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Sample records for poppy papaver somniferum

  1. Opium poppy mosaic virus, a new umbravirus isolated from Papaver somniferum in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joe; Lebas, Bénédicte; Liefting, Lia; Veerakone, Stella; Wei, Ting; Ward, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A novel virus, tentatively named "opium poppy mosaic virus" (OPMV), was isolated from Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with leaf mosaic and mottling symptoms in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2006. The virus was mechanically transmitted to herbaceous plants of several species, in which it induced local and/or systemic symptoms. No virus particles were observed by electron microscopy in the diseased P. somniferum or any of the symptomatic herbaceous plants. The complete genomic sequence of 4230 nucleotides contains four open reading frames (ORF) and is most closely related (59.3 %) to tobacco bushy top virus, a member of the genus Umbravirus. These data suggest that OPMV is a new umbravirus. PMID:26514844

  2. Quantitative studies on the mating system of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.).

    PubMed

    Patra, N K; Ram, R S; Chauhan, S P; Singh, A K

    1992-07-01

    Nearly 400 individuals at two locations and over a number of years were crossed and subsequently scored for selfing versus outcrossing in eight monohybrid populations of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Two different marker loci, petal colour (R/r) and capsule size (B/b) were used to determine the male gametes that had effected fertilizations in F2 recessives (rr and bb). The estimates of the outcrossing parameter α were found to vary with year, location and for the marker locus used (α range: 0.0988-0.3704). Study of two dihybrid crosses involving the two loci simultaneously, further confirmed that outcrossing at the R/r locus was significantly greater than that at the B/b locus. The nature of the outcrossing was, in general, nonrandom. Selfmg predominated in this species; however, there was a high frequency of natural outcrossing for generating variations in P. somniferum. PMID:24203187

  3. Disentangling Peronospora on Papaver: Phylogenetics, Taxonomy, Nomenclature and Host Range of Downy Mildew of Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum) and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Voglmayr, Hermann; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Landa, Blanca B.

    2014-01-01

    Based on sequence data from ITS rDNA, cox1 and cox2, six Peronospora species are recognised as phylogenetically distinct on various Papaver species. The host ranges of the four already described species P. arborescens, P. argemones, P. cristata and P. meconopsidis are clarified. Based on sequence data and morphology, two new species, P. apula and P. somniferi, are described from Papaver apulum and P. somniferum, respectively. The second Peronospora species parasitizing Papaver somniferum, that was only recently recorded as Peronospora cristata from Tasmania, is shown to represent a distinct taxon, P. meconopsidis, originally described from Meconopsis cambrica. It is shown that P. meconopsidis on Papaver somniferum is also present and widespread in Europe and Asia, but has been overlooked due to confusion with P. somniferi and due to less prominent, localized disease symptoms. Oospores are reported for the first time for P. meconopsidis from Asian collections on Papaver somniferum. Morphological descriptions, illustrations and a key are provided for all described Peronospora species on Papaver. cox1 and cox2 sequence data are confirmed as equally good barcoding loci for reliable Peronospora species identification, whereas ITS rDNA does sometimes not resolve species boundaries. Molecular phylogenetic data reveal high host specificity of Peronospora on Papaver, which has the important phytopathological implication that wild Papaver spp. cannot play any role as primary inoculum source for downy mildew epidemics in cultivated opium poppy crops. PMID:24806292

  4. Genetic analysis of capsule and its associated economic traits in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Birendra; Patra, Nirmal Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Four single crosses (VG20 x SGE48, SGE48 x SG35II, VG26 x SG35II, and SG35II x VG20) in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) were analyzed to study the gene actions involved in the inheritance of quantitative traits, namely plant height, branches/plant, capsules/plant, peduncle length, capsule index, stigmatic rays, straw yield/plant, and morphine content. Simple additive, dominance, and epistatic genetic components were found to be significant for inheritance pattern. Dominance effect (h) was higher than additive effect (d). Digenic interaction indicated the prevalence of dominance x dominance (l) followed by additive x dominance (j) type epistasis. The significance of dominance (h) and dominance x dominance (l) indicated duplicate epistasis for all the traits and crosses except SG35II x VG20 for stigmatic rays. Biparental mating followed by recurrent selection involving desired recombinants may be utilized to improve the component traits. PMID:20472706

  5. Atomic Structure of Salutaridine Reductase from the Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum)

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, Yasuhiro; Kutchan, Toni M.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2011-11-18

    The opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) is one of the oldest known medicinal plants. In the biosynthetic pathway for morphine and codeine, salutaridine is reduced to salutaridinol by salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248) using NADPH as coenzyme. Here, we report the atomic structure of SalR to a resolution of {approx}1.9 {angstrom} in the presence of NADPH. The core structure is highly homologous to other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. The major difference is that the nicotinamide moiety and the substrate-binding pocket are covered by a loop (residues 265-279), on top of which lies a large 'flap'-like domain (residues 105-140). This configuration appears to be a combination of the two common structural themes found in other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Previous modeling studies suggested that substrate inhibition is due to mutually exclusive productive and nonproductive modes of substrate binding in the active site. This model was tested via site-directed mutagenesis, and a number of these mutations abrogated substrate inhibition. However, the atomic structure of SalR shows that these mutated residues are instead distributed over a wide area of the enzyme, and many are not in the active site. To explain how residues distal to the active site might affect catalysis, a model is presented whereby SalR may undergo significant conformational changes during catalytic turnover.

  6. Investigation of abiogenic stress-induced alterations in the level of secondary metabolites in poppy plants (Papaver somniferum L.).

    PubMed

    Szabó, Beáta; Lakatos, A; Koszegi, T; Botz, L

    2008-12-01

    We aimed to understand the effects of water stress on the alkaloid production in various developmental stages of poppy plants and the effect of stress on the alkaloids content in the capsules. Three stages of the life cycle of Papaver somniferum L. were selected in our studies: Rosette, Flowering and Lancing developmental stages. Four types of water conditions were examined: Control, Withdrawal of Water, 50% Water Supply and Inundation. The morphological monitoring, results of Relative Water Content and proline content were used as indicators of stress. The result of the measurements in poppy leaves show that the secondary metabolites dramatically respond to these stress conditions. The constant water supply was beneficial for the accumulation of alkaloids in the capsules. PMID:19133499

  7. Trace and major element levels in rats after oral administration of diesel and biodiesel derived from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Laçine; Sözbilir, Nalan Bayşu

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated the toxic effects of diesel and biodiesel derived from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) oil seeds on the trace and major elements in kidney, lung, liver, and serum of rats. By the end of 21 days, trace and major element concentrations in kidney, lung, and liver tissues and the serum were measured using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. We observed that trace and major element levels in kidney, lung, and liver tissues and the serum changed. Especially, important differences were detected in trace and major element concentrations in kidney and lung tissues. In kidney tissue, the concentration differences of calcium, sodium, and zinc (Zn) were found between diesel and biodiesel groups. In lung tissue, the concentration differences of cadmium, lithium, magnesium, manganese, and Zn were found between diesel and biodiesel groups. Among the significant findings, Zn concentration in serum and liver tissue of diesel and biodiesel were different from control (p < 0.05). However, the metal levels of biodiesel group were similar to control group. Due to lesser toxicity of biodiesel, it could be considered as an alternate fuel. PMID:23552267

  8. Herbicidal treatments for control of Papaver somniferum L.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-five commercially available herbicides were evaluated for possible use to destroy illicit opium poppy crops (Papaver somniferum). In the first stage, herbicides were sprayed on poppy plants grown in containers. The following compounds killed poppy plants: (a) herbicides with typical foliar activity--amitrole, bromoxynil, 2,4-D, glyphosate, ioxynil and paraquat; and (b) herbicides with root and foliar activity--the triazines ametryn, atrazine, metribuzin, prometryn, simazine and terbutryn; the substituted ureas benzthiazuron, chloroxuron, diuron, fluometuron, linuron, methabenzthiazuron, neburon and phenobenzuron; and the miscellaneous compounds karbutilate, methazole, oxadiazon and pyrazon. Severe but sublethal injury was caused by cycloate, EPTC, molinate, pobulate, cacodylate + MSMA, ethofumesate, perfluidone and phenmedipham. Abnormal development of vegetative or reproductive parts of the plant was induced by benefin, butralin, dinitramine, pendimethalin, trifluralin, diphenamid, napropamide, dalapon and propham. Efficient herbicides with negligible persistence in soil at the doses applied were evaluated on poppy plants in the field at various stages of growth. Small plants were severely injured by 2,4-D, killed rapidly by bromoxynil, ioxynil, paraquat (in mixture + diquat), and more slowly by glyphosate and metribuzin. The resistance to herbicides increased with the age of the poppy plant. Severe damage with partial kill of developed plants was obtained with bromoxynil, ioxynil, glyphosate, and paraquat + diquat; the last treatment produced the fastest effect. PMID:6905769

  9. Dendryphion penicillatum and Pleospora papaveracea, Destructive Seedborne Pathogens and Potential Mycoherbicides for Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, N R; Jennings, J C; Bailey, B A; Farr, D F

    2000-07-01

    ABSTRACT Dendryphion penicillatum and Pleospora papaveracea were isolated from blighted Papaver somniferum and Papaver bracteatum plants grown in growth chambers and the field in Beltsville, MD. The etiology of the diseases was determined, and the fungi are being investigated as potential mycoherbicides to control the narcotic opium poppy plant. P. papaveracea is known to be a highly destructive seedborne pathogen of Papaver somniferum, causing seedling blight, leaf blight, crown rot, and capsule rot. Single conidia and ascospores were isolated and cultures established from naturally infested seed and diseased foliage and pods of opium poppy from Iran, Colombia, Venezuela, Sweden, India, and the United States (Maryland and Washington). Mycelia and conidia of P. papaveracea and D. penicillatum produced on necrotic leaf tissues appear morphologically similar, and the fungi were previously considered to be anamorph and teleomorph. However, no anamorph/teleomorph connection could be established, and the fungi appear to be distinct taxa. P. papaveracea produced conidia, mature pseudothecia, and chlamydospores in vitro and on infected stems. D. penicillatum produced conidia, microsclerotia, and macronematous conidiophores. Although both fungi were pathogenic to three poppy cultivars, conidial inoculum from P. papaveracea cultures was more virulent than conidial inoculum from D. penicillatum. Eight-week-old plants became necrotic and died 8 days after inoculation with a conidial suspension of P. papaveracea at 2 x 10(5) spores per ml. Disease severity was significantly enhanced by inoculum formulations that contained corn oil, by higher conidial inoculum concentrations, and by increased wetness periods. Symptoms on plants inoculated with either pathogen included leaf and stem necrosis, stem girdling, stunting, necrotic leaf spots, and foliar and pod blight. Inoculated seedlings exhibited wire stem, damping-off, and root rot. Conidia, and less frequently pseudothecia, of P

  10. Comparative analysis of transcription factor gene families from Papaver somniferum: identification of regulatory factors involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Parul; Pathak, Sumya; Lakhwani, Deepika; Gupta, Parul; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), known for biosynthesis of several therapeutically important benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), has emerged as the premier organism to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The most prominent molecules produced in opium poppy include narcotic analgesic morphine, the cough suppressant codeine, the muscle relaxant papaverine and the anti-microbial agent sanguinarine and berberine. Despite several health benefits, biosynthesis of some of these molecules is very low due to tight temporal and spatial regulation of the genes committed to their biosynthesis. Transcription factors, one of the prime regulators of secondary plant product biosynthesis, might be involved in controlled biosynthesis of BIAs in P. somniferum. In this study, identification of members of different transcription factor gene families using transcriptome datasets of 10 cultivars of P. somniferum with distinct chemoprofile has been carried out. Analysis suggests that most represented transcription factor gene family in all the poppy cultivars is WRKY. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed differential expression pattern of the members of a set of transcription factor gene families among 10 cultivars. Through analysis, two members of WRKY and one member of C3H gene family were identified as potential candidates which might regulate thebaine and papaverine biosynthesis, respectively, in poppy. PMID:26108744

  11. Transient Expression of cor Gene in Papaver somniferum

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Bahman; Shahriari-Ahmadi, Farajollah; Hashemi, Haleh; Marashi, Mohammad-Hasan; Mohseniazar, Mahdi; Farokhzad, Alireza; Sabokbari, Masoume

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Papaver somniferum is the commercial source of morphine and codeine. The isolation of effective genes involved in the morphine biosynthesis of P. somniferum is very important in the production of specific metabolites achieved using metabolic engi-neering techniques. In this pathway, the key enzyme COR is involved in the conversion of codeinone to codeine and morphinone to morphine. Methods the gene encoding of this enzyme was isolated using primers designed on the base of gene sequence available on (NCBI) for P. somniferum. This gene correct size around (960 bp) was first subcloned into pTZ57RIT vector then cloned into expression vectors (pBI121) between BamHI and SacI sites to allow the expression of cor gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S pro-moter. The result was confirmed through different molecular methods e.g. PCR and en-zyme digestion by BamHI and SacI. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into the E. coli strain DH5α using a freeze-thaw method. Having selected positive colones on selection medium, plasmid was extracted by miniprep method and recombinant plasmids were selected based on PCR and digestion. The construct was then mobilized in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58/pGV3850 (KmR RifR). After gene transformation to P. somniferum plants, the agroinfiltration method was also used for transient expression of COR enzyme. Results evaluation results showed that morphine and codeine were detectable in the leaves of transgenic plants containing cor transgene and there was significant difference in the final production. After completing this experiment for three times, results showed that in 11 sets from 15 sets of leaves experiment tested, main alkaloids (codeine, morphine, papaverin, noscapine and thebaine) were detectable. Conclusion Whereas no signal was detected in non-infiltrated control leaves or in leaves infiltrated with non-recombinant bacteria for morphine and codeine, others such as thebaine and papaverine were detectable

  12. Identification of a secretory phospholipase A2 from Papaver somniferum L. that transforms membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Jablonická, Veronika; Mansfeld, Johanna; Heilmann, Ingo; Obložinský, Marek; Heilmann, Mareike

    2016-09-01

    The full-length sequence of a new secretory phospholipase A2 was identified in opium poppy seedlings (Papaver somniferum L.). The cDNA of poppy phospholipase A2, denoted as pspla2, encodes a protein of 159 amino acids with a 31 amino acid long signal peptide at the N-terminus. PsPLA2 contains a PLA2 signature domain (PA2c), including the Ca(2+)-binding loop (YGKYCGxxxxGC) and the catalytic site motif (DACCxxHDxC) with the conserved catalytic histidine and the calcium-coordinating aspartate residues. The aspartate of the His/Asp dyad playing an important role in animal sPLA2 catalysis is substituted by a serine residue. Furthermore, the PsPLA2 sequence contains 12 conserved cysteine residues to form 6 structural disulfide bonds. The calculated molecular weight of the mature PsPLA2 is 14.0 kDa. Based on the primary structure PsPLA2 belongs to the XIB group of PLA2s. Untagged recombinant PsPLA2 obtained by expression in Escherichia coli, renaturation from inclusion bodies and purification by cation-exchange chromatography was characterized in vitro. The pH optimum for activity of PsPLA2 was found to be pH 7, when using mixed micelles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and Triton X-100. PsPLA2 specifically cleaves fatty acids from the sn-2 position of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and shows a pronounced preference for PC over phosphatidyl ethanolamine, -glycerol and -inositol. The active recombinant enzyme was tested in vitro against natural phospholipids isolated from poppy plants and preferably released the unsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, from the naturally occurring mixture of substrate lipids. PMID:27473012

  13. Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Morphine from Capsules of Papaver somniferum by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bulduk, Ibrahim; Gezer, Bahdışen; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, amount of morphine from poppy capsules (Papaver somniferum) was investigated using ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE). Response surface methodology was used to estimate effective experimental conditions on the content extraction of poppy capsules. For this purpose, solvent/solid ratio (10–20 mL/500 mg sample), pH (1–13), time (30–60 min), and temperature (30–50°C) were chosen as experimental variables. The affected response is extraction recovery values for morphine from poppy straw. For interpreting the relationship between experimental factors and response, a design table was established with combinations of three different concentrations levels of this compound in 29 trials. The second order quadratic model gave a satisfactory description of the experimental data. In our study, R-Squared (0.96), Adj-R-Squared (0.92), and Pred R-Squared (0.78) values for extraction yield display good accuracy of the derived model. The predicted optimal conditions for the highest morphine level (3.38 mg morphine/500 mg-sample) were found at 19.99 mL solvent/500 mg solid ratio, 59.94 min extraction time, 1.10 pH, and 42.36°C temperature. In the optimal extraction conditions, the experimental values are very close to the predicted values. Consequently, the response surface modeling can be achieved sufficiently to predict extraction yield from poppy straw by ultrasound assisted extraction. PMID:25861273

  14. Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Morphine from Capsules of Papaver somniferum by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Bulduk, Ibrahim; Gezer, Bahdışen; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, amount of morphine from poppy capsules (Papaver somniferum) was investigated using ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE). Response surface methodology was used to estimate effective experimental conditions on the content extraction of poppy capsules. For this purpose, solvent/solid ratio (10-20 mL/500 mg sample), pH (1-13), time (30-60 min), and temperature (30-50°C) were chosen as experimental variables. The affected response is extraction recovery values for morphine from poppy straw. For interpreting the relationship between experimental factors and response, a design table was established with combinations of three different concentrations levels of this compound in 29 trials. The second order quadratic model gave a satisfactory description of the experimental data. In our study, R-Squared (0.96), Adj-R-Squared (0.92), and Pred R-Squared (0.78) values for extraction yield display good accuracy of the derived model. The predicted optimal conditions for the highest morphine level (3.38 mg morphine/500 mg-sample) were found at 19.99 mL solvent/500 mg solid ratio, 59.94 min extraction time, 1.10 pH, and 42.36°C temperature. In the optimal extraction conditions, the experimental values are very close to the predicted values. Consequently, the response surface modeling can be achieved sufficiently to predict extraction yield from poppy straw by ultrasound assisted extraction. PMID:25861273

