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Sample records for poorly regulated exposure

  1. Health hazard of poorly regulated exposure during manufacture of cemented tungsten carbides and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, J H; Abraham, J L; Gilbert, R; Lax, M; Henneberger, P K; Heitzman, E R; Peppi, D J

    1992-12-01

    Forty two of 125 former workers in a factory in Syracuse, New York, which manufactured hard metal parts from tungsten carbide and cobalt, were studied by chest radiographs, spirometry, and plethysmographically determined lung volumes. The plant was closed in 1982 and the studies were performed in 1983-5. Recorded measurements of carbide dust concentrations were only mildly excessive by modern standards, but deceitful efforts to reduce the apparent concentration of dust were known to have occurred during an inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Lung biopsies in four cases in the study and necropsy in one of the 83 cases not studied during life showed giant cell interstitial pneumonia and appreciable concentrations of tungsten carbide. This information indicates that exposure was substantial. Four workers had evidence of pulmonary fibrosis by chest radiographs; two of these workers had normal pulmonary function. Fourteen had abnormal pulmonary function, five of whom had a restrictive pattern, eight a pattern of air trapping, and one a combined pattern. Thus radiographic, or functional abnormalities, or both occurred in 16 of the 42 cases studied. No correlation with duration of exposure was established. Progressive clinically important disease (one fatal) has been found in four ex-workers, two in each of the restrictive and air trapping groups. These findings suggest that poorly regulated dust concentrations in a hard metals factory possibly cause pulmonary abnormalities and sometimes severe illness. PMID:1472440

  2. Household instability and self-regulation among poor children

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Dana Charles; Raver, C. Cybele

    2015-01-01

    Past research suggests that poverty may negatively influence children’s psychological and behavioral health by increasing their exposure to chaotic living conditions in the household. The present study provides a descriptive ‘snapshot’ of instability in low-income households, and examines the associations between exposure to major destabilizing events over the course of a year and three domains of poor urban children’s self-regulation. Descriptive analyses suggest that although caregivers from unstable households report higher average levels of health problems and depression, they also have greater assets/savings, are more educated, and are less likely to be immigrants than caregivers from stable households. Results of propensity score-matched regression analyses reveal that high levels of household instability are significantly and negatively associated with preschoolers’ effortful control and global attention/impulsivity control, but not with their executive function. Children from mildly unstable homes (i.e., those who had experienced a single destabilizing event in the past year) showed no significant differences in any domain of self-regulation relative to their peers from stable households, suggesting a dose-response relationship between the number of destabilizing events experienced by children and their outcomes. Implications for theories of poverty-related adversity, stress, and parenting are discussed in addition to future directions for research. PMID:26924923

  3. The Effect of Social Programs and Exposure to Professionals on the Educational Aspirations of the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiapa, Carlos; Garrido, Jose Luis; Prina, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Investment in human capital is an important tool for reducing poverty. However, the poor may lack the capacity to aspire, which often results in underinvestment in their children's education. This paper studies the effect of a social program on the educational aspirations poor parents have for their children, and explores the role of exposure to…

  4. ESTIMATION OF CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES VIA POORLY CHARACTERIZED PATHWAYS USING CTEPP DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work involved providing better exposure estimates for poorly characterized pathways (dermal and indirect ingestion) for young children in the CTEPP study. The chemicals used in this analysis were chlorpyrifos and its degradation product 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol.

  5. Genome exposure and regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Webb, P; Johnson, R

    1998-09-01

    fibroblasts as revealed by in situ nick translation reveals a nuclear distribution pattern around the periphery, around the nucleoli and in punctate positions in the nuclear interior in parts of both S and G1 phases of the cell cycle. The same exposure pattern is duplicated by the pattern of DNA synthesis in S cells. It would appear that these nuclear regions represent positions of special activity. The previously proposed theory of genome regulation in mammalian cells is supported by these findings. The theory proposes that: a) gene activity requires exposure of the given locus followed by action of transcription factors on the exposed genes; b) the fiber system of the cell (cytoskeleton, nuclear fibers, and extracellular fibers) are required for normal exposure; c) active sites for gene expression and replication consist of the nuclear periphery where differentiation genes particularly are exposed; the nucleoli where at least some housekeeping genes are exposed; and possibly also punctate regions in the interior; d) noncoding sequences play a critical role in genome regulation, possibly including the transport of loci to be activated to appropriate exposure transcriptional and replicating locations. Cancer cells have lost specific differentiation gene activities, at least sometimes because of mutation of appropriate exposure genes; at least some protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are responsible for exposure and transport of specific differentiation gene loci to their appropriate exposure sites in the nucleus and for inducing exposure. PMID:10696237

  6. Infant Self-Regulation and Early Childhood Media Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Michael; Zuckerman, Barry; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Examine prospective associations between parent-reported early childhood self-regulation problems and media exposure (television and video viewing) at 2 years. We hypothesized that children with poor self-regulation would consume more media, possibly as a parent coping strategy. METHODS: We used data from 7450 children in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort. When children were 9 months and 2 years old, parents completed the Infant Toddler Symptom Checklist (ITSC), a validated scale of self-regulation. With daily media use at 2 years as our outcome, we conducted weighted multivariable regression analyses, controlling for child, maternal, and household characteristics. RESULTS: Children watched an average of 2.3 hours per day (SD 1.9) of media at age 2 years. Infants with poor self-regulation (9-month ITSC score ≥3) viewed 0.23 hour per day (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12–0.35) more media at 2 years compared with those with 9-month ITSC score of 0 to 2; this remained significant in adjusted models (0.15 hour per day [95% CI 0.02–0.28]). Children rated as having persistent self-regulation problems (ITSC ≥3 at both 9 months and 2 years) were even more likely to consume media at age 2 (adjusted β 0.21 hour per day [95% CI 0.03–0.39]; adjusted odds ratio for >2 hours per day 1.40 [95% CI 1.14–1.71]). These associations were slightly stronger in low socioeconomic status and English-speaking households. CONCLUSIONS: Early childhood self-regulation problems are associated with mildly increased media exposure, even after controlling for important confounding variables. Understanding this relationship may provide insight into helping parents reduce their children’s screen time. PMID:24733868

  7. Disaster risk and poverty: assessing the global exposure of the poor to floods and droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsemius, Hessel; Jongman, Brenden; Veldkamp, Ted; Hallegatte, Stéphane; Bangalore, Mook; Ward, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Poor people generally have a lower capacity to deal with the impacts of natural hazards. Yet, in several countries, low-income households have been shown to be disproportionately overrepresented in hazard-prone areas compared to households with higher income. Furthermore, the hazardous conditions under which poor households are exposed to now may become worse due to climate change with resulting increases in intensity and frequency of floods and droughts. To date, the relationship between poverty and natural hazard related disasters has only been explored on a case by case basis in a limited amount of countries. With the recent advances in the global spatial modeling of flood and drought hazard, it becomes feasible to study the relationship between poverty and natural hazards globally. In this presentation we present the most comprehensive analysis so far on the exposure of the global poor to floods and droughts under the current climatic conditions as well as under a range of future climate scenarios. We combine state-of-the-art global river flood and drought hazard models with detailed household asset and income datasets for over 50 countries world-wide, to analyse poverty-specific household exposure to current and future hazard levels.

  8. Violence exposure, sleep disturbance, and poor academic performance in middle school.

    PubMed

    Lepore, Stephen J; Kliewer, Wendy

    2013-11-01

    Violence has been linked to poor academic outcomes in youth, but there is little understanding of the mechanisms underlying this relation. This longitudinal survey study investigated whether sleep disturbance potentially mediates the associations between academic achievement and two forms of violence exposure--community violence and peer victimization-- in 498 seventh-grade youth. Structural equation models showed that community violence was associated with lower grade point average (GPA) directly and indirectly via sleep problems, whereas peer victimization was associated with lower GPA just indirectly via sleep problems. The structural models controlled for potential confounds, including depressive symptoms, intrusive thoughts and absenteeism. The findings suggest that failing grades and sleepiness in school may be signs that youth are exposed to violence. Interventions to improve sleep hygiene and reduce violence exposure may help to improve academic outcomes for youth. PMID:23315234

  9. Violence Exposure, Sleep Disturbance, and Poor Academic Performance in Middle School

    PubMed Central

    Lepore, Stephen J.; Kliewer, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Violence has been linked to poor academic outcomes in youth, but there is little understanding of the mechanisms underlying this relation. This longitudinal survey study investigated whether sleep disturbance potentially mediates the associations between academic achievement and two forms of violence exposure--community violence and peer victimization-- in 498 seventh-grade youth. Structural equation models showed that community violence was associated with lower grade point average (GPA) directly and indirectly via sleep problems, whereas peer victimization was associated with lower GPA just indirectly via sleep problems. The structural models controlled for potential confounds, including depressive symptoms, intrusive thoughts and absenteeism. The findings suggest that failing grades and sleepiness in school may be signs that youth are exposed to violence. Interventions to improve sleep hygiene and reduce violence exposure may help to improve academic outcomes for youth. PMID:23315234

  10. Children's Negative Emotionality Combined with Poor Self-Regulation Affects Allostatic Load in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dich, Nadya; Doan, Stacey; Evans, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the concurrent and prospective, longitudinal effects of childhood negative emotionality and self-regulation on allostatic load (AL), a physiological indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that negative emotionality in combination with poor self-regulation would predict elevated AL. Mothers reported on children's…

  11. Exposure to violence predicts poor educational outcomes in young children in South Africa and Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Sherr, L.; Hensels, I. S.; Skeen, S.; Tomlinson, M.; Roberts, K. J.; Macedo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Violence during childhood may affect short and long-term educational factors. There is scant literature on younger children from resource poor settings. Methods This study assessed child violence experiences (harsh punishment and exposure to domestic or community violence) and school enrolment, progress and attendance in children attending community-based organisations in South Africa and Malawi (n=989) at baseline and at 15 months' follow-up, examining differential experience of HIV positive, HIV affected and HIV unaffected children. Results Violence exposure was high: 45.4% experienced some form of psychological violence, 47.8% physical violence, 46.7% domestic violence and 41.8% community violence. Primary school enrolment was 96%. Violence was not associated with school enrolment at baseline but, controlling for baseline, children exposed to psychological violence for discipline were more than ten times less likely to be enrolled at follow-up (OR 0.09; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.57). Harsh discipline was associated with poor school progress. For children HIV positive a detrimental effect of harsh physical discipline was found on school performance (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.61). Conclusion Violence experiences were associated with a number of educational outcomes, which may have long-term consequences. Community-based organisations may be well placed to address such violence, with a particular emphasis on the challenges faced by children who are HIV positive. PMID:26678567

  12. Regulation of nuclear radiation exposures in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, U C

    2004-01-01

    India has a long-term program of wide spread applications of nuclear radiations and radioactive sources for peaceful applications in medicine, industry, agriculture and research and is already having several thousand places in the country where such sources are being routinely used. These places are mostly outside the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) installations. DAE supplies such sources. The most important application of nuclear energy in DAE is in electricity generation through nuclear power plants. Fourteen such plants are operating and many new plants are at various stages of construction. In view of the above mentioned wide spread applications, Indian parliament through an Act, called Atomic Energy Act, 1964 created an autonomous body called Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) with comprehensive authority and powers. This Board issues codes, guides, manuals, etc., to regulate such installations so as to ensure safe use of such sources and personnel engaged in such installations and environment receives radiation exposures within the upper bounds prescribed by them. Periodic reports are submitted to AERB to demonstrate compliance of its directives. Health, Safety and Environment Group of Bhabha Atomic Research Centres, Mumbai carries out necessary surveillance and monitoring of all installations of the DAE on a routine basis and also periodic inspections of other installations using radiation sources. Some of the nuclear fuel cycle plants like nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing involve large radioactive source inventories and have potential of accidental release of radioactivity into the environment, an Environmental Surveillance Laboratory (ESL) is set up at each such site much before the facility goes into operation. These ESL's collect baseline data and monitor the environment throughout the life of the facilities including the decommissioning stage. The data is provided to AERB and is available to members of the public. In addition, a multi

  13. NEK2 regulates stem-like properties and predicts poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang; Zhou, Senjun; Jiang, Shaojie; Liu, Xiaolong; Wang, Yifan; Zheng, Xueyong; Zhou, Haimeng; Li, Xuhui; Cai, Xiujun

    2016-08-01

    NEK2 has been estimated to play an important role in cancer progression. However, its relevance in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been explored. Immunohistochemistry revealed NEK2 expression was upregulated in HCC. NEK2-positive hepatocellular carcinoma patients were associated with poor prognosis after surgery compared with NEK2-negative patients based on Kaplan-Meier curves. Deletion of NEK2 reduced self-renewal properties and chemotherapeutic resistance, and decreased the stemness associated genes in cell lines. NEK2 was associated with unfavorable outcomes in HCC patients, and was revealed to regulate self-renewal property by means of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and chemotherapeutic resistance by preferential regulation of the expression of ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 in HCC cells. PMID:27349376

  14. Using Behavior Change to Reduce Child Lead Exposure in Resource-Poor Settings: A Formative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feit, M. N.; Mathee, A.; Harpham, T.; Barnes, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this formative research was to explore the acceptability and feasibility of changing housekeeping behaviors as a low-cost approach that may reduce childhood lead exposure in Johannesburg, South Africa. Using the Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs) methodology, modified housekeeping behaviors were negotiated with participants who…

  15. Do Time in Child Care and Peer Group Exposure Predict Poor Socioemotional Adjustment in Norway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solheim, Elisabet; Wichstrøm, Lars; Belsky, Jay; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Extensive exposure to nonparental child care during the first 4.5 years of life has been demonstrated in some American studies to negatively affect children's socioemotional functioning. Data from 935 preschool children who averaged 54.9 (SD = 3.0) months of age, from Trondheim, Norway were used to examine whether such negative effects, would…

  16. Prenatal substance exposure and child self-regulation: Pathways to risk and protection.

    PubMed

    Eiden, Rina D; Godleski, Stephanie; Schuetze, Pamela; Colder, Craig R

    2015-09-01

    A conceptual model of the association between prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) and child self-regulation via maternal harshness and language development was examined. Specifically, the model tested whether PCE was associated with self-regulation either directly or indirectly via high maternal harshness and poor language development. The role of child sex, autonomic reactivity, and cumulative environmental risk as potential moderators was also explored. The sample was 216 mother-child dyads recruited at birth and assessed at 2, 7, 13, 24, 36, and 48 months of child ages. Participating mothers were primarily African American (72%). Results indicated a significant indirect association between PCE and child effortful control at 36 months via higher maternal harshness. Autonomic reactivity moderated the association between maternal harshness and self-regulation such that among children with poor autonomic reactivity, high maternal harshness was associated with lower conscience at 3 years. Child sex and environmental risk did not moderate the association between PCE and self-regulation. Thus, the quality of caregiving experience played a significant role in the development of self-regulation among PCE children, especially those at higher autonomic risk. In particular, PCE children who also exhibit poor autonomic reactivity may be particularly susceptible to environmental influences such as parenting. PMID:25913650

  17. SOX2 Expression Is Regulated by BRAF and Contributes to Poor Patient Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Ida V.; Löfgren Burström, Anna; Edin, Sofia; Eklöf, Vincy; Öberg, Åke; Stenling, Roger; Palmqvist, Richard; Wikberg, Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy and also one of the main causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Aberrant expression of the transcription factor SOX2 has recently been observed in several cancer types, but its role in CRC has not been fully elucidated. Here we studied the expression of SOX2 in 441 CRC patients by immunohistochemistry and related the expression to clinicopathological and molecular variables and patient prognosis. SOX2 was expressed in 11% of the tumors and was significantly associated to BRAFV600E mutation, but not to KRAS mutations (codon 12 and 13). SOX2 positivity was correlated to poor patient survival, especially in BRAFV600E mutated cases. In vitro studies showed that cells expressing the constitutively active BRAFV600E had increased SOX2 expression, a finding not found in cells expressing KRASG12V. Furthermore, blocking downstream BRAF signalling using a MEK-inhibitor resulted in a decreased expression of SOX2. Since SOX2 overexpression has been correlated to increased migration and invasion, we investigated the SOX2 expression in human CRC liver metastasis and found that a SOX2 positive primary CRC also had SOX2 expression in corresponding liver metastases. Finally we found that cells overexpressing SOX2 in vitro showed enhanced expression of FGFR1, which has been reported to correlate with liver metastasis in CRC. Our novel findings suggest that SOX2 expression is partly regulated by BRAF signalling, and an increased SOX2 expression may promote CRC metastasis and mediate a poor patient prognosis. PMID:25010701

  18. Dietary salt loading and ion-poor water exposure provide insight into the molecular physiology of the rainbow trout gill epithelium tight junction complex.

    PubMed

    Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-08-01

    This study utilized dietary salt loading and ion-poor water (IPW) exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to further understand the role of fish gill epithelium tight junction (TJ) physiology in salt and water balance. Gill morphology, biochemistry and molecular physiology were examined, with an emphasis on genes encoding TJ proteins. Fish were either fed a control or salt-enriched diet (~10 % NaCl) for 4 weeks prior to IPW exposure for 24 h. Serum [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and muscle moisture content were unaltered by salt feeding, but changed in response to IPW irrespective of diet. Dietary salt loading altered the morphology (reduced Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive cell numbers and surface exposure of mitochondrion-rich cells), biochemistry (decreased vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase activity) and molecular physiology (decreased nkaα1a and cftrII mRNA abundance) of the gill in a manner indicative of reduced active ion uptake activity. But in control fish and not salt-fed fish, gill mRNA abundance of nkaα1c increased and nbc decreased after IPW exposure. Genes encoding TJ proteins were typically either responsive to salt feeding or IPW, but select genes responded to combined experimental treatment (e.g. IPW responsive but only if fish were salt-fed). Therefore, using salt feeding and IPW exposure, new insights into what factors influence gill TJ proteins and the role that specific TJ proteins might play in regulating the barrier properties of the gill epithelium have been acquired. In particular, evidence suggests that TJ proteins in the gill epithelium, or the regulatory networks that control them, respond independently to external or internal stimuli. PMID:27083431

  19. Novel Dosing Strategies Increase Exposures of the Potent Antituberculosis Drug Rifapentine but Are Poorly Tolerated in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Radojka M.; Park, Jeong-Gun; Cramer, Yoninah; Hafner, Richard; Hogg, Evelyn; Janik, Jennifer; Marzinke, Mark A.; Patterson, Kristine; Benson, Constance A.; Hovind, Laura; Dorman, Susan E.; Haas, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Rifapentine is a potent antituberculosis drug currently in phase III trials. Bioavailability decreases with increasing dose, yet high daily exposures are likely needed to improve efficacy and shorten the tuberculosis treatment duration. Further, the limits of tolerability are poorly defined. The phase I multicenter trial in healthy adults described here investigated two strategies to increase rifapentine exposures: dividing the dose or giving the drug with a high-fat meal. In arm 1, rifapentine was administered at 10 mg/kg of body weight twice daily and 20 mg/kg once daily, each for 14 days, separated by a 28-day washout; the dosing sequence was randomized. In arm 2, 15 mg/kg rifapentine once daily was given with a high-fat versus a low-fat breakfast. Sampling for pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on days 1 and 14. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. This trial was stopped early for poor tolerability and because of safety concerns. Of 44 subjects, 20 discontinued prematurely; 11 of these discontinued for protocol-defined toxicity (a grade 3 or higher adverse event or grade 2 or higher rifamycin hypersensitivity). Taking rifapentine with a high-fat meal increased the median steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to 24 h (AUC0–24ss) by 31% (relative standard error, 6%) compared to that obtained when the drug was taken with a low-fat breakfast. Dividing the dose increased exposures substantially (e.g., 38% with 1,500 mg/day). AUC0–24ss was uniformly higher in our study than in recent tuberculosis treatment trials, in which toxicity was rare. In conclusion, two strategies to increase rifapentine exposures, dividing the dose or giving it with a high-fat breakfast, successfully increased exposures, but toxicity was common in healthy adults. The limits of tolerability in patients with tuberculosis remain to be defined. (AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5311 has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration

  20. Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

    1981-04-01

    The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

  1. Association of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor expression in ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyum; Song, Si Young; Kim, Sunghoon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Yim, Ga Won; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Nam, Eun Ji

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) expression is elevated in both ovarian tumors and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, PAUF expression in ovarian tumors according to histologic subtype and grade has not been investigated. In this study, we examined various clinicopathologic features of 24 patients with mucinous cystadenoma (MCA), 36 with mucinous borderline tumors (MBTs), and 46 with mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs) according to PAUF expression status assessed using immunohistochemistry. We found that MACs more frequently stained positive for PAUF than did MCAs and MBTs (P < 0.0001). Although there was no significant differences with respect to other clinicopathologic characteristics of MACs according to PAUF expression status, patients with PAUF-weakly positive and PAUF-strongly positive MACs tended to have a shorter overall survival (OS) than those with PAUF-negative MAC, determined using a Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.1885). After adjusting for various clinicopathologic parameters, PAUF positivity of MACs was a significant predictive factor for disease-free survival (DFS) (negative vs. weakly positive: P = 0.045, hazard ratio [HR] = 57.406, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.090-3022.596; and negative vs. strongly positive: P = 0.034, HR = 97.890, 95% CI: 1.412-6785.925). In conclusion, PAUF was more frequently expressed in MAC than in its benign and borderline counterparts, and was associated with a poor OS and DFS in MAC patients. Therefore, we suggest that PAUF may be a practical biomarker for histopathological categorization and a prognostic marker for patients with an ovarian mucinous tumor. PMID:25197383

  2. Up-regulation of Tim-3 is associated with poor prognosis of patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Encheng; Huang, Qing; Wang, Ji; Fang, Chengfeng; Yang, Leilei; Zhu, Min; Chen, Jianhui; Chen, Lihua; Dong, Milian

    2015-01-01

    Tim-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3), belonging to the member of the novel Tim family, has been confirmed that it plays a critical negative role in regulating the immune responses against viral infection and carcinoma. Recently, it has also been reported that the over-expression of Tim-3 is associated with poor prognosis in solid tumors. However, the role of Tim-3 in colorectal cancer remains largely unknown. In the current study, we aim to investigate the expression of Tim-3 in colorectal carcinoma and discuss the relationship between Tim-3 expression and colon cancer prognosis, thus speculating the possible role of Tim-3 in colon cancer progression. Colon cancer tissues and paired normal tissue were obtained from 201 patients with colon cancer for preparation of tissue microarray. Tim-3 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The Tim-3 expression level was evaluated by q-RT-PCR, western blot and immunocytochemistry in four colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT116, LoVo, SW620). Tim-3 was expressed in 92.5% tumor tissue samples and 86.5% corresponding normal tissue samples. Expression of Tim-3 was significantly higher in tumor tissues than in normal tissues (P < 0.0001). Tim-3 expression in colon cancer tissues is in correlation with colon cancer lymphatic metastasis and TNM (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that Tim-3 expression could be a potential independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients (P < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis result showed that patients with higher Tim-3 expression had a significantly shorter survival time than those with lower Tim-3 expression patients. Our results indicated that Tim-3 might participate in the tumorgenesis of colon cancer and Tim-3 expression might be a potential independent prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:26339368

  3. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  4. Down-regulation of sirtuin 3 is associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma after resection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), one of the seven Sirtuins family members, plays critical roles in the progression of multiple cancer types. However, its role in the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been investigated systematically. Methods The correlation of Sirtuins expression with prognosis of HCC was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a large HCC patient cohort (n = 342). Expression of Sirt3 in tumoral and peritumoral tissues of HCC patients were further determined by western blotting (WB). Results IHC and WB studies both showed a decreased expression of Sirt3 in tumoral tissues compared with peritumoral tissues (P = 0.003 for IHC, P = 0.0042 for WB). Decreased expression of Sirt3 in both tumoral and peritumoral tissues was associated with increased recurrence probability and decreased overall survival rate by univariate analyses (intratumoral Sirt3: P = 0.011 for TTR, P = 0.001 for OS; peritumoral Sirt3: P = 0.017 for TTR, P = 0.023 for OS), the prognostic value was strengthened by multivariate analyses (intratumoral Sirt3: P = 0.031 for TTR, P = 0.001 for OS; peritumoral Sirt3: P = 0.047 for TTR, P = 0.031 for OS). Intratumoral Sirt3 also showed a favorable prognostic value in patients with BCLC stage A (TTR, P = 0.011; OS, P < 0.001). In addition, we found that IHC studies of other sirtuin members showed a decreased expression of Sirt2, Sirt4 and Sirt5 and an increased expression of Sirt1, Sirt6 and Sirt7 in intratumoral tissues compared with peritumoral tissues. In contrast to Sirt3, other members did not showed a remarkable correlation with HCC prognosis. Conclusions Down-regulation of intratumoral and peritumoral Sirt3 were both associated with poor outcome in HCC, moreover, intratumoral Sirt3 was a favorable prognostic predictor in early stage patients. PMID:24774224

  5. Gender differences in blood pressure regulation following artificial gravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Joyce; Goswami, Nandu; Kostas, Vladimir; Zhang, Qingguang; Ferguson, Connor; Moore, Fritz; Stenger, Michael, , Dr; Serrador, Jorge; W, Siqi

    study, men and women demonstrated significantly different strategies for regulating blood pressure and cerebral flow both at rest and during orthostatic stress on the day in which they had undergone exposure to AG. Since, in both men and women, a single, acute bout of AG exposure improved orthostatic tolerance, the feasibility of short exposures to AG during longer spaceflights or prior to entry into a gravitational (Earth or Mars) environment, should be explored. Given the known beneficial effects of AG on other organ systems, the present study indicates that the positive effect of artificial gravity on cardiac output make AG a likely candidate for sustaining cardiovascular conditioning upon return to gravity. Supported by KY NASA EPSCoR Grant #NNX07AT58A, KY State Matching Grants, NASA JSC Human Research Program and NASA Ames Research Center.

  6. Cocaine Exposure and Children's Self-Regulation: Indirect Association via Maternal Harshness

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, Rina D.; Schuetze, Pamela; Veira, Yvette; Cox, Elizabeth; Jarrett, Thomas M.; Johns, Josephine M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the association between prenatal cocaine exposure and children’s self-regulation at 3 years of child age. In addition to direct effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on children’s self-regulation, we hypothesized there would be indirect associations between cocaine exposure and self-regulation via higher maternal harshness and poor autonomic regulation in infancy. Methods: The sample consisted of 216 mother–infant dyads recruited at delivery from local area hospitals (116 cocaine-exposed, 100 non-exposed). Infant autonomic regulation was measured at 7 months of age during an anger/frustration task, maternal harshness was coded from observations of mother–toddler interactions at 2 years of age, and children’s self-regulation was measured at 3 years of age using several laboratory paradigms. Results: Contrary to hypotheses, there were no direct associations between maternal cocaine use during pregnancy and children’s self-regulation. However, results from testing our conceptual model including the indirect effects via maternal harshness or infant parasympathetic regulation indicated that this model fit the data well, χ2 (23) = 34.36, p > 0.05, Comparative Fit Index = 0.95, RMSEA = 0.05. Cocaine using mothers displayed higher intensity of harshness toward their toddlers during lab interactions across a variety of tasks at 2 years of age (β = 0.23, p < 0.05), and higher intensity of harshness at 2 years was predictive of lower self-regulation at 3 years (β = −0.36, p < 0.01). Maternal cocaine use was also predictive of a non-adaptive increase in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from baseline to the negative affect task, but RSA change in infancy was not predictive of self-regulation at 3 years. Conclusion: Results are supportive of animal models indicating higher aggression among cocaine treated dams, and indicate that higher maternal harshness among cocaine using mothers

  7. Theoretical estimates of exposure timescales of protein binding sites on DNA regulated by nucleosome kinetics.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-29

    It is being increasingly realized that nucleosome organization on DNA crucially regulates DNA-protein interactions and the resulting gene expression. While the spatial character of the nucleosome positioning on DNA has been experimentally and theoretically studied extensively, the temporal character is poorly understood. Accounting for ATPase activity and DNA-sequence effects on nucleosome kinetics, we develop a theoretical method to estimate the time of continuous exposure of binding sites of non-histone proteins (e.g. transcription factors and TATA binding proteins) along any genome. Applying the method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the exposure timescales are determined by cooperative dynamics of multiple nucleosomes, and their behavior is often different from expectations based on static nucleosome occupancy. Examining exposure times in the promoters of GAL1 and PHO5, we show that our theoretical predictions are consistent with known experiments. We apply our method genome-wide and discover huge gene-to-gene variability of mean exposure times of TATA boxes and patches adjacent to TSS (+1 nucleosome region); the resulting timescale distributions have non-exponential tails. PMID:26553807

  8. Poor Indoor Air Quality, Mold Exposure, and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections--Are We Placing Our Children at Risk?

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Dimos; Polyzoi, Eleoussa; Wells, John A; Koulis, Theo

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how respiratory health risks are associated with poor housing is essential to designing effective strategies to improve children's quality of life. The objective of the study described in this article was to determine the relationship between respiratory health and housing conditions. A survey was completed by 3,424 parents of children in third and fourth grade in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. An engineering audit and air samples were also taken in the homes of a subset of 715 homes. Results showed that a child's respiratory health is significantly associated with self-reported visible mold in the home and that a significant association existed between occupant-reported visible mold and tested airborne mold. Findings highlight the need for clearer standards of acceptable CFU/m3 limits for mold genera that are applicable to homes. In the absence of such guidelines, problems associated with indoor mold will continue to impact the health of residents, despite growing evidence of the adverse effects from mold exposure. PMID:27197351

  9. Mercy Mercy Me: Social Injustice and the Prevention of Environmental Pollutant Exposures among Ethnic Minority and Poor Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilworth-Bart, Janean E.; Moore, Colleen F.

    2006-01-01

    Children's lead and pesticide exposures are used as examples to examine social disparities in exposure reduction efforts as well as environmental policies impacting children in poverty and minority children. The review also presents an estimate of the effect of social disparities in lead exposure on standardized test performance. Because including…

  10. Differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma: Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) regulates HIF2A transcription and correlates to poor outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidian, Arash; Stedingk, Kristoffer von; Munksgaard Thorén, Matilda; Mohlin, Sofie; Påhlman, Sven

    2015-06-05

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are differentially regulated in tumor cells. While the current paradigm supports post-translational regulation of the HIF-α subunits, we recently showed that hypoxic HIF-2α is also transcriptionally regulated via insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II in the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of HIF-2α seems to be restricted to neural cell-derived tumors, while HIF-1α is canonically regulated at the post-translational level uniformly across different tumor forms. Enhanced expression of HIF2A mRNA at hypoxia is due to de novo transcription rather than increased mRNA stability, and chemical stabilization of the HIF-α proteins at oxygen-rich conditions unexpectedly leads to increased HIF2A transcription. The enhanced HIF2A levels do not seem to be dependent on active HIF-1. Using a transcriptome array approach, we identified members of the Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)/Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) complex families as potential regulators of HIF2A. Knockdown or inhibition of one of the members, ERRα, leads to decreased expression of HIF2A, and high expression of the ERRα gene ESRRA correlates with poor overall and progression-free survival in a clinical neuroblastoma material consisting of 88 tumors. Thus, targeting of ERRα and pathways regulating transcriptional HIF-2α are promising therapeutic avenues in neuroblastoma. - Highlights: • Transcriptional control of HIF-2α is restricted to neural cell-derived tumors. • Enhanced transcription of HIF2A is not due to increased mRNA stability. • Chemical stabilization of the HIF-α subunits leads to increased HIF2A transcription. • ERRα regulates HIF2A mRNA expression in neuroblastoma. • High expression of ESRRA correlates to poor outcome in neuroblastoma.

