Science.gov

Sample records for popocatpetl volcano mexico

  1. Control of the geomorphic evolution of an active crater: Popocatpetl (Mexico) 1994-2003.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, N.; Zamorano, J. J.; Palacios, D.; Macias, J. L.; Sanjosé, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    . References.- Cruz-Reyna, S. de la; Meli, R.; Macías, J.L.; Castillo, F.; & Cabrera, B., 1998. Cyclical dome extrusions that by late 1997 filled one-third of crater capacity, In Smithsonian-GVP Monthly Reports, Popocatépetl, Smithsonian Institution. Bull. Glob. Volcanism Netw, (GVN) 23 (2), 2 - 4. Donnadieu, F.; Kelfoun, K.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Decchi, E.; & Merle, O., 2003. Digital photogrammetry as a tool in analogue modelling: applications to volcano instability, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 123 (1-2), 161-180. Macías, J.L. & Siebe, C., 2005. Popocatépetl crater filled to the brim: significance for hazard evaluation, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research (141) 327-330. Martín-Del Pozzo, A.L.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Bonifaz, F.; Correa, I.; & Mendiola, I.F., 2003. Timing magma ascent at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research ,125, 107-120. Matiella, M.A.; Watson, I.M.; Delgado, H.; Rose, W.I.; , Cárdenas, L.; & Realmuro, V.J., 2008, Volcanic emissions from Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico, quantified using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared data: A case study of the December 2000-January 2001 emissions, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 170, 1-2, 76-85. Procter, J.N.; Platz, T.; & Cronin, S.J., 2006. A remnant summit lava dome and its influence on future eruptive hazards, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 10211. Schilling, S.P.; Ramsey, D.W.; Messerich, J.A.; & Thompson, R.A., 2006. Map: Rebuilding Mount St. Helens. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 2928. Tanarro, L. M.; Zamorano, J.J.; & Palacios, D., 2005. Glacier degradation and lahar formation on the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) during the last eruptive period (1994-2003), Zeitschrift Geomorphologie (140) 73-92. Zamorano, J.J., Gómez, A. 1996 "Análisis geomorfoloógico a detalle,1:10 000 del cráter del volcán Popocatépetl (1989-1996)" IV Reuni

  2. Control of the geomorphic evolution of an active crater: Popocatpetl (Mexico) 1994-2003.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, N.; Zamorano, J. J.; Palacios, D.; Macias, J. L.; Sanjosé, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic activity often causes intense and successive geomorphic changes to occur inside a crater. In terms of hazard mitigation, it is important to understand the cause of these changes whether they be exterior lava spills, sequences of explosions or massive glacier melt. Access to an active crater, however, is very difficult and dangerous, so analytical approaches involving remote study must substitute actual fieldwork. Several studies done at Popocatepetl volcano during its most recent eruptive phase that began in December 1994, use remote techniques and are described in Cruz-Reyna et al. (1998), Wright et al. (2002), Martín-Del Pozo et al. (2003), Tanarro et al. (2005), Matiella et al. (2008), and Zamorano et al. (1996,1998), among others. The compendium of results reveals that recent volcanic activity on Popocatépetl is characterized by successive dome growth and destruction inside the crater. Macias and Siebe (2005) even suggest that the walls of the crater may no longer withstand future dome growth. The purpose of this study is to understand the morphologic evolution of the interior of the crater during the most active period of the present eruptive phase on Popocatepetl from 1994 to 2003. The methodology is based on photogrammetry techniques that have been used successfully at volcanic sites by Donnadieu et al. (2003), and on a GIS to organize information, draft maps and 3-D images, and to calculate spatial variations in landforms (Procter et al., 2006; Schilling et al., 2006). Traditional aerial photo interpretation was used for 22 triplets selected from a collection of photos taken by the Mexican Highway and Transport Secretariat, from 1982 to 2003, and enabled us to draft geomorphic maps of the interior of the crater. The photos and maps were rectified and georeferenced with ArcGis software, and then the maps were digitized. The areas containing morphologic units associated with a date (exterior crater walls, colluvial ramps and recent volcanic complex

  3. Hazard maps of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero Ayala, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Began its current eruptive process in February 1991, in February 10, 1999 the biggest explosion since 1913 occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching attitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 m.a.s.l., further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affected nearby villages as Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlán, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During the 2005 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano due to low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time. Shows the updating of the volcanic hazard maps published in 2001, where we identify whit SPOT satellite imagery and Google Earth, change in the land use on the slope of volcano, the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano, the population inhabiting the area is approximately 517,000 people, and growing at an annual rate of 4.77%, also the region that has shown an increased in the vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by the construction of highways, natural gas pipelines and electrical infrastructure that connect to the Port of Manzanillo to Guadalajara city. The update the hazard maps are: a) Exclusion areas and moderate hazard for explosive events

  4. Geology of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Tilling, R.I.; Canul, R.

    1984-01-01

    The (pre-1982) 850-m-high andesitic stratovolcano El Chicho??n, active during Pleistocene and Holocene time, is located in rugged, densely forested terrain in northcentral Chiapas, Me??xico. The nearest neighboring Holocene volcanoes are 275 km and 200 km to the southeast and northwest, respectively. El Chicho??n is built on Tertiary siltstone and sandstone, underlain by Cretaceous dolomitic limestone; a 4-km-deep bore hole near the east base of the volcano penetrated this limestone and continued 770 m into a sequence of Jurassic or Cretaceous evaporitic anhydrite and halite. The basement rocks are folded into generally northwest-trending anticlines and synclines. El Chicho??n is built over a small dome-like structure superposed on a syncline, and this structure may reflect cumulative deformation related to growth of a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcano. The cone of El Chicho??n consists almost entirely of pyroclastic rocks. The pre-1982 cone is marked by a 1200-m-diameter (explosion?) crater on the southwest flank and a 1600-m-diameter crater apparently of similar origin at the summit, a lava dome partly fills each crater. The timing of cone and dome growth is poorly known. Field evidence indicates that the flank dome is older than the summit dome, and K-Ar ages from samples high on the cone suggest that the flank dome is older than about 276,000 years. At least three pyroclastic eruptions have occurred during the past 1250 radiocarbon years. Nearly all of the pyroclastic and dome rocks are moderately to highly porphyritic andesite, with plagioclase, hornblende and clinopyroxene the most common phenocrysts. Geologists who mapped El Chicho??n in 1980 and 1981 warned that the volcano posed a substantial hazard to the surrounding region. This warning was proven to be prophetic by violent eruptions that occurred in March and April of 1982. These eruptions blasted away nearly all of the summit dome, blanketed the surrounding region with tephra, and sent

  5. Geology of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Tilling, Robert I.; Canul, Rene

    1984-03-01

    The (pre-1982) 850-m-high andesitic stratovolcano El Chichón, active during Pleistocene and Holocene time, is located in rugged, densely forested terrain in northcentral Chiapas, México. The nearest neighboring Holocene volcanoes are 275 km and 200 km to the southeast and northwest, respectively. El Chichón is built on Tertiary siltstone and sandstone, underlain by Cretaceous dolomitic limestone; a 4-km-deep bore hole near the east base of the volcano penetrated this limestone and continued 770 m into a sequence of Jurassic or Cretaceous evaporitic anhydrite and halite. The basement rocks are folded into generally northwest-trending anticlines and synclines. El Chichón is built over a small dome-like structure superposed on a syncline, and this structure may reflect cumulative deformation related to growth of a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcano. The cone of El Chichón consists almost entirely of pyroclastic rocks. The pre-1982 cone is marked by a 1200-m-diameter (explosion?) crater on the southwest flank and a 1600-m-diameter crater apparently of similar origin at the summit, a lava dome partly fills each crater. The timing of cone and dome growth is poorly known. Field evidence indicates that the flank dome is older than the summit dome, and K-Ar ages from samples high on the cone suggest that the flank dome is older than about 276,000 years. At least three pyroclastic eruptions have occurred during the past 1250 radiocarbon years. Nearly all of the pyroclastic and dome rocks are moderately to highly porphyritic andesite, with plagioclase, hornblende and clinopyroxene the most common phenocrysts. Geologists who mapped El Chichón in 1980 and 1981 warned that the volcano posed a substantial hazard to the surrounding region. This warning was proven to be prophetic by violent eruptions that occurred in March and April of 1982. These eruptions blasted away nearly all of the summit dome, blanketed the surrounding region with tephra, and sent pyroclastic

  6. Climbing in the high volcanoes of central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Secor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A chain of volcanoes extends across central Mexico along the 19th parallel, a line just south of Mexico City. The westernmost of these peaks is Nevado de Colima at 4,636 feet above sea level. A subsidiary summit of Nevado de Colima is Volcan de Colima, locally called Fuego (fire) it still emits sulphurous fumes and an occasional plume of smoke since its disastrous eruption in 1941. Parictuin, now dormant, was born in the fall of 1943 when a cornfield suddenly erupted. Within 18 months, the cone grew more than 1,700 feet. Nevado de Toluca is a 15,433-foot volcanic peak south of the city of Toluca. Just southeast of Mexico City are two high volcanoes that are permanently covered by snow: Iztaccihuatl (17,342 fet) and Popocatepetl (17,887 feet) Further east is the third highest mountain in North America: 18,700-foot Citlateptl, or El Pico de Orizaba. North of these high peaks are two volcanoes, 14, 436-foot La Malinche and Cofre de Perote at 14,048 feet. This range of mountains is known variously as the Cordillera de Anahuac, the Sierra Volcanica Transversal, or the Cordillera Neovolcanica. 

  7. Seismic tomography at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Pia; Got, Jean-Luc; González, Carlos Valdés; Monteiller, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    We performed the first 3D seismic tomography of the Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico, from the inversion of the P-wave arrival times of nearly 1500 earthquakes recorded by up to 11 seismic stations of the permanent CENAPRED-SSN network. We used the Bayesian tomographic algorithm developed by Monteiller et al. (2005) to perform this P-wave travel-time tomography and carefully choose optimal regularization hyper-parameters. Sensitivity tests show that the inversion is correctly constrained under the volcano from - 1 to 4 km depth b.s.l.. At these depths, the optimal tomographic model mainly shows low-velocity volumes surrounded by higher-velocity volumes. Lateral heterogeneity is strong: the variation of the P-wave velocity may reach up to ± 20% of the average value at a given depth. Low-velocity volumes correlate well with results from former geological and geophysical studies.

  8. The effects of volcanoes on health: preparedness in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zeballos, J L; Meli, R; Vilchis, A; Barrios, L

    1996-01-01

    The article reviews the most important aspects of volcanic eruptions and presents a summary of the harmful materials they emit. The main health effects can be classified as either physical (trauma, respiratory diseases, etc.) or psychological (depression, anxiety, nightmares, neurosis, etc.). Popocatépetl, the most famous active volcano in Mexico, lies on the borders of the States of Mexico, Puebla and Morelos. In 1993, seismic activity intensified, as did as the emission of fumaroles, followed in December 1994 by moderate tremors and strong emissions of gases and ash. In 1996, a number of seismic events led to an unexpected explosion. A daily emission of 8,000 to 15,000 tonnes of sulfur dioxide has been measured. Popocatépetl is located in a densely populated region of Mexico. A complex network to monitor the volcano using sophisticated equipment has been set up, including visual surveillance, seismic, geochemical and geodesic monitoring. An early warning system (SINAPROC/CENAPRED) has been developed to keep the population permanently informed. The warning system uses colour codes: green for normal, yellow for alert, and red for warning and evacuation. An emergency plan has been prepared, including evacuation and preparation for medical centres and hospitals in the region, as well as intense public information campaigns. PMID:9170236

  9. Space Radar Image of Colima Volcano, Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Colima volcano in Jalisco, Mexico, a vigorously active volcano that erupted as recently as July 1994. The eruption partially destroyed a lava dome at the summit and deposited a new layer of ash on the volcano's southern slopes. Surrounding communities face a continuing threat of ash falls and volcanic mudflows from the volcano, which has been designated one of 15 high-risk volcanoes for scientific study during the next decade. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image is centered at 19.4 degrees north latitude, 103.7 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 35.7 kilometers by 37.5 kilometers (22 miles by 23 miles). This single-frequency, multi-polarized SIR-C image shows: red as L-band horizontally transmitted and received; green as L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue as the ratio of the two channels. The summit area appears orange and the recent deposits fill the valleys along the south and southwest slopes. Observations from space are helping scientists understand the behavior of dangerous volcanoes and will be used to mitigate the effects of future eruptions on surrounding populations. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), the C-band (6 cm) and the X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature

  10. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  11. Update of the volcanic risk map of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez Cornu, F. J.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Colima volcano, located in western Mexico (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W) began its current eruptive process in February 10, 1999. This event was the basis for the development of two volcanic hazard maps: one for ballistics (rock fall) lahars, and another one for ash fall. During the period of 2003 to 2008 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-Plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano thanks to the low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time The current volcanic activity has triggered ballistic projections, pyroclastic and ash flows, and lahars, all have exceeded the maps limits established in 1999. Vulnerable elements within these areas have gradually changed due to the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano. On the slopes of the northwest side, new blue agave Tequilana weber and avocado orchard crops have emerged along with important production of greenhouse tomato, alfalfa and fruit (citrus) crops that will eventually be processed and dried for exportation to the United States and Europe. Also, in addition to the above, large expanses of corn and sugar cane have been planted on the slopes of the volcano since the nineteenth century. The increased agricultural activity has had a direct impact in the reduction of the available forest land area. Coinciding with this increased activity, the 0.8% growth population during the period of 2000 - 2005, - due to the construction of the Guadalajara-Colima highway-, also increased this impact. The growth in vulnerability changed the level of risk with respect to the one identified in the year 1999 (Suarez, 2000), thus motivating us to perform an update to the risk map at 1:25,000 using vector models of the INEGI, SPOT images of different dates, and fieldwork done in order

  12. Monitoring Popocatepetl volcano's glaciers (Mexico): case study of glacier extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, H.; Julio, P.; Huggel, C.; Brugman, M.

    2003-04-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is located 60 km southeast of Mexico City and is one of the three ice-clad volcanoes in Mexico. The two glaciers of Popocatépetl became extinct after a strong retreat due to the combination of at least three causes: global change, change in regional meteorological conditions (induced by the vicinity to highly polluted areas) and local enforcement (namely volcanic eruption). Glacier dimensions of Popocatépetl glaciers have been measured by photogrammetric means, and even though continuous monitoring was not feasible for decades, in recent years availability of aerial photographs allowed a better documentation of glacier areal changes. The first inventory made in 1958 threw an areal extent of 0.89 km2. A second inventory of the areal extent of the two small glaciers of Popocatépetl in 1982 reported 0.56 km2. Average retreat rate resulted nearly 14,000 m2/year. An areal measurement for 1996 resulted in an-order-of-magnitude smaller retreat rate (more than 1,500 m2/year). In early 1997, the retreat rate was nearly 12,500 m2/year, an order of magnitude similar as that of the 1958-1982 period. This scheme changed strongly in the following years when retreat rate was twice in 1998 and more than 7 times greater in 1999. By the end of the year 2000, the retreat rate remained in the same order of magnitude as in early 1999. Since the year 2000 and up to the present, the glaciers are just a series of independent ice masses (seracs) and the bedrock is seen in between them. GPR determinations made in 1995 showed a 40 m average ice thickness. During ice drilling in the year 2000 at nearly the same spot where GPR determinations were made in 1995, a thickness of 4 m was found. Therefore, glacier shrinkage has been documented not only by areal restriction but also by strong changes in thickness. The strong retreat experienced by Popocatépetl’s glaciers along the last decades, were possibly due to global climatic enforcement and proximity to industrial

  13. Late Holocene Eruptive History of Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico: Implications for Future Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed mapping of the strata around the Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico indicates that there have been major eruptions every 1000 to 2000 years. The last two of these destroyed pre- Columbian cities in the area, and a similar level of eruption today might require evacuation of as many as 30 million people.

  14. A review of recent glaciological studies at the dormant Citlaltépetl Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes Ramos, J.; Ontiveros-Gonzalez, G.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2013-05-01

    We present the most recent instrumentation, analysis and state of the art on glaciological studies of Glaciar Norte on Citlaltépetl Volcano. The results described here are the result of glacier activity at a dormant volcano with very low activity such as slight vapor emissions. In contrast with Popocatépetl Volcano's glaciers, where the climatic signals were obscured by the eruptive activity, at Citlaltépetl Volcano the glacier represents a good indicator of the climatic change. Since the volcanic activity on Citlaltépetl consists only on minor diffuse gas emissions, this work shows how meteorological, glaciological, and energy exchange analyses allow the characterization of the behavior of this kind of mountain glaciers. Based on these results, we can tackle the separation of climatic vs. volcanic component at other glacial systems in Mexico.

  15. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  16. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  17. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  18. Expulsion of Barium and Methane at Mud Volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, D. G.; Dickens, G. R.; Snyder, G. T.; Gilhooly, W. P.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes and cold-seeps along continental margins transfer methane from gas-charged marine sediments to the water column. Such methane venting is dynamic and may provide an important and variable supply of carbon to the ocean and atmosphere through time. Barite mounds and chimneys have been found around some modern mud volcanoes and seeps, and similar structures can be identified in the geological record (e.g., bedded barite deposits). These observations suggest that expelled methane-rich fluids are greatly enriched in dissolved barium. However, there are very few analyses of barium concentrations in these systems. Here, we examine the dissolved barium of pore fluids from a series of shallow piston cores across two submarine mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico. Dissolved barium concentrations at 1.5 m below the seafloor at the Garden Bank volcano range from 18200 μ M at the center of the feature to 0.56 μ M on its flanks approximately 1 km away. Similarly, dissolved barium concentrations at the Mississippi Canyon volcano range from 15600 μ M to 0.50 μ M. Thus, the concentrations in the cores of the mud volcanoes are nominally 5 orders of magnitude greater than in mean ocean water ( ˜0.1 μ M). Anaerobic oxidation of upward flowing methane consumes sulfate, which leads to the dissolution of barite and release of barium to pore fluids. Because this mechanism alone cannot explain the extreme concentrations in the mud volcanoes, a deep source of barium may exist in the Gulf of Mexico strata. Our current work is focused on quantifying the fluxes and sedimentary fate of expelled barium at these locations. However, even if a large fraction of the barium precipitates adjacent to the sites of methane venting, fluid expulsion at mud volcanoes must significantly impact the barium cycle in the Gulf of Mexico. Conceivably, submarine mud volcanoes and cold-seeps along continental margins are a major source of barium to the deep ocean, a concept that has

  19. Stratigraphy of Late Pleistocene-Holocene pyroclastic deposits of Tacana Volcano, Mexico-Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, J. L.; Arce, J. L.; Garcia-Palomo, A.; Mora, J. C.; Saucedo, R.; Hughes, S.; Scolamacchia, T.

    2005-12-01

    Tacana volcano (4,060 masl), the highest peak of the Tacana Volcanic Complex, is an acitve volcano located on the Mexico-Guatemala border. Tacana resumed phreatic activity in 1950 and again in 1986. After this last event, the volcano became the locus of attention of authorities and local scientists began to study the complex. Tacana's stratigraphic record has been studied using radiocarbon dating and these indicate that the volcano has been very active in the past producing at least 12 explosive eruptions during the last 40 ka years as follow: a) Four partial dome destruction events with the generation of block-and-ash flow deposits at 40, 28, <26, and 16 ka. b) Four small-volume phreatomagmatic events that emplaced dilute density currents at 10.6, 7.5, 6, and 2.5 ka. c) Four eruptions that emplaced pumice-rich fall deposits, three of them widely dispersed towards the NE flank of the volcano in Guatemala and dated at ~32, <24 and <14 ka, and finally a 0.8 ka fall deposit restricted to the crater vicinity that might represent the youngest magmatic eruption of the volcano. Although refining of these stratigraphic sequence is still underway, the eruptive chronology of Tacana volcano cleary indicates that explosive eruptions producing plinian fall and pyroclastic density currents have taken place every 1 to 8 ka years. This record constrasts with the small phreatic eruptions that occur 1-2 per century. So, this indicates that Tacana volcano is more active than previously considered and these results must be considered for future researches on hazards maps and mitigation.

  20. Hazard map for volcanic ballistic impacts at El Chichón volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, Miguel; Ramos-Hernández, Silvia; Jiménez-Aguilar, Julio

    2014-05-01

    The 1982 eruption of El Chichón Volcano in southeastern Mexico had a strong social and environmental impact. The eruption resulted in the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of Mexico, causing about 2,000 casualties, displacing thousands, and producing severe economic losses. Even when some villages were relocated after the 1982 eruption, many people still live and work in the vicinities of the volcano and may be affected in the case of a new eruption. The hazard map of El Chichón volcano (Macías et al., 2008) comprises pyroclastic flows, pyroclastic surges, lahars and ash fall but not ballistic projectiles, which represent an important threat to people, infrastructure and vegetation in the case of an eruption. In fact, the fatalities reported in the first stage of the 1982 eruption were caused by roof collapse induced by ashfall and lithic ballistic projectiles. In this study, a general methodology to delimit the hazard zones for volcanic ballistic projectiles during volcanic eruptions is applied to El Chichón volcano. Different scenarios are defined based on the past activity of the volcano and parameterized by considering the maximum kinetic energy associated with ballistic projectiles ejected during previous eruptions. A ballistic model is used to reconstruct the "launching" kinetic energy of the projectiles observed in the field. The maximum ranges expected for the ballistics in the different explosive scenarios defined for El Chichón volcano are presented in a ballistic hazard map which complements the published hazard map. These maps assist the responsible authorities to plan the definition and mitigation of restricted areas during volcanic crises.

  1. Analysis of Vulnerability Around The Colima Volcano, MEXICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, S. P.

    2001-12-01

    The Colima volcano located in the western of the Trasmexican Volcanic Belt, in the central portion of the Colima Rift Zone, between the Mexican States of Jalisco and Colima. The volcano since January of 1998 presents a new activity, which has been characterized by two stages: the first one was an effusive phase that begin on 20 November 1998 and finish by the middle of January 1999. On February 10of 1999 a great explosion in the summit marked the beginning of an explosive phase, these facts implies that the eruptive process changes from an effusive model to an explosive one. Suárez-Plascencia et al, 2000, present hazard maps to ballistic projectiles, ashfalls and lahars for this scenario. This work presents the evaluation of the vulnerability in the areas identified as hazardous in the maps for ballistic, ashfalls and lahars, based on the economic elements located in the middle and lower sections of the volcano building, like agriculture, forestry, agroindustries and communication lines (highways, power, telephonic, railroad, etc). The method is based in Geographic Information Systems, using digital cartography scale 1:50,000, digital orthophotos from the Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, SPOT and Landsat satellite images from 1997 and 2000 in the bands 1, 2 and 3. The land use maps obtained for 1997 and 2000, were compared with the land use map reported by Suárez in 1992, from these maps an increase of the 5 porcent of the sugar cane area and corn cultivations were observed compared of those of 1990 (1225.7 km2) and a decrease of the forest surface, moving the agricultural limits uphill, and showing also some agave cultivation in the northwest and north hillslopes of the Nevado de Colima. This increment of the agricultural surface results in bigger economic activity in the area, which makes that the vulnerability also be increased to different volcanic products emitted during this phase of activity. The degradation of the soil by the

  2. Geochemistry of the volcano-hydrothermal system of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yuri; Fischer, Tobias P.; Pokrovsky, Boris; Sano, Yuji; Armienta, Maria Aurora; Macias, Jose Luis

    The 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano ejected more than 1km3 of anhydrite-bearing trachyandesite pyroclastic material to form a new 1-km-wide and 300-m-deep crater and uncovered the upper 500m of an active volcano-hydrothermal system. Instead of the weak boiling-point temperature fumaroles of the former lava dome, a vigorously boiling crater spring now discharges / 20kg/s of Cl-rich ( 15 000mg/kg) and sulphur-poor ( / 200mg/kg of SO4), almost neutral (pHup to 6.7) water with an isotopic composition close to that of subduction-type magmatic water (δD=-15‰, δ18O=+6.5‰). This spring, as well as numerous Cl-free boiling springs discharging a mixture of meteoric water with fumarolic condensates, feed the crater lake, which, compared with values in 1983, is now much more diluted ( 3000mg/kg of Cl vs 24 030mg/kg), less acidic (pH=2.6 vs 0.56) and contains much lower amounts of S ( / 200mg/kg of SO4, vs 3550mg/kg) with δ34S=0.5-4.2‰ (+17‰ in 1983). Agua Caliente thermal waters, on the southeast slope of the volcano, have an outflow rate of approximately 100kg/s of 71 °C Na-Ca-Cl water and are five times more concentrated than before the eruption (B. R. Molina, unpublished data). Relative N2, Ar and He gas concentrations suggest extensional tectonics for the El Chichón volcanic centre. The 3He/4He and 4He/20Ne ratios in gases from the crater fumaroles (7.3Ra, 2560) and Agua Caliente hot springs (5.3Ra, 44) indicate a strong magmatic contribution. However, relative concentrations of reactive species are typical of equilibrium in a two-phase boiling aquifer. Sulphur and C isotopic data indicate highly reducing conditions within the system, probably associated with the presence of buried vegetation resulting from the 1982 eruption. All Cl-rich waters at El Chichón have a common source. This water has the appearence of a "partially matured" magmatic fluid: condensed magmatic vapour neutralized by interaction with fresh volcaniclastic deposits and depleted in S

  3. Seismic structures beneath Popocatepetl (Mexico) and Gorely (Kamchatka) volcanoes derived from passive tomography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel; Koulakov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    A number of active volcanoes are observed in different parts of the world, and they attract great interest of scientists. Comparing their characteristics helps in understanding the origin and mechanisms of their activity. One of the most effective methods for studying the deep structure beneath volcanoes is passive source seismic tomography. In this study we present results of tomographic inversions for two active volcanoes located in different parts of the world: Popocatepetl (Mexico) and Gorely (Kamchatka, Russia). In the past century both volcanoes were actively erupted that explains great interest to their detailed investigations. In both cases we made the full data analysis starting from picking the arrival times from local events. In the case of the Popocatepetl study, a temporary seismological network was deployed by GFZ for the period from December 1999 to July 2000. Note that during this period there were a very few events recorded inside the volcano. Most of recorded earthquakes occurred in surrounding areas and they probably have the tectonic nature. We performed a special analysis to ground the efficiency of using these data for studying seismic structure beneath the network installed on the volcano. The tomographic inversion was performed using the LOTOS code by Koulakov (2009). Beneath the Popocatepetl volcano we have found a zone of strong anti-correlation between P- and S-velocities that leaded to high values of Vp/Vs ratio. Similar features were found for some other volcanoes in previous studies. We interpret these anomalies as zones of high content of fluids and melts that are related to active magma sources. For the case of Gorely volcano we used the data of a temporary network just deployed in summer 2013 by our team from IPGG, Novosibirsk. Luckily, during the field works, the volcano started to manifest strong seismic activity. In this period, 100 - 200 volcanic events occurred daily. We collected the continuous seismic records from 20 stations

  4. Geochemical surveillance of magmatic volatiles at Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.; Delgado, H.; Werner, C.; Counce, D.; Stimac, J.A.; Siebe, C.; Love, S.P.; Williams, S.N.; Fischer, T.; Johnson, L.

    1998-01-01

    Surveillance of Popocatepetl volcanic plume geochemistry and SO2 flux began in early 1994 after fumarolic and seismic activity increased significantly during 1993. Volatile traps placed around the summit were collected at near-monthly intervals until the volcano erupted on December 21, 1994. Additional trap samples were obtained in early 1996 before the volcano erupted again, emplacing a small dacite dome in the summit crater. Abundances of volatile constituents (ppm/day of Cl, Stotal, F, CO2, Hg, and As) vaaried, but most constituents were relatively high in earl\\y and late 1994. However, ratios of these constituents to Cl were highest in mid-1994. ??34S-Stotal in trap solutions ranged from 1.5??? to 6.4???; lowest values generally occurred during late 1994. ??13C-CO2 of trap solutions were greatly contaminated with atmospheric CO2 and affected by absorption kinetics. When trap data are combined with SO2 flux measurements made through November 1996, Popocatepetl released about 3.9 Mt SO2, 16 Mt CO2, 0.75 Mt HCl, 0.075 Mt HF, 260 t As, 2.6 t Hg, and roughly 200 Mt H2O. Near-vent gas concentrations in the volcanic plume measured by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) commonly exceed human recommended exposure limits and may constitute a potential health hazard. Volatile geochemistry combined with petrologic observations and melt-inclusion studies show that mafic magma injection into a preexisting silicic chamber has accompanied renewed volcanism at Popocatepetl. Minor assimilation of Cretaceous wall rocks probably occurred in mid-1994.

  5. Evolution and hazards of an inactive compound shield volcano: Cofre de Perote (eastern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, G.; Diaz, R.; Siebert, L.; Rodri­Guez, J.

    2007-05-01

    Cofre de Perote is located at the northernmost end of the Cofre de Perote-Citlaltépetl volcanic range that forms the eastern boundary of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This range comprises an important physiographic feature separating the Gulf coastal plains from the Altiplano, with a difference in relief of more than 1,000 m causing regional unstable conditions that have favored sector collapse of the volcanoes towards the coast. In contrast to the typical stratovolcanoes of the Mexican Volcanic Belt, Cofre de Perote volcano is dominated by the emplacement of andesistic and dacitic lava flows with very minor proportions of pyroclastic deposits, which gives it the morphology of a shield volcano with gentle slopes. The lava flows erupted through different vents like a compound volcano instead of a single conduit. The summit area of Cofre de Perote volcano is characterized by a prominent set of scarps that as a group show a spectacular horseshoe shape that may be linked to repetitive flank failures. So far, at least two main debris avalanche deposits have been confirmed on the eastern lower slopes of Cofre de Perote towards the Gulf of Mexico. There are five major evolutionary stages that characterize the growth of this compound volcano including: 1) emplacement of a multiple vent dome complex that forms the basal structure of Cofre around 1.3-1.9 Ma; 2) construction of the lower structure of the Cofre compound volcano by at least two main upper vents at 400 ky; 3) building of the summit dome-like lavas through various vents at 240 ky; 4) A large number of Pleistocene-to- Holocene monogenetic cones, likely related to regional volcanism, were erupted through the flanks of the Cofre de Perote edifice; 5) long after the volcano ceased its activity, repetitive sector collapse events occurred causing the truncation of the original volcano shape at 40 and 10 ky. These events show that the upper parts of the volcanic edifice collapsed in the Late

  6. Temperature anomaly in the volcano Popocatepetl area, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsarenko, A.; Grimalsky, V.; Yutsis, V.; Lavana Cardenas, J. C.; Chavez, O.; Sojo-Amezquita, A., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    Anomaly changes in the diurnal behavior of the temperature measured in the near-surface soil (30-40 cm) in Tlamacas monitoring site, volcano Popocatepetl area, are presented. Results of statistical analysis show 2 essential changes for the temperature characteristics observed during 2007-2009 and 2013-2014 monitoring periods: 1.) Minimum and maximum of the diurnal temperature have moved approximately to the 14 LT and to midnight, 24 LT, respectively (Fig 1., c). Under the "normal" condition, the absolute minimum of daily temperature is observed during sunrise (about 7 LT) for the atmosphere measurements and with certain time lag (about 9 LT, Fig.1,b) for the measurements in soil (depending on the depth), and absolute temperature maximum is observed in time when Solar radiation is not enough to provide heating of the atmosphere (about 16 LT) or the Earth surface (about 17 LT, Fig.1,b). Dispersion of the residual temperature (24-hours running trend of the temperature substituted) is 6 times lower for the period of monitoring 2013-2014 (Fig.1, g and h) in comparison with a period 2007-2009 (Fig.1, e and f). In other words, a temperature variation between the maximum and minimum during the day became 6 times lower that it was before.