  15. Identification and expression analyses of MYB and WRKY transcription factor genes in Papaver somniferum L.

    PubMed

    Kakeshpour, Tayebeh; Nayebi, Shadi; Rashidi Monfared, Sajad; Moieni, Ahmad; Karimzadeh, Ghasem

    2015-10-01

    Papaver somniferum L. is an herbaceous, annual and diploid plant that is important from pharmacological and strategic point of view. The cDNA clones of two putative MYB and WRKY genes were isolated (GeneBank accession numbers KP411870 and KP203854, respectively) from this plant, via the nested-PCR method, and characterized. The MYB transcription factor (TF) comprises 342 amino acids, and exhibits the structural features of the R2R3MYB protein family. The WRKY TF, a 326 amino acid-long polypeptide, falls structurally into the group II of WRKY protein family. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicate the presence of these TFs in all organs of P. somniferum L. and Papaver bracteatum L. Highest expression levels of these two TFs were observed in the leaf tissues of P. somniferum L. while in P. bracteatum L. the espression levels were highest in the root tissues. Promoter analysis of the 10 co-expressed gene clustered involved in noscapine biosynthesis pathway in P. somniferum L. suggested that not only these 10 genes are co-expressed, but also share common regulatory motifs and TFs including MYB and WRKY TFs, and that may explain their common regulation. PMID:26600674

  16. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Using High Papaverine Mutant of Papaver somniferum Reveals Pathway and Uncharacterized Steps of Papaverine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Sumya; Lakhwani, Deepika; Gupta, Parul; Mishra, Brij Kishore; Shukla, Sudhir; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The benzylisoquinoline alkaloid papaverine, synthesized in low amount in most of the opium poppy varieties of Papaver somniferum, is used as a vasodilator muscle relaxant and antispasmodic. Papaverine biosynthesis remains controversial as two different routes utilizing either (S)-coclaurine or (S)-reticuline have been proposed with uncharacterized intermediate steps. In an attempt to elucidate papaverine biosynthesis and identify putative genes involved in uncharacterized steps, we carried out comparative transcriptome analysis of high papaverine mutant (pap1) and normal cultivar (BR086) of P. somniferum. This natural mutant synthesizes more than 12-fold papaverine in comparison to BR086. We established more than 238 Mb transcriptome data separately for pap1 and BR086. Assembly of reads generated 127,342 and 106,128 unigenes in pap1 and BR086, respectively. Digital gene expression analysis of transcriptomes revealed 3,336 differentially expressing unigenes. Enhanced expression of (S)-norcoclaurine-6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT), (S)-3′-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4′-O-methyltransferase (4′OMT), norreticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (N7OMT) and down-regulation of reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (7OMT) in pap1 in comparison to BR086 suggest (S)-coclaurine as the route for papaverine biosynthesis. We also identified several methyltransferases and dehydrogenases with enhanced expression in pap1 in comparison to BR086. Our analysis using natural mutant, pap1, concludes that (S)-coclaurine is the branch-point intermediate and preferred route for papaverine biosynthesis. Differentially expressing methyltransferases and dehydrogenases identified in this study will help in elucidating complete biosynthetic pathway of papaverine. The information generated will be helpful in developing strategies for enhanced biosynthesis of papaverine through biotechnological approaches. PMID:23738019

  17. Production of Pharmaceuticals from Papaver Cultivars In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A methodology to clonally proliferate Iranian poppy (Papaver bracteatum Lindl.) and opium poppy (P. somniferum L.) shoots is presented employing an in vitro hydroponics system (i.e., automated plant culture system (APCS)). Temperature had a profound effect on growth and alkaloid production after 8-...

  18. Wound Induced Tanscriptional Regulation of Benzylisoquinoline Pathway and Characterization of Wound Inducible PsWRKY Transcription Factor from Papaver somniferum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Seema; Phukan, Ujjal J.; Gupta, M. M.; Shanker, Karuna; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Wounding is required to be made in the walls of the green seed pod of Opium poppy prior exudation of latex. To withstand this kind of trauma plants regulate expression of some metabolites through an induced transcript level. 167 unique wound-inducible ESTs were identified by a repetitive round of cDNA subtraction after 5 hours of wounding in Papaver somniferum seedlings. Further repetitive reverse northern analysis of these ESTs revealed 80 transcripts showing more than two fold induction, validated through semi-quantitative RT-PCR & real time expression analysis. One of the major classified categories among identified ESTs belonged to benzylisoquinoline transcripts. Tissue specific metabolite analysis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) in response to wounding revealed increased accumulation of narcotine and papaverine. Promoter analysis of seven transcripts of BIAs pathway showed the presence of W-box cis-element with the consensus sequence of TGAC, which is the proposed binding site for WRKY type transcription factors. One of the Wound inducible ‘WRKY’ EST isolated from our subtracted library was made full-length and named as ‘PsWRKY’. Bacterially expressed PsWRKY interacted with the W-box element having consensus sequence TTGACT/C present in the promoter region of BIAs biosynthetic pathway genes. PsWRKY further activated the TYDC promoter in yeast and transiently in tobacco BY2 cells. Preferential expression of PsWRKY in straw and capsule and its interaction with consensus W-box element present in BIAs pathway gene transcripts suggest its possible involvement in the wound induced regulation of BIAs pathway. PMID:23382823

  19. Intoxication due to Papaver rhoeas (Corn Poppy): Five Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Günaydın, Yahya Kemal; Dündar, Zerrin Defne; Çekmen, Bora; Akıllı, Nazire Belgin; Köylü, Ramazan; Cander, Başar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In this paper, we aimed to present five Papaver rhoeas intoxication cases, which is very rare in the literature. Case 1. A 35-year-old female patient was admitted to our emergency room with the complaints of nausea, restlessness, and dyspnea developing 3 hours after eating Papaver rhoeas. On physical examination, her general condition was moderate; she was conscious and the vital findings were normal. The pupils were myotic. She was transferred to the toxicology intensive care unit as she experienced a generalized tonic clonic seizure lasting for three minutes. Case 2. A 41-year-old female patient was brought to our emergency room by 112 ambulance as she had contractions in her arms and legs, unconsciousness, and foam coming from her mouth two hours after Papaver rhoeas ingestion. On physical examination, she was confused, the pupils were myotic, and she was tachycardic. Arterial blood gases analysis revealed lactic acidosis. Case 3. A 38-year-old female patient was admitted to our emergency room with complaints of nausea and vomiting two hours after ingestion of Papaver rhoeas. Her physical examination and tests were normal. Case 4. A 34-year-old male patient was admitted to our emergency room with complaints of numbness and loss of power in his arms and legs one hour after Papaver rhoeas ingestion. He was hospitalized at the toxicology intensive care unit for follow-up and treatment. Dyspnea and bradycardia developed on the follow-up. The oxygen saturation without oxygen support was 90%. ECG revealed sinus bradycardia. The cardiac enzymes did not increase. Case 5. A 42-year-old female patient was brought to our emergency room by 112 ambulance with contractions in her arms and legs and unconsciousness two hours after Papaver rhoeas ingestion. On her physical examination, she was confused and the pupils were myotic. Arterial blood gases analysis revealed lactic acidosis. Conclusion. All patients were followed up for a few days and then discharged from

  20. One step green synthesis of silver nano/microparticles using extracts of Trachyspermum ammi and Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Nalini, S P Kamala; Prakash, N Udaya; Madhankumar, D

    2012-06-01

    A novel biosynthesis route for silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) was attempted in this present investigation using aqueous extracts of Trachyspermum ammi and Papaver somniferum. The main constituents in T. ammi are thymol, p-cymene and γ-terpinene, while P. somniferum consists of morphine and codeine. The essential oil in T. ammi was found to be a good reducing agent than the alkaloids present in P. somniferum for the formation of biocompatible Ag-NPs. The effectiveness of both the extracts was investigated by using same dosage of extract in the synthesis of silver nanoparticle. The results showed that for the same dosage of extracts the T. ammi synthesized various size triangular shaped nanoparticles measuring from 87 nm, to a fewer nanoparticles having a size of 998 nm diagonally. P. somniferum resulted in almost spherical shaped particle ranging in size between 3.2 and 7.6 μm diagonally. Future research based on synthesis of size specific nanoparticle based on the optimization of reaction condition would be an interesting area. PMID:22348989

  1. Investigation of a substrate-specifying residue within Papaver somniferum and Catharanthus roseus aromatic amino acid decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Lazear, Michael; von Guggenberg, Renee; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong

    2014-10-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) catalyze the decarboxylation of aromatic amino acids with either benzene or indole rings. Because the substrate selectivity of AAADs is intimately related to their physiological functions, primary sequence data and their differentiation could provide significant physiological insights. However, due to general high sequence identity, plant AAAD substrate specificities have been difficult to identify through primary sequence comparison. In this study, bioinformatic approaches were utilized to identify several active site residues within plant AAAD enzymes that may impact substrate specificity. Next a Papaver somniferum tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC) was selected as a model to verify our putative substrate-dictating residues through mutation. Results indicated that mutagenesis of serine 372 to glycine enables the P. somniferum TyDC to use 5-hydroxytryptophan as a substrate, and reduces the enzyme activity toward 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa). Additionally, the reverse mutation in a Catharanthus roseus tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) enables the mutant enzyme to utilize tyrosine and dopa as substrates with a reduced affinity toward tryptophan. Molecular modeling and molecular docking of the P. somniferum TyDC and the C. roseus TDC enzymes provided a structural basis to explain alterations in substrate specificity. Identification of an active site residue that impacts substrate selectivity produces a primary sequence identifier that may help differentiate the indolic and phenolic substrate specificities of individual plant AAADs. PMID:25107664

  2. [Morphogenetic effects of the interaction of floral mutations petal-sepal and anther in petal in Papaver somniferum l].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, P G

    2001-01-01

    The morphogenetic effects of the interaction of the floral mutations petal-sepal and anther in petal in Papaver somniferum L. with a monocarpic shoot were studied. During analysis of the mutations controlled by the genes ptsp and Ant, no plants of the double-mutant class were found in the second generation, in which microsporangia form on the corolla sepal structures. The ratio of phenotypic classes obtained in the experiment corresponds to that inheritance, when the genetic control of mutant characters is realized by nonallele nonlinked genes Ant and ptsp upon epistatic interaction of these genes. These data were confirmed by analysis of the genotypes of F2 plants from the phenotypic class petal-sepal, which include plants that carry both mutant genes Ant and ptsp. The results obtained suggest that the gene Ant, which controls the formation of microsporangia in the corolla metameres, is not expressed in the presence of a mutation of the gene ptsp; i.e., microsporangia are not formed in tissues with photosynthesizing cells. It is evident that the development of microsporangia is determined by the level of a product of the gene Ptsp. The role of flavonols (quercetin), inhibitors of photosynthesis, as a mechanism of regulation of activity of the genes controlling morphogenesis of the corolla elements and differentiation of microsporangia, is discussed. PMID:11605406

  3. Recessive Loci Pps-1 and OM Differentially Regulate PISTILLATA-1 and APETALA3-1 Expression for Sepal and Petal Development in Papaver somniferum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sharad K.; Shukla, Ashutosh K.; Dhawan, Om P.; Shasany, Ajit K.

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of PISTILLATA (PI) and APETALA (AP) transcription factors in the development of floral organs has previously been elucidated but little is known about their upstream regulation. In this investigation, two novel mutants generated in Papaver somniferum were analyzed - one with partially petaloid sepals and another having sepaloid petals. Progeny from reciprocal crosses of respective mutant parent genotypes showed a good fit to the monogenic Mendelian inheritance model, indicating that the mutant traits are likely controlled by the single, recessive nuclear genes named “Pps-1” and “OM” in the partially petaloid sepal and sepaloid petal phenotypes, respectively. Both paralogs of PISTILLATA (PapsPI-1 and PapsPI-3) were obtained from the sepals and petals of P. somniferum. Ectopic expression of PapsPI-1 in tobacco resulted in a partially petaloid sepal phenotype at a low frequency. Upregulation of PapsPI-1 and PapsAP3-1 in the petal and the petal part of partially petaloid sepal mutant and down-regulation of the same in sepaloid petal mutant indicates a differential pattern of regulation for flowering-related genes in various whorls. Similarly, it was found that the recessive mutation OM in sepaloid petal mutant downregulates PapsPI-1 and PapsAP3-1 transcripts. The recessive nature of the mutations was confirmed by the segregation ratios obtained in this analysis. PMID:24979593

  4. PsAP2 an AP2/ERF family transcription factor from Papaver somniferum enhances abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sonal; Phukan, Ujjal J; Tripathi, Vineeta; Singh, Dhananjay K; Luqman, Suaib; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    The AP2/ERFs are one of the most important family of transcription factors which regulate multiple responses like stress, metabolism and development in plants. We isolated PsAP2 a novel AP2/ERF from Papaver somniferum which was highly upregulated in response to wounding followed by ethylene, methyl jasmonate and ABA treatment. PsAP2 showed specific binding with both DRE and GCC box elements and it was able to transactivate the reporter genes in yeast. PsAP2 overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants exhibited enhanced tolerance towards both abiotic and biotic stresses . Real time transcript expression analysis showed constitutive upregulation of tobacco Alternative oxidase1a and Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase in PsAP2 overexpressing tobacco plants. Further, PsAP2 showed interaction with NtAOX1a promoter in vitro, it also specifically activated the NtAOX1a promoter in yeast and tobacco BY2 cells. The silencing of PsAP2 using VIGS lead to significant reduction in the AOX1 level in P. somniferum. Taken together PsAP2 can directly bind and transcriptionally activate NtAOX1a and its overexpression in tobacco imparted increased tolerance towards both abiotic and biotic stress. PMID:26319514

  5. Recessive loci Pps-1 and OM differentially regulate PISTILLATA-1 and APETALA3-1 expression for sepal and petal development in Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sharad K; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Dhawan, Om P; Shasany, Ajit K

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of PISTILLATA (PI) and APETALA (AP) transcription factors in the development of floral organs has previously been elucidated but little is known about their upstream regulation. In this investigation, two novel mutants generated in Papaver somniferum were analyzed--one with partially petaloid sepals and another having sepaloid petals. Progeny from reciprocal crosses of respective mutant parent genotypes showed a good fit to the monogenic Mendelian inheritance model, indicating that the mutant traits are likely controlled by the single, recessive nuclear genes named "Pps-1" and "OM" in the partially petaloid sepal and sepaloid petal phenotypes, respectively. Both paralogs of PISTILLATA (PapsPI-1 and PapsPI-3) were obtained from the sepals and petals of P. somniferum. Ectopic expression of PapsPI-1 in tobacco resulted in a partially petaloid sepal phenotype at a low frequency. Upregulation of PapsPI-1 and PapsAP3-1 in the petal and the petal part of partially petaloid sepal mutant and down-regulation of the same in sepaloid petal mutant indicates a differential pattern of regulation for flowering-related genes in various whorls. Similarly, it was found that the recessive mutation OM in sepaloid petal mutant downregulates PapsPI-1 and PapsAP3-1 transcripts. The recessive nature of the mutations was confirmed by the segregation ratios obtained in this analysis. PMID:24979593

  6. Papaverine 7-O-demethylase, a novel 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenase from opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Scott C; Facchini, Peter J

    2015-09-14

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces several pharmacologically important benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including the vasodilator papaverine. Pacodine and palaudine are tri-O-methylated analogs of papaverine, which contains four O-linked methyl groups. However, the biosynthetic origin of pacodine and palaudine has not been established. Three members of the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenases (2ODDs) family in opium poppy display widespread O-dealkylation activity on several benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with diverse structural scaffolds, and two are responsible for the antepenultimate and ultimate steps in morphine biosynthesis. We report a novel 2ODD from opium poppy catalyzing the efficient substrate- and regio-specific 7-O-demethylation of papaverine yielding pacodine. The occurrence of papaverine 7-O-demethylase (P7ODM) expands the enzymatic scope of the 2ODD family in opium poppy and suggests an unexpected biosynthetic route to pacodine. PMID:26264169

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel freezing-inducible DREB1/CBF transcription factor gene in boreal plant Iceland poppy (Papaver nudicaule).

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuo; He, Jiao; Zhong, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Han-Du; Jin, Si-Han; Li, Xi; Sun, Ling-Xia

    2016-07-25

    DREB1 of the AP2/ERF superfamily plays a key role in the regulation of plant response to low temperatures. In this study, a novel DREB1/CBF transcription factor, PnDREB1, was isolated from Iceland poppy (Papaver nudicaule), a plant adaptive to low temperature environments. It is homologous to the known DREB1s of Arabidopsis and other plant species. It also shares similar 3D structure, and conserved and functionally important motifs with DREB1s of Arabidopsis. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the AP2 domain of PnDREB1 is similar to those of Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, and M. sativa. PnDREB1 is constitutively expressed in diverse tissues and is increased in roots. qPCR analyses indicated that PnDREB1 is significantly induced by freezing treatment as well as by abscissic acid. The expression levels induced by freezing treatment were higher in the variety with higher degree of freezing tolerance. These results suggested that PnDREB1 is a novel and functional DREB1 transcription factor involved in freezing response and possibly in other abiotic stresses. Furthermore, the freezing-induction could be suppressed by exogenous gibberellins acid, indicating that PnDREB1 might play some role in the GA signaling transduction pathway. This study provides a basis for better understanding the roles of DREB1 in adaption of Iceland poppy to low temperatures. PMID:27459263

  8. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy. PMID:24671624

  9. Traditional ecologies of the opium poppy and oral history in rural Turkey.

    PubMed

    Evered, Kyle T

    2011-01-01

    Cultivated in the Eastern Mediterranean region for millennia, the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) was profoundly significant in the economies, ecologies, cultures, and diets of the peoples of many towns and villages of rural Anatolia. When the United States compelled Turkey to eradicate cultivation of the plant in the early 1970s in order to diminish the flow of heroin into America, farmers were obliged to deal with not only changes in their incomes but also profound changes in their relationships with the land and the state. Although Turkish officials later allowed production to resume in a highly controlled manner for pharmaceutical purposes, significant socioeconomic and ecological dimensions of Turkey's poppy-growing communities were forever changed. Interviewing now-retired poppy farmers, I employ oral history as my primary source of historical evidence to reconstruct these past ecologies and associated social relationships and to give voice to the informants. PMID:21954490

  10. Evolution and diversity of the mechanisms endowing resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate-synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.).