  11. Down-regulation of Barx2 predicts poor survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yushuai; Zhao, Senlin; Zhang, Weihao; Zhang, Dongyuan; Weng, Junyong; Huang, Kejian; Sun, Huimin; Tang, Huamei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhihai; Wen, Yugang

    2016-09-01

    Human BarH-like homeobox 2 (Barx2), a homeodomain factor of the Bar family, has an important role in controlling the expression of cell adhesion molecules and has been reported in an increasing array of tumor types except colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of the current study was to characterize the expression of Barx2 and assess the clinical significance of Barx2 in CRC. First, we analyzed the expression of Barx2 in two independent public datasets from Oncomine. Subsequently, we evaluated Barx2 mRNA and protein expression by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. It was determined that Barx2 expression was lower in tumor tissues than in adjacent non-tumorous colorectal tissues of CRC patients, consistent with results from the public datasets. Subsequently, a tissue microarray containing 196 CRC specimens was evaluated for Barx2 expression by immunohistochemical staining. It was found that low expression of Barx2 significantly correlated with TNM stage, AJCC stage, differentiation, and relapse in patients with CRC. Patients with lower levels of Barx2 expression showed reduced disease-free survival and overall survival. Furthermore, a trend toward shorter overall survival in the patient group with Barx2-negative tumors independent of advanced AJCC stage and poor differentiation was determined by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Based on univariate and multivariate analyses, Barx2 expression was an independent prognostic factor for determining CRC prognosis. Taken together, low Barx2 expression was associated with the progression of CRC and could serve as a potential independent prognostic biomarker for patients with CRC. PMID:27453340

  12. Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Holloway, Adele; Cook, Anthony L.; Chin, Suyin P.; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin which increases skin cancer risk for exposed populations worldwide; however the underlying biomolecular mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is complex and poorly defined. Recent investigations show that histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase activity is impaired, and epigenetic patterns of gene regulation are consistently altered in cancers associated with arsenic exposure. Expression of the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is altered in solid tumours and haematological malignancies; however its role in arsenic-induced pathology is unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of arsenic on epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 and its targeting microRNA, miR-34a in primary human keratinocytes. Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) increased in keratinocytes exposed to 0.5 μM arsenite [As(III)]; and this was associated with chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a promoter. Moreover, although SIRT1 protein initially increased in these As(III)-exposed cells, after 24 days expression was not significantly different from untreated controls. Extended exposure to low-dose As(III) (0.5 μM; > 5 weeks) compromised the pattern of CpG methylation at SIRT1 and miR-34a gene promoters, and this was associated with altered expression for both genes. We have found that arsenic alters epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 expression via structural reorganisation of chromatin at the miR-34a gene promoter in the initial 24 h of exposure; and over time, through shifts in miR-34a and SIRT1 gene methylation. Taken together, this investigation demonstrates that arsenic produces cumulative disruptions to epigenetic regulation of miR-34a expression, and this is associated with impaired coordination of SIRT1 functional activity. - Highlights: • Submicromolar arsenic concentrations disrupt SIRT1 activity and expression in human keratinocytes. • Arsenic-induced chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a gene promoter is associated with hyperacetylation

  13. Stathmin1 regulates p27 expression, proliferation and drug resistance, resulting in poor clinical prognosis in cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Akira; Suzuki, Hideki; Yokobori, Takehiko; Tsukagoshi, Mariko; Altan, Bolag; Kubo, Norio; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Araki, Kenichiro; Wada, Satoshi; Kashiwabara, Kenji; Hosouchi, Yasuo; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) have a poor prognosis; postoperative survival depends on cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. The mechanism of EHCC progression needs to be clarified to identify ways to improve disease prognosis. Stathmin1 (STMN1) is a major cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics and is associated with malignant phenotypes and chemoresistance in various cancers. Recently, STMN1 was reported to interact with p27, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. Eighty EHCC cases were studied using immunohistochemistry and clinical pathology to determine the correlation between STMN1 and p27 expression; RNA interference to analyze the function of STMN1 in an EHCC cell line was also used. Cytoplasmic STMN1 expression correlated with venous invasion (P = 0.0021) and nuclear p27 underexpression (P = 0.0011). Patients in the high-STMN1-expression group were associated with shorter recurrence-free survival and overall survival than those in the low-expression group. An in vitro protein-binding assay revealed that cytoplasmic STMN1 bound to p27 in the cytoplasm, but not in the nucleus of EHCC cells. Moreover, p27 accumulated in EHCC cells after STMN1 suppression. STMN1 knockdown inhibited proliferation and increased the sensitivity of EHCC cells to paclitaxel. STMN1 contributes to a poor prognosis and cancer progression in EHCC patients. Understanding the regulation of p27 by STMN1 could provide new insights for overcoming therapeutic resistance in EHCC. PMID:24708177

  14. PFKL/miR-128 axis regulates glycolysis by inhibiting AKT phosphorylation and predicts poor survival in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Li, Jingqiu; Le, Yanping; Zhou, Chengwei; Zhang, Shun; Gong, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) affect cancer cell glucose metabolism by targeting mRNAs of diverse enzymes that have been implicated in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolytic pathways. However, the mechanisms that underlie miRNA-mediated regulation of phosphofructokinase (PFK), a key rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that miR-128 directly targets PFK liver type (PFKL) in lung cancer cells and regulates endogenous expression of PFKL at both the mRNA and protein levels. In line with this, overexpression of miR-128 decreased glucose uptake and lactate production, as well as increased cellular ATP content. Interestingly, knockdown of miR-128 was shown to promote lung cancer cell growth and colony formation. Moreover, we observed that miR-128 expression inversely correlated with PFKL mRNA levels in clinic lung cancer samples and that increased PFKL expression predicted poor overall survival in lung cancer patients. Mechanistically, we showed that miR-128 regulates PFKL via a feedback loop that involves inhibition of the AKT signaling pathway. Together, our results suggest that miR-128 acts as a metabolic regulator in lung cancer cells that may be therapeutically exploited. PMID:27186417

  15. PFKL/miR-128 axis regulates glycolysis by inhibiting AKT phosphorylation and predicts poor survival in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Li, Jingqiu; Le, Yanping; Zhou, Chengwei; Zhang, Shun; Gong, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) affect cancer cell glucose metabolism by targeting mRNAs of diverse enzymes that have been implicated in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolytic pathways. However, the mechanisms that underlie miRNA-mediated regulation of phosphofructokinase (PFK), a key rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that miR-128 directly targets PFK liver type (PFKL) in lung cancer cells and regulates endogenous expression of PFKL at both the mRNA and protein levels. In line with this, overexpression of miR-128 decreased glucose uptake and lactate production, as well as increased cellular ATP content. Interestingly, knockdown of miR-128 was shown to promote lung cancer cell growth and colony formation. Moreover, we observed that miR-128 expression inversely correlated with PFKL mRNA levels in clinic lung cancer samples and that increased PFKL expression predicted poor overall survival in lung cancer patients. Mechanistically, we showed that miR-128 regulates PFKL via a feedback loop that involves inhibition of the AKT signaling pathway. Together, our results suggest that miR-128 acts as a metabolic regulator in lung cancer cells that may be therapeutically exploited. PMID:27186417

  16. Up-Regulation of Long Non-Coding RNA AB073614 Predicts a Poor Prognosis in Patients with Glioma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Lv, Qiao-Li; Chen, Shu-Hui; Sun, Bao; Qu, Qiang; Cheng, Lin; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Fan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been found in human diseases, especially in cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that dysregulated lncRNAs are implicated in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. LncRNA AB073614 characterized as a new candidate lncRNA promotes the development of ovarian cancer. However, the role of lncRNA AB073614 in human gliomas remains unknown. The expression of AB073614 was detected in 65 glioma tissues and 13 normal brain tissues by qRT-PCR, showing that lncRNA AB073614 expression was significantly up-regulated in cancerous tissues compared with normal brain tissues (p < 0.001), and it was positively correlated with tumor grade (I-II grades vs. III-IV grades, p = 0.013) in glioma patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that increased AB073614 expression contributed to poor overall survival (HR (hazard ratio) = 1.952, 95%CI: 1.202-3.940, p = 0.0129). Further, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated that lncRNA AB073614 overexpression was an unfavorable prognostic factor in gliomas (HR = 1.997, 95%CI: 1.135-3.514, p = 0.016), regardless of the tumor grade (I-II grades vs. III-IV grades, HR = 1.902, 95%CI: 1.066-3.391, p = 0.029). Finally, after adjustment with age, sex, tumor grade and tumor location, multivariate Cox regression analysis suggested that both highly expressed lncRNA AB073614 (HR = 2.606, 95%CI: 1.408-4.824, p = 0.002) and high tumor grade (III-IV grades, HR = 2.720, 95%CI: 1.401-5.282, p = 0.003) could be considered independent poor prognostic indicators for glioma patients. In conclusion, our study suggested that increased lncRNA AB073614 expression may be identified as a poor prognostic biomarker in gliomas. PMID:27104549

  17. Up-regulation of CHAF1A, a poor prognostic factor, facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zehua; Cui, Feifei; Yu, Fudong; Peng, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Dawei; Lu, Su; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We identified that CHAF1A was up-regulated in colon tumor mucosa in TMA. • The expression pattern of CHAF1A was validated with qPCR and western-blot. • CHAF1A overexpression is an independent indicator for poor colon cancer survival. • CHAF1A facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Deregulation of chromatin assembly factor 1, p150 subunit A (CHAF1A) has recently been reported to be involved in the development of some cancer types. In this study, we identified that the frequency of positive CHAF1A staining in primary tumor mucosa (45.8%, 93 of 203 samples) was significantly elevated compared to that in paired normal mucosa (18.7%, 38 of 203 samples). The increased expression was strongly associated with cancer stage, tumor invasion, and histological grade. The five-year survival rate of patients with CHAF1A-positive tumors was remarkably lower than that of patients with CHAF1A-negative tumors. Colon cancer cells with CHAF1A knockdown exhibited decreased cell growth index, reduction in colony formation ability, elevated cell apoptosis rate as well as impaired colon tumorigenicity in nude mice. Hence, CHAF1A upregulation functions as a poor prognostic indicator of colon cancer, potentially contributing to its progression by mediating cancer cell proliferation.

  18. PDK-1 regulates lactate production in hypoxia and is associated with poor prognosis in head and neck squamous cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wigfield, S M; Winter, S C; Giatromanolaki, A; Taylor, J; Koukourakis, M L; Harris, A L

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe the expression and function of a HIF-1-regulated protein pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK-1) in head and neck squamous cancer (HNSCC). Using RNAi to downregulate hypoxia-inducible PDK-1, we found that lactate and pyruvate excretion after 16–48 h of hypoxia was suppressed to normoxic levels. This indicates that PDK-1 plays an important role in maintaining glycolysis. Knockdown had no effect on proliferation or survival under hypoxia. The immunohistochemical expression of PDK-1 was assessed in 140 cases of HNSCC. PDK-1 expression was not expressed in normal tissues but was upregulated in HNSCC and found to be predominantly cytoplasmic with occasional strong focal nuclear expression. It was strongly related to poor outcome (P=0.005 split by median). These results indicate that HIF regulation of PDK-1 has a key role in maintaining lactate production in human cancer and that the investigation of PDK-1 inhibitors should be investigated for antitumour effects. PMID:18542064

  19. Smoking and Secondhand Smoke Exposure at Home Were Associated with Poor Perceived Family Well-Being: Findings of FAMILY Project

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Man Ping; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Wan, Alice; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the associations of cigarette smoking and secondhand (SHS) exposure at home with family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted among 3043 randomly selected adults (response rate 70%) in 2010 and 2012 to monitor family health information and tobacco use in Hong Kong. Family well-being was measured using three questions of perceived family harmony, happiness and health (3Hs) with responses ranging from 0–10 and a higher score indicating better family well-being. Smoking status, nicotine dependence, quitting behaviours and SHS exposure at home were recorded. Multiple linear regressions were used to calculate β-coefficients for individual family 3Hs component and an overall composite score representing family well-being. Results Compared with never smokers, current smokers reported lower levels of family harmony (adjusted β = -0.15, 95% CI: -0.35 to -0.10), happiness (adjusted β = -0.12, 95% CI: -0.28 to -0.02), health (adjusted β = -0.15, 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.03) and overall family well-being (adjusted β = -0.17, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.06). Quit attempt and intention to quit were not associated with family well-being. SHS exposure at home was associated with lower levels of family harmony (adjusted β = -0.17, 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.07), happiness (adjusted β = -0.19, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.08), health (adjusted β = -0.13, 95% CI: -0.26 to -0.03) and family well-being (adjusted β = -0.19, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.09). Conclusions Smoking and SHS exposure at home were associated with the lower levels of perceived family well-being. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the results. PMID:27560663

  20. Increased Expression of SETD7 Promotes Cell Proliferation by Regulating Cell Cycle and Indicates Poor Prognosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiewei; Yu, Chaoqin; He, Miaoxia; Cai, Zailong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of SET domain containing 7 (SETD7) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and determine whether SETD7 can be used as a predictor of overall survival in HCC patients. Methods mRNAs and proteins of SETD7 and related genes in HCC tumor samples and paired adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues (ANLTs) (n = 20) or culture cells were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation and apoptosis with SETD7 knockdown SMMC-7721 cells or SETD7 overexpressed HepG2 cells were analyzed by CCK8 assay or flow cytometry. Gene expression alterations in SETD7 knockdown of SMMC-7721 cells were determined by digital gene expression (DGE) profiling. Defined data on patients (n = 225) with HCC were retrieved for the further study. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were performed using paraffin tissues with tumor and ANLTs. SETD7 and related proteins were determined by TMAs immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were conducted to associate SETD7 expression with tumor features and patient outcomes, as well as related proteins expression. Results SETD7 expression was significantly higher in HCC tumor tissues than in ANLTs. SETD7 overexpression in vitro can promote HepG2 cell proliferation, whereas SETD7 knockdown can inhibit SMMC-7721 cell proliferation by regulating the cell cycle. SETD7 expression was significantly correlated with five genes expression. Increased SETD7 is associated with metastasis, recurrence, large tumor size, and poor tumor differentiation, and indicates poor prognosis in HCC patients. Conclusions SETD7 plays a critical role in HCC, and its immunohistochemistry signature provides potential clinical significance for personalized prediction of HCC prognosis. PMID:27183310

  1. Up-Regulation of Long Non-Coding RNA AB073614 Predicts a Poor Prognosis in Patients with Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lei; Lv, Qiao-Li; Chen, Shu-Hui; Sun, Bao; Qu, Qiang; Cheng, Lin; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Fan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been found in human diseases, especially in cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that dysregulated lncRNAs are implicated in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. LncRNA AB073614 characterized as a new candidate lncRNA promotes the development of ovarian cancer. However, the role of lncRNA AB073614 in human gliomas remains unknown. The expression of AB073614 was detected in 65 glioma tissues and 13 normal brain tissues by qRT-PCR, showing that lncRNA AB073614 expression was significantly up-regulated in cancerous tissues compared with normal brain tissues (p < 0.001), and it was positively correlated with tumor grade (I–II grades vs. III–IV grades, p = 0.013) in glioma patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that increased AB073614 expression contributed to poor overall survival (HR (hazard ratio) = 1.952, 95%CI: 1.202–3.940, p = 0.0129). Further, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated that lncRNA AB073614 overexpression was an unfavorable prognostic factor in gliomas (HR = 1.997, 95%CI: 1.135–3.514, p = 0.016), regardless of the tumor grade (I–II grades vs. III–IV grades, HR = 1.902, 95%CI: 1.066–3.391, p = 0.029). Finally, after adjustment with age, sex, tumor grade and tumor location, multivariate Cox regression analysis suggested that both highly expressed lncRNA AB073614 (HR = 2.606, 95%CI: 1.408–4.824, p = 0.002) and high tumor grade (III–IV grades, HR = 2.720, 95%CI: 1.401–5.282, p = 0.003) could be considered independent poor prognostic indicators for glioma patients. In conclusion, our study suggested that increased lncRNA AB073614 expression may be identified as a poor prognostic biomarker in gliomas. PMID:27104549

  2. Effectiveness of clopidogrel dose escalation to normalize active metabolite exposure and antiplatelet effects in CYP2C19 poor metabolizers.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, Richard B; Madabushi, Rajnikanth; Zineh, Issam; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Peer, Cody J; Schuck, Robert N; Figg, William Douglas; Shuldiner, Alan R; Pacanowski, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    Carriers of two copies of the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 variant convert less clopidogrel into its active metabolite, resulting in diminished antiplatelet responses and higher cardiovascular event rates. To evaluate whether increasing the daily clopidogrel dose in poor metabolizers (PM) overcomes the effect of the CYP2C19 * 2 variant, we enrolled 18 healthy participants in a genotype-stratified, multi-dose, three-period, fixed-sequence crossover study. Six participants with the *1/*1 extensive (EM), *1/*2 intermediate (IM), and *2/*2 poor metabolizer genotypes each received 75 mg, 150 mg, and 300 mg each for 8 days. In each period, maximal platelet aggregation 4 hours post-dose (MPA4) and active metabolite area under the curve (AUC) differed among genotype groups (P < .05 for all). At day 8, PMs needed 300 mg daily and IMs needed 150 mg daily to attain a similar MPA4 as EMs on the 75 mg dose (32.6%, 33.2%, 31.3%, respectively). Similarly, PMs needed 300 mg daily to achieve active metabolite concentrations that were similar to EMs on 75 mg (AUC 37.7 and 33.5 ng h/mL, respectively). These results suggest that quadrupling the usual clopidogrel dose might be necessary to overcome the effect of poor CYP2C19 metabolism. PMID:24710841

  3. High expression of myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 predicts poor prognosis for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after curative hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunwei; Xiang, Hua; Si, Huiyuan; Guo, Dandan; Sun, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Myofibrillogenesis regulator (MR-1) is overexpressed in human cancer cells and plays an essential role in cancer cell growth. However, its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of MR-1 expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in patients with HCC. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to detect MR-1 mRNA levels in tissues samples from 120 HCC patients. Results showed that MR-1 expression was significantly higher in HCC tissues when compared with matched adjacent normal tissues (P=0.004). In HCC cancerous tissues, it was also significantly associated with tumor size (P=0.024) and serum AFP level (P=0.003). Moreover, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that HCC patients with high MR-1 expression had shorter overall survival time than those with low MR-1 expression (P=0.009). When analyzed with a multivariate Cox regression model, MR-1 was identified as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Furthermore, when combined with serum AFP level, the median survival time significantly differed between patients with baseline high serum AFP and high MR-1 expression levels and those with normal AFP and low MR-1 levels (P=0.007). Taken together, our results suggest that high expression of MR-1 is involved in HCC progression and could be a novel biomarker of poor prognosis in patients with HCC. PMID:26823810

  4. Proactive Regulation Reduces Asbestos Exposures in Lake County, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, D.; Ley, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Lake County Air Quality Management District adopted its rule for Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) in 1996 with the goal of preventing impacts and exposures through education, proactive project design, and common sense. Utilizing detailed GIS mapping and streamlined mitigation measures, the District maintains an effective program to reduce the hazard of NOA in our community. Measures for NOA are also incorporated into the County Grading Ordinance, and most small projects fall under those rules. Larger projects require a Serpentine Dust Control Plan from the District that provides clear mitigation measures, with the focus primarily on dust prevention. This cooperative approach results in a comprehensive effort to minimize potential health hazards from naturally occurring asbestos. Compliance is more easily achieved when workers are informed of the hazards and potential for exposure, and the rules/mitigation measures are clear and simple. Informed individuals generally take prompt corrective action to protect themself and those around them from the potential for breathing asbestos-containing dust. This proactive program results in improved community health by preventing exposure to asbestos.

  5. Childhood Trauma Exposure Disrupts the Automatic Regulation of Emotional Processing

    PubMed Central

    Marusak, Hilary A; Martin, Kayla R; Etkin, Amit; Thomason, Moriah E

    2015-01-01

    Early-life trauma is one of the strongest risk factors for later emotional psychopathology. Although research in adults highlights that childhood trauma predicts deficits in emotion regulation that persist decades later, it is unknown whether neural and behavioral changes that may precipitate illness are evident during formative, developmental years. This study examined whether automatic regulation of emotional conflict is perturbed in a high-risk urban sample of trauma-exposed children and adolescents. A total of 14 trauma-exposed and 16 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched comparison youth underwent functional MRI while performing an emotional conflict task that involved categorizing facial affect while ignoring an overlying emotion word. Engagement of the conflict regulation system was evaluated at neural and behavioral levels. Results showed that trauma-exposed youth failed to dampen dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity and engage amygdala–pregenual cingulate inhibitory circuitry during the regulation of emotional conflict, and were less able to regulate emotional conflict. In addition, trauma-exposed youth showed greater conflict-related amygdala reactivity that was associated with diminished levels of trait reward sensitivity. These data point to a trauma-related deficit in automatic regulation of emotional processing, and increase in sensitivity to emotional conflict in neural systems implicated in threat detection. Aberrant amygdala response to emotional conflict was related to diminished reward sensitivity that is emerging as a critical stress-susceptibility trait that may contribute to the emergence of mental illness during adolescence. These results suggest that deficits in conflict regulation for emotional material may underlie heightened risk for psychopathology in individuals that endure early-life trauma. PMID:25413183

  6. Childhood trauma exposure disrupts the automatic regulation of emotional processing.

    PubMed

    Marusak, Hilary A; Martin, Kayla R; Etkin, Amit; Thomason, Moriah E

    2015-04-01

    Early-life trauma is one of the strongest risk factors for later emotional psychopathology. Although research in adults highlights that childhood trauma predicts deficits in emotion regulation that persist decades later, it is unknown whether neural and behavioral changes that may precipitate illness are evident during formative, developmental years. This study examined whether automatic regulation of emotional conflict is perturbed in a high-risk urban sample of trauma-exposed children and adolescents. A total of 14 trauma-exposed and 16 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched comparison youth underwent functional MRI while performing an emotional conflict task that involved categorizing facial affect while ignoring an overlying emotion word. Engagement of the conflict regulation system was evaluated at neural and behavioral levels. Results showed that trauma-exposed youth failed to dampen dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity and engage amygdala-pregenual cingulate inhibitory circuitry during the regulation of emotional conflict, and were less able to regulate emotional conflict. In addition, trauma-exposed youth showed greater conflict-related amygdala reactivity that was associated with diminished levels of trait reward sensitivity. These data point to a trauma-related deficit in automatic regulation of emotional processing, and increase in sensitivity to emotional conflict in neural systems implicated in threat detection. Aberrant amygdala response to emotional conflict was related to diminished reward sensitivity that is emerging as a critical stress-susceptibility trait that may contribute to the emergence of mental illness during adolescence. These results suggest that deficits in conflict regulation for emotional material may underlie heightened risk for psychopathology in individuals that endure early-life trauma. PMID:25413183

  7. Relating climate change policy to poverty policy: assessing the global exposure of the poor to floods and droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsemius, Hessel; Jongman, Brenden; Veldkamp, Ted; Hallegatte, Stéphane; Bangalore, Mook; Ward, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Prior to the COP21 conference in Paris this year, the World Bank published a report called "Shockwaves - Managing the Impacts of Climate Change on Poverty". The report flagged that ending poverty and stabilizing climate change should be jointly tackled and that without a good joint policy, a further 100 million people could become trapped in poverty by 2050. As part of the "Shockwaves" report, we investigated whether low-income households are disproportionately overrepresented in hazard-prone areas compared to households with higher income. Furthermore, the hazardous conditions under which poor households are exposed to now may become worse due to climate change with resulting increases in intensity and frequency of floods and droughts. We also show how the amount of affected people to these natural hazards change in the future if nothing is done. We use recent advances in the global spatial modeling of flood and drought hazard and a large sample of household surveys containing asset and income data to explore the relationships.

  8. Rat- and human-based risk estimates of lung cancer from occupational exposure to poorly-soluble particles: A quantitative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuempel, E. D.; Smith, R. J.; Dankovic, D. A.; Stayner, L. T.

    2009-02-01

    In risk assessment there is a need for quantitative evaluation of the capability of animal models to predict disease risks in humans. In this paper, we compare the rat- and human-based excess risk estimates for lung cancer from working lifetime exposures to inhaled poorly-soluble particles. The particles evaluated include those for which long-term dose-response data are available in both species, i.e., coal dust, carbon black, titanium dioxide, silica, and diesel exhaust particulate. The excess risk estimates derived from the rat data were generally lower than those derived from the human studies, and none of the rat- and human-based risk estimates were significantly different (all p-values>0.05). Residual uncertainty in whether the rat-based risk estimates would over- or under-predict the true excess risks of lung cancer from inhaled poorly-soluble particles in humans is due in part to the low power of the available human studies, limited particle size exposure data for humans, and ambiguity about the best animal models and extrapolation methods.

  9. Warm, Humid, and High Sun Exposure Climates are Associated with Poorly Controlled Eczema: PEER (Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry) Cohort, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Sargen, Michael R.; Hoffstad, Ole; Margolis, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of children experiencing eczema flares during winter and summer months along with global variation in eczema prevalence has fueled speculation that climate may modulate disease activity. The aim of this study was to determine if long-term weather patterns affect the severity and persistence of eczema symptoms in children. We performed a prospective cohort study of U.S. children (N=5,595) enrolled in PEER (Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry) between 2004 and 2012 to evaluate the effect of climate (daily temperature, daily sun exposure, daily humidity) on the severity of eczema symptoms. Odds ratios were calculated for the patient evaluated outcome of disease control. Multivariate logistic regression modeling adjusting for gender, race, income, and topical medication use demonstrated that higher temperature (OR=0·90, 95% CI: 0·87–0·93, p<0·001) and increased sun exposure (OR=0·93, 95% CI: 0·89–0·98, p=0·009) were associated with poorly controlled eczema. Higher humidity (OR=0·90, 95% CI: 0·812–0.997, p=0·04) was also associated with poorly controlled disease, but the statistical significance of this association was lost in our multivariate analysis (p=0.44). PMID:23774527

  10. Effects of exposure to television advertising for energy-dense/nutrient-poor food on children's food intake and obesity in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bora; Kim, Hyogyoo; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Jihyun; Chung, Sang-Jin

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of television food advertising on participant food intake and risk of obesity. A total of 2419 children aged 11-13 years were selected from 118 elementary schools in South Korea. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire with questions about height, weight, television viewing times, food preferences, and food intakes. To estimate actual exposure to food advertising, we asked participants to specify the times at which they usually watched television. We then collected data on the various types of food advertisement broadcast on five different television networks during those viewing times over the course of the previous 7 months. The amount of television watched and exposure to energy-dense/nutrient-poor (EDNP) food advertising were associated with an increased risk of being overweight or obese. Exposure to television advertising for EDNP food was also significantly associated with higher EDNP food preference and intake and lower fruit and vegetable intake. However, these relationships disappeared for all foods after adjusting for the overall amount of television watched. Although it was not possible to conclude that exposure to television advertising for EDNP food was associated with an increased risk of obesity, preference for EDNP foods, or overall food intake due to the strong comprehensive effects of television viewing time, there was a reason to believe the evidence of the effects of advertising in this study. Future longitudinal studies are needed to determine the exclusive effects of exposure to television advertising for EDNP food. PMID:24996594

  11. ALARA and de minimis concepts in regulation of personnel exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The ALARA process should not be limited by a de minimis level on either collective or individual dose, but should be limited or defined by an acceptable discount-rate on future costs and effects, and a monetary value for detriment, to be used in cost-effectiveness or cost-benefit calculations at dose levels well below the regulatory limits. This approach would provide the desired benefit of simplifying the decision process, it makes it more cost effective, and would avoid the inconsistencies of limits on only one of the four parameters of importance in the optimization process. These are average individual effective dose equivalent rate, number of individuals to be included in the summation, years of exposure, and costs, which include costs of analysis to reduce the exposure. This approach emphasizes that these doses to an individual may not be considered trivial by society when given to a very large population, especially if they could easily be avoided. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Influence of environmental exposure on human epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Carmen J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental toxicants can alter epigenetic regulatory features such as DNA methylation and microRNA expression. As the sensitivity of epigenomic regulatory features may be greatest during the in utero period, when critical windows are narrow, and when epigenomic profiles are being set, this review will highlight research focused on that period. I will focus on work in human populations, where the impact of environmental toxicants in utero, including cigarette smoke and toxic trace metals such as arsenic, mercury and manganese, on genome-wide, gene-specific DNA methylation has been assessed. In particular, arsenic is highlighted, as this metalloid has been the focus of a number of studies and its detoxification mechanisms are well understood. Importantly, the tissues and cells being examined must be considered in context in order to interpret the findings of these studies. For example, by studying the placenta, it is possible to identify potential epigenetic adaptations of key genes and pathways that may alter the developmental course in line with the developmental origins of health and disease paradigm. Alternatively, studies of newborn cord blood can be used to examine how environmental exposure in utero can impact the composition of cells within the peripheral blood, leading to immunological effects of exposure. The results suggest that in humans, like other vertebrates, there is a susceptibility for epigenomic alteration by the environment during intrauterine development, and this may represent a mechanism of plasticity of the organism in response to its environment as well as a mechanism through which long-term health consequences can be shaped. PMID:25568453

  13. Trauma exposure interacts with impulsivity in predicting emotion regulation and depressive mood

    PubMed Central

    Ceschi, Grazia; Billieux, Joël; Hearn, Melissa; Fürst, Guillaume; Van der Linden, Martial

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic exposure may modulate the expression of impulsive behavioral dispositions and change the implementation of emotion regulation strategies associated with depressive mood. Past studies resulted in only limited comprehension of these relationships, especially because they failed to consider impulsivity as a multifactorial construct. Objective Based on Whiteside and Lynam's multidimensional model that identifies four distinct dispositional facets of impulsive-like behaviors, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking (UPPS), the current study used a sample of community volunteers to investigate whether an interaction exists between impulsivity facets and lifetime trauma exposure in predicting cognitive emotion regulation and depressive mood. Methods Ninety-three adults completed questionnaires measuring lifetime trauma exposure, impulsivity, cognitive emotion regulation, and depressive mood. Results Results showed that trauma-exposed participants with a strong disposition toward urgency (predisposition to act rashly in intense emotional contexts) tended to use fewer appropriate cognitive emotion regulation strategies than other individuals. Unexpectedly, participants lacking in perseverance (predisposition to have difficulties concentrating on demanding tasks) used more appropriate emotion regulation strategies if they had experienced traumatic events during their life than if they had not. Emotion regulation mediated the path between these two impulsivity facets and depressive mood. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that impulsivity has a differential impact on emotion regulation and depressive mood depending on lifetime exposure to environmental factors, especially traumatic events. PMID:25317255

  14. Postnatal Sulfur Dioxide Exposure Reversibly Alters Parasympathetic Regulation of Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Woerman, Amanda L.; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure disrupts parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Here, we examine the relative risks of prenatal versus postnatal exposure to the air pollutant, and the reversibility of the cardiovascular effects. Two groups of animals were used for this study. For prenatal exposure, pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide for 1 hour daily throughout gestation, and with their pups upon birth to medical-grade air through 6 days postnatal. For postnatal exposure, dams were exposed to air, and upon delivery along with their pups to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide through postnatal day 6. Electrocardiograms were recorded from pups on postnatal day 5 to examine changes in heart rate. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons upon sulfur dioxide exposure. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure diminished glutamatergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by 40.9% and increased heart rate, whereas prenatal exposure altered neither of these properties. When postnatal exposure concluded on postnatal day 5, excitatory neurotransmission remained decreased through day 6, and returned to basal levels by day 7. Electrocardiograms showed that heart rate remained elevated through day 6 and recovered by day 7. Upon activation of the parasympathetic diving reflex, the response was significantly blunted by postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure through day 7 but recovered by day 8. Postnatal, but not prenatal, exposure to sulfur dioxide can disrupt parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Neonates can recover from these effects within 2–3 days of discontinued exposure. PMID:23774227

  15. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure reversibly alters parasympathetic regulation of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Woerman, Amanda L; Mendelowitz, David

    2013-08-01

    Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure disrupts parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Here, we examine the relative risks of prenatal versus postnatal exposure to the air pollutant and the reversibility of the cardiovascular effects. Two groups of animals were used for this study. For prenatal exposure, pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide for 1 hour daily throughout gestation and with their pups after birth to medical-grade air through 6 days postnatal. For postnatal exposure, dams were exposed to air, and after delivery along with their pups to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide through postnatal day 6. ECGs were recorded from pups on postnatal day 5 to examine changes in heart rate. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus on sulfur dioxide exposure. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure diminished glutamatergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by 40.9% and increased heart rate, whereas prenatal exposure altered neither of these properties. When postnatal exposure concluded on postnatal day 5, excitatory neurotransmission remained decreased through day 6 and returned to basal levels by day 7. ECGs showed that heart rate remained elevated through day 6 and recovered by day 7. On activation of the parasympathetic diving reflex, the response was significantly blunted by postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure through day 7 but recovered by day 8. Postnatal, but not prenatal, exposure to sulfur dioxide can disrupt parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Neonates can recover from these effects within 2 to 3 days of discontinued exposure. PMID:23774227

  16. Prenatal nicotine exposure induces poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and the intrauterine programming mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tie, Kai; Tan, Yang; Deng, Yu; Li, Jing; Ni, Qubo; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) induces skeletal growth retardation and dyslipidemia in offspring displaying intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Cholesterol accumulation resulting from cholesterol efflux dysfunction may reduce the quality of articular cartilage through fetal programming. This study evaluated the quality of articular cartilage of female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and explored the mechanisms using a rat IUGR model established by the administration of 2.0mg/kg/d of subcutaneous nicotine from gestational days 11-20. The results demonstrated an increased OARSI (Osteoarthritis Research Society International) score and total cholesterol content, decreased serum corticosterone, and increased IGF1 and dyslipidemia with catch-up growth in PNE adult offspring. Cartilage matrix, IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway expression were reduced in PNE fetuses and adult offspring. Therefore, PNE induced poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet via a dual programming mechanism. PMID:26769161

  17. The Association between Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Physiological Regulation at 13 Months of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuetze, Pamela; Eiden, Rina D.; Danielewicz, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the association between prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) and autonomic regulation at 13 months of age. Methods: Measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were obtained from 156 (79 exposed, and 77 nonexposed) infants during baseline and during tasks designed to elicit positive (PA) and negative affect (NA).…

  18. Family Interactions, Exposure to Violence, and Emotion Regulation: Perceptions of Children and Early Adolescents at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houltberg, Benjamin J.; Henry, Carolyn S.; Morris, Amanda Sheffield

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the protective nature of youth reports of family interactions in relation to perceived exposure to violence and anger regulation in 84 children and early adolescents (mean age of 10.5; 7-15 years old) primarily from ethnic minority groups and living in high-risk communities in a large southwestern city. Path analysis and…

  19. Determining the impact of prenatal tobacco exposure on self-regulation at 6 months.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Sandra A; Fang, Hua; Johnson, Craig; James, Karen E; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2014-06-01

    Our goal in the present study was to examine the effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on infant self-regulation, exploring birth weight as a mediator and sex as a moderator of risk. A prospective sample of 218 infants was assessed at 6 months of age. Infants completed a battery of tasks assessing working memory/inhibition, attention, and emotional reactivity and regulation. Propensity scores were used to statistically control for confounding risk factors associated with maternal smoking during pregnancy. After prenatal and postnatal confounds were controlled, prenatal tobacco exposure was related to reactivity to frustration and control of attention during stimulus encoding. Birth weight did not mediate the effect of prenatal exposure but was independently related to reactivity and working memory/inhibition. The effect of tobacco exposure was not moderated by sex. PMID:24512173

  20. The effects of prolonged exposure and sertraline on emotion regulation in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Jerud, Alissa B; Pruitt, Larry D; Zoellner, Lori A; Feeny, Norah C

    2016-02-01

    The effects of current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) interventions on emotion regulation are relatively unknown. Many conceptualize PTSD as a disorder of emotion dysregulation, and clinicians often fear that emotion regulation impairments will not change with stand-alone PTSD treatments, particularly for individuals with pre-existing emotion regulation difficulties. The present study examined changes in emotion regulation (expressive suppression, cognitive reappraisal, negative mood regulation) with prolonged exposure (PE) therapy or sertraline, specifically examining whether those with higher pre-existing emotion regulation difficulties improved over treatment on these indices. Individuals with chronic PTSD (N = 200) received 10 weeks of PE or sertraline and were followed through 6-month follow-up. Emotion regulation was assessed at pre- and post-treatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Individuals with poorer initial emotion regulation showed greater improvement on all indices of emotion regulation, regardless of which treatment they received. Changes occurred during active treatment and were maintained over follow-up. These findings have both theoretical and clinical implications, arguing that emotion regulation is not impaired across all individuals with PTSD and that PE and sertraline effectively address emotion regulation difficulties. PMID:26723004

  1. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B.; Pronk, Tessa E.; Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den; Ven, Leo T.M. van der; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  2. Increased synthesis of folate transporters regulates folate transport in conditions of ethanol exposure and folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Shilpa; More, Deepti; Rahat, Beenish; Khanduja, Krishan Lal; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption and dietary folate inadequacy are the main contributors leading to folate deficiency (FD). The present study was planned to study regulation of folate transport in conditions of FD and ethanol exposure in human embryonic kidney cell line. Also, the reversible nature of effects mediated by ethanol exposure and FD was determined by folate repletion and ethanol removal. For ethanol treatment, HEK293 cells were grown in medium containing 100 mM ethanol, and after treatment, one group of cells was shifted on medium that was free from ethanol. For FD treatment, cells were grown in folate-deficient medium followed by shifting of one group of cells on folate containing medium. FD as well as ethanol exposure resulted in an increase in folate uptake which was due to an increase in expression of folate transporters, i.e., reduced folate carrier, proton-coupled folate transporter, and folate receptor, both at the mRNA and protein level. The effects mediated by ethanol exposure and FD were reversible on removal of treatment. Promoter region methylation of folate transporters remained unaffected after FD and ethanol exposure. As far as transcription rate of folate transporters is concerned, an increase in rate of synthesis was observed in both ethanol exposure and FD conditions. Additionally, mRNA life of folate transporters was observed to be reduced by FD. An increased expression of folate transporters under ethanol exposure and FD conditions can be attributed to enhanced rate of synthesis of folate transporters. PMID:26433955

  3. Effect of low pH exposure on Na(+) regulation in two cichlid fish species of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rafael M; Ferreira, Marcio S; Wood, Chris M; Val, Adalberto L

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of acute exposure to low pH on Na(+) regulation in two Amazon cichlids collected from natural ion-poor "blackwaters", angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) and discus (Symphysodon discus). Na(+) uptake kinetic parameters, unidirectional Na(+) fluxes, and net Cl(-) fluxes were determined at pH6.0 and 3.6. At pH6.0, both species presented low unidirectional Na(+) flux rates, with kinetics showing a relatively low affinity for Na(+) (angelfish Km=79, discus Km=268μmolL(-1)), with similar maximum transport capacities (Jmax~535nmolg(-1)h(-1)). Overall, there appeared to be high sensitivity to inhibition by low pH, yet low intrinsic branchial permeability limiting diffusive ion effluxes, resulting in relatively low net loss rates of Na(+), the same strategy as seen previously in other blackwater cichlids, and very different from the strategy of blackwater characids. At low pH, Na(+) uptake in angelfish was inhibited competitively (increased Km=166μmolL(-1)) and non-competitively (decreased Jmax=106nmolg(-1)h(-1)), whereas in discus, only a decrease in Jmax (112nmolg(-1)h(-1)) was statistically significant. An acute reduction in H(+)-ATPase activity, but not in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, in the gills of angelfish suggests a possible mechanism for this non-competitive inhibition at low pH. Discus fish were more tolerant to low pH than angelfish, as seen by lesser effects of exposure to pH3.6 on unidirectional Na(+) uptake and efflux rates and net Na(+) and Cl(-) loss rates. Overall, discus are better than angelfish in maintaining ionic balance under acidic, ion-poor conditions. PMID:23911980

  4. Inhibition of miR-146b expression increases radioiodine-sensitivity in poorly differential thyroid carcinoma via positively regulating NIS expression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Luchuan; Lv, Bin; Chen, Bo; Guan, Ming; Sun, Yongfeng; Li, Haipeng; Zhang, Binbin; Ding, Changyuan; He, Shan; Zeng, Qingdong

    2015-07-10

    Dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) with the loss of radioiodine uptake (RAIU) is often observed in clinical practice under radioiodine therapy, indicating the challenge for poor prognosis. MicroRNA (miRNA) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in many diseases; yet, the role of miRNAs in RAIU has not been generally investigated. Based on recent studies about miRNA expression in papillary or follicular thyroid carcinomas, the expression profiles of several thyroid relative miRNAs were investigated in one DTC cell line, derived from normal DTC cells by radioiodine treatment. The top candidate miR-146b, with the most significant overexpression profiles in dedifferentiated cells, was picked up. Further research found that miR-146b could be negatively regulated by histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in normal cells, indicating the correlation between miR-146b and Na{sup +}/I{sup −} symporter (NIS)-mediated RAIU. Fortunately, it was confirmed that miR-146b could regulate NIS expression/activity; what is more important, miR-146b interference would contribute to the recovery of radioiodine-sensitivity in dedifferentiated cells via positively regulating NIS. In the present study, it was concluded that NIS-mediated RAIU could be modulated by miR-146b; accordingly, miR-146b might serve as one of targets to enhance efficacy of radioactive therapy against poorly differential thyroid carcinoma (PDTC). - Highlights: • Significant upregulated miR-146b was picked up from thyroid relative miRNAs in DTC. • MiR-146b was negatively regulated by HDAC3 in normal thyroid carcinoma cells. • NIS activity and expression could be regulated by miR-146b in thyroid carcinoma. • MiR-146b inhibition could recover the decreased radioiodine-sensitivity of DTC cells.