  7. Magnetic precursors to the 2013 eruptive activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J.; Flores, A.

    2013-12-01

    Popocateptl volcano, 60km from Mexico City, has been erupting since 1994 with periods of more intense activity. Volcanomagnetic signals at Popocatepetl have been correlated with different volcanic phenomena especially ascent of several magma batches in pulses lasting several hours that precede increasing seismicity at the volcano. Data from the TL magnetic station on the northern flank of the volcano at 4000masl and from the CPX station at the same altitude on the southwestern flank are processed with the data from the TEO base station (weighted differences) in order to remove signals not associated with the volcano. Short term negative volcanic anomalies around 10nT preceded sharp increases in seismicity and copious ash emission during April and May 2013. They were correlated with periods of harmonic tremor and interpreted as new ascending magma batches, below the Curie point. A longer term descending magnetic trend from February on, is of thermomagnetic origen and is associated with the more mafic andesite compositions of the ash which contain higher MgO and are consistent with influx of deeper magma at higher magmatic temperatures. Sharp positive magnetic peaks are related both with explosions and seismic events, while sustained steps of positive anomalies are related with dome growth and cooling

  8. Hydrogeochemical surveillance at El Chichón volcano crater lake, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, María Aurora; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ramos, Silvia; Ceniceros, Nora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor

    2014-09-01

    El Chichón volcano has an eruptive record of at least 12 major eruptions in the Holocene, the latest one in March-April 1982 causing the worst volcanic disaster in the history of Mexico. After about 6 centuries of quiescence, this eruption destroyed a large dome and opened a 1 km wide crater. A lake, formed within the crater shortly after the eruption, has been an important source of information about the evolution of the post-eruptive processes. The fluctuations of the crater lake water physicochemical parameters, observed since 1983, have allowed in identifying hydrothermal waters and H2S-rich gases, influenced by tectonic and meteorological effects, as the main contributors to its composition. Here we propose some methods to help in assessing the state of the volcano derived from the relative contribution of these factors as an easy to implement volcanic surveillance method in potentially active volcanoes with crater lakes, or other volcano-influenced water sources.

  9. a Reconstruction of the 1793 Eruption of San Martin Tuxtla Volcano, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, L.

    2013-05-01

    San Martin Volcano is located in the State of Veracruz, Eastern Mexico (18.572N, 95.169W, 1650 masl). The last eruption of this volcano occurred in 1793. The activity, which was documented lasted for several months and produced thick ashfall deposits in its vicinity. The blasts were heard in the coast of Tampico some 500km NW from the volcano. There are also reports of noticeable ashfall at distances as far as 200 Km from the crater. No casualties from the eruption were reported but the economic and other human activities were greatly perturbed. The center of emission eruption was a cinder cone located within the 500 wide crater in the summit of the volcano. We present isopach maps of the airfall deposits from this eruption. The 5cm isopach covers an area roughly 200 Km2 with downwind axis towards the W-SW. Based on this information we reconstructed some of the characteristics of the eruption by fitting the theoretical isopachs obtained from the well known model of ash deposition by Suzuki to the observed isopachs. The estimated height of the eruptive column is of the order of 10 km for a mass erupted of 0.5 cubic km. We used wind data from the nearby meteorological station of the city of Veracruz.

  10. The 1793 eruption of San Martín Tuxtla volcano, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espíndola, J. M.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, M. L.; Schaaf, P.; Rodríguez, S. R.

    2010-11-01

    San Martín Tuxtla (N18.562°; W95.199°, 1659 masl) is a basaltic volcano located in southern Veracruz, a Mexican State bordering the Gulf of Mexico. It rises in a volcanic field strewn with monogenetic volcanic cones, maars and three other large volcanoes mostly dormant since the late Pliocene: Santa Marta, San Martín Pajapan and Cerro El Vigía. The latest eruptive event of San Martín occurred in 1793 and was described by Don José Mariano Moziño, a naturalist under the commission of the Viceroy of the then New Spain. In this work we present results of the study of this eruption based on historical accounts and field observations. We identified an ash deposit around the volcano related to the 1793 eruption, mapped its distribution and determined its granulometric, petrographic and geochemical characteristics. These studies suggest that the volcano began its activity with explosive phreatomagmatic explosions, which were followed by Strombolian activity; this period lasting from March to October 1793. The activity continued with an effusive phase that lasted probably 2 years. The eruption covered an area of about 480 km 2 with at least 1 cm of ash; the fines reaching distances greater than 300 km from the crater. A total mass of about 2.5 × 10 14 g was ejected and the volcanic columns probably reached altitudes of the order of 10 km during the most explosive phases. The lava emitted formed a coulee that descended the northern flank of the volcano and has an approximate volume of 2.0 × 10 7 m 3.

  11. Geochemistry of summit fumarole vapors and flanking thermal/mineral waters at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.; Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.

    1997-06-01

    Popocatepetl Volcano is potentially devastating to populations living in the greater Mexico City area. Systematic monitoring of fumarole gases and flanking thermal/mineral springs began in early 1994 after increased fumarolic and seismic activity were noticed in 1991. These investigations had two major objectives: (1) to determine if changes in magmatic conditions beneath Popocatepetl might be reflected by chemical changes in fumarolic discharges and (2) to determine if thermal/mineral spring waters in the vicinity of Popocatepetl are geochemically related to or influences by the magmatic system. This report summarizes results from these two discrete studies.

  12. Fluoride in ash leachates: environmental implications at Popocatépetl volcano, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, M. A.; de La Cruz-Reyna, S.; Cruz, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A.; Marin, M.

    2011-07-01

    Ash emitted by volcanic eruptions, even of moderate magnitude, may affect the environment and the health of humans and animals through different mechanisms at distances significantly larger than those indicated in the volcanic hazard maps. One such mechanism is the high capacity of ash to transport toxic volatiles like fluoride, as soluble condensates on the particles' surface. The mobilization and hazards related to volcanic fluoride are discussed based on the data obtained during the recent activity of Popocatépetl volcano in Central Mexico.

  13. Update of map the volcanic hazard in the Ceboruco volcano, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    (Hibiscus sabdariffa). Recently it has established tomato and green pepper crops in greenhouses. The regional commercial activities are concentrated in the localities of Ixtlán, Jala and Ahuacatlán. The updated hazard maps are: a) Hazard map of pyroclastic flows, b) Hazard map of lahars and debris flow, and c) Hazard map of ash-fall. The cartographic and database information obtained will be the basis for updating the Operational Plan of the Ceboruco Volcano by the State Civil & Fire Protection Unit of Nayarit, Mexico, and the urban development plans of surrounding municipalities, in order to reduce their vulnerability to the hazards of the volcanic activity.

  14. Energy partition in the 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, I.; de la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Espindola, J. M.

    1992-06-01

    The 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico has been extensively investigated from various standpoints, including seismicity, tephra geology, atmospheric effects and tectonic structure. In this paper, the six largest of a series of explosions are isolated, considering various sources of information. Then, the seismic energy released by volcanic earthquakes and tremor is estimated using seismograms of low magnification in order to avoid saturation of seismic wave amplitudes. The explosion kinetic energy is evaluated by two methods: one by the initial velocity of the ejecta and the other by the air wave data recorded at a distance. Both the results are roughly coincident. The thermal energy is classified into two components: that transferred by volcanic ejecta and that consumed by convective clouds. The thermal energy released by the explosions is very large compared with that of mechanical energy, such as the seismic energy and explosion kinetic energy. After the last major explosion of April 4, A-type volcanic earthquakes swarmed till the end of April. Their occurrence rate decreased with time in an aftershock-like sequence. These earthquake swarms may have been due to post-eruptive readjustment of the stress field within and near the volcano. Such seismic activity contrasts with other examples of similar major eruptions, which were followed by growth of lava domes in the new craters after the paroxysmal eruptions. The 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano has not been followed by the growth of a lava dome within the newly formed crater.

  15. Analysis of the seismicity activity of the volcano Ceboruco, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ayala, N. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Gomez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a stratovolcano is located in the state of Nayarit,Mexico (104 ° 30'31 .25 "W, 21 ° 7'28 .35" N, 2280msnm). This is an volcano active, as part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Nelson (1986) reports that it has had activity during the last 1000 years has averaged eruptions every 125 years or so, having last erupted in 1870, currently has fumarolic activity. In the past 20 years there has been an increase in the population and socio-economic activities around the volcano (Suárez Plascencia, 2013); which reason the Ceboruco study has become a necessity in several ways. Recent investigations of seismicity (Rodríguez Uribe et al., 2013) have classified the earthquakes in four families Ceboruco considering the waveform and spectral features. We present analysis included 57 days of seismicity from March to October 2012, in the period we located 97 events with arrivals of P and S waves clear, registered in at least three seasons, three components of the temporal network Ceboruco volcano.

  16. Seismic Characteristics of the Vulcanian Explosions from the 2003-2005 Eruption at Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Cornú, Francisco Javier; Espíndola, Juan Manuel; Nava Pichardo, Fidencio Alejandro; Suárez-Plascencia, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Colima Volcano (19.512°N, 103.617°W, 4000 m.a.s.l.), located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima in western Mexico, is the most active volcano in the country. Its activity has taken place through diverse styles of eruption, from very explosive to effusive. In the last decades it has presented frequent vulcanian eruptions with episodes of dome construction-destruction. Four of these cycles occurred from 1990 to 2005, the last one from July 2003 to September 2005. We focus on this last period, for which we analyzed seismic phases and coupled pressure airwaves from high dynamic range seismograms, both in the time and frequency domains, to determine characteristic features, propagation velocities, and origin times for both deep seismic sources and the associated explosions. The results show that the sources of the P-waves associated with the explosions are not located at the summit, but instead at different shallow locations for the different explosions, suggesting the presence of various magmatic pathways within the volcano.

  17. Eruptive history, current activity and risk estimation using geospatial information in the Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Flores-Peña, S.

    2013-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19 30.696 N, 103 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima, and is the most active volcano in Mexico. In January 20, 1913, Colima had its biggest explosion of the twentieth century, with VEI 4, after the volcano had been dormant for almost 40 years. In 1961, a dome reached the northeastern edge of the crater and started a new lava flow, and from this date maintains constant activity. In February 10, 1999, a new explosion occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching altitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 masl, further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events, ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affecting the nearby villages: Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlan, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During 2005 to July 2013, this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity; similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1905. That was before the Plinian eruption of 1913, where pyroclastic flows reached a distance of 15 km from the crater. In this paper we estimate the risk of Colima volcano through the analysis of the vulnerability variables, hazard and exposure, for which we use: satellite imagery, recurring Fenix helicopter over flights of the state government of Jalisco, the use of the images of Google Earth and the population census 2010 INEGI. With this information and data identified changes in economic activities, development, and use of land. The expansion of the agricultural frontier in the lower sides of the volcano Colima, and with the advancement of traditional crops of sugar cane and corn, increased the growth of

  18. Some aspects of the seismicity associated with the 1982 eruption of El Chichon Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espíndola, J. M.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Jiménez, Z.

    2006-10-01

    We review the different phases of the seismicity related to the 1982 eruption of El Chichon Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico. The pre-eruption seismicity was already anomalous by late 1980, became significant by late 1981 and increased towards 28 March, 1982, when the first eruptive event occurred. A noticeable feature within the 7-day period of unrest is the occurrence of three earthquake swarms before the devastating explosions of 3 and 4 April 1982 (local time). The periodicity and appearance of the swarms, close to the time of maximum tidal strain, suggests a large overpressure in the magmatic system, and the triggering of the events by the earth tides. The post-eruption seismicity occurred mostly in a radius 5 km from the crater and a depth range 11 to 15 km suggesting that this region was a deeper reservoir of the erupted magma.

  19. Habitat heterogeneity - biological association relationships in the asphalt volcano, SW Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, E.; Gaytan, A.

    2007-05-01

    A new class of cold seep, named asphalt volcano, was discovered in the Campeche Knolls region of the southern Gulf of Mexico, supporting chemosynthetic communities alike those lying at similar depth on the Angolan margin and the Barbados Prism suggesting an interesting longitudinal connectivity in the faunal components. The discovery of this novel deep-sea habitat has raised questions about diversity and process dynamics in this novel poorly described milieu. Results from two previous cruises jointly sponsored by German, US and Mexican funding agencies have allowed us to recognize the presence of large densities of background benthic megafauna, mainly represented by sea-cucumbers and galatheid crabs, which occupy diverse habitats in asphalt volcano and feed on microbial assemblages on the asphalt covering extended area. Asphalt displays different degrees of hardness suggesting ongoing activity of asphalt extrusion in the site that is reflected in biological benthic communities in different states succession and complexity. The fresh asphalt and the immediately surrounding soft sediment are colonized by mats of complex microbial assemblages where both background benthic megafauna and chemosynthetic tube worms and mussels aggregate. Our results focus on the diversity of the habitats associated with methane seepage through the example of geological structures in the asphalt volcano considering the small scale with the analysis of the relationships between biological assemblages and habitat heterogeneity assessing the role of the geological structure on biological communities. Bubbling of gas, oil and the content of thermogenic gas and gas hydrate in the asphalt suggests that the asphalt plays an important role as a reservoir of methane in this marginal deep sea.

  20. TerraSAR-X Small Baseline interferometry of Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw van Dalfsen, Elske; Walter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Popocatepetl is an active 5426 m high stratovolcano, with a steep-walled, 400 by 600 m wide crater. It is located 70 km southeast of Mexico city, and its activity potentially influences up to 25 million people. More than 15 major eruptions occurred in historic times, the last one in 1947. The year 2012 has been a highly active one, with numerous ash plumes in mid-April, and explosions during July-October. We have acquired TerraSAR-X images of Popocatepetl, and the surrounding area, using strip and spot mode, covering this period. We have created small baseline interferograms from TerraSAR-X strip mode images, using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) software. Of the resulting interferograms, several show medium to good coherence on the lower and upper flanks of the volcano and some are even coherent in the crater area. We further analysed the data that cover the time period from 27 march 2012 to 22 october 2012. During this time period the volcano has been very active, displaying on and off: gas and ash plumes, explosions injecting incandescent fragments up to 1 km from the crater and even ashfall in municipalities up to 50 km away. The short revisit time of TerraSAR-X of 11 days increases the chances of a coherent image during such active periods. We present the preliminary results from this unique data set.

  1. Estimation of lahar flow velocity on Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Salinas, E.; Manea, V. C.; Palacios, D.; Castillo-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-11-01

    During 1997 and 2001 two lahars took place in the Tenenepanco and Huiloac gorges on the northeastern sector of the Popocatépetl volcano in Mexico. These lahars were the result of volcanic activity characterized by a pyroclastic fall and flow. The lahars were triggered by the mass failures produced hours after the eruption. The well-known superelevation technique commonly used in this kind of study was applied to infer the lahar's mean velocity. Estimations show a broad flow velocity range of 1.3-13.8 m/s depending on the following geomorphological parameters: channel depth and slope, peak discharge and distance from the initial source. These results were compared with lahar velocities from Mount St Helens (1980) and Nevado del Ruiz (1985), which were obtained by the same superelevation technique. According to the data, the lahars from Nevado del Ruiz and Popocatépetl were triggered by similar conditions, while at Mount St Helens they were the result of the conversion of a pyroclastic surge cloud. Actually, the Mount St Helens lahars were almost twice as fast as the ones at Nevado del Ruiz and Popocatépetl. This observation shows the importance of the lahars' genesis in that the pyroclastic surge clouds produce faster lahars than do pyroclastic falls. Such results should be taken into account in lahar risk assessment studies for communities located near active volcanoes.

  2. Sulfur dioxide and particles in quiescent volcanic plumes from Poas, Arenal, and Colima volcanos, Costa Rica and Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of SO2 emission rates and concentrations and of particle distribution, size, shape, and composition were made in quiescent volcanic plumes emitted into the troposphere from Poas and Arenal volcanos, Costa Rica, and Colima volcano, Mexico. SO2 emission rates were 700 +- 180 metric tons per day (t/d) for Poas, 210 +- 30 t/d for Arenal, and 320 +- 50 t/d for Colima. The concentrations of SO2 calculated from the COSPEC/lidar data were 5-380 ppb.-from Authors

  3. Lava Dome Growth at Volcan de Fuego MEXICO (Colima Volcano), October 2001 to May 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Reyes-Davila, G. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Volcan de Fuego (19.512 N, 103.617 W) is located on the border between the States of Jalisco and Colima, Mexico, it is also known as Colima Volcano or Zapotl n Volcano, is a stratovolcano rising nearly 4000 m above sea level, and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Recent activity has been characterized by at least 3 different phases since January 1998 when seismic swarms began and ended with the extrusion of blocky lava in November 22, 1998 by the West vent as the 1991 eruptive process. That extrusive period lasted until the end of January, 1999 when was possible to observe a change in the seismic pattern, which mark the beginning of a new eruptive regime, an explosive one. On February 10, 1999 at approximately 0154 local time, 0754 gmt, an explosive event happens at the summit dome of Volc n de Fuego, four more big explosions took place at the summit the last one at dawn February 22, 2001. These explosions opened a new crater at the summit with a elliptical form with radius of 260 x 225 m and depth between 40 m and 15 m. A small dome structure inside the new crater was reported by March 2001. A reconnaissance flight in August 2001 shows two main features in the main crater an steep-sided mound(scoria cone) over the West vent and an inner crater on the NE vent. On October 31 Civil Defense members at Nevado Base on Nevado de Colima observed a neddle over the main crater rim, reconnaissance flight shows a spiny, 40 m high with a diameter of 20 m grows from the NE vent, the spiny seems to formed by material of the 1976 eruption. Continuous aerial observations allow us to follow the growth of a new dome pushing out the spiny. On November 23 the dimensions of the dome under the spiny were a radius of about 14 m and 21 m high for a total extrusion of 86,000 m3 which implies a extrusion rate of 0.027m3 /seg. By December the dome push out the spiny and began to grow from the NW vent. By December 29 an increase in the rate of extrusion was observed reaching a value

  4. Observed inflation-deflation cycles at Popocatepetl volcano using tiltmeters and its possible correlation with regional seismic activity in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G., Sr.; Jimenez Velazquez, J. C., Sr.; Valdes Gonzalez, C. M., Sr.; Reyes Pimentel, T. A.; Galaviz Alonso, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Popocatepetl, the smoking mountain, is a stratovolcano located in central Mexico with an elevation of 5450 masl. The active volcano, close to some of the largest urban centers in Mexico - 60 km and 30 km far from Mexico City and Puebla, respectively - poses a high hazard to an estimated population of 500 thousand people living in the vicinity of the edifice. Accordingly, in July 1994 the Popocatepetl Volcanological Observatory (POVO) was established. The observatory is operated and supported by the National Center for Disaster Prevention of Mexico (CENAPRED), and is equipped to fully monitor different aspects of the volcanic activity. Among the instruments deployed, we use in this investigation two tiltmometers and broad-band seismometers at two sites (Chipiquixtle and Encinos), which send the information gathered continuously to Mexico City.In this research, we study the characteristics of the tiltmeters signals minutes after the occurrence of certain earthquakes. The Popocatepetl volcano starts inflation-deflation cycles due to the ground motion generated by events located at certain regions. We present the analysis of the tiltmeters and seismic signals of all the earthquakes (Mw>5) occurred from January 2013 to June 2014, recorded at Chipiquixtle and Encinos stations. First, we measured the maximum tilt variation after each earthquake. Next, we apply a band-pass filter for different frequency ranges to the seismic signals of the two seismic stations, and estimated the total energy of the strong motion phase of the seismic record. Finally, we compared both measurements and observed that the maximum tilt variations were occurring when the maximum total energy of the seismic signals were in a specific frequency range. We also observed that the earthquake records that have the maximum total energy in that frequency range were the ones with a epicentral location south-east of the volcano. We conclude that our observations can be used set the ground for an early

  5. Field Courses for Volcanic Hazards Mapping at Parícutinand Jorullo Volcanoes (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victoria Morales, A.; Delgado Granados, H.; Roberge, J.; Farraz Montes, I. A.; Linares López, C.

    2007-05-01

    During the last decades, Mexico has suffered several geologic phenomena-related disasters. The eruption of El Chichón volcano in 1982 killed >2000 people and left a large number of homeless populations and severe economic damages. The best way to avoid and mitigate disasters and their effects is by making geologic hazards maps. In volcanic areas these maps should show in a simplified fashion, but based on the largest geologic background possible, the probable (or likely) distribution in time and space of the products related to a variety of volcanic processes and events, according to likely magnitude scenarios documented on actual events at a particular volcano or a different one with similar features to the volcano used for calibration and weighing geologic background. Construction of hazards maps requires compilation and acquisition of a large amount of geological data in order to obtain the physical parameters needed to calibrate and perform controlled simulation of volcanic events under different magnitude-scenarios in order to establish forecasts. These forecasts are needed by the authorities to plan human settlements, infrastructure, and economic development. The problem is that needs are overwhelmingly faster than the adjustments of university programs to include courses. At the Earth Science División of the Faculty of Engineering at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, the students have a good background that permits to learn the methodologies for hazards map construction but no courses on hazards evaluations. Therefore, under the support of the university's Program to Support Innovation and Improvement of Teaching (PAPIME, Programa de Apoyo para la Innovación y Mejoramiento de la Enseñanza) a series of field-based intensive courses allow the Earth science students to learn what kind of data to acquire, how to record, and process in order to carry out hazards evaluations. This training ends with hazards maps that can be used immediately by the

  6. Characteristics of Long-Period Events Associated With Volcanic Degassing at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, A.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2004-05-01

    Emissions of gas and ash dominate volcanic eruptive activity in Popocatepetl volcano since 1994. Volcanic eruptive activity consists of construction and destruction dome phases. Ash emissions ranged from small short-lived plumes rising a few hundred meters above the crater rim, to larger plumes reaching up to 15 km above the crater. Resulting tephra falls dusted the entire summit area. Bursts of volcanic degassing accompanied by long-period (LP) seismic signals observed as isolated events, or as sequences of discrete events with overall durations and amplitudes. Some gas emissions accompanied by persistent or spasmodic tremor. There are four families of LP events identified within the frequency range between 0.5 and 5 Hz. Family-one presents low-frequency emergent onsets with higher amplitudes at higher frequencies. Family-two includes emergent onsets with modulate amplitudes simulating tremor and dominant frequencies in defined picks in the band between 1 and 3 Hz. Family-three presents LP events with impulsive onset and decaying amplitude with time, these events present a wide range of amplitudes and dominant frequencies around 2 Hz. Family-four includes LP events with monochromatic appearance with sharp picks below 3 Hz. From thousands of LP events preliminary locations based on phase picks suggest that LP seismicity occur within uppermost 1000 m below the crater floor, consistently constrain defined clusters in the east-region of the crater and in the area where the domes growth. The network used to located LP events included 15 broadband stations distributed along radial profiles on the upper flanks of Popocatepetl. We report data collected during a broadband seismic experiment carried out at Popocatepetl Volcano as part of an international cooperative program between the GeoForschungsZentr um, Potsdam, Germany, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, MEXICO.

  7. Geophysical characterization of hydrothermal systems and intrusive bodies, El Chichón volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzeler, Martin; Varley, Nick; Roach, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The 1982 explosive eruptions of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) destroyed the inner dome and created a 1-km-wide and 180-m-deep crater within the somma crater. A shallow hydrothermal system was exposed to the surface of the new crater floor and is characterized by an acid crater lake, a geyser-like Cl-rich spring (soap pool), and numerous fumarole fields. Multiple geophysical surveys were performed to define the internal structure of the volcanic edifice and its hydrothermal system. We carried out a high-resolution ground-based geomagnetic survey in the 1982 crater and its surroundings and 38 very low frequency (VLF) transects around the crater lake. A 3-D inversion of the ground-based magnetic data set highlighted three high-susceptibility isosurfaces, interpreted as highly magnetized bodies beneath the 1982 crater floor. Inversion of a digitized regional aeromagnetic map highlighted four major deeply rooted cryptodomes, corresponding to major topographic highs and massive lava dome outcrops outside and on the somma rim. The intracrater magnetic bodies correspond closely to the active hydrothermal vents and their modeled maximum basal depth matches the elevation of the springs on the flanks of the volcano. Position, dip, and vertical extent of active and extinct hydrothermal vents identified by VLF-EM surveys match the magnetic data set. We interpret the shallow lake spring hydrothermal system to be mostly associated with buried remnants of the 550 BP dome, but the Cl-rich soap pool may be connected to a small intrusion emplaced at shallow depth during the 1982 eruption.

  8. Lahar simulation with SPH and field calibration at the Colima Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Leticia; Haddad, Bouchra; Capra, Lucia; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    As a result of the frequent effusive activity of Volcán de Colima (10° 30'44''N, 103° 37'02'' W), the most active volcano in Mexico, plenty of rain triggered lahars are produced, especially during the rainy season. Along the recent period of activity, particularly from 2010, many of these lahars channelled through the main ravines of the volcano and reach large distances, representing high risk for more than 10,000 people at the surroundings. Modeling of lahars has become an important tool in the assessment of the related hazards, in order to undertake appropriate mitigation actions and reduce the associated risks. Recent lahars at the Colima Volcano are well documented, so they can be used to prove the accuracy of modelling. In this work, we used the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method, a depth integrated coupled model created by Pastor in 2005, to replicate the propagation stage of 3 recent Colima lahars occurred on Montegrande ravine in 1992, 2011 and 2012. The studied events include hyperconcentrated, debris and a mixture of the previous flow natures. The inputs used for the SPH simulations were the initial point, volume of each lahar and an adapted morphology of its mass. Field data used to verify the SPH results include the stopping point of the lahar, its path, velocity and height values, as the floodplain area. All this information was a result of fieldwork recognition (cross section profiles of the inner part of the ravine) and free satellite imagery analysis. The best results were obtained using Bingham rheology. The proposed parameters to simulate Colima lahars were 20 Pa of yield strength and 30 Pa.s of viscosity for the 1992 lahar (hyperconcentrated flow), 200 Pa and 50 Pa.s in case of the 2011 debris flow, and finally 20 Pa and 24 Pa.s for the 2012 event, whose nature evolved from debris to an hyperconcentrated flow. In all cases a 1900 kg/m3 density was used. Highly accurate results showed the relevant role played by rheological

  9. The ~ 2000 yr BP Jumento volcano, one of the youngest edifices of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Muñoz-Salinas, E.; Castillo, M.; Salinas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Chichinautzin Volcanic Field is situated at the southern limit of the Basin of Mexico and the Metropolitan area of Mexico City, the third most populated city around the world. The Chichinautzin Volcanic field holds more than 220 monogenetic volcanoes. Xitle is the youngest of these with an estimated age of 1.6 ky BP. Xitle's eruptive activity took place during the Mesoamerican Mexican Pre-classic period and is related to the destruction of Cuicuilco Archaeological Site, the oldest civilization known in Central Mexico. However, there are still several regional cones that have not been dated. Based on 14C ages, stratigraphic and geomorphologic criteria, we conclude that the Jumento volcano, located to the west of Xitle, is one of the youngest cones of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field. The Jumento volcano has a basaltic andesite composition, and its eruptive activity was initially hydromagmatic, followed by Strombolian and finally effusive events occurred recorded through: (1) a sequence of hydromagmatic pyroclastic surges and ashfall layers emplaced at a radius of > 5 km from the crater with charcoal fragments at its base; this activity built the Jumento's cone with slopes of 32°; and (2) lava flows that breached the southern part of the cone and flowed for up to 2.5 km from the vent. The resulting 14C ages for this volcano yielded a maximum age of ~ 2 ky BP. Morphometric analysis indicates that the state of degradation of Jumento cone is similar to the Xitle, suggesting that the Jumento could be in the state of degradation of a volcanic structure of similar age or younger adding credence to the probable radiocarbon age of ~ 2 ky BP for the Jumento edifice.

  10. Albedo estimation using near infrared photography at Glaciar Norte of Citlaltepetl Volcano (Mexico).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros, Guillermo; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2015-04-01

    In this work we show preliminary results of the application of the methodology proposed by Corripio (2004) for albedo estimation of a glacial surface using oblique photography. This analysis was performed for the Glaciar Norte of Citlaltepetl volcano (Mexico), using images obtained with a modified digital camera for capturing the portion of the near infrared spectrum starting at 950 nm and a digital elevation model with a grid of 2 m. The main goal was to obtain a picture of the spatial distribution of albedo on the glacier, in order to find out if there was any morphological evidence of the influence of the glacier energy balance. Some of the obtained results show a certain spatial distribution with comparatively higher albedo values at the lower parts of the glacier as compared with higher parts. The higher values may correspond to different metamorphism of snow/ice at different heights due to the effects of lower slope. Corripio, J. G. (2004). Snow surface albedo estimation using terrestrial photography. International journal of remote sensing, 25(24), 5705-5729.

  11. Vector analysis of chemical variation in the lavas of Parícutin volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miesch, A.T.

    1979-01-01

    Compositional variations in the lavas of Parícutin volcano, Mexico, have been examined by an extended method of Q-mode factor analysis. Each sample composition is treated as a vector projected from an original eight-dimensional space into a vector system of three dimensions. The compositions represented by the vectors after projection are closely similar to the original compositions except for Na2Oand Fe2O3.The vectors in the three-dimensional system cluster about three different planes that represent three stages of compositional change in the Parícutin lavas. Because chemical data on the compositions of the minerals in the lavas are presently lacking, interpretations of the mineral phases that may have been involved in fractional crystallization are based on CIPW norm calculations. Changes during the first stage are attributed largely to the fractional crystallization of plagioclase and olivine. Changes during the second stage can be explained by the separation of plagioclase and pyroxene. Changes during the final stage may have resulted mostly from the assimilation of a granitic material, as previously proposed by R. E. Wilcox.

  12. Zircon xenocryst resorption and magmatic regrowth at El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Brenda; Schmitt, Axel K.; Roberge, Julie; Tenorio, Felipe Garcia; Damiata, Brian N.

    2016-02-01

    El Chichón volcano is the only active volcano located within the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc in southern Mexico, which lies between the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and the Central American Volcanic Arc. Previous studies have shown that ~ 12 eruptions have occurred at El Chichón within the last 8000 years, forming a complex of lava domes with a central crater and surrounding pyroclastic deposits. Here, we report the discovery of zircon in Holocene El Chichón rocks, which were analyzed by high spatial resolution imaging (color cathodoluminescence CCL) and isotopic (secondary ionization mass spectrometry SIMS) methods to resolve core and rim crystallization ages. Pumice samples from five proximal pyroclastic flow and fall-out deposits were collected based on published stratigraphy. Two of the samples were further (re-)classified by new 14C dates. In addition, we sampled two lavas from the 1982 eruption and from remnants of the older Somma lava complex. Zircon crystals were dated using 230Th/238U disequilibrium (U-Th) and U-Pb geochronology. U-Th zircon ages fall between near eruption ages and ca. 84 ka, with overlapping ages in all samples. By contrast, zircon core U-Pb ages range between ca. 290 Ma and 1.9 Ga. These ages are consistent with xenocrystic origins and their heterogeneity indicates derivation from clastic country rocks. Strong age contrasts between inherited xenocrystic and young magmatic domains in individual zircon crystals are evidence for arrested assimilation of crustal rocks where initially zircon-undersaturated magmas cooled rapidly to form a crystal mush or subsolidus amalgamate as a crustally contaminated boundary layer. This layer contributed zircon crystals to eruptible magma during episodic recharge events followed by partial melt extraction, mixing and homogenization. Zircon overgrowths are significantly older than major minerals whose U-series ages and sharp zonation boundaries suggest crystallization only within a few ka before eruption

  13. Magmatic processes at Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico: petrology, geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, P.; Stimac, J.; Siebe, C.; Mac¡as, J.

    2003-12-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is one of the most famous and most active stratovolcanoes of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). It is located 60 km south-east of Mexico-City and 40 km west of the city of Puebla, both cities have more than 30 million inhabitants. In this contribution we present a study of Late Pleistocene to Recent products of Popocatépetl (Popo) volcano and surrounding scoria cones to better establish their genetic relationship and magmatic history. Popo and flanking vents are located within the central portion of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is related to oblique subduction of young oceanic lithosphere. Current activity of Popo can be understood in the context of its past eruptions and those from surrounding scoria cones. The latest cycle of eruption began Dec. 21, 1994 with continuous to pulsating emission of phreatic ash. The last important event happened on July 19, 2003, covering Mexico-City with a thin ash-layer. Both Popo and surrounding scoria cones produced moderate-K, calc-alkaline rocks, with the two groups differing mainly in degree of differentiation, water content, and oxidation state. Some vent samples on the immediate flanks of Popo and have phenocryst assemblages and compositions transitional between typical flanking vent and stratovolcano samples. Monogenetic vents produced mainly basaltic andesites to andesites, primarily by crystal fractionation of Ol (Fo80-90)+chromite, 2PyxñOl, and 2PyxñPlagñHb assemblages, with minor assimilation of crustal debris. The andesitic to dacitic rocks of Popo are dominated by Plag-2Pyx-2OxideñHbl assemblages, with variable amounts of Ol (Fo70-90)+chromite xenocrysts. A few Popo samples contain locally abundant xenolithic debris of cognate-granitoid intrusions and their metasedimentary wallrocks. The two suites share parental Mg-rich basaltic andesite magmas, with the Popo magmas reflecting longer residence in the crust, and enhanced hydration and oxidation due to the resulting processes of

  14. Susceptibility mapping in the Río El Estado watershed, Pico de Orizaba volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Lugo Hubp, J.; Paredes Mejía, L.; Aceves Quesada, F.