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Pernin, Fanny; Scarabel, Laura

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the diversity of mechanisms conferring resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.) and the processes underlying the selection for resistance. Six mutant ALS alleles, Arg₁₉₇, His₁₉₇, Leu₁₉₇, Ser₁₉₇, Thr₁₉₇ and Leu₅₇₄ were identified in five Italian populations. Different alleles were found in a same population or a same plant. Comparison of individual plant phenotype (herbicide sensitivity) and genotype (amino-acid substitution(s) at codon 197) showed that all mutant ALS alleles conferred dominant resistance to the field rate of the sulfonylurea tribenuron and moderate or no resistance to the field rate of the triazolopyrimidine florasulam. Depending on the allele, dominant or partially dominant resistance to the field rate of the imidazolinone imazamox was observed. Putative non-target-site resistance mechanisms were also likely present in the populations investigated. The derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence assays targeting ALS codons crucial for herbicide sensitivity developed in this work will facilitate the detection of resistance due to mutant ALS alleles. Nucleotide variation around codon 197 indicated that mutant ALS alleles evolved by multiple, independent appearances. Resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas clearly evolved by redundant evolution of a set of mutant ALS alleles and likely of non-target-site mechanisms. PMID:21421378

  11. Stereochemical inversion of (S)-reticuline by a cytochrome P450 fusion in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Scott C; Hagel, Jillian M; Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Burns, Darcy C; Facchini, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    The gateway to morphine biosynthesis in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is the stereochemical inversion of (S)-reticuline since the enzyme yielding the first committed intermediate salutaridine is specific for (R)-reticuline. A fusion between a cytochrome P450 (CYP) and an aldo-keto reductase (AKR) catalyzes the S-to-R epimerization of reticuline via 1,2-dehydroreticuline. The reticuline epimerase (REPI) fusion was detected in opium poppy and in Papaver bracteatum, which accumulates thebaine. In contrast, orthologs encoding independent CYP and AKR enzymes catalyzing the respective synthesis and reduction of 1,2-dehydroreticuline were isolated from Papaver rhoeas, which does not accumulate morphinan alkaloids. An ancestral relationship between these enzymes is supported by a conservation of introns in the gene fusions and independent orthologs. Suppression of REPI transcripts using virus-induced gene silencing in opium poppy reduced levels of (R)-reticuline and morphinan alkaloids and increased the overall abundance of (S)-reticuline and its O-methylated derivatives. Discovery of REPI completes the isolation of genes responsible for known steps of morphine biosynthesis. PMID:26147354

  12. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture. PMID:17961129

  13. New Physicochemical Treatment Method of Poppy Seeds for Agriculture and Food Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božena, Šerá; Iveta, Gajdová; Michal, Šerý; Petr, Špatenka

    2013-09-01

    Poppy seeds (Papaver somniferum L.) are often attacked by various fungal diseases, and their field germination rate is low. The aim of this experiment was to increase the germination rate and growth of seedlings by modifying the poppy seeds using cold plasma discharge. The seeds were treated in a Plasonic AR-550-M under power of 500 W with argon gas flow of 50 mL/min, oxygen gas flow of 50 mL/min for different time durations in seconds (0, 180, 300, 600, 1800, 3000, 4200, and 5400). The seed germination rate and growth of the seedlings were recorded. Cold plasma positively affected the seed germination rate for time exposure between 180~3000 s. Seedling acceleration on the sixth day of the experiment showed the highest values at exposure 180~600 s. Cold plasma seems to be a good physicochemical way to modify seeds without chemical agronomical application.

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Downy Mildew Pathogens of Opium Poppy and PCR-Based In Planta and Seed Detection of Peronospora arborescens.

    PubMed

    Landa, Blanca B; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Muñoz-Ledesma, Francisco J; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M

    2007-11-01

    ABSTRACT Severe downy mildew diseases of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) can be caused by Peronospora arborescens and P. cristata, but differentiating between the two pathogens is difficult because they share morphological features and a similar host range. In Spain, where severe epidemics of downy mildew of opium poppy have occurred recently, the pathogen was identified as P. arborescens on the basis of morphological traits. In this current study, sequence homology and phylogenetic analyses of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were carried out with DNA from P. arborescens and P. cristata from diverse geographic origins, which suggested that only P. arborescens occurs in cultivated Papaver somniferum in Spain. Moreover, analyses of the rDNA ITS region from 27 samples of downy-mildew-affected tissues from all opium-poppy-growing regions in Spain showed that genetic diversity exists within P. arborescens populations in Spain and that these are phylogenetically distinct from P. cristata. P. cristata instead shares a more recent, common ancestor with a range of Peronospora species that includes those found on host plants that are not members of the Papaveraceae. Species-specific primers and a PCR assay protocol were developed that differentiated P. arborescens and P. cristata and proved useful for the detection of P. arborescens in symptomatic and asymptomatic opium poppy plant parts. Use of these primers demonstrated that P. arborescens can be transmitted in seeds and that commercial seed stocks collected from crops with high incidence of the disease were frequently infected. Field experiments conducted in microplots free from P. arborescens using seed stocks harvested from infected capsules further demonstrated that transmission from seedborne P. arborescens to opium poppy plants can occur. Therefore, the specific-PCR detection protocol developed in this study can be of use for epidemiological studies and diagnosing the

  15. Improved sanguinarine production via biotic and abiotic elicitations and precursor feeding in cell suspensions of latex-less variety of Papaver somniferum with their gene expression studies and upscaling in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Khan, Shamshad Ahmad; Mathur, Ajay K; Ghosh, Sumit; Shanker, Karuna; Kalra, Alok

    2014-11-01

    Elicitors play an important role in challenging the plant defense system through plant-environment interaction and thus altering the secondary metabolite production. Culture filtrates of four endophytic fungi, namely, Chaetomium globosum, Aspergillus niveoglaucus, Paecilomyces lilacinus, and Trichoderma harzianum were tested on embryogenic cell suspensions of latex-less Papaver somniferum in dose-dependent kinetics. Besides this, abiotic elicitors salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and carbon dioxide were also applied for improved sanguinarine production. Maximum biomass accumulation (growth index (GI) = 293.50 ± 14.82) and sanguinarine production (0.090 ± 0.008 % dry wt.) were registered by addition of 3.3 % v/v T. harzanium culture filtrate. Interestingly, it was further enhanced (GI = 323.40 ± 25.30; 0.105 ± 0.008 % dry wt.) when T. harzanium culture filtrate was employed along with 50 μM shikimate. This was also supported by real-time (RT) (qPCR), where 8-9-fold increase in cheilanthifoline synthase (CFS), stylopine synthase (STS), tetrahydroprotoberberine cis-N-methyltransferase (TNMT), and protopine 6-hydroxylase (P6H) transcripts was observed. Among abiotic elicitors, while hydrogen peroxide and carbon dioxide registered low level of sanguinarine accumulation, maximum sanguinarine content was detected by 250 μM salicylic acid (0.058 ± 0.003 % dry wt.; GI = 172.75 ± 13.40). RT (qPCR) also confirms the downregulation of sanguinarine pathway on CO2 supplementation. Various parameters ranging from agitation speed (70 rpm), impeller type (marine), media volume (2 l), inoculum weight (100 g), and culture duration (9 days) were optimized during upscaling in 5-l stirred tank bioreactor to obtain maximum sanguinarine production (GI = 434.00; 0.119 ± 0.070 % dry wt.). Addition of 3.3 % v/v T. harzanium culture filtrate and 50-μM shikimate was done on the 6th day of bioreactor run. PMID:24677097

  16. Spatiotemporal analysis of epiphytotics of downy mildew of oilseed poppy in tasmania, australia.

    PubMed

    Scott, J B; Hay, F S; Wilson, C R; Cotterill, P J; Fist, A J

    2003-06-01

    Downy mildew, caused by Peronospora arborescens, has become the major disease affecting oilseed poppy (Papaver somniferum) since its first record in Tasmania in 1996. Two field trials conducted in 2000 and 2001 studied the progression and spatial distribution of downy mildew epiphytotics. The logistic and exponential models best described the progression of disease incidence and severity, respectively. Incidence and severity increased rapidly following canopy closure. In 2001, incidence increased from 0.16%, prior to canopy closure, to 100% at late flowering (40 days). Spatial analyses of epiphytotics were conducted by fitting the beta-binomial and binomial distributions, median runs analysis, and the spatial analysis by distance indices. All analyses demonstrated that the distribution of incidence and severity was strongly spatially aggregated from canopy closure until at least late flowering. These results suggest that secondary spread from a few primary infections is the major factor in epiphytotics. PMID:18943064

  17. Recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide and the potential impacts on growth and alkaloid production in wild poppy (Papaver setigerum DC.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the current study, we quantified changes in the growth and alkaloid content of wild poppy, (P. setigerum) as a function of recent and projected changes in global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2]. The experimental [CO2] values (300, 400, 500 and 600 µmol mol-1) correspond roughly t...

  18. Characterization of three O-methyltransferases involved in noscapine biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-06-01

    Noscapine is a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid produced in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and other members of the Papaveraceae. It has been used as a cough suppressant and more recently was shown to possess anticancer activity. However, the biosynthesis of noscapine in opium poppy has not been established. A proposed pathway leading from (S)-reticuline to noscapine includes (S)-scoulerine, (S)-canadine, and (S)-N-methylcanadine as intermediates. Stem cDNA libraries and latex extracts of eight opium poppy cultivars displaying different alkaloid profiles were subjected to massively parallel pyrosequencing and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Comparative transcript and metabolite profiling revealed the occurrence of three cDNAs encoding O-methyltransferases designated as SOMT1, SOMT2, and SOMT3 that correlated with the accumulation of noscapine in the eight cultivars. SOMT transcripts were detected in all opium poppy organs but were most abundant in aerial organs, where noscapine primarily accumulates. SOMT2 and SOMT3 showed strict substrate specificity and regiospecificity as 9-O-methyltransferases targeting (S)-scoulerine. In contrast, SOMT1 was able to sequentially 9- and 2-O-methylate (S)-scoulerine, yielding (S)-tetrahydropalmatine. SOMT1 also sequentially 3'- and 7-O-methylated both (S)-norreticuline and (S)-reticuline with relatively high substrate affinity, yielding (S)-tetrahydropapaverine and (S)-laudanosine, respectively. The metabolic functions of SOMT1, SOMT2, and SOMT3 were investigated in planta using virus-induced gene silencing. Reduction of SOMT1 or SOMT2 transcript levels resulted in a significant decrease in noscapine accumulation. Reduced SOMT1 transcript levels also caused a decrease in papaverine accumulation, confirming the selective roles for these enzymes in the biosynthesis of both alkaloids in opium poppy. PMID:22535422

  19. Characterization of a Flavoprotein Oxidase from Opium Poppy Catalyzing the Final Steps in Sanguinarine and Papaverine Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Hagel, Jillian M.; Beaudoin, Guillaume A. W.; Fossati, Elena; Ekins, Andrew; Martin, Vincent J. J.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids are a diverse class of plant specialized metabolites that includes the analgesic morphine, the antimicrobials sanguinarine and berberine, and the vasodilator papaverine. The two-electron oxidation of dihydrosanguinarine catalyzed by dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase (DBOX) is the final step in sanguinarine biosynthesis. The formation of the fully conjugated ring system in sanguinarine is similar to the four-electron oxidations of (S)-canadine to berberine and (S)-tetrahydropapaverine to papaverine. We report the isolation and functional characterization of an opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) cDNA encoding DBOX, a flavoprotein oxidase with homology to (S)-tetrahydroprotoberberine oxidase and the berberine bridge enzyme. A query of translated opium poppy stem transcriptome databases using berberine bridge enzyme yielded several candidate genes, including an (S)-tetrahydroprotoberberine oxidase-like sequence selected for heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant enzyme preferentially catalyzed the oxidation of dihydrosanguinarine to sanguinarine but also converted (RS)-tetrahydropapaverine to papaverine and several protoberberine alkaloids to oxidized forms, including (RS)-canadine to berberine. The Km values of 201 and 146 μm for dihydrosanguinarine and the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine, respectively, suggested high concentrations of these substrates in the plant. Virus-induced gene silencing to reduce DBOX transcript levels resulted in a corresponding reduction in sanguinarine, dihydrosanguinarine, and papaverine accumulation in opium poppy roots in support of DBOX as a multifunctional oxidative enzyme in BIA metabolism. PMID:23118227

  20. Tyrosine Aminotransferase Contributes to Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Opium Poppy1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Facchini, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TyrAT) catalyzes the transamination of l-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, yielding 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and l-glutamate. The decarboxylation product of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, is a precursor to a large and diverse group of natural products known collectively as benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). We have isolated and characterized a TyrAT cDNA from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), which remains the only commercial source for several pharmaceutical BIAs, including codeine, morphine, and noscapine. TyrAT belongs to group I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes wherein Schiff base formation occurs between PLP and a specific Lys residue. The amino acid sequence of TyrAT showed considerable homology to other putative plant TyrATs, although few of these have been functionally characterized. Purified, recombinant TyrAT displayed a molecular mass of approximately 46 kD and a substrate preference for l-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, with apparent Km values of 1.82 and 0.35 mm, respectively. No specific requirement for PLP was detected in vitro. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirmed the conversion of l-Tyr to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. TyrAT gene transcripts were most abundant in roots and stems of mature opium poppy plants. Virus-induced gene silencing was used to evaluate the contribution of TyrAT to BIA metabolism in opium poppy. TyrAT transcript levels were reduced by at least 80% in silenced plants compared with controls and showed a moderate reduction in total alkaloid content. The modest correlation between transcript levels and BIA accumulation in opium poppy supports a role for TyrAT in the generation of alkaloid precursors, but it also suggests the occurrence of other sources for 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde. PMID:21949209

  1. Morphine Biosynthesis in Opium Poppy Involves Two Cell Types: Sieve Elements and Laticifers[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Onoyovwe, Akpevwe; Hagel, Jillian M.; Chen, Xue; Khan, Morgan F.; Schriemer, David C.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Immunofluorescence labeling and shotgun proteomics were used to establish the cell type–specific localization of morphine biosynthesis in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Polyclonal antibodies for each of six enzymes involved in converting (R)-reticuline to morphine detected corresponding antigens in sieve elements of the phloem, as described previously for all upstream enzymes transforming (S)-norcoclaurine to (S)-reticuline. Validated shotgun proteomics performed on whole-stem and latex total protein extracts generated 2031 and 830 distinct protein families, respectively. Proteins corresponding to nine morphine biosynthetic enzymes were represented in the whole stem, whereas only four of the final five pathway enzymes were detected in the latex. Salutaridine synthase was detected in the whole stem, but not in the latex subproteome. The final three enzymes converting thebaine to morphine were among the most abundant active latex proteins despite a limited occurrence in laticifers suggested by immunofluorescence labeling. Multiple charge isoforms of two key O-demethylases in the latex were revealed by two-dimensional immunoblot analysis. Salutaridine biosynthesis appears to occur only in sieve elements, whereas conversion of thebaine to morphine is predominant in adjacent laticifers, which contain morphine-rich latex. Complementary use of immunofluorescence labeling and shotgun proteomics has substantially resolved the cellular localization of morphine biosynthesis in opium poppy. PMID:24104569

  2. Regulation of the alkaloid biosynthesis by miRNA in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Boke, Hatice; Ozhuner, Esma; Turktas, Mine; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Unver, Turgay

    2015-04-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is an important medicinal plant producing benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIA). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) of approximately 21 nucleotides. They are noncoding, but regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Although many studies have been conducted on the identification and functions of plant miRNA, scarce researches on miRNA regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis have been reported. In this study, a total of 316 conserved and 11 novel miRNAs were identified in opium poppy using second-generation sequencing and direct cloning. Tissue-specific regulation of miRNA expression was comparatively analysed by miRNA microarray assays. A total of 232 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed among four tissues. Likewise, 1469 target transcripts were detected using in silico and experimental approaches. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses indicated that miRNA putatively regulates carbohydrate metabolism and genetic-information processing. Additionally, miRNA target transcripts were mostly involved in response to stress against various factors and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis processes. Target transcript identification analyses revealed that some of the miRNAs might be involved in BIA biosynthesis, such as pso-miR13, pso-miR2161 and pso-miR408. Additionally, three putatively mature miRNA sequences were predicted to be targeting BIA-biosynthesis genes. PMID:25735537

  3. Orally active opioid compounds from a non-poppy source.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Beckett, Jaclyn R; Brahmbhatt, Vivek N; Ebinger, Theresa M; Fabian, Chrisjon A; Nixon, Justin R; Orlando, Steven T; Rana, Chintan A; Tejani, Ali H; Tomazic, Robert J

    2013-06-27

    The basic science and clinical use of morphine and other "opioid" drugs are based almost exclusively on the extracts or analogues of compounds isolated from a single source, the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). However, it now appears that biological diversity has evolved an alternative source. Specifically, at least two alkaloids isolated from the plant Mitragyna speciosa, mitragynine ((E)-2-[(2S,3S)-3-ethyl-8-methoxy-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12b-octahydroindolo[3,2-h]quinolizin-2-yl]-3-methoxyprop-2-enoic acid methyl ester; 9-methoxy coryantheidine; MG) and 7-hydroxymitragynine (7-OH-MG), and several synthetic analogues of these natural products display centrally mediated (supraspinal and spinal) antinociceptive (analgesic) activity in various pain models. Several characteristics of these compounds suggest a classic "opioid" mechanism of action: nanomolar affinity for opioid receptors, competitive interaction with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, and two-way analgesic cross-tolerance with morphine. However, other characteristics of the compounds suggest novelty, particularly chemical structure and possible greater separation from side effects. We review the chemical and pharmacological properties of these compounds. PMID:23517479