  5. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure during pregnancy disturbs temporal sex determination regulation in mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongan; Liu, Wei; Yang, Qing; Yu, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhou

    2015-10-01

    Animal researches and clinical studies have supported the relevance between phthalates exposure and testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). These disorders may comprise common origin in fetal life, especially during sex determination and differentiation, where the mechanism remains unclear. The present study evaluated the disturbances in gene regulatory networks of sex determination in fetal mouse by in utero Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) exposure. Temporal expression of key sex determination genes were examined during the critical narrow time window, using whole-mount in situ hybridization and quantitative-PCR. DEHP exposure resulted in significant reduction in mRNA of Sry during sex determination from gestation day (GD) 11.0 to 11.5 in male fetal mice, and the increasing of Sry expression to threshold level on GD 11.5 was delayed. Meanwhile, Gadd45g and Gata4, the upstream genes of Sry, and downstream gene Sox9 were also significantly downregulated in expression. In fetal females, the expression of Wnt4 and beta-catenin were up-regulated by DEHP exposure. Taken together, the results suggest that the potential mechanism of gonadal development disorder by DEHP may origin from repression of important male sex determination signaling pathway, involving Gadd45g → Gata4 → Sry → Sox9. The results would promote a better understanding of the association between phthalate esters (PAEs) exposure and the reductive disorder. PMID:26219507

  6. Down-regulation of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) is associated with poor prognosis in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinyang; Liu, Sulai; Yu, Qiuxia; Lin, Yang; Bi, Yunke; Wang, Yi; An, Ruihua

    2013-06-01

    Human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) molecules are transmembrane glycoproteins that have been reported to be down-regulated in multiple types of human malignancies, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). However, only one study has investigated its prognostic value in CCRCC. In the present study, HLA-I protein expression was analyzed in 120 archived, paraffin-embedded CCRCC samples and 10 adjacent normal tissues using immunohistochemistry. The correlation between HLA-I expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated by the χ(2) test. Patients' overall survival was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. HLA-I down-regulation was observed in 38.3% (46/120) of renal tumor samples, but only in 10% (1/10) of adjacent normal tissues. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation of HLA-I expression with TNM stage, lymph node metastasis, and Fuhrman grade. Patients with tumors displaying down-regulation of HLA-I showed significantly shorter overall survival (P=0.021, log-rank test). More importantly, multivariate analysis indicated that down-regulation of HLA-I was an independent prognostic factor for CCRCC patients (P=0.033). Overall, our data suggest that HLA-I down-regulation is associated with tumor progression and a poor prognosis in CCRCC patients, and emphasize the importance of HLA-I in natural and therapeutic immune surveillance of patients with CCRCC. PMID:23245688

  7. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p < 0.001) and associated with CD163+ macrophages (p < 0.0001), poorer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.021) and significantly increased numbers of TGF-α+ cells. While G-CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  8. Overexpression of SPARC correlates with poor prognosis in patients with cervical carcinoma and regulates cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    SHI, DEHUAN; JIANG, KAN; FU, YING; FANG, RUI; LIU, XI; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with the progression of numerous types of cancer. However, the role of SPARC in the progression of cervical cancer has not yet been adequately elucidated. In the current study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry were employed to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression of SPARC in normal cervical tissue, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. In addition, three epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers (E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin) were detected by immunohistochemistry in the same specimens, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was conducted to detect the serum levels of SPARC in patients with cervical neoplasia. In highly invasive subclones of human cervical carcinoma cells, HeLa-1 and SiHa-1, lentiviral transfections were performed and RT-qPCR and western blot were used to investigate the effects of downregulated EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 on the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin. The results revealed that, in cervical carcinoma tissue, SPARC expression was significantly upregulated in a manner that positively correlated with N-cadherin and vimentin expression, and negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression. SPARC overexpression and high serum levels were significantly associated with the progression of cervical cancer and adverse prognosis of cervical cancer patients. Downregulation of SPARC can markedly reduce the expression of N-cadherin and vimentin and increase the expression of E-cadherin. Thus, overexpression of SPARC is significantly associated with poor prognostic clinicopathological characteristics in cervical carcinoma, and may be important in EMT. The results of the current study suggest that SPARC may be a potential therapeutic option for individuals diagnosed with cervical carcinoma. PMID:27123099

  9. Low Expression of DYRK2 (Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulated Kinase 2) Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haiyan; Hu, Kaishun; Wu, Wenjing; Li, Yu; Tian, Huan; Chu, Zhonghua; Koeffler, H Phillip; Yin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) is a member of dual-specificity kinase family, which could phosphorylate both Ser/Thr and Tyr substrates. The role of DYRK2 in human cancer remains controversial. For example, overexpression of DYRK2 predicts a better survival in human non-small cell lung cancer. In contrast, amplification of DYRK2 gene occurs in esophageal/lung adenocarcinoma, implying the role of DYRK2 as a potential oncogene. However, its clinical role in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been explored. In this study, we analyzed the expression of DYRK2 from Oncomine database and found that DYRK2 level is lower in primary or metastatic CRC compared to adjacent normal colon tissue or non-metastatic CRC, respectively, in 6 colorectal carcinoma data sets. The correlation between DYRK2 expression and clinical outcome in 181 CRC patients was also investigated by real-time PCR and IHC. DYRK2 expression was significantly down-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Functional studies confirmed that DYRK2 inhibited cell invasion and migration in both HCT116 and SW480 cells and functioned as a tumor suppressor in CRC cells. Furthermore, the lower DYRK2 levels were correlated with tumor sites (P = 0.023), advanced clinical stages (P = 0.006) and shorter survival in the advanced clinical stages. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that DYRK2 expression was an independent prognostic factor (P < 0.001). Taking all, we concluded that DYRK2 a novel prognostic biomarker of human colorectal cancer. PMID:27532268

  10. Low Expression of DYRK2 (Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulated Kinase 2) Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenjing; Li, Yu; Tian, Huan; Chu, Zhonghua; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Yin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) is a member of dual-specificity kinase family, which could phosphorylate both Ser/Thr and Tyr substrates. The role of DYRK2 in human cancer remains controversial. For example, overexpression of DYRK2 predicts a better survival in human non-small cell lung cancer. In contrast, amplification of DYRK2 gene occurs in esophageal/lung adenocarcinoma, implying the role of DYRK2 as a potential oncogene. However, its clinical role in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been explored. In this study, we analyzed the expression of DYRK2 from Oncomine database and found that DYRK2 level is lower in primary or metastatic CRC compared to adjacent normal colon tissue or non-metastatic CRC, respectively, in 6 colorectal carcinoma data sets. The correlation between DYRK2 expression and clinical outcome in 181 CRC patients was also investigated by real-time PCR and IHC. DYRK2 expression was significantly down-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Functional studies confirmed that DYRK2 inhibited cell invasion and migration in both HCT116 and SW480 cells and functioned as a tumor suppressor in CRC cells. Furthermore, the lower DYRK2 levels were correlated with tumor sites (P = 0.023), advanced clinical stages (P = 0.006) and shorter survival in the advanced clinical stages. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that DYRK2 expression was an independent prognostic factor (P < 0.001). Taking all, we concluded that DYRK2 a novel prognostic biomarker of human colorectal cancer. PMID:27532268

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors with Tyrosine Kinase Domain Mutations Exhibit Reduced Cbl Association, Poor Ubiquitylation, and Down-regulation but Are Efficiently Internalized

    PubMed Central

    Padrón, David; Sato, Mitsuo; Shay, Jerry W.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Roth, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Some non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase domain mutations require altered signaling through the EGFR for cell survival and are exquisitely sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. EGFR down-regulation was impaired in two NSCLCs with EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutations. The mutant receptors were poorly ubiquitylated and exhibited decreased association with the ubiquitin ligase Cbl. Over-expression of Cbl increased the degradation of EGFR. Treatment with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of the chaperone heat shock protein 90, also increased both wild-type and mutant EGFR degradation without affecting internalization. The down-regulation of the mutant EGFRs was still impaired when they were stably expressed in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, the mutations that altered signaling also decreased the interaction of EGFRs with the mechanisms responsible for endosomal sorting. PMID:17699773

  12. Positive parenting mitigates the effects of poor self-regulation on BMI trajectories from age 4 to 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Lauren E.; Francis, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine whether parenting style moderated the effects of delay of gratification on BMI trajectories from age 4 to 15 years. Methods Longitudinal data were analyzed on 778 children drawn from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Parenting style (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, neglectful) was created from measures of mothers’ sensitivity and expectations for self-control when children were age 4 years. Self-regulation was also measured at 4 years using a well-known delay of gratification protocol. BMI was calculated from measured height and weight at each time point. Mixed modeling was used to test the interaction of parenting styles and ability to delay gratification on BMI trajectories from 4 to 15 years. Results There was a significant interaction effect of parenting and ability to delay on BMI growth from 4 to 15 years for boys. Boys who had authoritarian mothers and failed to delay gratification had a significantly steeper rate of growth in BMI from childhood through adolescence than children in any other parenting x delay group. Conclusions Authoritative and permissive parenting styles were protective against more rapid BMI gains for boys who could not delay gratification. Ability to delay gratification was protective against BMI gains for boys who had parents with authoritarian or neglectful parenting styles. PMID:23977874

  13. Down-regulation of miR-133a as a poor prognosticator in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhou; Li, Jinmei; Chen, Hongming; Mo, Yanli; Ye, Haiyin; Luo, Yiping; Guo, Kangwen; Mai, Zongjiong; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Baoying; Zhou, Yijin; Yang, Zhixiong

    2016-10-15

    miR-133a has been demonstrated to play an important role in tumor progression. The aim of present study was to analyze the correlation between miR-133a expression level and clinicopathologic features and its prognostic significance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The expression of miR-133a in 104 pairs of human lung cancer tissues and adjacent normal lung tissues were analyzed by qRT-PCR. Here we show that miR-133a was down-regulated in NSCLC. The levels of miR-133a were negatively correlated with the status of N classification (N0-N1 vs. N2-N3, P=0.000), clinical stage (I-II vs. III-IV, P=0.010) and MMP-14 expression (High vs. Low, P=0.012). The patients with low miR-133a expression had shorter survival time than those with high miR-133a expression. Multivariate analysis indicated that the level of miR-133a expression was an independent prognostic indicator (P=0.012) for the survival of patients with NSCLC. In conclusion, decreased expression of miR-133a might be a potential unfavorable prognostic factor for patients with NSCLC, and further studies would be needed to prove our findings. PMID:27282282

  14. Borealin/Dasra B is a cell cycle-regulated chromosomal passenger protein and its nuclear accumulation is linked to poor prognosis for human gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.-L.; Chen, T.-H.; Wang, C.-F.; Chiang, Y.-H.; Huang, Y.-L.; Wong, F.-H.; Chou, C.-K. . E-mail: ckchou@mail.pmf.org.tw; Chen, C.-M. . E-mail: cmchen@ym.edu.tw

    2006-04-15

    Chromosomal passenger proteins including Aurora B, Survivin, and Borealin/Dasra B, also called CDCA8/FLJ10468, are known to play crucial roles during mitosis and cell division. Inappropriate chromosomal segregation and cell division may cause auneuploidy leading to cancer. However, it is still unclear how the expression of chromosomal passenger proteins may be linked to cancer. In this study, we demonstrated that Borealin is a cell cycle-regulated gene and is upregulated at G2-M phases of the cell cycle. We showed that Borealin interacts with Survivin but not with Aurora B. The interaction domain of Survivin in Borealin was mapped to the N-terminal 92 amino-acid residues of Borealin. To examine the linkage between expression of Borealin and cancer, we performed immunohistochemistry analysis using anti-Borealin specific antibody on the paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues. Our results showed that Borealin expression is significantly correlated with Survivin (P = 0.003) and Ki67 (P = 0.007) in gastric cancer. Interestingly, an increased nuclear Borealin level reveals borderline association with a poor survival rate (P = 0.047). Taken together, our results demonstrated that Borealin is a cell cycle-regulated chromosomal passenger protein and its aberrant expression is linked to a poor prognosis for gastric cancer.

  15. Emotion self-regulation and empathy depend upon longer stimulus exposure.

    PubMed

    Ikezawa, Satoru; Corbera, Silvia; Wexler, Bruce E

    2014-10-01

    Observation of others in pain induces positive elevation (pain effect) in late event-related potentials (ERP). This effect is associated with top-down attention regulating processes. It has previously been shown that stimulus exposure duration can affect top-down attentional modulation of response to threat-related stimuli. We investigated the effect of exposure duration on ERP response to others in pain. Two late ERP components, P3 and late positive potentials (LPP), from 18 healthy people were measured while they viewed pictures of hands in painful or neutral situations for either 200 or 500 ms, during two task conditions (pain judgment and counting hands). P3 and LPP pain effects during the pain judgment condition were significantly greater with 500 ms than 200 ms stimulus presentation. Ours is the first study to suggest that engagement of empathy-related self-regulatory processes reflected in late potentials requires longer exposure to the pain-related stimulus. Although this is important information about the relationship between early sensory and subsequent brain processing, and about engagement of self-regulatory processes, the neural basis of this time-dependence remains unclear. It might be important to investigate the relationship between stimulus duration and empathic response in clinical populations where issues of self-regulation, empathic response and speed of information processing exist. PMID:24064924

  16. Extracellular protein disulfide isomerase regulates coagulation on endothelial cells through modulation of phosphatidylserine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Narcis I.; Lupu, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the cellular receptor for plasma protease factor VIIa (FVIIa), and the TF-FVIIa complex initiates coagulation in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Cell surface-exposed TF is mainly cryptic and requires activation to fully exhibit the procoagulant potential. Recently, the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been hypothesized to regulate TF decryption through the redox switch of an exposed disulfide in TF extracellular domain. In this study, we analyzed PDI contribution to coagulation using an in vitro endothelial cell model. In this model, extracellular PDI is detected by imaging and flow cytometry. Inhibition of cell surface PDI induces a marked increase in TF procoagulant function, whereas exogenous addition of PDI inhibits TF decryption. The coagulant effects of PDI inhibition were sensitive to annexin V treatment, suggesting exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), which was confirmed by prothrombinase assays and direct labeling. In contrast, exogenous PDI addition enhanced PS internalization. Analysis of fluorescent PS revealed that PDI affects both the apparent flippase and floppase activities on endothelial cells. In conclusion, we identified a new mechanism for PDI contribution to coagulation on endothelial cells, namely, the regulation of PS exposure, where PDI acts as a negative regulator of coagulation. PMID:20448108

  17. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  18. Transcriptional response of stress-regulated genes to industrial effluent exposure in the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum.

    PubMed

    Karray, Sahar; Tastard, Emmanuelle; Moreau, Brigitte; Delahaut, Laurence; Geffard, Alain; Guillon, Emmanuel; Denis, Françoise; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel; Chénais, Benoît; Marchand, Justine

    2015-11-01

    This study assessed the responses of molecular biomarkers and heavy metal levels in Cerastoderma glaucum exposed for 1 week to two industrial effluents (1%) discharged into the Tunisian coastal area, F1 and F2, produced by different units of production of a phosphate treatment plant. A significant uptake of metals (Cd, Cu, Zn, and Ni) was observed in exposed cockles compared to controls, with an uptake higher for F1 than for F2. A decrease in LT50 (stress on stress test) was also observed after an exposure to the effluent F1. Treatments resulted in different patterns of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of the different genes tested in this report. Gene transcription monitoring performed on seven genes potentially involved in the tolerance to metal exposure showed that for both exposures, mechanisms are rapidly and synchronically settled down to prevent damage to cellular components, by (1) handling and exporting out metal ions through the up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette xenobiotic transporter (ABCB1) and metallothionein (MT), (2) increasing the mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutases, CuZnSOD and MnSOD), (3) protecting and/or repairing proteins through the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) mRNAs, and (4) increasing ATP production (through the up-regulation of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1)) to provide energy for cells to tolerate stress exposure. The tools developed may be useful both for future control strategies and for the use of the cockle C. glaucum as a sentinel species. PMID:25613800

  19. Non-coding RNA LINC00857 is predictive of poor patient survival and promotes tumor progression via cell cycle regulation in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; He, Yanli; Liu, Weijun; Bai, Shengbin; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Wang, Zhuwen; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Balbin, O. Alejandro; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Lu, Yi; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra M.; Carrott, Philip W.; Lynch, William R.; Chang, Andrew C.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Beer, David G.; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    We employed next generation RNA sequencing analysis to reveal dysregulated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in lung cancer utilizing 461 lung adenocarcinomas (LUAD) and 156 normal lung tissues from 3 separate institutions. We identified 281 lncRNAs with significant differential-expression between LUAD and normal lung tissue. LINC00857, a top deregulated lncRNAs, was overexpressed in tumors and significantly associated with poor survival in LUAD. knockdown of LINC00857 with siRNAs decreased tumor cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in vitro, as well as tumor growth in vivo. Overexpression of LINC00857 increased cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. Mechanistic analyses indicated that LINC00857 mediates tumor progression via cell cycle regulation. Our study highlights the diagnostic/prognostic potential of LINC00857 in LUAD besides delineating the functional and mechanistic aspects of its aberrant disease specific expression and potentially using as a new therapeutic target. PMID:26862852

  20. Non-coding RNA LINC00857 is predictive of poor patient survival and promotes tumor progression via cell cycle regulation in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihui; He, Yanli; Liu, Weijun; Bai, Shengbin; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Wang, Zhuwen; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Balbin, O Alejandro; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Lu, Yi; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra M; Carrott, Philip W; Lynch, William R; Chang, Andrew C; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Beer, David G; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Guoan

    2016-03-01

    We employed next generation RNA sequencing analysis to reveal dysregulated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in lung cancer utilizing 461 lung adenocarcinomas (LUAD) and 156 normal lung tissues from 3 separate institutions. We identified 281 lncRNAs with significant differential-expression between LUAD and normal lung tissue. LINC00857, a top deregulated lncRNAs, was overexpressed in tumors and significantly associated with poor survival in LUAD. knockdown of LINC00857 with siRNAs decreased tumor cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in vitro, as well as tumor growth in vivo. Overexpression of LINC00857 increased cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. Mechanistic analyses indicated that LINC00857 mediates tumor progression via cell cycle regulation. Our study highlights the diagnostic/prognostic potential of LINC00857 in LUAD besides delineating the functional and mechanistic aspects of its aberrant disease specific expression and potentially using as a new therapeutic target. PMID:26862852

  1. Down-regulated expression of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Long-Yi; Zhou, Dong-Xun; Lu, Jin; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Zou, Da-Jin

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTP1B protein showed decreased expression in 67.79% of the HCC patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PTP1B expression predicts poor prognosis of HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PTP1B expression is correlated with expansion of OV6{sup +} tumor-initiating cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of PTP1B is associated with activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin signaling. -- Abstract: The protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a classical non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in metabolic signaling and can exert both tumor suppressing and tumor promoting effects in different cancers depending on the substrate involved and the cellular context. However, the expression level and function of PTP1B in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. In this study, PTP1B expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in normal liver tissue (n = 16) and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 169). The correlations between PTP1B expression level and clinicopathologic features and patient survival were also analyzed. One hundred and eleven of 169 HCC patients (65.7%) had negative or low PTP1B expression in tumorous tissues, whereas normal tissues always expressed strong PTP1B. Decreased PTP1B expression was significantly associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features and poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry also showed that low PTP1B expression level was correlated with high percentage of OV6{sup +} tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) and high frequency of nuclear {beta}-Catenin expression in HCC specimens. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the loss of inhibitory effect of PTP1B may contribute to progression and invasion of HCC through activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin signaling and expansion of liver T-ICs. PTP1B may serve as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target in HCC.

  2. Improvement of primary health care of patients with poorly regulated diabetes mellitus type 2 using shared decision-making – the DEBATE trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since 2004, a national Disease Management Program (DMP) has been implemented in Germany, which includes educational measures aimed at patients with type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, about 15-20% of T2D patients remain in poor metabolic control. Qualitative research shows that one reason for this might be an increasing frustration of general practitioners (GPs) with the management of their poorly regulated T2D patients over time. We aim at approaching this problem by improving the GP-patient-communication and fostering shared decision-making. Methods/Design An educative intervention will be tested within a multi-centred cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) in Germany. We include 20 GPs in three regions. Each of the 60 GPs will recruit about 13 patients meeting the inclusion criteria (total of 780 patients). GPs allocated to the intervention group will receive a peer-visit from a specifically trained GP-colleague who will motivate them to apply patient-centred communication techniques including patient-centred decision aids. GPs allocated to the control group will not take part in any intervention program, but will provide care as usual to their patients. The primary inclusion criterion for patients at the time of the recruitment is an HbA1c-level of over 8.0. Primary outcome is the change of HbA1c at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months compared to HbA1c at baseline. Secondary outcomes include patient’s participation in the process of shared decision-making and quality of life. Discussion If this intervention proves to be effective it may be integrated into the existing Disease Management Program for T2D in Germany. PMID:22913642

  3. Identification of genes up-regulated in response to Cd exposure in Brassica juncea L.

    PubMed

    Minglin, Lang; Yuxiu, Zhang; Tuanyao, Chai

    2005-12-19

    In this paper, the fluorescent mRNA differential display (DD) technique was applied to analyze transcriptional regulation in response to Cd treatment in a heavy-metal accumulator, Brassica juncea. 154 DD bands were identified, of which fragments corresponding to 15 and 13 cDNAs were successfully cloned from leaves and roots, respectively. Many of the genes were confirmed to have a 2-5 fold increase in expression in both roots and leaves after 48 h Cd exposure (approximately 22.4 ppm). However, several isolated genes, e.g., DD2, DD21, DD22, showed a reversed mRNA expression pattern. Sequencing revealed those Cd-induced up-regulated genes displayed mRNAs corresponding to 19 different genes, 18 of which had a clear identity to Arabidopsis thaliana sequences and a putative function was assigned to 15 of them, including the auxin-responsive GH3, ARF-like small GTPases/ARFs, ARD/ARD', APS reductase, Nop, catalase, zinc finger (C3HC4-type RING finger), diacylglycerol kinase, and haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase families. Three cDNAs corresponded to predicted membrane proteins (KOG3491) or a ribosome-associated membrane protein RAMP4. One other clone, DD26, did not show significant identities to any translated sequence in the GenBank database, suggesting it may either encode unidentified proteins, or correspond to un-translated, non-conserved regions of mRNA molecules. These Cd-responsive up-regulated genes are mostly also regulated by abiotic or biotic stresses, e.g., dehydration, chilling, high salt, auxin, heat and infection, in other plants. The present study leads to an increased understanding of genes and/or the biochemical pathways involved in heavy-metal resistance and accumulation in plants. PMID:16226851

  4. Early Life Adverse Environmental Exposures Increase the Risk of Uterine Fibroid Development: Role of Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Uterine Fibroids [UF(s), AKA: leiomyoma] are the most important benign neoplastic threat to women's health. They are the most common cause of hysterectomy imposing untold personal consequences and 100s of billions of healthcare dollars, worldwide. Currently, there is no long term effective FDA-approved medical treatment available, and surgery is the mainstay. The etiology of UFs is not fully understood. In this regard, we and others have recently reported that somatic mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional mediator subunit Med12 are found to occur at a high frequency (∼85%) in UFs. UFs likely originate when a Med12 mutation occurs in a myometrial stem cell converting it into a tumor-forming stem cell leading to a clonal fibroid lesion. Although the molecular attributes underlying the mechanistic formation of UFs is largely unknown, a growing body of literature implicates unfavorable early life environmental exposures as potentially important contributors. Early life exposure to EDCs during sensitive windows of development can reprogram normal physiological responses and alter disease susceptibility later in life. Neonatal exposure to the EDCs such as diethylstilbestrol (DES) and genistein during reproductive tract development has been shown to increase the incidence, multiplicity and overall size of UFs in the Eker rat model, concomitantly reprogramming estrogen-responsive gene expression. Importantly, EDC exposure represses enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2) and reduces levels of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) repressive mark through Estrogen receptor/Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Protein kinase B non-genomic signaling in the developing uterus. Considering the fact that distinct Mediator Complex Subunit 12 (Med12) mutations are detected in different fibroid lesions in the same uterus, the emergence of each Med12 mutation is likely an independent event in an altered myometrial stem cell. It is therefore possible that a chronic reduction in

  5. Early Life Adverse Environmental Exposures Increase the Risk of Uterine Fibroid Development: Role of Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Uterine Fibroids [UF(s), AKA: leiomyoma] are the most important benign neoplastic threat to women’s health. They are the most common cause of hysterectomy imposing untold personal consequences and 100s of billions of healthcare dollars, worldwide. Currently, there is no long term effective FDA-approved medical treatment available, and surgery is the mainstay. The etiology of UFs is not fully understood. In this regard, we and others have recently reported that somatic mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional mediator subunit Med12 are found to occur at a high frequency (∼85%) in UFs. UFs likely originate when a Med12 mutation occurs in a myometrial stem cell converting it into a tumor-forming stem cell leading to a clonal fibroid lesion. Although the molecular attributes underlying the mechanistic formation of UFs is largely unknown, a growing body of literature implicates unfavorable early life environmental exposures as potentially important contributors. Early life exposure to EDCs during sensitive windows of development can reprogram normal physiological responses and alter disease susceptibility later in life. Neonatal exposure to the EDCs such as diethylstilbestrol (DES) and genistein during reproductive tract development has been shown to increase the incidence, multiplicity and overall size of UFs in the Eker rat model, concomitantly reprogramming estrogen-responsive gene expression. Importantly, EDC exposure represses enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2) and reduces levels of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) repressive mark through Estrogen receptor/Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Protein kinase B non-genomic signaling in the developing uterus. Considering the fact that distinct Mediator Complex Subunit 12 (Med12) mutations are detected in different fibroid lesions in the same uterus, the emergence of each Med12 mutation is likely an independent event in an altered myometrial stem cell. It is therefore possible that a chronic reduction in

  6. Response of extracellular matrix regulators in mouse lung after exposure to photons, protons and simulated solar particle event protons.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Pecaut, Michael J; Coutrakon, George B; Slater, James M; Gridley, Daila S

    2009-07-01

    This study compared the effects of photons (gamma rays), protons and simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE) on the expression of profibrotic factors/extracellular matrix (ECM) regulators in lung tissue after whole-body irradiation. TGF-beta1, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2, -9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 and 2 (TIMP-1, -2) were assessed on days 4 and 21 in lungs from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 0 Gy or 2 Gy photons (0.7 Gy/min), protons (0.9 Gy/min) and sSPE (0.056 Gy/h). RT-PCR, histological and immunohistochemical techniques were used. The most striking changes included (1) up-regulation of TGF-beta1 by photons and sSPE, but not protons, at both times, (2) MMP-2 enhancement by photons and sSPEs, (3) TIMP-1 up-regulation by photons at both times, and (4) more collagen accumulation after exposure to either photons or sSPE than after exposure to protons. The findings demonstrate that expression of important ECM regulators was highly dependent upon the radiation regimen as well as the time after exposure. The data further suggest that irradiation during an SPE may increase an astronaut's risk for pulmonary complications. The greater perturbations after photon exposure compared to proton exposure have clinical implications and warrant further investigation. PMID:19580505

  7. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-03-29

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell-cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  8. Up-regulated expression of scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is associated with malignant behaviors and poor prognosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Wang, Jing; Li, Ming; Yin, Linlin; Li, Xiang-An; Zhang, Ting-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an integral membrane protein that is expressed in numerous cells and tissue types. The primary role of SR-B1 is to facilitate uptake of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in the liver. Altered SR-B1 expression contributes to human diseases. This study assessed association of SR-B1 expression in breast tissue specimens with breast cancer development and prognosis. Tissue specimens from 30 cases of adjacent normal breast tissues, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal breast cancer (IDCA) were subjected to Western blot analysis, and 135 cases of DCIS and IDCA were used for quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of SR-B1 expression. The data showed that SR-B1 was significantly overexpressed in IDCA tissues compared to normal breast and DCIS tissues. SR-B1 expression was associated with pre-menopausal status, tumor size, and worse overall survival of patients. The data from this ex vivo study suggests that up-regulated SR-B1 protein expression is associated with malignant behaviors of breast cancer and that SR-B1 is an independent predictor for poor survival in breast cancer patients. PMID:27067809

  9. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell–cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  10. Exposure to Pre- and Perinatal Risk Factors Partially Explains Mean Differences in Self-Regulation between Races

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. C.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Miller, J. Mitchell; DeShay, Rashaan A.; Beaver, Kevin M.; White, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether differential exposure to pre- and perinatal risk factors explained differences in levels of self-regulation between children of different races (White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, and Other). Methods Multiple regression models based on data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (n ≈ 9,850) were used to analyze the impact of pre- and perinatal risk factors on the development of self-regulation at age 2 years. Results Racial differences in levels of self-regulation were observed. Racial differences were also observed for 9 of the 12 pre-/perinatal risk factors. Multiple regression analyses revealed that a portion of the racial differences in self-regulation was explained by differential exposure to several of the pre-/perinatal risk factors. Specifically, maternal age at childbirth, gestational timing, and the family’s socioeconomic status were significantly related to the child’s level of self-regulation. These factors accounted for a statistically significant portion of the racial differences observed in self-regulation. Conclusions The findings indicate racial differences in self-regulation may be, at least partially, explained by racial differences in exposure to pre- and perinatal risk factors. PMID:26882110

  11. Chronic Light Exposure in the Middle of the Night Disturbs the Circadian System and Emotional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Yan, Lily

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, the circadian system is composed of a principal circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and a number of subordinate oscillators in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral tissues/organs. However, how the time-keeping functions of this multiple oscillator circuit are affected by aberrant lighting environments remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic light exposure in the middle of the night on the circadian system by comparing the mice housed in a 12:4:4:4-h L:DLD condition with the controls in 12:12-h L:D condition. Daily rhythms in locomotor activity were analyzed and the expression patterns of protein products of clock genes Period1 and Period2 (PER1 and PER2) were examined in the SCN and extra-SCN brain regions, including the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Following 2 weeks of housing in the L:DLD condition, animals showed disturbed daily rhythms in locomotor activity and lacked daily rhythms of PER1 and PER2 in the SCN. In the extra-SCN brain regions, the PER1 and PER2 rhythms were affected in a region-specific pattern, such that they were relatively undisturbed in the striatum and hippocampus, phase-shifted in the BLA, and abolished in the PVN. In addition, mice in the L:DLD condition showed increased anxiety-like behaviors and reduced brain-derived neurotropic factor messenger RNA expression in the hippocampus, amygdala, and medial prefrontal cortex, which are brain regions that are involved in emotional regulation. These results indicate that nighttime light exposure leads to circadian disturbances not only by abolishing the circadian rhythms in the SCN but also by inducing misalignment among brain oscillators and negatively affects emotional processing. These observations serve to identify risks associated with decisions regarding lifestyle in our modern society. PMID:27075857

  12. Sleep regulation and sex hormones exposure in men and women across adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lord, C; Sekerovic, Z; Carrier, J

    2014-10-01

    This review aims to discuss how endogenous and exogenous testosterone exposures in men and estrogens/progesterone exposures in women interact with sleep regulation. In young men, testosterone secretion peaks during sleep and is linked to sleep architecture. Animal and human studies support the notion that sleep loss suppresses testosterone secretion. Testosterone levels decline slowly throughout the aging process, but relatively few studies investigate its impact on age-related sleep modifications. Results suggest that poorer sleep quality is associated with lower testosterone concentrations and that sleep loss may have a more prominent effect on testosterone levels in older individuals. In women, sex steroid levels are characterized by a marked monthly cycle and reproductive milestones such as pregnancy and menopause. Animal models indicate that estrogens and progesterone influence sleep. Most studies do not show any clear effects of the menstrual cycle on sleep, but sample sizes are too low, and research designs often inhibit definitive conclusions. The effects of hormonal contraceptives on sleep are currently unknown. Pregnancy and the postpartum period are associated with increased sleep disturbances, but their relation to the hormonal milieu still needs to be determined. Finally, studies suggest that menopausal transition and the hormonal changes associated with it are linked to lower subjective sleep quality, but results concerning objective sleep measures are less conclusive. More research is necessary to unravel the effects of vasomotor symptoms on sleep. Hormone therapy seems to induce positive effects on sleep, but key concerns are still unresolved, including the long-term effects and efficacy of different hormonal regimens. PMID:25218407

  13. Poor, Unsafe, and Overweight: The Role of Feeling Unsafe at School in Mediating the Association Among Poverty Exposure, Youth Screen Time, Physical Activity, and Weight Status.