    2013-12-01

    In volcanic terrains, dormant stratovolcanoes are very common and can trigger landslides and debris flows continually along stream systems, thereby affecting human settlements and economic activities. It is important to assess their potential impact and damage through the use of landslide inventory maps and landslide models. This poster provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT no 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory and produce a landslide susceptibility map by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The Río El Estado watershed on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico, is selected as a study area. The catchment covers 5.2 km2 with elevations ranging from 2676.79 to 4248.2 m a.s.l. and hillslopes between 5° and 56°. The stream system of Río El Estado catchment erodes Tertiary and Quaternary lavas, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits. The geologic and geomorphologic factors in combination with high seasonal precipitation, high degree of weathering, and steep slopes predispose the study area to landslides. The method encompasses two main levels of analysis to assess landslide susceptibility. The first level builds a historic landslide inventory. In the study area, an inventory of more than 100 landslides was mapped from interpretation of multi-temporal aerial orthophotographs and local field surveys to assess and describe landslide distribution. All landslides were digitized into a GIS, and the spatial geo-database of landslides was constructed from standardized GIS datasets. The second level calculates the susceptibility for the watershed. Multiple Logistic Regression (MLR) was used to examine the relationship between landsliding and several independent variables (elevation, slope, terrain curvature, flow direction, saturation, contributing area, land use, and geology

  15. Monitoring the Dynamic of a Fluvial Channel after Lahar Disturbance: Huiloac Gorge (Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Tanarro, L. M.; Renschler, C.; Sanjosé, J. J.; Atkinson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Capra, L.; Poblete, M.A. and Alvarado, R. 2004. The 1997 and 2001 lahars of Popocatépetl volcano (Central Mexico): textural and sedimentological constraints on their origin and hazards. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 131: 351-369. Gran, K. y Montgomery, D., 2005. Spatial and temporal patterns in fluvial recovery following volcanic eruptions: Channel response to basin-wide sediment loading at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines. GSA Bulletin, 117; 1-2: 195-211. Hayes, S.K., Montgomery, D.R. and Newhall, C.G., 2002, Fluvial sediment transport and deposition following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Geomorphology. Vol. 45: 211-224. Major, J.J., Pierson, T.C., Dinehart, R.L. y Costa, J.E. 2000. Sediment yield following severe volcanic disturbance- A two-decade perspective from Mount St. Helens. Geology, 28, n° 9: 819-822. Major, J.J., 2003. Post-eruption hydrology and sediment transport in volcanic river systems, Water Resources IMPACT, 5(3): 10-15. Muñoz, E. 2007. Los lahares del Popocatépetl: tratamiento de la información para la prevención de catástrofes. (PhD thesis, Universidad Complutense de Madrid.) Palacios, D., 1995. Rockslide processes on the north slope of Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, Permafrost and Periglaciar Processes, 6: 345-356. Palacios, D., J.J. Zamorano and G. Parrilla. 1998. Proglacial debris flows in Popocatépetl North Face and their relation to 1995 eruption. Z. Geomorph. N. P., 42(3), 273-295 Palacios, D., J.J. Zamorano and A. Gómez. 2001. The impact of present lahars on the geomorphologic evolution of proglacial gorges: Popocatépetl, Mexico. Geomorphology, 37(1-2), 15-42.

  16. Reconstructing 800 years of historical eruptive activity at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Del Pozzo, Ana Lillian; Rodríguez, Alan; Portocarrero, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Pictorial and written documents spanning 800 years were analyzed for information about historical eruptions at Popocatépetl volcano. These documents were prepared by several indigenous groups as well as by the Spanish conquistadors and missionaries during their military campaigns and long-term evangelization and colonization and later on, by Indian nobles and Spanish historians. Pre-Columbian drawings show flames coming out of Popocatépetl's crater while later descriptions from the Spanish colonial period in Mexico (1521 to 1821) refer to ash emission and ballistics, lahars, and some pumice falls, similar to what were depicted in the thirteenth to sixteenth century drawings. Graphic information from the pre-Columbian codices, colonial maps, and paintings referring to the eruptions were correlated with historical accounts and religious chronicles, thereby leading to the reconstruction of a more detailed sequence of eruptive events. From such information, it was possible for us to prepare ash distribution maps for the 1540, 1592, and 1664 eruptions. Most of the known historical eruptions seem to be similar to those that have been occurring at Popocatépetl since 1994, indicating the importance of ash emission and crater dome formation throughout its recent eruptive history. The strongest eruptions occurred in 1510, 1519, 1540, 1580, 1664, and 2001; these produced widespread ash falls that affected both populated and rural areas. Duration of eruptive episodes during the past 800 years were estimated to have ranged from less than a year to more than 30 years, separated by repose periods ranging between 7 and over 100 years.

  17. New Insights on the Evolution of Magmas at Paricutin Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, M. C.; Peate, D. W.; Ukstins Peate, I.

    2011-12-01

    Paricutin volcano, located within the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF), Mexico, erupted over a 9 year period (1943-1952). Often cited as the classic example of assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) processes, bulk compositions of the erupted lavas at Paricutin range from basaltic andesite to andesite and previous studies have correlated this change in bulk composition to increases in 87Sr/86Sr and δ18 O. In this study, we have focused on melt inclusions and new whole rock data to better understand the processes leading to the evolution of magmatic compositions at Paricutin. Olivine- and orthopyroxene hosted melt inclusions are utilized to examine the relative timing of fractionation and contamination during the different eruptive periods of Paricutin. New whole rock trace element compositions, both from this study and the literature, are also incorporated to better determine the initial diversity of magmas and the temporal evolution of bulk compositions. Melt inclusions and whole rock compositions record a complex magmatic history. Initial erupted magmas (Phase 1) are compositionally variable (Ba/Nb from 45-60). Relative to Phase 1, Phase 2 magmas and inclusions have lower Ba/Nb (~38-52) and higher K2O/TiO2 (~1-1.5), inconsistent with models for crustal contamination and fractionation. In addition, Phase 2 lavas have comparable 87Sr/86Sr but distinctive Zr/Y (~6 vs. 7-8) and LREE/HREE ratios (La/YbN: 5.3-5.7 vs. 6.6-7.2) compared to Phase 1 magmas, features that can be explained by small differences in melting. Melt inclusions also record little evidence for magma mixing between Phases 1 and 2, again reflecting the distinctive melt compositions. Phase 3 magmas, in contrast to Phases 1 and 2, record a wide compositional range (SiO2 from ~57-60.5 wt%, Ba/Nb ~53-73) that is consistent with an AFC model. Co-variations in Cl/K and K2O/TiO2 suggest that Phase 3 is assimilating dominantly mid to upper crustal material, similar to xenoliths and basement

  18. Volcano-Ice Interactions in Mexico: Extinction of Glaciers at Popocatépetl and the Fate of the Glaciers of Iztaccíhuatl and Citlaltépetl Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Granados, H.

    2007-05-01

    In spite of the state of activity of the Mexican volcanoes (erupting, fumarolic, or dormant) study of volcano-ice interactions is of key importance because one of the main consequences of these interactions is the generation of lahars. Study of glaciers and volcanic activity help to prevent the possibility of devastating events at volcanoes in Mexico, especially because some explosive events at Popocatépetl volcano generated lahars during the past twelve years. Small-sized glaciers exist or existed at Iztaccíhuatl, Popocatépetl and Citlaltépetl whose volcanic activity is characterized by a different level of activity. The extinction of glaciers of Popocatépetl volcano was eruption-forced. 40% of climatic-related shrinkage occurred in 4 decades whereas 32% of eruption-related shrinkage occurred in 4 years. Long-term effects of glacier extinction include an imbalance between recharge and extraction of groundwater at surrounding aquifers provoked by disappearance of glacier-related melt water. The volcano started to erupt in 1994. Impact of the eruption on the glaciers was in several ways: immediate thermal effect of hot falling ash on snow and ice.; ballistic projectiles are also hot and yield high kinetic energy producing melting restricted to the impact areas; every event depositing 1cm of ash represents a load of ~102-104 tons; fumaroles of <100°C on cracks beneath the glacier provoked continuous melting at the base of the glacier even during the winter; possibly, volcanic gases indirectly affected the glaciers, but greenhouse effect is difficult to assess. Iztaccíhuatl volcano's glaciers have been influenced by the same factors as at Popocatépetl, except the eruption. Citlaltépetl volcano's glaciers have been just affected by climatic changes. Both volcanoes show fumaroles or diffuse degassing. An eruptive event in the short term may cause the same effect as occurred at Popocatépetl volcano. The large ice masses of the world are claimed to be affected

  19. Petrologic characteristics of the 1982 and pre-1982 eruptive products of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, J.J.; Tilling, R.I.; Duffield, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Studies on a suite of rocks from this volcano indicate that the juvenile materials of the 1982 and pre-1982 eruptions of the volcano have essentially the same mineralogy and chemistry. Data suggest that chemical composition changed little over the 0.3 m.y. sample period. Modally, plagioclase is the dominant phenocryst, followed by amphibole, clinopyroxene and minor phases including anhydrite. Plagioclase phenocrysts show complex zoning: the anorthite-rich zones are probably the result of changing volatile P on the magma and may reflect the changes in the volcano's magma reservoir in response to repetitive, explosive eruptive activity.-R.E.S.

  20. Hydrogeochemical monitoring of El Chichón Volcano crater lake, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceniceros, N.; Armienta, M. A.; Ramos, S.; Cruz, O.; Aguayo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The geochemistry of the crater lake of the El Chichón volcano has been studied since 1983. Results have been used to analyze post-eruptive processes and assessing volcanic risk. Chemical analysis has included pH, temperature, principal ions, fluoride, Iron , sulfide, boron and Silica. From 1985, all determinations have been performed at the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory of the Geophysics Institute (National University of Mexico). Such analysis were made following the standard methods, as given in APHA (1989), e.g. UV-visible, emission, and atomic absorption spectroscopy, potentiometric and volumetric techniques.. The El Chichón crater lake water showed an increasing pH from 1983 to 1986 (from 0.56 to 2.33), from then pH has fluctuated around the later value (in August 2002 pH was 1.98). Conductivity showed a high fluctuations with a general decreasing trend, ranging between 83800 uS/cm (1983, Casadevall et al., 1984) and close to 2000 uS/cm (December 1998). Water-type has changed along these years: The Chichon water could be classified as acid, calcium-chloride in 1983; in 1991 changed to Sulfate-mixed and since 1992, it has been mostly of sodium chloride type, except for a few dates when it could be classified as sulfate-mixed or calcic type. Since 1985, cation concentrations produced by environmental rock dissolution decreased in the same manner. A decreasing trend with time was observed also in anions of a potential magmatic origin like sulfate, chloride and fluoride. Molar concentrations of chloride have been mostly greater than sulfate concentrations (up to two orders of magnitude) and have varied without any observed correlation. Oxidation-reduction processes may explain the large sulfate concentration changesSulfate shows large. The geochemical modeling programs (MINTEQA2, PHREEQCE) showed saturation indices close to equilibrium for gypsum and anhydrite suggesting that sulfates also can be derived from other processes such as dissolution

  1. Multidisciplinary determination of Lahar Erosion Dynamics at the Colima Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Leticia; Renschler, Crish; Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    Volcán de Colima (10° 30'44''N, 103° 37'02'' W) is currently the most active volcano in Mexico and the North American plate. Associated to its frequent volcanic activity, renovated in 1998 and later in 2010, secondary processes like lahars, triggered by rain mixing with the loose pyroclastic debris produced, are common. Colima lahars channelled through the main water drainages (ravines), and reach large distances along their path (from 7 to 15 km long) burying farmland and all kind of human infrastructures at the surrounding area. The inner part of the ravines is greatly affected by lahars, especially by the bulking processes, so establish an appropriate method to determine its affection rate seems to be needed. In order to analyze 1-year lahar erosion dynamics inside one of the most active ravine (Montegrande 2011-2012 period), our team proposed a multidisciplinary perspective that combines numerical modeling (ArcGeoWEPP), fieldwork recognition and free satellite imagery, in the assessment of the related hazards. On the one hand, ArcGeoWEPP model allowed simulation of watersheds and hillslope profiles within ravines, taking into account climate parameters, land and vegetation covers. This tool was especially useful in areas where the terrain complexity prevented access. The results of this model were combined with 16 real cross-section topographies observed inside the Montegrande ravine and the floodplain delineation of lahars created from satellite imagery. The total 1-year volume of debris at Montegrande was finally reached, but also the erosive, sedimentary and balanced areas were identified, so as the lahar and its deposit dimensions. 750,000 tons per year were eroded inside the Montegrande ravine during 2011-2012 lahars, 805,000 tons if the hillslopes of the surrounding area were considered, and 580,000 tons were deposited along the path. The flood plain area was 1,100,000 m2. Numerical models combined with field data obtained from different sources seems

  2. Volcanic history of El Chichón Volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) during the Holocene, and its impact on human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espíndola, J. M.; Macías, J. L.; Tilling, R. I.; Sheridan, M. F.

    Before its devastating eruption in 1982, El Chichón Volcano was little known and did not appear on any listings of hazardous volcanoes. Subsequent geologic studies, based on stratigraphic and radiocarbon investigations, showed that at least three explosive eruptions had occurred previously at this volcano. In this paper, we present the result of recent studies on the stratigraphy of the volcano and new radiocarbon ages which show that at least 11 eruptions have taken place at El Chichón in the past 8000years. Explosive events, most of them producing block-and-ash flow and surge deposits, occurred around 550, 900, 1250, 1500, 1600, 1900, 2000, 2500, 3100, 3700 and 7700years BP. The juvenile products of these eruptions have a trachyandesitic composition with similar degree of evolution, as evidenced from their SiO2 abundance and depletion in MgO, CaO, TiO2, as well as trace and rare earth elements. This suggests segregation of olivine and orthopyroxene from the melt. Since human settlements in southeast Mexico and Central America can be traced as far back as approximately 2500years BP, most of these events probably affected human activity. In fact, there are reports of pottery shards and other artifacts in deposits from the eruption of 1250 BP. Pottery fragments in deposits of an eruption that took place 2500 BP are also reported in this paper. Thus, the impact of the volcano on human activities has been frequent, with most of the repose intervals lasting between 100 to 600years. The impact of the eruptions was probably of greater than local extent, because airfall tephra could reach distant sites and possibly even affect weather. The eruptive history of El Chichón also offers clues in the investigation of the Maya civilization. Several researchers have considered the volcano as an important factor in the answer to some intriguing questions such as the extensive use of volcanic ash in Late Classic Maya ceramics or, of greater importance, the causes of the collapse

  3. Volcanic history of El Chichon Volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) during the Holocene, and its impact on human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espindola, J.M.; Macias, J.L.; Tilling, R.I.; Sheridan, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    Before its devastating eruption in 1982, El Chichon Volcano was little known and did not appear on any listings of hazardous volcanoes. Subsequent geologic studies, based on stratigraphic and radiocarbon investigations, showed that at least three explosive eruptions had occurred previously at this volcano. In this paper, we present the result of recent studies on the stratigraphy of the volcano and new radiocarbon ages which show that at least 11 eruptions have taken place at El Chichon in the past 8000 years. Explosive events, most of them producing block-and-ash flow and surge deposits, occurred around 550, 900, 1250, 1500, 1600, 1900, 2000, 2500, 3100, 3700 and 7700 years BP. The juvenile products of these eruptions have a trachyandesitic composition with similar degree of evolution, as evidenced from their SiO2 abundance and depletion in MgO, CaO, TiO2, as well as trace and rare earth elements. This suggests segregation of olivine and orthopyroxene from the melt. Since human settlements in southeast Mexico and Central America can be traced as far back as approximately 2500 years BP, most of these events probably affected human activity. In fact, there are reports of pottery shards and other artifacts in deposits from the eruption of 1250 BP. Pottery fragments in deposits of an eruption that took place 2500 BP are also reported in this paper. Thus, the impact of the volcano on human activities has been frequent, with most of the repose intervals lasting between 100 to 600 years. The impact of the eruptions was probably of greater than local extent, because airfall tephra could reach distant sites and possibly even affect weather. The eruptive history of El Chichon also offers clues in the investigation of the Maya civilization. Several researchers have considered the volcano as an important factor in the answer to some intriguing questions such as the extensive use of volcanic ash in Late Classic Maya ceramics or, of greater importance, the causes of the

  4. Monitoring the Dynamic of a Fluvial Channel after Lahar Disturbance: Huiloac Gorge (Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Tanarro, L. M.; Renschler, C.; Sanjosé, J. J.; Atkinson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions generate disturbances that affect hydrological systems (Major, 2003) by depositing large volumes of sediments in watersheds that exceed amounts common to non-volcanic river systems (Montgomery, 2005). If the eruption releases abundant melt water, the river system may respond immediately by forming hazardous flows called lahars. River system recovery following eruptive and laharic impact is an important process, but it has received little attention (Gran and Montgomery, 2005) despite the fact that Major et al. (2000) and Hayes et al. (2002) have shown that these disruptions cause long term instability and their effects persist for decades. Lahar deposits resulting from interaction between volcanic activity and the glacier located above the Huiloac Gorge on the northern slope of Popocatepetl volcano (19°02´ N, 98°62´ W, 5,424 m), have infilled the gorge (Palacios, 1995; Palacios et al., 1998 and 2001; Capra et al., 2004; Muñoz, 2007). All of the major lahars that occurred on the volcano in 1995 (4 km), 1997 (21 km), and 2001 (14 km) have channelled through Huiloac Gorge, and have dramatically altered its morphology and dynamics through erosion and deposition. The present study traces these changes in the aftermath of the laharic events that occurred from 1997-2001. A sector of the channel, located at 3200m-3240m altitude, of 500 m long and 15 to 20 m wide, in the mid-section of the gorge, was chosen as the control site. Precipitation is heaviest there and is most apt to trigger secondary post-eruptive lahars. ArcGis software was used to draw 6 geomorphic maps of the site showing spatial variations in the landforms for the period February 2002 - February 2008. In addition, 29 cross-profiles were made of the gorge for the same time interval, excluding February 2004. The volume of sediment eroded and deposited was calculated for each date by comparing variations in the height of the floor and banks of the gorge depicted in the cross-profile, and

  5. Some insights about the activity of the Ceboruco Volcano (Nayarit, Mexico) from recent seismic low-frequency activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Uribe, María Carolina; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco Javier; Nava Pichardo, Fidencio Alejandro; Suárez-Plascencia, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the western end of the Mexican volcanic belt, near several population centers and by the side of a strategic highway. During the last 1,000 years it has had, on the average, one eruption every 125 years. It last eruptive activity began in 1870, and during the following 5 years it presented superficial activity including vapor emissions, ash falls, and rhyodacitic lava flows along the southeast side. A data set consisting of 139 low-frequency volcanic-type earthquakes, recorded from March 2003 to July 2008 at the CEBN triaxial short period digital station on the southwestern side of the volcano, was classified according to waveform and spectral characteristics into four families: short duration, extended coda, bobbin, and modulated amplitude. Approximate hypocentral locations indicate that there is no particular location for events of any family, but rather that all events occur at different points within the volcano. The presence of ongoing volcanic-earthquake activity together with the ongoing vapor emissions indicate that the Ceboruco volcano continues to be active, and the higher occurrence rates of short-duration events, as compared with those for the other families, could indicate an increase in the stress in the volcanic edifice. This apparent stress increase, together with the fact that the last eruption occurred 143 years ago, tell us that the Ceboruco may be approaching a critical state, and may represent a hazard to the surrounding communities and economic activities.

  6. Sulfur dioxide and particles in quiescent volcanic plumes from Poas, Arenal, and Colima volcanos, Costa Rica and Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casadevall, T. J.; Rose, W. I., Jr.; Fuller, W. H.; Hunt, W. H.; Woods, D. C.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.; Chuan, R. L.; Friend, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of SO2 emission rates and concentrations and of particle distribution, size, shape, and composition were made in quiescent volcanic plumes emitted into the troposphere from Poas and Arenal volcanos, Costa Rica, and Colima volcano, Mexico. SO2 emission rates were 700 + or - 180 metric tons per day (t/d) for Poas, 210 + or - 30 t/d for Arenal, and 320 + or - 50 t/d for Colima. The concentrations of SO2 calculated from the COSPEC/lidar data were 5-380 ppb. Concentrations of SO2 measured directly by flame photometry were 10-250 ppb. Particles collected in the plumes with a quartz crystal microbalance impactor were mostly less than 3 microns in diameter and consisted of droplets of dilute sulfur-bearing solutions and minor amounts of layer silicate particles coated with a sulfur-bearing film or crust. Total particle concentrations were 4.7 micrograms per cu.m for Poas and 18.8 micrograms per cu.m for Colima. Comparison of concentrations of SO2 in the plumes with gas samples collected at fumaroles on the ground suggests that the plumes are diluted by the atmosphere by factors of up to 100,000.

  7. Gravity and seismicity analyses of the El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, F.; Gonzalez-Moran, T.; Gonzalez, L.

    1990-03-01

    Subduction induced compressional stress, lateral displacement faults probably linked to the NW extension of the Polochic-Motagua fault system, and local magma emplacement create a complex geological setting for the El Chichon volcano. Gravity analysis reveals that the principal structures in the area correspond to synclines and anticlines. Downward continuation of the gravity field suggests the presence of magma emplacement SE of the volcano. This magmatic emplacement appears to be the principal cause of the truncation of the syncline in which the volcano lies. Analyses of earthquakes occurring after eruptions show that the vertical distribution of events is confined to a roughly cylindrical zone which correlates well with the region of magmatic emplacement inferred from the gravity analysis. Even though more than 350 km separate the volcano from the Middle American trench, the compressional stress regime reported for the area may correlate with subduction stress (N30°E). However, the strike direction for the principal faults in the zone, N60°W, permits us to postulate that the NW extension of the Polochic-Motagua fault system is implicated in the local tectonics of the El Chichon area.

  8. Lessons from Popocatepetl Volcano (Mexico): Ancient Settlement Buried by Lavas, Mudflows, and Air-Fall Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, H.; Panfil, M.; Gonzalez, E. A.; Coyoacan, C. U.; Urangaela, G.; Plunket, P.; Gardner, T.; Abrams, M.

    1994-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is 5452 m in altitude and capped by glaciers with a long Late Pleistocene-Holocene history. Volcanic activity has been intense during the last 10 000 years. Therefore, the valleys at the NE foothills of the volcano, covered by air-fall ejecta and drained by the runoff of the glaciers, became very attractive to ancient inhabitants of the Xalizintla Valley (XV) west of Puebla City, because of fertility of soils. The XV was occupied by humans about 2000 years ago who witnessed five events related to volcanic activity related to Popo. These events, described in this paper, are being taken into account for volcanic risk evaluation since several towns with a population of more than 23 000 people reoccupied again the Xalizintla Valley.

  9. Hazard map for volcanic ballistic impacts at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel A.; Delgado-Granados, Hugo; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-11-01

    During volcanic explosions, volcanic ballistic projectiles (VBP) are frequently ejected. These projectiles represent a threat to people, infrastructure, vegetation, and aircraft due to their high temperatures and impact velocities. In order to protect people adequately, it is necessary to delimit the projectiles' maximum range within well-defined explosion scenarios likely to occur in a particular volcano. In this study, a general methodology to delimit the hazard zones for VBP during volcanic eruptions is applied to Popocatépetl volcano. Three explosion scenarios with different intensities have been defined based on the past activity of the volcano and parameterized by considering the maximum kinetic energy associated with VBP ejected during previous eruptions. A ballistic model is used to reconstruct the "launching" kinetic energy of VBP observed in the field. In the case of Vulcanian eruptions, the most common type of activity at Popocatépetl, the ballistic model was used in concert with an eruptive model to correlate ballistic range with initial pressure and gas content, parameters that can be estimated by monitoring techniques. The results are validated with field data and video observations of different Vulcanian eruptions at Popocatépetl. For each scenario, the ballistic model is used to calculate the maximum range of VBP under optimum "launching" conditions: ballistic diameter, ejection angle, topography, and wind velocity. Our results are presented in the form of a VBP hazard map with topographic profiles that depict the likely maximum ranges of VBP under explosion scenarios defined specifically for Popocatépetl volcano. The hazard zones shown on the map allow the responsible authorities to plan the definition and mitigation of restricted areas during volcanic crises.

  10. Three dimensional P-wave velocity structure at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.; Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    Popocatépetl Volcano is an active andesitic stratovolcano (5460m) of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt that has been erupting since December 1994. We used three-dimensional seismic tomography to detect variations in the P-wave velocity structure during three different volcanic cycles, which are separated by the two largest eruptions that occurred at Popocatépetl on June 30th, 1997 and January 22nd, 2001. The start of the first dataset is defined by the eruption in June 1996; the last dataset ends with the eruption in September 2003. The P-wave velocity structure of the volcano has been determined to 10 km depth below the summit using nearly 4000 P-arrival times from about 900 volcano tectonic events recorded on a local 10-station network. The Root Mean Square (RMS) of the arrival time residuals was reduced by 22% - 30% from the initial RMS of about 0.30 s, after running seven iterations of our tomography code. In the three eruption cycles, we observe velocity structures which complement the results of former studies, as well as image previously unrecognized velocity anomalies. We observe velocity changes of ~1km/s in certain areas before and after large eruptions. We compare the tomographic results with geologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations and interpret low velocity zones as fractured rock (SE-zone) or as thermally disturbed zones including hot rock and melt (below the crater region and north flank), from which unexpected future eruptions or flank collapses may occur. High velocity zones are interpreted as roofs of magma reservoirs, old dike systems or relicts of the ancient volcano. The observed changes in velocity anomalies before and after large eruptions, determined by four-dimensional tomography, indicate a change in the internal volcanic fluid-filled structures during volcanic eruptions and show the need for time-resolved geophysical techniques when investigating volcanic structures.

  11. Lahars simulation and field calibration in Popocatépetl Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, B.; Zamorano, J. J.; Pastor, M.; Andrés, N.; Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.

    2012-04-01

    The term "lahar" refers to the process generated in volcanoes by high sediment concentration flows that range from hyperconcentrated to Debris flows. This complex dynamic system represents a threat to people living near volcanoes. In order to delimitate hazardous area, mathematical models should be applied and tested. These models depend strongly on data collected in the field and, an additionally, good DEM is required to produce satisfactory results. Recent Popocatépetl lahars are well documented and as a result, they can be used to assess the accuracy of numerical models. In this work, SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) depth integrated model created by Pastor in 2005 is applied to reproduce Popocatépetl lahars. The mathematical model is derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model and the assumed rheology corresponds to the Bingham model. On the other hand, a systematic collection of field data it's carried out by GFAM group in Popocatépetl volcano and it's included updating channel topography; as well as the factors: i) run out area boundary; ii) estimation of the velocity of the flow and iii) depth distribution of lahar's deposit. All this field data it's used for back analyses and calibration of the rheological parameters. Besides the calibration of rheological parameters, it is also investigated the effect of the topographic mesh resolution. Moreover, flow depth obtained by SPH model is systematically compared with field evidences along the lahar's path. Research funded by CGL2009-7343 project, Government of Spain.

  12. Eruptive History of the Rhyolitic Guangoche Volcano, Los Azufres Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Granados, E.; Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.; Layer, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Guangoche is a rhyolitic and polygenetic volcano with a maximum elevation of 2,760 meters above sea level. It is situated to the southwest of the Los Azufres Volcanic Field (LAVF), in the central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Guangoche volcano is the youngest volcano described within the LAVF. It shows a horseshoe shaped crater open to the south, with a central lava dome. Its eruptive history during late Pleistocene has been intense with six explosive eruptions that consists of: 1) A southwards sector collapse of the volcano that generated a debris avalanche deposit with megablocks of heterogenous composition; 2) A plinian-type eruption that generated a pumice fall deposit and pyroclastic density currents by column collapse at 30.6 ka; 3) A plinian-type eruption "White Pumice Sequence" (29 ka) that developed a 22-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 7.0 x 107 kg/s (vol. = 0.53 km3); 4) A dome-destruction event, "Agua Blanca Pyroclastic Sequence" at 26.7 ka, that deposited a block-and-ash flow deposit; 5) A subplinian-plinian type eruption "Ochre Pyroclastic Sequence" (<26 ka) with an important initial phreatomagmatic phase, that generated pyroclastic density currents and pumice fallouts. The subplinian-plinian event generated a 16-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 1.9 x 107 kg/s, and magma volume of 0.38 km3; 6) The eruptive history ended with a subplinian eruption (<<26 ka), that generated a multilayered fall deposit, that developed a 11-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 2.9 x 106 kg/s and a magma volume of 0.26 km3. Volcanic activity at Guangoche volcano has been intense and future activity should not be discarded. Unfortunately, the last two events have not been dated yet. Guangoche rhyolitic magma is characterized by low-Ba contents suggesting crystal mush extraction for their genesis.

  13. Hazard assessment of long-range tephra dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico). Inplications on civil aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonasia, R.; Scaini, C.; Capra, L.; Nathenson, M.; Siebe, C.; Arana-Salinas, L.; Folch, A.

    2013-12-01

    Popocatépetl is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude. The current volcanic hazards map, reconstructed after the crisis occurred in 1994, considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra dispersal hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is strongly required. In this work we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels. Tephra dispersal modelling is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the 'Ochre Pumice' Plinian eruption (4965 14C yrBP). FALL3D model input eruptive parameters are constrained through an inversion method carried out with the semi-analytical HAZMAP model and are varied sampling them on the base of a Probability Density Function. We analyze the influence of seasonal variations on ash dispersal and estimate the average persistence of critical ash concentrations at relevant locations and airports. This study assesses the impact that a Plinian eruption similar to the Ochre Pumice eruption would have on the main airports of Mexico and adjacent areas. The hazard maps presented here

  14. Analysis of Seismicity Related to the December 2002 - February 2003 Eruptions at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quezada-Reyes, A.; Valdes-Gonzalez, C.; Lesage, P.

    2007-05-01

    Since its reactivation in 1994 Popocatepetl Volcano has undergone several activity stages, some of which comprise cycles of intrusion, extrusion and destruction of a lava dome. Popocatepetl has produced up to several tens of daily long-period (LP) events and several volcanic tremor episodes, along with a few volcano-tectonic earthquakes. A lava dome was extruded on May 2002 and subsequently destroyed by 19 explosions from December 2002 to February 2003. The seismicity accompanying the destruction of the lava dome was dominated by long-period (LP) events and a mix of harmonic and spasmodic tremor. We analysed the seismity related to this explosive phase and classified the majority of LP events into three families according to their frequency content. Most of the LP events are characterized by a dominant frequency near 2 Hz throughout the eruptive period. Many events also exhibited a low-amplitude short-period (SP) phase ocurring a few seconds before the LP signal. The SP signal was not observed without the LP event, although several events occurred in the absence of the precursory signal. We also found a notably decrease of LP events activity prior to December 18, 2002 and February 14 to 28, 2003 explosive episodes. Three different types of tremor lasting from a few minutes to several hours were also observed: spasmodic, harmonic and a very low-amplitude pulse-like type of tremor, the latter occurring on November 11, 12 and 30 with a duration of about 120 minutes each. Harmonic tremor episodes lasted from a few minutes to a few hours and there was no tremor occurrence days before the explosive events. Tremor spectra display a fundamental frequency which can vary in the range 0.6-1.3 Hz within a one-hour-long series of tremor. Similar observations are obtained for the peak spacing of the harmonic tremor spectra. These variations may reflect short-term fluctuations of the acoustic properties of the source while no long-term evolutions of the LP sources are detected

  15. Very long-period signals associated with vulcanian explosions at Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.

