0-25 Hz and amplitude of vibration was varied in the range 0-5 mm. Boiling takes place at much lower superheats for the same heat flux, slope of boiling curve decreases remarkably, when the surface is given external excitation. High frequency and high amplitude oscillations lead to more intensive heat transfer. There are some combinations of frequency and vibration amplitude, which cause up to two times increase in heat transfer coefficients.

  6. The Underwater Spectrometric System Based on CZT Detector for Survey of the Bottom of MR Reactor Pool - 13461

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, Victor; Safronov, Alexey; Ivanov, Oleg; Smirnov, Sergey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav

    2013-07-01

    The underwater spectrometer system for detection of irradiated nuclear fuel on the pool bottom of the reactor was elaborated. During the development process metrological studies of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors were conducted. These detectors are designed for spectrometric measurements in high radiation fields. A mathematical model based on the Monte Carlo method was created to evaluate the capability of such a system. A few experimental models were realized and the characteristics of the spectrometric system are represented. (authors)

  7. Radiolysis of boiling water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Hiroishi, Daisuke; Lertnaisat, Phantira; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-01

    γ-radiolysis of boiling water has been investigated. The G-value of H2 evolution was found to be very sensitive to the purity of water. In high-purity water, both H2 and O2 gases were formed in the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1; a negligible amount of H2O2 remained in the liquid phase. The G-values of H2 and O2 gas evolution depend on the dose rate: lower dose rates produce larger yields. To clarify the importance of the interface between liquid and gas phase for gas evolution, the gas evolution under Ar gas bubbling was measured. A large amount of H2 was detected, similar to the radiolysis of boiling water. The evolution of gas was enhanced in a 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution. Deterministic chemical kinetics simulation elucidated the mechanism of radiolysis in boiling water.

  8. Interactions Between the Nighttime Valley-Wind System and a Developing Cold-Air Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, Gabriele; Staquet, Chantal; Chemel, Charles

    2016-06-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast numerical model is used to characterize the influence of a thermally-driven down-valley flow on a developing cold-air pool in an idealized alpine valley decoupled from the atmosphere above. Results for a three-dimensional (3D) valley, which allows for the formation of a down-valley flow, and for a two-dimensional (2D) valley, where the formation of a down-valley flow is inhibited, are analyzed and compared. A key result is that advection leads to a net cooling in the 2D valley and to a warming in the 3D valley, once the down-valley flow is fully developed. This difference stems from the suppression of the slope-flow induced upward motions over the valley centre in the 3D valley. As a result, the downslope flows develop a cross-valley circulation within the cold-air pool, the growth of the cold-air pool is reduced and the valley atmosphere is generally warmer than in the 2D valley. A quasi-steady state is reached for which the divergence of the down-valley flow along the valley is balanced by the convergence of the downslope flows at the top of the cold-air pool, with no net contribution of subsiding motions far from the slope layer. More precisely, the inflow of air at the top of the cold-air pool is found to be driven by an interplay between the return flow from the plain region and subsidence over the plateaux. Finally, the mechanisms that control the structure of the cold-air pool and its evolution are found to be independent of the valley length as soon as the quasi-steady state is reached and the down-valley flow is fully developed.

  9. Hyporheic transport and biogeochemical reactions in pool-riffle systems under varying ambient groundwater flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Maier, Uli; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    At the interface between stream water, groundwater, and the hyporheic zone (HZ), important biogeochemical processes that play a crucial role in fluvial ecology occur. Solutes that infiltrate into the HZ can react with each other and possibly also with upwelling solutes from the groundwater. In this study, we systematically evaluate how variations of gaining and losing conditions, stream discharge, and pool-riffle morphology affect aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. For this purpose, a computational fluid dynamics model of stream water flow is coupled to a reactive transport model. Scenarios of variations of the solute concentration in the upwelling groundwater were conducted. Our results show that solute influx, residence time, and the size of reactive zones strongly depend on presence, magnitude, and direction of ambient groundwater flow. High magnitudes of ambient groundwater flow lower AR efficiency by up to 4 times and DN by up to 3 orders of magnitude, compared to neutral conditions. The influence of stream discharge and morphology on the efficiency of AR and DN are minor, in comparison to that of ambient groundwater flow. Different scenarios of O2 and NO3 concentrations in the upwelling groundwater reveal that DN efficiency of the HZ is highest under low upwelling magnitudes accompanied with low concentrations of O2 and NO3. Our results demonstrate how ambient groundwater flow influences solute transport, AR, and DN in the HZ. Neglecting groundwater flow in stream-groundwater interactions would lead to a significant overestimation of the efficiency of biogeochemical reactions in fluvial systems.

  10. Geographic Information Systems-Transportation ISTEA management systems server-net prototype pooled fund study: Phase B summary

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, J. Jr.; Dean, C.D.; Armstrong, H.M.

    1997-06-01

    The Geographic Information System-Transportation (GIS-T) ISTEA Management Systems Server Net Prototype Pooled Fund Study represents the first national cooperative effort in the transportation industry to address the management and monitoring systems as well as the statewide and metropolitan transportation planning requirements of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). The Study was initiated in November 1993 through the Alliance for Transportation Research and under the leadership of the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department. Sandia National Laboratories, an Alliance partner, and Geographic Paradigm Computing. Inc. provided technical leadership for the project. In 1992, the Alliance for Transportation Research, the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department, Sandia National Laboratories, and Geographic Paradigm Computing, Inc., proposed a comprehensive research agenda for GIS-T. That program outlined a national effort to synthesize new transportation policy initiatives (e.g., management systems and Intelligent Transportation Systems) with the GIS-T server net ideas contained in the NCHRP project {open_quotes}Adaptation of GIS to Transportation{close_quotes}. After much consultation with state, federal, and private interests, a project proposal based on this agenda was prepared and resulted in this Study. The general objective of the Study was to develop GIS-T server net prototypes supporting the ISTEA requirements for transportation planning and management and monitoring systems. This objective can be further qualified to: (1) Create integrated information system architectures and design requirements encompassing transportation planning activities and data. (2) Encourage the development of functional GIS-T server net prototypes. (3) Demonstrate multiple information systems implemented in a server net environment.