    PubMed

    Côté-Lussier, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Séguin, Louise; Barnett, Tracie A

    2015-07-01

    This study applied socioecological and cumulative risk exposure frameworks to test the hypotheses that 1) the experience of poverty is associated with feeling less safe at school, and 2) feeling less safe is associated with engaging in poorer weight-related behaviors, as well as an increased probability of being overweight or obese. Data were from the ongoing Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, initiated in 1998 with a population-based cohort of 2,120 Québec (Canada) infants 5 months of age and their parent or primary caregiver. Measures of youths' (age, 13 years) self-reported feelings of safety, screen time, physical activity, and objectively assessed not overweight/obese (70%), overweight (22%), and obese (8%) weight status were collected in 2011. Family poverty trajectory from birth was assessed by using latent growth modeling. As hypothesized, exposure to poverty was associated with feeling less safe at school and, in turn, with an increased probability of being overweight or obese. The association was most pronounced for youths who experienced chronic poverty. Compared with youths who experienced no poverty and felt unsafe, those who experienced chronic poverty and felt unsafe were nearly 18% more likely to be obese (9.2% vs. 11.2%). Although feeling unsafe was associated with screen time, screen time did not predict weight status. PMID:25921649

  14. Poor, Unsafe, and Overweight: The Role of Feeling Unsafe at School in Mediating the Association Among Poverty Exposure, Youth Screen Time, Physical Activity, and Weight Status

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Lussier, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Séguin, Louise; Barnett, Tracie A.

    2015-01-01

    This study applied socioecological and cumulative risk exposure frameworks to test the hypotheses that 1) the experience of poverty is associated with feeling less safe at school, and 2) feeling less safe is associated with engaging in poorer weight-related behaviors, as well as an increased probability of being overweight or obese. Data were from the ongoing Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, initiated in 1998 with a population-based cohort of 2,120 Québec (Canada) infants 5 months of age and their parent or primary caregiver. Measures of youths' (age, 13 years) self-reported feelings of safety, screen time, physical activity, and objectively assessed not overweight/obese (70%), overweight (22%), and obese (8%) weight status were collected in 2011. Family poverty trajectory from birth was assessed by using latent growth modeling. As hypothesized, exposure to poverty was associated with feeling less safe at school and, in turn, with an increased probability of being overweight or obese. The association was most pronounced for youths who experienced chronic poverty. Compared with youths who experienced no poverty and felt unsafe, those who experienced chronic poverty and felt unsafe were nearly 18% more likely to be obese (9.2% vs. 11.2%). Although feeling unsafe was associated with screen time, screen time did not predict weight status. PMID:25921649

  15. Noise exposure and hearing loss prevention programmes after 20 years of regulations in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, W E; Swan, S S; McDaniel, M M; Camp, J E; Cohen, M A; Stebbins, J G

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate noise exposures and hearing loss prevention efforts in industries with relatively high rates of workers' compensation claims for hearing loss. Methods Washington State workers' compensation records were used to identify up to 10 companies in each of eight industries. Each company (n = 76) was evaluated by a management interview, employee personal noise dosimetry (n = 983), and employee interviews (n = 1557). Results Full‐shift average exposures were ⩾85 dBA for 50% of monitored employees, using Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) parameters with a 5 dB exchange rate (Lave), but 74% were ⩾85 dBA using a 3 dB exchange rate (Leq). Only 14% had Lave ⩾90 dBA, but 42% had Leq ⩾90 dBA. Most companies conducted noise measurements, but most kept no records, and consideration of noise controls was low in all industries. Hearing loss prevention programmes were commonly incomplete. Management interview scores (higher score = more complete programme) showed significant associations with percentage of employees having Lave ⩾85 dBA and presence of a union (multiple linear regression; R2 = 0.24). Overall, 62% of interviewed employees reported always using hearing protection when exposed. Protector use showed significant associations with percentage of employees specifically required to use protection, management score, and average employee time spent ⩾95 dBA (R2 = 0.65). Conclusions The findings raise serious concerns about the adequacy of prevention, regulation, and enforcement strategies in the United States. The percentage of workers with excessive exposure was 1.5–3 times higher using a 3 dB exchange rate instead of the OSHA specified 5 dB exchange rate. Most companies gave limited or no attention to noise controls and relied primarily on hearing protection to prevent hearing loss; yet 38% of employees did not use protectors routinely. Protector use was highest when hearing loss

  16. Analyses of resected human brain metastases of breast cancer reveal the association between up-regulation of hexokinase 2 and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L; Weil, Robert J; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M; Merino, Maria J; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M; Meltzer, Paul S; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2009-09-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer seem to be increasingin incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser-captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared with unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases, which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMgamma3, SIAH, STHMN3, and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P) in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using short hairpin RNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose-limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival after craniotomy (P = 0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  17. Analyses of Resected Human Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer Reveal the Association between Up-regulation of Hexokinase 2 and Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S. Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L.; Weil, Robert J.; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M.; Merino, Maria J.; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared to unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, TNM stage and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Q-PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMγ3, SIAH, STHMN3 and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P), in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using shRNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival post-craniotomy (P=0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  18. Regulation of arcuate genes by developmental exposures to endocrine-disrupting compounds in female rats.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Troy A; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Mamounis, Kyle J; Oruc, Elif; Zama, Aparna Mahakali; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2016-07-01

    Developmental exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) alters reproduction and energy homeostasis, both of which are regulated by the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Little is known about the effects of EDC on ARC gene expression. In Experiment #1, pregnant dams were treated with either two doses of bisphenol A (BPA) or oil from embryonic day (E)18-21. Neonates were injected from postnatal day (PND)0-7. Vaginal opening, body weights, and ARC gene expression were measured. Chrm3 (muscarinic receptor 3) and Adipor1 (adiponectin receptor 1) were decreased by BPA. Bdnf (brain-derived neurotropic factor), Igf1 (insulin-like growth factor 1), Htr2c (5-hydroxytryptamine receptor), and Cck2r (cholescystokinin 2 receptor) were impacted. In Experiment #2, females were exposed to BPA, diethylstilbestrol (DES), di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, or methoxychlor (MXC) during E11-PND7. MXC and DES advanced the age of vaginal opening and ARC gene expression was impacted. These data indicate that EDCs alter ARC genes involved in reproduction and energy homeostasis in females. PMID:27103539

  19. Cognitive Emotion Regulation and Written Exposure Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wisco, Blair E.; Sloan, Denise M.; Marx, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the extent to which cognitive emotion-regulation (ER) strategies moderated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment outcome among 40 motor vehicle accident survivors. Participants were randomly assigned to either a brief written exposure therapy (WET) condition or a waitlist condition and were assessed pre- and posttreatment and at a 3-month follow-up. Positive-reappraisal and putting-into-perspective strategies at baseline interacted with condition to predict symptom change over time. Both strategies predicted greater reductions in PTSD in the waitlist group, suggesting facilitation of natural recovery. However, positive reappraisal was associated with smaller reductions in PTSD in the WET group, suggesting that this strategy may interfere with treatment. Treatment also reduced use of the maladaptive ER strategy of rumination. These results provide evidence that putting-into-perspective and positive-reappraisal strategies are beneficial in the absence of treatment and that certain types of ER strategies may reduce response to WET, highlighting the importance of future research examining ER during treatment. PMID:24482755

  20. TEMPERATURE REGULATION IN THE UNRESTRAINED RABBIT DURING EXPOSURE TO 600 MHZ RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six male New Zealand white rabbits were individually exposed to 600 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation for 90 min in a waveguide exposure system at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 or 30 C. Immediately after exposure, the rabbit was removed from the exposure chamber and its colon...

  1. Genetical Toxicogenomics in Drosophila Identifies Master Modulatory Loci that are Regulated by Developmental Exposure to Lead

    PubMed Central

    Ruden, Douglas M.; Chen, Lang; Possidente, Debra; Possidente, Bernard; Rasouli, Parsa; Wang, Luan; Lu, Xiangyi; Garfinkel, Mark D.; Hirsch, Helmut V. B.; Page, Grier P.

    2009-01-01

    The genetics of gene expression in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) can be mapped as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). So-called “genetical genomics” studies have identified locally-acting eQTLs (cis-eQTLs) for genes that show differences in steady state RNA levels. These studies have also identified distantly-acting master-modulatory trans-eQTLs that regulate tens or hundreds of transcripts (hotspots or transbands). We expand on these studies by performing genetical genomics experiments in two environments in order to identify trans-eQTL that might be regulated by developmental exposure to the neurotoxin lead. Flies from each of 75 RIL were raised from eggs to adults on either control food (made with 250 µM sodium acetate), or lead-treated food (made with 250 µM lead acetate, PbAc). RNA expression analyses of whole adult male flies (5–10 days old) were performed with Affymetrix DrosII whole genome arrays (18,952 probesets). Among the 1,389 genes with cis-eQTL, there were 405 genes unique to control flies and 544 genes unique to lead-treated ones (440 genes had the same cis-eQTLs in both samples). There are 2,396 genes with trans-eQTL which mapped to 12 major transbands with greater than 95 genes. Permutation analyses of the strain labels but not the expression data suggests that the total number of eQTL and the number of transbands are more important criteria for validation than the size of the transband. Two transbands, one located on the 2nd chromosome and one on the 3rd chromosome, co-regulate 33 lead-induced genes, many of which are involved in neurodevelopmental processes. For these 33 genes, rather than allelic variation at one locus exerting differential effects in two environments, we found that variation at two different loci are required for optimal effects on lead-induced expression. PMID:19737576

  2. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially regulate CB1 receptor function at glutamatergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacey L; Alexander, Nancy J; Bluett, Rebecca J; Patel, Sachin; McCool, Brian A

    2016-09-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system has been suggested to play a key role in ethanol preference and intake, the acute effects of ethanol, and in the development of withdrawal symptoms following ethanol dependence. Ethanol-dependent alterations in glutamatergic signaling within the lateral/basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) are critical for the development and expression of withdrawal-induced anxiety. Notably, the eCB system significantly regulates both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic activity within the BLA. Chronic ethanol exposure significantly alters eCB system expression within regions critical to the expression of emotionality and anxiety-related behavior, including the BLA. Here, we investigated specific interactions between the BLA eCB system and its functional regulation of synaptic activity during acute and chronic ethanol exposure. In tissue from ethanol naïve-rats, a prolonged acute ethanol exposure caused a dose dependent inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic activity via a presynaptic mechanism that was occluded by CB1 antagonist/inverse agonists SR141716a and AM251. Importantly, this acute ethanol inhibition was attenuated following 10 day chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE). CIE exposure also significantly down-regulated CB1-mediated presynaptic inhibition at glutamatergic afferent terminals but spared CB1-inhibition of GABAergic synapses arising from local inhibitory-interneurons. CIE also significantly elevated BLA N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA or anandamide) levels and decreased CB1 receptor protein levels. Collectively, these data suggest a dynamic regulation of the BLA eCB system by acute and chronic ethanol. PMID:26707595

  3. Enhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation via systematic novelty exposure: the influence of maternal HPA function

    PubMed Central

    Dinces, Sarah M.; Romeo, Russell D.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Tang, Akaysha C.

    2014-01-01

    In the rat, repeated brief exposures to novelty early in life can induce long-lasting enhancements in adult cognitive, social, emotional, and neuroendocrine function. Family-to-family variations in these intervention effects on adult offspring are predicted by the mother’s ability to mount a rapid corticosterone (CORT) response to the onset of an acute stressor. Here, in Long-Evans rats, we investigated whether neonatal and adulthood novelty exposure, each individually and in combination, can enhance offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation. Using a 2 × 2 within-litter design, one half of each litter were exposed to a relatively novel non-home environment for 3-min (Neo_Novel) daily during infancy (PND 1–21) and the other half of the litter remained in the home cage (Neo_Home); we further exposed half of these two groups to early adulthood (PND 54–63) novelty exposure in an open field and the remaining siblings stayed in their home cages. Two aspects of HPA regulation were assessed: the ability to maintain a low level of resting CORT (CORTB) and the ability to mount a large rapid CORT response (CORTE) to the onset of an acute stressor. Assessment of adult offspring’s ability to regulate HPA regulation began at 370 days of age. We further investigated whether the novelty exposure effects on offspring HPA regulation are sensitive to the context of maternal HPA regulation by assessing maternal HPA regulation similarly beginning 7 days after her pups were weaned. We found that at the population level, rats receiving neonatal, but not early adulthood exposure or both, showed a greater rapid CORTE than their home-staying siblings. At the individual family level, these novelty effects are positively associated with maternal CORTE. These results suggest that early experience of novelty can enhance the offspring’s ability to mount a rapid response to environmental challenge and the success of such early life intervention is critically dependent

  4. CYP2B6*6 genotype and high efavirenz plasma concentration but not nevirapine are associated with low lumefantrine plasma exposure and poor treatment response in HIV-malaria-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Maganda, B A; Minzi, O M S; Ngaimisi, E; Kamuhabwa, A A R; Aklillu, E

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the influence of efavirenz (EFV)- or nevirapine (NVP)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) on lumefantrine plasma exposure in HIV-malaria-coinfected patients and implication of pharmacogenetic variations. A total of 269 HIV patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria on NVP-based ART (NVP-arm), EFV-based ART (EFV-arm) or not receiving ART (control-arm) were enrolled and treated with artemether-lumefantrine. Day-7 lumefantrine, baseline EFV and NVP plasma concentrations, and CYP2B6*6,*18, CYP3A4*1B, CYP3A5*3,*6,*7, ABCB1 c.3435C>T and ABCB1 c.4036A>G genotypes were determined. The median day-7 lumefantrine plasma concentration was significantly lower in the EFV-arm compared with that in NVP- and control-arm. High EFV plasma concentrations and CYP2B6*6/*6 genotype significantly correlated with low lumefantrine plasma concentrations and high rate of recurrent parasitemia. No significant effect of NVP-based ART on lumefantrine exposure was observed. In conclusion, owing to long-term CYP3A induction, EFV-based ART cotreatment significantly reduces lumefantrine plasma exposure leading to poor malaria treatment response, which is more pronounced in CYP2B6 slow metabolizers. PMID:25963334

  5. Localization, depuration, bioaccumulation and impairment of ion regulation associated with cationic polymer exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Muir, M M; Kosteretz, K G; Lech, J J

    1997-10-01

    1. Static exposure of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, to three commercial 14C-labelled cationic polymers (EDP, epichlorhydrin-dimethylamine; CYT, polyacrylamide ester; and STK, polyacrylamide amide) resulted in 14C being concentrated only in gill tissue. 2. Depuration studies examining the effect of humic acid (HA) on cationic polymer bound in gill tissue indicate that the binding is reversible with exposure to polymer-free water and polymer-free water with HA for each of the three polymers. 3. Analysis of blood pH, Na+, K+, total NH3 and Cl- after static water exposures to EDP (m.w. 50,000) at 7.5 mg EDP/l revealed a treatment related decrease in blood pH, from 7.1 to 6.6, accompanied by an increase in blood NH3 and evidence of severe impairment of ion regulation. 4. Repeated exposure to the cationic polymers did not result in increases in the 14C concentration in gill tissue suggesting that bioaccumulation of the polymers does not occur. 5. These data suggest that the gill is the site of toxicity for these cationic polymers and that their toxic effects involve gill function and ion regulation rather than systemic actions on internal organs. PMID:9364738

  6. RKIP Regulates Neural Cell Apoptosis Induced by Exposure to Microwave Radiation Partly Through the MEK/ERK/CREB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Zhao, Li; Wang, Shaoxia; Su, Zhentao

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is important for neural cell apoptosis induced by microwave exposure and explored the role of MEK/ERK/CREB pathway regulated by RKIP in the apoptosis. Differentiated PC12 cells were exposed to continuous microwave radiation at 2.856 GHz for 5 min with average power density of 30 mW/cm(2). RKIP sense and anti-sense recombinant plasmids were constructed and transfected into PC12 cells, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and caspase-3 activity assay were used to detect cell apoptosis. The results showed that RKIP was downregulated after microwave exposure while the MEK/ERK/CREB signaling pathway was activated excessively. Moreover, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax decreased, activity of caspase-3 increased, and thus apoptotic DNA fragmentation increased. RKIP overexpression significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of MEK, ERK, and CREB, while RKIP downregulation had the reverse effect. Furthermore, U0126 was found to antagonize the changes caused by RKIP downregulation after exposure to radiation. In conclusion, RKIP plays an important role in the neural cell apoptosis induced by microwave radiation, and the regulation of cell apoptosis by RKIP is partly through the MEK/ERK/CREB pathway. This suggests that RKIP may act as a key regulator of neuronal damage caused by microwave radiation. PMID:25108669

  7. Arsenite exposure accelerates aging process regulated by the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chan-Wei; How, Chun Ming; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen and high levels of arsenic contamination in food, soils, water, and air are of toxicology concerns. Nowadays, arsenic is still a contaminant of emerging interest, yet the effects of arsenic on aging process have received little attention. In this study, we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of chronic arsenite exposure on the aging process in Caenorhabditis elegans. The results showed that prolonged arsenite exposure caused significantly decreased lifespan compared to non-exposed ones. In addition, arsenite exposure (100 μM) caused significant changes of age-dependent biomarkers, including a decrease of defecation frequency, accumulations of intestinal lipofuscin and lipid peroxidation in an age-dependent manner in C. elegans. Further evidence revealed that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was significantly increased in an age-dependent manner upon 100 μM arsenite exposure. Moreover, the mRNA levels of transcriptional makers of aging (hsp-16.1, hsp-16.49, and hsp-70) were increased in aged worms under arsenite exposure (100 μM). Finally, we showed that daf-16 mutant worms were more sensitive to arsenite exposure (100 μM) on lifespan and failed to induce the expression of its target gene sod-3 in aged daf-16 mutant under arsenite exposure (100 μM). Our study demonstrated that chronic arsenite exposure resulted in accelerated aging process in C. elegans. The overproduction of intracellular ROS and the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO play roles in mediating the accelerated aging process by arsenite exposure in C. elegans. This study implicates a potential ecotoxicological and health risk of arsenic in the environment. PMID:26796881

  8. Developmental fluoxetine exposure increases behavioral despair and alters epigenetic regulation of the hippocampal BDNF gene in adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Fabien; Pawluski, Jodi L; Homberg, Judith R; Machiels, Barbie; Kroeze, Yvet; Kumar, Neha; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Kenis, Gunter; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of infants are exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications during the perinatal period. Perinatal exposure to SSRI medications alter neuroplasticity and increase depressive- and anxiety-related behaviors, particularly in male offspring as little work has been done in female offspring to date. The long-term effects of SSRI on development can also differ with previous exposure to prenatal stress, a model of maternal depression. Because of the limited work done on the role of developmental SSRI exposure on neurobehavioral outcomes in female offspring, the aim of the present study was to investigate how developmental fluoxetine exposure affects anxiety and depression-like behavior, as well as the regulation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the hippocampus of adult female offspring. To do this female Sprague-Dawley rat offspring were exposed to prenatal stress and fluoxetine via the dam, for a total of four groups of female offspring: 1) No Stress+Vehicle, 2) No Stress+Fluoxetine, 3) Prenatal Stress+Vehicle, and 4) Prenatal Stress+Fluoxetine. Primary results show that, in adult female offspring, developmental SSRI exposure significantly increases behavioral despair measures on the forced swim test, decreases hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels, and increases levels of the repressive histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylated mark at the corresponding promoter. There was also a significant negative correlation between hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels and immobility in the forced swim test. No effects of prenatal stress or developmental fluoxetine exposure were seen on tests of anxiety-like behavior. This research provides important evidence for the long-term programming effects of early-life exposure to SSRIs on female offspring, particularily with regard to affect-related behaviors and their underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26844865

  9. Exposure to diesel exhaust up-regulates iNOS expression in ApoE knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Ni; Kido, Takashi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; Breemen, Cornelis van; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-09-01

    Traffic related particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, the biological mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation induces up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to contribute to vascular dysfunction, progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods: ApoE knockout mice (30-week) were exposed to DE (at 200 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of particulate matter) or filtered-air (control) for 7 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). iNOS expression in the blood vessels and heart was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. To examine iNOS activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and vasoconstriction stimulated by phenylephrine (PE) was measured with and without the presence of the specific inhibitor for iNOS (1400 W). NF-{kappa}B (p65) activity was examined by ELISA. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B (p65) was determined by real-time PCR. Results: DE exposure significantly enhanced iNOS expression in the thoracic aorta (4-fold) and heart (1.5 fold). DE exposure significantly attenuated PE-stimulated vasoconstriction by {approx} 20%, which was partly reversed by 1400 W. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B was significantly augmented after DE exposure. NF-{kappa}B activity was enhanced 2-fold after DE inhalation, and the augmented NF-{kappa}B activity was positively correlated with iNOS expression (R{sup 2} = 0.5998). Conclusions: We show that exposure to DE increases iNOS expression and activity possibly via NF-{kappa}B-mediated pathway. We suspect that DE exposure-caused up-regulation of iNOS contributes to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis, which could ultimately lead to urban air pollution-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. - Highlights: > Exposed ApoE knockout mice (30-week) to diesel exhaust (DE) for 7 weeks. > Examine iNOS expression and activity in the

  10. Maternal distress associates with placental genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure and IGF2: Role of obesity and sex.

    PubMed

    Mina, Theresia H; Räikkönen, Katri; Riley, Simon C; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2015-09-01

    Maternal emotional distress symptoms, including life satisfaction, anxiety and depressed mood, are worse in Severely Obese (SO) than lean pregnancy and may alter placental genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure and placental growth. We hypothesised that the associations between increased maternal distress symptoms and changes in placental gene expression including IGF2 and genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure are more pronounced in SO pregnancy. We also considered whether there were sex-specific effects. Placental mRNA levels of 11β-HSDs, NR3C1-α, NR3C2, ABC transporters, mTOR and the IGF2 family were measured in term placental samples from 43 lean (BMI≤25kg/m(2)) and 50 SO (BMI≥40kg/m(2)) women, in whom distress symptoms were prospectively evaluated during pregnancy. The mRNA levels of genes with a similar role in regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure were strongly inter-correlated. Increased maternal distress symptoms associated with increased NR3C2 and IGF2 isoform 1(IGF2-1) in both lean and SO group (p≤0.05). Increased distress was associated with higher ABCB1 and ABCG2 mRNA levels in SO but lower ABCB1 and higher 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels in lean (p≤0.05) suggesting a protective adaptive response in SO placentas. Increased maternal distress associated with reduced mRNA levels of ABCB1, ABCG2, 11β-HSD2, NR3C1-α and IGF2-1 in placentas of female but not male offspring. The observed sex differences in placental responses suggest greater vulnerability of female fetuses to maternal distress with potentially greater fetal glucocorticoid exposure and excess IGF2. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings and to test whether this translates to potentially greater negative outcomes of maternal distress in female offspring in early childhood. PMID:26056743

  11. Down-Regulation of Decapping Protein 2 Mediates Chronic Nicotine Exposure-Induced Locomotor Hyperactivity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jing; Sun, Jinghan; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Tong; Ren, Qingzhong; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2012-01-01

    Long-term tobacco use causes nicotine dependence via the regulation of a wide range of genes and is accompanied by various health problems. Studies in mammalian systems have revealed some key factors involved in the effects of nicotine, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), dopamine and other neurotransmitters. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways that link nicotine-induced molecular and behavioral modifications remain elusive. Utilizing a chronic nicotine administration paradigm, we found that adult male fruit flies exhibited locomotor hyperactivity after three consecutive days of nicotine exposure, while nicotine-naive flies did not. Strikingly, this chronic nicotine-induced locomotor hyperactivity (cNILH) was abolished in Decapping Protein 2 or 1 (Dcp2 or Dcp1) -deficient flies, while only Dcp2-deficient flies exhibited higher basal levels of locomotor activity than controls. These results indicate that Dcp2 plays a critical role in the response to chronic nicotine exposure. Moreover, the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of Dcp2 in the fly head was suppressed by chronic nicotine treatment, and up-regulation of Dcp2 expression in the nervous system blocked cNILH. These results indicate that down-regulation of Dcp2 mediates chronic nicotine-exposure-induced locomotor hyperactivity in Drosophila. The decapping proteins play a major role in mRNA degradation; however, their function in the nervous system has rarely been investigated. Our findings reveal a significant role for the mRNA decapping pathway in developing locomotor hyperactivity in response to chronic nicotine exposure and identify Dcp2 as a potential candidate for future research on nicotine dependence. PMID:23300696

  12. Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Up-regulates iNOS Expression in ApoE Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ni; Kido, Takashi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; van Breemen, Cornelis; van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2012-01-01

    Traffic related particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, the biological mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation induces up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to contribute to vascular dysfunction, progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods ApoE knockout mice (30-week) were exposed to DE (at 200µg/m3 of particulate matter) or filtered-air (control) for 7 weeks (6h/day, 5days/week). iNOS expression in the blood vessels and heart was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. To examine iNOS activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and vasoconstriction stimulated by phenylephrine (PE) was measured with and without the presence of the specific inhibitor for iNOS (1400W). NF-κB (p65) activity was examined by ELISA. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-κB (p65) was determined by real-time PCR. Results DE exposure significantly enhanced iNOS expression in the thoracic aorta (4-fold) and heart (1.5 fold). DE exposure significantly attenuated PE-stimulated vasoconstriction by ~20%, which was partly reversed by 1400W. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-κB was significantly augmented after DE exposure. NF-κB activity was enhanced 2-fold after DE inhalation, and the augmented NF-κB activity was positively correlated with iNOS expression (R2= 0.5998). Conclusions We show that exposure to DE increases iNOS expression and activity possibly via NF-κB-mediated pathway. We suspect that DE exposure-caused up-regulation of iNOS contributes to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis, which could ultimately lead to urban air pollution-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:21722660

  13. The potential immune modulatory effect of chronic bisphenol A exposure on gene regulation in male medaka (Oryzias latipes) liver.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenhui; Shen, Yang; Pan, Chenyuan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Minghong; Yang, Ming; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) ubiquitously present in various environmental media. The present study aims to identify the responsive genes in male fish chronically exposed to low concentrations of BPA at the transcription level. We screened genes from a suppression subtractive hybridization library constructed from male medaka (Oryzias latipes) livers after 60-d exposure to 10μg/L BPA under the condition at which changes of hepatic antioxidant parameters have been previously reported. The identified genes were predicted to be involved in multiple biological processes including antioxidant physiology, endocrine system, detoxification, notably associated with the immune response processes. With real time PCR analysis, the immune-associated genes including hepcidin-like precursor, complement component and factors, MHC class I, alpha-2-macroglobulin and novel immune-type receptor 6 isoform were significantly up-regulated in a nonmonotonic dose response pattern in livers upon exposure to different concentrations of BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1000μg/L). Our results demonstrated a negative impact on gene regulation in fish chronically exposed to relatively low and environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA, and suggested the potential immune modulatory effect of chronic EDC exposure on fish. The immunotoxicity of BPA and other EDCs should be much concerned for the health of human beings and other vertebrates exposed to it. PMID:27104808

  14. Influence of short time exposure to an insect growth regulator, hexaflumuron, on mortality and adult emergence of vector mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Vasuki, V; Rajavel, A R

    1992-01-01

    Hexaflumuron, an insect growth regulator (IGR), was found to greatly affect the development of immatures and emergence of adults of three species of vector mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi, when larvae were subjected to short time exposure of < or = 1 h. This IGR could completely prevent adult emergence even at a minimum exposure time of 10 min at 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 mg/l. On treatment, larval and pupal mortality as well as varying degrees of morphogenetic abnormalities were induced in immatures and adults of the three species. Four weeks of control achieved in a slow moving sullage canal breeding Culex quinquefasciatus indicates that this IGR can be of use in such breeding habitats. PMID:1308571

  15. The role of nodose ganglia in the regulation of cardiovascular function following pulmonary exposure to ultraffine titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Hong; Wu, Zhongxin; Lin, Yen-Chang; Chen, Teh-Hsun; Cumpston, Jared L; Kashon, Michael L; Leonard, Steve; Munson, Albert E; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of nanosized air pollutant particles is a recognised risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, the link between occupational exposure to engineered nanoparticles and adverse cardiovascular events remains unclear. In the present study, the authors demonstrated that pulmonary exposure of rats to ultrafine titanium dioxide (UFTiO2) significantly increased heart rate and depressed diastolic function of the heart in response to isoproterenol. Moreover, pulmonary inhalation of UFTiO2 elevated mean and diastolic blood pressure in response to norepinephrine. Pretreatment of the rats ip with the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blocker ruthenium red inhibited substance P synthesis in nodose ganglia and associated functional and biological changes in the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, the effects of pulmonary inhalation of UFTiO2 on cardiovascular function are most likely triggered by a lung-nodose ganglia-regulated pathway via the activation of TRP channels in the lung. PMID:23593933

  16. UP-REGULATION OF TISSUE FACTOR IN HUMAN PULMONARY ARTERY ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AFTER ULTRAFINE PARTICLE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Epidemiology studies have linked exposure to pollutant particles to

    increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but the mechanisms remain unknown.

    Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the ultrafine fraction of ambient pollutant

    particle...

  17. Epigenetic histone modification regulates developmental lead exposure induced hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Man; Xu, Yi; Cai, Rong; Tang, Yuqing; Ge, Meng-Meng; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Li; Hu, Fan; Ruan, Di-Yun; Wang, Hui-Li

    2014-02-10

    Lead (Pb) exposure was commonly considered as a high environmental risk factor for the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the molecular basis of this pathological process still remains elusive. In light of the role of epigenetics in modulating the neurological disease and the causative environment, the alterations of histone modifications in the hippocampus of rats exposed by various doses of lead, along with concomitant behavioral deficits, were investigated in this study. According to the free and forced open field test, there showed that in a dosage-dependent manner, lead exposure could result in the increased locomotor activity of rats, that is, hyperactivity: a subtype of ADHD. Western blotting assays revealed that the levels of histone acetylation increased significantly in the hippocampus by chronic lead exposure, while no dramatic changes were detected in terms of expression yields of ADHD-related dopaminergic proteins, indicating that histone acetylation plays essential roles in this toxicant-involved pathogenesis. In addition, the increased level of histone acetylation might be attributed to the enzymatic activity of p300, a typical histone acetyltransferase, as the transcriptional level of p300 was significantly increased upon higher-dose Pb exposure. In summary, this study first discovered the epigenetic mechanism bridging the environmental influence (Pb) and the disease itself (ADHD) in the histone modification level, paving the way for the comprehensive understanding of ADHD's etiology and in further steps, establishing the therapy strategy of this widespread neurological disorder. PMID:24291742

  18. Exposure to coplanar PCBs induces endothelial cell inflammation through epigenetic regulation of NF-κB subunit p65.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Perkins, Jordan T; Petriello, Michael C; Hennig, Bernhard

    2015-12-15

    Epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones alter cellular phenotypes without changing genetic codes. Alterations of epigenetic marks can be induced by exposure to environmental pollutants and may contribute to associated disease risks. Here we test the hypothesis that endothelial cell dysfunction induced by exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is mediated in part though histone modifications. In this study, human vascular endothelial cells were exposed to physiologically relevant concentrations of several PCBs congeners (e.g., PCBs 77, 118, 126 and 153) followed by quantification of inflammatory gene expression and changes of histone methylation. Only exposure to coplanar PCBs 77 and 126 induced the expression of histone H3K9 trimethyl demethylase jumonji domain-containing protein 2B (JMJD2B) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subunit p65, activated NF-κB signaling as evidenced by nuclear translocation of p65, and up-regulated p65 target inflammatory genes, such as interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and IL-1α/β. The increased accumulation of JMJD2B in the p65 promoter led to a depletion of H3K9me3 repression mark, which accounts for the observed up-regulation of p65 and associated inflammatory genes. JMJD2B gene knockdown confirmed a critical role for this histone demethylase in mediating PCB-induced inflammation of the vascular endothelium. Finally, it was determined, via chemical inhibition, that PCB-induced up-regulation of JMJD2B was estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) dependent. These data suggest that coplanar PCBs may exert endothelial cell toxicity through changes in histone modifications. PMID:26519613

  19. Poor Americans: How the Poor White Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilisuk, Marc; Pilisuk, Phyllis

    Contents of this book include the following essays which originally appeared in "Transaction" magazine: (1) "Poor Americans: an introduction," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (2) "How the white poor live," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (3) "The culture of poverty," Oscar Lewis; (4) "Life in Appalachia--the case of Hugh McCaslin," Robert…

  20. Increased expression of long noncoding RNA TUG1 predicts a poor prognosis of gastric cancer and regulates cell proliferation by epigenetically silencing of p57

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, E; He, X; Yin, D; Han, L; Qiu, M; Xu, T; Xia, R; Xu, L; Yin, R; De, W

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as crucial regulators of cancer biology that contribute to tumorigenesis. LncRNA TUG1 was initially detected in a genomic screen for genes upregulated in response to taurine treatment in developing mouse retinal cells. Our previous study showed that TUG1 could affect cell proliferation through epigenetically regulating HOXB7 in human non-small cell lung cancer. However, the clinical significance and potential role of TUG1 in GC remains unclear. In this study, we found that TUG1 is significantly increased and is correlated with outcomes in gastric cancer (GC). Further experiments revealed that knockdown of TUG1 repressed GC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations showed that TUG1 has a key role in G0/G1 arrest. We further demonstrated that TUG1 was associated with PRC2 and that this association was required for epigenetic repression of cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitors, including p15, p16, p21, p27 and p57, thus contributing to the regulation of GC cell cycle and proliferation. Together, our results suggest that TUG1, as a regulator of proliferation, may serve as a candidate prognostic biomarker and target for new therapies in human GC. PMID:26913601

  1. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  2. Temperature regulation in the unrestrained rabbit during exposure to 600-MHz radiofrequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Long, M.D.; Fehlner, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Six male New Zealand white rabbits were individually exposed to 600-MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation for 90 min in a waveguide exposure system at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 or 30 C. Immediately after exposure, the rabbit was removed from the exposure chamber and its colonic and ear skin temperatures were quickly measured. The whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) required to increase colonic and ear skin temperature was determined. At a Ta of 20 C, the threshold SAR for elevating colonic and ear skin temperature was 0.64 and 0.26 W/kg, respectively. At a Ta of 30 C, the threshold SARs were slightly less than at 20 C, with values of 0.26 W/kg for elevating colonic temperature and 0.19 W/kg for elevating ear skin temperature. The relationship between heat load and elevation in deep body temperature shown in the study at 600 MHz is similar to past studies that employed much-higher frequencies of RF radiation (2450-2884 MHz).