    1999-01-01

    Very long period (VLP) seismic signals associated with large summit eruptions of Popocatepetl volcano in the last four years are investigated using data from a broadband seismometer (0.04-120 s) deployed on the north flank of the volcano at a radial distance of 5 km from the active crater. The VLP signals associated with individual eruptions share similar waveforms. Discrete VLP signals accompanying long-period (LP) events also share similar signatures and have dominant periods that are nearly identical to those observed in the VLP waveforms of explosions. The VLP particle motions for eruption onsets consistently point to a source located a few km beneath the crater. The VLP ground displacement response to each explosion is marked by a compression, followed by a dilatation and terminating with another compression, suggesting a sequence of pressurization-depressurization-repressurization of the conduit. The repetitive nature of the waveforms points to a non-destructive source process which has remained active in the magmatic system of Popocatepetl at least since April 1997.Very long period (VLP) seismic signals associated with large summit eruptions of Popocatepetl volcano in the last four years are investigated using data from a broadband seismometer (0.04-120 s) deployed on the north flank of the volcano at a radial distance of 5 km from the active crater. The VLP signals associated with individual eruptions share similar waveforms. Discrete VLP signals accompanying long-period (LP) events also share similar signatures and have dominant periods that are nearly identical to those observed in the VLP waveforms of explosions. The VLP particle motions for eruption onsets consistently point to a source located a few km beneath the crater. The VLP ground displacement response to each explosion is marked by a compression, followed by a dilatation and terminating with another compression, suggesting a sequence of pressurization-depressurization-repressurization of the

  16. Comparison of Eruptive Processes of the years 1903 and 2015 of the Colima Volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, A.; Suarez, G. B. V.; Arreola-Ochoa, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Colima volcano eruption processes during the months of January - July 2015, was characterized by two types of activity: From January to May we registered 923 exhalations and smaller explosions. Having up to 31 events per day, the columns of ash reached an altitude between 4500 and 7000 masl. Each event frequently averaging between 50 and 500 meters from about 442 or 48% of the total events this period. The reports of falling ash came from as far as the city of Salamanca at 278 km to the NE. The intense activity destroyed the original dome forming a new one with an elliptical crater 224 m by 166 m and 35 m deep. On May 15 we observed the growth of a new dome. On July 4, this created the falling of rocks along the slopes and the formation of three Andesitic lava flows at the N, SW and S flanks. By July 11 the volume of lava extruded was about 6 x106 m3, with a rate extrusion of 1.21 m3per sec. 2. Based on three flyby observations, it was noted that the lava flows on the S and SW sectors had a higher extrusion rate in the N sector. The first two were placed on a slope with an average gradient of 36º, while on the northern slope gradient is 23º, as a result of the interaction of extrusion speed, slope and height of the lava front, there were constant landslides, causing at least 4 Merapi type pyroclastic flows, that flowed by the gullies of Montegrande and San Antonio. The first flow reached distances of 7 km and 10.4 km. It is the largest lava flow recorded since January 20, 1913. The devastating results were the burning of 500 meters of the Templado Forest, burning along the Montegrande Creek and finally affecting many crops and livestock. This type of activity already had shown in 1975 and 1991 by the lava flow and S NE flank where the pyroclastic flows had no destructive effects, except for some small fires in forested areas at the base of the volcano (Thorpe, et al, 1977). In March 1903 Colima volcano showed similar activity per Arreola J. and Diaz Severo

  17. Volcanic Risk Perception in Five Communities Located near the Chichón Volcano, Northern Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Chichón volcano (17° 19’ N and 93° 15’ W) is located in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. This volcano is classified by UNESCO as one of the ten most dangerous volcanos in the world. The eruptions of March and April in 1982 affected at least 51 communities located in the surroundings of the volcano and caused the death of about 2000 people. In this work we evaluate the risk perception in five communities highly populated: Juárez, Ostuacán, Pichucalco, Reforma and Sunuapa. We selected these communities because they have a high possibility to be affected by a volcanic eruption in the future. Our survey was carried out during February and March 2006. A total of 222 families were interviewed using a questionnaire to measure risk perception. These questionnaires retrieved general information as how long people had been living there and their reasons to do so; their experiences during the 1982 events, their opinion about the authorities participation and their perception of volcanic risk; the plans of the community for disaster prevention and mitigation. Some of the most important results are: (1). People perceive a very low volcanic risk and the 70% of interviewees believe that a new eruption in the future is almost improbable because it happened in 1982. This result is particularly interesting because, according to the state government, more than 100,000 inhabitants will be directly affected in case of a new similar eruption; (2). About 95% of the population do not know the current activity of the volcano and consider that the authorities do not inform properly to their communities; (3). The response of the authorities during the events of 1982 was ranked as deficient mainly because they were unable provide shelters, storage facilities, food as well as medicine and health care access; (4). Approximately 60% of the community will accept to be re-located again in case of a new eruption; (5). About 70% of the population will not accept to be re-located because

  18. The ongoing dome emplacement and destruction cyclic process at Popocatépetl volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vazquez, Angel; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing eruptive activity of Popocatépetl volcano has been characterized by emplacement and subsequent destruction of a succession of lava domes. Between the onset of the current eruption in 1994 and the time of this submission, 38 episodes of lava dome formation and removal have been identified. Each dome has showed particular features related to the magma extrusion process. Among other manifestations, dome-emplacement events have been usually accompanied by relatively low-intensity, protracted explosions referred to as exhalations. After variable times of residence, emplacements have ended in partial or total destruction of the domes by strong vulcanian explosions that produced sizeable ash plumes, with most of them also ejecting incandescent debris onto the volcano flanks. Here, we present a detailed account for the observed activity related to the domes' growth and destruction, related seismic monitoring signals, and morphological features of the domes based on 19 years of visual observations and image analysis. We then discuss a model for the process of dome growth and destruction and its hazard implications.

  19. Kinematics and age of Early Tertiary trench parallel volcano-tectonic lineaments in southern Mexico: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Ferrari, L.; Lopez Martinez, M.; Cerca Martinez, M.; Serrano Duran, L.

    2007-05-01

    We present new geological, structural, and geochronological data that constrain the timing and geometry of Early Tertiary strike slip deformation in southwestern Mexico and its relation with the concurrent magmatic activity. Geologic mapping in Guerrero and Michoacan States documented two regional WNW trending volcano-tectonic lineaments sub parallel to the present trench. The southernmost lineament runs for ~140 km from San Miguel Totolapan area (NW Guerrero) to Sanchiqueo (SE Michoacan), and passes through Ciudad Altamirano. Its southeastern part is marked by the alignment of at least eleven silicic to intermediate major domes as well as by the course of the Balsas River. The northwestern part of the lineament is characterized by ductile left lateral shear zones in Early Tertiary plutonic rocks observed in the Rio Chiquito valley. Domes near Ciudad Altamirano are unaffected by ductile shearing and yielded a ~42 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age, setting a minimum age for this deformation. The northern volcano-tectonic lineament runs for ~190 km between the areas of Huitzuco in northern Guerrero and the southern part of the Tzitzio fold in eastern Michoacan. The Huautla, Tilzapotla, Taxco, La Goleta and Nanchititla silicic centers (all in the range 37-34 Ma) are emplaced along this lineament, which continues to the WNW trough a mafic dike swarm exposed north of Tiquicheo (37-35 Ma) and the Purungueo subvolcanic body (~42 Ma). These rocks, unaffected by ductile shearing, give a minimum age of deformation similar to the southern Totolapan-Sanquicheo lineament. Post ~42 Ma deformation is essentially brittle and is characterized by several left lateral and right lateral transcurrent faults with typical Riedel patterns. Other trench-parallel left lateral shear zones active in pre-Oligocene times were recently reported in western Oaxaca. The recognizing of Early Tertiary trench-parallel and left-lateral ductile shearing in internal areas of southern Mexico suggest a field of widely

  20. Geomorphic assessment of the debris avalanche deposit from the Jocotitlán volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Sergio; López-Blanco, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    Edifice collapse of the Jocotitlán volcano produced a debris avalanche deposit whose morphology is characterized by conical hummocks and elongated ridges. We consulted aerial photographs, orthophotographs, and conducted field work to define field relationships between mound morphology and stratigraphy. Based on field evidence and geomorphic and geologic interpretation we sub-divide the deposit into three sectors (north, northeastern, and eastern). We determine the emplacement mechanisms of the different sectors based on their distinct morphologic and lithologic features. In this context, we generate a geomorphometric database comprising 17 variables for each mound and apply multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) to define the relationships between them. The principal components incorporated 73% of the total data variance and seven geomorphometric variables (perimeter, major axis, area, height, distance to the source, axis ratio and circularity index) defined two groups: hummocks and ridges. The circularity index and the axis ratio best characterize the elongated form of hummocks composing the deposits. Contrasts in lithological characteristics, such as material strength and mobility, provide evidence for a transition from a sliding mass (debris avalanche deposit) to a debris-flow-like emplacement. Differences in deposit morphology suggest two collapse mechanisms: magmatic intrusion (Bezymianny-type sector collapse) and a tectonic mass-slide, an earthquake could provide the trigger for both collapses. The eastern lower flank of the volcano then collapsed gravitationally due to a movement along a fault (tectonic activity possibly related to the Acambay-Tixmadeje Fault System). This produced the northeastern sector of the debris avalanche deposit dominated by large elongated ridges. The spatial arrangement of both sectors (the N and NE) suggests that the two failure events occurred simultaneously. Finally, the eastern

  1. Monitoring of volcanic emissions for risk assessment at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Hugo; Campion, Robin; Fickel, Matthias; Cortés Ramos, Jorge; Alvarez Nieves, José Manuel; Taquet, Noemi; Grutter, Michel; Osiris García Gómez, Israel; Darío Sierra Mondragón, Rubén; Meza Hernández, Israel

    2015-04-01

    In January 2014, the Mexican Agency FOPREDEN (Natural Disaster Prevention Fund) accepted to fund a project to renew, upgrade and complement the gas monitoring facilities. The UNAM-CENAPRED (National Center for Disaster Prevention) gas monitoring system currently consists of: • A COSPEC instrument and two mini-DOAS used for mobile traverse measurements • An SO2 camera used for punctual campaign • A network of three permanent scanning mini-DOAS (NOVAC type 1 instrument) and one permanent mini-DOAS (NOVAC type II, currently under repair). The activity planed in the framework of the new project, of which several of them are already successfully implemented, include: • Completely refurbished permanent scanning mini-DOAS network consisting of four stations and the punctual deployment of three RADES (Rapid Deployment System) for assessing plume geometry and chemistry or for responding to emergency situations. • Prolongation of the mobile traverse measurements in order to continuously update the 20 years-long SO2 flux database obtained with the COSPEC, now coupled with a mobile DOAS for redundancy. • The development and installation of a permanent SO2 camera, for monitoring in real time the short timescale variations of the SO2 emissions. • The installation of two permanent FTIR spectrometers, one measuring the plume thermal emissions and the other measuring with the solar occultation geometry, for frequent measurements of molecular ratio between SO2, HCl, HF and SiF4 • The exploitation in near-real time of the satellite imagery (OMI, MODIS and ASTER) available for the volcano. A special attention will be paid to increase the reliability and graphical representation of these data stream in order to facilitate their use for decision-making by the civil protection authority in charge of the volcano.

  2. Temporal and spectral characteristics of seismicity observed at Popocatepetl volcano, central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Valdes-Gonzalez, C.; Dawson, P.

    2000-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano entered an eruptive phase from December 21, 1994 to March 30, 1995, which was characterized by ash and fumarolic emissions. During this eruptive episode, the observed seismicity consisted of volcano-tectonic (VT) events, long-period (LP) events and sustained tremor. Before the initial eruption on December 21, VT seismicity exhibited no increase in number until a swarm of VT earthquakes was observed at 01:31 hours local time. Visual observations of the eruption occurred at dawn the next morning. LP activity increased from an average of 7 events a day in October 1994 to 22 events per day in December 1994. At the onset of the eruption, LP activity peaked at 49 events per day. LP activity declined until mid-January 1995 when no events were observed. Tremor was first observed about one day after the initial eruption and averaged 10 h per episode. By late February 1995, tremor episodes became more intermittent, lasting less than 5 min, and the number of LP events returned to pre-eruption levels (7 events per day). Using a spectral ratio technique, low-frequency oceanic microseismic noise with a predominant peak around 7 s was removed from the broadband seismic signal of tremor and LP events. Stacks of corrected tremor episodes and LP events show that both tremor and LP events contain similar frequency features with major peaks around 1.4 Hz. Frequency analyses of LP events and tremor suggest a shallow extended source with similar radiation pattern characteristics. The distribution of VT events (between 2.5 and 10 km) also points to a shallow source of the tremor and LP events located in the first 2500 m beneath the crater. Under the assumption that the frequency characteristics of the signals are representative of an oscillator we used a fluid-filled-crack model to infer the length of the resonator.

  3. The January 22, 2001, scoria flow produced at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, J.; Arce, J.; Gardner, J.; Garcia, F.; Castillo, J.

    2006-12-01

    After several days of intense seismic activity and dome grow formation at Popocatépetl`s crater, an explosive event took place on January 22, 2001, that produced a 8-km-high ash column with the sudden generation of a dense pyroclastic flow that immediately separated in two main parts to the NE and N portions of the crater. 1) The NE flow moved along the N-NE flanks of the volcano on top of loose debris and old lava flows forming different lobes, the largest of which, reached up to 6.5 km from the crater; 2) The N flow moved across the N-flank of the volcano that was covered with a glacier, to be then chanalized into the Tetenepanco ravine moving on top of old lavas, and moraine layers, and reaching as far as 5 km from the crater. The latter flow partially melted the glacier producing a debris flow that reached the town of Xalitzintla located at 15 km from the summit. As a whole, the pyroclastic flow deposits have a maximum thickness of 3 m, and lateral and frontal levees up to 1 m. The deposits vary from block-supported to matrix-supported massive beds with juvenile blocks. The components of the deposits are, in order of abundance, black scoria (~54 wt% SiO2) > banded scoria > pumice (~63 wt% SiO2) > accidental, dense lithics and > crystals. Scoria blocks have cauliflower shapes with external chilled margins. The mineral assemblage of the juvenile clasts are phenocrysts of plagioclase (An47±10), clinopyroxene (En48±3), orthopyroxene (En64±1), ilmenite, and titanomagnetite, set in a rhyolitic glass (pumice clast; 74.39 wt% SiO2) or microlite-rich matrix (scoria clast). The dense lithics also contain rare olivine phenocrysts (Fe2+/(Fe2++Mg) = 0.1). Ilmenite-titanomagnetite geothermometer indicates that prior to the eruption, both the pumice and scoria melts were equilibrated at a temperature of 938 ± 13° C and log oxygen fugacity of -10.27 ± 0.2.

  4. Long-range hazard assessment of volcanic ash dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): implications for civil aviation safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonasia, Rosanna; Scaini, Chiara; Capra, Lucia; Nathenson, Manuel; Siebe, Claus; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Folch, Arnau

    2014-01-01

    Popocatépetl is one of Mexico's most active volcanoes threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude, the last two of which destroyed human settlements in pre-Hispanic times. Popocatépetl's reawakening in 1994 produced a crisis that culminated with the evacuation of two villages on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Shortly after, a monitoring system and a civil protection contingency plan based on a hazard zone map were implemented. The current volcanic hazards map considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. The presence of airborne volcanic ash at low and jet-cruise atmospheric levels compromises the safety of aircraft operations and forces re-routing of aircraft to prevent encounters with volcanic ash clouds. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is required. In this work, we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels, corresponding to the situation defined in Europe during 2010, and still under discussion. Tephra dispersal mode is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the "Ochre Pumice" Plinian eruption (4965 14C yr BP

  5. Glacier retreat during the recent eruptive period of Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, Nuria; Zamorano, José J.; Sanjosé, José J.; Atkinson, Alan; Palacios, David

    Popocatépetl (19°02‧ N, 98°62‧ W; 5424 m) is one of the largest active stratovolcanoes in the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. A glacier located on the north side has undergone severe ablation since the volcano reinitiated eruptive activity in December 1994. In our study, we calculate the extent of the glacier recession and the loss in glacial mass balance during the period of greatest laharic activity (1994-2002), using photogrammetric treatment of 20 pairs of aerial photographs. The results indicate that from November 1997 to December 2002, the glacier released approximately 3 967 000 m3 of water. A period of intense glacier melting occurred from 4 November 2000 to 15 March 2001 during which time 717 000 m3 of water was released. Much of the melting was attributed to the pyroclastic flow that took place on 22 January 2001 and produced a 14.2 km lahar with 68 000 m3 of water. Among the many types of volcanic events, pyroclastic flows were the most effective in causing sudden snowmelt, although small explosions were also effective since they deposited incandescent material on the glacier. The collapse of the plinian columns covered the glacier with pyroclasts and increased its volume. The existence of control points for georeferencing and a knowledge of the topography underlying the glacier previous to the eruption would have provided more accurate and useful results for hazard prevention.

  6. The Large-Scale Debris Avalanche From The Tancitaro Volcano (Mexico): Characterization And Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, S.; Gigli, G.; Falorni, G.; Garduno Monroy, V. H.; Arreygue, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Tancitaro is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Michoacán Guanajuato volcanic field within the west-central portion of the trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this area is characterized by two composite volcanoes, the highest of which is the Tancitaro volcanic edifice (3840 m), some low angle lava cones and more than 1,000 monogenetic cinder cones. The distribution of the cinder cones is controlled by NE-SW active faults, although there are also additional faults with NNW-SSE trends along which some cones are aligned. The Tancitaro stratovolcano is located at the intersection of the tectonical structures that originate these alignments. All this geological activity has contributed to the gravitational instability of the volcano, leading to a huge sector collapse which produced the investigated debris avalanche. The collapse structure is an east-facing horseshoe-shaped crater (4 km wide and 5.3 km long), related with a large fan that was deposited within the Tepalcatepec depression. The deposit starts only 7 km downslope from the failure scar, it is 66 km long and covers an area of approximately 1155 km2. The landslide magnitude is about 20 km3 and it was firstly determined by the reconstruction of the paleo-edifice using a GIS software and then validated by the observation of significant outcrops. The fan was primarily formed by the deposit of this huge debris avalanche and subsequently by debris flow and fluvial deposits. Field investigations on the fan area highlighted the presence of two texturally distinct parts, which are referred to the 'block facies' and the 'matrix facies'. The first sedimentary structure is responsible for the typical hummock morphologies in the proximal area, as seen in many other debris avalanche deposits. Instead in the distal zones, the deposit is made up by the 'mixed block and matrix facies'. Blocks and megablocks, some of which are characterized by a jigsaw puzzle texture, gradually decrease in size

  7. Magma mixing, recharge and eruption histories recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts from El Chichon Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J., III; Davidson, J.P.; Tilling, R.I.; Arth, Joseph G.

    2000-01-01

    Consistent core-to-rim decreases of 87Sr/86Sr ratios and coincident increases in Sr concentrations in plagioclase phenocrysts of varying size (~ 1 cm to 2 mm) are reported from samples of the 1982 and pre-1982 (~ 200 ka) eruptions of El Chichon Volcano. Maximum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7054, significantly higher than the whole-rock isotopic ratios (~ 0.7040-0.7045), are found in the cores of plagioclase phenocrysts, and minimum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7039 are found near some of the rims. Plagioclase phenocrysts commonly display abrupt fluctuations in An content (up to 25 mol %) that correspond to well-developed dissolution surfaces The isotopic, textural and compositional characteristics suggest that these plagioclase phenocrysts grew in a system that was periodically recharged by higher-temperature magma with a lower 87Sr/86Sr ratio and a higher Sr concentration. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios in plagioclase phenocrysts of rocks from the 200 ka eruption indicate that, at that time, the magma had already attained the lowest recorded 87Sr/86Sr value of the system (~ 0.7039). In contrast, cores from plagioclase phenocrysts of the 1982 eruption, inferred to have grown in the past few thousand years, have the highest recorded 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the system. Collectively, the Sr isotopic data (for plagioclase and whole rock), disequilibrium textural features of the phenocrysts, known eruption frequencies, and inferred crystal-residence times of the plagioclases are best interpreted in terms of an intermittent magma chamber model. Similar processes, including crustal contamination, magma mixing, periodic recharge by addition of more mafic magma to induce plagioclase disequilibrium (possibly triggering eruption) and subsequent re-equilibration, apparently were operative throughout the 200 ky history of the El Chichon magma system.

  8. Eruptive activity of enigmatic medium-sized volcanoes in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF), Central Mexico: The case of El Metate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrel, M.; Siebe, C.; Guilbaud, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    The MGVF has a total area of ca. 40,000 km2 and is well known for being the host of the only two monogenetic volcanoes in Mexico that were born in historical times: Jorullo (1759-1774) and Paricutin (1943-1952). Another particularity of the MGVF is its high number of eruptive vents with over 1000 small monogenetic cones and associated lava flows (average vol. of 0.021 km3) and ca. 400 medium-sized volcanoes (average vol. from 0.5 to 50 km3). Most of these medium-sized volcanoes may be characterized as shields that were produced dominantly by effusive activity as opposed to the small cones formed also by explosive phases of activity. The products of the small cones range from olivine basalts to andesites whereas the medium-sized volcanoes are restricted to a smaller compositional range in the andesitic domain. Although the medium-sized volcanoes are more sparsely distributed in time and space and less abundant than the small cones, the risks associated with renewal of this type of activity should not be neglected. This study focuses on El Metate which is probably the youngest shield of the MGVF (< 3,700 y. BP). Unlike a typical shield volcano composed of a succession of thin fluid basaltic flows, El Metate consists of well-preserved >60 m thick andesite flows distributed radially around a summit dome. Detailed mapping and sampling allowed us to reconstruct its eruptive activity and the time sequence of lava flow emplacement. We have identified 13 individual lava flows with lengths ranging between 3 and 15 km covering 103 km2 and average thicknesses between 60 and 150 m. Individual volumes range between 0.5 and 3.5 km3 for a total of 11 to 15 km3. Estimates of flow emplacement parameters indicate maximum average effusion rates ranging between 15 and 100 m3.s-1 and a cumulative duration from 15 to 30 years. Such a short emplacement time is comparable to the historical monogenetic eruption of nearby Paricutin volcano (9 years) but the erupted volume of lava is

  9. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling of volcanic debris flows: Application to Huiloac Gorge lahars (Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David; Pastor, Manuel; Zamorano, José Juan

    2016-09-01

    Lahars are among the most catastrophic volcanic processes, and the ability to model them is central to mitigating their effects. Several lahars recently generated by the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) moved downstream through the Huiloac Gorge towards the village of Santiago Xalitzintla. The most dangerous was the 2001 lahar, in which the destructive power of the debris flow was maintained throughout the extent of the flow. Identifying the zone of hazard can be based either on numerical or empirical models, but a calibration and validation process is required to ensure hazard map quality. The Geoflow-SPH depth integrated numerical model used in this study to reproduce the 2001 lahar was derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model, and was discretized using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The results of the calibrated SPH model were validated by comparing the simulated deposit depth with the field depth measured at 16 cross sections distributed strategically along the gorge channel. Moreover, the dependency of the results on topographic mesh resolution, initial lahar mass shape and dimensions is also investigated. The results indicate that to accurately reproduce the 2001 lahar flow dynamics the channel topography needed to be discretized using a mesh having a minimum 5 m resolution, and an initial lahar mass shape that adopted the source area morphology. Field validation of the calibrated model showed that there was a satisfactory relationship between the simulated and field depths, the error being less than 20% for 11 of the 16 cross sections. This study demonstrates that the Geoflow-SPH model was able to accurately reproduce the lahar path and the extent of the flow, but also reproduced other parameters including flow velocity and deposit depth.

  10. Long-range hazard assessment of volcanic ash dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): implications for civil aviation safety

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonasia, Rosanna; Scaini, Chirara; Capra, Lucia; Nathenson, Manuel; Siebe, Claus; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Folch, Arnau

    2013-01-01

    Popocatépetl is one of Mexico’s most active volcanoes threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene–Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude, the last two of which destroyed human settlements in pre-Hispanic times. Popocatépetl’s reawakening in 1994 produced a crisis that culminated with the evacuation of two villages on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Shortly after, a monitoring system and a civil protection contingency plan based on a hazard zone map were implemented. The current volcanic hazards map considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. The presence of airborne volcanic ash at low and jet-cruise atmospheric levels compromises the safety of aircraft operations and forces re-routing of aircraft to prevent encounters with volcanic ash clouds. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is required. In this work, we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels, corresponding to the situation defined in Europe during 2010, and still under discussion. Tephra dispersal mode is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the “Ochre Pumice” Plinian eruption (4965 14C

  11. Lahar flow simulations using LAHARZ program: Application for the Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Salinas, E.; Castillo-Rodríguez, M.; Manea, V.; Manea, M.; Palacios, D.

    2009-05-01

    Lahars are a type of catastrophic event that is generated in volcanic environments. Due to the recent technological advances computer simulated models have become widely used by the scientific community to predict the distribution of catastrophic events, such as floods, debris avalanches, earth landslides or lahars, and to mitigate possible damage to populations located in a risk area. Our study risk area is located in the Popocatépetl volcano, a large and active stratovolcano in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Here, lahars have been occurring during the last century, and some of them have seriously affected nearby towns. Since one of the main input parameters into a lahar simulation is the Digital Elevation Model (DEM), this paper focuses on studying lahar simulations on Popocatépetl using DEMs obtained from various sources with the aid of a popular package known as LAHARZ. The first simulations were performed using a 1:50,000 topographic map with 20-m contours interval. The second set of tests used an enhanced DEM with profiles measured during fieldwork in the lahar channel. In the last set of tests, we added lateral artificial barriers to the channel profiles used in the previous enhanced DEM. Our results show that the use of high resolution and detailed DEMs does not necessarily guarantee a realistic lahar simulation as was previously thought, and a detailed explanation as to why the LAHARZ code computation creates ragged edges is offered. Our results also offer useful information on the level of detail necessary for an input DEM into LAHARZ in order to obtain lahar simulations closer to real lahars. The minimum resolution for the DEM used in simulations must be less than the width of the narrowest cross-section of the channel to realistically reproduce the lahars. For DEMs with lower resolution, sometimes the modeled lahars are shorter in length, and therefore underestimate real hazards to populations. Also, the results show that lateral barriers are

  12. Late Holocene stratigraphy of the Tetimpa archaeological sites, northeast flank of Popocatepetl volcano, central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panfil, M.S.; Gardner, T.W.; Hirth, K.G.

    1999-01-01

    Late Holocene (240 km2 on the east side of the volcano with >25 cm of tephra. Lavas from eruptive sequence I dammed drainage in the lowland area near the town of San Nicolas and caused local upstream deposition of as much as 30 m of lacustrine silts, clays, and sands. These lacustrine deposits record an eruptive hiatus for the Tetimpa area of about 750 14C yr: between ca. 2100 and ca. 1350 yr B.P., no major tephras were deposited in the Tetimpa area. In upland areas, this time period is represented by an unconformity and by Entisols formed in the top of pumice deposits and lavas from eruptive sequence I. Artifacts, agricultural furrows, and dwellings record human reoccupation of this surface. At the end of this hiatus, several lahars were deposited above the lacustrine sequence and locally above the Entisol in upland positions adjacent to streams. Between ca. 1350 and ca. 1200 yr B.P., tephras from eruptive sequence II buried these paleosols, occupation sites, lacustrine sediments, and lahars. Andesitic (~62% SiO2) pumice lapilli deposits in the Tetimpa area record three pumice-fall eruptions directed northeast and east of the crater. The first and smallest of these (maximum Tetimpa area thickness = 12 cm; >52 km2 covered by >25 cm) took place at ca. 1350 yr B.P. and was accompanied by pyroclastic surge events preserved in the Tetimpa area by charcoal, sand waves, and cross-stratified sand-sized tephra. At ca. 1200 yr B.P., the products of two Plinian-style events and additional pyroclastic surges reached the Tetimpa area. The largest of these tephra-fall events covered the Tetimpa area with 0.5-1 m of tephra and blanketed an area of >230 km2 with a thickness of >25 cm. The Tetimpa record confirms two of the four periods of explosive volcanism recognized by studies conducted around Popocatepetl in the past 30 yr. Eruptive sequence I corresponds to the explosive period between 2100 and 2500 yr B.P., and eruptive sequence II corresponds to the period between 900 and

  13. Glacier melting during lava dome growth at Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico): Evidences of a major threat before main eruptive phases at ice-caped volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, L.; Roverato, M.; Groppelli, G.; Caballero, L.; Sulpizio, R.; Norini, G.

    2015-03-01

    Nevado de Toluca volcano is one of the largest stratovolcanoes in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. During Late Pleistocene its activity was characterized by large dome growth and subsequent collapse emplacing large block and ash flow deposits, intercalated by Plinian eruptions. Morphological and paleoclimate studies at Nevado de Toluca and the surrounding area evidenced that the volcano was affected by extensive glaciation during Late Pleistocene and Holocene. During the older recognized glacial period (27-60 ka, MIS 3), the glacier was disturbed by the intense magmatic and hydrothermal activity related to two dome extrusion episodes (at 37 ka and 28 ka). Glacier reconstruction indicates maximum ice thickness of 90 m along main valleys, as at the Cano ravines, the major glacial valley on the northern slope of the volcano. Along this ravine, both 37 and 28 ka block-and-ash deposits are exposed, and they directly overlay a fluviatile sequence, up to 40 m-thick, which 14C ages clearly indicate that their emplacement occurred just before the dome collapsed. These evidences point to a clear interaction between the growing dome and its hydrothermal system with the glacier. During dome growth, a large amount of melting water was released along major glacial valleys forming thick fluvioglacial sequences that were subsequently covered by the block-and-ash flow deposits generated by the collapse of the growing dome. Even though this scenario is no longer possible at the Nevado de Toluca volcano, the data presented here indicate that special attention should be paid to the possible inundation areas from fluviatile/lahar activity prior to the main magmatic eruption at ice-capped volcanoes.

  14. Petroleum degradation and associated microbial signatures at the Chapopote asphalt volcano, Southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Kasten, Sabine; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Zabel, Matthias; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    At the Chapopote Knoll in the Southern Gulf of Mexico, deposits of asphalt provide the substrate for a prolific cold seep ecosystem extensively colonized by chemosynthetic communities. This study investigates microbial life and associated biological processes within the asphalts and surrounding oil-impregnated sediments by analysis of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs), petroleum hydrocarbons and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ 13C) of hydrocarbon gases. Asphalt samples are lightly to heavily biodegraded suggesting that petroleum-derived hydrocarbons serve as substrates for the chemosynthetic communities. Accordingly, detection of bacterial diester and diether phospholipids in asphalt samples containing finely dispersed gas hydrate suggests the presence of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Biological methanogenesis contributes a substantial fraction to the methane captured as hydrate in the shallow asphalt deposits evidenced by significant depletion in 13C relative to background thermogenic methane. In sediments, petroleum migrating from the subsurface stimulates both methanogenesis and methanotrophy at a sulfate-methane transition zone 6-7 m below the seafloor. In this zone, microbial IPLs are dominated by archaeal phosphohydroxyarchaeols and archaeal diglycosidic diethers and tetraethers. Bacterial IPLs dominate surface sediments that are impregnated by severely biodegraded oil. In the sulfate-reduction zone, diagnostic IPLs indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in petroleum degradation. A diverse mixture of phosphohydroxyarchaeols and mixed phospho- and diglycosidic archaeal tetraethers in shallow oil-impregnated sediments point to the presence of anaerobic methane-oxidizing ANME-2 and ANME-1 archaea, respectively, or methanogens. Archaeal IPLs increase in relative abundance with increasing sediment depth and decreasing sulfate concentrations, accompanied by a shift of archaeol-based to tetraether-based archaeal IPLs. The

  15. Renewed Volcano-Stratigraphc Studies of Calderas with Geothermal Potential in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, J. L.; Arce, J. L.; García-Tenorio, F.; Layer, P. W.; Saucedo, R.; Castro, R.; Garduño, V. H.; Jimenez, A.; Pérez, H.; Valdez, G.; Meriggi, L.

    2014-12-01

    During the past six years we have carried out volcanologic fieldwork either in active geothermal fields in Mexico (Los Azufres, Tres Vírgenes, and Cerro Prieto) or in potential sites in which some geothermal exploration studied had been done by the National Power Company (CFE). These studies have been very successful in reassessing the location of the geothermal reservoirs within the volcanic successions through detailed mapping of the volcanic units using high resolution topography and satellite imagery to produce 3-D imagery in conjunction with field work to produce preliminary geologic maps. Detailed stratigraphy of volcanic units, assisted with 40Ar/39Ar and radiocarbon geochronology have redefined the evolution of some of these complexes. For example, our studies at Los Azufres geothermal field located in the State of Michoacán indicate that the volcanic complex of the same name sits upon a structural high transected by E-W faults related to the youngest structures of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanic complex has been emplaced during the past ~1.5 Ma. During this time, magmas evolved from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition with the emplacement of circa 100 vents. Several landforms have undergone intense hydrothermal alteration and, in some cases, generated debris avalanches. The revised stratigraphy based on drill holes and new dates of cores suggested that the geothermal reservoir is hosted in Miocene rocks bracketed between the Miocene Sierra de Mil Cumbres volcanics (17-22 Ma) and the products of the volcanic field itself. Similar studies will be carried out at four other Pleistocene calderas (Acoculco, La Primavera, Aguajito and Reforma) attempting to refine their volcanic stratigraphy, evolution, and the location of the geothermal system, and those results will help in the design of exploration strategies for geothermal sources.