  4. Death in a legal poppy field in Spain.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Antonia; Ballesteros, Salomé; Almarza, Elena; Garijo, Joaquín

    2016-08-01

    Opium is a substance extracted from Papaver somniferum L. Opium latex contains morphine, codeine, and thebaine and non-analgesic alkaloids such as papaverine and noscapine. In Spain opium growing is allowed only for scientific or pharmaceutical purposes and harvest is supervised by the Spanish Health Ministry. This work describes a sudden fatality involving opium consumption in a legal poppy field. The toxicological and autopsy findings, previous disease, paraphernalia, and scenario are discussed in order to clarify cause and manner of death. A 32-year-old white caucasian male was found unresponsive in a legal poppy field in the South of Spain. The emergency medical services responded to the scene where he was pronounced dead. The friends explained that the deceased had presented with about 30min of convulsions; in spite of trying to keep his airway tract open they noted that "he stayed airless". According to them the victim suffered from epilepsy. Tools found beside his body consisted of plain wood sticks with a blade razor, a fabric handle, and paper. A comprehensive toxicological screening for abuse and psychoactive drugs was performed in the deceased samples. This included ethanol and volatile analysis by HS-GC-FID in peripheral blood and urine, enzyme immunoassay in urine by CEDIA, and a basic drug screening in all samples (including paraphernalia) by GC-MS using modes full scan for screening/confirmation and selected ion monitoring for quantitation. The peripheral blood, urine, vitreous, and gastric content contained the following concentrations of opiates expressed in mg/L (gastric content additionally also expressed in mg total): 0.10, 7.12, 0.23, and 14.80 (2.81mg total) of thebaine, 0.13, 4.50, 0.13, and 6.60 (1.25mg total) of morphine (free), 0.48, 0.88, 0.17, and 1.50 (0.28mg total) of codeine. These tree opiates were also detected in the tools (paraphernalia) used by the deceased for opium consumption. Other toxicological findings were metabolites of

  5. Expression Patterns Conferred by Tyrosine/Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase Promoters from Opium Poppy Are Conserved in Transgenic Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Peter J.; Penzes-Yost, Catherine; Samanani, Nailish; Kowalchuk, Brett

    1998-01-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) contains a large family of tyrosine/dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (tydc) genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamic acid amides. Eight members from two distinct gene subfamilies have been isolated, tydc1, tydc4, tydc6, tydc8, and tydc9 in one group and tydc2, tydc3, and tydc7 in the other. The tydc8 and tydc9 genes were located 3.2 kb apart on one genomic clone, suggesting that the family is clustered. Transcripts for most tydc genes were detected only in roots. Only tydc2 and tydc7 revealed expression in both roots and shoots, and TYDC3 mRNAs were the only specific transcripts detected in seedlings. TYDC1, TYDC8, and TYDC9 mRNAs, which occurred in roots, were not detected in elicitor-treated opium poppy cultures. Expression of tydc4, which contains a premature termination codon, was not detected under any conditions. Five tydc promoters were fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in a binary vector. All constructs produced transient GUS activity in microprojectile-bombarded opium poppy and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell cultures. The organ- and tissue-specific expression pattern of tydc promoter-GUS fusions in transgenic tobacco was generally parallel to that of corresponding tydc genes in opium poppy. GUS expression was most abundant in the internal phloem of shoot organs and in the stele of roots. Select tydc promoter-GUS fusions were also wound induced in transgenic tobacco, suggesting that the basic mechanisms of developmental and inducible tydc regulation are conserved across plant species. PMID:9733527

  6. Quantitative 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolite Profiling as a Functional Genomics Platform to Investigate Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Opium Poppy1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hagel, Jillian M.; Weljie, Aalim M.; Vogel, Hans J.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces a diverse array of bioactive benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and has emerged as a versatile model system to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The plant is widely cultivated as the only commercial source of the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine. Variations in plant secondary metabolism as a result of genetic diversity are often associated with perturbations in other metabolic pathways. As part of a functional genomics platform, we used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolite profiling for the analysis of primary and secondary metabolism in opium poppy. Aqueous and chloroform extracts of six different opium poppy cultivars were subjected to chemometric analysis. Principle component analysis of the 1H NMR spectra for latex extracts clearly distinguished two varieties, including a low-alkaloid variety and a high-thebaine, low-morphine cultivar. Distinction was also made between pharmaceutical-grade opium poppy cultivars and a condiment variety. Such phenotypic differences were not observed in root extracts. Loading plots confirmed that morphinan alkaloids contributed predominantly to the variance in latex extracts. Quantification of 34 root and 21 latex metabolites, performed using Chenomx NMR Suite version 4.6, showed major differences in the accumulation of specific alkaloids in the latex of the low-alkaloid and high-thebaine, low-morphine varieties. Relatively few differences were found in the levels of other metabolites, indicating that the variation was specific for alkaloid metabolism. Exceptions in the low-alkaloid cultivar included an increased accumulation of the alkaloid precursor tyramine and reduced levels of sucrose, some amino acids, and malate. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of 42 genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism showed differential gene expression mainly associated with alkaloid biosynthesis. Reduced alkaloid levels in the condiment variety were associated with the

  7. Poppy APETALA1/FRUITFULL Orthologs Control Flowering Time, Branching, Perianth Identity, and Fruit Development1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pabón-Mora, Natalia; Ambrose, Barbara A.; Litt, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Several MADS box gene lineages involved in flower development have undergone duplications that correlate with the diversification of large groups of flowering plants. In the APETALA1 gene lineage, a major duplication coincides with the origin of the core eudicots, resulting in the euFUL and the euAP1 clades. Arabidopsis FRUITFULL (FUL) and APETALA1 (AP1) function redundantly in specifying floral meristem identity but function independently in sepal and petal identity (AP1) and in proper fruit development and determinacy (FUL). Many of these functions are largely conserved in other core eudicot euAP1 and euFUL genes, but notably, the role of APETALA1 as an “A-function” (sepal and petal identity) gene is thought to be Brassicaceae specific. Understanding how functional divergence of the core eudicot duplicates occurred requires a careful examination of the function of preduplication (FUL-like) genes. Using virus-induced gene silencing, we show that FUL-like genes in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) function in axillary meristem growth and in floral meristem and sepal identity and that they also play a key role in fruit development. Interestingly, in opium poppy, these genes also control flowering time and petal identity, suggesting that AP1/FUL homologs might have been independently recruited in petal identity. Because the FUL-like gene functional repertoire encompasses all roles previously described for the core eudicot euAP1 and euFUL genes, we postulate subfunctionalization as the functional outcome after the major AP1/FUL gene lineage duplication event. PMID:22286183

  8. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase from opium poppy, a key enzyme in sanguinarine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2013-02-15

    Sanguinarine is a benzo[c]phenenthridine alkaloid with potent antimicrobial properties found commonly in plants of the Papaveraceae, including the roots of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Sanguinarine is formed from the central 1-benzylisoquinoline intermediate (S)-reticuline via the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine, which undergoes five enzymatic oxidations and an N-methylation. The first four oxidations from (S)-scoulerine are catalyzed by cytochromes P450, whereas the final conversion involves a flavoprotein oxidase. All but one gene in the biosynthetic pathway from (S)-reticuline to sanguinarine has been identified. In this communication, we report the isolation and characterization of (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase (MSH) from opium poppy based on the transcriptional induction in elicitor-treated cell suspension cultures and root-specific expression of the corresponding gene. Along with protopine 6-hydroxylase, which catalyzes the subsequent and penultimate step in sanguinarine biosynthesis, MSH is a member of the CYP82N subfamily of cytochromes P450. The full-length MSH cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the recombinant microsomal protein was tested for enzymatic activity using 25 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids representing a wide range of structural subgroups. The only enzymatic substrates were the N-methylated protoberberine alkaloids N-methylstylopine and N-methylcanadine, which were converted to protopine and allocryptopine, respectively. PMID:23313486

  9. Systematic silencing of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthetic genes reveals the major route to papaverine in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Desgagné-Penix, Isabel; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    Papaverine, a major benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), is used as a vasodilator and antispasmodic. Conversion of the initial intermediate (S)-norcoclaurine to papaverine involves 3'-hydroxylation, four O-methylations and dehydrogenation. However, our understanding of papaverine biosynthesis remains controversial more than a century after an initial scheme was proposed. In vitro assays and in vivo labeling studies have been insufficient to establish the sequence of conversions, the potential role of the intermediate (S)-reticuline, and the enzymes involved. We used virus-induced gene silencing in opium poppy to individually suppress the expression of six genes with putative roles in papaverine biosynthesis. Suppression of the gene encoding coclaurine N-methyltransferase dramatically increased papaverine levels at the expense of N-methylated alkaloids, indicating that the main biosynthetic route to papaverine proceeds via N-desmethylated compounds rather than through (S)-reticuline. Suppression of genes encoding (S)-3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4-O-methyltransferase and norreticuline 7-O-methyltransferase, which accept certain N-desmethylated alkaloids, reduced papaverine content. In contrast, suppression of genes encoding N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase or reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase, which are specific for N-methylated alkaloids, did not affect papaverine levels. Suppression of norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase transcript levels significantly suppressed total alkaloid accumulation, implicating (S)-coclaurine as a key branch-point intermediate. The differential detection of N-desmethylated compounds in response to suppression of specific genes highlights the primary route to papaverine. PMID:22725256

  10. Quantitative 1H NMR metabolomics reveals extensive metabolic reprogramming of primary and secondary metabolism in elicitor-treated opium poppy cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zulak, Katherine G; Weljie, Aalim M; Vogel, Hans J; Facchini, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Background Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces a diverse array of bioactive benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and has emerged as a model system to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The plant is cultivated as the only commercial source of the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine, but also produces many other alkaloids including the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Modulations in plant secondary metabolism as a result of environmental perturbations are often associated with the altered regulation of other metabolic pathways. As a key component of our functional genomics platform for opium poppy we have used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) metabolomics to investigate the interplay between primary and secondary metabolism in cultured opium poppy cells treated with a fungal elicitor. Results Metabolite fingerprinting and compound-specific profiling showed the extensive reprogramming of primary metabolic pathways in association with the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis in response to elicitor treatment. Using Chenomx NMR Suite v. 4.6, a software package capable of identifying and quantifying individual compounds based on their respective signature spectra, the levels of 42 diverse metabolites were monitored over a 100-hour time course in control and elicitor-treated opium poppy cell cultures. Overall, detectable and dynamic changes in the metabolome of elicitor-treated cells, especially in cellular pools of carbohydrates, organic acids and non-protein amino acids were detected within 5 hours after elicitor treatment. The metabolome of control cultures also showed substantial modulations 80 hours after the start of the time course, particularly in the levels of amino acids and phospholipid pathway intermediates. Specific flux modulations were detected throughout primary metabolism, including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, nitrogen assimilation, phospholipid/fatty acid synthesis and the shikimate pathway, all of which generate secondary

  11. Manipulating the Biosynthesis of Bioactive Compound Alkaloids for Next-Generation Metabolic Engineering in Opium Poppy Using CRISPR-Cas 9 Genome Editing Technology.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Yagiz; Gurkok, Tugba; Zhang, Baohong; Unver, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated9 (Cas9) endonuclease system is a powerful RNA-guided genome editing tool. CRISPR/Cas9 has been well studied in model plant species for targeted genome editing. However, few studies have been reported on plant species without whole genome sequence information. Currently, no study has been performed to manipulate metabolic pathways using CRISPR/Cas9. In this study, the type II CRISPR/SpCas9 system was used to knock out, via nonhomologous end-joining genome repair, the 4'OMT2 in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), a gene which regulates the biosythesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). For sgRNA transcription, viral-based TRV and synthetic binary plasmids were designed and delivered into plant cells with a Cas9 encoding-synthetic vector by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. InDels formed by CRISPR/Cas9 were detected by sequence analysis. Our results showed that the biosynthesis of BIAs (e.g. morphine, thebaine) was significantly reduced in the transgenic plants suggesting that 4'OMT2 was efficiently knocked-out by our CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing approach. In addition, a novel uncharacterized alkaloid was observed only in CRISPR/Cas9 edited plants. Thus, the applicabilitiy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system was demonstrated for the first time for medicinal aromatic plants by sgRNAs transcribed from both synthetic and viral vectors to regulate BIA metabolism and biosynthesis. PMID:27483984

  12. Uncoupled defense gene expression and antimicrobial alkaloid accumulation in elicited opium poppy cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, P J; Johnson, A G; Poupart, J; de Luca, V

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) cell cultures with autoclaved mycelial homogenates of Botrytis sp. resulted in the accumulation of sanguinarine. Elicitor treatment also caused a rapid and transient induction in the activity of tyrosine/dopa decarboxylase (TYDC, EC 4.1.1.25), which catalyzes the conversion of L-tyrosine and L-dopa to tyramine and dopamine, respectively, the first steps in sanguinarine biosynthesis. TYDC genes were differentially expressed in response to elicitor treatment. TYDC1-like mRNA levels were induced rapidly but declined to near baseline levels within 5 h. In contrast, TYDC2-like transcript levels increased more slowly but were sustained for an extended period. Induction of TYDC mRNAs preceded that of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) mRNAs. An elicitor preparation from Pythium aphanidermatum was less effective in the induction of TYDC mRNA levels and alkaloid accumulation; however, both elicitors equally induced accumulation of PAL transcripts. In contrast, treatment with methyl jasmonate resulted in an induction of TYDC but not PAL mRNAs. The calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide and the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine partially blocked the fungal elicitor-induced accumulation of sanguinarine. However, only staurosporine and okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, blocked the induction of TYDC1-like transcript levels, but they did not block the induction of TYDC2-like or PAL transcript levels. These data suggest that activation mechanisms for PAL, TYDC, and some later sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes are uncoupled. PMID:8754678

  13. Use of Climatic Data to Identify Potential Sites in the United States for Growing Papaver bracteatum as a Pharmaceutical Crop.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, R. E.

    1987-09-01

    A procedure utilizing maps in the National Climatic Atlas was used to survey the United States to find areas for domesticating Papaver bracteatum, a wild poppy from the Trans-Caucasus. This poppy has unique properties which make it a possible heroinless source of codeine. Climatic conditions similar to the native habitat and requirements of Papaver bracteatum can be found in areas of western Utah, northern Nevada, southern Idaho, eastern Washington and Oregon, northeastern California and southwestern Wyoming. A detailed climatic analysis was made to evaluate more specific locations within this large area. A site near Medford, Oregon was selected as best suited for developing modern cultural procedures and improving strains to successfully grow crops of Papaver bracteatum.

  14. 7 CFR 400.677 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... charges (7 CFR 400.116). A delinquent debt does not include debts discharged in bankruptcy and other debts... (cannabis sativa), opium poppies (papaver somniferum), and other drug-producing plants, the planting...

  15. 7 CFR 400.677 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... charges (7 CFR 400.116). A delinquent debt does not include debts discharged in bankruptcy and other debts... (cannabis sativa), opium poppies (papaver somniferum), and other drug-producing plants, the planting...

  16. 7 CFR 400.677 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... charges (7 CFR 400.116). A delinquent debt does not include debts discharged in bankruptcy and other debts... (cannabis sativa), opium poppies (papaver somniferum), and other drug-producing plants, the planting...

  17. 7 CFR 400.677 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... charges (7 CFR 400.116). A delinquent debt does not include debts discharged in bankruptcy and other debts... (cannabis sativa), opium poppies (papaver somniferum), and other drug-producing plants, the planting...

  18. 7 CFR 400.677 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... charges (7 CFR 400.116). A delinquent debt does not include debts discharged in bankruptcy and other debts... (cannabis sativa), opium poppies (papaver somniferum), and other drug-producing plants, the planting...