  3. Up-regulation of KIF14 is a predictor of poor survival and a novel prognostic biomarker of chemoresistance to paclitaxel treatment in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjing; Shi, Yanhua; Li, Jing; Cui, Wei; Yang, Baozhi

    2016-01-01

    Kinesin family member 14 (KIF14) is a member of kinesin family proteins which have been found to be dysregulated in various cancer types. However, the expression of KIF14 and its potential prognostic significance have not been investigated in cervical cancer. Real-time PCR was performed to assess the expression levels of KIF14 in 47 pairs of cervical cancer tissues and their matched normal tissues from patients who had not been exposed to chemotherapy as well as tissue samples from 57 cervical cancer patients who are sensitive to paclitaxel treatment and 53 patients who are resistant. The association between KIF14 expression levels in tissue and clinicopathological features or chemosensitivity was examined. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards model were applied to assess the correlation between KIF14 expression levels and overall survival (OS) of cervical cancer patients. KIF14 expression levels were significantly increased in cervical cancer tissues compared with matched non-cancerous tissues and it was higher in tissues of patients who are chemoresistant compared with those who are chemosensitive. KIF14 expression was positively associated with high tumour stage (P=0.0044), lymph node metastasis (P=0.0034) and chemoresistance (P<0.0001). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that high KIF14 expression levels predicted poor survival in patients with (P=0.0024) or without (P=0.0028) paclitaxel treatment. Multivariate analysis revealed that KIF14 was an independent prognostic factor for OS. Our study suggests that KIF14 may serve as a predictor of poor survival and a novel prognostic biomarker of chemoresistance to paclitaxel treatment in cervical cancer. PMID:27128470

  4. Up-regulation of KIF14 is a predictor of poor survival and a novel prognostic biomarker of chemoresistance to paclitaxel treatment in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Shi, Yanhua; Li, Jing; Cui, Wei; Yang, Baozhi

    2016-04-01

    Kinesin family member 14 (KIF14) is a member of kinesin family proteins which have been found to be dysregulated in various cancer types. However, the expression of KIF14 and its potential prognostic significance have not been investigated in cervical cancer. Real-time PCR was performed to assess the expression levels of KIF14 in 47 pairs of cervical cancer tissues and their matched normal tissues from patients who had not been exposed to chemotherapy as well as tissue samples from 57 cervical cancer patients who are sensitive to paclitaxel treatment and 53 patients who are resistant. The association between KIF14 expression levels in tissue and clinicopathological features or chemosensitivity was examined. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards model were applied to assess the correlation between KIF14 expression levels and overall survival (OS) of cervical cancer patients. KIF14 expression levels were significantly increased in cervical cancer tissues compared with matched non-cancerous tissues and it was higher in tissues of patients who are chemoresistant compared with those who are chemosensitive. KIF14 expression was positively associated with high tumour stage (P=0.0044), lymph node metastasis (P=0.0034) and chemoresistance (P<0.0001). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that high KIF14 expression levels predicted poor survival in patients with (P=0.0024) or without (P=0.0028) paclitaxel treatment. Multivariate analysis revealed that KIF14 was an independent prognostic factor for OS. Our study suggests that KIF14 may serve as a predictor of poor survival and a novel prognostic biomarker of chemoresistance to paclitaxel treatment in cervical cancer. PMID:27128470

  5. Analysis of cell-cycle regulation following exposure of lung-derived cells to γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trani, D.; Lucchetti, C.; Cassone, M.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Acute exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation results in a delay of cell-cycle progression and/or augmentation of apoptosis. Following ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, cell-cycle arrest in the G1- or G2-phase of the cell-cycle prevents or delays DNA replication or mitosis, providing time for the DNA repair machinery to exert its function. Deregulation or failing of cell-cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair mechanisms may lead normal cells bearing chromosome mutations to acquire neoplastic autonomy, which in turn can trigger the onset of cancer. Existing studies have focused on the impact of p53 status on the radiation response of lung cancer (LC) cell lines in terms of both cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis, while no comparative studies have been performed on the radiation response of lung derived normal and cancerous epithelial cells. To investigate the radiation response in normal and cancerous phenotypes, along with the role and impact of p53 status, and possible correlations with pRb/p105 or other proteins involved in carcinogenesis and cell-cycle regulation, we selected two lung-derived epithelial cell lines, one normal (NL20, p53 wild-type) and one non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), H358 (known to be p53-deficient). We compared the levels of γ-induced cell proliferation ability, cell-cycle arrest, apoptotic index, and expression levels of cell-cycle regulating and regulated proteins. The different cell sensitivity, apoptotic response and protein expression profiles resulting from our study for NL20 and H358 cells suggest that still unknown mechanisms involving p53, pRb/p105 and their target molecules might play a pivotal role in determining cell sensitivity and resistance upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  6. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light. PMID:11886503

  7. Systemic TLR2 agonist exposure regulates hematopoietic stem cells via cell-autonomous and cell-non-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Herman, A C; Monlish, D A; Romine, M P; Bhatt, S T; Zippel, S; Schuettpelz, L G

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a member of the TLR family of receptors that play a central role in innate immunity. In addition to regulating effector immune cells, where it recognizes a wide variety of pathogen-associated and nonpathogen-associated endogenous ligands, TLR2 is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Its role in HSCs, however, is not well understood. Furthermore, augmented TLR2 signaling is associated with myelodysplastic syndrome, an HSC disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and a high risk of transformation to leukemia, suggesting that aberrant signaling through this receptor may have clinically significant effects on HSCs. Herein, we show that systemic exposure of mice to a TLR2 agonist leads to an expansion of bone marrow and spleen phenotypic HSCs and progenitors, but a loss of HSC self-renewal capacity. Treatment of chimeric animals shows that these effects are largely cell non-autonomous, with a minor contribution from cell-autonomous TLR2 signaling, and are in part mediated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-α. Together, these data suggest that TLR2 ligand exposure influences HSC cycling and function via unique mechanisms from TLR4, and support an important role for TLR2 in the regulation of HSCs. PMID:27315114

  8. Chapter 5. Pesticide Regulations: Exposure-dose modeling from FIFRA to FQPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The federal laws and regulations governing the registration and use of pesticides in the United States under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act are published in the Federal Register, while state laws such as California are published in the California Food an...

  9. MUSCARINIC CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR REGULATION AND ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN RESPONSE TO INSECTICIDE EXPOSURE DURING DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daily injections of low doses of the organophosphorus pesticide, parathion, into neonatal rats during the rapid phase of cholinergic system development (postnatal days 8-20), resulted in an average 67% inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and a 23% down regulation of muscarinic cho...

  10. Determining the Impact of Prenatal Tobacco Exposure on Self-Regulation at 6 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Sandra A.; Fang, Hua; Johnson, Craig; James, Karen E.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2014-01-01

    Our goal in the present study was to examine the effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on infant self-regulation, exploring birth weight as a mediator and sex as a moderator of risk. A prospective sample of 218 infants was assessed at 6 months of age. Infants completed a battery of tasks assessing working memory/inhibition, attention, and…

  11. Sugars and light/dark exposure trigger differential regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress).

    PubMed

    Sokolov, L N; Déjardin, A; Kleczkowski, L A

    1998-12-15

    Expression of four Arabidopsis (thale cress) genes corresponding to the small (ApS) and large subunits (ApL1, ApL2, ApL3) of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a key enzyme of starch biosynthesis, was found to be profoundly and differentially regulated by sugar and light/dark exposures. Transcript levels of both ApL2 and ApL3, and to a lesser extent ApS, increased severalfold upon feeding sucrose or glucose to the detached leaves in the dark, whereas the mRNA content for ApL1 decreased under the same conditions. Glucose was, in general, less effective than sucrose in inducing regulation of AGPase genes, possibly due to observed limitations in its uptake when compared with sucrose uptake by detached leaves. Osmotic agents [sorbitol, poly(ethylene glycol)] had no effect on ApS, ApL2 and ApL3 transcript level, but they did mimic the effect of sucrose on ApL1 gene, suggesting that the latter is regulated by osmotic pressure rather than any particular sugar. For all the genes the sugar effect was closely mimicked by an exposure of the dark-pre-adapted leaves to the light. Under both dark and light conditions, sucrose fed to the detached leaves was found to be rapidly metabolized to hexoses and, to some extent, starch. Starch production reflected most probably an increase in substrate availability for AGPase reaction rather than being due to changes in AGPase protein content, since both the sugar feeding and light exposure had little or no effect on the activity of AGPase or on the levels of its small and large subunit proteins in leaf extracts. The data suggest tight translational or post-translational control, but they may also reflect spatial control of AGPase gene expression within a leaf. The sugar/light-dependent regulation of AGPase gene expression may represent a part of a general cellular response to the availability/allocation of carbohydrates during photosynthesis. PMID:9841881

  12. Down-regulation of C12orf59 is associated with a poor prognosis and VHL mutations in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianting; Li, Cailing; Luo, Liya; Xia, Lingling; Li, Xianxin; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Zesong

    2016-01-01

    C12orf59 is newly identified gene in kidney. However, the relation of C12orf59 expression and clinic features is unknown. Here, our study showed that C12orf59 was broadly expressed in normal human tissues with high expression levels in kidney while its expression is beyond detectable in a panel of cancer cell lines. C12orf59 expression in RCC was significantly decreased compared with corresponding adjacent noncancerous tissues (P < 0.01). The decreased C12orf59 expression was correlated with lymph node status (P < 0.05), distant metastases (P < 0.05), poor survival (P < 0.001) (HR 3.00; 95% CI, 1.29–7.53), VHL non-sense mutations or frame-shift mutations (P < 0.01), and UMPP gene non-sense mutations or frame-shift mutations (P = 0.01). Thus, we propose that the decreased C12orf59 expression status is a prognostic biomarker of ccRCC and cooperates with the loss of VHL all the while promoting renal carcinogenesis. PMID:26758419

  13. Preparation of a Novel Form of Gelatin With a Three-Dimensional Ordered Macroporous Structure to Regulate the Release of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Zhao, Zongzhe; Hao, Yanna; Zhao, Ying; Qiu, Yang; Jiang, Jie; Yu, Tong; Ji, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel three-dimensional ordered macroporous gelatin (3DOMG) was fabricated as a carrier for increasing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs, offering sustained release and a high oral bioavailability. Polymethyl methacrylate nanospheres (257 nm) were used as a colloidal plastic framework to synthesize 3DOMG. Fenofibrate (FNB) was selected as a model drug and loaded onto 3DOMG by the adsorption equilibrium method. Detailed characterization showed that the FNB absorbed onto 3DOMG was in a microcrystalline state. A fluorescence experiment and the prepared drug microcrystal network gave further information on the physical state of the drug. A degradation experiment proved that 3DOMG was readily biodegradable. In vitro release testing showed that 3DOMG increased the dissolution rate of FNB and produced a sustained release. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study confirmed that 3DOMG improved the oral bioavailability compared with that of commercial sustained-release capsules. These findings confirm that 3DOMG can be regarded as a promising carrier for an oral drug delivery system. PMID:26906173

  14. Reducing Pb poisoning in birds and Pb exposure in game meat consumers: the dual benefit of effective Pb shot regulation.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rafael; Vallverdú-Coll, Núria; López-Antia, Ana; Taggart, Mark A; Martínez-Haro, Monica; Guitart, Raimon; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E

    2014-02-01

    The use of lead (Pb) ammunition in the form of shot pellets has been identified as a Pb exposure risk in wildlife and their human consumers. We explore the hypothesis that Pb shot ban enforcement reduces the risk of avian Pb poisoning as well as Pb exposure in game meat consumers. We assessed compliance with a partial ban on Pb shot commencing in 2003 by examination of 937 waterbirds harvested by hunters between 2007 and 2012 in the Ebro delta (Spain). Prevalence of Pb shot ingestion was determined, as were Pb concentrations in liver and muscle tissue to evaluate the potential for Pb exposure in game meat consumers. Hunted birds with only embedded Pb shot (no steel) declined from 26.9% in 2007-08 to <2% over the following three hunting seasons after ban reinforcement. Pb shot ingestion in mallards decreased from a pre-ban value of 30.2% to 15.5% in the post-ban period. Liver Pb levels were predominantly defined by the presence of ingested shot, whereas muscle levels were defined by the presence of both ingested and embedded shot. Only 2.5% of mallard muscle tissue had Pb levels above European Union regulations for meat (0.1μg/g wet weight) in the 2008-09 season, when Pb shot ingestion prevalence was also at a minimum (5.1%). Effective restrictions in Pb ammunition use have a dual benefit since this reduces Pb exposure for game meat consumers due to embedded ammunition as well as reducing Pb poisoning in waterbirds. PMID:24309467

  15. Escherichia coli Response to Uranyl Exposure at Low pH and Associated Protein Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia colicells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzedby two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro. PMID:24587082

  16. Regulation of catalase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Effects of oxidant stress and exposure to human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H Y; Hassett, D J; Bean, K; Cohen, M S

    1992-09-01

    We studied the effects of oxidant stress on the catalase activity and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is an obligate pathogen of man that evokes a remarkable but ineffective neutrophil response. Gonococci make no superoxide dismutase but express high catalase activity. Gonococcal catalase activity increased threefold when organisms were subjected to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide. This increase in catalase activity was marked by a parallel increase in protein concentration recognized by a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against the purified gonococcal enzyme. Catalase was primarily localized to the gonococcal cytoplasm in the presence or absence of stress; only a single isoenzyme of catalase could be identified. Exposure of gonococci to neutrophil-derived oxidants was accomplished by stimulating neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or by using gonococcal Opa variants that interacted with neutrophils with different degrees of efficiency. Gonococci exposed to neutrophils demonstrated a twofold increase in catalase activity in spite of some reduction in viability. Exposure of gonococci to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide made the organisms significantly more resistant to higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and to neutrophils than control organisms. These results suggest that catalase is an important defense for N. gonorrhoeae during attack by human neutrophils. The rapid response of this enzyme to hydrogen peroxide should be taken into consideration in studies designed to evaluate the interaction between neutrophils and gonococci. PMID:1522209

  17. Effects of chronic exposure to cocaine are regulated by the neuronal protein Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Bibb, J A; Chen, J; Taylor, J R; Svenningsson, P; Nishi, A; Snyder, G L; Yan, Z; Sagawa, Z K; Ouimet, C C; Nairn, A C; Nestler, E J; Greengard, P

    2001-03-15

    Cocaine enhances dopamine-mediated neurotransmission by blocking dopamine re-uptake at axon terminals. Most dopamine-containing nerve terminals innervate medium spiny neurons in the striatum of the brain. Cocaine addiction is thought to stem, in part, from neural adaptations that act to maintain equilibrium by countering the effects of repeated drug administration. Chronic exposure to cocaine upregulates several transcription factors that alter gene expression and which could mediate such compensatory neural and behavioural changes. One such transcription factor is DeltaFosB, a protein that persists in striatum long after the end of cocaine exposure. Here we identify cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) as a downstream target gene of DeltaFosB by use of DNA array analysis of striatal material from inducible transgenic mice. Overexpression of DeltaFosB, or chronic cocaine administration, raised levels of Cdk5 messenger RNA, protein, and activity in the striatum. Moreover, injection of Cdk5 inhibitors into the striatum potentiated behavioural effects of repeated cocaine administration. Our results suggest that changes in Cdk5 levels mediated by DeltaFosB, and resulting alterations in signalling involving D1 dopamine receptors, contribute to adaptive changes in the brain related to cocaine addiction. PMID:11268215

  18. Estrogen target gene regulation and coactivator expression in rat uterus after developmental exposure to the ultraviolet filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor.

    PubMed

    Durrer, Stefan; Maerkel, Kirsten; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2005-05-01

    Because the estrogen receptor (ER) ligand type influences transactivation, it is important to obtain information on molecular actions of nonclassical ER agonists. UV filters from cosmetics represent new classes of endocrine active chemicals, including the preferential ER beta ligands 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) and 3-benzylidene camphor. We studied estrogen target gene expression in uterus of Long Evans rats after developmental exposure to 4-MBC (0.7, 7, 24, and 47 mg/kg x d) administered in feed to the parent generation before mating, during pregnancy and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. 4-MBC altered steady-state levels of mRNAs encoding for ER alpha, ER beta, progesterone receptor (PR), IGF-I, androgen receptor, determined by real-time RT-PCR in uterus of 12-wk-old offspring. Western-blot analyses of the same tissue homogenates indicated changes in ER alpha and PR but not ER beta proteins. To assess sensitivity to estradiol (E2), offspring were ovariectomized on d 70, injected with E2 (10 or 50 microg/kg sc) on d 84, and killed 6 h later. Acute up-regulation of PR and IGF-I and down-regulation of ER alpha and androgen receptor by E2 were dose-dependently reduced in 4-MBC-exposed rats. The reduced response to E2 was accompanied by reduced coactivator SRC-1 mRNA and protein levels. Our data indicate that developmental exposure to 4-MBC affects the regulation of estrogen target genes and the expression of nuclear receptor coregulators in uterus at mRNA and protein levels. PMID:15705771

  19. ROR functions as a ceRNA to regulate Nanog expression by sponging miR-145 and predicts poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Wang, Peng; Hua, Yongqiang; Xi, Hao; Meng, Zhiqiang; Liu, Te; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Luming

    2016-01-01

    lncRNAs have emerged as key regulators of tumor development and progression. ROR is a typical lncRNA that plays important regulatory roles in the pathogenesis and progression of tumors. Nevertheless, current understanding of the involvement of ROR in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumorigenesis remains limited. In this study, we measured ROR in 61 paired cancerous and noncancerous tissue samples by qRT-PCR and investigated the biological role of ROR on the phenotypes of pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in vitro and in vivo. The effects of ROR on PCSCs were studied by RNA interference approaches in vitro and in vivo. Insights of the mechanism of competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) were gained from bioinformatic analysis, luciferase assays and RNA binding protein immunoprecipitation. The positive ROR/Nanog interaction was identified and verified by immunohistochemistry assay. Compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, ROR was up-regulated in most tumor tissues. Knockdown of ROR by RNA interference in PCSCs inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis and decreased migration. Moreover, ROR silencing resulted in significantly decreased tumourigenicity of PCSCs in nude mice than controls. In particular, ROR may act as a ceRNA, effectively becoming a sink for miR-145, thereby activating the derepression of core transcription factors Nanog. In conclusions, we demonstrated that decreased ROR expression could inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and tumourigenicity by modulating Nanog. Therefore, ROR is a potential novel prognostic marker to predict the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer patients after surgery and may be a rational target for therapy. PMID:26636540

  20. Effects of arsenic exposure on DNA methylation and epigenetic gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, John F; Puga, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic is a nonmutagenic human carcinogen that induces tumors through unknown mechanisms. A growing body of evidence suggests that its carcinogenicity results from epigenetic changes, particularly in DNA methylation. Changes in gene methylation status, mediated by arsenic, have been proposed activate oncogene expression or silence tumor suppressor genes, leading to long-term changes in activity of genes controlling cell transformation. Mostly descriptive, and often contradictory, studies have demonstrated that arsenic exposure is associated with both hypo- and hyper-methylation at various genetic loci in vivo or in vitro. This ambiguity has made it difficult to assess whether the changes induced by arsenic are causally involved in the transformation process or are simply a reflection of the altered physiology of rapidly dividing cancer cells. Here, we discuss the evidence supporting changes in DNA methylation as a cause of arsenic carcinogenesis and highlight the strengths and limitations of these studies, as well areas where consistencies and inconsistencies exist. PMID:20514360

  1. Combining datasets to predict the effects of regulation of environmental lead exposure in housing stock.

    PubMed

    Strauss, W J; Carroll, R J; Bortnick, S M; Menkedick, J R; Schultz, B D

    2001-03-01

    A model for children's blood lead concentrations as a function of environmental lead exposures was developed by combining two nationally representative sources of data that characterize the marginal distributions of blood lead and environmental lead with a third regional dataset that contains joint measures of blood lead and environmental lead. The complicating factor addressed in this article was the fact that methods for assessing environmental lead were different in the national and regional datasets. Relying on an assumption of transportability (that although the marginal distributions of blood lead and environmental lead may be different between the regional dataset and the nation as a whole, the joint relationship between blood lead and environmental lead is the same), the model makes use of a latent variable approach to estimate the joint distribution of blood lead and environmental lead nationwide. PMID:11252599

  2. Gestational nicotine exposure regulates expression of AMPA and NMDA receptors and their signaling apparatus in developing and adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Dávila-García, Martha I.; Yarl, Weonpo; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.

    2011-01-01

    Untimely activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) by nicotine results in short- and long-term consequences on learning and behavior. In this study, the aim was to determine how prenatal nicotine exposure affects components of glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus during postnatal development. We investigated regulation of both nAChRs and glutamate receptors for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), from postnatal day (P) 1 to P63 after a temporally restricted exposure to saline or nicotine for 14 days in utero. We analyzed postsynaptic density components associated with AMPAR and NMDAR signaling: Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), Calmodulin (CaM), and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95), as well as presynaptically localized synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25). At P1, there was significantly heightened expression of AMPAR subunit GluR1 but not GluR2, and of NMDAR subunits NR1, NR2a and NR2d but not NR2b. NR2c was not detectable. At P1, the postsynaptic proteins CaMKIIα, CaM, and PSD95 were also significantly upregulated, together with presynaptic SNAP25. This enhanced expression of glutamate receptors and signaling proteins was concomitant with elevated levels of [3H] Epibatidine (EB) binding in prenatal nicotine-exposed hippocampus, indicating that α4β2 nAChR may influence glutamatergic function in the hippocampus at P1. By P14, neither [3H]EB binding nor the expression levels of subunits GluR1, GluR2, NR1, NR2a, NR2b, NR2c, or NR2d seemed changed with prenatal nicotine. However, CaMKIIα was significantly upregulated with nicotine treatment while CaM showed downregulation at P14. The effects of nicotine persisted in young adult brains at P63. They exhibited significantly downregulated GluR2, NR1, and NR2c expression levels in hippocampal homogenates and a considerably muted overall distribution of [3H]AMPA binding in areas CA1, CA2, CA3, and the dentate

  3. Sterilizing the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Sheila M.

    1977-01-01

    Suggests that freedom for the middle classes may mean vulnerability for the poor. The enthusiasm for sterilization may be so intense as to deprive the poor of their right not to be sterilized. (Author/AM)

  4. Effects of sodium chloride exposure on ion regulation in larvae (glochidia) of the freshwater mussel Lampsilis fasciola.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Lygia S; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M; Loro, Vania L; Higgins, Sarah; Gillis, Patricia L

    2015-12-01

    The salinization of freshwater can have negative effects on ecosystem health, with heightened effects in salt-sensitive biota such as glochidia, the larvae of freshwater mussels. However, the toxicological mechanism underlying this sensitivity is unknown. Therefore, Lampsilis fasciola glochidia were exposed to NaCl (nominally 0.25 and 1.0 g/L) prepared in reconstituted moderately-hard water (control), as well as to a dilution of that water (1:4) with ultrapure reference water (diluted control). Unidirectional Na(+) influx (measured with (22)Na) was evaluated after 1, 3 and 48 h of exposure. In addition, unidirectional Cl(-) influx (measured with (36)Cl), whole-body ion (Cl(-) and Na(+)) concentrations, and glochidia viability (measured as the ability to close valves) were assessed after 48 h of exposure. Significantly reduced glochidia viability (56%) was observed after exposure to 1.0 g/L NaCl. Na(+) influx was significantly higher in glochidia exposed to both 0.25 and 1.0 g/L NaCl for 1h than in those kept under control conditions. After 3 and 48 h of exposure, differences in Na(+) influx rate between salt-exposed and control glochidia were generally reduced, indicating that larvae may be able to, at least temporarily, recover their ability to regulate Na(+) influx when exposed to elevated NaCl concentration. Compared to the moderately-hard water control, whole-body Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were relatively unchanged in glochidia exposed to 0.25 g/L NaCl, but were significantly elevated in glochidia exposed to 1.0 g/L NaCl and the diluted control. While Na(+) influx rate had recovered to the control level after 48 h of exposure to 1.0 g/L NaCl, Cl(-) influx rate remained elevated, being ~7-fold higher than the Na(+) influx rate. These findings suggest that the loss of viability observed when glochidia were exposed to a high NaCl concentration (1.0 g/L) could be caused by ionoregulatory disturbances mainly associated with an elevated Cl(-) influx. PMID

  5. Fluoride exposure regulates the elongation phase of protein synthesis in cultured Bergmann glia cells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Méndez, Marco; Ramírez, Diana; Alamillo, Nely; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Del Razo, Luz María; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-08-17

    Fluoride is an environmental pollutant present in dental products, food, pesticides and water. The latter, is the greatest source of exposure to this contaminant. Structural and functional damages to the central nervous system are present in exposed population. An established consequence of the neuronal is the release of a substantial amount of glutamate to the extracellular space, leading to an excitotoxic insult. Glutamate exerts its actions through the activation of specific plasma membrane receptors and transporters present in neurons and in glia cells and it is the over-activation of glutamate receptors and transporters, the biochemical hallmark of neuronal and oligodendrocyte cell death. In this context, taking into consideration that fluoride leads to degeneration of cerebellar cells, we took the advantage of the well-established model of cerebellar Bergmann glia cultures to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms inherent to fluoride neurotoxicity that might be triggered in glia cells. We could establish that fluoride decreases [(35)S]-methionine incorporation into newly synthesized polypeptides, in a time-dependent manner, and that this halt in protein synthesis is the result of a decrease in the elongation phase of translation, mediated by an augmentation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 phosphorylation. These results favor the notion of glial cells as targets of fluoride toxicity and strengthen the idea of a critical involvement of glia cells in the function and dysfunction of the brain. PMID:24954634

  6. PIAS1 is a determinant of poor survival and acts as a positive feedback regulator of AR signaling through enhanced AR stabilization in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Puhr, M; Hoefer, J; Eigentler, A; Dietrich, D; van Leenders, G; Uhl, B; Hoogland, M; Handle, F; Schlick, B; Neuwirt, H; Sailer, V; Kristiansen, G; Klocker, H; Culig, Z

    2016-05-01

    Novel drugs like Abiraterone or Enzalutamide, which target androgen receptor (AR) signaling to improve androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), have been developed during the past years. However, the application of these drugs is limited because of occurrence of inherent or acquired therapy resistances during the treatment. Thus, identification of new molecular targets is urgently required to improve current therapeutic prostate cancer (PCa) treatment strategies. PIAS1 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription-1)) is known to be an important cell cycle regulator and PIAS1-mediated SUMOylation is essential for DNA repair. In this context, elevated PIAS1 expression has already been associated with cancer initiation. Thus, in the present study, we addressed the question of whether PIAS1 targeting can be used as a basis for an improved PCa therapy in combination with anti-androgens. We show that PIAS1 significantly correlates with AR expression in PCa tissue and in cell lines and demonstrate that high PIAS1 levels predict shorter relapse-free survival. Our patient data are complemented by mechanistic and functional in vitro experiments that identify PIAS1 as an androgen-responsive gene and a crucial factor for AR signaling via prevention of AR degradation. Furthermore, PIAS1 knockdown is sufficient to decrease cell proliferation as well as cell viability. Strikingly, Abiraterone or Enzalutamide treatment in combination with PIAS1 depletion is even more effective than single-drug treatment in multiple PCa cell models, rendering PIAS1 as a promising target protein for a combined treatment approach to improve future PCa therapies. PMID:26257066

  7. PIAS1 is a determinant of poor survival and acts as a positive feedback regulator of AR signaling through enhanced AR stabilization in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puhr, M; Hoefer, J; Eigentler, A; Dietrich, D; van Leenders, G; Uhl, B; Hoogland, M; Handle, F; Schlick, B; Neuwirt, H; Sailer, V; Kristiansen, G; Klocker, H; Culig, Z

    2016-01-01

    Novel drugs like Abiraterone or Enzalutamide, which target androgen receptor (AR) signaling to improve androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), have been developed during the past years. However, the application of these drugs is limited because of occurrence of inherent or acquired therapy resistances during the treatment. Thus, identification of new molecular targets is urgently required to improve current therapeutic prostate cancer (PCa) treatment strategies. PIAS1 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription-1)) is known to be an important cell cycle regulator and PIAS1-mediated SUMOylation is essential for DNA repair. In this context, elevated PIAS1 expression has already been associated with cancer initiation. Thus, in the present study, we addressed the question of whether PIAS1 targeting can be used as a basis for an improved PCa therapy in combination with anti-androgens. We show that PIAS1 significantly correlates with AR expression in PCa tissue and in cell lines and demonstrate that high PIAS1 levels predict shorter relapse-free survival. Our patient data are complemented by mechanistic and functional in vitro experiments that identify PIAS1 as an androgen-responsive gene and a crucial factor for AR signaling via prevention of AR degradation. Furthermore, PIAS1 knockdown is sufficient to decrease cell proliferation as well as cell viability. Strikingly, Abiraterone or Enzalutamide treatment in combination with PIAS1 depletion is even more effective than single-drug treatment in multiple PCa cell models, rendering PIAS1 as a promising target protein for a combined treatment approach to improve future PCa therapies. PMID:26257066

  8. Up-regulated expression of phospholipase C, β1 is associated with tumor cell proliferation and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junxiang; Zhao, Xuya; Wang, Dazhi; He, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Cao, Wei; Huang, Yu; Wang, Ling; Zhou, Shi; Luo, Kaijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Phospholipase C, β1 (PLCB1) plays critical roles in intracellular transduction and regulating signal activation which are important to tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism of PLCB1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still unknown. This study aims to investigate whether its expression is associated with the clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of the patients with HCC. Methods Immunohistochemistry on two tissue microarrays containing 141 cases of HCC tissues and adjacent non-tumorous tissues were performed to analyze the correlation between PLCB1 expression and clinicopathological features. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox multivariate analysis were performed to determine the PLCB1 expression in HCC prognosis. Furthermore, effects of PLCB1 on proliferation of HCC cells were explored using a colony formation assay and apoptosis assay. Results We identified that PLCB1 expression was significantly higher in tumor tissues than that in adjacent non-tumorous tissues and associated with advanced tumor stage. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with PLCB1-positive tumors had poorer survival than the patients with PLCB1-negative tumors. In multivariate analyses, PLCB1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. Moreover, overexpression of PLCB1 in HCC cells promoted cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis, while knocking down PLCB1 reduced cell viability in vitro. Further investigation found that activation of ERK signaling might involve in PLCB1-mediated cell growth. Conclusion Our study suggests that PLCB1 promotes the progression of HCC and can be served as an independent prognostic factor and a promising therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:27051304

  9. Aniline exposure associated with up-regulated transcriptional responses of three glutathione S-transferase Delta genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wen-Chiao; Chien, Yi-Chih; Chien, Cheng-I

    2015-03-01

    Complex transcriptional profile of glutathione S-transferase Delta cluster genes occurred in the developmental process of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this project was to quantify the expression levels of Gst Delta class genes altered by aniline exposure and to understand the relationship between aniline dosages and the variation of Gst Delta genes expressed in D. melanogaster. Using RT-PCR expression assays, the expression patterns of the transcript mRNAs of the glutathione S-transferase Delta genes were revealed and their expression levels were measured at eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. The adult stage was selected for further dose-response assays. After analysis, the results indicated that three Gst Delta genes (Gst D2, Gst D5 and Gst D6) were found to show a peak of up-regulated transcriptional response at 6-8h of exposure of aniline. Furthermore, the dose-response relationship of their induction levels within the dose regiments (from 1.2 to 2.0 μl/tube) had been measured. The expression patterns and annotations of these genes were discussed in the context. PMID:25682008

  10. Chronic fetal exposure to caffeine altered resistance vessel functions via RyRs-BKCa down-regulation in rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Li, Yongmei; Gao, Qinqin; Li, Dawei; Tang, Jiaqi; Sun, Miao; Zhang, Pengjie; Liu, Bailin; Mao, Caiping; Xu, Zhice

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine modifies vascular/cardiac contractility. Embryonic exposure to caffeine altered cardiac functions in offspring. This study determined chronic influence of prenatal caffeine on vessel functions in offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (5-month-old) were exposed to high dose of caffeine, their offspring (5-month-old) were tested for vascular functions in mesenteric arteries (MA) and ion channel activities in smooth muscle cells. Prenatal exposure to caffeine increased pressor responses and vasoconstrictions to phenylephrine, accompanied by enhanced membrane depolarization. Large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels in buffering phenylephrine-induced vasoconstrictions was decreased, whole cell BKCa currents and spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) were decreased. Single channel recordings revealed reduced voltage/Ca2+ sensitivity of BKCa channels. BKCa α-subunit expression was unchanged, BKCa β1-subunit and sensitivity of BKCa to tamoxifen were reduced in the caffeine offspring as altered biophysical properties of BKCa in the MA. Simultaneous [Ca2+]i fluorescence and vasoconstriction testing showed reduced Ca2+, leading to diminished BKCa activation via ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels (RyRs), causing enhanced vascular tone. Reduced RyR1 was greater than that of RyR3. The results suggest that the altered STOCs activity in the caffeine offspring could attribute to down-regulation of RyRs-BKCa, providing new information for further understanding increased risks of hypertension in developmental origins. PMID:26277840

  11. Exposure of Human Prostaspheres to Bisphenol A Epigenetically Regulates SNORD Family Noncoding RNAs via Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Cheong, Ana; Lam, Hung-Ming; Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xuegong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiang; Medvedovic, Mario; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Prins, Gail S

    2015-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous endocrine disruptor exerting lifelong effects on gene expression in rodent prostate cancer (PCa) models. Here, we aimed to determine whether epigenetic events mediating the action of BPA on human prostaspheres enriched in epithelial stem-like/progenitor cells is linked to PCa. We performed genome-wide transcriptome and methylome analyses to identify changes in prostaspheres treated with BPA (10 nM, 200 nM, and 1000 nM) or estradiol-17β (E2) (0.1 nM) for 7 days and validated changes in expression, methylation, and histone marks in parallel-treated prostaspheres. BPA/E2-treatment altered expression of 91 genes but not the methylation status of 485,000 CpG sites in BPA/E2-treated prostaspheres. A panel of 26 genes was found repressed in all treatment groups. Fifteen of them were small nucleolar RNAs with C/D motif (SNORDs), which are noncoding, small nucleolar RNAs known to regulate ribosomal RNA assembly and function. Ten of the most down-regulated SNORDs were further studied. All 10 were confirmed repressed by BPA, but only 3 ratified as E2-repressed. SNORD suppression showed no correlation with methylation status changes in CpG sites in gene regulatory regions. Instead, BPA-induced gene silencing was found to associate with altered recruitments of H3K9me3, H3K4me3, and H3K27me3 to 5'-regulatory/exonic sequences of 5 SNORDs. Expression of 4 out of these 5 SNORDs (SNORD59A, SNORD82, SNORD116, and SNORD117) was shown to be reduced in PCa compared with adjacent normal tissue. This study reveals a novel and unique action of BPA in disrupting expression of PCa-associated SNORDs and a putative mechanism for reprogramming the prostasphere epigenome via histone modification. PMID:26248216