  16. Crater lake and post-eruption hydrothermal activity, El Chichón Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; de la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Rose, William I., Jr.; Bagley, Susan; Finnegan, David L.; Zoller, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Explosive eruptions of Volcán El Chichón in Chiapas, Mexico on March 28 and April 3–4, 1982 removed 0.2 km3 of rock to form a 1-km-wide 300-m-deep summit crater. By late April 1982 a lake had begun to form on the crater floor, and by November 1982 it attained a maximum surface area of 1.4 × 105 m2 and a volume of 5 × 106 m3. Accumulation of 4–5 m of rainfall between July and October 1982 largely formed the lake. In January 1983, temperatures of fumaroles on the crater floor and lower crater walls ranged from 98 to 115°C; by October 1983 the maximum temperature of fumarole emissions was 99°C. In January 1983 fumarole gas emissions were greater than 99 vol. % H2O with traces of CO2, SO2, and H2S. The water of the lake was a hot (T = 52–58°C), acidic (pH = 0.5), dilute solution (34,046 mg L−1 dissolved solids; Cl/S = 20.5). Sediment from the lake contains the same silicate minerals as the rocks of the 1982 pyroclastic deposits, together with less than 1% of elemental sulfur. The composition and temperature of the lake water is attributed to: (1) solution of fumarole emissions; (2) reaction of lake water with hot rocks beneath the lake level; (3) sediments washed into the lake from the crater walls; (4) hydrothermal fluids leaching sediments and formational waters in sedimentary rocks of the basement; (5) evaporation; and (6) precipitation.

  17. Size, distribution, and magma output rate for shield volcanoes of the Michoacán-Guanajuato volcanic field, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenaka, T.

    1994-10-01

    The Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF), in the west-central Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), contains nearly 400 medium-sized volcanoes in addition to 1000 small monogenetic cones. The area is distinct from other parts of the MVB, where large composite volcanoes predominate. Shield volcanoes are dominant among medium-sized volcanoes, which also include minor lava domes and composite volcanoes. The location, height, basal diameter, and crater diameter (when applicable) of 378 medium-sized volcanoes were catalogued, and the slope angles and volumes were calculated from these data. The median shield volcano has a height of 340 m, a basal diameter of 4100 m, an average slope angle of 9.4°, and a volume of 1.7 km 3. The shield volcanoes in the MGVF are similar in size to Icelandic-type shield volcanoes, but the former have much higher slope angles and smaller basal diameters than the latter. Within the MGVF, these medium-sized volcanoes are located between 190 km and 430 km from the Middle America Trench; the distribution area is similar to that of small cones, but clusters and alignments are not as obvious for the medium-sized cones. The shield density is highest between 270 and 280 km from the Middle America Trench, 20 km farther than the density maximum for small cones. Ten medium-sized volcanoes were considered younger than 40,000 yr B.P. from lava flow morphology. The slope angle and a ratio of height to basal diameter are not useful age indicators, because they seem to reflect difference in original shield shape. K-Ar ages of shield volcanoes reveal that the volcanoes located north of latitude 19°55'N were active between 1 Ma and 3 Ma, whereas those south of latitude 19°55'N were active since 1 Ma. The average volcanic output rate estimated for the last 1 Ma is 0.7 km 3/1000 yr., whereas that for the period of 1-3 Ma is 0.2 km 3/1000 yr. An increase in magma production occurred around 1 Ma in response to migration of volcanism and probably to a change in

  18. Assessing landslide susceptibility, hazards and sediment yield in the Río El Estado watershed, Pico de Orizaba volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Lugo Hubp, J.; Aceves Quesada, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    This work provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT # 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, analyze the distribution of landslides, and characterize landforms that are prone to slope instability by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The study area is the Río El Estado watershed that covers 5.2 km2 and lies on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano.The watershed was studied by using aerial photographs, fieldwork, and adaptation of the Landslide Hazard Zonation Protocol of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, USA. 107 gravitational slope failures of six types were recognized: shallow landslides, debris-avalanches, deep-seated landslides, debris flows, earthflows, and rock falls. This analysis divided the watershed into 12 mass-wasting landforms on which gravitational processes occur: inner gorges, headwalls, active scarps of deep-seated landslides, meanders, plains, rockfalls, non-rule-identified inner gorges, non-rule-identified headwalls, non-rule-identified converging hillslopes and three types of hillslopes classified by their gradient: low, moderate, and high. For each landform the landslide area rate and the landslide frequency rate were calculated as well as the overall hazard rating. The slope-stability hazard rating has a range that goes from low to very high. The overall hazard rating for this watershed was very high. The shallow slide type landslide was selected and area and volume of individual landslides were retrieved from the watershed landslide inventory geo-database, to establish an empirical relationship between area and volume that takes the form of a power law. The relationship was used to estimate the total volume of landslides in the study area. The findings are important to understand the long-term evolution of the southwestern flank stream system of Pico de

  19. Stratigraphic reconstruction of the 13 ka BP debris avalanche deposit at Colima volcano (Mexico): effect of climatic conditions on the flow mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, M.; Capra, L.

    2010-12-01

    Colima volcano is an andesitic stratovolcano located in the western part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and at the southern end of the N-S trending Colima graben, about 70 km from the Pacific Ocean coast. It is probably the most active Mexican volcano in historic time and one of the most active of North America. Colima volcano yielded numerous partial edifice collapses with emplacement of debris avalanche deposits (DADs) of contrasting volume, morphology, texture and origin. This work has the aim to provide the evidences of how the climatic condition during the 13 ka flank collapse of the Colima volcano affected the textural characteristic and the mobility of the debris avalanche and debris flow originated from this event that occurred just after the Last Glacial Maximum in Mexico (18.4-14.5 ka 14C BP with snow line at 3600 m a.s.l. up to 13 ka BP). The 13,000 yrs old debris avalanche deposit, here named Tonila (TDAD) presents the typical debris avalanche textural characteristics (angular to sub-angular clasts, coarse matrix, jigsaw fit) but at approximately 13 km from the source, the deposit transforms to an hybrid phase with debris avalanche fragments imbedded in a finer, homogenous and indurated matrix more similar to a debris flow deposit. The debris avalanche deposit is directly overly by debris flows, often more than 10 m thick that contains large amount of logs from pine tree, mostly accumulated toward the base and imbricated down flow. Fluvial deposits also occur throughout all successions, representing periods of stream and river reworking highly localized and re-establishment. All these evidences point to the presence of water in the mass previous to the failure. The event here described represent an anomalous event between the previously described deposit associated to volcanic complex, and evidence as climatic condition can alter and modifies the depositional sequences incrementing the hazard.

  20. Scientific and public responses to the ongoing volcanic crisis at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: Importance of an effective hazards-warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Tilling, Robert I.

    2008-02-01

    Volcanic eruptions and other potentially hazardous natural phenomena occur independently of any human actions. However, such phenomena can cause disasters when a society fails to foresee the hazardous manifestations and adopt adequate measures to reduce its vulnerability. One of the causes of such a failure is the lack of a consistent perception of the changing hazards posed by an ongoing eruption, i.e., with members of the scientific community, the Civil Protection authorities and the general public having diverging notions about what is occurring and what may happen. The problem of attaining a perception of risk as uniform as possible in a population measured in millions during an evolving eruption requires searching for communication tools that can describe—as simply as possible—the relations between the level of threat posed by the volcano, and the level of response of the authorities and the public. The hazards-warning system adopted at Popocatépetl Volcano, called the Volcanic Traffic Light Alert System (VTLAS), is a basic communications protocol that translates volcano threat into seven levels of preparedness for the emergency-management authorities, but only three levels of alert for the public (color coded green-yellow-red). The changing status of the volcano threat is represented as the most likely scenarios according to the opinions of an official scientific committee analyzing all available data. The implementation of the VTLAS was intended to reduce the possibility of ambiguous interpretations of intermediate levels by the endangered population. Although the VTLAS is imperfect and has not solved all problems involved in mass communication and decision-making during a volcanic crisis, it marks a significant advance in the management of volcanic crises in Mexico.

  1. Scientific and public responses to the ongoing volcanic crisis at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: Importance of an effective hazards-warning system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Tilling, Robert I.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions and other potentially hazardous natural phenomena occur independently of any human actions. However, such phenomena can cause disasters when a society fails to foresee the hazardous manifestations and adopt adequate measures to reduce its vulnerability. One of the causes of such a failure is the lack of a consistent perception of the changing hazards posed by an ongoing eruption, i.e., with members of the scientific community, the Civil Protection authorities and the general public having diverging notions about what is occurring and what may happen. The problem of attaining a perception of risk as uniform as possible in a population measured in millions during an evolving eruption requires searching for communication tools that can describe—as simply as possible—the relations between the level of threat posed by the volcano, and the level of response of the authorities and the public. The hazards-warning system adopted at Popocatépetl Volcano, called the Volcanic Traffic Light Alert System(VTLAS), is a basic communications protocol that translates volcano threat into seven levels of preparedness for the emergency-management authorities, but only three levels of alert for the public (color coded green–yellow–red). The changing status of the volcano threat is represented as the most likely scenarios according to the opinions of an official scientific committee analyzing all available data. The implementation of the VTLAS was intended to reduce the possibility of ambiguous interpretations of intermediate levels by the endangered population. Although the VTLAS is imperfect and has not solved all problems involved in mass communication and decision-making during a volcanic crisis, it marks a significant advance in the management of volcanic crises in Mexico.

  2. The early Oligocene Copperas Creek volcano and geology along New Mexico Highway 15 between Sapillo Creek and the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, Grant and Catron counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratte, James C.

    2008-01-01

    New Mexico Highway 15 between Sapillo Creek and the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument provides a tour through the eroded remains of the ~ 30 million year old Copperas Creek volcano, as preserved between the west-northwest -trending Sapillo Creek and Gila Hot Springs grabens of Basin and Range age. Colorful exposures of altered volcanic rocks in road cuts and a scenic overlook of the Alum Mountain eruptive center are witness to the hydrothermal alteration and mineralization in a Yellowstone-type hot spring environment here in Oligocene time. New Mexico Highway 15 ends at the Gila Cliff Dwellings where alcoves in Gila Conglomerate were occupied by members of the Mogollon culture 700-800 years ago.

  3. Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaan, Leslie

    The text explores Mexico's history, geography, art, religion, and lifestyles in the context of its complex economy. The text focuses on Mexico's economy and reasons for its current situation. Part I of this teaching unit includes: Teacher Overview, Why Study Mexico, Mexico Fact Sheet, Map of Mexico, the Land and Climate, History, Government,…

  4. The three-dimensional structure beneath the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) based on local earthquake seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, P. Y.; Koulakov, I. Yu

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new seismic velocity model (P- and S-wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio) beneath the Popocatépetl volcano to a depth of ~ 4 km below sea level (bsl). This model is based on the tomographic inversion of P- and S-wave arrival time data from earthquakes in the region of the volcano. These data were recorded by the 15 stations of a temporary seismic network that was deployed on the volcano in 1999 and 2000. The recording period was during a relatively quiet period between two strong eruptions, which occurred before and after the experiment. This period is characterized by low levels of volcano-related seismicity. Most of the recorded events occurred across an area much larger than the network. In this study, we conducted several synthetic tests, which validate the use of the out-of-network events to improve the resolution of the tomographic inversion beneath the stations. In the resulting model, we see that the main volcanic edifice is associated with high velocities that have a mushroom shape and that these high velocities are most prominent in the P-wave model. This feature may indicate the presence of overpressured solidified igneous rocks, which comprise the edifice of Popocatépetl. Below the summit of the volcano, we observe a prominent high Vp/Vs anomaly, which reaches a value of 1.9. This anomaly probably indicates the existence of cracks and pores filled with melts and fluids, and it may represent a fracture zone that serves as a conduit feeding the volcano. This model characterizes the interior structure of the Popocatépetl volcano prior to the strong September 2000 eruption, which occurred a few months after the termination of the experiment.

  5. The anatomy of a cinder cone: preliminary paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, structural, and petrologic data from the La Cienega volcano, Cerros del Rio volcanic field, northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronis, M. S.; Foucher, M.; Lineline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Cerros del Rio volcanic field is one of several middle Pliocene to Pleistocene basaltic volcanic fields of the axial Rio Grande Rift in central and northern New Mexico. It is a monogenetic volcanic field that comprises about 60 cinder-spatter cones, occupies ~ 700 km2, and ranges in age from 2.7 Ma to 1.1 Ma. Eruptive centers are typically central vent volcanoes, ranging from low-relief shields to steep-sided, breached cinder and spatter cone remnants. They represent short eruptive events that likely were derived from rapidly evolving reservoir-conduit systems. Mining activity has exposed the volcanic plumbing system of the Cienega Mine cinder cone, just west of Santa Fe, NM. Here, geologists from France and USA have been investigating the exposed roots of this eviscerated Pliocene volcano to investigate magma conduit geometry, magma flow structures, and eruption patterns. We are testing models for magma transport and volcano construction using a variety of field and laboratory tools. Common models of volcanic construction envision the magma feeder as a dike or pipe-like conduit transporting molten rock from a deep reservoir to the eruptive vent. We posit that small volcanic pluming systems are inherently more complex and actually involve numerous feeder geometries throughout the volcano lifespan. Our preliminary work suggests that the simple exteriors of some cinder cones hide a long life and complex history, both of which would change the appreciation of the related volcanic hazards in active systems. The Cienega Mine cinder cone consists of several meter- to decimeter-wide intrusions that connect to eruptive centers. These intrusions show a continuity of brittle to ductile structures from their margins to interiors. We have collected samples across each intrusion as well as along strike for anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and petrographic analysis in order to establish magma flow patterns. AMS results yield a remarkably consistent dataset that

  6. Scaling laws of the size-distribution of monogenetic volcanoes within the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, R.; Legrand, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Rodríguez-Pascua, M. A.; Giner-Robles, J. L.

    2011-04-01

    The Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field displays about 1040 monogenetic volcanoes mainly composed of basaltic cinder cones. This monogenetic volcanic field is the consequence of a dextral transtensive tectonic regime within the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), the largest intra continental volcanic arc around the world, related to the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates underneath the North American Plate. We performed a statistical analysis for the size-distribution of the basal diameter (Wco) for cinder cones. Dataset used here was compiled by Hasenaka and Carmichael (1985). Monogenetic volcanoes obey a power-law very similar to the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes, with respect to their size-distribution: log 10 ( N >= Wco ) = α - β log10( Wco), with β = 5.01 and α = 2.98. Therefore, the monogenetic volcanoes exhibit a (Wco) size-distribution empirical power-law, suggesting a self-organized criticality phenomenon.

  7. The 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico: Mineralogy and petrology of the anhydritebearing pumices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhr, James F.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.; Varekamp, Johan C.

    1984-12-01

    The 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano produced three major pumice- and ash-fall layers. Fresh pumices from the three layers are indistinguishable porphyritic trachyandesites with 55.9 wt. % SiO 2, 2.2% MgO, 2.8% K 2O, 0.4% P 2O 5, and over 1.2% SO 3. The pumices contain 58 wt. % crystals dominated by plagioclase (mode An 43) and hornblende, with lesser amounts of augite, titanomagnetite, anhydrite, apatite, sphene, pyrrhotite, and biotite enclosed in a vesiculated matrix glass with 68 wt. % SiO 2. Anhydrite forms subhedral to euhedral microphenocrysts without reaction coronas, as well as inclusions within the outer zones of major phenocrystic minerals. Inclusions of apatite and glass occur within anhydrite microphenocrysts. Anhydrite was crystallizing from the melt prior to eruption. Pumices resampled some ten months after the eruptions contain only 0.2 wt. % SO 3, and have only scattered remnants of anhydrite and traces of gypsum lining vesicles. A single rainy season in Chiapas (>4 m yr -1 rainfall) was sufficient to remove most primary anhydrite, which may be a relatively common igneous mineral, although rarely preserved in the geologic record. El Chichón trachyandesites are relatively enriched in K 2O, Rb, Sr, Th, U, Cs, and light rare elements compared to other andesites from Mexico and Central America. These enrichments may be related to the large distance from El Chichón to the Middle America Trench, or to subduction beneath Chiapas of the Tehuantepec Ridge, a major fracture zone of the Cocos Plate. Major- and trace-element analyses obtained by microprobe and instrumental neutron activation are given for all major minerals and glass, allowing trace-element partition coefficients to be calculated. Sphene and apatite contain high concentrations of rare earth elements, W, Th, and U. Sphene is also highly enriched in Hf and Ta. Prior to eruption, the El Chichón trachyandesite was at a relatively low temperature in the range 750° to 850°C, with fO 2

  8. Metal enrichment of soils following the April 2012-2013 eruptive activity of the Popocatépetl volcano, Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Espinosa, P F; Jonathan, M P; Morales-García, S S; Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth Campos; Martínez-Tavera, E; Muñoz-Sevilla, N P; Cardona, Miguel Alvarado

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the total (Zn, Pb, Ni, Hg, Cr, Cd, Cu, As) and partially leachable metals (PLMs) in 25 ash and soil samples from recent (2012-2013) eruptions of the Popocatépetl Volcano in Central Mexico. More recent ash and soil samples from volcanic activity in 2012-2013 had higher metal concentrations than older samples from eruptions in 1997 suggesting that the naturally highly volatile and mobile metals leach into nearby fresh water sources. The higher proportions of As (74.72%), Zn (44.64%), Cu (42.50%), and Hg (32.86%) reflect not only their considerable mobility but also the fact that they are dissolved and accumulated quickly following an eruption. Comparison of our concentration patterns with sediment quality guidelines indicates that the Cu, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, and Pb concentrations are higher than permissible limits; this situation must be monitored closely as these concentrations may reach lethal levels in the future. PMID:26514800

  9. The 1997 and 2001 lahars of Popocatépetl volcano (Central Mexico): textural and sedimentological constraints on their origin and hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, L.; Poblete, M. A.; Alvarado, R.

    2004-03-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is the most active volcano in central Mexico, and represents a high risk for more than 40 million people, including Mexico City. In 1994, volcanic activity at Popocatépetl renewed with the formation of ash-rich plumes up to 7 km high. In April 1996, lava emissions filled the crater and were accompanied by a series of explosions that produced eruptive columns up to 8 km high. Associated with explosive events in 1997 and 2001, two major lahars events occurred, leaving debris flow deposits along Huiloac Gorge for as far as 15 km, to the town of Santiago Xalitzinta. The 1997 debris flow deposit originated after a prolonged emission of ash which caused glacier melt and a rapid release of water (1×10 7 m 3). The amount of melting water was sufficient to gradually erode the river bed causing a flood that gradually transformed from a debris flow to a hyperconcentrated flow. In contrast, the 2001 debris flow that originated from a post-depositional remobilization of a pumice flow deposit, did not experience any flow transformation and carried 25% water at maximum. The different behavior of these two lahars has important hazard implications. Both lahars reached Xalitzintla town, but at that point, the 1997 lahar had already transformed into a sediment-loaded stream flow. The 2001 lahar, by contrast, maintained the characteristics of a debris flow, being more competent, and with greater destructive power. What happened with these lahars demonstrates how important it is to take into consideration secondary volcanic phenomena. Even though they were not large flows, they were capable of threatening populated areas, even during periods of volcanic quiescence or reduced magmatic activity.

  10. Archeomagnetic dating of the eruption of Xitle volcano (Mexico) from a reappraisal of the paleointensity with the MSP-DSC protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Ayala, Manuel; Camps, Pierre; Alva-Valdivia, Luis; Poidras, Thierry; Nicol, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The Xitle volcano, located south of Mexico City, is a monogenic volcano that has provided seven lava flows in a time interval of a few years. The age of these eruptions, estimated by means of radiocarbon dates on charcoal from beneath the flows, is still very poorly known, ranging from 4765±90 BC to 520±200 AD (see Siebe, JVGR, 2000 for a review). This lava field was emplaced over the archaeological city of Cuicuilco whose occupation is estimated between 700 BC and 150 AD. Thus a question is still pending: Is the downfall of Cuicuilco directly attributable to the eruption of Xitle? It seems that the answer is negative if we consider the latest radiocarbon dating by Siebe (2000), which sets the age of the eruption to 280±35 AD, that is significantly younger to the abandon of the city. Because this new age has direct implications on the history of the movements of ancient populations in the Central Valley of Mexico, we propose in the present study to check this estimate by archaeomagnetic dating. Xitle lava have been investigated several times for paleomagnetism, including directional analyses and absolute paleointensity determinations (see Alva, EPS, 57, 839-853, 2005 for a review). The characteristic Remanence direction is precisely determined. It is much more difficult to estimate precisely the paleointensity with the Thellier method: values scatter between 40 and 90 μT in a single flow (Alva, 2005). We propose here to estimate the paleointensity by means of the MSP-DSC protocol (Fabian and Leonhardt, 2010) with the new ultra-fast heating furnace FUReMAG developed in Montpellier (France). The sampling was performed along four profiles, one vertical through the entire thickness of the flow and three horizontal (at the top, middle and the bottom of the flow). Our preliminary results show that there is no difference between the values found in the different profiles, all providing a value around 62 μT. The comparison of our results (Dec = 359.0°, Inc = 35.2

  11. Gender differences and regionalization of the cultural significance of wild mushrooms around La Malinche volcano, Tlaxcala, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montoya, A; Torres-García, E A; Kong, A; Estrada-Torres, A; Caballero, J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cultural significance of wild mushrooms in 10 communities on the slopes of La Malinche volcano, Tlaxcala. The frequency and order of mention of each mushroom species in interviews of 200 individuals were used as indicators of the relative cultural significance of each species. A X(2) analysis was used to compare the frequency of mention of each species between males and females, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the difference in the total number of fungi mentioned by either gender. Traditional names for mushroom species were documented and frequency of mention assessed through multivariate statistics. The fungi with highest frequency of mention were Amanita basii, Lyophyllum decastes, Boletus pinophilus, Gomphus floccosus and Cantharellus cibarius complex. We found significant differences in the frequency of mention of different fungi by males and females but no significant difference was found for the total number of fungi mentioned by either gender. Principal component analysis suggested a cultural regionalization of La Malinche volcano communities based on preferences for consumption and use of traditional names. We observed two groups: one formed by communities on the eastern part of the volcano (with mixed cultures) and the other including communities on the western slope (ethnic Nahua towns). San Isidro Buensuceso is the most distinct community, according to the criteria in this study. PMID:22466796

  12. Flux rates and sulfur isotopic composition of pore fluids from three mud volcanoes in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Ruppel, C. D.; Dickens, G. R.; Berg, P.; Macko, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Chloride and sulfate pore water analyses were performed on a total of 29 piston and gravity cores collected along center to flank transects across 3 mud volcanoes, which were located on the Louisiana continental slope in Garden Banks (GB425), Green Canyon (CG185), and Mississippi Canyon (MC852). All three sites are known areas of oil and gas discharge. In addition, seepage at GC185 and GB425 supports highly developed chemosynthetic communities, whereas no known communities have been observed at MC852. Comparison of pore water chemistry (sulfur concentrations and sulfur isotope compositions) among these 3 sites provides initial insight about fluid migration processes and advection rates and about the connection between fluid flux and the establishment of chemosynthetic communities. Pore water advection velocities were calculated from chloride profiles using a steady-state one dimensional advection-diffusion model. In general, chloride concentrations increased with depth to more than four times seawater concentrations. Incidences of pore water freshening are likely associated with hydrate dissociation. Chloride profiles show characteristic concave-up shapes at the center of each mud volcano and concave-down shapes along the flanks, a pattern that we previously interpreted and modeled (doi:10.1029/2004GL021909; doi:10.1111/j.1468-8123.2007.00191.x) in terms of seawater recharge-discharge. The depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) shoals toward the center of the mud volcanoes, indicating potentially rapid anaerobic methane oxidation in these areas. Where the SMI is shallow, pore water sulfide S-isotope values are correspondingly elevated (~ +10 ‰) relative to seawater sulfate (δ34S = +21‰) and presumably represent near-quantitative reduction of pore water sulfate at GB425 and MC852. There is no such pattern at GC185. Such differences potentially reflect advection rates, the ages of the fluids, timing of fluid efflux, and differences in their chemistry.

  13. Hydrochemical dynamics of the “lake spring” system in the crater of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Taran, Y.; Inguaggiato, S.; Varley, N.; Santiago Santiago, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) erupted violently in March-April 1982, breaching through the former volcano-hydrothermal system. Since then, the 1982 crater has hosted a shallow (1-3.3 m, acidic (pH ˜ 2.2) and warm (˜ 30 °C) crater lake with a strongly varying chemistry (Cl/SO 4 = 0-79 molar ratio). The changes in crater lake chemistry and volume are not systematically related to the seasonal variation of rainfall, but rather to the activity of near-neutral geyser-like springs in the crater (Soap Pool). These Soap Pool springs are the only sources of Cl for the lake. Their geyser-like behaviour with a long-term (months to years) periodicity is due to a specific geometry of the shallow boiling aquifer beneath the lake, which is the remnant of the 1983 Cl-rich (24,000 mg/l) crater lake water. The Soap Pool springs decreased in Cl content over time. The zero-time extrapolation (1982, year of the eruption) approaches the Cl content in the initial crater lake, meanwhile the extrapolation towards the future indicates a zero-Cl content by 2009 ± 1. This particular situation offers the opportunity to calculate mass balance and Cl budget to quantify the lake-spring system in the El Chichón crater. These calculations show that the water balance without the input of SP springs is negative, implying that the lake should disappear during the dry season. The isotopic composition of lake waters (δD and δ 18O) coincide with this crater lake-SP dynamics, reflecting evaporation processes and mixing with SP geyser and meteoric water. Future dome growth, not observed yet in the post-1982 El Chichón crater, may be anticipated by changes in lake chemistry and dynamics.

  14. The ˜AD 1250 effusive eruption of El Metate shield volcano (Michoacán, Mexico): magma source, crustal storage, eruptive dynamics, and lava rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Guilbaud, Marie-Noëlle; Siebe, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Medium-sized volcanoes, also known as Mexican shields due to their andesitic composition and slightly higher slope angles in comparison to Icelandic shields, occur across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and represent nearly one third of all volcanic edifices in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF). Many questions about their origin and eruptive dynamics remain unanswered. Here, we focus on El Metate, the youngest (˜AD 1250) monogenetic shield volcano of the MGVF and the most voluminous (˜9.2 km3 dense rock equivalent) Holocene eruption in Mexico. Its eruptive history was reconstructed through detailed mapping, geochemical analysis (major and trace elements, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data), and rheological study of its thick andesitic flows. Early and late flow units have distinct morphologies, chemical and mineralogical compositions, and isotopic signatures which show that these lavas were fed by two separate magma batches that originated from a heterogeneous mantle source and followed distinct differentiation paths during their ascent. Thermobarometry calculations constraining the conditions of crystallization indicate a temporary storage of the last erupted magma batch at a depth of ˜7-10 km. Lava rheology was estimated using petrographic characteristics, geochemical data, and flow dimensions. The magma viscosity increased from 102-103 Pa s prior to eruption through 106-108 Pa s during ascent, to 109-1011 Pa s during lava emplacement. Though magma viscosity was quite high, the eruption was purely effusive. The explosive eruption of such a large magma volume was probably avoided due to efficient open system degassing (outgassing) of the magma as it ascended through the uppermost crust and erupted at the surface.

  15. Late Holocene Peléan-style eruption at Tacaná volcano, Mexico and Guatemala: past, present, and future hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macías, J. L.; Espíndola, J. M.; Garcia-Palomo, A.; Scott, K.M.; Hughes, S.; Mora, J C.

    2000-01-01

    Tacaná volcano, located on the border between Mexico and Guatemala, marks the northern extent of the Central American volcanic chain. Composed of three volcanic structures, it is a volcanic complex that has had periodic explosive eruptions for at least the past 40 k.y. The most recent major eruption occurred at the San Antonio volcano, the youngest volcanic edifice forming the complex, about 1950 yr ago. The Peléan style eruption, issued from the southwest part of the dome, and swept a 30° sector with a hot block and ash flow that traveled about 14 km along the Cahoacán ravine. Deposits from this event are well exposed around the town of Mixcun and were therefore given the name of that town, the Mixcun flow deposit. The Mixcun flow deposit is, in the channel facies, a light gray, massive, thick (>10 m), matrix-supported unit with dispersed lithic clasts of gravel to boulder size, divisible in some sections into a variable number of flow units. The overbank facies is represented by a thin (2 and has a minimum estimated volume of 0.12 km3. Basaltic-andesite inclusions (54% SiO2) and various signs of disequilibrium in the mineral assemblage of the two-pyroxene andesitic products (60%–63% SiO2) suggest that magma mixing may have triggered the eruption. Following deposition of the Mixcun flow deposit andesitic to dacitic (62%–64% SiO2) lava flows were extruded and a dacitic dome (64.4% SiO2) at the San Antonio summit formed. Syn-eruptive and posteruptive lahars flooded the main drainages of the Cahoacán and Izapa-Mixcun valleys in the area of the present city of Tapachula (population 250000) and the pre-Hispanic center of Izapa. Three radiocarbon ages date this event between A.D. 25 and 72 (range ±1σ, 38 B.C.–A.D. 216), which correlates with a halt in construction at Izapa (Hato phase of ca. 50 B.C.–A.D. 100), probably due to temporary abandonment of the city caused by lahars. Another similar event would produce extensive damage to the towns (population

  16. A Reassessment of the Seismicity Related to the 1998-1999 Eruption of Colima Volcano, Western Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-Camacho, A.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Espindola, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The 1998-1999 activity of Colima volcano (19.514°N, 103.62°W, 3850 m a.s.l.) consisted of a climactic episode on 20 November, 1998. On this date, a dome formed on the small summit crater during the previous few days, collapsed generating block-and-ash flows. The event was preceded by almost twelve months of seismic activity, which continued afterwards for several more months. In a previous work (Zamora-Camacho et al., 2007; Pure Appl. Geophys. 164, 39-52) we analyzed the seismic activity occurred from 20 March, 1998 to 31 March, 1999. However the seismicity related to the activity did not dwindled down to pre-eruptive levels until January 2000. In this work we present the results of our analysis of the period March-December 1999, which completes the sequence of events related to the eruption. This analysis is of importance because constitutes the most complete study of the seismicity of an eruptive period of Colima volcano, in the sense that we determined most of the events recorded by the seismic net (RESCO) and located all of those that were amenable to location. The whole period of seismic activity consisted of more than 11,000 events of which 1156 belonging to the period March-December 1999 were located. Of this group 1082 have magnitude (Mc) between 1 and 3.5 and depths mostly in the 0-10 km range.

  17. The ~ 31 ka rhyolitic Plinian to sub-Plinian eruption of Tlaloc Volcano, Sierra Nevada, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, H.; Macías, J. L.; Arce, J. L.; Gardner, J. E.; Layer, P. W.

    2013-02-01

    Tlaloc is a late Pleistocene stratovolcano located NE of México City. It is the northernmost volcano of the N-S Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range, which consists from north to south of Tlaloc, Telapón, Iztaccíhuatl, and Popocatépetl volcanoes. Tlaloc has always been considered the oldest (and extinct) volcano of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range. Recent field data revealed that Tlaloc was very active during late Pleistocene through a series of explosive eruptions. One of these eruptions produced the Multilayered White Pumice (MWP) a rhyolitic pyroclastic sequence. The eruption began with a 24-km high Plinian column MWP-F1 that was dispersed to the NE by prevailing winds. It was interrupted by fountaining of the column with the generation of a pyroclastic density current that emplaced MWP-S1 layer. Then, followed five unstable sub-Plinian columns (MWP-F2 to F6) that reached altitudes between 16 and 19 km. Fall deposits as a whole are 1 m thick at 12 km from the vent, cover a minimum area of 577 km2 for a total volume of 4.68 km3 (DRE 1.58 km3). The eruption ejected a total mass of 3.45 × 1012 kg at different mass discharges. The last sub-Plinian column (MWP-F6) collapsed and produced dense pyroclastic density currents that deposited pumiceous pyroclastic flows (MWP-PF) following main ravines to the north and east of the vent. These density currents filled gullies with 23 m-thick deposits at a distance of 12 km from the vent totaling a minimum DRE volume of 0.2 km3. Pyroclastic flow deposits charred tree trunks that yielded an age of 31,490 + 1995/- 1595 yr B.P. that closely date the age of the eruption. Rain during this phase of the eruption generated syn-eruptive lahars (MWP-DF). Post-eruptive lahars (MWP-ED) finally swept the volcano flanks. The MWP deposits consist of abundant white pumice (up to 96 vol.%), rare gray pumice, cognate lithics, accidental altered lithics, xenocrysts. White and gray pumice clasts contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase, sanidine

  18. Constraining the degassing processes of Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: A vesicle size distribution and glass geochemistry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. K.; Roberge, J.; Jerram, D. A.