  19. Manipulating the Biosynthesis of Bioactive Compound Alkaloids for Next-Generation Metabolic Engineering in Opium Poppy Using CRISPR-Cas 9 Genome Editing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Alagoz, Yagiz; Gurkok, Tugba; Zhang, Baohong; Unver, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated9 (Cas9) endonuclease system is a powerful RNA-guided genome editing tool. CRISPR/Cas9 has been well studied in model plant species for targeted genome editing. However, few studies have been reported on plant species without whole genome sequence information. Currently, no study has been performed to manipulate metabolic pathways using CRISPR/Cas9. In this study, the type II CRISPR/SpCas9 system was used to knock out, via nonhomologous end-joining genome repair, the 4′OMT2 in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), a gene which regulates the biosythesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). For sgRNA transcription, viral-based TRV and synthetic binary plasmids were designed and delivered into plant cells with a Cas9 encoding-synthetic vector by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. InDels formed by CRISPR/Cas9 were detected by sequence analysis. Our results showed that the biosynthesis of BIAs (e.g. morphine, thebaine) was significantly reduced in the transgenic plants suggesting that 4′OMT2 was efficiently knocked-out by our CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing approach. In addition, a novel uncharacterized alkaloid was observed only in CRISPR/Cas9 edited plants. Thus, the applicabilitiy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system was demonstrated for the first time for medicinal aromatic plants by sgRNAs transcribed from both synthetic and viral vectors to regulate BIA metabolism and biosynthesis. PMID:27483984

  20. Marc Chagall: "Wild Poppies."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carolyn

    1987-01-01

    Based on a full-color reproduction of Marc Chagall's painting, "Wild Poppies," the goals of this lesson plan are to introduce students to artist's use of dreams and memories in making art, to communicate the idea that artists include their visual memories of people and things they love in their artwork, and to introduce the concepts of line and…

  1. Latex-less opium poppy: cause for less latex and reduced peduncle strength.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Nidarshana; Singh, Sharad K; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Lal, Raj K; Gupta, Madan M; Dwivedi, Upendra N; Shasany, Ajit K

    2014-03-01

    A genotype 'Sujata' developed earlier at CSIR-CIMAP from its parent 'Sampada' is considered to be the latex-less variety of Papaver somniferum. These two genotypes are contrasting in terms of latex and stem strength. Earlier we have carried out microarray analysis to identify differentially expressing genes from the capsules of the two genotypes. In this study, the peduncles of the two genotypes were compared for the anatomy revealing less number of laticifers in the cortex and vascular bundles. One of the important cell wall-related genes (for laccase) from the microarray analysis showing significantly higher expression in 'Sampada' capsule was taken up for further characterization in the peduncle here. It was functionally characterized through transient overexpression and RNAi suppression in 'Sujata' and 'Sampada'. The increase in acid insoluble lignin and total lignin in overexpressed tissue of 'Sujata', and comparable decrease in suppressed tissue of 'Sampada', along with corresponding increase and decrease in the transcript abundance of laccase confirm the involvement of laccase in lignin biosynthesis. Negligible transcript in phloem compared to the xylem tissue localized its expression in xylem tissue. This demonstrates the involvement of P. somniferum laccase in lignin biosynthesis of xylem, providing strength to the peduncle/stem and preventing lodging. PMID:24033330

  2. Rapid identification of a narcotic plant Papaver bracteatum using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Aragane, Masako; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nakajima, Jun'ichi; Yoshida, Masao; Yoshizawa, Masao; Abe, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Rei; Suzuki, Jin; Moriyasu, Takako; Nakae, Dai; Sudo, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hishida, Atuyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Makabe, So; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    In May 2011, numerous poppy plants closely resembling Papaver bracteatum Lindl., a type of narcotic plant that is illegal in Japan, were distributed directly from several large flower shops or through online shopping throughout Japan, including the Tokyo Metropolitan area. In order to better identify the narcotic plants, the relative nuclear DNA content at the vegetative stage was measured by flow cytometric (FCM) analysis in 3 closely-related species of the genus Papaver section Oxytona, namely P. orientale, P. pseudo-orientale, and P. bracteatum, based on the difference between the chromosome numbers of these species. The results showed that the nuclear DNA content differed between these 3 species, and that most of the commercially distributed plants examined in this study could be identified as P. bracteatum. The remaining plants were P. pseudo-orientale, a non-narcotic plant. In addition, the FCM results for the identification of P. bracteatum completely agreed with the results obtained by the morphological analysis, the inter-genic spacer sequence of rpl16-rpl14 (PS-ID sequence) of chloroplast DNA, and the presence of thebaine. These results clearly indicate the usefulness of FCM analysis for the identification of P. bracteatum plants, including when they are in their vegetative stage. PMID:24952707

  3. Measurement of some Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloids in Different Organs of Persian Poppy during Ontogenetical Stages.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mahdi; Naghavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseinzadeh, Abdol Hadi; Abbasi, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Papaver bracteatum, a perennial species, has been known as a rich source of thebaine and a potential alternative to Papaver somniferum for the production of codeine and some semisynthetic antagonist drugs. In this study, ion mobility spectrum (IMS) of the root, leaf, bottom part of stem, upper part of stem, capsule wall, petal, and capsule content during developmental stages of P. bracteatum including annual rosette, perennial rosette, bud initiation, pendulous bud, preflowering, and lancing were investigated. The IMS revealed thebaine, papaverine, and noscapine as the major components of the extracted alkaloids. Based on the results of the study it appears that, at least in part, there is a competition among the biosynthesis pathways of papaverine, noscapine, and morphinan alkaloids from a common source. Root and capsule wall were the most potent organs for extraction of thebaine, while lancing stage was the best developmental stage for thebaine exploitation. However, it seems that total biomass of root and capsule wall plays a key role in the final selection of favorite organ. Although papaverine and noscapine in the stem at preflowering stage had the most quantity, significant amounts were found in the capsule wall. In general, total alkaloid content of leaf was lower than the other plant parts. PMID:27061130

  4. Extraction and Functional Properties of Proteins from Pre-roasted and Enzyme Treated Poppyseed (Papaver somniferum L.) Press Cakes.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Emin; Emir, Dilek Dündar

    2016-01-01

    In this study, proteins of the defatted meals obtained from cold-pressed poppyseed previously treated (pre-roasting and enzyme against control) were extracted and their compositional and functional properties were determined. Saline-alkaline extraction (pH 11-12, and 0.2-0.6 M NaCI) and isoelectric point (pH 4.0-5.5) precipitation technique showed that seed pre-roasting enhances protein yield while enzyme treatment reduces it. There were 7 bands on SDS-PAGE, and enzyme treated samples were weaker than control. While enzyme treatment decreased denaturation temperatures (T(d)), roasting enhanced the enthalpy change (ΔH) values. Pre-treatments caused a decrease in protein least gelling concentration (LGC) values. Water and oil holding capacities (WHC and OHC) were found lower in enzyme treated and higher in preroasted samples. Similar effects were also determined for emulsifying activity (EA) and emulsion stability (ES) values. While foaming capacity (FC) in treated samples decreased, foam stability (FS) increased oppositely. In conclusion, poppyseed meals can be nutritionally good source for diet protein, and a limited pre-roasting can be very beneficial for enhanced protein extraction yield and desirable functional properties. PMID:26972462

  5. POPPY: Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall; Long, Joseph; Douglas, Ewan; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Slocum, Christine

    2016-02-01

    POPPY (Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon) simulates physical optical propagation including diffraction. It implements a flexible framework for modeling Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction and point spread function formation, particularly in the context of astronomical telescopes. POPPY provides the optical modeling framework for WebbPSF (ascl:1504.007) and was developed as part of a simulation package for JWST, but is available separately and is broadly applicable to many kinds of imaging simulations.

  6. Afghanistan, poppies, and the global pain crisis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter A; Sillup, George P; Capo, Joseph A

    2010-03-01

    The World Health Organization has reported that somewhere between 30-86 million people suffer from moderate to severe pain due to cancer, HIV/AIDS, burns, wounds and other illnesses annually and do not have access to proper opiate anesthetics to control the pain [1]. The vast majority of these people live in poor nations where medicinal opiates are either too expensive or not readily available. In this paper, it is argued that access to adequate healthcare is a human right and that adequate healthcare includes management of pain. The solution to this problem may be in Afghanistan, a country now overwhelmed with poverty and war. Afghanistan is the world's leading producer of heroin. The increase in heroin production in Afghanistan has caused the United States and the international community to begin to eradicate Afghanistan's poppy fields leading to increased poverty among poppy farmers. This paper proposed a paradigm that can be implemented in Afghanistan which would allow for Afghan farmers to continue growing their poppy crop for medicinal opiates like morphine for poor nations. The paradigm covers all parameters of medicinal opiates production including licensing, security, cultivation, harvest, and factory production of medicinal opiates. The paradigm proposed is less expensive than eradication, brings honest income to Afghan farmers and the new Afghan nation, and can eventually lead to Afghanistan acquiring a respectable role in the world community. In closing, a full ethical analysis of the paradigm is included to justify the arguments made in the paper. PMID:20190697

  7. The rules of drug taking: wine and poppy derivatives in the ancient world. VII. A ritual use of poppy derivatives?

    PubMed

    Nencini, P

    1997-08-01

    Besides fertility, poppies have been used to symbolize sleep, night, and death. Consistent with the agrarian origin of their ritual use, poppies also became a symbol of reincarnation. Several literary and iconographic sources, in particular of the early Roman imperial age, are here interpreted as evidence that poppy derivatives were ingested during mystery rites. The reversible narcotic effects of poppy derivatives should have allowed a "realistic" representation of death and reincarnation, as intended by the Orphic belief of the transmigration of souls. PMID:9286008

  8. Opiates in poppy seed: effect on urinalysis results after consumption of poppy seed cake-filling.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, B C; Dyszel, S M; Hood, L V

    1987-07-01

    We report the analysis of poppy seed filling for morphine and codeine content. Concentrations in the range 17.4 to 18.6 micrograms/g (morphine) and 2.3 to 2.5 micrograms/g (codeine) were found in different lots of the filling, which is widely used in baking. The effect of consumption of poppy seed filling on opiate urinalysis results is discussed. Morphine concentrations as high as 4.5 mg/L are reported, with persistence of concentrations greater than 0.3 mg/L as long as 35 h after consumption. PMID:3297423

  9. Organic parasite control for poultry and rabbits in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Plants used for treating endo- and ectoparasites of rabbits and poultry in British Columbia included Arctium lappa (burdock), Artemisia sp. (wormwood), Chenopodium album (lambsquarters) and C. ambrosioides (epazote), Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Juniperus spp. (juniper), Mentha piperita (peppermint), Nicotiana sp. (tobacco), Papaver somniferum (opium poppy), Rubus spp. (blackberry and raspberry relatives), Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion), Thuja plicata (western redcedar) and Urtica dioica (stinging nettle). PMID:21756341

  10. Organic parasite control for poultry and rabbits in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Plants used for treating endo- and ectoparasites of rabbits and poultry in British Columbia included Arctium lappa (burdock), Artemisia sp. (wormwood), Chenopodium album (lambsquarters) and C. ambrosioides (epazote), Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Juniperus spp. (juniper), Mentha piperita (peppermint), Nicotiana sp. (tobacco), Papaver somniferum (opium poppy), Rubus spp. (blackberry and raspberry relatives), Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion), Thuja plicata (western redcedar) and Urtica dioica (stinging nettle). PMID:21756341

  11. [Screening potential DNA barcode regions of genus Papaver].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Liu, Yu-jing; Wu, Yan-sheng; Cao, Ying; Yuan, Yuan

    2015-08-01

    DNA barcoding is an effective technique in species identification. To determine the candidate sequences which can be used as DNA barcode to identify in Papaver genus, five potential sequences (ITS, matK, psbA-trnH, rbcL, trnL-trnF) were screened. 69 sequences were downloaded from Genbank, including 21 ITS sequences, 10 matK sequences, 8 psbA-trnH sequences, 14 rbcL sequences and 16 trnL-trnF sequences. Mega 6.0 was used to analysis the comparison of sequences. By the methods of calculating the distances in intraspecific and interspecific divergences, evaluating DNA barcoding gap and constructing NJ and UPMGA phylogenetic trees. The sequence trnL-trnF performed best. In conclusion, trnL-trnF can be considered as a novel DNA barcode in Papaver genus, other four sequences can be as combination barcode for identification. PMID:26677693

  12. The rules of drug taking: wine and poppy derivatives in the ancient world. VI. Poppies as a source of food and drug.

    PubMed

    Nencini, P

    1997-05-01

    Poppies were widely used during antiquity as a source of food, therapeutics, and poisons. It is likely that the alimentary value of poppy seeds was known in the Neolithic age, and there is some evidence that the neuropsychopharmacological effects of poppy juice were exploited during the Minoan civilization in the eastern Mediterranean basin. The Minoan civilization dates the attribution to poppies of symbolic meanings connected with rites of agricultural fertility. The persistence throughout antiquity of this symbolism is testified by literary and iconographic evidence of the attribution of poppies to goddesses of fertility, such as Demeter, Aphrodite, and Ceres. PMID:9178441

  13. Poppies for medicine in Afghanistan: lessons from India and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Windle, James

    2011-01-01

    This study examines India and Turkey as case studies relevant to the Senlis Council’s ‘poppies for medicine’ proposal. The proposal is that Afghan farmers are licensed to produce opium for medical and scientific purposes. Here it is posited that the Senlis proposal neglects at least three key lessons from the Turkish and Indian experiences. First, not enough weight has been given to diversion from licit markets, as experienced in India. Second, both India and Turkey had significantly more efficient state institutions with authority over the licensed growing areas. Third, the proposal appears to overlook the fact that Turkey’s successful transition was largely due to the use of the poppy straw method of opium production. It is concluded that, while innovative and creative policy proposals such as that of the Senlis proposal are required if Afghanistan is to move beyond its present problems, ‘poppies for medicine’ does not withstand evidence-based scrutiny. PMID:22213882

  14. Occurrence, genetic control and evolution of non-target-site based resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in the dicot weed Papaver rhoeas.

    PubMed

    Scarabel, Laura; Pernin, Fanny; Délye, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Non-target-site resistance (NTSR) to herbicides is a major issue for the chemical control of weeds. Whilst predominant in grass weeds, NTSR remains largely uninvestigated in dicot weeds. We investigated the occurrence, inheritance and genetic control of NTSR to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors in Papaver rhoeas (corn poppy) using progenies from plants with potential NTSR to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox. NTSR to imazamox was inherited from parents over two successive generations. NTSR to tritosulfuron (a sulfonylurea) was observed in F1 generations and inherited in F2 generations. NTSR to florasulam (a triazolopyrimidine) emerged in F2 generations. Our findings suggest NTSR was polygenic and gradually built-up by accumulation over generations of loci with moderate individual effects in single plants. We also demonstrated that ALS alleles conferring herbicide resistance can co-exist with NTSR loci in P. rhoeas plants. Previous research focussed on TSR in P. rhoeas, which most likely caused underestimation of NTSR significance in this species. This may also apply to other dicot species. From our data, resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas appears complex, and involves well-known mutant ALS alleles and a set of unknown NTSR loci that confer resistance to ALS inhibitors from different chemical families. PMID:26259184

  15. Self-incompatibility-induced programmed cell death in field poppy pollen involves dramatic acidification of the incompatible pollen tube cytosol.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Bosch, Maurice; Haque, Tamanna; Teng, Nianjun; Poulter, Natalie S; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2015-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important genetically controlled mechanism to prevent inbreeding in higher plants. SI involves highly specific interactions during pollination, resulting in the rejection of incompatible (self) pollen. Programmed cell death (PCD) is an important mechanism for destroying cells in a precisely regulated manner. SI in field poppy (Papaver rhoeas) triggers PCD in incompatible pollen. During SI-induced PCD, we previously observed a major acidification of the pollen cytosol. Here, we present measurements of temporal alterations in cytosolic pH ([pH]cyt); they were surprisingly rapid, reaching pH 6.4 within 10 min of SI induction and stabilizing by 60 min at pH 5.5. By manipulating the [pH]cyt of the pollen tubes in vivo, we show that [pH]cyt acidification is an integral and essential event for SI-induced PCD. Here, we provide evidence showing the physiological relevance of the cytosolic acidification and identify key targets of this major physiological alteration. A small drop in [pH]cyt inhibits the activity of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase required for pollen tube growth. We also show that [pH]cyt acidification is necessary and sufficient for triggering several key hallmark features of the SI PCD signaling pathway, notably activation of a DEVDase/caspase-3-like activity and formation of SI-induced punctate actin foci. Importantly, the actin binding proteins Cyclase-Associated Protein and Actin-Depolymerizing Factor are identified as key downstream targets. Thus, we have shown the biological relevance of an extreme but physiologically relevant alteration in [pH]cyt and its effect on several components in the context of SI-induced events and PCD. PMID:25630437

  16. Tall Poppies: Bullying Behaviors Faced by Australian High-Performance School-Age Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Maureen; Calder, Angela; Allen, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about Australian high-performance school-age athletes' experiences as victims of the tall poppy syndrome. Tall poppies are successful individuals bullied by those who are less successful in order to "normalize them." Nineteen current or previous national or international high-performance school-age athletes were…

  17. Socio-climatic Exposure of an Afghan Poppy Farmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankin, J. S.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2011-12-01

    Many posit that climate impacts from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will have consequences for the natural and agricultural systems on which humans rely for food, energy, and livelihoods, and therefore, on stability and human security. However, many of the potential mechanisms of action in climate impacts and human systems response, as well as the differential vulnerabilities of such systems, remain underexplored and unquantified. Here I present two initial steps necessary to characterize and quantify the consequences of climate change for farmer livelihood in Afghanistan, given both climate impacts and farmer vulnerabilities. The first is a conceptual model mapping the potential relationships between Afghanistan's climate, the winter agricultural season, and the country's political economy of violence and instability. The second is a utility-based decision model for assessing farmer response sensitivity to various climate impacts based on crop sensitivities. A farmer's winter planting decision can be modeled roughly as a tradeoff between cultivating the two crops that dominate the winter growing season-opium poppy (a climate tolerant cash crop) and wheat (a climatically vulnerable crop grown for household consumption). Early sensitivity analysis results suggest that wheat yield dominates farmer decision making variability; however, such initial results may dependent on the relative parameter ranges of wheat and poppy yields. Importantly though, the variance in Afghanistan's winter harvest yields of poppy and wheat is tightly linked to household livelihood and thus, is indirectly connected to the wider instability and insecurity within the country. This initial analysis motivates my focused research on the sensitivity of these crops to climate variability in order to project farmer well-being and decision sensitivity in a warmer world.

  18. Degradation of morphine in opium poppy processing waste composting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin Quan; Zhang, Jin Lin; Schuchardt, Frank; Wang, Yan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate morphine degradation and optimize turning frequency in opium poppy processing waste composting, a pilot scale windrow composting trial was run for 55 days. Four treatments were designed as without turning (A1), every 5 days turning (A2), every 10 days turning (A3) and every 15 days turning (A4). During composting, a range of physicochemical parameters including the residual morphine degradation, temperature, pH, and the contents of total C, total N, total P and total K were investigated. For all treatments, the residual morphine content decreased below the detection limit and reached the safety standards after day 30 of composting, the longest duration of high temperature (⩾50 °C) was observed in A3, pH increased 16.9-17.54%, total carbon content decreased 15.5-22.5%, C/N ratio reduced from 46 to 26, and the content of total phosphorus and total potassium increased slightly. The final compost obtained by a mixture of all four piles was up to 55.3% of organic matter, 3.3% of total nutrient (N, P2O5 and K2O) and 7.6 of pH. A turning frequency of every ten days for a windrow composting of opium poppy processing waste is recommended to produce homogenous compost. PMID:24613672

  19. Buprenorphine for cancer pain: is it ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Prommer, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Buprenorphine (BUP) is a semisynthetic derivative of the opium alkaloid thebaine found in the poppy Papaver somniferum. Its chemical structure contains the morphine structure but differs by having a cyclopropylmethyl group. Buprenorphine is a potent µ opioid agonist. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver and gut. The development of a transdermal BUP formulation in 2001 led to its evaluation in cancer pain. This article provides the practitioner with an update on the current role of BUP in cancer care. It highlights data suggesting effectiveness in various types of cancer pain. The article reviews pharmacology, routes of administration, adverse effects, drug interactions, and cost considerations. PMID:25163678

  20. Concentrations of Morphine and Codeine in Paired Oral Fluid and Urine Specimens Following Ingestion of a Poppy Seed Roll and Raw Poppy Seeds.