  12. miR-214/199a/199a* cluster levels predict poor survival in hepatocellular carcinoma through interference with cell-cycle regulators

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Dabiao; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhiliang; Xie, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the clinical and functional association of miR-214/199a/199a* cluster in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to clarify the mechanism of miR-214. Methods Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional regression analyses were used to determine the association of miR-214/199a/199a* cluster levels with the survival of HCC patients. The role of miR-214 in regulating HCC cell proliferation was studied with miR-214 mimics/inhibitor-treated cells. Furthermore, the inhibition effect of miR-214 on E2F2, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 3 and CDK6 expression was assessed in HCC cell lines with miR-214 mimics/inhibitors to increase/decrease miR-214 expression. Direct binding of miR-214 to the 3′-untranslated regions of E2F2, CDK3, and CDK6 was verified by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Results In analyzing HCC clinical specimens and cell lines, we discovered a uniform decrease in miR-214/199a/199a* expression in comparison with noncancerous tissue or normal liver epithelial cell lines. Higher miR-214 levels were related with improved patient survival. Overexpression of miR-214 in HCC cells inhibited proliferation by inducing G1-S checkpoint arrest. Conversely, RNA interference–mediated silencing of miR-214 promoted cell-cycle progression and accelerated the proliferation of HCC cells. E2F2, CDK3 and CDK6 were each directly targeted for inhibition by miR-214, and restoring their expression reversed miR-214 inhibition of cell-cycle progression. The relationship between expression of miR-214 and its targets was confirmed in HCC tumor xenografts and clinical specimens. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that miR-214 has tumor-suppressive activity in HCC through inhibition of E2F2, CDK3 and CDK6. PMID:26498144

  13. Effects of the lipid regulating drug clofibric acid on PPARα-regulated gene transcript levels in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) at pharmacological and environmental exposure levels

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Jenna; Winter, Matthew J.; Lange, Anke; Cumming, Rob; Owen, Stewart F.; Tyler, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) plays a key role in regulating various genes involved in lipid metabolism, bile acid synthesis and cholesterol homeostasis, and is activated by a diverse group of compounds collectively termed peroxisome proliferators (PPs). Specific PPs have been detected in the aquatic environment; however little is known on their pharmacological activity in fish. We investigated the bioavailability and persistence of the human PPARα ligand clofibric acid (CFA) in carp, together with various relevant endpoints, at a concentration similar to therapeutic levels in humans (20 mg/L) and for an environmentally relevant concentration (4 μg/L). Exposure to pharmacologically-relevant concentrations of CFA resulted in increased transcript levels of a number of known PPARα target genes together with increased acyl-coA oxidase (Acox1) activity, supporting stimulation of lipid metabolism pathways in carp which are known to be similarly activated in mammals. Although Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity was not affected, mRNA levels of several biotransformation genes were also increased, paralleling previous reports in mammals and indicating a potential role in hepatic detoxification for PPARα in carp. Importantly, transcription of some of these genes (and Acox1 activity) were affected at exposure concentrations comparable with those reported in effluent discharges. Collectively, these data suggest that CFA is pharmacologically active in carp and has the potential to invoke PPARα-related responses in fish exposed in the environment, particularly considering that CFA may represent just one of a number of PPAR-active compounds present to which wild fish may be exposed. PMID:25749508

  14. Up-regulation of Gadd45α after Exposure to Metal Nanoparticles: the Role of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lingfang; Zhang, Yue; Jiang, Mizu; Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Jia, Zhenyu; Tollerud, David J.; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Qunwei

    2014-01-01

    The increased development and use of nanoparticles in various fields may lead to increased exposure, directly affecting human health. Our current knowledge of the health effects of metal nanoparticles such as Cobalt and Titanium dioxide (Nano-Co and Nano-TiO2) is limited but suggests that some metal nanoparticles may cause genotoxic effects including cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and apoptosis. The growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45α protein (Gadd45α) has been characterized as one of the key players in the cellular responses to a variety of DNA damaging agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the alteration of Gadd45α expression in mouse embryo fibroblasts (PW) exposed to metal nanoparticles and the possible mechanisms. Non-toxic doses of Nano-Co and Nano-TiO2 were selected to treat cells. Our results showed that Nano-Co caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in Gadd45α expression, but Nano-TiO2 did not. To investigate the potential pathways involved in Nano-Co-induced Gadd45α up-regulation, we measured the expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in PW cells exposed to Nano-Co and Nano-TiO2. Our results showed that exposure to Nano-Co caused HIF-1α accumulation in the nucleus. In addition, hypoxia inducible factor 1α knock-out cells [HIF-1α (−/−)] and its wild-type cells [HIF-1α (+/+)] were used. Our results demonstrated that Nano-Co caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in Gadd45α expression in wild-type HIF-1α (+/+) cells, but only a slight increase in HIF-1α (−/−) cells. Pre-treatment of PW cells with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, 17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), prior to exposure to Nano-Co significantly abolished the Nano-Co-induced Gadd45α expression. These results suggest that HIF-1α accumulation may be partially involved in the increased Gadd45α expression in cells exposed to Nano-Co. These findings may have important implications for understanding the potential health

  15. An examination of the roles of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder on emotion regulation strategies of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans.

    PubMed

    Sippel, Lauren M; Roy, Alicia M; Southwick, Steven M; Fichtenholtz, Harlan M

    2016-09-01

    Theories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) implicate emotional processes, including difficulties utilizing adaptive emotion regulation strategies, as critical to the etiology and maintenance of PTSD. Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND) veterans report high levels of combat exposure and PTSD. We aimed to extend findings suggesting that emotion regulation difficulties are a function of PTSD, rather than combat trauma exposure or common comorbidities, to OIF/OEF/OND veterans, in order to inform models of PTSD risk and recovery that can be applied to returning veterans. We tested differences in emotion regulation, measured with the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale and Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, among trauma-exposed veterans with (n = 24) or without PTSD (n = 22) and healthy civilian comparison participants (n = 27) using multivariate analyses of covariance, adjusting for major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and demographic variables (age, sex, and ethnicity). Veterans with PTSD reported more use of expressive suppression and more difficulties with emotion regulation than veterans without PTSD and healthy comparison participants. Groups did not differ on cognitive reappraisal. Findings suggest the key role of PTSD above and beyond trauma exposure, depression, and anxiety in specific aspects of emotion dysregulation among OIF/OEF/OND veterans. Interventions that help veterans expand and diversify their emotion regulation skills may serve as helpful adjunctive treatments for PTSD among OIF/OEF/OND veterans. PMID:27195939

  16. Rich Donors, Poor Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The shifting ideological winds of foreign aid donors have driven their policy towards governments in poor countries. Donors supported state-led development policies in poor countries from the 1940s to the 1970s; market and private-sector driven reforms during the 1980s and 1990s; and returned their attention to the state with an emphasis on…

  17. Inference in `poor` languages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    1996-10-01

    Languages with a solvable implication problem but without complete and consistent systems of inference rules (`poor` languages) are considered. The problem of existence of finite complete and consistent inference rule system for a ``poor`` language is stated independently of the language or rules syntax. Several properties of the problem arc proved. An application of results to the language of join dependencies is given.

  18. Sexually dimorphic gene regulation in brain as a target for endocrine disrupters: developmental exposure of rats to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor.

    PubMed

    Maerkel, Kirsten; Durrer, Stefan; Henseler, Manuel; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2007-01-15

    The developing neuroendocrine brain represents a potential target for endocrine active chemicals. The UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, but also interferes with the thyroid axis. We investigated effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 4-MBC in the same rat offspring at brain and reproductive organ levels. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. mRNA of estrogen target genes involved in control of sexual behavior and gonadal functions was measured by real-time RT-PCR in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO) of adult offspring. 4-MBC exposure affected mRNA levels of ER alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), preproenkephalin (PPE) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in a sex- and region-specific manner. In order to assess possible changes in sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were gonadectomized on day 70, injected with estradiol (E2, 10 or 50 microg/kg s.c.) or vehicle on day 84, and sacrificed 6 h later. The acute induction of PR mRNA, and repression (at 6 h) of PPE mRNA by E2 was enhanced by 4-MBC in male and female VMH and female MPO, whereas male MPO exhibited reduced responsiveness of both genes. Steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 mRNA levels were increased in female VMH and MPO. The data indicate profound sex- and region-specific alterations in the regulation of estrogen target genes at brain level. Effect patterns in baseline and E2-induced gene expression differ from those in uterus and prostate. PMID:17188730

  19. Sexually dimorphic gene regulation in brain as a target for endocrine disrupters: Developmental exposure of rats to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor

    SciTech Connect

    Maerkel, Kirsten; Durrer, Stefan; Henseler, Manuel; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter . E-mail: Walter.Lichtensteiger@access.unizh.ch

    2007-01-15

    The developing neuroendocrine brain represents a potential target for endocrine active chemicals. The UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, but also interferes with the thyroid axis. We investigated effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 4-MBC in the same rat offspring at brain and reproductive organ levels. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. mRNA of estrogen target genes involved in control of sexual behavior and gonadal functions was measured by real-time RT-PCR in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO) of adult offspring. 4-MBC exposure affected mRNA levels of ER alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), preproenkephalin (PPE) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in a sex- and region-specific manner. In order to assess possible changes in sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were gonadectomized on day 70, injected with estradiol (E2, 10 or 50 {mu}g/kg s.c.) or vehicle on day 84, and sacrificed 6 h later. The acute induction of PR mRNA, and repression (at 6 h) of PPE mRNA by E2 was enhanced by 4-MBC in male and female VMH and female MPO, whereas male MPO exhibited reduced responsiveness of both genes. Steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 mRNA levels were increased in female VMH and MPO. The data indicate profound sex- and region-specific alterations in the regulation of estrogen target genes at brain level. Effect patterns in baseline and E2-induced gene expression differ from those in uterus and prostate.

  20. VITELLOGENIN MRNA REGULATION AND PLASMA CLEARANCE IN MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS AFTER CESSATION OF EXPOSURE TO 17B-ESTRADIOL AND P-NONYLPHENOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to determine the kinetics of hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA regulation and plasma VTG accumulation and clearance in male sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) during and after cessation of exposure to either 17b-estradiol (E2) or para-nonylphenol (NP)...

  1. Early soy exposure via maternal diet regulates rat mammary epithelial differentiation by paracrine signaling from stromal adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Shankar, Kartik; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2009-05-01

    Diet-mediated changes in transcriptional programs that promote the early differentiation of the mammary gland may lead to reduced breast cancer risk. The disparity in adult breast cancer incidence between Asian women and Western counterparts is attributed partly to high soy food intake. Here, we conducted genome-wide profiling of mammary tissues of weanling rats exposed to soy protein isolate (SPI) or control casein (CAS) via maternal diet to evaluate the contribution of early exposure on mammary gene expression. Of the identified 18 up- and 39 downregulated genes with SPI relative to CAS, a subset was associated with lipid metabolic pathways, consistent with reduced mammary adipocyte size and suggesting stromal adipocyte-specific genomic changes. Female offspring of rats fed SPI tended to have fewer terminal end buds (P = 0.06) and had significantly lower body weight and abdominal fat mass. To demonstrate the functional consequence of SPI-mediated adipocyte metabolic changes on neighboring mammary epithelium, the expression of in vivo regulated genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with soy isoflavone genistein and effects of the resultant conditioned medium (CM) on the differentiation of HC11 mammary epithelial cells were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and/or Western immunoblots. In differentiated 3T3-L1, genistein decreased fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase and increased hydroxysteroid 11-beta dehydrogenase 1 expression. CM from genistein-treated adipocytes had higher adiponectin levels and augmented prolactin-induced, glucocorticoid-regulated beta-casein levels. These findings suggest that soy-associated components, by targeting mammary adipocytes, alter paracrine signaling to enhance mammary epithelial differentiation, with important implications for the prevention of breast cancer associated with obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:19321580

  2. Poorly controlled gout: who is doing poorly?

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Faith Li-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Gout, an inflammatory arthritis caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals, is commonly seen in primary care and specialist clinics. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in gout due to advances in therapies and the understanding of pathophysiology, with new guidelines being published by international bodies. However, there is still a gap between the goals of treatment and actual day-to-day practice. Barriers that result in poorly controlled gout include patient factors such as lack of understanding of the disease, stigma and nonadherence to treatment, as well as physician factors such as knowledge gaps, inadequate use of allopurinol and lack of ownership of the disease. The medical profession needs to do more to bridge the gap through physician and patient education, identification of treatment targets with appropriate use of drugs, and dissemination of guidelines. PMID:27549096

  3. Poorly controlled gout: who is doing poorly?

    PubMed

    Chia, Faith Li-Ann

    2016-08-01

    Gout, an inflammatory arthritis caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals, is commonly seen in primary care and specialist clinics. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in gout due to advances in therapies and the understanding of pathophysiology, with new guidelines being published by international bodies. However, there is still a gap between the goals of treatment and actual day-to-day practice. Barriers that result in poorly controlled gout include patient factors such as lack of understanding of the disease, stigma and nonadherence to treatment, as well as physician factors such as knowledge gaps, inadequate use of allopurinol and lack of ownership of the disease. The medical profession needs to do more to bridge the gap through physician and patient education, identification of treatment targets with appropriate use of drugs, and dissemination of guidelines. PMID:27549096

  4. High expression of piwi-like RNA-mediated gene silencing 1 is associated with poor prognosis via regulating transforming growth factor-β receptors and cyclin-dependent kinases in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiwei; Xu, Gang; Lan, Jing; Huang, Qingqing; Tang, Zuxiong; Tian, Liping

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that abnormal expression levels of PIWI may serve a crucial role in tumorigenesis. However, the pathological role and its association with prognosis remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression levels of piwi‑like RNA‑mediated gene silencing 1 (HIWI) and piwi‑like RNA‑mediated gene silencing 2 (HILI) in breast cancer tissues were reported to be high. The high expression levels of HIWI are correlated with poor prognosis in detected patients. In addition, by overexpression and interference, it was demonstrated that HIWI promotes the activity of breast cancer cells while depression of HIWI may induce apoptosis of breast cancer cells. It was additionally identified that suppression of HIWI may arrest the cells at the G2/M stage. The expression levels of transforming growth factor‑β receptor (TβR)I, TβRII, cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)4, CDK6 and CDK8 were observed to be regulated by HIWI, which indicated a novel mechanism of HIWI in the regulation of breast cancer progression. The present study provides novel insight into the HIWI expression in breast cancer, providing a potential biomarker for assessment of prognosis and therapy of breast cancer. PMID:26847393

  5. Maize miRNA and target regulation in response to hormone depletion and light exposure during somatic embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Hernández, Elva C.; Alejandri-Ramírez, Naholi D.; Juárez-González, Vasti T.; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D.

    2015-01-01

    Maize somatic embryogenesis (SE) is induced from the immature zygotic embryo in darkness and under the appropriate hormones' levels. Small RNA expression is reprogrammed and certain miRNAs become particularly enriched during induction while others, characteristic to the zygotic embryo, decrease. To explore the impact of different environmental cues on miRNA regulation in maize SE, we tested specific miRNA abundance and their target gene expression in response to photoperiod and hormone depletion for two different maize cultivars (VS-535 and H-565). The expression levels of miR156, miR159, miR164, miR168, miR397, miR398, miR408, miR528, and some predicted targets (SBP23, GA-MYB, CUC2, AGO1c, LAC2, SOD9, GR1, SOD1A, PLC) were examined upon staged hormone depletion in the presence of light photoperiod or darkness. Almost all examined miRNA, except miR159, increased upon hormone depletion, regardless photoperiod absence/presence. miR528, miR408, and miR398 changed the most. On the other hand, expression of miRNA target genes was strongly regulated by the photoperiod exposure. Stress-related miRNA targets showed greater differences between cultivars than development-related targets. miRNA/target inverse relationship was more frequently observed in darkness than light. Interestingly, miR528, but not miR159, miR168 or miR398, was located on polyribosome fractions suggesting a role for this miRNA at the level of translation. Overall our results demonstrate that hormone depletion exerts a great influence on specific miRNA expression during plant regeneration independently of light. However, their targets are additionally influenced by the presence of photoperiod. The reproducibility or differences observed for particular miRNA-target regulation between two different highly embryogenic genotypes provide clues for conserved miRNA roles within the SE process. PMID:26257760

  6. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    involving Bdnf and Pdyn may contribute to the enhanced postoperative nociceptive sensitization and analgesic tolerance observed after continuous opioid exposure. Treatments blocking the epigenetically mediated up-regulation of these genes or administration of TrkB or κ-opioid receptor antagonists may improve the clinical utility of opioids, particularly after surgery. PMID:27094549

  7. National radiation exposures and risks caused by implementing EPA`s proposed revised national primary drinking water regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1993-05-01

    This report estimates risks to workers and the public associated with treatment processes and their associated waste products that would be mandated under proposed regulations of radium, radon, and uranium in drinking water. Three scenarios were examined: (1) all wastes flushed to the sanitary sewer; (2) all wastes disposed on land; (3) similar to (2) but radon removal by granulated activated carbon rather than packed tower aeration. Risks considered included accidental injury and cancer. Worker risks for both scenarios I and II were estimated to be 0.025 and 0.01 deaths per year of operation for radium-226 and radium-228, respectively. Worker risks for uranium were estimated to be 0.13 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 0.5 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Worker risks for radon removal were estimated to be 1.7 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 2.2 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for radium-226 were 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and for radium-228 were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} deaths/year of operation. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for uranium were 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. Risks to the public for scenario I and II for radon were 24 deaths/year of operation and for scenario III were nil. Public risks were quantified only for people exposed during a year of operation. For example, effects of public exposures in future years via groundwater contamination associated with landfill of treatment waste were not considered.

  8. Poor school performance.

    PubMed

    Karande, Sunil; Kulkarni, Madhuri

    2005-11-01

    Education is one of the most important aspects of human resource development. Poor school performance not only results in the child having a low self-esteem, but also causes significant stress to the parents. There are many reasons for children to under perform at school, such as, medical problems, below average intelligence, specific learning disability, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, emotional problems, poor socio-cultural home environment, psychiatric disorders and even environmental causes. The information provided by the parents, classroom teacher and school counselor about the child's academic difficulties guides the pediatrician to form an initial diagnosis. However, a multidisciplinary evaluation by an ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, counselor, clinical psychologist, special educator, and child psychiatrist is usually necessary before making the final diagnosis. It is important to find the reason(s) for a child's poor school performance and come up with a treatment plan early so that the child can perform up to full potential. PMID:16391452

  9. Morphosyntax in Poor Comprehenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2015-01-01

    Children described as "poor comprehenders" (PCs) have reading comprehension difficulties in spite of adequate word reading abilities. PCs are known to display weakness with semantics and higher-level aspects of oral language, but less is known about their grammatical skills, especially with regard to morphosyntax. The purpose of this…

  10. Vitellogenin mRNA regulation and plasma clearance in male sheepshead minnows, (Cyprinodon variegatus) after cessation of exposure to 17 beta-estradiol and p-nonylphenol.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Michael J; Bowman, Christopher J; Hemmer, Becky L; Friedman, Stephanie D; Marcovich, Dragoslav; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D

    2002-07-01

    Research was conducted to determine the kinetics of hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA regulation and plasma VTG accumulation and clearance in male sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) during and after cessation of exposure to either 17 beta-estradiol (E2) or para-nonylphenol (NP). Adult fish were continuously exposed to aqueous measured concentrations of 0.089 and 0.71 microg E2 per l, and 5.6 and 59.6 microg NP per l for 16 days using an intermittent flow-through dosing apparatus. Fish were sampled on days 8 and 16 of exposure followed by sampling at discrete intervals for up to 96 days post-exposure. At each interval five fish were randomly sampled from each concentration and hepatic VTG mRNA and serum VTG levels for individual fish determined by slot blot and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Exposure to E2 and NP resulted in a dose dependent increase in hepatic VTG mRNA and plasma VTG over the course of the 16-day exposure period. Mean plasma VTG levels at day 16 were >100 mg/ml for both high doses of E2 and NP, and >20 mg/ml for the low exposure treatments. Within 8 days post-exposure, hepatic VTG mRNA levels returned to baseline in both high and low E2 treatments but remained elevated 2-4 fold in the NP treatments. Due to a shortened sampling period, a clearance rate for plasma VTG in the 5.6 microg NP per l treatment could not determined. In the 0.089, 0.71 microg E2 per l, and 59.6 microg NP per l treatments, VTG levels began decreasing within 4 days after exposure cessation and exhibited an exponential rate of elimination from plasma. Clearance rates for 0.71 microg E2 per l and 59.6 microg NP per l were not significantly different (P=0.47), however, both demonstrated significantly higher rates of clearance (P<0.02) than observed in the 0.089 microg E2 per l treatment. Our results indicate that hepatic VTG mRNA rapidly diminishes after cessation of estrogenic exposure in sheepshead minnows, but plasma VTG clearance is

  11. Analysis of cell cycle regulated and regulating proteins following exposure of lung derived cells to sub-lethal doses of a-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trani, D.; Claudio, P. P.; Cassone, M.; Lucchetti, C.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Introduction Since the last century mankind had to face an increased exposure to man made and natural sources of radiation Radiation represents a therapeutic instrument for radiosensitive cancers as well as a cytotoxic agent for normal human tissues The effects of prolonged exposure to low doses of high energy radiation are still not well-known at the molecular and clinical level Understanding their molecular effects will aid in developing more tailored therapeutic strategies as well as implementing radio-protective measures essential prerequisite for the long-time permanence of men in space Objective of the study The general aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility and the response of lung epithelial cells to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiations We decided to study a panel of epithelial bronchial cell lines because of their fast-growth rate and their prominent exposure to both environmental and medical radiations The specific objective of our study was to qualitatively and semi-quantitatively assess the involvement and behaviour of selected genes in DNA damage DNA-repair mechanisms and apoptosis which follow radiation exposure with the aim to determine the involvement of the most promising targets for the early detection of radiation-mediated lung damage before chronic disease develops Methods Four epithelial cell lines one normal and three neoplastic were selected in order to detect and compare survival cell cycle and protein expression differences related to their different genetic asset

  12. Regulation of COX-2 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α is associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients post TACE surgery

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, MINGSHENG; WANG, LONG; CHEN, JUNWEI; BAI, MINGJUN; ZHOU, CHUREN; LIU, SUJUAN; LIN, QU

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is not entirely clear whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is involved in the regulation of COX-2 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and whether these events affect the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). In this report the relationship between HIF-1α and COX-2 protein expression, EMT in tumor specimens from HCC patients after TACE surgery and the clinical significance of HIF-1α and COX-2 expression were analyzed using statistical approaches. HepG2 cells treated with CoCl2 was employed as a hypoxia cell model in vitro to study hypoxia-induced HIF-1α, COX-2 expression, and EMT alteration. The results showed that HIF-1α and COX-2 protein expression increased in HCC tissues after TACE surgery. Moreover, there was positive correlation between upregulation of HIF-1α and COX-2. Elevated expression of HIF-1α increased both Snail and Vimentin protein expression, while it reduced E-cadherin protein expression. It was further verified that hypoxia enhanced protein expression of HIF-1α and COX-2 in HepG2 cells treated with CoCl2. Upregulation of HIF-1α and COX-2, together with EMT alteration resulted in increased migration and invasion of HepG2 cells under hypoxia. In conclusion, TACE surgery results in aggravated hypoxia status, leading to increased HIF-1α protein expression in HCC tissue. To adapt to hypoxic environment, HIF-1α stimulates COX-2 protein expression and promotes EMT process in hepatocellular cancer cells, which enhances HCC invasion and metastasis, and might contribute to poor prognosis in HCC patients post TACE treatment. PMID:26984380

  13. The systematic regulation of oyster CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5 in response to air exposure.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lusheng; Zhang, Huan; Du, Xinyu; Li, Yiqun; Li, Meijia; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    As a proinflammatory cytokine, vertebrate interleukin 17 (IL17) plays a vital role in the balance of inflammation and homeostasis, and is involved in a systemic regulation of glucose homeostasis. In the present study, a remarkable increase of glucose concentration was observed in oyster serum after 2 d air exposure, which was followed by a rapid up-regulation of CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5. After oysters was received an injection of extra glucose, the mRNA expressions of CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5 were also significantly up-regulated. The histopathological changes of hepatopancreas were observed after the oysters were treated by the recombinant proteins of CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5 in vivo or subjected to air exposure. A significant decrease of GSK3β (Glycogen synthase kinase-3β) protein was also observed after the injection of CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5 recombinant proteins in vivo. When the oysters with CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5 genes knocked down were subjected to air exposure, the decline of GSK3β concentration was slowed down and it could still be obviously detected after 7 d compared with that in the control. Meanwhile, the expression of CgDefensin and CgDFFA was inhibited, while CgIAP was up-regulated when CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5 genes were knocked down, and the oysters exhibited higher mortality (p < 0.05) at 3 d, whereas lower at the late stage of air exposure compared with that in the controls. The results collectively suggested that once oysters were exposed to air, the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines CgIL17-1 and CgIL17-5 was induced by the up-regulated glucose concentration in oyster serum, which would be not only a negative feedback to the high glucose concentration through mediating the regulation of GSK3β, but also an inducer on tissue damage and immunocompetence as well as the adaptability to stresses. PMID:27268575

  14. Programming of stress-related behavior and epigenetic neural gene regulation in mice offspring through maternal exposure to predator odor

    PubMed Central

    St-Cyr, Sophie; McGowan, Patrick O.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal stress mediated through the mother can lead to long-term alterations in stress-related phenotypes in offspring. The capacity for adaptation to adversity in early life depends in part on the life history of the animal. This study was designed to examine the behavioral and neural response in adult offspring to prenatal exposure to predator odor: an ethologically-relevant psychological stressor. Pregnant mice were exposed daily to predator odors or distilled water control over the second half of the pregnancy. Predator odor exposure lead to a transient decrease in maternal care in the mothers. As adults, the offspring of predator odor-exposed mothers showed increased anti-predator behavior, a predator-odor induced decrease in activity and, in female offspring, an increased corticosterone (CORT) response to predator odor exposure. We found a highly specific response among stress-related genes within limbic brain regions. Transcript abundance of Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) was elevated in the amygdala in adult female offspring of predator odor-exposed mothers. In the hippocampus of adult female offspring, decreased Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcript abundance was correlated with a site-specific decrease in DNA methylation in Bdnf exon IV, indicating the potential contribution of this epigenetic mechanism to maternal programming by maternal predator odor exposure. These data indicate that maternal predator odor exposure alone is sufficient to induce an altered stress-related phenotype in adulthood, with implications for anti-predator behavior in offspring. PMID:26082698

  15. Effects of Hypoxia Exposure on Hepatic Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) Expression in Atlantic Croaker: Molecular Mechanisms of CYP1A Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Saydur; Thomas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α) and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) are biomarkers of environmental exposure to hypoxia and organic xenobiotic chemicals that act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, respectively. Many aquatic environments heavily contaminated with organic chemicals, such as harbors, are also hypoxic. Recently, we and other scientists reported HIF-α genes are upregulated by hypoxia exposure in aquatic organisms, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia regulation of CYP1A expression have not been investigated in teleost fishes. As a first step in understanding the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia modulation of CYP1A expression in fish, we characterized CYP1A cDNA from croaker liver. Hypoxia exposure (dissolved oxygen, DO: 1.7 mg/L for 2 to 4 weeks) caused significant decreases in hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels compared to CYP1A levels in fish held in normoxic conditions. In vivo studies showed that the nitric oxide (NO)-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine, significantly decreased CYP1A expression in croaker livers, whereas the competitive inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS), Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, restored CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in hypoxia-exposed (1.7 mg DO/L for 4 weeks) fish. In vivo hypoxia exposure also markedly increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a cytokine), HIF-2α mRNA and endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein levels in croaker livers. Pharmacological treatment with vitamin E, an antioxidant, lowered the IL-1β, HIF-2α mRNA and eNOS protein levels in hypoxia-exposed fish and completely reversed the down-regulation of hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in response to hypoxia exposure. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced down-regulation of CYP1A is due to alterations of NO and oxidant status, and cellular IL-1β and HIF-α levels. Moreover, the present study provides the first evidence of a role for antioxidants in hepatic eNOS and IL-1β regulation in aquatic vertebrates during hypoxic stress. PMID:22815834

  16. Poor ovarian reserve.

    PubMed

    Jirge, Padma Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Poor ovarian reserve (POR) is an important limiting factor for the success of any treatment modality for infertility. It indicates a reduction in quantity and quality of oocytes in women of reproductive age group. It may be age related as seen in advanced years of reproductive life or may occur in young women due to diverse etiological factors. Evaluating ovarian reserve and individualizing the therapeutic strategies are very important for optimizing the success rate. Majority or women with POR need to undergo in vitro fertilization to achieve pregnancy. However, pregnancy rate remains low despite a plethora of interventions and is associated with high pregnancy loss. Early detection and active management are essential to minimize the need for egg donation in these women. PMID:27382229

  17. Poor ovarian reserve

    PubMed Central

    Jirge, Padma Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Poor ovarian reserve (POR) is an important limiting factor for the success of any treatment modality for infertility. It indicates a reduction in quantity and quality of oocytes in women of reproductive age group. It may be age related as seen in advanced years of reproductive life or may occur in young women due to diverse etiological factors. Evaluating ovarian reserve and individualizing the therapeutic strategies are very important for optimizing the success rate. Majority or women with POR need to undergo in vitro fertilization to achieve pregnancy. However, pregnancy rate remains low despite a plethora of interventions and is associated with high pregnancy loss. Early detection and active management are essential to minimize the need for egg donation in these women. PMID:27382229

  18. Inhibition of P-Glycoprotein and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 Regulates the Hepatobiliary Excretion and Plasma Exposure of Thienorphine and Its Glucuronide Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Lei; Shen, Guo-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Xiao, Wei-Bin; Yuan, Mei; Gong, Ze-Hui; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Thienorphine (TNP) is a novel partial opioid agonist that has completed phase II clinical evaluation as a promising drug candidate for the treatment of opioid dependence. Previous studies have shown that TNP and its glucuronide conjugate (TNP-G) undergo significant bile excretion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of efflux transporters in regulating biliary excretion and plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G. An ATPase assay suggested that TNP and TNP-G were substrates of P-gp and MRP2, respectively. The in vitro data from rat hepatocytes showed that bile excretion of TNP and TNP-G was regulated by the P-gp and MRP2 modulators. The accumulation of TNP and TNP-G in HepG2 cells significantly increased by the treatment of mdr1a or MRP2 siRNA for P-gp or MRP2 modulation. In intact rats, the bile excretion, and pharmacokinetic profiles of TNP and TNP-G were remarkably changed with tariquidar and probenecid pretreatment, respectively. Tariquidar increased the Cmax and AUC0-t and decreased MRT and T1/2 of TNP, whereas probenecid decreased the plasma exposure of TNP-G and increased its T1/2. Knockdown P-gp and MRP2 function using siRNA significantly increased the plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G and reduced their mean retention time in mice. These results indicated the important roles of P-gp and MRP2 in hepatobiliary excretion and plasma exposure of TNP and TNP-G. Inhibition of the efflux transporters may affect the pharmacokinetics of TNP and result in a drug-drug interaction between TNP and the concomitant transporter inhibitor or inducer in clinic. PMID:27555820

  19. [Current options to manage clopidogrel poor responsiveness].

    PubMed

    Fileti, Luca; Campo, Gianluca; Valgimigli, Marco; Marchesini, Jlenia; Ferrari, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy (aspirin + clopidogrel) is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). More than 40 million patients worldwide receive clopidogrel, but about 20% of them are nonresponders or poor responders. Many studies using different techniques, platelet agonists and definitions have shown that patients who are poor responders to clopidogrel have an increased risk of death, reinfarction and stent thrombosis. The mechanisms leading to poor responsiveness are not fully elucidated and are likely multifactorial: genetic factors, accelerated platelet turnover, up-regulation of the P2Y12 pathways, high baseline platelet reactivity, poor compliance, underdosing and drug-drug interactions. The management of these patients is very difficult, but evidence does exist showing that a strategy of higher maintenance dose or switch to different thienopyridines (e.g. ticlopidine or prasugrel) or use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors during PCI may be helpful to overcome poor responsiveness and improve the long-term clinical outcome. This review describes the impact of poor responsiveness to clopidogrel on clinical outcomes, the mechanisms leading to poor effect, and the different assays to assess it. Finally, current and future options for its management are discussed. PMID:21355335

  20. Cigarette smoke exposure reveals a novel role for the MEK/ERK1/2 MAPK pathway in regulation of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Balsiger, Robert; Tyrrell, Jean; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Tarran, Robert; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Background CFTR plays a key role in maintenance of lung fluid homeostasis. Cigarette smoke decreases CFTR expression in the lung but neither the mechanisms leading to CFTR loss, nor potential ways to prevent its loss have been identified to date. Methods The molecular mechanisms leading to down-regulation of CFTR by cigarette smoke were determined using pharmacologic inhibitors and silencing RNAs. Results Using human bronchial epithelial cells, here we show that cigarette smoke induces degradation of CFTR that is attenuated by the lysosomal inhibitors, but not proteasome inhibitors. Cigarette smoke can activate multiple signaling pathways in airway epithelial cells, including the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway regulating cell survival. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the loss of plasma membrane CFTR upon cigarette smoke exposure. Similarly, decreased expression of Erk1/2 using silencing RNAs prevented the suppression of CFTR protein by cigarette smoke. Conversely, specific inhibitors of the JNK or p38 MAPK pathways had no effect on CFTR decrease after cigarette smoke exposure. In addition, inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the reduction of the airway surface liquid observed upon cigarette smoke exposure of primary human airway epithelial cells. Finally, addition of the antioxidant NAC inhibited activation of Erk1/2 by cigarette smoke and precluded the cigarette smoke-induced decrease of CFTR. Conclusions These results show that the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway regulates plasma membrane CFTR in human airway cells. General Significance The MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway should be considered as a target for strategies to maintain/restore CFTR expression in the lung of smokers. PMID:25697727

  1. Morphosyntax in Poor Comprehenders

    PubMed Central

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2016-01-01

    Children described as poor comprehenders (PCs) have reading comprehension difficulties in spite of adequate word reading abilities. PCs are known to display weakness with semantics and higher-level aspects of oral language, but less is known about their grammatical skills, especially with regard to morphosyntax. The purpose of this study was to examine morphosyntax in fourth grade PCs and typically developing readers (TDs), using three experimental tasks involving finiteness marking. Participants also completed standardized, norm-referenced assessments of phonological memory, vocabulary, and broader language skills. PCs displayed weakness relative to TDs on all three morphosyntax tasks and on every other assessment of oral language except phonological memory, as indexed by nonword repetition. These findings help to clarify the linguistic profile of PCs, suggesting that their language weaknesses include grammatical weaknesses that cannot be fully explained by semantic factors. Because finiteness markers are usually mastered prior to formal schooling in typical development, we call for future studies to examine whether assessments of morphosyntax could be used for the early identification of children at risk for future reading comprehension difficulty.