    2012-05-01

    The explosive activity of Popocatépetl Volcano is a threat to the surrounding densely populated areas and it is therefore important to recognize indicators of change in eruptive style (explosive to dome building) within a short period of time. In this study we present results of vesicle size distributions (VSDs) and compositional analysis of matrix glass from juvenile clasts from five of the main plinian eruptions of Popocatépetl (ca. 23-1.2 ka), the 2001 small eruption during partial dome collapse and four eruptions during 1997 (May 11th and June 14th, 15th and 30th). Major element analysis of matrix glass (WDS-EPMA) allows the estimation of the depth from which the erupted magma went into disequilibrium (between crystals and melt), by calculating the equilibrium pressure using the quartz-albite-orthoclase ternary system of Blundy and Cashman (2001). Quantitative interpretation of texture in juvenile (pumice or scoria) clasts via VSD analysis using CSD software was used to link physical changes experienced by magma during ascent, with conditions responsible for eruptions. The extent and style of vesiculation in juvenile clasts is also related to eruption style and duration and has specifically allowed the recognition of changes in vesicular texture that represent variations from explosive to dome building activity (Mangan and Sisson, 2000; Adams et al., 2006). This study highlights a more complicated story in terms of magma storage, than that previously accepted for the Popocatépetl volcanic system and is an important contribution to ongoing research at the volcano.

  19. Inter-laboratory comparison of X-ray fluorescence analyses of eruptive products of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; Bornhorst, Theodore J.; Taggart, Joseph E., Jr.; Rose, William I., Jr.; McGee, James J.

    1987-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison has been made of X-ray fluorescence analyses of 10 samples of lava and pumices from El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico. Some determinations of major-element constituents agree within analytical uncertainty, whereas others exchibit significant bias. Analyses carried out at the Michigan Technological University (MTU) laboratory are systematically lower in MgO (26–48%), Fetotal(5–18%), CaO (4–15%) and higher in K2O (0–15%) than analyses made at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Denver laboratory. These differences are ascribed in part to a complex combination of calibration assumptionsand mineralogical and particle-size effects inherent in the use of pressed rock-powder pellets in the analytical procedure of the MTU laboratory. Other, but as yet unknown, differences in sample preparation and/or analytical technique may also be important; effects related to natural sample inhomogeneityare believed to be insignificant. The inter-laboratory differences in the analytical data complicated accurate assessment of whether El Chichón magmas have changed composition during the past 300 000 a. Knowledge of such change is needed for understanding petrogenetic history and for such related studies as evaluation of volcanic hazards.

  20. Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Mexico was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. In areal extent, Mexico is the third largest country on the continent of North America (not counting Greenland, which is a province of Denmark), comprised of almost 2 million square kilometers (756,000 square miles) of land. Home to roughly 100 million people, Mexico is second only to the United States in population, making it the world's largest Spanish-speaking nation. To the north, Mexico shares its border with the United States-a line that runs some 3,100 kilometers (1,900 miles) east to west. About half of this border is defined by the Rio Grande River, which runs southeast to the Gulf of Mexico (partially obscured by clouds in this image) and marks the dividing line between Texas and Mexico. Toward the upper left (northwest) corner of this image is the Baja California peninsula, which provides the western land boundary for the Gulf of California. Toward the northwestern side of the Mexican mainland, you can see the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains (brownish pixels) running southeast toward Lake Chapala and the city of Guadalajara. About 400 km (250 miles) east and slightly south of Lake Chapala is the capital, Mexico City. Extending northward from Mexico City is the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains, the irregular line of brownish pixels that seem to frame the western edges of the bright white cumulus clouds in this image. Between these two large mountain ranges is a large, relatively dry highland region. To the south, Mexico shares borders with Guatemala and Belize, both of which are located south of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Image courtesy Reto Stockli, Brian Montgomery, and Robert Simmon, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  1. Chemical and isotopic compositions of thermal springs, fumaroles and bubbling gases at Tacaná Volcano (Mexico-Guatemala): implications for volcanic surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, Dmitri; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Taran, Yuri; Varley, Nicholas; Santiago S., José A.

    2009-04-01

    This study presents baseline data for future geochemical monitoring of the active Tacaná volcano-hydrothermal system (Mexico-Guatemala). Seven groups of thermal springs, related to a NW/SE-oriented fault scarp cutting the summit area (4,100m a.s.l.), discharge at the northwest foot of the volcano (1,500-2,000m a.s.l.); another one on the southern ends of Tacaná (La Calera). The near-neutral (pH from 5.8 to 6.9) thermal ( T from 25.7°C to 63.0°C) HCO3-SO4 waters are thought to have formed by the absorption of a H2S/SO2-CO2-enriched steam into a Cl-rich geothermal aquifer, afterwards mixed by Na/HCO3-enriched meteoric waters originating from the higher elevations of the volcano as stated by the isotopic composition (δD and δ18O) of meteoric and spring waters. Boiling temperature fumaroles (89°C at ~3,600m a.s.l. NW of the summit), formed after the May 1986 phreatic explosion, emit isotopically light vapour (δD and δ18O as low as -128 and -19.9‰, respectively) resulting from steam separation from the summit aquifer. Fumarolic as well as bubbling gases at five springs are CO2-dominated. The δ13CCO2 for all gases show typical magmatic values of -3.6 ± 1.3‰ vs V-PDB. The large range in 3He/4He ratios for bubbling, dissolved and fumarolic gases [from 1.3 to 6.9 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)] is ascribed to a different degree of near-surface boiling processes inside a heterogeneous aquifer at the contact between the volcanic edifice and the crystalline basement (4He source). Tacaná volcano offers a unique opportunity to give insight into shallow hydrothermal and deep magmatic processes affecting the CO2/3He ratio of gases: bubbling springs with lower gas/water ratios show higher 3He/4He ratios and consequently lower CO2/3He ratios (e.g. Zarco spring). Typical Central American CO2/3He and 3He/4He ratios are found for the fumarolic Agua Caliente and Zarco gases (3.1 ± 1.6 × 1010 and 6.0 ± 0.9 R A, respectively). The L/ S (5.9 ± 0.5) and ( L + S)/ M

  2. Paleomagnetic, Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility, and 40AR/39AR Data from the Cienega Volcano, Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, M. S.; Petronis, M. S.; Lindline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2012-12-01

    Cinder cone eruptions are typically interpreted to have formed by the ascension of magma through a simple conduit. Recent field work and laboratory studies on different excavated volcanoes around the world suggest that magma transport within cinder cones can involve a complex system of feeder geometries. We studied the Cienega volcano, a cinder cone in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field, northern New Mexico, in order to better understand the complexity and the evolution of volcanic plumbing systems in the development of cinder cone volcanoes. We hypothesized that cinder cone plumbing systems are inherently complex and involve numerous feeder geometries (e.g. dikes, sills) and flow patterns both towards and away from the central vent complex. The Cienega volcano comprises tephra fall deposits as well as several vents, multiple intrusions, and numerous lava flow sequences. We inspected the magmatic plumbing system using different laboratory methods including paleomagnetic, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), rock magnetic and thin section studies. We collected samples across each outcrop of the feeder system. The dikes are olivine porphyritic basalts with major clinopyroxene, calcic plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and xenocrystic quartz. Most samples display a trachytic texture with plagioclase crystals showing a preferred orientation parallel to the dike margins. The magnetic information is held predominantly by a cubic phase magnetite with a low- to moderate-Ti composition of Single or Pseudo-Single Domain grains. The AMS results show various flow directions. Three of six dikes yielded magma flow directions away from the vent. The other dikes showed both a subvertical flow, which corresponds to the typical movement of magma in a dike originating from a deeper crustal level, and a downward flow direction. We concluded that magma initially flowed upward from the magma chamber until it encountered flow resistance. At this structural level (the current

  3. The evolution of the Eagle Peak volcano — a distinctive phase of middle miocene volcanism in the western Mogollon-Datil volcanic field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, Dana J.; Ratté, James C.; McIntosh, William C.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Futa, Kiyoto

    1995-12-01

    The andesitic to dacitic Eagle Peak volcano represents a distinctive phase of Middle Miocene, post-caldera volcanism in the western part of the Mogollon-Datil volcanic field in southwestern New Mexico. Erupted during Basin and Range extensional tectonism, rocks of the Eagle Peak volcano are chemically and isotopically distinct from the bimodal suite, extension-related basalt and rhyolite that also erupted in this area from the Early Miocene to the Pleistocene. Instead, they have close petrogenetic affinities to the early post-caldera ( 27-23 Ma) calc-alkaline, Bearwallow Mountain Andesite erupted from shield volcanos aligned along prominent Basin and Range fault structures. Geologic mapping and detailed petrographic and chemical studies of the Eagle Peak volcano has enabled the distinction of five different flow units, a central plug and a feeder dike. The flows were erupted from a central vent and two subsidiary "satellitic" centers on the western and southwestern flanks of the volcano. {40Ar }/{39Ar } age-spectrum and paleomagnetic studies indicate that the Eagle Peak volcano was active between 12.1 and 11.4 Ma; its activity spanned at least one magnetic polarity reversal. With exception of late satellitic eruptions on the northwestern margin of the volcano, central vent and satellitic flows were erupted in rapid succession and have an average age of 11.7 Ma. The central plug yielded a plateau age of 11.4 Ma, which is a minimum of 90,000 years (2σ) younger than the 11.7 Ma average age of the central vent and satellitic flows. Major-oxide, trace-element and isotope geochemistry define two distinct magmatic series: a central vent and a satellitic series. Rocks of the satellitic series, although similar in modal mineralogy and rare earth element patterns, are slightly more alkaline and relatively enriched in the high field strength elements Nb, Ta, P and Ti compared to the central vent eruptives. Sr and Nd isotopes further demonstrate these differences; a sample of

  4. Mexico.

    PubMed

    1988-02-01

    Focus in this discussion of Mexico is on the following: geography; the people; history; political conditions; the economy; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Mexico. As of July 1987, the population of Mexico numbered 81.9 million with an estimated annual growth rate of 2.09%. 60% of the population is Indian-Spanish (mestizo), 30% American Indian, 9% white, and 1% other. Mexico is the most populous Spanish-speaking country in the world and the 2nd most populous country in Latin America. Education is decentralized and expanded. Mexico's topography ranges from low desert plains and jungle-like coastal strips to high plateaus and rugged mountains. Hernan Cortes conquered Mexico in 1919-21 and founded a Spanish colony that lasted for almost 300 years. Independence from Spain was proclaimed by Father Miguel Hidalgo on September 16, 1810; the republic was established on December 6, 1822. Mexico's constitution of 1917 provides for a federal republic with a separation of powers into independent executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. Significant political themes of the administration of President Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado, who began his 6-year term in 1982, have been restructuring the economy, liberalizing trade practices, decentralizing government services, and eliminating corruption among public servants. In 1987, estimates put the real growth of the Mexican economy at 1.5%; the gross domestic product (GDP) had shrunk by 3.5% in 1986. Yet, on the positive side, Mexico's international reserves increased to record levels in 1987 (to about $15 billion), and its current account surplus reached more than $3 billion. Mexico has made considerable progress in moving to restructure its economy. It has substantially reduced impediments to international trade and has moved to reduce the number of parastatal firms. 1987 was the 2nd consecutive year in which Mexico recorded triple-digit inflation; inflation reached 158.8%. Other problems include

  5. Vertical AMS variation within basalt flow profiles from the Xitle volcano (Mexico) as indicator of heterogeneous strain in lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Miranda, C. I.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; González-Rangel, J. A.; Gogitchaishvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Kontny, A.

    2016-02-01

    The within-flow vertical variation of anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of three basaltic flow profiles from the Xitle volcano were investigated in relation to the lava flow-induced shear strain. Rock magnetic properties and opaque microscopy studies have shown that the magnetic mineralogy is dominated by Ti-poor magnetite with subtle vertical variations in grain size distribution: PSD grains dominate in a thin bottommost zone, and from base to top from PSD-MD to PSD-SD grains are found. The vertical variation of AMS principal direction patterns permitted identification of two to three main lava zones, some subdivided into subzones. The lower zone is very similar in all profiles with the magnetic foliation dipping toward the flow source, whereas the upper zone has magnetic foliation dipping toward the flow direction or alternates between dipping against and toward the flow direction. The K1 (maximum AMS axis) directions tend to be mostly parallel to the flow direction in both zones. The middle zone shows AMS axes diverging among profiles. We present heterogeneous strain ellipse distribution models for different flow velocities assuming similar viscosity to explain the AMS directions and related parameters of each zone. Irregular vertical foliations and transverse to flow lineation of a few samples at the bottommost and topmost part of profiles suggest SD inverse fabric, levels of intense friction, or degassing effects in AMS orientations.

  6. Tectonic and magmatic controls on the location of post-subduction monogenetic volcanoes in Baja California, Mexico, revealed through spatial analysis of eruptive vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurélie; Connor, Laura J.; Cañon-Tapia, Edgardo; Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Post-subduction (12.5 Ma to less than 1 Ma) monogenetic volcanism on the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, formed one of the densest intra-continental areas of eruptive vents on Earth. It includes about 900 vents within an area ˜700 km long (N-S) and 70 to 150 km wide (W-E). This study shows that post-subduction volcanic activity was distributed along this arc and that modes exist in the volcano distribution, indicating that productivity of the magma source region was not uniform along the length of the arc. Vent clustering, vent alignments, and cone elongations were measured within eight monogenetic volcanic fields located along the peninsula. Results indicate that on a regional scale, vent clustering varies from north to south with denser spatial clustering in the north on the order of 1.9 × 10-1 vents/km2 to less dense clustering in the south on the order of 7.8 × 10-2 vents/km2. San Quintin, San Carlos, Jaraguay, and Santa Clara are spatially distinct volcanic fields with higher eruptive vent densities suggesting the existence of individual melt columns that may have persisted over time. In contrast, the San Borja, Vizcaino, San Ignacio, and La Purisima vent fields show lower degrees of vent clustering and no obvious spatial gaps between fields, thus indicating an area of more distributed volcanism. Insight into the lithospheric stress field can be gained from vent alignments and vent elongation measurements. Within the fields located along the extinct, subduction-related volcanic arc, elongation patterns of cinder cones and fissure-fed spatter cones, vent clusters, and vent alignments trend NW-SE and N-S. Within the Santa Clara field, located more to the west within the forearc, elongation patterns of the same volcanic features trend NE-SW. These patterns suggest that magmatism was more focused in the forearc and in the northern part of Baja California than in its southern region. Within the extinct arc, magma ascent created volcano alignments and elongate

  7. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  8. Sulfur and oxygen isotopic systematics of the 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Luhr, J.F.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Thermometers based on sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of anhydrite, pyrrhotite, titanomagnetite, and plagioclase crystals from fresh pumices of the 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano indicate a pre-eruption temperature of 810 ± 40°C, confirming textural evidence that the anhydrite precipitated directly from the melt. The isotopic composition of sulfate leached from fresh ashfall samples shows it to be a mixture of anhydrite microphenocrysts and adsorbed sulfate derived from oxidized sulfur (SO2) in the eruption plume. The leachate data show no evidence for rapid oxidation of significant amounts of H2S in the eruption cloud even though the fugacity ratio of H2S/SO2 in the gas phase of the magma was >400. This may indicate kinetic inhibition of H2S to SO2 conversion in the eruption cloud. Prior to eruption, the magma contained an estimated 2.6 wt. % sulfur (as SO3). The estimated δ 34S of the bulk magma is 5.8‰. Such a high value may reflect assimilation of 34S-enriched evaporites or the prior loss of 34S-depleted H2S to a fluid or gas phase during formation of a small prophyry-type hydrothermal system or ore deposit. In either case, the original magma must have been very sulfur rich. It is likely that the initial high sulfur content of the magma and at least some of its 34S enrichment reflects involvement of subducted volcanogenic massive sulfides deposits during Benioff-zone partial melting. Isotopic data on mineralized, accidental lithic fragments support the possible development of a porphyry-type system at El Chichón.

  9. Sulfur and oxygen isotopic systematics of the 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rye, R. O.; Luhr, J. F.; Wasserman, M. D.

    1984-12-01

    Thermometers based on sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of anhydrite, pyrrhotite, titanomagnetite, and plagioclase crystals from fresh pumices of the 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano indicate a pre-eruption temperature of 810 ± 40°C, confirming textural evidence that the anhydrite precipitated directly from the melt. The isotopic composition of sulfate leached from fresh ashfall samples shows it to be a mixture of anhydrite microphenocrysts and adsorbed sulfate derived from oxidized sulfur (SO 2) in the eruption plume. The leachate data show no evidence for rapid oxidation of significant amounts of H 2S in the eruption cloud even though the fugacity ratio of H 2S/SO 2 in the gas phase of the magma was >400. This may indicate kinetic inhibition of H 2S to SO 2 conversion in the eruption cloud. Prior to eruption, the magma contained an estimated 2.6 wt. % sulfur (as SO 3). The estimated δ 34S of the bulk magma is 5.8‰. Such a high value may reflect assimilation of 34S-enriched evaporites or the prior loss of 34S-depleted H 2S to a fluid or gas phase during formation of a small prophyry-type hydrothermal system or ore deposit. In either case, the original magma must have been very sulfur rich. It is likely that the initial high sulfur content of the magma and at least some of its 34S enrichment reflects involvement of subducted volcanogenic massive sulfides deposits during Benioff-zone partial melting. Isotopic data on mineralized, accidental lithic fragments support the possible development of a porphyry-type system at El Chichón.

  10. On the Radon mechanism of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling. Tlamacas mountain case study, volcano Popocatepetl area, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsarenko, A.; Grimalsky, V.; Yutsis, V. V.; Koshevaya, S.; Bravo Osuna, A.

    2013-05-01

    Results on Radon monitoring in 3 different sites in volcano Popocatepetl and referent site revealed Radon depletion anticipating 9 cases of moderate eruptive activity among 23 total events. The most pronounced reaction was observed in Tlamacas observational site. The averaged Radon concentration in Paso de Cortes and Tlamacas 2 sites is significantly lower in comparison with that at Tlamacas; the Radon variation in the mentioned sites has many specific features meanwhile in the Tlamacas site Radon behavior emphasizes a more individual character. The combined study by means of Radon survey, Gamma ray, Uranium, Thorium and Potassium spectrometry revealed an anomalously increased diffusion Radon emanation localized in the area of Tlamacas. Complementary geophysical studies by methods of gravimetric and magnetic prospection make credible postulation about volcanic origin of Tlamacas mountain. Observed zonal geological structures in the Tlamacas mountain and surrounding area may stimulate intensive Radon emanation from the volcanic depth. A new conception is proposed regarding a Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling in the case of Tlamacas being similar in nature with a shortened electrical circuit Earth—thunderstorm clouds (high-altitude mountains) so that an enhanced ionization caused by intensive Radon release may explain in a novel way the noise-like geomagnetic emission observed before destructive earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Numerical simulation gives values of geomagnetic perturbations 10-3 - 10-1 nT under "normal" conditions which can easily transform into the range 1 - 10 nT in the case of higher electric field E > 1 kV/m which is typical for mountains.

  11. Mexico.

    PubMed

    1984-09-01

    Although Mexico has serious economic and population growth problems, the country is making progress toward solving both of these problems. Mexico has a population of 77.7 million and a population density of 102 persons/square mile. The country has a birth rate of 32/1000, a death rate of 6/1000, and an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The estimated infant mortality rate is 55/1000. The median age of the population is 17.4. Mexico City, with a population of 15 million, is the 3rd largest city in the world, and by 1995, it is expected to be the largest city in the world, with a projected population of 25.2 million. The government vigorously promotes family planning, and the annual population growth rate slowed down from a high of 3.2% in 1970-75 to the current rate of 2.6%. Mexico hopes to achieve replacement level fertility by the year 2000. Other government policies promote income equality, agricultural development, and regional equalization of population growth. In 1982 Mexico's per capita income was US$2270, exports totaled US$21 billion, and imports totaled US$15 billion. By 1976, Mexico's international debt was US$30.2 billion, and inflation was rampant. Recently, the newly elected president, Miguel de la Madrid of the Partido Revolucionario Institutional, obtained a grant of US$39 million from the International Monetary Fund and removed price controls. These efforts should help stabilize Mexico's economy. The country will also need to expand its exports and increase its cultivatable acreage. PMID:12339665

  12. Stable sulfur and carbon isotope investigations of pore-water and solid-phase compounds in sediments of the Chapopote Asphalt Volcano, southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, T.; Bruechert, V.; Pape, T.; Schubotz, F.; Kasten, S.

    2007-05-01

    During R/V Meteor cruise M67 2a/b (March-April 2006) to the Asphalt Volcanoes of the southern Gulf of Mexico two gravity cores were retrieved from the central depression of the Chapopote Knoll which contained viscous oil/asphalt a few meters below the sediment surface. Also several push cores were taken with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) QUEST at sites where oil/asphalt reached closely below the sediment surface. From these cores solid-phase and pore-water samples were taken for on-board and subsequent shore-based analyses. Together with a core taken from a background site which is not influenced by asphalt/oil seepage these sediment and pore water samples are currently subject to detailed analyses of (1) the stable sulfur isotopic composition of both dissolved (sulfate and sulfide) and solid-phase (iron monosulfides, pyrite) sulfur compounds, and (2) the composition and stable carbon isotopic signatures of hydrocarbon gases. The major aims of these investigations are to identify whether and to which extent the upward migration of oil, asphalt and gas (1) stimulates biogeochemical processes and turn-over rates, and (2) influences the stable sulfur isotopic signatures of both dissolved and solid phase sulfur compounds. Furthermore, we seek to determine the potential of these - possibly unusual - stable sulfur isotopic signals of solid-phase sulfides to reconstruct hydrocarbon seepage in older geological records and to elucidate how the composition and the stable carbon isotopic signatures of the hydrocarbon gases are altered by the action of typical chemosynthetic communities thriving at these sites.

  13. CO2 and He degassing at El Chichón volcano, Chiapas, Mexico: gas flux, origin and relationship with local and regional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazot, Agnes; Rouwet, Dmitri; Taran, Yuri; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Varley, Nick

    2011-05-01

    During 2007-2008, three CO2 flux surveys were performed on El Chichón volcanic lake, Chiapas, Mexico, with an additional survey in April 2008 covering the entire crater floor (including the lake). The mean CO2 flux calculated by sequential Gaussian simulation from the lake was 1,190 (March 2007), 730 (December 2007) and 1,134 g m-2 day-1 (April 2008) with total emission rates of 164 ± 9.5 (March 2007), 59 ± 2.5 (December 2007) and 109 ± 6.6 t day-1 (April 2008). The mean CO2 flux estimated from the entire crater floor area was 1,102 g m-2 day-1 for April 2008 with a total emission rate of 144 ± 5.9 t day-1. Significant change in CO2 flux was not detected during the period of survey, and the mapping of the CO2 flux highlighted lineaments reflecting the main local and regional tectonic patterns. The 3He/4He ratio (as high as 8.1 R A) for gases in the El Chichón crater is generally higher than those observed at the neighbouring Transmexican Volcanic Belt and the Central American Volcanic Arc. The CO2/3He ratios for the high 3He/4He gases tend to have the MORB-like values (1.41 × 109), and the CO2/3He ratios for the lower 3He/4He gases fall within the range for the arc-type gases. The high 3He/4He ratios, the MORB-like CO2/3He ratios for the high 3He/4He gases and high proportion of MORB-CO2 ( M = 25 ±15%) at El Chichón indicate a greater depth for the generation of magma when compared to typical arc volcanoes.

  14. Petrological and Geochemical Evolution, during the last 40,000 years of the Tacana Volcano Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, J.; Macias, J.; Garcia-palomo, A.; Espindola, J.; Manetti, P.; Vaselli, O.

    2001-12-01

    The Tacaná Volcanic Complex (TVC) is located in SW Chiapas, Mexico. Its highest peak constitutes a marker of the international border with Guatemala. Fieldwork aided by photo interpretation has allowed us to recognize three different volcanic centers at the TVC: Chichuj (EVCh; 3,800 masl.), Tacaná, which gives name to the complex (EVT; 4,060 masl), and San Antonio (EVSA; 3,700 masl). The volcanic deposits from these three centers consist mainly of block-and-ash flows, lavas, and summit domes. In this work were analyzed selected samples of lava flows, lava domes, and juvenile clasts from the most recent pyroclastic flows. The lava flows and the domes have andesitic-dacitic composition, and the juvenile clasts are andesitic. Basaltic andesite enclaves found in the 2000 yr BP Mixcun pyroclastic flow are the most basic of all analyzed products in the CVT (andesitic basalt). All the products are porphyritic with phenocrysts of plagioclase, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene, and amphibole. Using two pyroxenes and ilmenite-titanomagnetite geothermometers, we estimated the temperature of crystallization, which varies between 910o and 950oC. The geochemical data (majors elements, trace elements and isotopes) shows that crystal fractionation was the principal process of evolution, with a small assimilation of granitic crustal rocks.

  15. Eruptive conditions and depositional processes of Narbona Pass Maar volcano, Navajo volcanic field, Navajo Nation, New Mexico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Semken, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Phreatomagmatic deposits at Narbona Pass, a mid-Tertiary maar in the Navajo volcanic field (NVF), New Mexico (USA), were characterized in order to reconstruct the evolution and dynamic conditions of the eruption. Our findings shed light on the temporal evolution of the eruption, dominant depositional mechanisms, influence of liquid water on deposit characteristics, geometry and evolution of the vent, efficiency of fragmentation, and the relative importance of magmatic and external volatiles. The basal deposits form a thick (5-20 m), massive lapilli tuff to tuff-breccia deposit. This is overlain by alternating bedded sequences of symmetrical to antidune cross-stratified tuff and lapilli tuff; and diffusely-stratified, clast-supported, reversely-graded lapilli tuffs that pinch and swell laterally. This sequence is interpreted to reflect an initial vent-clearing phase that produced concentrated pyroclastic density currents, followed by a pulsating eruption that produced multiple density currents with varying particle concentrations and flow conditions to yield the well-stratified deposits. Only minor localized soft-sediment deformation was observed, no accretionary lapilli were found, and grain accretion occurs on the lee side of dunes. This suggests that little to no liquid water existed in the density currents during deposition. Juvenile material is dominantly present as blocky fine ash and finely vesiculated fine to coarse lapilli pumice. This indicates that phreatomagmatic fragmentation was predominant, but also that the magma was volatile-rich and vesiculating at the time of eruption. This is the first study to document a significant magmatic volatile component in an NVF maar-diatreme eruption. The top of the phreatomagmatic sequence abruptly contacts the overlying minette lava flows, indicating no gradual drying-out period between the explosive and effusive phases. The lithology of the accidental clasts is consistent throughout the vertical pyroclastic

  16. Broadband seismic measurements of degassing activity associated with lava effusion at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip; Asch, Guenter

    2008-01-01

    From November 1999 through July 2000, a broadband seismic experiment was carried out at Popocatépetl Volcano to record seismic activity over a wide period range (0.04–100 s). We present an overview of the seismicity recorded during this experiment and discuss results of analyses of long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) seismic signals recorded at stations nearest to the crater over a four-month interval December 1999–March 2000. Three families of LP signals (Types-I, II, and III) are identified based on distinctive waveform features observed periods shorter than 1 s, periods longer than 15 s, and within the period range 0.5–2.5 s. Type-I LP events have impulsive first arrivals and exhibit a characteristic harmonic wave train with dominant periods in the 1.4–1.9 s range during the first 10 s of signal. These events are also associated with a remarkable VLP wavelet with period near 30 s. Type-II LP events represent pairs of events occurring in rapid succession and whose signatures are superimposed. These are typically marked by slowly emergent first arrivals and by a characteristic VLP wave train with dominant period near 30 s, made of two successive wavelets whose shapes are quasi-identical to those of the VLP wavelets associated with Type-I events. Type-III LP events represent the most energetic signals observed during our experiment. These have an emergent first arrival and display a harmonic signature with dominant period near 1.1 s. They are dominated by periods in the 0.25–0.35 s band and contain no significant energy at periods longer than 15 s. Hypocentral locations of the three types of LP events obtained from phase picks point to shallow seismic sources clustered at depths shallower than 2 km below the crater floor. Observed variations in volcanic eruptive activity correlate with defined LP families. Most of the observed seismicity consists of Type-I events that occur in association with 1–3-min-long degassing bursts (

  17. The Early Oligocene Copperas Creek Volcano and geology along New Mexico Higway 15 between Sapillo Creek and the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, Grant and Catron Counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratté, James C.

    2008-01-01

    The section of New Mexico Highway 15 between the intersection of NM-15 and NM 35 (aka Sapillo junction) at the south and the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument at the north end of NM –15 occupies an approximately 18 mile long, mile wide, corridor through the eastern part of the Gila Wilderness (Fig. 1). Whereas most of the Gila Wilderness is dominated by silicic, caldera-forming supervolcanoes of Eocene to Oligocene age, this part of NM-15 traverses a volcanic terrain of similar age, but composed mainly of intermediate composition lava flows and minor associated rhyolitic intrusions and pyroclastic rocks, which are related to the here-named Copperas Creek volcano. This volcanic complex is bounded by Basin and Range structures: on the south by the Sapillo Creek graben, and on the north by the Gila Hot Springs graben, both of which are filled with Gila Conglomerate of late Tertiary to Pleistocene(?) age. Hot springs in the Gila River valley are localized along faults in the deepest part of the Gila Hot Springs graben. The cliff dwellings of the National Monument were constructed in caves in Gila Conglomerate in the western part of the Gila Hot Springs graben. The eastern edge of the Gila Cliff Dwellings caldera is buried by younger rocks east of the cliff dwellings, but spectacular cliffs of Bloodgood Canyon Tuff, which fills the caldera, can be viewed along the West Fork of the Gila River from the trail starting at the cliff dwellings. Although this is not intended as a formal road log, highway mileage markers (MM) will be used to locate geologic features more or less progressively from south to north along NM-15.

  18. Mexico.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    The background notes on Mexico provide text and recent statistical information on the geography, population, government, economy, and foreign relations, specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement with US. The 1992 population is estimated at 89 million of which 60% are mestizo (Indian-Spanish), 30% are American Indian, 9% are Caucasian, and 1% are other. 90% are Roman Catholic. There are 8 years of compulsory education. Infant mortality is 30/1000 live births. Life expectancy for males is 68 years and 76 years for females. The labor force is comprised of 30% in services, 24% in agriculture and fishing, 19% in manufacturing, 13% in commerce, 7% in construction, 4% in transportation and communication, and .4% in mining. There are 31 states and a federal district. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was $3200 in 1991. Military expenditures were .5% of GDP in 1991. The average inflation rate is 19%. Mexico City with 20 million is the largest urban center in the world. In recent years, the economy has been restructured with market oriented reforms; the result has been a growth of GDP of 3.6% in 1991 from 2% in 1987. Dependence on oil exports has decreased. There has been privatization and deregulation of state-owned companies. Subsidies to inefficient companies have been stopped. Tariff rates were reduced. The financial debt has been reduced and turned into a surplus of .8% in 1992. Mexico's foreign debt has been reduced from its high in 1987 of $107 billion. Agricultural reforms have been ongoing for 50 years. Land was redistributed, but standards of living and productivity have improved only slightly. Rural land tenure regulations have been changed, and other economic reforms are expected. Mexico engages in ad hoc international groups and is selective about membership in international organizations. PMID:12178052

  19. Intimate association of sI and sII hydrate structures at the Chapopote asphalt volcano, southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, S. A.; Murshed, M. M.; Pape, T.; Klein, H.; Bohrmann, G.; Kuhs, W. F.; Brewer, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Intimate associations of two gas hydrate structures seem to be uncommon in most known hydrate deposits. Here we report on a mixture of hydrate structure I (sI) and structure II (sII) from the Chapopote asphalt volcano in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Gas hydrates were found within the matrix and pores of asphalts extruded at the seafloor. Three gas hydrate pieces were studied in high spatial resolution using high-energy synchrotron X-rays to investigate the crystal structure and the crystallite size distributions (CSD), by gas chromatography and by Raman spectroscopy. Hydrate-bound gases of all three hydrate pieces were composed mostly of methane (94 - 98 mol% of C1—C5 hydrocarbons). Two of the hydrate pieces comprised only sI gas hydrate, formed predominantly from methane. The other piece comprised an intimate mixture of both sI and sII, with sII representing ca. 25 wt.% and sI ca. 75 wt.% of the present hydrate phase. The crystallites of sII had an arithmetical mean size of about 380 µm. The mean crystallite sizes of sI clustered at about 200 µm. The CSD of sII hydrate was shaped in a normal distribution, slightly skewed toward larger sizes. Instead, 2 from a total of 3 sI CSDs were skewed to small sizes. Raman spectroscopy revealed that sI and sII were closely associated within individual grains/agglomerates on a scale of tens to hundreds µm. The differences in crystallite sizes of sI and sII are significant, suggesting differences in the nucleation density or different ages of the crystallites, if time is the dominant factor in the crystallite size evolution. The coexistence of the two structures may be a result of one or of a combination of several independent processes: i) de-mixing into two hydrate structures from the gas phase, which provides an additional degree of freedom for lowering the free energy in the system; ii) fractionated crystallization with a changing gas composition during crystallization; and iii) simultaneous crystallization of

  20. Chikurachki Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... plume from the April 22, 2003, eruption of the Chikurachki volcano is portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle Imaging ... the volcanically active Kuril Island group, the Chikurachki volcano is an active stratovolcano on Russia's Paramushir Island (just south of ...