    PubMed

    Samano, Kimberly L; Clouette, Randal E; Rowland, Barbara J; Sample, R H Barry

    2015-10-01

    Interpretation of opiate drug test results can be challenging due to casual dietary consumption of poppy seeds, which may contain variable opiate content. Opiate concentrations in paired oral fluid (OF), collected with the Oral-Eze(®) Oral Fluid Collection System, and urine were analyzed after ingestion of poppy seeds from the same source, consumed raw or contained in a roll. In Part 1, 12 individuals consumed equal portions of a poppy seed roll. For Part 2, the same individuals consumed an equivalent quantity of raw poppy seeds, containing ∼3.2 mg of morphine and 0.6 mg of codeine. Specimens were analyzed both by enzyme immunoassay (opiates) and by GC-MS (morphine/codeine). Urinary morphine was between 155-1,408 (roll) and 294-4,213 ng/mL (raw), measured at 2, 4, 6 and 20 h post-ingestion. Urinary codeine concentrations between 140-194 (roll) and 121-664 ng/mL (raw) were observed up to 6 h post-ingestion. Following consumption of raw poppy seeds, OF specimens were positive, above LOQ, from 0.25 to 3.0 h with morphine ranging from 7 to 600 ng/mL and codeine from 8 to 112 ng/mL. After poppy seed roll consumption, morphine concentrations of 7-143 ng/mL were observed up to 1.5 h with codeine detected in only 5.5% of OF specimens and ranging from 8 to 28 ng/mL. Combined with the existing poppy seed literature, these results support previous findings and provide guidance for interpretation of OF opiate testing. PMID:26378141

  1. Concentrations of Morphine and Codeine in Paired Oral Fluid and Urine Specimens Following Ingestion of a Poppy Seed Roll and Raw Poppy Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Samano, Kimberly L.; Clouette, Randal E.; Rowland, Barbara J.; Sample, R.H. Barry

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of opiate drug test results can be challenging due to casual dietary consumption of poppy seeds, which may contain variable opiate content. Opiate concentrations in paired oral fluid (OF), collected with the Oral-Eze® Oral Fluid Collection System, and urine were analyzed after ingestion of poppy seeds from the same source, consumed raw or contained in a roll. In Part 1, 12 individuals consumed equal portions of a poppy seed roll. For Part 2, the same individuals consumed an equivalent quantity of raw poppy seeds, containing ∼3.2 mg of morphine and 0.6 mg of codeine. Specimens were analyzed both by enzyme immunoassay (opiates) and by GC–MS (morphine/codeine). Urinary morphine was between 155–1,408 (roll) and 294–4,213 ng/mL (raw), measured at 2, 4, 6 and 20 h post-ingestion. Urinary codeine concentrations between 140–194 (roll) and 121–664 ng/mL (raw) were observed up to 6 h post-ingestion. Following consumption of raw poppy seeds, OF specimens were positive, above LOQ, from 0.25 to 3.0 h with morphine ranging from 7 to 600 ng/mL and codeine from 8 to 112 ng/mL. After poppy seed roll consumption, morphine concentrations of 7–143 ng/mL were observed up to 1.5 h with codeine detected in only 5.5% of OF specimens and ranging from 8 to 28 ng/mL. Combined with the existing poppy seed literature, these results support previous findings and provide guidance for interpretation of OF opiate testing. PMID:26378141

  2. Fractional extraction and structural characterization of opium poppy and cotton stalks hemicelluloses

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Dincturk, Ozlem Dilek; Turgut Sahin, H.

    2010-01-01

    Hemicellulosic moieties from opium poppy and cotton stalks were solublized in water at varying alkali concentrations (NaOH) and peroxide (H2O2). The hemicelluloses were then be precipitated from the solutions by acidification. The 2.0 and 3.0% H2O2extractions resulted in a yield of 0.8 and 0.71%, respectively, accounting for 3.2 and 2.9% of the hemicelluloses present in the opium poppy stalks. A similar result was also obtained for cotton stalks. It was found that alkaline peroxide is an effective agent for solubilization of hemicelluloses from opium poppy and cotton stalks. PMID:21120035

  3. Urinary concentrations of morphine and codeine after consumption of poppy seeds.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Opfermann, Georg; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of morphine and codeine in human urine was performed after oral intake of cakes containing commercially available poppy seeds in order to estimate the possibility of positive doping results. Therefore, eight products from different manufacturers (poppy seeds or baking mixtures) and origin were obtained and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the presence of the alkaloids. One selected batch of poppy seeds was used as an ingredient in a typical cake and was the object of an excretion study with nine volunteers. After application, several urine specimens contained morphine with concentrations higher than 1 microg/mL, and peak values of approximately 10.0 microg/mL were detected. Because the International Olympic Committee set a cutoff limit for morphine at 1 microg/mL, high-performance athletes could possibly test positive in doping control after consumption of products containing poppy seeds. PMID:12587685

  4. [Alimentary intake of opioid alkaloids by horses. Hazards due to poppy-containing feeds].

    PubMed

    Hertzsch, R; Emmerich, I U; Lachenmeier, D W; Sproll, C; Monakhova, Y B; Aboling, S; Bachmann, U; Vervuert, I

    2015-01-01

    Opioid alkaloids were identified in the urine of horses during an anti-doping control and in a case of intoxication. In both cases, it was suspected that the horses had ingested poppy-contaminated feed. To verify this suspicion, possible opioid alkaloid sources in Germany were identified through a literature research. Additionally, the contaminated feed was botanically and chemically analysed. The results indicated that both cases were most probably caused by the poppy in the feed. This highlights the previously underestimated risk of an intake of poppy-contaminated feed in horses. Recommendations are formulated for the prevention of positive doping-test results and intoxications by poppy-contaminated feeds in horses. Furthermore, a threshold for morphine in urine samples in competing horses is proposed. PMID:25624174

  5. Comparison of chemical and botanical studies of Turkish papaver belonging to the section pilosa.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, A; Baytop, A; Hutin, M; Foucher, J P; Hocquemiller, R; Cave, A

    1985-10-01

    The alkaloidal contents of the Turkish PAPAVER belonging to the section PILOSA have been studied by high performance liquid chromatography. According to the results obtained, the section PILOSA should be divided into two subsections; the first being characterised by the presence of the alkaloids amurine, glaucine and roemerine and the second by protopine and rhoeadine. These conclusions were confirmed by the botanical studies. PMID:17342603

  6. Effect of Replacing Beef Fat with Poppy Seed Oil on Quality of Turkish Sucuk.

    PubMed

    Gök, Vel

    2015-01-01

    Sucuk is the most popular dry-fermented meat product. Sucuk has a relatively high fat. Poppy seed oil as animal fat replacer was used in Turkish sucuk and effects of its use on sucuk quality were investigated. There was a significant (p<0.5) treatment × ripening time interaction for moisture, pH (p<0.05) and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values (p<0.01). Increasing poppy seed oil level decreased (p<0.05) TBARS values. Addition of poppy seed oil to the sucuks had a significant effect (p<0.01) on hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness and springiness values. Cholesterol content of sucuks decreased (p<0.05) with poppy seed oil addition. Using pre-emulsified poppy seed oil as partial fat replacer in Turkish sucuk decreased cholesterol and saturated fatty acid content, but increased polyunsaturated fatty acids. Poppy seed oil as partial animal fat replacer in Turkish sucuk may have significant health benefits. PMID:26761834

  7. The Hidden Habit of the Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana: First Demonstration of Vertical Plant Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Quesada-Moraga, Enrique; López-Díaz, Cristina; Landa, Blanca Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana strain 04/01-Tip, obtained from a larva of the opium poppy stem gall wasp Iraella luteipes (Hymenoptera; Cynipidae), endophytically colonizes opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) plants and protects them against this pest. The goal of this study was to monitor the dynamics of endophytic colonization of opium poppy by B. bassiana after the fungus was applied to the seed and to ascertain whether the fungus is transmitted vertically via seeds. Using a species-specific nested PCR protocol and DNA extracted from surface-sterilised leaf pieces or seeds of B. bassiana-inoculated opium poppy plants, the fungus was detected within the plant beginning at the growth stage of rosette building and them throughout the entire plant growth cycle (about 120–140 days after sowing). The fungus was also detected in seeds from 50% of the capsules sampled. Seeds that showed positive amplification for B. bassiana were planted in sterile soil and the endophyte was again detected in more than 42% of the plants sampled during all plant growth stages. Beauveria bassiana was transmitted to seeds in 25% of the plants from the second generation that formed a mature capsule. These results demonstrate for the first time the vertical transmission of an entomopathogenic fungus from endophytically colonised maternal plants. This information is crucial to better understand the ecological role of entomopathogenic fungi as plant endophytes and may allow development of a sustainable and cost effective strategy for I. luteipes management in P. somniferum. PMID:24551242

  8. The hidden habit of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana: first demonstration of vertical plant transmission.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Moraga, Enrique; López-Díaz, Cristina; Landa, Blanca Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana strain 04/01-Tip, obtained from a larva of the opium poppy stem gall wasp Iraella luteipes (Hymenoptera; Cynipidae), endophytically colonizes opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) plants and protects them against this pest. The goal of this study was to monitor the dynamics of endophytic colonization of opium poppy by B. bassiana after the fungus was applied to the seed and to ascertain whether the fungus is transmitted vertically via seeds. Using a species-specific nested PCR protocol and DNA extracted from surface-sterilised leaf pieces or seeds of B. bassiana-inoculated opium poppy plants, the fungus was detected within the plant beginning at the growth stage of rosette building and them throughout the entire plant growth cycle (about 120-140 days after sowing). The fungus was also detected in seeds from 50% of the capsules sampled. Seeds that showed positive amplification for B. bassiana were planted in sterile soil and the endophyte was again detected in more than 42% of the plants sampled during all plant growth stages. Beauveria bassiana was transmitted to seeds in 25% of the plants from the second generation that formed a mature capsule. These results demonstrate for the first time the vertical transmission of an entomopathogenic fungus from endophytically colonised maternal plants. This information is crucial to better understand the ecological role of entomopathogenic fungi as plant endophytes and may allow development of a sustainable and cost effective strategy for I. luteipes management in P. somniferum. PMID:24551242

  9. Engineering biosynthesis of the anticancer alkaloid noscapine in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanran; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine is a potential anticancer drug isolated from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum, and genes encoding enzymes responsible for the synthesis of noscapine have been recently discovered to be clustered on the genome of P. somniferum. Here, we reconstitute the noscapine gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to achieve the microbial production of noscapine and related pathway intermediates, complementing and extending previous in planta and in vitro investigations. Our work provides structural validation of the secoberberine intermediates and the description of the narcotoline-4′-O-methyltransferase, suggesting this activity is catalysed by a unique heterodimer. We also reconstitute a 14-step biosynthetic pathway of noscapine from the simple alkaloid norlaudanosoline by engineering a yeast strain expressing 16 heterologous plant enzymes, achieving reconstitution of a complex plant pathway in a microbial host. Other engineered yeasts produce previously inaccessible pathway intermediates and a novel derivative, thereby advancing protoberberine and noscapine related drug discovery. PMID:27378283

  10. Engineering biosynthesis of the anticancer alkaloid noscapine in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanran; Smolke, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine is a potential anticancer drug isolated from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum, and genes encoding enzymes responsible for the synthesis of noscapine have been recently discovered to be clustered on the genome of P. somniferum. Here, we reconstitute the noscapine gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to achieve the microbial production of noscapine and related pathway intermediates, complementing and extending previous in planta and in vitro investigations. Our work provides structural validation of the secoberberine intermediates and the description of the narcotoline-4'-O-methyltransferase, suggesting this activity is catalysed by a unique heterodimer. We also reconstitute a 14-step biosynthetic pathway of noscapine from the simple alkaloid norlaudanosoline by engineering a yeast strain expressing 16 heterologous plant enzymes, achieving reconstitution of a complex plant pathway in a microbial host. Other engineered yeasts produce previously inaccessible pathway intermediates and a novel derivative, thereby advancing protoberberine and noscapine related drug discovery. PMID:27378283

  11. A microbial biomanufacturing platform for natural and semisynthetic opioids.

    PubMed

    Thodey, Kate; Galanie, Stephanie; Smolke, Christina D

    2014-10-01

    Opiates and related molecules are medically essential, but their production via field cultivation of opium poppy Papaver somniferum leads to supply inefficiencies and insecurity. As an alternative production strategy, we developed baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a microbial host for the transformation of opiates. Yeast strains engineered to express heterologous genes from P. somniferum and bacterium Pseudomonas putida M10 convert thebaine to codeine, morphine, hydromorphone, hydrocodone and oxycodone. We discovered a new biosynthetic branch to neopine and neomorphine, which diverted pathway flux from morphine and other target products. We optimized strain titer and specificity by titrating gene copy number, enhancing cosubstrate supply, applying a spatial engineering strategy and performing high-density fermentation, which resulted in total opioid titers up to 131 mg/l. This work is an important step toward total biosynthesis of valuable benzylisoquinoline alkaloid drug molecules and demonstrates the potential for developing a sustainable and secure yeast biomanufacturing platform for opioids. PMID:25151135

  12. The rules of drug taking: wine and poppy derivatives in the Ancient World. IX. Conclusions.

    PubMed

    Nencini, P

    1997-12-01

    Evidence of a ritual use of poppies becomes more and more rare during the late Roman age, until only the medical usage of poppies seems to survive. In the meantime, a complete lack of evidence of a hedonic use of opium persists. As a whole, this study shows a remarkable continuity in the modalities of wine and poppy derivative use from the Ancient World to the present, particularly in that the hedonic use of psychoactive drugs remained restricted to alcoholic beverages. This observation challenges the opinion that drug-taking behavior is under the control of transient cultural contingencies. In addition, it imputes that the attribution of any documented prehistoric or historical nonmedical use of psychotropic drugs for the aim of experimenting with their pleasant effects is a stereotype. PMID:9440156

  13. The opium poppy as a symbol of sleep in Bertel Thorvaldsen's relief of 1815.

    PubMed

    Tekiner, Halil; Kosar, Muberra

    2016-03-01

    Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844) is one of the most remarkable representatives of Neoclassicist sculptural art in Europe, which was largely inspired by the classical art and culture of Greek and Roman antiquity. A pair of marble reliefs, Night and Day, exhibited in the Thorvaldsen Museum (Copenhagen), marks the culmination of Thorvaldsen's relief art and is of particular interest to the history of sleep medicine. In the first relief, Night, an angel with her neck bent and eyes closed has two babies in her embrace and seems to be floating down in grief, with an owl hovering behind her. Her hair is also twined with opium poppies, the symbol of sleep and death in antiquity. Our findings suggest that this relief not only indicates a mythological association between the opium poppy and sleep but also has a strong connotation with the poppy's medicinal use for inducing sleep throughout the centuries. PMID:26210393

  14. Differentiation of opium and poppy straw using capillary electrophoresis and pattern recognition techniques.

    PubMed

    Reid, Raymond G; Durham, David G; Boyle, Susanne P; Low, Ann S; Wangboonskul, Jinda

    2007-12-12

    Opium samples from four different locations and poppy straw from different plant varieties have been assayed using micellar capillary electrophoresis incorporating a sweeping technique. Individual alkaloids (morphine, codeine, papaverine, noscapine, thebaine, oripavine, reticuline and narceine) were quantitatively determined in the different samples by a validated capillary electrophoresis method. Unsupervised pattern recognition of the opium samples and the poppy straw samples using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct clusters. Supervised pattern recognition using soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was performed to show individual groupings and allow unknown samples to be classified according to the models built using the CZE assay results. PMID:18022406

  15. Cytomechanical Properties of Papaver Pollen Tubes Are Altered after Self-Incompatibility Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Geitmann, Anja; McConnaughey, William; Lang-Pauluzzi, Ingeborg; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E.; Emons, Anne Mie C.

    2004-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) in Papaver rhoeas triggers a ligand-mediated signal transduction cascade, resulting in the inhibition of incompatible pollen tube growth. Using a cytomechanical approach we have demonstrated that dramatic changes to the mechanical properties of incompatible pollen tubes are stimulated by SI induction. Microindentation revealed that SI resulted in a reduction of cellular stiffness and an increase in cytoplasmic viscosity. Whereas the former cellular response is likely to be the result of a drop in cellular turgor, we hypothesize that the latter is caused by as yet unidentified cross-linking events. F-actin rearrangements, a characteristic phenomenon for SI challenge in Papaver, displayed a spatiotemporal gradient along the pollen tube; this suggests that signal propagation occurs in a basipetal direction. However, unexpectedly, local application of SI inducing S-protein did not reveal any evidence for localized signal perception in the apical or subapical regions of the pollen tube. To our knowledge this represents the first mechanospatial approach to study signal propagation and cellular responses in a well-characterized plant cell system. Our data provide the first evidence for mechanical changes induced in the cytoplasm of a plant cell stimulated by a defined ligand. PMID:15111444

  16. Papaver Rhoeas L. Hydroalcoholic Extract Exacerbates Forced Swimming Test-Induced Depression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osanloo, Naser; Najafi-Abedi, Akram; Jafari, Fatemeh; Javid, Farshid; Pirpiran, Mohsen; Memar Jafari, Mohammad-Reza; Mousavi Khosravi, Seyed Ali; Rahimzadeh Behzadi, Mohammad; Ranjbaran, Mina; Sahraei, Hedayat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Depression is one of the most frequent psychiatric disorders in the world with occurs with higher incidence in women. In the present study, the effect of water-alcoholic extract of Papaver rhoeas L. on forced swimming test (FST) in Swiss-Webster mice were examined. Methods: We used Swiss-Webster mice (20–25 g) to execute FST on them. The plant extract (1, 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) was injected to the animals 30 minutes before each session. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) was used as standard antidepressant drug. In another group of animals, 30 minutes after extract administration, blood samples were taken from retro-orbital sinus for corticosterone assay. Yet in third group, the drugs were injected to the animals and 30 minutes later, their activities were tested in an open field apparatus. Results: Our experiments showed that the extract efficiently reduced FST time both in male and female mice dose-dependently. This effect was comparable with fluoxetine. In addition, corticosterone assay indicated that plasma corticosterone in animals which received extract was higher than those amounts in fluoxetine and saline controls. Moreover, the animals did not show any motor activity deficit in all doses of the extract and fluoxetine compared to saline control. Conclusion: The extract of Papaver rhoeas can reduce immobility time which is comparable to the effect of fluoxetine. Also the effect of the extract is contrary to its effects on plasma corticosterone level and or animals’ activity. PMID:27563412

  17. The california poppy (eschscholtzia mexicana) as a copper indicator plant - a new example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Gale, C.W., III

    1976-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of the California poppy (Eschscholtzia mexicana) correlates closely with the copper-rich outcrop of a small porphyry-type deposit in Arizona. Chemical factors are probably more important than physical factors in determining why this species is sometimes found as a copper indicator plant. ?? 1976.