  2. Alterations in the oxidative metabolism of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks in response to exposure to the insect growth regulator fluazuron.

    PubMed

    Gaudêncio, Fabrício Nascimento; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Lima, Mariana Gomes; Gôlo, Patrícia Silva; Angelo, Isabele da Costa; Castro, Rosane Nora; Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique da; Scott, Fabio Barbour; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2016-01-01

    Aiming to characterize the potential off-target effects of fluazuron on ticks, biochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate changes in the carbohydrate metabolism of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks after exposure to fluazuron. Hemolymph and fat body were collected from female ticks before and after (4, 8 and 15 days) exposure to fluazuron. Spectrophotometric analyses were done to quantify glucose concentration and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the hemolymph and the concentration of glycogen in the tick's fat body. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was employed to determine the concentration of carboxylic acids in the hemolymph and to evaluate changes in intermediary metabolic processes requiring oxygen consumption. Increases in the levels of LDH activity and lactic acid concentration indicated that fluazuron enhanced fermentative metabolism in ticks. Exposure to fluazuron was also found to increase glucose concentrations in the hemolymph over time, although no significant differences were noted daily. In addition to expanding the body of knowledge about the mode of action of fluazuron, investigations into these mechanisms may also be useful in discovering new and as yet unexplored secondary effects. PMID:26982563

  3. Epigenetic Regulation of Immunological Alterations Following Prenatal Exposure to Marijuana Cannabinoids and its Long Term Consequences in Offspring.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Sido, Jessica M; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-06-01

    Use of marijuana during pregnancy is fairly commonplace and can be expected increase in frequency as more states legalize its recreational use. The cannabinoids present in marijuana have been shown to be immunosuppressive, yet the effect of prenatal exposure to cannabinoids on the immune system of the developing fetus, its long term consequences during adult stage of life, and transgenerational effects have not been well characterized. Confounding factors such as co-existing drug use make the impact of cannabis use on progeny inherently difficult to study in a human population. Data from various animal models suggests that in utero exposure to cannabinoids results in profound T cell dysfunction and a greatly reduced immune response to viral antigens. Furthermore, evidence from animal studies indicates that the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids can be mediated through epigenetic mechanisms such as altered microRNA, DNA methylation and histone modification profiles. Such studies support the hypothesis that that parental or prenatal exposure to cannabis can trigger epigenetic changes that could have significant immunological consequences for offspring as well as long term transgenerational effects. PMID:25618446

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Immunological Alterations Following Prenatal Exposure to Marijuana Cannabinoids and its Long Term Consequences in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E.; Sido, Jessica M.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Use of marijuana during pregnancy is fairly commonplace and can be expected increase in frequency as more states legalize its recreational use. The cannabinoids present in marijuana have been shown to be immunosuppressive, yet the effect of prenatal exposure to cannabinoids on the immune system of the developing fetus, its long term consequences during adult stage of life, and transgenerational effects have not been well characterized. Confounding factors such as coexisting drug use make the impact of cannabis use on progeny inherently difficult to study in a human population. Data from various animal models suggests that in utero exposure to cannabinoids results in profound T cell dysfunction and a greatly reduced immune response to viral antigens. Furthermore, evidence from animal studies indicates that the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids can be mediated through epigenetic mechanisms such as altered microRNA, DNA methylation and histone modification profiles. Such studies support the hypothesis that that parental or prenatal exposure to cannabis can trigger epigenetic changes that could have significant immunological consequences for offspring as well as long term transgenerational effects. PMID:25618446

  5. Bacillus thermoamylovorans Spores with Very-High-Level Heat Resistance Germinate Poorly in Rich Medium despite the Presence of ger Clusters but Efficiently upon Exposure to Calcium-Dipicolinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Krawczyk, Antonina O.; Klaus, Verena; de Jong, Anne; Boekhorst, Jos; Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2015-01-01

    High-level heat resistance of spores of Bacillus thermoamylovorans poses challenges to the food industry, as industrial sterilization processes may not inactivate such spores, resulting in food spoilage upon germination and outgrowth. In this study, the germination and heat resistance properties of spores of four food-spoiling isolates were determined. Flow cytometry counts of spores were much higher than their counts on rich medium (maximum, 5%). Microscopic analysis revealed inefficient nutrient-induced germination of spores of all four isolates despite the presence of most known germination-related genes, including two operons encoding nutrient germinant receptors (GRs), in their genomes. In contrast, exposure to nonnutrient germinant calcium-dipicolinic acid (Ca-DPA) resulted in efficient (50 to 98%) spore germination. All four strains harbored cwlJ and gerQ genes, which are known to be essential for Ca-DPA-induced germination in Bacillus subtilis. When determining spore survival upon heating, low viable counts can be due to spore inactivation and an inability to germinate. To dissect these two phenomena, the recoveries of spores upon heat treatment were determined on plates with and without preexposure to Ca-DPA. The high-level heat resistance of spores as observed in this study (D120°C, 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.1 min; z value, 12.2 ± 1.8°C) is in line with survival of sterilization processes in the food industry. The recovery of B. thermoamylovorans spores can be improved via nonnutrient germination, thereby avoiding gross underestimation of their levels in food ingredients. PMID:26341201

  6. Bacillus thermoamylovorans Spores with Very-High-Level Heat Resistance Germinate Poorly in Rich Medium despite the Presence of ger Clusters but Efficiently upon Exposure to Calcium-Dipicolinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Erwin M; Krawczyk, Antonina O; Klaus, Verena; de Jong, Anne; Boekhorst, Jos; Eijlander, Robyn T; Kuipers, Oscar P; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2015-11-01

    High-level heat resistance of spores of Bacillus thermoamylovorans poses challenges to the food industry, as industrial sterilization processes may not inactivate such spores, resulting in food spoilage upon germination and outgrowth. In this study, the germination and heat resistance properties of spores of four food-spoiling isolates were determined. Flow cytometry counts of spores were much higher than their counts on rich medium (maximum, 5%). Microscopic analysis revealed inefficient nutrient-induced germination of spores of all four isolates despite the presence of most known germination-related genes, including two operons encoding nutrient germinant receptors (GRs), in their genomes. In contrast, exposure to nonnutrient germinant calcium-dipicolinic acid (Ca-DPA) resulted in efficient (50 to 98%) spore germination. All four strains harbored cwlJ and gerQ genes, which are known to be essential for Ca-DPA-induced germination in Bacillus subtilis. When determining spore survival upon heating, low viable counts can be due to spore inactivation and an inability to germinate. To dissect these two phenomena, the recoveries of spores upon heat treatment were determined on plates with and without preexposure to Ca-DPA. The high-level heat resistance of spores as observed in this study (D120°C, 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.1 min; z value, 12.2 ± 1.8°C) is in line with survival of sterilization processes in the food industry. The recovery of B. thermoamylovorans spores can be improved via nonnutrient germination, thereby avoiding gross underestimation of their levels in food ingredients. PMID:26341201

  7. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  8. Epigenetic regulation of neurodevelopmental genes in response to in utero exposure to phthalate plastic chemicals: How can we delineate causal effects?

    PubMed

    Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Symeonides, Christos; Vuillermin, Peter; Mueller, Jochen; Sly, Peter D; Saffery, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence, from animal models and human observational studies, implicates the in utero (and early postnatal) environment in the 'programming' of risk for a variety of adverse outcomes and health trajectories. The modern environment is replete with man-made compounds such as plastic product chemicals (PPC), including phenols and phthalates. Evidence from several human cohorts implicates exposure to these chemicals in adverse offspring neurodevelopment, though a direct causal relationship has not been firmly established. In this review we consider a potential causal pathway that encompasses epigenetic human variation, and how we might test this mechanistic hypothesis in human studies. In the first part of this report we outline how PPCs induce epigenetic change, focusing on the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, a key regulator of neurodevelopment. Further, we discuss the role of the epigenetics of BDNF and other genes in neurodevelopment and the emerging human evidence of an association between phthalate exposure and adverse offspring neurodevelopment. We discuss aspects of epidemiological and molecular study design and analysis that could be employed to strengthen the level of human evidence to infer causality. We undertake this using an exemplar recent research example: maternal prenatal smoking, linked to methylation change at the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) gene at birth, now shown to mediate some of the effects of maternal smoking on birth weight. Characterizing the relationship between the modern environment and the human molecular pathways underpinning its impact on early development is paramount to understanding the public health significance of modern day chemical exposures. PMID:27208563

  9. Regulation of GM-CSF and IL-3 production from the murine keratinocyte cell line PAM 212 following exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.L.; Staszewski, R.; Sauder, D.N.; Knisely, T.L.; Granstein, R.D. )

    1991-08-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure induces profound changes in the synthesis and secretion of various cytokines both in vivo and in vitro. Little is known regarding the mechanism of these responses. This investigation evaluated the effects of UVR on the ability of a murine keratinocyte line (PAM 212) to produce interleukin 3 (IL-3) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Subconfluent rapidly dividing PAM 212 cells were shown by RNA slot-blot hybridization studies to have increased levels of mRNA for both IL-3 and GM-CSF within 1 h of UVR exposure. However, only GM-CSF-specific bioactivity, as determined by antibody neutralization studies, was shown to increase above baseline in cell supernatants. Cells grown to confluence responded differently to UVR. Under these culture conditions an apparent decrease in bioactivity was detected after UVR exposure for both growth factors, and no change in mRNA levels was detected. In addition to culture density, removal of extracellular calcium or sodium during irradiation, treatment with amiloride, or inhibition of new mRNA synthesis with cordycepin was shown to influence the UVR-induced alteration in release of IL-3 or GM-CSF bioactivity from both confluent and subconfluent PAM 212 cells. These results demonstrate that UVR influences the release of the colony stimulating factors GM-CSF and IL-3 from keratinocyte, and suggests that the state of cell growth and conditions of membrane ion transport influence the mechanisms regulating secretion of those factors.

  10. Differential regulation of sodium-potassium pump isoforms during smolt development and seawater exposure of Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, Stephen D.; Regish, Amy M.; Christensen, Arne K.; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater and seawater isoforms of the alpha subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) have previously been identified in gill ionocytes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). In the present study we examine the abundance and cellular localization of these isoforms during the parr–smolt transformation, a developmental process that is preparatory for seawater entry. The abundance of NKAα1a was lower in smolts than in parr, remained relatively constant during spring and decreased in summer. NKAα1b increased tenfold in smolts during spring, peaking in late April, coincident with downstream migration and increased salinity tolerance. NKAα1b increased a further twofold after seawater exposure of smolts, whereas NKAα1a decreased by 98%. The abundance of NKAα1b-positive, and NKAα1b and NKAα1a co-labeled ionocytes increased during smolt development, whereas the number of NKAα1a cells decreased. After seawater exposure of smolts, NKAα1b-positive ionocytes increased, NKAα1a-positive cells decreased, and co-labeled cells disappeared. Plasma growth hormone and cortisol increased during spring in smolts, but not in parr, peaking just prior to the highest levels of NKAα1b. The results indicate that the increase in the abundance of NKAα1b during smolt development is directly linked to the increase in salinity tolerance that occurs at this stage, but that significant changes also occur after seawater exposure. Spring increases in circulating levels of growth hormone and cortisol indicate that these hormones may be instrumental in upregulating NKAα1b during smolt development.

  11. CYP2E1 epigenetic regulation in chronic, low-level toluene exposure: Relationship with oxidative stress and smoking habit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Garza, Octavio; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Byun, Hyang-Min; Márquez-Gamiño, Sergio; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro

    2015-08-01

    Background: CYP2E1 is a versatile phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for the biotransformation of most volatile organic compounds, including toluene. Human toluene exposure increases CYP2E1 mRNA and modifies its activity in leucocytes; however, epigenetic implications of this interaction have not been investigated. Goal: To determine promoter methylation of CYP2E1 and other genes known to be affected by toluene exposure. Methods: We obtained venous blood from 24 tannery workers exposed to toluene (mean levels: 10.86 +/− 7 mg/m{sup 3}) and 24 administrative workers (reference group, mean levels 0.21 +/− 0.02 mg/m{sup 3}) all of them from the city of León, Guanajuato, México. After DNA extraction and bisulfite treatment, we performed PCR-pyrosequencing in order to measure methylation levels at promoter region of 13 genes. Results: In exposed group we found significant correlations between toluene airborne levels and CYP2E1 promoter methylation (r = − .36, p < 0.05), as well as for IL6 promoter methylation levels (r = .44, p < 0.05). Moreover, CYP2E1 promoter methylation levels where higher in toluene-exposed smokers compared to nonsmokers (p = 0.009). We also observed significant correlations for CYP2E1 promoter methylation with GSTP1 and SOD1 promoter methylation levels (r = − .37, p < 0.05 and r = − .34, p < 0.05 respectively). Conclusion: These results highlight the importance of considering CYP2E1 epigenetic modifications, as well as its interactions with other genes, as key factors for unraveling the sub cellular mechanisms of toxicity exerted by oxidative stress, which can initiate disease process in chronic, low-level toluene exposure. People co-exposed to toluene and tobacco smoke are in higher risk due to a possible CYP2E1 repression. - Highlights: • We investigated gene-specific methylation in persons chronically exposed to toluene. • In a previous study, a reduced CYP2E1 activity was observed in these participants. • CYP2E1

  12. Hippocampal cell fate regulation by chronic cocaine during periods of adolescent vulnerability: Consequences of cocaine exposure during adolescence on behavioral despair in adulthood.

    PubMed

    García-Cabrerizo, R; Keller, B; García-Fuster, M J

    2015-09-24

    Given that adolescence represents a critical moment for shaping adult behavior and may predispose to disease vulnerability later in life, the aim of this study was to find a vulnerable period during adolescence in which hippocampal cell fate regulation was altered by cocaine exposure, and to evaluate the long-term consequences of a cocaine experience during adolescence in affecting hippocampal plasticity and behavioral despair in adulthood. Study I: Male rats were treated with cocaine (15mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 7 consecutive days during adolescence (early post-natal day (PND) 33-39, mid PND 40-46, late PND 47-53). Hippocampal plasticity (i.e., cell fate regulation, cell genesis) was evaluated 24h after the last treatment dose during the course of adolescence (PND 40, PND 47, PND 54). Study II: The consequences of cocaine exposure during adolescence (PND 33-39 or PND 33-46; 7 or 14days) were measured in adulthood at the behavioral (i.e., forced swim test, PND 62-63) and molecular (hippocampal cell markers, PND 64) levels. Chronic cocaine during early adolescence dysregulated FADD forms only in the hippocampus (HC), as compared to other brain regions, and during mid adolescence, impaired cell proliferation (Ki-67) and increased PARP-1 cleavage (a cell death maker) in the HC. Interestingly, chronic cocaine exposure during adolescence did not alter the time adult rats spent immobile in the forced swim test. These results suggest that this paradigm of chronic cocaine administration during adolescence did not contribute to the later manifestation of behavioral despair (i.e., one pro-depressive symptom) as measured by the forced swim test in adulthood. PMID:26215918

  13. Genome-wide alterations in polycomb-regulated epigenomic modifications in embryonic osteoblasts following exposure to maternal obesity in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional status during intrauterine and early postnatal life impacts the risk of chronic diseases, presumably via epigenetic mechanisms. However, evidence on the impact of gestational events on regulation of bone development is sparse. Recently we showed that bone development is inhibited in gest...

  14. Consequences of Growing Up Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.

    The consequences and correlates of growing up poor as well as the mechanisms through which poverty influences children are explored. This book is organized with a primary focus on research findings and a secondary concern with policy implications. The chapters are: (1) "Poor Families, Poor Outcomes: The Well-Being of Children and Youth" (Jeanne…

  15. Pattern Recognition Scavenger Receptor A/CD204 Regulates Airway Inflammatory Homeostasis Following Organic Dust Extract Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Jill A.; Anderson, Leigh; Gleason, Angela M.; West, William W.; Romberger, Debra J.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to agriculture organic dusts, comprised of a diversity of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, results in chronic airway diseases. The multi-functional class A macrophage scavenger receptor (SRA)/CD204 has emerged as an important class of pattern recognition receptors with broad ligand binding ability. Our objective was to determine the role of SRA in mediating repetitive and post-inflammatory organic dust extract (ODE)-induced airway inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and SRA knockout (KO) mice were intra-nasally treated with ODE or saline daily for 3 wk and immediately euthanized or allowed to recover for 1 wk. Results show that lung histopathologic changes were increased in SRA KO mice as compared to WT following repetitive ODE exposures marked predominately by increased size and distribution of lymphoid aggregates. After a 1-wk recovery from daily ODE treatments, there was significant resolution of lung injury in WT mice, but not SRA KO animals. The increased lung histopathology induced by ODE treatment was associated with decreased accumulation of neutrophils, but greater accumulation of CD4+ T-cells. The lung cytokine milieu induced by ODE was consistent with a TH1/TH17 polarization in both WT and SRA KO mice. Overall, our data demonstrate that SRA/CD204 plays an important role in the normative inflammatory lung response to ODE as evidenced by the enhanced dust-mediated injury viewed in the absence of this receptor. PMID:24491035

  16. Adult longevity of certain mosquito species after larval and pupal exposure to sublethal concentration of an insect growth regulator, hexaflumuron.

    PubMed

    Vasuki, V

    1992-03-01

    Longevity of the adults of three vector species, Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti was drastically reduced when they were exposed at larval and pupal stages to sublethal concentrations of an insect growth regulator hexaflumuron. When the three species were exposed to 0.05 mg/l at the pupal stage, males and females of Cx. quinquefasciatus suffered a more shortened life span than other species. Among the females whose feeding activity was adversely affected by IGR treatment at the pupal stage, Ae. aegypti showed the minimum survival duration with LT50 of 2.74 days. PMID:1523463

  17. Down-regulation of muscarinic receptors and the m3 subtype in white-footed mice by dietary exposure to parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.; Hill, E.F.; Fernando, J.C.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of ad libitum dietary exposure (as occurs in the field) to parathion for 14 d was investigated on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in brains and submaxillary glands of adults of a field species, the white-footed mouse Peromyscus leucopus. Immunoprecipitation using subtype selective antibodies revealed that the relative ratios of the m1-m5 mAChR subtypes in Peromyscus brain were similar to those in rat brain. There was little variability in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in control mice brains but large variability in 39 exposed mice, resulting from differences in food ingestion and parathion metabolism. Accordingly, data on radioligand binding to mAChRs in each mouse brain were correlated with brain AChE activity in the same mouse, and AChE inhibition served as a biomarker of exposure reflecting in situ paraoxon concentrations. Exposure to parathion for 14 d reduced maximal binding (Bmax) of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB), [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS), and [3H]-4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide ([3H]-4-DAMP) by up to approximately 58% without affecting receptor affinities for these ligands. Maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]QNB and [3H]-4-DAMP binding occurred in mice with highest AChE inhibition, while equivalent maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]NMS occurred in mice with only approximately 10% AChE inhibition, without further change at higher parathion doses. This is believed to be due to the hydrophilicity of [3H]NMS, which limits its accessibility to internalized desensitized receptors. In submaxillary glands (mAChRs are predominantly m3 subtype), there were significant dose-dependent reductions in [3H]QNB binding and m3 mRNA levels in exposed mice, revealed by Northern blot analyses. The reduction in m3 receptors is suggested to result mostly from reduced synthesis at the transcription level, rather than from translational or posttranslational events. The data suggest that down-regulation of mAChRs occurs

  18. Cardiac fibrosis and down regulation of GLUT4 in experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy are ameliorated by chronic exposures to intermittent altitude

    PubMed Central

    Faramoushi, Mahdi; Amir Sasan, Ramin; Sari Sarraf, Vahid; Karimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic intermittent hypoxia is considered as a preconditioning status in cardiovascular health to inducing resistance to the low oxygen supply. Diabetic cardiomyopathy leads to inability of the heart to effective circulation of blood preventing of consequent tissue damages so; the aim of this study was elucidation of effect of chronic exposure to hypoxia on Cardiac fibrosis and expression of GLUT4 in experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods: A total number of 30 rats were randomly divided into three groups; 1: Normoxia control group (NN, n = 10). 2: Normoxia diabetic group (ND, n = 10) that took fat diet for 2 weeks then were injected by streptozotocin (37 mg/kg) and 3: Hypoxia diabetic group (HD, n = 10): that were exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) (altitude ≈3400 m, 14% oxygen for 8 weeks). After hypoxia challenge, plasma metabolic parameters including: fasting blood glucose (FBS), triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) were measured by colorimetric assay. Cardiac expression of GLUT4 protein and cardiac collagen accumulation were determined in the excised left ventricle by western blotting, and Masson trichrome staining respectively. Results: Based on resultant data, FBS, TG and TC were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in HD vs. ND. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) were also significantly attenuated after exposed to CIH in HD group compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Significant increase in packed cell volume and hemoglobin concentration was observed in HD group compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Comparison of heart wet weight between three groups showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) with lower amount in HD and ND versus NN. Myocardial fibrosis was significantly more pronounced in ND when compared to NN. Eight weeks exposure to hypoxia ameliorated this increase in HD group. Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased GLUT4 protein expression in HD compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Data suggested that CIH

  19. The cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a regulates Langerhans cell radiation resistance and promotes T regulatory cell generation upon exposure to ionizing irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jeremy G.; Idoyaga, Juliana; Salmon, Hélène; Hogstad, Brandon; Bigarella, Carolina L.; Ghaffari, Saghi; Leboeuf, Marylene; Merad, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with ionizing irradiation (IR) may lead to accumulation of tumor-infiltrating T regulatory (Treg) cells and subsequent tumor resistance to radiotherapy. Here we focused on the contribution of the epidermal mononuclear phagocytes, Langerhans cells (LCs), to this phenomenon because of their ability to resist depletion by high-dose IR. We found that LCs resisted apoptosis and rapidly repaired DNA damage post-IR. Particularly, we found that CDKN1A (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, also known as p21) was overexpressed in LCs, and that Cdkn1a−/− LCs underwent apoptosis and accumulated DNA damage following IR treatment. Wild-type, but not Cdkn1a−/−, LCs up-regulated major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, migrated to the draining lymph nodes and increased Treg cell numbers upon exposure to IR. These findings suggest a means for manipulating LC IR-resistance to increase cutaneous tumor response to radiotherapy. PMID:26343536

  20. Tumor Protein (TP)-p53 Members as Regulators of Autophagy in Tumor Cells upon Marine Drug Exposure.

    PubMed

    Ratovitski, Edward A

    2016-01-01

    Targeting autophagic pathways might play a critical role in designing novel chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of human cancers, and the prevention of tumor-derived chemoresistance. Marine compounds were found to decrease tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Some of them were shown to induce autophagic flux in tumor cells. In this study, we observed that the selected marine life-derived compounds (Chromomycin A2, Psammaplin A, and Ilimaquinone) induce expression of several autophagic signaling intermediates in human squamous cell carcinoma, glioblastoma, and colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro through a transcriptional regulation by tumor protein (TP)-p53 family members. These conclusions were supported by specific qPCR expression analysis, luciferase reporter promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation of promoter sequences bound to the TP53 family proteins, and silencing of the TP53 members in tumor cells. PMID:27537898

  1. Tumor Protein (TP)-p53 Members as Regulators of Autophagy in Tumor Cells upon Marine Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ratovitski, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting autophagic pathways might play a critical role in designing novel chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of human cancers, and the prevention of tumor-derived chemoresistance. Marine compounds were found to decrease tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Some of them were shown to induce autophagic flux in tumor cells. In this study, we observed that the selected marine life-derived compounds (Chromomycin A2, Psammaplin A, and Ilimaquinone) induce expression of several autophagic signaling intermediates in human squamous cell carcinoma, glioblastoma, and colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro through a transcriptional regulation by tumor protein (TP)-p53 family members. These conclusions were supported by specific qPCR expression analysis, luciferase reporter promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation of promoter sequences bound to the TP53 family proteins, and silencing of the TP53 members in tumor cells. PMID:27537898

  2. Non-invasive assessment of Alterations in Cardiovascular regulation and function and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias resulting from microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsdell, Craig D.; Sundby, Grete H.; Sherman, Derin; Maa, Ming; Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Williams, Gordon H.; Cohen, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular regulation and function that occur during and after space flight have been reported. These alterations are manifested, for example, by reduced orthostatic tolerance upon reentry to the earth's gravity from space. However, the precise physiologic mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain to be fully elucidated. Perhaps as a result, fully effective countermeasures have yet to be developed. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute Cardiovascular Alterations Team is currently conducting a head-down tilt bed rest study in Boston. These studies involve the application of two powerful new methodologies developed at the NASA Center for Quantitative Cardiovascular Physiology, Modeling and Data Analysis at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-cardiovascular system identification and T Wave Alternans analysis-for the study of the effects of simulated microgravity on the cardiovascular system. This study is being used as a basis for developing effective countermeasures against microgravity induced orthostatic hypotension and ventricular arrhythmias. .

  3. Different Regulation of p53 Expression by Cadmium Exposure in Kidney, Liver, Intestine, Vasculature, and Brain Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Tokumoto, Maki; Hattori, Yuta; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Shimada, Akinori; Satoh, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) is known to adversely affect renal function. Our previous studies indicated that Cd induces p53-dependent apoptosis by inhibiting gene expression of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (Ube) 2d family in both human and rat proximal tubular cells. In this study, the effects of Cd on protein expression of p53 and apoptotic signals in the kidney and liver of mice exposed to Cd for 12 months were examined, as well as the effects of Cd on p53 protein levels and gene expression of the Ube2d family in various cell lines. Results showed that in the kidney of mice exposed to 300 ppm Cd for 12 months, there was overaccumulation of p53 proteins in addition to the induction of apoptosis, which was triggered specifically in the proximal tubules. Interestingly, the site of apoptosis was the same as that of p53 accumulation in the proximal tubules. In the liver of mice chronically exposed to Cd, gene expression of the Ube2d family tended to be slightly decreased, together with slight apoptosis without the accumulation of p53 protein. In rat small intestine epithelial (IEC-6) cells, Cd decreased not only the p53 protein level but also gene expression of Ube2d1, Ube2d2 and Ube2d4. In human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), Cd did not suppress gene expression of the Ube2d family, but increased the p53 protein level. In human brain astrocytes (HBASTs), Cd only increased gene expression of UBE2D3. These results suggest that Cd-induced apoptosis through p53 protein is associated with renal toxicity but not hepatic toxicity, and the modification of p53 protein by Cd may vary depending on cell type. PMID:26977261

  4. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha; Massey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  5. Forgotten Americans: The "Working Poor."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, Tom

    1984-01-01

    The working poor are employable people who have found low-paying jobs and barely scrape out a living. By removing many forms of federal aid, the Reagan administration has locked the working poor into poverty. In saving a few dollars today, we are penalizing the next generation. (CS)

  6. Ethanol Exposure Induces Neonatal Neurodegeneration by Enhancing CB1R Exon1 Histone H4K8 Acetylation and Up-regulating CB1R Function causing Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Subbanna, Shivakumar; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pace, Betty S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ethanol exposure to rodents during postnatal day 7 (P7), which is comparable to the third trimester of human pregnancy, induces long-term potentiation and memory deficits. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits are still poorly understood. Methods: In the present study, we explored the potential role of epigenetic changes at cannabinoid type 1 (CB1R) exon1 and additional CB1R functions, which could promote memory deficits in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Results: We found that ethanol treatment of P7 mice enhances acetylation of H4 on lysine 8 (H4K8ace) at CB1R exon1, CB1R binding as well as the CB1R agonist-stimulated GTPγS binding in the hippocampus and neocortex, two brain regions that are vulnerable to ethanol at P7 and are important for memory formation and storage, respectively. We also found that ethanol inhibits cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression in neonatal and adult mice. The blockade or genetic deletion of CB1Rs prior to ethanol treatment at P7 rescued CREB phosphorylation and Arc expression. CB1R knockout mice exhibited neither ethanol-induced neurodegeneration nor inhibition of CREB phosphorylation or Arc expression. However, both neonatal and adult mice did exhibit enhanced CREB phosphorylation and Arc protein expression. P7 ethanol-treated adult mice exhibited impaired spatial and social recognition memory, which were prevented by the pharmacological blockade or deletion of CB1Rs at P7. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that P7 ethanol treatment induces CB1R expression through epigenetic modification of the CB1R gene, and that the enhanced CB1R function induces pCREB, Arc, spatial, and social memory deficits in adult mice. PMID:25609594

  7. Effects of chronic exposure to tributyltin on tissue-specific cytochrome P450 1 regulation in juvenile common carp.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Zhong, Li-Qiao; Mu, Wei-Na; Wu, Yan-Hua

    2016-06-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to compare tributyltin (TBT)-induced cytochrome P450 1 (CYP450 1) regulation in liver, gills and muscle of juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio). 2. Fish were exposed to sublethal concentrations of TBT (75, 0.75 and 7.5 μg/L) for 60 days. CYP450 1A was measured at the enzyme activity level as 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, as well as the mRNA expression of CYP450 1 family genes (CYP1A, CYP1B, CYP1C1 and CYP1C2) in fish tissues. 3. Based on the results, the liver displayed the highest absolute levels of EROD activity, both under nonexposed and exposed conditions. Additional, EROD activities and CYP1A gene levels showed a good correlation in all three organs. According to the mRNA expression of CYP450 1 family genes, it suggested that CYP1A was to accommodate most EROD activity in fish, but other CYP450 forms also involved in this proceeding. 4. Overall, the study revealed both similarities and differences in the concentration-dependent CYP450 1 responses of the three target organs, which could provide useful information to better understand the mechanisms of TBT-induced bio-toxicity. PMID:26446983

  8. Pharyngeal pumping inhibition and avoidance by acute exposure to high CO2 levels are both regulated by the BAG neurons via different molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Kfir; Charar, Chayki; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a key molecule in many biological processes. Studies in humans, mice, D. melanogaster, C. elegans, unicellular organisms and plants have shed light on the molecular pathways activated by elevated levels of CO2. However, the mechanisms that organisms use to sense and respond to high CO2 levels remain largely unknown. Previous work has shown that C. elegans quickly avoid elevated CO2 levels using mechanisms that involve the BAG, ASE and AFD neurons via cGMP- and calcium- signaling pathways. Here, we discuss our recent finding that exposure of C. elegans to high CO2 levels leads to a very rapid cessation in the contraction of the pharynx muscles. Surprisingly, none of the tested CO2 avoidance mutants affected the rapid pumping inhibition response to elevated CO2 levels. A forward genetic screen identified that the hid-1-mediated pathway of dense core vesicle maturation regulates the pumping inhibition, probably through affecting neuropeptide secretion. Genetic studies and laser ablation experiments showed that the CO2 response of the pharyngeal muscle pumping is regulated by the BAG neurons, the same neurons that mediate CO2 avoidance. PMID:26430557

  9. Effects of antihistamine on up-regulation of histamine H1 receptor mRNA in the nasal mucosa of patients with pollinosis induced by controlled cedar pollen challenge in an environmental exposure unit.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Sakoda, Takema; Enomoto, Tadao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of antihistamine on the up-regulation of H1R mRNA in the nasal mucosa of patients with pollinosis induced by controlled exposure to pollen using an environmental exposure unit. Out of 20 patients, we designated 14 responders, whose levels of H1R mRNA in the nasal mucosa were increased after the first pollen exposure and excluded 6 non-responders. Accordingly, the first exposure to pollen without treatment significantly induced both nasal symptoms and the up-regulation of H1R mRNA in the nasal mucosa of the responders. Subsequently, prophylactic administration of antihistamine prior to the second pollen exposure significantly inhibited both of the above effects in the responders. Moreover, the nasal expression of H1R mRNA before the second pollen exposure in the responders pretreated with antihistamine was significantly decreased, as compared with that before the first pollen exposure without treatment. These findings suggest that antihistamines suppressed histamine-induced transcriptional activation of H1R gene in the nasal mucosa, in addition to their blocking effect against histamine on H1R, resulting in a decrease of nasal symptoms. These findings further suggest that by their inverse agonistic activity, antihistamines suppress the basal transcription of nasal H1R in the absence of histamine in responders. PMID:26598006

  10. Effects of In Vitro Exposure to Diarrheic Toxin Producer Prorocentrum lima on Gene Expressions Related to Cell Cycle Regulation and Immune Response in Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    de Jesús Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Background Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP) associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA) causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3–5 mm). The Pacific oysters were fed with three dinoflagellate concentrations: 0.3, 3, and 30×103 cells mL−1 along with a nontoxic control diet of Isochrysis galbana. The effects of P. lima on C. gigas were followed by analyzing expression levels of a total of four genes, three involved in cell cycle regulation and one in immune response by polymerase chain reaction and real time quantitative PCR, where changes in time and cell concentration were found. The highest expression levels were found in oysters fed 3×103 cells mL−1 at 168 h for the cycle regulator p21 protein (9 fold), chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (8 fold), elongation factor 2 (2 fold), and lipopolysaccharide/β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (13 fold above base line). Additionally, the transcript level of all the genes decreased in oysters fed wich the mixed diet 30×103 cells mL−1 of dinoflagellate after 72 h and was lowest in the chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (0.9 fold below baseline). Conclusions On C. gigas the whole cell ingestion of P lima caused a clear mRNA modulation expression of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune system. Over-expression could be related to DNA damage, disturbances in cell cycle continuity, probably a genotoxic effect, as well as an activation of its innate immune system as first line of defense. PMID:24825133

  11. Prolonged exposure of chromaffin cells to nitric oxide down-regulates the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase and corresponding mRNA and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Rut; Torres, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the main receptor for nitric oxide (NO) when the latter is produced at low concentrations. This enzyme exists mainly as a heterodimer consisting of one α and one β subunit and converts GTP to the second intracellular messenger cGMP. In turn, cGMP plays a key role in regulating several physiological processes in the nervous system. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of a NO donor on sGC activity and its protein and subunit mRNA levels in a neural cell model. Results Continuous exposure of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture to the nitric oxide donor, diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETA/NO), resulted in a lower capacity of the cells to synthesize cGMP in response to a subsequent NO stimulus. This effect was not prevented by an increase of intracellular reduced glutathione level. DETA/NO treatment decreased sGC subunit mRNA and β1 subunit protein levels. Both sGC activity and β1 subunit levels decreased more rapidly in chromaffin cells exposed to NO than in cells exposed to the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that NO decreases β1 subunit stability. The presence of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors effectively prevented the DETA/NO-induced down regulation of sGC subunit mRNA and partially inhibited the reduction in β1 subunits. Conclusions These results suggest that activation of PKG mediates the drop in sGC subunit mRNA levels, and that NO down-regulates sGC activity by decreasing subunit mRNA levels through a cGMP-dependent mechanism, and by reducing β1 subunit stability. PMID:12350235

  12. Second-hand smoke exposure in indoor and outdoor areas of cafés and restaurants: Need for extending smoking regulation outdoors?