  1. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  2. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  3. Dynamical parameter analysis of continuous seismic signals of Popocatépetl volcano (Central Mexico): A case of tectonic earthquakes influencing volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárraga, Marta; Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana; Carniel, Roberto; Martínez-Bringas, Alicia; García, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2012-06-01

    The continuous background seismic activity contains information on the internal state of a volcanic system. Here, we report the influence of major regional tectonic earthquakes (M > 5 in most cases) on such state, reflected as changes in the spectral and dynamical parameters of the volcano continuous seismic data. Although changes do not always occur, analysis of five cases of earthquake-induced variations in the signals recorded at Popocatépetl volcano in central México reveal significant fluctuations following the tectonic earthquakes. External visible volcanic activity, such as small to moderate explosions and ash emissions, were related to those fluctuations. We briefly discuss possible causes of the variations. We conclude that recognition of fluctuations in the dynamical parameters in volcano monitoring seismic signals after tectonic earthquakes, even those located in the far field, hundreds of kilometers away, may provide an additional criterion for eruption forecasting, and for decision making in the definition of volcanic alert levels.

  4. Spreading Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgia, Andrea; Delaney, Paul T.; Denlinger, Roger P.

    As volcanoes grow, they become ever heavier. Unlike mountains exhumed by erosion of rocks that generally were lithified at depth, volcanoes typically are built of poorly consolidated rocks that may be further weakened by hydrothermal alteration. The substrates upon which volcanoes rest, moreover, are often sediments lithified by no more than the weight of the volcanic overburden. It is not surprising, therefore, that volcanic deformation includes-and in the long term is often dominated by-spreading motions that translate subsidence near volcanic summits to outward horizontal displacements around the flanks and peripheries. We review examples of volcanic spreading and go on to derive approximate expressions for the time volcanoes require to deform by spreading on weak substrates. We also demonstrate that shear stresses that drive low-angle thrust faulting from beneath volcanic constructs have maxima at volcanic peripheries, just where such faults are seen to emerge. Finally, we establish a theoretical basis for experimentally derived scalings that delineate volcanoes that spread from those that do not.

  5. Spreading volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borgia, A.; Delaney, P.T.; Denlinger, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    As volcanoes grow, they become ever heavier. Unlike mountains exhumed by erosion of rocks that generally were lithified at depth, volcanoes typically are built of poorly consolidated rocks that may be further weakened by hydrothermal alteration. The substrates upon which volcanoes rest, moreover, are often sediments lithified by no more than the weight of the volcanic overburden. It is not surprising, therefore, that volcanic deformation includes-and in the long term is often dominated by-spreading motions that translate subsidence near volcanic summits to outward horizontal displacements around the flanks and peripheries. We review examples of volcanic spreading and go on to derive approximate expressions for the time volcanoes require to deform by spreading on weak substrates. We also demonstrate that shear stresses that drive low-angle thrust faulting from beneath volcanic constructs have maxima at volcanic peripheries, just where such faults are seen to emerge. Finally, we establish a theoretical basis for experimentally derived scalings that delineate volcanoes that spread from those that do not.

  6. Chilean Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On the border between Chile and the Catamarca province of Argentina lies a vast field of currently dormant volcanoes. Over time, these volcanoes have laid down a crust of magma roughly 2 miles (3.5 km) thick. It is tinged with a patina of various colors that can indicate both the age and mineral content of the original lava flows. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 15, 1999. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and green wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  7. Evolution of Popocatépetl volcano's glaciers in Mexico with and without volcanic activity: diagnosis from a minimal mass balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros-Gonzalez, G.; Cortes Ramos, J.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2013-05-01

    This work describes the influence of eruptive activity on the evolution of the glacial cover on Popocatepetl volcano. Here, we try to answer a simple question: what had happened if this glacier had not been affected by the volcanic activity? In order to answer this question we modeled the mass balance evolution of this glacier using meteorological data and a minimal mass balance model developed for glaciers elsewhere. For this model we assumed no volcanic activity. These results were compared with measurements available for the actual situation at Popocatépetl Volcano. It was possible to separate the influence of the volcanic activity on the evolution of this glacier system considering two scenarios: one was modeled with a simulation of the mass balance where volcanic activity does not affect, and a second scenario is based on the documented studies developed around the glacial disappearance of the glaciers.

  8. ~20 years of SO2 measurements at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) using COSPEC: volcanological interpretation of the data and use for validation of instrumental developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Granados, H.; Cardenas Gonzalez, L.

    2013-12-01

    On February 1st 1994, the first COSPEC measurements were carried out at Popocatépetl volcano. Since the first measurements, the volcano showed very high emission rates. Along the last ~20 years, measurements have been carried out using several modes (ground-static, ground-mobile, airborne-fixed wing, airborne-rotatory wing); trajectories (diagonal to, across, and along the plume); and during different activity episodes (passive degassing and effusive and explosive periods); as well as together with other instrumental developments and resources (DOAS, UV-cameras, MODIS, ASTER, OMI). Popocatépetl volcano has emitted nearly 40Mt of SO2 in ~20years and has shown very large variations in the average emissions depending on the state of activity, having a maximum emission rate of ~170 Kt in December 2000. This work shows a summary of results of the measurements obtained during this period emphasizing the volcanological meaning of the existing database so far. In addition, the use of these data for validation of other data sets is discussed.

  9. The deglaciation of Iztaccíhuatl volcano (Mexico) from the Little Ice Age maximum to the present, determined by photogrametry and lichenometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, D.; García-Sancho, L.; Zamorano, J. J.; Andrés, N.; Pintado, A.

    2012-04-01

    Iztaccíhualt Volcano (19°10'20''N, 98°38'30''W, 5230 m asl) preserves an important moraine complex from the Little Ice Age (LIA), which stretches to 4300 m asl. These moraines are different from former ones because they are not covered by ash fall from the last plinian explosive phases of the nearby Popocatépetl volcano. In fact, the last emission of those pyroclasts took place during the XI century (Vázquez-Selem, 2000). The summit area of the Iztaccíhualt volcano still has glaciers whose terminus are located around 5000 m asl. From the end of the LIA until present the glacier terminus have ascended 700 m. To study the deglaciation process in Iztaccíhualt volcano from the LIA maximum to present, the Ayoloco valley was selected as it is the most important valley of the western slope of the volcano. Taking this valley as a reference, we determined the limits of glaciers in different dates by georeferencing the aerial and panoramic photographs (from 1897 to 2000) and analysing the 1958 field cartography of the glacial limits (Lorenzo, 1964). On the one hand, we carried out a statistical analysis of the size of the Rhizocarpon geographicum thallus and, on the other hand, we undertook a statistical study of the biodiversity of the lichen species through a number of cross-sections from the lowest LIA moraines to the current glacier snouts. This methodology allowed dating the exact moment in which the glacier retreated over certain points of the analysed cross-sections and determining the ecesis and the growth curve of the Rhizocarpon geographicum specie. In the Ayoloco valley the average growth rate is of 0.23 mm per year. From this information, we could deduce the evolution of the glacier from the LIA maximum to present. The results indicate that two main advances took place during the XVII and the XIX centuries. At the beginning of the XX century the glacier terminus were very close to the moraines of the maximum advance. An intense glacial retreat took place

  10. Iceland Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-23

    ... of which are so thick that they block the penetration of light from CALIPSO's lidar to the surface. The yellow layer near the surface over France is believed to be primarily air pollution, but could also contain ash from the volcano. Highlighting its ...

  11. The CO2 flux and the chemistry of the crater lake in 2013-2015 evidence for the enhanced activity of El Chichon volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jácome Paz, Mariana Patricia; Taran, Yuri; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Collard, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    During 2013-2015, four CO2 flux surveys were performed in the El Chichon crater both, from the lake surface and from the soil of the crater floor. The chemistry of the lake water, as well as its physical parameters (surface area, depth, temperature) were also determined. The CO2 flux in 2014-2015 compared to the 2007-2008 data (Mazot et al., 2011, BV, 73: 423-441) increased almost one order of magnitude (from ~ 140 t/d in 2008 to ~ 840 t/d in 2014). During the last two years the lake became the largest for the whole time of observations with the maximum surface area more than 18 ha covering completely the NE fumarolic field and all thermal springs feeding the lake with mineralized water. Despite the maximum volume of the lake it was characterized in 2015 by the highest since 2007 chloride content (~2500 ppm) and temperature (34°C). A large degassing spot in the middle of the lake for the first time was observed in April 2015 with more than 10,000 g m-2 d-1 of the CO2 flux. These observations evidence that the volcano-hydrothermal system of El Chichon volcano came into a new stage of activity associated most probably with changes in the magmatic activity at depth.

  12. The CO2 Flux and the Chemistry of the Crater lake in 2013-2015 Evidence for the Enhanced Activity of El Chichon volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Jácome Paz, M. P.; Inguaggiato, S.; Collard, N.

    2015-12-01

    During 2013-2015, four CO2 flux surveys were performed in the El Chichon crater both, from the lake surface and from the soil of the crater. The chemistry of the lake water, as well as its physical parameters (surface area, depth, temperature) were also determined. The CO2 flux in 2014-2015 compared to the 2007-2008 data (Mazot et al., 2011, BV, 73: 423-441) increased almost one order of magnitude (from ~ 140 ton d-1 in 2008 to ~ 840 ton d-1 in 2014). During the last two years the lake became the largest for the whole time of observations with the maximum surface area more than 18 ha covering completely the NE fumarolic field and all thermal springs feeding the lake with mineralized water. Despite the maximum volume of the lake it was characterized in 2015 by the highest since 2007 chloride content (~2500 ppm) and temperature (34°C). A large degassing spot in the middle of the lake for the first time was observed in April 2015 with more than 10,000 g m-2 d-1 of the CO2 flux. These observations evidence that the volcano-hydrothermal system of El Chichon volcano came into a new stage of activity associated most probably with changes in the magmatic activity at depth.

  13. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  14. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  15. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the

  16. Magmatic controls on eruption dynamics of the 1950 yr B.P. eruption of San Antonio Volcano, Tacaná Volcanic Complex, Mexico-Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Juan Carlos; Gardner, James Edward; Macías, José Luis; Meriggi, Lorenzo; Santo, Alba Patrizia

    2013-07-01

    San Antonio Volcano, in the Tacaná Volcanic Complex, erupted ~ 1950 yr. B.P., with a Pelean type eruption that produced andesitic pyroclastic surges and block-and-ash flows destroying part of the volcano summit and producing a horse-shoe shaped crater open to the SW. Between 1950 and 800 yr B.P. the eruption continued with effusive andesites followed by a dacite lava flow and a summit dome, all from a single magma batch. All products consist of phenocrysts and microphenocrysts of zoned plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, magnetite ± ilmenite, set in partially crystallized groundmass of glass and microlites of the same mineral phases, except for the lack of amphibole. Included in the andesitic blocks of the block-and-ash flow deposit are basaltic andesite enclaves with elongated and ellipsoidal forms and chilled margins. The enclaves have intersertal textures with brown glass between microphenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, pyroxene, and olivine, and minor proportions of phenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, and pyroxene. A compositional range obtained of blocks and enclaves resulted from mixing between andesite (866 °C ± 22) and basaltic andesite (enclaves, 932 °C ± 22), which may have triggered the explosive Pelean eruption. Vestiges of that mixing are preserved as complex compositional zones in plagioclase and clinopyroxene-rich reaction rims in amphibole in the andesite. Whole-rock chemistry, geothermometry, experimental petrology and modeling results suggest that after the mixing event the eruption tapped hybrid andesitic magma (≤ 900 °C) and ended with effusive dacitic magma (~ 825 °C), all of which were stored at ~ 200 MPa water pressure. A complex open-system evolution that involved crustal end-members best explains the generation of effusive dacite from the hybrid andesite. Amphibole in the dacite is rimmed by reaction products of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxides produced by decompression during ascent. Amphibole in the andesite

  17. Deposition temperature of some PDC deposits from the 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) inferred from rock-magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulpizio, Roberto; Zanella, Elena; Macías, José Luis

    2008-08-01

    Thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) analyses were carried out on lithic fragments from two different typologies of pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits of the 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano, in order to estimate their equilibrium temperature ( Tdep) after deposition. The estimated Tdep range is 360-400 °C, which overlaps the direct measurements of temperature carried out four days after the eruption on the PDC deposits. This overlap demonstrates the reliability of the TRM method to estimate the Tdep of pyroclastic deposits and to approximate their depositional temperature. These results also constraint the time needed for reaching thermal equilibrium within four days for the studied PDC deposits, in agreement with predictions of theoretical models. Sedimentological analysis demonstrates that different thickness of aggrading granular dominated pulses does not affect significantly the estimated Tdep for the two studied PDCs. The component analysis highlights how the entrapment of a significant amount of pre-heated lithic fragments from the dome and the conduit walls reduced the cooling of the pyroclastic mixture.

  18. The challenging retrieval of the displacement field from InSAR data for andesitic stratovolcanoes: Case study of Popocatepetl and Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel, V.; Hooper, A.; De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Reyes-Davila, G.; Doin, M. P.; Bascou, P.

    2011-02-01

    Despite the ability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry to measure ground motion with high-resolution, application of this remote sensing technique to monitor andesitic stratovolcanoes remains limited. Specific acquisition conditions characterizing andesitic stratovolcanoes, mainly vegetated areas with large elevation ranges, induce low signal coherence as well as strong tropospheric artefacts that result in small signal-to-noise ratio. We propose here a way to mitigate these difficulties and improve the SAR measurements. We derive ground motions for two of the most active Mexican stratovolcanoes: Popocatepetl and Colima Volcano, from the time series of SAR data acquired from December 2002 to August 2006. The SAR data are processed using a method that combines both persistent scatterers and small baseline approaches. Stratified tropospheric delays are estimated for each interferogram using inputs from the global atmospheric model NARR, up to a maximum of 10 rad/km. These delays are validated using spectrometer data, as well as the correlation between the wrapped phase and the elevation. The tropospheric effect is removed from the wrapped phase in order to improve the unwrapping process. On Popocatepetl, we observe no significant deformation. The Colima summit area exhibits a constant subsidence rate of more than 1 cm/year centered on the summit but enhanced (reaching more than 2 cm/year) around the 1998 lava flow. We model this subsidence considering both a deflating magma source at depth and the effect of the eruptive deposits load.

  19. Geomorphological evolution of volcanic fluvial channels: Eighteen years of morphological monitoring of the upper strect of the Tenenepanco Gorge, Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanarro, Luis Miguel; Juan Zamorano, Jose; Andres, Nuria; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    During volcanic eruptions a significant volume of material accumulates on the slopes and pre-existing gorges of the stratovolcanoes. This abundance of loose and unconsolidated material is very likely to be mobilized by rapid flows or lahars generated by sudden heavy rain or melting snow and ice. Thus, volcanic gorges are affected by complex cycles of incision, filling and widening, altering the equilibrium of river systems due to the major changes that lahars cause in channel morphology. These geomorphological dynamics characterize the gorges located on the north flank of the Popocatépetl volcano (19°02' N, 98°62' W, 5424 m). This volcano, located in the centre of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, began its most recent eruptive period in December 1994, when a glacier partially covered the northern slope. Since then, the interaction of volcanic and glacier activity triggered the formation of lahars in the gorges, causing significant morphological changes in the channel (especially in April 1995, July 1997 and January 2001). The most recent major eruption at Popocatépetl took place on 19 July 2003, and since then a series of smaller eruptions has reduced the glacier to near extinction. The aim of this study is to assess the morphological response of the Tenenepanco channel over an 18-year period, from 1995-2013, where two main scenarios can be observed: a) the period from 1995 to 2001 of volcanic activity and glacier retreat with the formation of flows and b) the period from 2002 to 2013 of relative volcanic calm, the almost complete extinction of the glacier, and the formation of secondary lahars associated with heavy rainfall. Monitoring of the gorge has consisted in the elaboration of 14 geomorphological maps during field studies (November 14, 1995, December 5, 1997, February 7, 1998, October 6, 2001, November 14, 1995, December 5, 1997, February 7, 1998, October 6, 2001, Julio 16, 2002, February 11, 2004, September 8, 2004, February 5, 2006, November 2, 2008

  20. An overview of a GIS method for mapping landslides and assessing landslide hazards at Río El Estado watershed, on the SW flank of Pico de Orizaba Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Contreras, T.; Polenz, M.; Ramírez Herrera, M.; Paredes Mejía, L.; Arana Salinas, L.

    2012-12-01

    This poster provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT no 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, produce a landslide susceptibility map, and estimate sediment production by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The Río El Estado watershed on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico, is selected as a study area. The catchment covers 5.2 km2 with elevations ranging from 2676.79 to 4248.2 m a.s.l. and hillslopes between 0° and 56°. The stream system of Río El Estado catchment erodes Tertiary and Quaternary lavas, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits. The geologic and geomorphologic factors in combination with high seasonal precipitation, high degree of weathering, and steep slopes predispose the study area to landslides. The methodology encompasses three main stages of analysis to assess landslide hazards: Stage 1 builds a historic landslide inventory. In the study area, an inventory of more than 170 landslides is created from multi-temporal aerial-photo-interpretation and local field surveys to assess landslide distribution. All landslides were digitized into a geographic information system (GIS), and a spatial geo-database of landslides was constructed from standardized GIS datasets. Stage 2 Calculates the susceptibility for the watershed. During this stage, Multiple Logistic Regression and SINMAP) will be evaluated to select the one that provides scientific accuracy, technical accessibility, and applicability. Stage 3 Estimate the potential total material delivered to the main stream drainage channel by all landslides in the catchment. Detailed geometric measurements of individual landslides visited during the field work will be carried out to obtain the landslide area and volume. These measurements revealed an empirical relationship between area and volume that took the

  1. An overview of a GIS method for mapping landslides and assessing landslide susceptibility in the Río La Carbonera watershed, on the SE flank of Pico de Orizaba Volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Contreras, T.

    2015-12-01

    This poster provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant PAPIIT # IN102115) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, produce a landslide susceptibility map, and estimate sediment production by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The Río La Carbonera watershed on the southeastern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico, is selected as a study area. The catchment covers 71.9 km2 with elevations ranging from 1224 to 3643 m a.s.l. and hillslopes between <5° and 68°. The stream system of Río La Carbonera catchment erodes Tertiary and Quaternary lavas, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits. The geologic and geomorphologic factors in combination with high seasonal precipitation, high degree of weathering, and steep slopes predispose the study area to landslides. The methodology encompasses three main stages of analysis to assess landslide hazards: Stage 1 builds a historic landslide inventory. In the study area, an inventory of more than 200 landslides is created from multi-temporal aerial-photo-interpretation and local field surveys to assess landslide distribution. All landslides were digitized into a geographic information system (GIS), and a spatial geo-database of landslides was constructed from standardized GIS datasets. Stage 2 calculates the susceptibility for the watershed. During this stage, (SINMAP using default values) is evaluated. Stage 3 Estimate the potential total material delivered to the main stream drainage channel by all landslides in the catchment. Detailed geometric measurements of individual landslides visited during the field work will be carried out to obtain the landslide area and volume. These measurements revealed an empirical relationship between area and volume that took the form of a power law. This relationship will be used to estimate the potential volume of material delivered to the

  2. Application of HydroGeoSphere to model the response to anthropogenic climate change of three-dimensional hydrological processes in the geologically, geothermally, and topographically complex Valles Caldera super volcano, New Mexico: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wine, M.; Cadol, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is expected to reduce streamflow in the southwestern USA due to reduction in precipitation and increases in evaporative demand. Understanding the effects of climate change in this region is particularly important for mountainous areas since these are primary sources of recharge in arid and semi-arid environments. Therefore we undertook to model effects of climate change on the hydrological processes in Valles Caldera (448 km2), located in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. In Valles Caldera modeling the surficial, hydrogeological, and geothermal processes that influence hydrologic fluxes each present challenges. The surficial dynamics of evaporative demand and snowmelt both serve to control recharge dynamics, but are complicated by the complex topography and spatiotemporal vegetation dynamics. Complex factors affecting evaporative demand include leaf area index, temperature, albedo, and radiation affected by topographic shading; all of these factors vary in space and time. Snowmelt processes interact with evaporative demand and geology to serve as an important control on streamflow generation, but modeling the effects of spatiotemporal snow distributions on streamflow generation remains a challenge. The complexity of Valles Caldera's geology—and its associated hydraulic properties—rivals that of its surficial hydrologic forcings. Hydrologically important geologic features that have formed in the Valles Caldera are three-dimensionally intricate and include a dense system of faults, alluvium, landslides, lake deposits, and features associated with the eruption and collapse of this super volcano. Coupling geothermally-driven convection to the hydrologic cycle in this still-active geothermal system presents yet an additional challenge in modeling Valles Caldera. Preliminary results from applying the three-dimensional distributed hydrologic finite element model HydroGeoSphere to a sub-catchment of Valles Caldera will be

  3. Source mechanism of Vulcanian degassing at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, determined from waveform inversions of very long period signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra

    2005-01-01

    The source mechanism of very long period (VLP) signals accompanying volcanic degassing bursts at Popocatépetl is analyzed in the 15–70 s band by minimizing the residual error between data and synthetics calculated for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium. The waveforms of two eruptions (23 April and 23 May 2000) representative of mild Vulcanian activity are well reproduced by our inversion, which takes into account volcano topography. The source centroid is positioned 1500 m below the western perimeter of the summit crater, and the modeled source is composed of a shallow dipping crack (sill with easterly dip of 10°) intersecting a steeply dipping crack (northeast striking dike dipping 83° northwest), whose surface extension bisects the vent. Both cracks undergo a similar sequence of inflation, deflation, and reinflation, reflecting a cycle of pressurization, depressurization, and repressurization within a time interval of 3–5 min. The largest moment release occurs in the sill, showing a maximum volume change of 500–1000 m3, pressure drop of 3–5 MPa, and amplitude of recovered pressure equal to 1.2 times the amplitude of the pressure drop. In contrast, the maximum volume change in the dike is less (200–300 m3), with a corresponding pressure drop of 1–2 MPa and pressure recovery equal to the pressure drop. Accompanying these volumetric sources are single-force components with magnitudes of 108 N, consistent with melt advection in response to pressure transients. The source time histories of the volumetric components of the source indicate that significant mass movement starts within the sill and triggers a mass movement response in the dike within a few seconds. Such source behavior is consistent with the opening of a pathway for escape of pent-up gases from slow pressurization of the sill driven by magma crystallization. The opening of this pathway and associated rapid evacuation of volcanic gases induces the pressure drop. Pressure

  4. Source Mechanism of Vulcanian Degassing at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, Determined From Moment-Tensor Inversion of Very-long-period Seismic Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.; Arciniega, A.

    2004-12-01

    The source mechanism of very-long-period (VLP) signals accompanying degassing exhalations at Popocatépetl is analyzed in the 15-70~s band by minimizing the residual error between data and synthetics calculated for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium. The waveforms of two events (04/23/00, 05/23/00) representative of mild Vulcanian eruptions are well reproduced by our inversion, which takes into account volcano topography. The source centroid is positioned 1500~m below the western perimeter of the summit crater, and the modeled source is composed of a shallow-dipping crack (sill with easterly dip of 10° ) intersecting a steeply-dipping crack (northeast striking dike with northwest dip of 83° ), whose surface trace bisects the vent. Both cracks undergo a similar sequence of inflation, deflation, and reinflation --- reflecting a cycle of pressurization, depressurization, and repressurization within a time interval of 3-5~min. The largest moment release occurs in the sill, showing a maximum volume change of 500-1000\\:m3, pressure drop of 3-5~MPa, and amplitude of recovered pressure equal to 1.2 times the amplitude of the pressure drop. In contrast, the maximum volume change in the dike is 200-300\\:m3, with a corresponding pressure drop of 1-2~MPa and pressure recovery equal to the pressure drop. Accompanying these volumetric sources is a single force with magnitude of 5 × 108~N, consistent with melt advection in response to the pressure transients. The source-time history of the three components of this force confirms that significant mass movement starts in the sill and triggers a mass movement response in the dike within ˜ 5~s. Such source behavior is consistent with the opening of an escape pathway for accumulated gases from slow pressurization of the sill driven by magma crystallization. The opening of a pathway for pent-up gases in the sill and rapid evacuation of this separated gas phase induces the pressure drop. Pressure recovery in the magma

  5. A Textural Exploration of the Physical Attributes of Pumice Clasts From the 23,000 Y.B.P. Eruption of Popocatepetl Volcano in Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, N. R.; Gardner, J. E.; Siebe, C.

    2005-12-01

    The eruption of Popocatepetl Volcano 23,000 Y.B.P. produced the youngest in a series of debris avalanches. This 9 km3 debris avalanche was followed by a large blast deposit and then the White Pumice fall, on which we focus. We are investigating whether the large decompression that resulted from the debris avalanche may have caused the vesiculation process to change, thereby altering the physical properties of the deposit. The White Pumice is the thickest fall deposit at Popocatepetl and has an estimated minimum volume of 1-2 km3 DRE. Its relative reverse grading in lithic sizes suggests mass flux increased throughout the eruption, assuming no significant change in winds during deposition. While the mass flux appears to increase, the average vesicularity of pumice clasts decreases through the deposit. Bulk vesicularity of the pumices ranges from 55.3% to 88.3%, with a mean value of 75.4% and a mode of 77%, based on density measurements of 900 pumice clasts. We are also characterizing the textural attributes of pumice from the deposit, which we are qualitatively analyzing through ESEM pictures of the surface of low, medium, and high vesicularity pumice clasts. Preliminary results suggest that individual pumice clasts throughout the vesicularity range share the same textural qualities in different proportions. A variable degree of vesiculation on the surface of individual pumices occurs in sections that transition into one another. Some areas are smooth with little to no vesiculation and an abundance of cracks. In low vesicularity sections of individual pumice, there are predominately rounded to slightly elongate vesicles with irregular bubble shapes. These areas often have a rough surface texture due to pieces of glass welded to the smooth, glassy bubble walls. In more vesicular regions of the same pumice, the rough texture due to welding is less common and the vesicles become more elongate with smoother bubble walls and a more regular shape. Areas with tube vesicles

  6. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  7. Focus: alien volcanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael; Lopes, Rosaly

    2007-03-01

    Part 1: Volcanoes on Earth - blowing their top; Part 2: Volcanoes of the inner Solar System - dead or alive: the Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus; Part 3: Volcanoes of the outer Solar System - fire and ice: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Miranda, Titan, Triton, Enceladus.

  8. Volcano seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  9. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  10. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  11. Galactic Super Volcano Similar to Iceland Volcano

    NASA Video Gallery

    This composite image from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio data from the Very Large Array shows a cosmic volcano being driven by a black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy. This eruptio...

  12. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Fraser

    2005-05-01

    Adventure travels to volcanoes offer chance encounters with danger, excitement, and romance, plus opportunities to experience scientific enlightenment and culture. To witness a violently erupting volcano and its resulting impacts on landscape, climate, and humanity is a powerful personal encounter with gigantic planetary forces. To study volcano processes and products during eruptions is to walk in the footsteps of Pliny himself. To tour the splendors and horrors of 25 preeminent volcanoes might be the experience of a lifetime, for scientists and nonscientists alike. In The Volcano Adventure Guide, we now have the ultimate tourist volume to lead us safely to many of the world's famous volcanoes and to ensure that we will see the important sites at each one.

  13. Mud volcanoes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    The term mud volcano is applied to a variety of landforms having in common a formation by extrusion of mud from beneath the ground. Although mud is the principal solid material that issues from a mud volcano, there are many examples where clasts up to boulder size are found, sometimes thrown high into the air during an eruption. Other characteristics of mud volcanoes (on Earth) are discussed. The possible presence of mud volcanoes, which are common and widespread on Earth, on Mars is considered.

  14. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  15. Imaging an Active Volcano Edifice at Tenerife Island, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Rietbrock, Andreas; García-Yeguas, Araceli

    2008-08-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Teide volcano is being carried out on Tenerife, a volcanic island in Spain's Canary Islands archipelago. The main objective of the Tomography at Teide Volcano Spain (TOM-TEIDEVS) experiment, begun in January 2007, is to obtain a three-dimensional (3-D) structural image of Teide volcano using seismic tomography and seismic reflection/refraction imaging techniques. At present, knowledge of the deeper structure of Teide and Tenerife is very limited, with proposed structural models based mainly on sparse geophysical and geological data. The multinational experiment-involving institutes from Spain, the United Kingdom, Italy, Ireland, and Mexico-will generate a unique high-resolution structural image of the active volcano edifice and will further our understanding of volcanic processes.

  16. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  17. Shaking up volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, Stephanie G.; Haney, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Most volcanic eruptions that occur shortly after a large distant earthquake do so by random chance. A few compelling cases for earthquake-triggered eruptions exist, particularly within 200 km of the earthquake, but this phenomenon is rare in part because volcanoes must be poised to erupt in order to be triggered by an earthquake (1). Large earthquakes often perturb volcanoes in more subtle ways by triggering small earthquakes and changes in spring discharge and groundwater levels (1, 2). On page 80 of this issue, Brenguier et al. (3) provide fresh insight into the interaction of large earthquakes and volcanoes by documenting a temporary change in seismic velocity beneath volcanoes in Honshu, Japan, after the devastating Tohoku-Oki earthquake in 2011.

  18. Identification of a potential monogenetic volcano using seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Denis; Bataille, Klaus; Cembrano, Jose; Pavez, Andres; Bashkar, Kundu; Gahalaut, Vineet; Perez, Raul

    2014-05-01

    Some monogenetic volcano fields are very close to cities, such as in New Zealand or in México. A new monogenetic volcano may appear at any place and at any time, which could be potentially hazardous for nearby regions. The ability to detect a new one in advance is obviously very important and challenging. The existence of nearby seismometers may help for such detection. Magma sometimes reaches the surface with the birth of a volcano which can be monogenetic, but in other cases the magma does not reach the surface How to detect such movements? How to be sure the magma will reach the surface? Some observations may detect them, such as seismicity which is distributed as a swarm, with a very peculiar distribution in time and magnitudes. In particular, it is important to distinguish between a tectonic swarm and a volcanic swarm. Scaling laws of seismicity in magnitude and time help to perform such a distinction. We show three cases: a seismic swarm in Chile, in the 2007 Aysen crisis, corresponding to an aborted birth of a monogenetic volcano; a seismic swarm triggered after the 2004 great Mw~9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake over an old monogenetic volcano; and a spatial study of monogenetic volcanoes in Mexico (Michoacán) showing the difficulty to forecast the place and time of the birth of a monogenetic cone without seismological records.

  19. Volcano seismicity in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurman, Helena

    I examine the many facets of volcano seismicity in Alaska: from the short-lived eruption seismicity that is limited to only the few weeks during which a volcano is active, to the seismicity that occurs in the months following an eruption, and finally to the long-term volcano seismicity that occurs in the years in which volcanoes are dormant. I use the rich seismic dataset that was recorded during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano to examine eruptive volcano seismicity. I show that the progression of magma through the conduit system at Redoubt could be readily tracked by the seismicity. Many of my interpretations benefited greatly from the numerous other datasets collected during the eruption. Rarely was there volcanic activity that did not manifest itself in some way seismically, however, resulting in a remarkably complete chronology within the seismic record of the 2009 eruption. I also use the Redoubt seismic dataset to study post-eruptive seismicity. During the year following the eruption there were a number of unexplained bursts of shallow seismicity that did not culminate in eruptive activity despite closely mirroring seismic signals that had preceded explosions less than a year prior. I show that these episodes of shallow seismicity were in fact related to volcanic processes much deeper in the volcanic edifice by demonstrating that earthquakes that were related to magmatic activity during the eruption were also present during the renewed shallow unrest. These results show that magmatic processes can continue for many months after eruptions end, suggesting that volcanoes can stay active for much longer than previously thought. In the final chapter I characterize volcanic earthquakes on a much broader scale by analyzing a decade of continuous seismic data across 46 volcanoes in the Aleutian arc to search for regional-scale trends in volcano seismicity. I find that volcanic earthquakes below 20 km depth are much more common in the central region of the arc

  20. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  1. Mexico City, Mexico as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image is the clearest photo of Mexico City, Mexico taken from U.S. Manned Spacecraft. North is to the upper right. Mexico City sits in a basin surrounded by large volcanoes. The restricted atmospheric circulation in the basin, coupled with the inevitable air emissions produced by a city of 20 million people has created a critical air pollution problem for the city. In most photographs of the region, Mexico City is obscured by haze. The clarity of the photograph allows many key cultural features to be identified, including all of the major boulevards, the horse track (western part of the city), the university (south of the city), and the museum areas. Large, man-made ponds east of the city also stand out.