  18. Plant science. Morphinan biosynthesis in opium poppy requires a P450-oxidoreductase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Thilo; Kern, Marcelo; King, Andrew J; Larson, Tony R; Teodor, Roxana I; Donninger, Samantha L; Li, Yi; Dowle, Adam A; Cartwright, Jared; Bates, Rachel; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry; Walker, Carol; Bowser, Tim A; Graham, Ian A

    2015-07-17

    Morphinan alkaloids from the opium poppy are used for pain relief. The direction of metabolites to morphinan biosynthesis requires isomerization of (S)- to (R)-reticuline. Characterization of high-reticuline poppy mutants revealed a genetic locus, designated STORR [(S)- to (R)-reticuline] that encodes both cytochrome P450 and oxidoreductase modules, the latter belonging to the aldo-keto reductase family. Metabolite analysis of mutant alleles and heterologous expression demonstrate that the P450 module is responsible for the conversion of (S)-reticuline to 1,2-dehydroreticuline, whereas the oxidoreductase module converts 1,2-dehydroreticuline to (R)-reticuline rather than functioning as a P450 redox partner. Proteomic analysis confirmed that these two modules are contained on a single polypeptide in vivo. This modular assembly implies a selection pressure favoring substrate channeling. The fusion protein STORR may enable microbial-based morphinan production. PMID:26113639

  19. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  20. A comparison of ice cold water pretreatment and α-bromonaphthalene cytogenetic method for identification of Papaver species.

    PubMed

    Osalou, Amir Rezaei; Rouyandezagh, Sheida Daneshvar; Alizadeh, Behrouz; Er, Celal; Sevimay, Cafer Sirri

    2013-01-01

    The plants belonging to many species in genus Papaver are very similar and have very small chromosomes that make identification very difficult. The study aimed to compare the effects of α-bromonaphtalene and ice cold water pretreatment to identify chromosomes of Papaver species collected from different areas of Iranian West Azerbaijan and Turkish Van, Agri and, Hakkari provinces. The seeds were germinated in Jacobson trays at 24°C under continuous light. Thereafter, roots from 1.5 cm long plantlets were pretreated with α bromonaphtalene for 15, 30, and 45 min or at 0°C in ice cold water for 24 h before fixing, hydrolyzation, and feulgen staining. The ice cold water pretreatment was more appropriate and easy to determine chromosomes. Seeds from seven samples did not germinate. Sixty samples out of the rest of 62 samples were identified as P. pseudo orientale, one sample was identified as P. bracteatum, and another as P. orientale. This is the first study that used ice cold water to determine the chromosomes in papaver species. It is hoped that it will also facilitate to determine chromosome number and identify other papver species. PMID:24109208

  1. A Comparison of Ice Cold Water Pretreatment and α-Bromonaphthalene Cytogenetic Method for Identification of Papaver Species

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei Osalou, Amir; Daneshvar Rouyandezagh, Sheida; Alizadeh, Behrouz; Er, Celal; Sevimay, Cafer Sirri

    2013-01-01

    The plants belonging to many species in genus Papaver are very similar and have very small chromosomes that make identification very difficult. The study aimed to compare the effects of α-bromonaphtalene and ice cold water pretreatment to identify chromosomes of Papaver species collected from different areas of Iranian West Azerbaijan and Turkish Van, Agri and, Hakkari provinces. The seeds were germinated in Jacobson trays at 24°C under continuous light. Thereafter, roots from 1.5 cm long plantlets were pretreated with α bromonaphtalene for 15, 30, and 45 min or at 0°C in ice cold water for 24 h before fixing, hydrolyzation, and feulgen staining. The ice cold water pretreatment was more appropriate and easy to determine chromosomes. Seeds from seven samples did not germinate. Sixty samples out of the rest of 62 samples were identified as P. pseudo orientale, one sample was identified as P. bracteatum, and another as P. orientale. This is the first study that used ice cold water to determine the chromosomes in papaver species. It is hoped that it will also facilitate to determine chromosome number and identify other papver species. PMID:24109208

  2. Morphine and Codeine in Oral Fluid after Controlled Poppy Seed Administration

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Opiates are an important drug class in drug testing programs. Ingestion of poppy seeds containing morphine and codeine can yield positive opiate tests and mislead result interpretation in forensic and clinical settings. Multiple publications evaluated urine opiate concentrations following poppy seed ingestion, but only 2 addressed oral fluid (OF) results; neither provided the ingested morphine and codeine dosage. We administered two 45g raw poppy seed doses, each containing 15.7mg morphine and 3.1mg codeine, 8h apart to 17 healthy adults. All OF specimens were screened by on-site OF immunoassay Draeger DrugTest 5000, and confirmed with OF collected with Oral-Eze® device and quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (1μg/L morphine and codeine limits of quantification). Specimens (n=459) were collected before and up to 32h after the first dose. All specimens screened positive 0.5h after dosing and remained positive for 0.5-13h at Draeger 20μg/L morphine cutoff. Maximum OF morphine and codeine concentrations (Cmax) were 177 and 32.6μg/L, with times to Cmax (Tmax) of 0.5-1h and 0.5-2.5h post-dose, respectively. Windows of detection after the second dose extended at least 24h for morphine and to 18h for codeine. After both doses, the last morphine positive OF result was 1h with 40μg/L 2004 proposed US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration cutoff, and 0.5h with 95μg/L cutoff, recently recommended by the Driving Under the Influence of Drugs and Medicines project. Positive OF morphine results are possible 0.5-1h after ingestion of 15.7mg of morphine in raw poppy seeds, depending upon the cutoff employed. PMID:25345619

  3. Acetylation serves as a protective group in noscapine biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Chen, Xue; Facchini, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    We have characterized four sequential enzymes that transform 1-hydroxy-N-methylcanadine to narcotoline hemiacetal, completing our elucidation of noscapine biosynthesis in opium poppy. Two cytochromes P450 catalyze hydroxylations at C13 and C8 on the protoberberine scaffold, the latter step inducing ring opening and the formation of an aldehyde moiety. Acetylation at C13 before C8 hydroxylation introduces a protective group subsequently hydrolyzed by a carboxylesterase, which triggers rearrangement to a cyclic hemiacetal. PMID:25485687

  4. 7 CFR 400.46 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 CFR 12.2, the following definitions are applicable: (a) Controlled substance means any prohibited... (erythroxylum coca), marijuana (cannabis satiua), opium poppies (papauer somniferum), and other...

  5. 7 CFR 400.46 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 CFR 12.2, the following definitions are applicable: (a) Controlled substance means any prohibited... (erythroxylum coca), marijuana (cannabis satiua), opium poppies (papauer somniferum), and other...

  6. 7 CFR 400.46 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 CFR 12.2, the following definitions are applicable: (a) Controlled substance means any prohibited... (erythroxylum coca), marijuana (cannabis satiua), opium poppies (papauer somniferum), and other...

  7. 7 CFR 400.46 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 CFR 12.2, the following definitions are applicable: (a) Controlled substance means any prohibited... (erythroxylum coca), marijuana (cannabis satiua), opium poppies (papauer somniferum), and other...

  8. 7 CFR 400.46 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 CFR 12.2, the following definitions are applicable: (a) Controlled substance means any prohibited... (erythroxylum coca), marijuana (cannabis satiua), opium poppies (papauer somniferum), and other...

  9. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling for evaluating poppy seed rancidity and brewing.

    PubMed

    Jawień, Ewa; Ząbek, Adam; Deja, Stanisław; Łukaszewicz, Marcin; Młynarz, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Poppy seeds are widely used in household and commercial confectionery. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the application of metabolic profiling for industrial monitoring of the molecular changes which occur during minced poppy seed rancidity and brewing processes performed on raw seeds. Both forms of poppy seeds were obtained from a confectionery company. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) was applied as the analytical method of choice together with multivariate statistical data analysis. Metabolic fingerprinting was applied as a bioprocess control tool to monitor rancidity with the trajectory of change and brewing progressions. Low molecular weight compounds were found to be statistically significant biomarkers of these bioprocesses. Changes in concentrations of chemical compounds were explained relative to the biochemical processes and external conditions. The obtained results provide valuable and comprehensive information to gain a better understanding of the biology of rancidity and brewing processes, while demonstrating the potential for applying NMR spectroscopy combined with multivariate data analysis tools for quality control in food industries involved in the processing of oilseeds. This precious and versatile information gives a better understanding of the biology of these processes. PMID:26540222

  10. Morphine and codeine concentrations in human urine following controlled poppy seeds administration of known opiate content.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-08-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45 g oral poppy seed doses 8 h apart, each containing 15.7 mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32 h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA(®) heroin metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6-AM) and Lin-Zhi 6-AM immunoassays with 10 μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32 h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2000 and 300 μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7522 μg/L with a median peak concentration of 5239 μg/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2000 μg/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6 h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18 h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2000 μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300 μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6-AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results. PMID

  11. Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau Uplift Drives Divergence of Polyploid Poppies: Meconopsis Viguier (Papaveraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongyan; Ash, Julian E.; Linde, Celeste C.; Cunningham, Saul; Nicotra, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    Meconopsis Viguier (Papaveraceae) is an iconic genus of alpine forbs that includes medicinal and ornamental species. This study extends previous phylogenetic analyses of Meconopsis, using ITS sequences representing all the major Meconopsis clades. Phenotypic traits are also analysed for all described species. Our results show that Meconopsis evolved as a ≥ octaploid clade, with considerable interior structure reflecting further changes in ploidy levels as well as phenotypic differentiation. We support the exclusion of a few species as Cathcartia or Papaver, making Meconopsis a Tibetan region clade. Based on average rates of nucleotide substitution in angiosperm herbs we estimate that the Meconopsis clade diverged from the Meconella clade of Papaver approximately 16.6 Ma. This is soon after the ‘hard’ collision of the Indian continent with Asia caused uplift of the Himalaya and Hengduan ranges, greatly extended the Tibetan plateau, and initiated monsoonal climates. Eight major clades within Meconopsis are well supported and these correspond closely to previously recognised subgenus groups. However, the relationship among the clades is poorly resolved, probably because they diverged rapidly ∼15-11 Ma. Two of these clades are ∼dodecaploid but appear to have originated independently. The eight clades have distinct distributions, variously associated with the Himalaya, the eastern Plateau and Hengduan ranges. Some Meconopsis species were not monophyletic, suggesting that a combination of multilocus molecular and phenotypic traits is required when defining and revising species. PMID:24933008

  12. Himalayan-Tibetan plateau uplift drives divergence of polyploid poppies: Meconopsis Viguier (Papaveraceae).

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongyan; Ash, Julian E; Linde, Celeste C; Cunningham, Saul; Nicotra, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    Meconopsis Viguier (Papaveraceae) is an iconic genus of alpine forbs that includes medicinal and ornamental species. This study extends previous phylogenetic analyses of Meconopsis, using ITS sequences representing all the major Meconopsis clades. Phenotypic traits are also analysed for all described species. Our results show that Meconopsis evolved as a ≥ octaploid clade, with considerable interior structure reflecting further changes in ploidy levels as well as phenotypic differentiation. We support the exclusion of a few species as Cathcartia or Papaver, making Meconopsis a Tibetan region clade. Based on average rates of nucleotide substitution in angiosperm herbs we estimate that the Meconopsis clade diverged from the Meconella clade of Papaver approximately 16.6 Ma. This is soon after the 'hard' collision of the Indian continent with Asia caused uplift of the Himalaya and Hengduan ranges, greatly extended the Tibetan plateau, and initiated monsoonal climates. Eight major clades within Meconopsis are well supported and these correspond closely to previously recognised subgenus groups. However, the relationship among the clades is poorly resolved, probably because they diverged rapidly ∼15-11 Ma. Two of these clades are ∼dodecaploid but appear to have originated independently. The eight clades have distinct distributions, variously associated with the Himalaya, the eastern Plateau and Hengduan ranges. Some Meconopsis species were not monophyletic, suggesting that a combination of multilocus molecular and phenotypic traits is required when defining and revising species. PMID:24933008

  13. Antioxidant, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic effects of Papaver rhoeas L. extract on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Teodora; Pesheva, Margarita; Gregan, Fridrich; Chankova, Stephka

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the antioxidant and antimutagenic/anticarcinogenic capacity of Papaver rhoeas L. water extract against standard mutagen/carcinogen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and radiomimetic zeocin (Zeo) on a test system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The following assays were used: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, quantitative determination of superoxide anion (antireactive oxygen species [antiROS test]), DNA topology assay, D7ts1 test--for antimutagenic--and Ty1 transposition test--for anticarcinogenic effects. Strong pro-oxidative capacity of Zeo was shown to correlate with its well-expressed mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of MMS were also confirmed. Our data concerning the antioxidant activity of P. rhoeas L. extract revealed that concentration corresponding to IC(50) in the DPPH assay possessed the highest antioxidant activity in the antiROS biological assay. It was also observed that a concentration with 50% scavenging activity expressed the most pronounced antimutagenic properties decreasing Zeo-induced gene conversion twofold, reverse mutation fivefold, and total aberrations fourfold. The same concentration possessed well-expressed anticarcinogenic properties measured as reduction of MMS-induced Ty1 transposition rate fivefold and fourfold when Zeo was used as an inductor. Based on the well-expressed antioxidant, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic properties obtained in this work, the P. rhoeas L. extract could be recommended for further investigations and possible use as a food additive. PMID:25185065

  14. The Occurrence of Flavonoids and Related Compounds in Flower Sections of Papaver nudicaule

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Bettina; Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids play an important role in the pigmentation of flowers; in addition, they protect petals and other flower parts from UV irradiation and oxidative stress. Nudicaulins, flavonoid-derived indole alkaloids, along with pelargonidin, kaempferol, and gossypetin glycosides, are responsible for the color of white, red, orange, and yellow petals of different Papaver nudicaule cultivars. The color of the petals is essential to attract pollinators. We investigated the occurrence of flavonoids in basal and apical petal areas, stamens, and capsules of four differently colored P. nudicaule cultivars by means of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The results reveal the specific occurrence of gossypetin glycosides in the basal spot of all cultivars and demonstrate that kaempferol glycosides are the major secondary metabolites in the capsules. Unlike previous reports, the yellow-colored stamens of all four P. nudicaule cultivars are shown to contain not nudicaulins but carotenoids. In addition, the presence of nudicaulins, pelargonidin, and kaempferol glycosides in the apical petal area was confirmed. The flavonoids and related compounds in the investigated flower parts and cultivars of P. nudicaule are profiled, and their potential ecological role is discussed. PMID:27338493

  15. The Occurrence of Flavonoids and Related Compounds in Flower Sections of Papaver nudicaule.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Bettina; Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids play an important role in the pigmentation of flowers; in addition, they protect petals and other flower parts from UV irradiation and oxidative stress. Nudicaulins, flavonoid-derived indole alkaloids, along with pelargonidin, kaempferol, and gossypetin glycosides, are responsible for the color of white, red, orange, and yellow petals of different Papaver nudicaule cultivars. The color of the petals is essential to attract pollinators. We investigated the occurrence of flavonoids in basal and apical petal areas, stamens, and capsules of four differently colored P. nudicaule cultivars by means of chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The results reveal the specific occurrence of gossypetin glycosides in the basal spot of all cultivars and demonstrate that kaempferol glycosides are the major secondary metabolites in the capsules. Unlike previous reports, the yellow-colored stamens of all four P. nudicaule cultivars are shown to contain not nudicaulins but carotenoids. In addition, the presence of nudicaulins, pelargonidin, and kaempferol glycosides in the apical petal area was confirmed. The flavonoids and related compounds in the investigated flower parts and cultivars of P. nudicaule are profiled, and their potential ecological role is discussed. PMID:27338493

  16. Effects of Papaver rhoeas (L.) extract on formalin-induced pain and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Saeed-Abadi, S; Ranjbaran, M; Jafari, F; Najafi-Abedi, A; Rahmani, B; Esfandiari, B; Delfan, B; Mojabi, N; Ghahramani, M; Sahraei, H

    2012-11-01

    Stress amelioration can improve its metabolic as well as other side effects. In the present study, the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Papver rhoeas (L.) on formalin-induced pain and inflammation were investigated in male Swiss-Webster mice (20-25 g). Formalin injects in the plantar portion of mice hind paw and pain was studied for 60 min. The plant extract and other drugs were administered intraperitoneally 30 min before formalin. Experiments showed that administration of extract (25, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) could induced analgesia in a dose-response manner in both phases of formalin test. More over, the extract inhibits inflammation induced by formalin injection. Naloxone (4 mg kg(-1)), dextromethorphan (20 mg kg(-1)) and NG-nitro-L-arginine-methylester (L-NAME; 10 mg kg(-1)) reduced the extract analgesia in first but not late phase. Extract administration also increased plasma corticosterone level in dose-dependent manner. It could be concluded that Papaver rhoeas (L.) extract could inhibits acute phase of formalin test in mice by opioidergic, glutamatergic and nitricergic mechanisms. In addition, the extract can induce corticosterone plasma level which may be responsible for inhibition of inflammation and chronic phase of pain induced by formalin. PMID:24163947

  17. The Papaver rhoeas S determinants confer self-incompatibility to Arabidopsis thaliana in planta.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zongcheng; Eaves, Deborah J; Sanchez-Moran, Eugenio; Franklin, F Christopher H; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2015-11-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is a major genetically controlled system used to prevent inbreeding in higher plants. S determinants regulate allele-specific rejection of "self" pollen by the pistil. SI is an important model system for cell-to-cell recognition and signaling and could be potentially useful for first-generation (F1) hybrid breeding. To date, the transfer of S determinants has used the complementation of orthologs to "restore" SI in close relatives. We expressed the Papaver rhoeas S determinants PrsS and PrpS in Arabidopsis thaliana. This enabled pistils to reject pollen expressing cognate PrpS. Moreover, plants coexpressing cognate PrpS and PrsS exhibit robust SI. This demonstrates that PrsS and PrpS are sufficient for a functional synthetic S locus in vivo. This transfer of novel S determinants into a highly divergent species (>140 million years apart) with no orthologs suggests their potential utility in crop production. PMID:26542572

  18. Prickly Poppies Can Get Pricklier: Ontogenetic Patterns in the Induction of Physical Defense Traits

    PubMed Central

    Hoan, Ryan P.; Ormond, Rhys A.; Barton, Kasey E.