    PubMed

    Fu, Marcela; Fernández, Esteve; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; San Emeterio, Noemi; Quirós, Nuria; Sureda, Xisca; Ballbè, Montse; Muñoz, Glòria; Riccobene, Anna; Centrich, Francesc; Saltó, Esteve; López, María J

    2016-07-01

    Smoke-free legislation in indoor public places has concentrated smokers in the areas outside building entrances or other outdoor areas. This study assessed the drift of second-hand smoke between outdoor and indoor areas of cafés and restaurants in Barcelona, Spain, and characterized the exposure on outdoor terraces. Using a cross-sectional design, we monitored vapor-phase nicotine in indoor areas and outside entrances simultaneously (n=47), and on some outdoor terraces (n=51). We computed the median nicotine concentration and interquartile range (IQR) to describe the data and performed multivariate analysis to describe nicotine concentration and its determinants. The overall median nicotine concentration indoors was 0.65µg/m(3) (IQR: 0.29-1.17µg/m(3)), with significant differences based on the number of smokers at the entrance (p=0.039). At outside entrances, the overall median nicotine concentration was 0.41µg/m(3) (IQR: 0.21-1.17µg/m(3)). The nicotine concentrations indoors and at the corresponding outside entrances were not significantly different, and the multivariate analysis confirmed the relationship between these variables. On terraces, the overall median nicotine concentration was 0.54µg/m(3) (IQR: 0.25-1.14µg/m(3)), but it increased to 0.60µg/m(3) when a tobacco smell was perceived, 0.72µg/m(3) on closed terraces, 1.24µg/m(3) when there were >6 smokers, and 1.24µg/m(3) when someone smoked >20min. Multivariate analysis confirmed the outdoor terrace area, the season, the type of enclosure, and the number of smokers as the most relevant variables explaining nicotine concentration (R(2)=0.396). These findings show that second-hand smoke exposure exists in indoor areas due to smokers smoking at the outside entrances. In addition, exposure may occur on outdoor terraces when smokers are present and the terrace is enclosed to some extent. Thus, the current Spanish law does not fully protect non-smokers from second-hand smoke and supports extending

  13. Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-06-15

    Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

  14. The dormancy-breaking stimuli "chilling, hypoxia and cyanamide exposure" up-regulate the expression of α-amylase genes in grapevine buds.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Sebastián; Donoso, Amanda; Pérez, Francisco J

    2014-03-15

    It has been suggested that respiratory stress is involved in the mechanism underlying the dormancy-breaking effect of hydrogen cyanamide (H2CN2) and sodium azide in grapevine buds; indeed, reductions in oxygen levels (hypoxia) and inhibitors of respiration promote bud-break in grapevines. In this study, we showed that, hypoxia increased starch hydrolysis soluble sugar consumption and up-regulated the expression of α-amylase genes (Vvα-AMYs) in grapevine buds, suggesting that these biochemical changes induced by hypoxia, may play a relevant role in the release of buds from endodormancy (ED). Three of the four Vvα-AMY genes that are expressed in grapevine buds were up-regulated by hypoxia and a correlation between changes in sugar content and level of Vvα-AMY gene expression during the hypoxia treatment was found, suggesting that soluble sugars mediate the effect of hypoxia on Vvα-AMY gene expression. Exogenous applications of soluble sugars and sugar analogs confirmed this finding and revealed that osmotic stress induces the expression of Vvα-AMY1 and Vvα-AMY3 and that soluble sugars induces Vvα-AMY2 and Vvα-AMY4 gene expression. Interestingly, the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA3) induced the expression of Vvα-AMY3 and Vvα-AMY4 genes, while dormancy breaking stimuli, chilling and cyanamide exposure, mainly induced the expression of Vvα-AMY1 and Vvα-AMY2 genes, suggesting that these two α-amylase genes might be involved in the release of grapevine buds from the ED. PMID:24594388

  15. Poor smokers, poor quitters, and cigarette tax regressivity.

    PubMed

    Remler, Dahlia K

    2004-02-01

    The traditional view that excise taxes are regressive has been challenged. I document the history of the term regressive tax, show that traditional definitions have always found cigarette taxes to be regressive, and illustrate the implications of the greater price responsiveness observed among the poor. I explain the different definitions of tax burden: accounting, welfare-based willingness to pay, and welfare-based time inconsistent. Progressivity (equity across income groups) is sensitive to the way in which tax burden is assessed. Analysis of horizontal equity (fairness within a given income group) shows that cigarette taxes heavily burden poor smokers who do not quit, no matter how tax burden is assessed. PMID:14759931

  16. A MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE EMBRYONIC FORELIMB OF THE C57BL/6J MOUSE REVEALS SIGNIFICANT ALTERATIONS METABOLIC AND DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION FOLLOWING ETHANOL EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The observation of transcriptional changes following embryonic ethanol exposure may provide significant insights into the biological response to ethanol exposure. In this study, we used microarray analysis to examine the transcriptional response of the developing limb to a dose ...

  17. Exposure to Diflubenzuron Results in an Up-Regulation of a Chitin Synthase 1 Gene in Citrus Red Mite, Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wen-Kai; Ding, Tian-Bo; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Liao, Chong-Yu; Zhong, Rui; Yang, Wen-Jia; Liu, Bin; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Chitin synthase synthesizes chitin, which is critical for the arthropod exoskeleton. In this study, we cloned the cDNA sequences of a chitin synthase 1 gene, PcCHS1, in the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), which is one of the most economically important pests of citrus worldwide. The full-length cDNA of PcCHS1 contains an open reading frame of 4605 bp of nucleotides, which encodes a protein of 1535 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 175.0 kDa. A phylogenetic analysis showed that PcCHS1 was most closely related to CHS1 from Tetranychus urticae. During P. citri development, PcCHS1 was constantly expressed in all stages but highly expressed in the egg stage (114.8-fold higher than in the adult). When larvae were exposed to diflubenzuron (DFB) for 6 h, the mite had a significantly high mortality rate, and the mRNA expression levels of PcCHS1 were significantly enhanced. These results indicate a promising use of DFB to control P. citri, by possibly acting as an inhibitor in chitin synthesis as indicated by the up-regulation of PcCHS1 after exposure to DFB. PMID:24590130

  18. Exposure to diflubenzuron results in an up-regulation of a chitin synthase 1 gene in citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Xia, Wen-Kai; Ding, Tian-Bo; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Liao, Chong-Yu; Zhong, Rui; Yang, Wen-Jia; Liu, Bin; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Chitin synthase synthesizes chitin, which is critical for the arthropod exoskeleton. In this study, we cloned the cDNA sequences of a chitin synthase 1 gene, PcCHS1, in the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), which is one of the most economically important pests of citrus worldwide. The full-length cDNA of PcCHS1 contains an open reading frame of 4605 bp of nucleotides, which encodes a protein of 1535 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 175.0 kDa. A phylogenetic analysis showed that PcCHS1 was most closely related to CHS1 from Tetranychus urticae. During P. citri development, PcCHS1 was constantly expressed in all stages but highly expressed in the egg stage (114.8-fold higher than in the adult). When larvae were exposed to diflubenzuron (DFB) for 6 h, the mite had a significantly high mortality rate, and the mRNA expression levels of PcCHS1 were significantly enhanced. These results indicate a promising use of DFB to control P. citri, by possibly acting as an inhibitor in chitin synthesis as indicated by the up-regulation of PcCHS1 after exposure to DFB. PMID:24590130

  19. Negative regulation of the FOXO3a transcription factor by mTORC2 induces a pro-survival response following exposure to ultraviolet-B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Robert P; Shantz, Lisa M

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation, the principal cause of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), activates both the rapamycin-sensitive mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and the rapamycin-resistant mTORC2. We have previously reported that UVB-induced keratinocyte survival is dependent on mTORC2, though the specific mechanism is not well understood. FOXO3a is an important transcription factor involved in regulating cell survival. The activity of FOXO3a is reduced as a result of protein kinase B (AKT/PKB) activation, which is downstream of mTORC2; however, the specific function of FOXO3a during UVB-induced apoptosis is unclear. In this study, we establish that in cells with wild-type mTORC2 activity, FOXO3a is quickly phosphorylated in response to UVB and sequestered in the cytoplasm. In contrast, loss of mTORC2 causes FOXO3a to be localized to the nucleus and sensitizes cells to UVB-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, this sensitization is rescued by knockdown of FOXO3a. Taken together, these studies provide strong evidence that inhibition of mTORC2 enhances UVB-induced apoptosis in a FOXO3a-dependent manner, and suggest that FOXO3a activation by mTORC2 inhibitors may be a valuable chemopreventive target in NMSC. PMID:27058291

  20. Basal regulation of HPA and dopamine systems is altered differentially in males and females by prenatal alcohol exposure and chronic variable stress

    PubMed Central

    Uban, Kristina A.; Comeau, Wendy; Ellis, Linda A.; Galea, Liisa A. M.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on central nervous system function include an increased prevalence of mental health problems, including substance use disorders (SUD). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and dopamine systems have overlapping neurocircuitries and are both implicated in SUD. PAE alters both HPA and dopaminergic activity and regulation, resulting in increased HPA tone and an overall reduction in tonic dopamine activity. However, effects of PAE on the interaction between HPA and dopamine (DA) systems have not been investigated. The present study examined PAE effects on basal regulation of central stress and dopamine systems in key brain regions where these systems intersect. Adult Sprague-Dawley male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol-exposed (PAE), pairfed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) groups were subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS) or remained as a no stress (non-CVS) control group. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, as well as glucocorticoid and DA receptor (DA-R) expression were measured under basal conditions 24 hours following the end of CVS. We show, for the first time, that regulation of basal HPA and DA systems, and likely, HPA-DA interactions, are altered differentially in males and females by PAE and CVS. PAE augmented the typical attenuation in weight gain during CVS in males and caused increased weight loss in females. Increased basal corticosterone levels in control, but not PAE, females suggest that PAE alters the profile of basal hormone secretion throughout CVS. CVS downregulated basal CRH mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and throughout the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in PAE females but only in the posterior BNST of control females. PAE males and females exposed to CVS exhibited more widespread upregulation of basal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA throughout the hippocampus, and an attenuated decrease in DA-R expression throughout the nucleus accumbens and striatum compared

  1. Are Poor Chinese Text Comprehenders Also Poor in Written Composition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Connie Qun; Ye, Feifei; Meng, Wanjin; Leong, Che Kan

    2013-01-01

    We studied the performance in three genres of Chinese written composition (narration, exposition, and argumentation) of 158 grade 4, 5, and 6 poor Chinese text comprehenders compared with 156 good Chinese text comprehenders. We examined text comprehension and written composition relationship. Verbal working memory (verbal span working memory and…

  2. The management of poor performance

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, John F

    2007-01-01

    Identification of poor performance is in an integral part of government policy. The suggested approach for the identification of such problems, advocated by the General Medical Council, is that of appraisal. However, traditionally, there has been a reluctance to deal with poor performers, as all doctors have made mistakes and are usually only too ready to forgive and be non‐critical of colleagues. The problems are widespread, and 6% of the senior hospital workforce in any 5‐year period may have problems. PMID:17308213

  3. Prospects for the Working Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Based on a chapter entitled "Barriers to Employment of the Disadvantaged by Martin Deutsch and S. M. Miller in "Manpower Report of the President, 1968. Discusses the Nixon proposals for remediating poverty in relation to the socioeconomic factors operating to maintain the condition of being poor while working. (JM)

  4. Poor Memory: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Malcolm L.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a case study of a person who had a cardiac arrest with some right-sided brain damage. Describes the effects of poor memory on cognition, personality, and interpersonal relationships based on personal observations during memory impairment. Highlights the course of rehabilitation over a two-year period. (PAS)

  5. Are poor Chinese text comprehenders also poor in written composition?

    PubMed

    Guan, Connie Qun; Ye, Feifei; Meng, Wanjin; Leong, Che Kan

    2013-10-01

    We studied the performance in three genres of Chinese written composition (narration, exposition, and argumentation) of 158 grade 4, 5, and 6 poor Chinese text comprehenders compared with 156 good Chinese text comprehenders. We examined text comprehension and written composition relationship. Verbal working memory (verbal span working memory and operation span working memory) and different levels of linguistic tasks-morphological sensitivity (morphological compounding and morphological chain), sentence processing (syntax construction and syntax integrity), and text comprehension (narrative and expository texts)-were used to predict separately narrative, expository, and argumentation written compositions in these students. Grade for grade, the good text comprehenders outperformed the poor text comprehenders in all tasks, except for morphological chain. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed differential contribution of the tasks to different genres of writing. In particular, text comprehension made unique contribution to argumentation writing in the poor text comprehenders. Future studies should ask students to read and write parallel passages in the same genre for better comparison and incorporate both instructional and motivational variables. PMID:23666849

  6. Estrogen Sensitivity of Target Genes and Expression of Nuclear Receptor Co-Regulators in Rat Prostate after Pre- and Postnatal Exposure to the Ultraviolet Filter 4-Methylbenzylidene Camphor

    PubMed Central

    Durrer, Stefan; Ehnes, Colin; Fuetsch, Michaela; Maerkel, Kirsten; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Background and objectives In previous studies, we found that the ultraviolet filter 4-methyl-benzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, is a preferential estrogen receptor (ER)-β ligand, and interferes with development of female reproductive organs and brain of both sexes in rats. Here, we report effects on male development. Methods 4-MBC (0.7, 7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to offspring until adulthood. mRNA was determined in prostate lobes by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and protein was determined by Western blot analysis. Results 4-MBC delayed male puberty, decreased adult prostate weight, and slightly increased testis weight. Androgen receptor (AR), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), ER-α, and ER-β expression in prostate were altered at mRNA and protein levels, with stronger effects in dorsolateral than ventral prostate. To assess sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were castrated on postnatal day 70, injected with 17β-estradiol (E2; 10 or 50 μg/kg, sc) or vehicle on postnatal day 84, and sacrificed 6 hr later. Acute repression of AR and IGF-1 mRNAs by E2, studied in ventral prostate, was reduced by 4-MBC exposure. This was accompanied by reduced co-repressor N-CoR (nuclear receptor co-repressor) protein in ventral and dorsolateral prostate, whereas steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) protein levels were unaffected. Conclusions Our data indicate that 4-MBC affects development of male reproductive functions and organs, with a lowest observed adverse effect level of 0.7 mg/kg. Nuclear receptor coregulators were revealed as targets for endocrine disruptors, as shown for N-CoR in prostate and SRC-1 in uterus. This may have widespread effects on gene regulation. PMID:18174949

  7. Seven poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Latham, D. W.; Davis, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement of 83 new redshifts from galaxies in the region of seven of the poor clusters of galaxies identified by Morgan et al (1975) and Albert et al (1977) has been followed by an estimation of cluster masses through the application of both the virial theorem and the projected mas method. For each system, these two estimates are consistent. For the two clusters with highest X-ray luminosities, the line-of-sight velocity dispersions are about 700 km/sec, while for the five other clusters, the dispersions are of the order of less than about 370 km/sec. The D or cD galaxy in each poor cluster is at the kinematic center of each system.

  8. Exposure assessment of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C; Schaum, J

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews exposure information available for trichloroethylene (TCE) and assesses the magnitude of human exposure. The primary sources releasing TCE into the environment are metal cleaning and degreasing operations. Releases occur into all media but mostly into the air due to its volatility. It is also moderately soluble in water and can leach from soils into groundwater. TCE has commonly been found in ambient air, surface water, and groundwaters. The 1998 air levels in microg/m(3) across 115 monitors can be summarized as follows: range = 0.01-3.9, mean = 0.88. A California survey of large water utilities in 1984 found a median concentration of 3.0 microg/L. General population exposure to TCE occurs primarily by inhalation and water ingestion. Typical average daily intakes have been estimated as 11-33 microg/day for inhalation and 2-20 microg/day for ingestion. A small portion of the population is expected to have elevated exposures as a result of one or more of these pathways: inhalation exposures to workers involved in degreasing operations, ingestion and inhalation exposures occurring in homes with private wells located near disposal/contamination sites, and inhalation exposures to consumers using TCE products in areas of poor ventilation. More current and more extensive data on TCE levels in indoor air, water, and soil are needed to better characterize the distribution of background exposures in the general population and elevated exposures in special subpopulations. Images Figure 1 PMID:10807565

  9. Occludin expression in goldfish held in ion-poor water.

    PubMed

    Chasiotis, Helen; Effendi, Jennifer C; Kelly, Scott P

    2009-02-01

    With an emphasis on the tight junction protein occludin, the response of goldfish following abrupt exposure (0-120 h) as well as long-term acclimation (14 and 28 days) to ion-poor water (IPW) was examined. Both abrupt and long-term exposure to IPW lowered serum osmolality, [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)], and elevated serum glucose. After abrupt exposure to IPW, gill tissue exhibited a prompt and sustained decrease in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, and a transient increase in occludin expression that returned to control levels by 6 h. Following 14 and 28 days in IPW, gill occludin expression was markedly elevated, while Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was only significantly different (elevated) at day 14. Kidney tissue exhibited an elevation in both Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and occludin expression after 28 days; however, in the intestine, occludin expression declined at day 14 but did not differ from FW fish at day 28. These studies demonstrate that goldfish can tolerate abrupt as well as sustained exposure to ion-poor surroundings. Data also suggests that occludin may play an adaptive role in fishes acclimated to ion-poor conditions by contributing to the modulation of epithelial barrier properties in ionoregulatory tissues. PMID:18802707

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor regulates CYP1B1 but not ABCB1 and ABCG2 in hCMEC/D3 human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells after TCDD exposure.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Aude; Potin, Sophie; Chapy, Hélène; Crete, Dominique; Glacial, Fabienne; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declèves, Xavier

    2015-07-10

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor activated by a variety of widespread persistent environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). It can transactivate the expression of several target genes. Recently AhR transcripts were detected in isolated human brain microvessels and in the hCMEC/D3 human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line, an in vitro model of the human cerebral endothelium. To date AhR implication in the co-regulation of ABCB1, ABCG2 and CYP1B1 at human cerebral endothelium has not been addressed. Here we investigated whether AhR could co-regulate ABCB1, ABCG2 and CYP1B1 expressions in the hCMEC/D3 cell line. Exposure to TCDD induced a concentration-dependent increase in CYP1B1 expression. We demonstrated AhR involvement in the TCDD-mediated increase in CYP1B1 expression by using small interfering RNA against AhR. Western blotting analysis also revealed an increase in CYP1B1 protein expression following TCDD exposure in hCMEC/D3. Regarding ABCB1 and ABCG2, exposure to TCDD had no effect on their protein expressions and functional activities. In conclusion our data indicated a differential modulation of CYP1B1 and ABCB1/ABCG2 expressions in hCMEC/D3 cells following TCDD exposure. PMID:25858487

  11. Do car-mounted mobile measurements used for radio-frequency spectrum regulation have an application for exposure assessments in epidemiological studies?

    PubMed

    Bolte, John F B; Maslanyj, Myron; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Kamer, Jos; Colussi, Loek

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the spatial and temporal trends in environmental exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields is important in studies investigating whether there are associated health effects on humans and ecological effects on plants and animals. The main objective of this study is to assess whether the RFeye car-mounted mobile measurement system used for radio frequency spectrum monitoring in The Netherlands and the United Kingdom could be of value in assessing exposure over large areas as an alternative to measuring exposure with personal exposure meters or using complex modelling techniques. We evaluated the responses of various body-worn personal exposure meters in comparison with the mobile measurement system for spectrum monitoring. The comparison was restricted to downlink mobile communication in the GSM900 and GSM1800 frequency bands. Repeated measurements were performed in three areas in Cambridge, United Kingdom and in three areas in Amersfoort, The Netherlands. We found that exposure assessments through the car-mounted measurements are at least of similar quality to exposure modelling and better than the body worn exposimeter data due to the absence of the shielding effect. The main conclusion is that the mobile measurements provide an efficient and low cost alternative particularly in mapping large areas. PMID:26540087

  12. Regulation of amino acid metabolism as a defensive strategy in the brain of three freshwater teleosts in response to high environmental ammonia exposure.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; Giblen, Terri; AbdElgawad, Hamada; De Rop, Michelle; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2013-04-15

    Many teleosts have evolved mechanisms to cope with ammonia toxicity in the brain when confronted with high environmental ammonia (HEA). In the present study, the possible role of conversion of accumulated ammonia to glutamine and other free amino acids in the brain of three freshwater teleosts differing in their sensitivities to ammonia was investigated. The detoxification mode of ammonia in brain is suggested to be through amination of glutamate to glutamine by the coupled activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), transaminase (aspartate aminotransaminase 'AST' and alanine aminotransaminase 'ALT') and glutamine synthetase (GSase). We investigated the metabolic response of amino acids in the brain of highly sensitive salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), the less sensitive cyprinid Cyprinus carpio (common carp) and the highly resistant cyprinid Carassius auratus (goldfish) when exposed to 1mM ammonia (as NH4HCO3; pH 7.9) for 0 h (control), 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h. Results show that HEA exposure increased ammonia accumulation significantly in the brain of all the three species from 12h onwards. Unlike in trout, ammonia accumulation in carp and goldfish was restored to control levels (48-84h); which was accompanied with a significant increase in glutamine content as well as GSase activity. In trout, glutamine levels also increased (84-180 h) but GSase was not activated. The elevated glutamine level in trout was accompanied by a significant depletion of the glutamate pool in contrast to the stable glutamate levels seen in carp and goldfish. This suggests a simultaneous increase in the rate of glutamate formation to match with the demand of glutamine formation in cyprinids. The activity of GDH was elevated significantly in carp and goldfish but remained unaltered in trout. Also, the transaminase enzymes (AST and ALT) were elevated significantly in exposed carp and goldfish while only ALT was up-regulated in trout. Consequently, in carp and

  13. Temptation in the background: non-consummatory exposure to food temptation enhances self-regulation in boys but not in girls

    PubMed Central

    Grubliauskiene, Aiste; Dewitte, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of calorie-dense low-nutrient food in everyday life raises the question as to how children deal with such opportunities. We investigate whether pre-exposure to the object of temptation in a situation that discourages consumption boosts children’s ability to resist similar temptation subsequently. We show that 7–12-year-old boys, but not girls, demonstrate increased resistance to a temptation after pre-exposure to a similar temptation. Future research might explore the role of exposure to temptation in girls. PMID:25101042

  14. Livestock services and the poor.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, V; Redmond, E

    2004-04-01

    This paper reviews the economic framework for the delivery of livestock services to the poor. It is argued that the demand for livestock products is likely to increase rapidly and the ability of the poor to participate in the opportunities presented by this growth is linked critically to the availability of good service support, both on the input and output side. Governments therefore have a responsibility to supply the necessary public goods (including the institutions and legal frameworks), and the market infrastructure for facilitating the emergence of efficient markets for livestock services. The paper further argues that the dynamics of public policy in developing countries are much more complex than the simple application of economic logic. It is the larger political economy that often dictates policy choices. It is therefore important to integrate political economy and governance issues into the economic debate on livestock service delivery. The paper also reviews the context in which the markets for livestock services will need to function. Different countries are facing very different sets of issues, and the identification of possible interventions in livestock service markets would require careful field research and analysis. In this context, the paper suggests the elements of a research agenda for the next few years. PMID:15080541

  15. Seven poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Latham, D. W.; Davis, R. J.

    1984-08-01

    The authors have measured 83 new redshifts for galaxies in the region of seven of the poor clusters of galaxies identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White and Albert, White, and Morgan. For three systems (MKW 1s, AWM 1, and AWM 7) complete redshift samples were obtained for galaxies brighter than mB(0) = 15.7 within 1° of the D or cD galaxy. The authors estimate masses for the clusters by applying both the virial theorem and the projected mass method. For the two clusters with the highest X-ray luminosities, the line-of-sight velocity dispersions are ≡700 km s-1, and mass-to-light ratios M/LB(0) ⪆ 400 M_sun;/L_sun;. For the five other clusters the velocity dispersions are ⪉370 km s-1, and four of the five have mass-to-light ratios ⪉250 M_sun;/L_sun;. The D or cD galaxy in each poor cluster is at the kinematic center of the system.

  16. Adult and paediatric poor metabolisers of desloratadine: an assessment of pharmacokinetics and safety.

    PubMed

    Prenner, Bruce; Kim, Kenneth; Gupta, Samir; Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Manitpisitkul, Prasarn; Lorber, Richard; Wang, Zaiqi; Lutsky, Barry

    2006-03-01

    Antihistamines are widely used to treat allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) in adults and children. Desloratadine is a once-daily oral antihistamine with a favourable sedation profile that is approved for the treatment of AR and CIU. Phenotypic polymorphism in the metabolism of desloratadine has been observed, such that some individuals have a decreased ability to form 3-hydroxydesloratadine, the major metabolite of desloratadine; such individuals are termed 'poor metabolisers of desloratadine'. This review describes the prevalence of poor metabolisers of desloratadine, quantifies the exposure to desloratadine in poor metabolisers and demonstrates that the increased exposure in poor metabolisers is independent of age when administered at age-appropriate doses. Furthermore, this review demonstrates that the increased exposure to desloratadine in poor metabolisers is not associated with any changes in the safety and tolerability profile of desloratadine, including cardiovascular safety. PMID:16503743

  17. Child Health: Reaching the Poor

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Adam; Bustreo, Flavia; Bryce, Jennifer; Claeson, Mariam

    2004-01-01

    In most countries, rates of mortality and malnutrition among children continue to decline, but large inequalities between poor and better-off children exist, both between and within countries. These inequalities, which appear to be widening, call into question the strategies for child mortality reduction relied upon to date. We review (1) what is known about the causes of socioeconomic inequalities in child health and where programs aimed at reducing inequalities may be most effectively focused and (2) what is known about the success of actual programs in narrowing these inequalities. We end with lessons learned: the need for better evidence, but most of all for a new approach to improving the health of all children that is evidence based, broad, and multifaceted. PMID:15117689

  18. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets. PMID:12227146

  19. Altered Expression of Genes in Signaling Pathways Regulating Proliferation of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Mice with Subchronic Benzene Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongli; Zhang, Juan; Xiong, Mengzhen; Wei, Haiyan; Tan, Kehong; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-08-01

    Leukemias and hematopoietic disorders induced by benzene may arise from the toxicity of benzene to hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells (HS/PCs). Since there is a latency period between initial benzene exposure and the development of leukemia, subsequent impact of benzene on HS/PCs are crucial for a deeper understanding of the carcinogenicity and hematotoxicity in post-exposure stage. This study aims to explore the effects of benzene on HS/PCs and gene-expression in Wnt, Notch and Hh signaling pathways in post-exposure stage. The C3H/He mice were injected subcutaneously with benzene (0, 150, 300 mg/kg/day) for three months and were monitored for another 10 months post-exposure. The body weights were monitored, the relative organ weights, blood parameters and bone marrow smears were examined. Frequency of lineage(-) sca-1(+) c-kit(+) (LSK) cells, capability of colony forming and expression of genes in Wnt, Notch and Hedghog (Hh) signaling pathways were also analyzed. The colony formation of the progenitor cells for BFU-E, CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM was significantly decreased with increasing benzene exposure relative to controls, while no significant difference was observed in colonies for CFU-G and CFU-M. The mRNA level of cyclin D1 was increased and Notch 1 and p53 were decreased in LSK cells in mice exposed to benzene but with no statistical significance. These results suggest that subsequent toxic effects of benzene on LSK cells and gene expression in Wnt, Notch and Hh signaling pathways persist in post-exposure stage and may play roles in benzene-induced hematotoxicity. PMID:26262635

  20. Poorly soluble particulates: searching for a unifying denominator of nanoparticles and fine particles for DNEL estimation.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2011-01-11

    Under the new European chemicals regulation, REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) a Derived No-Effect Level (DNEL), i.e., the level of exposure above which humans should not be exposed, is defined. The focus of this paper is to develop a weight-of-evidence-based DNEL-approach for inhaled poorly soluble particles. Despite the common mode of action of inhaled insoluble, spherical particulate matter (PM), a unifying, most appropriate metric conferring pulmonary biopersistence and toxicity has yet not been demonstrated. Nonetheless, there is compelling evidence from repeated rat inhalation exposure studies suggesting that the particle displacement volume is the most prominent unifying denominator linking the pulmonary retained dose with toxicity. Procedures were developed to analyze and model the pulmonary toxicokinetics from short-term to long-term exposure. Six different types of poorly soluble nano- to submicron PMs were compared: ultrafine and pigmentary TiO₂, synthetic iron oxide (Fe₃O₄, magnetite), two aluminum oxyhydroxides (AlOOH, Boehmite) with primary isometric particles approximately of either 10 or 40 nm, and MWCNT. The specific agglomerate densities of these materials ranged from 0.1 g/cm³ (MWCNT) to 5 g/cm³ (Fe₃O₄). Along with all PM, due to their long retention half-times and associated biopersistence in the lung, even short-term inhalation studies may require postexposure periods of at least 3 months to reveal PM-specific dispositional and toxicological characteristics. This analysis provides strong evidence that pulmonary toxicity (sustained inflammation) is dependent on the volume-based cumulative lung exposure dose. Lung toxicity, evidenced by PMN in BAL occurred at lung doses exceeding 10-times the overload threshold. Furthermore, the conclusion is supported that repeated inhalation studies on rats should utilize an experimental window of cumulative volume loads of respirable PM in the range of 1

  1. Body temperature regulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Sigal, Ronald J; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness. PMID:27227101

  2. Body temperature regulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Glen P.; Sigal, Ronald J.; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness. PMID:27227101

  3. Transcriptional response of stress-regulated genes to cadmium exposure in the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum from the gulf of Gabès area (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Karray, Sahar; Marchand, Justine; Moreau, Brigitte; Tastard, Emmanuelle; Thiriet-Rupert, Stanislas; Geffard, Alain; Delahaut, Laurence; Denis, Françoise; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel; Chénais, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates cadmium effects on key messenger RNA (mRNA) expression (MT, MnSOD, CuZnSOD, CAT, ABCB1, HSP70, and CO1) by qPCR in the cockle Cerastoderma glaucum after chronic exposure to two high but environmentally relevant concentrations of CdCl2 (50 μg/L and 5 mg/L) for 12 h to 18 days. Cd accumulation measured in cockles' tissues is significantly higher in both treatment conditions compared to controls and in a dose-dependent manner. Stress on stress tests performed at different times of the experiment clearly demonstrated that exposure to both concentrations of Cd significantly affects cockle survival time in air. Important changes in gene transcription were also highlighted. In particular, MT, HSP70, CAT, and CuZnSOD seem to be relevant biomarkers of Cd exposure because (1) their mRNA levels increase upon exposure and (2) they are highly correlated to Cd accumulation in tissues. Results may be useful for control strategies and for the use of cockles as sentinel organisms. PMID:25523290

  4. Acrolein Exposure Blocks Down-Regulation of Cytokines and IgE Antibody in a Mucosal Tolerance Model but does not Alter Phenotypic Markers of Allergic Lung Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrolein (ACR) is a highly reactive upper airway toxicant that humans are exposed in a variety of environmental situations. Here we examined the effect of ACR exposure on development of immune tolerance in mice. To induce tolerance, female BALB/C mice were intranasally inoculate...

  5. Violence Exposure and Adjustment in Inner-City Youth: Child and Caregiver Emotion Regulation Skill, Caregiver?Child Relationship Quality, and Neighborhood Cohesion as Protective Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliewer, Wendy; Cunningham, Jera Nelson; Diehl, Robyn; Parrish, Katie Adams; Walker, Jean M.; Atiyeh, Cynthia; Neace, Brooke; Duncan, Larissa; Taylor, Kelli; Mejia, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    This short-term, longitudinal interview study used an ecological framework to explore protective factors within the child, the caregiver, the caregiver?child relationship, and the community that might moderate relations between community violence exposure and subsequent internalizing and externalizing adjustment problems and the different patterns…

  6. Occupational solvent exposure and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Sabbath, E.L.; Glymour, M.M.; Berr, C.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Zins, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chronic occupational solvent exposure is associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Cognitive reserve may protect solvent-exposed workers from cognitive impairment. We tested whether the association between chronic solvent exposure and cognition varied by educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of French national gas and electricity (GAZEL) employees (n = 4,134). Lifetime exposure to 4 solvent types (chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, benzene, and nonbenzene aromatic solvents) was assessed using a validated job-exposure matrix. Education was dichotomized at less than secondary school or below. Cognitive impairment was defined as scoring below the 25th percentile on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test at mean age 59 (SD 2.8; 88% of participants were retired at testing). Log-binomial regression was used to model risk ratios (RRs) for poor cognition as predicted by solvent exposure, stratified by education and adjusted for sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: Solvent exposure rates were higher among less-educated patients. Within this group, there was a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure to each solvent type and RR for poor cognition (e.g., for high exposure to benzene, RR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.09–1.41), with significant linear trends (p < 0.05) in 3 out of 4 solvent types. Recency of solvent exposure also predicted worse cognition among less-educated patients. Among those with secondary education or higher, there was no significant or near-significant relationship between any quantification of solvent exposure and cognition. Conclusions: Solvent exposure is associated with poor cognition only among less-educated individuals. Higher cognitive reserve in the more-educated group may explain this finding. PMID:22641403

  7. 12 CFR 206.4 - Credit exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Credit exposure. 206.4 Section 206.4 Banks and... LIABILITIES (REGULATION F) § 206.4 Credit exposure. (a) Limits on credit exposure. (1) The policies and... credit exposure to an individual correspondent to not more than 25 percent of the bank's total...

  8. 12 CFR 206.4 - Credit exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Credit exposure. 206.4 Section 206.4 Banks and... LIABILITIES (REGULATION F) § 206.4 Credit exposure. (a) Limits on credit exposure. (1) The policies and... credit exposure to an individual correspondent to not more than 25 percent of the bank's total...

  9. 12 CFR 206.4 - Credit exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Credit exposure. 206.4 Section 206.4 Banks and... LIABILITIES (REGULATION F) § 206.4 Credit exposure. (a) Limits on credit exposure. (1) The policies and... credit exposure to an individual correspondent to not more than 25 percent of the bank's total...

  10. 12 CFR 206.4 - Credit exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Credit exposure. 206.4 Section 206.4 Banks and... LIABILITIES (REGULATION F) § 206.4 Credit exposure. (a) Limits on credit exposure. (1) The policies and... credit exposure to an individual correspondent to not more than 25 percent of the bank's total...