  2. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  3. Volcano Near Pavonis Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-549, 19 November 2003

    The volcanic plains to the east, southeast, and south of the giant Tharsis volcano, Pavonis Mons, are dotted by dozens of small volcanoes. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example located near 2.1oS, 109.1oW. The elongate depression in the lower left (southwest) quarter of the image is the collapsed vent area for this small, unnamed volcano. A slightly sinuous, leveed channel runs from the depression toward the upper right (north-northeast); this is the trace of a collapsed lava tube. The entire scene has been mantled by dust, such that none of the original volcanic rocks are exposed--except minor occurrences on the steepest slopes in the vent area. The scene is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  4. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  5. Petrography of volcaniclastic rocks in intra-arc volcano-bounded to fault-bounded basins of the Rosario segment of the Lower Cretaceous Alisitos oceanic arc, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsaglia, K. M.; Barone, M.; Critelli, S.; Busby, C.; Fackler-Adams, B.

    2016-05-01

    The Rosario segment of the Early Cretaceous Alisitos oceanic magmatic arc in Baja California displays a record of arc-axis sedimentation and volcanism that is well preserved in outcrops within a southern volcano-bounded and a northern fault-bounded basin that flanked an intervening subaerial edifice. This record includes volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks that range from felsic to mafic in composition. Volcaniclastic/tuffaceous sandstone samples from two previously published measured sections are mainly composed of volcanic clasts with moderate plagioclase content. Locally quartz and/or potassium feldspar are present in trace to moderate amounts. The proportions of volcanic lithic types exhibiting vitric, microlitic, lathwork, and felsitic textures are highly variable with no distinct stratigraphic trends, likely as a function of the mixed styles of eruption and magma compositions that produced pyroclasts, as well as erosion-produced epiclastic debris. The volcaniclastic fill of the basins is consistent with an oceanic arc setting, except for the relatively high felsitic volcanic lithic content, likely associated with subaerial, as opposed to the more common submarine felsic magmatism associated with arc extension in oceanic settings. There are no major differences in compositional modes of tuff and sandstone between the fault-bounded and volcano-bounded basin strata, even though they exhibit distinctly different volcaniclastic facies. This suggests that proximal arc-axis basins of varying types around a single major subaerial edifice provide a faithful record of volcanic trends in the arc segment, regardless of variation in transport and depositional processes.

  6. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  7. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  8. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times, most destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of feet into the atmoshpehere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. 

  9. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly

    2005-02-01

    This guide contains vital information for anyone wishing to visit, explore, and photograph active volcanoes safely and enjoyably. Following an introduction that discusses eruption styles of different types of volcanoes and how to prepare for an exploratory trip that avoids volcanic dangers, the book presents guidelines to visiting 42 different volcanoes around the world. It is filled with practical information that includes tour itineraries, maps, transportation details, and warnings of possible non-volcanic dangers. Three appendices direct the reader to a wealth of further volcano resources in a volume that will fascinate amateur enthusiasts and professional volcanologists alike. Rosaly Lopes is a planetary geology and volcanology specialist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. In addition to her curatorial and research work, she has lectured extensively in England and Brazil and written numerous popular science articles. She received a Latinas in Science Award from the Comision Feminil Mexicana Nacional in 1991 and since 1992, has been a co-organizer of the United Nations/European Space Agency/The Planetary Society yearly conferences on Basic Science for the Benefit of Developing Countries.

  10. Volcanoes and the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Edited By Joan; Ernst, Gerald G. J.

    2005-10-01

    Volcanoes and the Environment is a comprehensive and accessible text incorporating contributions from some of the world's authorities in volcanology. This book is an indispensable guide for those interested in how volcanism affects our planet's environment. It spans a wide variety of topics from geology to climatology and ecology; it also considers the economic and social impacts of volcanic activity on humans. Topics covered include how volcanoes shape the environment, their effect on the geological cycle, atmosphere and climate, impacts on health of living on active volcanoes, volcanism and early life, effects of eruptions on plant and animal life, large eruptions and mass extinctions, and the impact of volcanic disasters on the economy. This book is intended for students and researchers interested in environmental change from the fields of earth and environmental science, geography, ecology and social science. It will also interest policy makers and professionals working on natural hazards. An all-inclusive text that goes beyond the geological working of volcanoes to consider their environmental and sociological impacts Each chapter is written by one of the world's leading authorities on the subject Accessible to students and researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds

  11. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.B. . Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. . Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This pair of images was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 26. The image on the left shows the scene in true color. The small purple box in the upper righthand corner marks the location of Nyamuragira's hot summit. The false-color image on the right shows the plume from the volcano streaming southwestward. This image was made using MODIS' channels sensitive at wavelengths from 8.5 to 11 microns. Red pixels indicate high concentrations of sulphur dioxide. Image courtesy Liam Gumley, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  13. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  14. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  15. Mexico Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Smoke from Fires in Southern Mexico     View Larger Image ... southern Mexico sent smoke drifting northward over the Gulf of Mexico. These views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ...

  16. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  17. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    As the natural phenomenon the mud volcanism (mud volcanoes) of Azerbaijan are known from the ancient times. The historical records describing them are since V century. More detail study of this natural phenomenon had started in the second half of XIX century. The term "mud volcano" (or "mud hill") had been given by academician H.W. Abich (1863), more exactly defining this natural phenomenon. All the previous definitions did not give such clear and capacious explanation of it. In comparison with magmatic volcanoes, globally the mud ones are restricted in distribution; they mainly locate within the Alpine-Himalayan, Pacific and Central Asian mobile belts, in more than 30 countries (Columbia, Trinidad Island, Italy, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Burma, Malaysia, etc.). Besides it, the zones of mud volcanoes development are corresponded to zones of marine accretionary prisms' development. For example, the South-Caspian depression, Barbados Island, Cascadia (N.America), Costa-Rica, Panama, Japan trench. Onshore it is Indonesia, Japan, and Trinidad, Taiwan. The mud volcanism with non-accretionary conditions includes the areas of Black Sea, Alboran Sea, the Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana coast), Salton Sea. But new investigations reveal more new mud volcanoes and in places which were not considered earlier as the traditional places of mud volcanoes development (e.g. West Nile Rive delta). Azerbaijan is the classic region of mud volcanoes development. From over 800 world mud volcanoes there are about 400 onshore and within the South-Caspian basin, which includes the territory of East Azerbaijan (the regions of Shemakha-Gobustan and Low-Kura River, Absheron peninsula), adjacent water area of South Caspian (Baku and Absheron archipelagoes) and SW Turkmenistan and represents an area of great downwarping with thick (over 25 km) sedimentary series. Generally, in the modern relief the mud volcanoes represent more or less large uplifts

  18. Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of February 7, ASTER captured this nighttime thermal infrared image of an eruption of Anatahan Volcano in the central Mariana Islands. The summit of the volcano is bright indicating there is a very hot area there. Streaming to the west is an ash plume, visible by the red color indicating the presence of silicate-rich particles. Dark grey areas are clouds that appear colder than the ocean. Anatahan is a stratovolcano that started erupting in May 2003, forming a new crater.

    The image covers an area of 56.3 x 41.8 km, and is located 16 degrees north latitude and 145.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  20. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  1. Volcanoes and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence that volcanic eruptions affect climate is reviewed. Single explosive volcanic eruptions cool the surface by about 0.3 C and warm the stratosphere by several degrees. Although these changes are of small magnitude, there have been several years in which these hemispheric average temperature changes were accompanied by severely abnormal weather. An example is 1816, the "year without summer" which followed the 1815 eruption of Tambora. In addition to statistical correlations between volcanoes and climate, a good theoretical understanding exists. The magnitude of the climatic changes anticipated following volcanic explosions agrees well with the observations. Volcanoes affect climate because volcanic particles in the atmosphere upset the balance between solar energy absorbed by the Earth and infrared energy emitted by the Earth. These interactions can be observed. The most important ejecta from volcanoes is not volcanic ash but sulfur dioxide which converts into sulfuric acid droplets in the stratosphere. For an eruption with its explosive magnitude, Mount St. Helens injected surprisingly little sulfur into the stratosphere. The amount of sulfuric acid formed is much smaller than that observed following significant eruptions and is too small to create major climatic shifts. However, the Mount St. Helens eruption has provided an opportunity to measure many properties of volcanic debris not previously measured and has therefore been of significant value in improving our knowledge of the relations between volcanic activity and climate.

  2. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  3. Applications of a simplified equation of state for the density of silicate hydrous magmas: The Volcán de Colima (Mexico) buoyancy-driven dome growth process. Similarities and differences with the Popocatépetl volcano domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Mellado, Alex Onar; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Navarro-Ochoa, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    Colima and Popocatépetl volcanoes began erupting during the second half of the twentieth century after periods or relatively long quiescence. Both eruptive episodes show similarities: persistent dome growth and destruction episodes over periods of decades, and differences: higher rates of magma and gas production at Popocatépetl, with similar magmas (Popocatépetl's slightly more acidic). We use a simplified equation of state (EOS) for calculating the density of the hydrous andesitic magmas of Volcán de Colima in a realistic range of pressures, temperatures and dissolved water content to model the density contrast with the host rock causing buoyancy of the magmatic column. We use this model to explain some aspects of the dome-forming effusive activity of Colima, and compare the results with a similar study made in a previous work on Popocatépetl. This dome-height isostatic model explains well the observed mean heights (around 50 m) of the Colima lava domes with the buoyant force resulting from a 2.5 wt.% H 2O content in the melt, a value consistent with recently published measurements of rock inclusions. The slightly higher H 2O contents required for the observed dome heights at Popocatépetl is explained in terms of the different depths of the isostatic compensation levels, the compositional differences between the magmas, and the structural differences between the volcanic edifices.

  4. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island

  5. Effect of the ash Fall on the Human Health at Colima Volcano During 2005-2006.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, A.; Martin, A. L.; Fonseca, R.; Garcia, M.

    2007-05-01

    Colima Volcano in western Mexico had several small ash emitting eruptions during 2005-2006. In this time period we studied the impact of the ash fall on human health through field observations, interviews and health data processing. The volcano was most active in May-June 2005. Data from 15.000 medical records of the Colima and Jalisco State Health Departments show two main health problems in humans during this time: Conjunctivitis was detected in 1,933 people and respiratory disease in 12,630 people in an area of 1,841,283 km2 which was affected by small amounts of ash fall near the volcano in 2005. Ash emissions from Colima Volcano correlate well with increased affections. When emissions increased so did the frequency of these health problems in the population.

  6. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability

  7. Remote sensing of Italian volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, R.; Casacchia, R.; Coradini, A.; Duncan, A. M.; Guest, J. E.; Kahle, A.; Lanciano, P.; Pieri, D. C.; Poscolieri, M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a July 1986 remote sensing campaign of Italian volcanoes are reviewed. The equipment and techniques used to acquire the data are described and the results obtained for Campi Flegrei and Mount Etna are reviewed and evaluated for their usefulness for the study of active and recently active volcanoes.

  8. Volcanoes, Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The island of Java (8.0S, 112.0E), perhaps better than any other, illustrates the volcanic origin of Pacific Island groups. Seen in this single view are at least a dozen once active volcano craters. Alignment of the craters even defines the linear fault line of Java as well as the other some 1500 islands of the Indonesian Archipelago. Deep blue water of the Indian Ocean to the south contrasts to the sediment laden waters of the Java Sea to the north.

  9. Volcanoes of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Charles

    1996-09-01

    Nothing can be more breathtaking than the spectacle of a volcano erupting. Space-age lunar and planetary missions offer us an unprecedented perspective on volcanism. Starting with the Earth, Volcanoes of the Solar System takes the reader on a guided tour of the terrestrial planets and moons and their volcanic features. We see lunar lava fields through the eyes of the Apollo astronauts, and take an imaginary hike up the Martian slopes of Olympus Mons--the tallest volcano in the solar system. Complemented by over 150 photographs, this comprehensive and lucid account of volcanoes describes the most recent data on the unique and varied volcanic features of Venus and updates our knowledge on the prodigiously active volcanoes of Io. A member of the Association of European Volcanologists, Charles Frankel has directed documentary films on geology, astronomy and space exploration and has authored a number of articles on the earth sciences.

  10. Elysium Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On July 4, 1998--the first anniversary of the Mars Pathfinder landing--Mars Global Surveyor's latest images were radioed to Earth with little fanfare. The images received on July 4, 1998, however, were very exciting because they included a rare crossing of the summit caldera of a major martian volcano. Elysium Mons is located at 25oN, 213oW, in the martian eastern hemisphere. Elysium Mons is one of three large volcanoes that occur on the Elysium Rise-- the others are Hecates Tholus (northeast of Elysium Mons) and Albor Tholus (southeast of Elysium Mons). The volcano rises about 12.5 kilometers (7.8 miles) above the surrounding plain, or about 16 kilometers (9.9 miles) above the martian datum-- the 'zero' elevation defined by average martian atmospheric pressure and the planet's radius.

    Elysium Mons was discovered by Mariner 9 in 1972. It differs in a number of ways from the familiar Olympus Mons and other large volcanoes in the Tharsis region. In particular, there are no obvious lava flows visible on the volcano's flanks. The lack of lava flows was apparent from the Mariner 9 images, but the new MOC high resolution image--obtained at 5.24 meters (17.2 feet) per pixel--illustrates that this is true even when viewed at higher spatial resolution.

    Elysium Mons has many craters on its surface. Some of these probably formed by meteor impact, but many show no ejecta pattern characteristic of meteor impact. Some of the craters are aligned in linear patterns that are radial to the summit caldera--these most likely formed by collapse as lava was withdrawn from beneath the surface, rather than by meteor impact. Other craters may have formed by explosive volcanism. Evidence for explosive volcanism on Mars has been very difficult to identify from previous Mars spacecraft images. This and other MOC data are being examined closely to better understand the nature and origin of volcanic features on Mars.

    The three MOC images, 40301 (red wide angle), 40302 (blue wide angle

  11. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  12. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  13. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. )

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  14. Counterfactual Volcano Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    , if a major storm surge happens to arrive at a high astronomical tide, sea walls may be overtopped and flooding may ensue. In the domain of geological hazards, periods of volcanic unrest may generate precursory signals suggestive of imminent volcanic danger, but without leading to an actual eruption. Near-miss unrest periods provide vital evidence for assessing the dynamics of volcanoes close to eruption. Where the volcano catalogue has been diligently revised to include the maximum amount of information on the phenomenology of unrest periods, dynamic modelling and hazard assessment may be significantly refined. This is illustrated with some topical volcano hazard examples, including Montserrat and Santorini.

  15. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is

  16. HSDP: The Lost Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blichert-Toft, J.; Albarede, F.

    2008-12-01

    We measured high-precision Hf, Nd, and Pb isotope compositions for 40 samples from the final leg of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) core using solution chemistry and MC-ICP-MS. This final leg extends the drill core from 3097.7 mbsl down to a depth of 3505.7 mbsl. The new isotope data are indistinguishable from those higher up in the Mauna Kea part of the core and vary from, respectively, +11.6 to +12.3, +6.4 to +7.0, and 18.2948 to 18.6819 for ɛHf, ɛNd, and 206Pb/204Pb. The Pb isotope data define three linear trends with a common intersection. Principal component analysis recognizes no more than three geochemical end-members (99.8% of the variance) among these trends. When all the Pb isotope data acquired so far ([1-3] and this work) are pooled, two contrasting groups stand out, mostly with respect to 208Pb/206Pb. (1) A first coherent, prevalent group is identified, which represents the Kea main eruptive sequence. This group combines the Kea-mid8 and the Kea-lo8 subgroups of [3]: although these subgroups define two separate trends in Pb-Pb isotope space, they smoothly follow each other in time. (2) A second group of 15 flows at depths below 2000 mbsl is characterized by distinctly higher source Th/U and, for the samples above the new core samples, also high 3He/4He. These samples belong to the K/L group of [2] and to the Kea-hi8 group of [3] and are about 0.4 (Hf) and 0.5 (Nd) ɛ units below the main sequence Kea values. The toggle between these two groups of flows is so sharp and repetitive and the gap between the values so conspicuous that the alternation must reflect eruptions from distinct volcanic centers, Mauna Kea and an unknown volcano (K/L) that bears some isotopic resemblance to Kilauea for Nd and Hf and to Loihi for He [2, 4]. This 'lost' volcano stopped erupting about 550 ka ago, i.e., 200 ka before the oldest ages known for Kilauea [5], and is presently buried under 2-3000 m of Mauna Kea flows. We left out the data on the lost volcano

  17. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of meters into the atmosphere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. Countless eruptions in the geologic past have produced volcanic rocks that form much of the Earth's present surface. The gradual disintegration and weathering of these rocks have yielded some of the richest farmlands in the world, and these fertile soils play a significant role in sustaining our large and growing population. Were it not for volcanic activity, the Hawaiian Islands with their sugar cane and pineapple fields and magnificent landscapes and seascapes would not exist to support their residents and to charm their visitors. Yet, the actual eruptive processes are catastrophic and can claim life and property.

  18. Volcanoes, Third Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Christopher J.

    It takes confidence to title a smallish book merely “Volcanoes” because of the impliction that the myriad facets of volcanism—chemistry, physics, geology, meteorology, hazard mitigation, and more—have been identified and addressed to some nontrivial level of detail. Robert and Barbara Decker have visited these different facets seamlessly in Volcanoes, Third Edition. The seamlessness comes from a broad overarching, interdisciplinary, professional understanding of volcanism combined with an exceptionally smooth translation of scientific jargon into plain language.The result is a book which will be informative to a very broad audience, from reasonably educated nongeologists (my mother loves it) to geology undergraduates through professional volcanologists. I bet that even the most senior professional volcanologists will learn at least a few things from this book and will find at least a few provocative discussions of subjects they know.

  19. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  20. Living with volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The 1980 cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981) in southwestern Washington ushered in a decade marked by more worldwide volcanic disasters and crises than any other in recorded history. Volcanoes killed more people (over 28,500) in the 1980's than during the 78 years following 1902 eruption of Mount Pelee (Martinique). Not surprisingly, volcanic phenomena and attendant hazards received attention from government authorities, the news media, and the general public. As part of this enhanced global awareness of volcanic hazards, the U.S. Geological Survey (Bailey and others, 1983) in response to the eruptions or volcanic unrest during the 1980's at Mount St. Helens and Redoubt are still erupting intermittently, and the caldera unrest at Long Valley also continues, albeit less energetically than during the early 1980's.

  1. Flank tectonics of Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.; Carr, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the numerous terraces on the flanks of the Olympus Mons volcano on Mars, seen on space images to be arranged in a roughly concentric pattern, is investigated. The images of the volcano show that the base of each terrace is marked by a modest but abrupt change in slope, suggesting that these terraces could be thrust faults caused by a compressional failure of the cone. The mechanism of faulting and the possible effect of the interior structure of Olympus Mons was investigated using a numerical model for elastic stresses within a Martian volcano, constructed for that purpose. Results of the analysis supports the view that the terraces on Olympus Mons, as well as on other three Martian volcanoes, including Ascraeus Mons, Arsia Mons, and Pavonis Mons are indeed thrust faults.

  2. Morphometric evolution of composite volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Statistical relations between geometry, slope, and age for 26 circum-Pacific composite volcanoes (stratovolcanoes) are presented. Topics considered include morphometry, eruption characteristics, growth rates, repose periods, flow lengths, and petrological/chemical trends. Composite and cinder cones are compared, and it is suggested that, if cinder cones do evolve into composite volcanoes, a fundamental change in cone morphometry, eruption style, and petrology occurs at a basal diameter of 2 km.

  3. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. ); Kurz, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  4. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  5. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift

  6. Chiliques volcano, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24,2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen.

    The daytime image was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    These images were acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A

  7. Northern Arizona Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Northern Arizona is best known for the Grand Canyon. Less widely known are the hundreds of geologically young volcanoes, at least one of which buried the homes of local residents. San Francisco Mtn., a truncated stratovolcano at 3887 meters, was once a much taller structure (about 4900 meters) before it exploded some 400,000 years ago a la Mt. St. Helens. The young cinder cone field to its east includes Sunset Crater, that erupted in 1064 and buried Native American homes. This ASTER perspective was created by draping ASTER image data over topographic data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Data.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 20.4 by 24.6 kilometers (12.6 by 15.2 miles) Location: 35.3 degrees North latitude, 111

  8. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  9. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  10. Earthquakes & Volcanoes, Volume 23, Number 6, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey; Gordon, David W., (Edited By)

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes and Volcanoes is published bimonthly by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide current information on earthquakes and seismology, volcanoes, and related natural hazards of interest to both generalized and specialized readers.

  11. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Ash Plume Particle Properties     ... satellite flew over Iceland's erupting Eyjafjallajökull volcano on April 19, 2010, its Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ...

  12. An active seismic experiment at Tenerife Island (Canary Island, Spain): Imaging an active volcano edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, A.; Ibañez, J. M.; Rietbrock, A.; Tom-Teidevs, G.

    2008-12-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Teide Volcano was carried out on Tenerife, a volcanic island in Spain's Canary Islands. The main objective of the TOM-TEIDEVS experiment is to obtain a 3-dimensional structural image of Teide Volcano using seismic tomography and seismic reflection/refraction imaging techniques. At present, knowledge of the deeper structure of Teide and Tenerife is very limited, with proposed structural models mainly based on sparse geophysical and geological data. This multinational experiment which involves institutes from Spain, Italy, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Mexico will generate a unique high resolution structural image of the active volcano edifice and will further our understanding of volcanic processes.

  13. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is a space radar image of the area around the Unzen volcano, on the west coast of Kyushu Island in southwestern Japan. Unzen, which appears in this image as a large triangular peak with a white flank near the center of the peninsula, has been continuously active since a series of powerful eruptions began in 1991. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 93rd orbit on April 15, 1994. The image shows an area 41.5 kilometers by 32.8 kilometers (25.7 miles by 20.3 miles) that is centered at 32.75 degrees north latitude and 130.15 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received); green represents the average of L-band and C-band (vertically transmitted and received); blue represents the C-band (vertically transmitted and received). Unzen is one of 15 'Decade' volcanoes identified by the scientific community as posing significant potential threats to large local populations. The city of Shimabara sits along the coast at the foot of Unzen on its east and northeast sides. At the summit of Unzen a dome of thick lava has been growing continuously since 1991. Collapses of the sides of this dome have generated deadly avalanches of hot gas and rock known as pyroclastic flows. Volcanologists can use radar image data to monitor the growth of lava domes, to better understand and predict potentially hazardous collapses.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The

  14. Volcanoes and global catastrophes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, Tom

    1988-01-01

    The search for a single explanation for global mass extinctions has let to polarization and the controversies that are often fueled by widespread media attention. The historic record shows a roughly linear log-log relation between the frequency of explosive volcanic eruptions and the volume of their products. Eruptions such as Mt. St. Helens 1980 produce on the order of 1 cu km of tephra, destroying life over areas in the 10 to 100 sq km range, and take place, on the average, once or twice a decade. Eruptions producing 10 cu km take place several times a century and, like Krakatau 1883, destroy life over 100 to 1000 sq km areas while producing clear global atmospheric effects. Eruptions producting 10,000 cu km are known from the Quaternary record, and extrapolation from the historic record suggests that they occur perhaps once in 20,000 years, but none has occurred in historic time and little is known of their biologic effects. Even larger eruptions must also exist in the geologic record, but documentation of their volume becomes increasingly difficult as their age increases. The conclusion is inescapable that prehistoric eruptions have produced catastrophes on a global scale: only the magnitude of the associated mortality is in question. Differentiation of large magma chambers is on a time scale of thousands to millions of years, and explosive volcanoes are clearly concentrated in narrow belts near converging plate margins. Volcanism cannot be dismissed as a producer of global catastrophes. Its role in major extinctions is likely to be at least contributory and may well be large. More attention should be paid to global effects of the many huge eruptions in the geologic record that dwarf those known in historic time.

  15. Global Volcano Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  16. Relative chronology of Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landheim, R.; Barlow, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    Impact cratering is one of the major geological processes that has affected the Martian surface throughout the planet's history. The frequency of craters within particular size ranges provides information about the formation ages and obliterative episodes of Martian geologic units. The Barlow chronology was extended by measuring small craters on the volcanoes and a number of standard terrain units. Inclusions of smaller craters in units previously analyzed by Barlow allowed for a more direct comparison between the size-frequency distribution data for volcanoes and established chronology. During this study, 11,486 craters were mapped and identified in the 1.5 to 8 km diameter range in selected regions of Mars. The results are summarized in this three page report and give a more precise estimate of the relative chronology of the Martian volcanoes. Also, the results of this study lend further support to the increasing evidence that volcanism has been a dominant geologic force throughout Martian history.

  17. Remote sensing of volcanos and volcanic terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Francis, Peter W.; Wilson, Lionel; Pieri, David C.; Self, Stephen; Rose, William I.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using remote sensing to monitor potentially dangerous volcanoes is discussed. Thermal studies of active volcanoes are considered along with using weather satellites to track eruption plumes and radar measurements to study lava flow morphology and topography. The planned use of orbiting platforms to study emissions from volcanoes and the rate of change of volcanic landforms is considered.

  18. Multiphase modelling of mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon, classically considered as the surface expression of piercement structures rooted in deep-seated over-pressured sediments in compressional tectonic settings. The release of fluids at mud volcanoes during repeated explosive episodes has been documented at numerous sites and the outflows resemble the eruption of basaltic magma. As magma, the material erupted from a mud volcano becomes more fluid and degasses while rising and decompressing. The release of those gases from mud volcanism is estimated to be a significant contributor both to fluid flux from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere, and to the atmospheric budget of some greenhouse gases, particularly methane. For these reasons, we simulated the fluid dynamics of mud volcanoes using a newly-developed compressible multiphase and multidimensional transient solver in the OpenFOAM framework, taking into account the multicomponent nature (CH4, CO2, H2O) of the fluid mixture, the gas exsolution during the ascent and the associated changes in the constitutive properties of the phases. The numerical model has been tested with conditions representative of the LUSI, a mud volcano that has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. The activity of LUSI mud volcano has been well documented (Vanderkluysen et al., 2014) and here we present a comparison of observed gas fluxes and mud extrusion rates with the outcomes of numerical simulations. Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E. & Smekens, J.-F. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 15, 2932-2946

  19. Another Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Carlin

    2009-01-01

    A Mexican saying holds that "Como Mexico no hay dos"--There is only one Mexico. American media these days interpret that notion with a vengeance. Story after story depicts a country overrun by out-of-control drug wars and murder, where corrupt police officers trip over beheaded victims more often than they nab perpetrators. South of the border, a…

  20. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    show it. The bright spot close to the equator is the remnant of a giant storm in Saturn's extended atmosphere that has lasted more than 5 years. The present photo provides what is possibly the sharpest view of the ring system ever achieved from a ground-based observatory . Many structures are visible, the most obvious being the main ring sections, the inner C-region (here comparatively dark), the middle B-region (here relatively bright) and the outer A-region, and also the obvious dark "divisions", including the well-known, broad Cassini division between the A- and B-regions, as well as the Encke division close to the external edge of the A-region and the Colombo division in the C-region. Moreover, many narrow rings can be seen at this high image resolution , in particular within the C-region - they may be compared with those seen by the Voyager spacecraft during the flybys, cf. the weblinks below. This image demonstrates the capability of NAOS-CONICA to observe also extended objects with excellent spatial resolution. It is a composite of four short-exposure images taken through the near-infrared H (wavelength 1.6 µm) and K (2.2 µm) filters. This observation was particularly difficult because of the motion of Saturn during the exposure. To provide the best possible images, the Adaptive Optics system of NAOS was pointed towards the Saturnian moon Tethys , while the image of Saturn was kept at a fixed position on the CONICA detector by means of "differential tracking" (compensating for the different motions in the sky of Saturn and Tethys). This is also why the (faint) image of Tethys - visible south of Saturn (i.e., below the planet in PR Photo 04a/02 ) - appears slightly trailed. Io - volcanoes and sulphur ESO PR Photo 04b/02 ESO PR Photo 04b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 478 pix - 39k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 955 pix - 112k] ESO PR Photo 04c/02 ESO PR Photo 04c/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 469 pix - 58k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 937 pix - 368k] Caption : PR Photo 04b/02 shows

  1. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  2. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  3. Io Volcano Observer (IVO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.; Thomas, N.; Johnson, T.; Christensen, P.; Wurz, P.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Shinohara, C.; Girard, T.

    2009-04-01

    In early FY2008, NASA solicited study concepts for Discovery/Scout-class missions that would be enabled by use of 2 Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs). We proposed an Io Volcano Observer (IVO) study concept, because the ASRGs enable pointing flexibility and a high data rate from a low-cost mission in Jupiter orbit. Io presents a rich array of inter-connected orbital, geophysical, atmospheric, and plasma phenomena and is the only place in the Solar System (including Earth) where we can watch very large-scale silicate volcanic processes in action. Io is the best place to study tidal heating, which greatly expands the habitable zones of planetary systems. The coupled orbital-tidal evolution of Io and Europa is key to understanding the histories of both worlds. IVO utilizes an elliptical orbit inclined > 45° to Jupiter's orbital plane with repeated fast flybys of Io. Io will have nearly constant illumination at each flyby, which facilitates monitoring of changes over time. The view of Io on approach and departure will be nearly polar, enabling unique measurement and monitoring of polar heat flow (key to tidal heating models), equatorial plumes, and magnetospheric interactions. We expect to collect and return 20 Gbits per flyby via 34-m DSN stations, >1000 times the Io data return of Galileo. The minimal payload we considered included (1) a narrow-angle camera, (2) a thermal mapper, (3) an ion and neutral mass spectrometer, and (4) a pair of fluxgate magnetometers. The camera will acquire global km-scale monitoring and sampling down to 10 m/pixel or better. One key objective is to acquire nearly simultaneous (<0.1 s) multispectral measurements to determine the peak lava temperatures, which in turn constrains the temperature and rheology of Io's mantle and whether or not the heat flow is in equilibrium with tidal heating. The thermal mapper will be similar to THEMIS on Mars Odyssey, but with bandpasses designed to monitor volcanic activity, measure heat

  4. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-05-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  5. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  6. What Happened to Our Volcano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an investigative approach to "understanding Earth changes." The author states that students were familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in other regions of the world but never considered how the land beneath their feet had experienced changes over time. Here, their geology unit helped them understand and…

  7. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. . Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  8. On the geometric form of volcanoes - Comment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The model of Lacey et al. (1981) accounting for the geometric regularity and approximate cone shape of volcanoes is discussed. It is pointed out that, contrary to the model, volcano eruptions do not occur randomly in elevation and azimuth, but are commonly restricted to summit vents and a few well defined flank zones, so that the form of a volcano is determined by its vent locations and styles of eruption. Other false predictions of the model include the constancy of lava volumes at all vent elevations, the increase in volcano radius as the square root of time, a critical height for volcano growth, the influence of planetary gravity on volcano height and the negligible influence of ash falls and flows and erosional deposition. It is noted that the model of Shteynberg and Solov'yev, in which cone shape is related to stresses due to increasing cone height, may provide a better understanding of volcano morphology.

  9. Scoria cone formation through a violent Strombolian eruption: Irao Volcano, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji; Horikawa, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Takashi; Itaya, Tetsumaru; Connor, Charles B.; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Scoria cones are common volcanic features and are thought to most commonly develop through the deposition of ballistics produced by gentle Strombolian eruptions and the outward sliding of talus. However, some historic scoria cones have been observed to form with phases of more energetic violent Strombolian eruptions (e.g., the 1943-1952 eruption of Parícutin, central Mexico; the 1975 eruption of Tolbachik, Kamchatka), maintaining volcanic plumes several kilometers in height, sometimes simultaneous with active effusive lava flows. Geologic evidence shows that violent Strombolian eruptions during cone formation may be more common than is generally perceived, and therefore it is important to obtain additional insights about such eruptions to better assess volcanic hazards. We studied Irao Volcano, the largest basaltic monogenetic volcano in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, SW Japan. The geologic features of this volcano are consistent with a violent Strombolian eruption, including voluminous ash and fine lapilli beds (on order of 10-1 km3 DRE) with simultaneous scoria cone formation and lava effusion from the base of the cone. The characteristics of the volcanic products suggest that the rate of magma ascent decreased gradually throughout the eruption and that less explosive Strombolian eruptions increased in frequency during the later stages of activity. During the eruption sequence, the chemical composition of the magma became more differentiated. A new K-Ar age determination for phlogopite crystallized within basalt dates the formation of Irao Volcano at 0.4 ± 0.05 Ma.

  10. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.