    2014-01-01

    Plant ontogeny is a common source of variation in defense and herbivory. Yet, few studies have investigated how the induction of physical defense traits changes across plant ontogeny. Physical defense traits are costly to produce, and thus, it was predicted that induction as a cost-saving strategy would be particularly favorable for seedlings, leading to ontogenetic declines in the inducibility of these traits. We tested for induction of three different physical defense traits (prickles, latex and leaf toughness) in response to mechanical defoliation and jasmonic acid application using prickly poppies (Argemone glauca and A. mexicana, Papaveraceae) as a model system. Genetic variation in the induction of physical defenses was tested using maternal sib-ships sampled from multiple populations. Both species induced higher densities of laminar prickles, although the magnitude of induction was much higher in the endemic Hawaiian prickly poppy, A. glauca, than in the cosmopolitan A. mexicana. The magnitude of prickle induction was also higher in young compared to older juvenile plant stages in A. glauca, demonstrating a strong role of ontogeny. Neither latex exudation nor leaf toughness was induced in either species. Although significant genetic variation was detected within and among populations for constitutive expression of physical defense traits in Argemone, there was no evidence for genetic variation in the induction of these traits. This study provides the first evidence for the induction of physical defenses in prickly poppies, emphasizing how an ontogenetically explicit framework can reveal new insights into plant defense. Moreover, this study illustrates how sister species comparisons between island vs. continental plants can provide new insights into plant functional and evolutionary ecology, highlighting a fruitful area for future research on more species pairs. PMID:24802133

  19. Morphine and codeine in oral fluid after controlled poppy seed administration.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Newmeyer, Matthew N; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-07-01

    Opiates are an important drug class in drug testing programmes. Ingestion of poppy seeds containing morphine and codeine can yield positive opiate tests and mislead result interpretation in forensic and clinical settings. Multiple publications evaluated urine opiate concentrations following poppy seed ingestion, but only two addressed oral fluid (OF) results; neither provided the ingested morphine and codeine dosage. We administered two 45 g raw poppy seed doses, each containing 15.7 mg morphine and 3.1 mg codeine, 8 h apart to 17 healthy adults. All OF specimens were screened by on-site OF immunoassay Draeger DrugTest 5000, and confirmed with OF collected with Oral-Eze® device and quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (1 µg/L morphine and codeine limits of quantification). Specimens (n = 459) were collected before and up to 32 h after the first dose. All specimens screened positive 0.5 h after dosing and remained positive for 0.5-13 h at Draeger 20 µg/L morphine cut-off. Maximum OF morphine and codeine concentrations (Cmax ) were 177 and 32.6 µg/L, with times to Cmax (Tmax ) of 0.5-1 h and 0.5-2.5 h post-dose, respectively. Windows of detection after the second dose extended at least 24 h for morphine and to 18 h for codeine. After both doses, the last morphine positive OF result was 1 h with 40 µg/L 2004 proposed US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration cut-off, and 0.5 h with 95 µg/L cut-off, recently recommended by the Driving under the Influence of Drugs and Medicines project. Positive OF morphine results are possible 0.5-1 h after ingestion of 15.7 mg of morphine in raw poppy seeds, depending on the cut-off employed. PMID:25345619

  20. "Poppies are democracy!" A critical geopolitics of opium eradication and reintroduction in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Evered, Kyle T

    2011-01-01

    Historical scholarship in traditional geopolitics often relied on documents authored by states and by other influential actors. Although much work in the subfield of critical geopolitics thus far has addressed imbalances constructed in official, academic, and popular media due to a privileging of such narratives, priority might also be given to unearthing and bringing to light alternative geopolitical perspectives from otherwise marginalized populations. Utilizing the early-1970s case of the United States' first “war on drugs,” this article examines the geopolitics of opium-poppy eradication and its consequences within Turkey. Employing not only archival and secondary sources but also oral histories from now-retired poppy farmers, this study examines the diffusion of U.S. antinarcotics policies into the Anatolian countryside and the enduring impressions that the United States and Turkish government created. In doing so, this research gives voice to those farmers targeted by eradication policies and speaks more broadly to matters of narcotics control, sentiments of anti-Americanism, and notions of democracy in Turkey and the region, past and present. PMID:22164875

  1. Reduction of metabolic signs of acute stress in male mice by Papaver rhoaes hydro-alcoholic extract.

    PubMed

    Ranjbaran, M; Mirzaei, P; Lotfi, F; Behzadi, S; Sahraei, H

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Papaver rhoeas L. (Papaveraceae) on the metabolic changes induced by electro foot shock stress in male NMRI mice (25-30 g) has been investigated. The mice were received electric foot shock (40 mV) for 100 sec. Plasma corticosterone levels, food and water intake and delay to eating (Anorexia) were assessed 20 min later. Different doses of the plant extract (15, 30 and 60 mg kg(-1)), or saline (10 mL kg(-1)) was injected to the animals intraperitoneally 30 min before the stress. The control groups received saline (10 mL kg(-1)) or the extract (15, 30 and 60 mg kg(-1)) and 30 min later were exposed to the apparatus but did not received stress. Our results indicated that stress can increase plasma corticosterone level significantly and the extract can exacerbate the stress effect. However, stress could reduce food and water intake and increase delay to eating times which were inhibited by the extract pretreatment. The results indicate that administration of the extract of Papaver rhoeas can reduce the side effects of stress but increases plasma corticosterone level which may be due to its effects on the adrenal gland. PMID:24502164

  2. Biochemical genomics for gene discovery in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy and related species.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu Thuy T; Onoyovwi, Akpevwe; Farrow, Scott C; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a large, diverse group of ∼2500 specialized plant metabolites. Many BIAs display potent pharmacological activities, including the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine, the antimicrobial agents sanguinarine and berberine, and the muscle relaxant (+)-tubocurarine. Opium poppy remains the sole commercial source for codeine, morphine, and a variety of semisynthetic drugs, including oxycodone and buprenorphine, derived primarily from the biosynthetic pathway intermediate thebaine. Recent advances in transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics have created unprecedented opportunities for isolating and characterizing novel BIA biosynthetic genes. Here, we describe the application of next-generation sequencing and cDNA microarrays for selecting gene candidates based on comparative transcriptome analysis. We outline the basic mass spectrometric techniques to perform deep proteome and targeted metabolite analyses on BIA-producing plant tissues and provide methodologies for functionally characterizing biosynthetic gene candidates through in vitro enzyme assays and transient gene silencing in planta. PMID:22999177

  3. Determination of inorganic elements in poppy straw by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry as a means of ascertaining origin.

    PubMed

    Copur, E; Göger, N G; Orbey, T; Sener, B

    2005-01-01

    Cultivation of poppy as a source of opium alkaloids for legitimate medical purposes has a long tradition in Turkey. The main products are poppy straw and concentrate of poppy straw, obtained from dried poppy capsules. The aims of the study reported in the present article were to establish inorganic element profiles for the poppy-growing provinces of Turkey by means of x-ray analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS) and to explore the potential of the technique for determination of origin. Ten elements (sodium, magnesium, silicon, phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, potassium, calcium, copper and zinc) were analysed in poppy straw samples from 67 towns in nine provinces. As regards the determination of origin, the most significant finding was the presence of copper and zinc in the poppy straw samples from 8 of the 15 towns in Afyon Province. Since those elements are not normally found in soil, it is assumed that their presence is the result of environmental (industrial) contamination. Differences in the samples from the other eight provinces were less significant, possibly a result of their geographical proximity. Nevertheless, differences in the samples were apparent. Because the findings are relative rather than absolute in terms of presence or absence of individual inorganic elements, further research is required to convert them into operationally usable results. The inorganic element profiles generated in the study have been used to form the basis for the development of a comprehensive database on poppy straw samples, which may be used in comparing samples and determining their origin. PMID:21338021

  4. Coca and poppy eradication in Colombia: environmental and human health assessment of aerially applied glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Keith R; Anadón, Arturo; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Cerdeira, Antonio L; Marshall, Jon; Sanin, Luz-Helena

    2007-01-01

    The production of coca and poppy as well as the processing and production of cocaine and heroin involve significant environmental impacts. Both coca and poppy are grown intensively in a process that involves the clearing of land in remote areas, the planting of the crop, and protection against pests such as weeds, insects, and pathogens. The aerial spray program to control coca and poppy production in Colombia with the herbicide glyphosate is conducted with modern state-of-the-art aircraft and spray equipment. As a result of the use of best available spray and navigation technology, the likelihood of accidental off-target spraying is small and is estimated to be less than 1% of the total area sprayed. Estimated exposures in humans resulting from direct overspray, contact with treated foliage after reentry to fields, inhalation, diet, and drinking water were small and infrequent. Analyses of surface waters in five watersheds showed that, on most occasions, glyphosate was not present at measurable concentrations; only two samples had residues just above the method detection limit of 25 microg/L. Concentrations of glyphosate in air were predicted to be very small because of negligible volatility. Glyphosate in soils that are directly sprayed will be tightly bound and biologically unavailable and have no residual activity. Concentrations of glyphosate plus Cosmo-Flux will be relatively large in shallow surface waters that are directly oversprayed (maximum instantaneous concentration of 1,229microgAE/L in water 30cm deep); however, no information was available on the number of fields in close proximity to surface waters, and thus it was not possible to estimate the likelihood of such contamination. The formulation used in Colombia, a mixture of glyphosate and Cosmo-Flux, has low toxicity to mammals by all routes of exposure, although some temporary eye irritation may occur. Published epidemiological studies have not suggested a strong or consistent linkage between

  5. Norcoclaurine Synthase Is a Member of the Pathogenesis-Related 10/Bet v1 Protein Family[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Facchini, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). NCS from Thalictrum flavum (Tf NCS), Papaver somniferum (Ps NCS1 and Ps NCS2), and Coptis japonica (Cj PR10A) share substantial identity with pathogen-related 10 (PR10) and Bet v1 proteins, whose functions are not well understood. A distinct enzyme (Cj NCS1) with similarity to 2-oxoglutarate–dependent dioxygenases was suggested as the bona fide NCS in C. japonica. Here, we validate the exclusive role of PR10/Bet v1-type NCS enzymes in BIA metabolism. Immunolocalization of Ps NCS2 revealed its cell type–specific occurrence in phloem sieve elements, which contain all other known BIA biosynthetic enzymes. In opium poppy, NCS transcripts and proteins were abundant in root and stem, but at low levels in leaf and carpel. Silencing of NCS in opium poppy profoundly reduced alkaloid levels compared with controls. Immunoprecipitation of NCS from total protein extracts of T. flavum cells resulted in a nearly complete attenuation of NCS activity. A Ps NCS2–green fluorescent protein fusion introduced by microprojectile bombardment into opium poppy cells initially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum but subsequently sorted to the vacuole. In our hands, Cj NCS1 did not catalyze the formation of (S)-norcoclaurine from dopamine and 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde. PMID:21037103

  6. Noscapine comes of age.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Facchini, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Noscapine is a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid, which represents a class of plant specialized metabolites within the large and structurally diverse group of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. Along with the narcotic analgesic morphine, noscapine is a major alkaloid in the latex of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) that has long been used as a cough suppressant and has undergone extensive investigation as a potential anticancer drug. Cultivated opium poppy plants remain the only commercial source of noscapine. Despite its isolation from opium more than two centuries ago, the almost complete biosynthesis of noscapine has only recently been established based on an impressive combination of molecular genetics, functional genomics, and metabolic biochemistry. In this review, we provide a historical account of noscapine from its discovery through to initial investigations of its formation in opium poppy. We also describe recent breakthroughs that have led to an elucidation of the noscapine biosynthetic pathway, and we discuss the pharmacological properties that have prompted intensive evaluation of the potential pharmaceutical applications of noscapine and several semi-synthetic derivatives. Finally, we speculate on the future potential for the production of noscapine using metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in plants and microbes. PMID:25583437

  7. Detection of Verticillium wilt of olive trees and downy mildew of opium poppy using hyperspectral and thermal UAV imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón Madrid, Rocío; Navas Cortés, Juan Antonio; Montes Borrego, Miguel; Landa del Castillo, Blanca Beatriz; Lucena León, Carlos; Jesús Zarco Tejada, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The present study explored the use of high-resolution thermal, multispectral and hyperspectral imagery as indicators of the infections caused by Verticillium wilt (VW) in olive trees and downy mildew (DM) in opium poppy fields. VW, caused by the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae, and DM, caused by the biotrophic obligate oomycete Peronospora arborescens, are the most economically limiting diseases of olive trees and opium poppy, respectively, worldwide. V. dahliae infects the plant by the roots and colonizes its vascular system, blocking water flow and eventually inducing water stress. P. arborescens colonizes the mesophyll, appearing the first symptoms as small chlorotic leaf lesions, which can evolve to curled and thickened tissues and systemic infections that become deformed and necrotic as the disease develops. The work conducted to detect VW and DM infection consisted on the acquisition of time series of airborne thermal, multispectral and hyperspectral imagery using 2-m and 5-m wingspan electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in spring and summer of three consecutive years (2009 to 2011) for VW detection and on three dates in spring of 2009 for DM detection. Two 7-ha commercial olive orchards naturally infected with V. dahliae and two opium poppy field plots artificially infected by P. arborescens were flown. Concurrently to the airborne campaigns, olive orchards and opium poppy fields were assessed "in situ" to assess actual VW severity and DM incidence. Furthermore, field measurements were conducted at leaf and crown level. The field results related to VW detection showed a significant increase in crown temperature (Tc) minus air temperature (Ta) and a decrease in leaf stomatal conductance (G) as VW severity increased. This reduction in G was associated with a significant increase in the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI570) and a decrease in chlorophyll fluorescence. DM asymptomatic leaves showed significantly higher NDVI and lower green/red index

  8. Lipoxygenase activity and sanguinarine production in cell suspension cultures of California poppy (Eschscholtzia californica CHAM.).

    PubMed

    Kollárová, R; Oblozinský, M; Kováciková, V; Holková, I; Balazová, A; Pekárová, M; Hoffman, P; Bezáková, L

    2014-08-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of biotic elicitor (phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea) and abiotic elicitors (methyljasmonate [MJ] and salicylic acid [SA]) on lipoxygenase (LOX) activity and sanguinarine production in cell suspension cultures of California poppy (Eschscholtzia californica CHAM.). We have observed different time effects of elicitors (10, 24, 48 and 72 h) on LOX activity and production of sanguinarine in in vitro cultures. All elicitors used in the experiments evidently increased the LOX activity and sanguinarine production in contrast to control samples. The highest LOX activities were determined in samples elicitated by MJ after 48 h and 72 h and the lowest LOX activities (in contrast to control samples) were detected after biotic elicitation by Botrytis cinerea. These activities showed about 50% lower level against the activities after MJ elicitation. The maximal amount of sanguinarine was observed after 48 h in MJ treated cultures (429.91 mg/g DCW) in comparision with control samples. Although all elicitors affect the sanguinarine production, effect of SA and biotic elicitor on sanguinarine accumulation in in vitrocultures was not so significant than after MJ elicitation. PMID:25158577

  9. Characterization of Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Korean Papaver rhoeas Bee Pollen Contributing to Anti-Influenza Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Hwang, Byung Soon; Kim, Dae-Won; Kim, Ji-Yul; Woo, E-Eum; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Choi, Hwa Jung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2016-04-01

    The active constituents of Korean Papaver rhoeas bee pollen conferring neuraminidase inhibitory activities (H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1) were investigated. Six flavonoids and one alkaloid were isolated and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry data. These included kaempferol-3-sophoroside (1), kaempferol-3-neohesperidoside (2), kaempferol-3-sambubioside (3), kaempferol-3-glucoside (4), quercetin-3-sophoroside (5), luteolin (6), and chelianthifoline (7). All compounds showed neuraminidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 151.1 µM. The most potent neuraminidase inhibitor was luteolin, which was the dominant content in the ethyl acetate fraction. All tested compounds displayed noncompetitive inhibition of H3N2 neuraminidase. Furthermore, compounds 1-7 all reduced the severity of virally induced cytopathic effects as determined by the Madin-Darby canine kidney cell-based assay showing antiviral activity with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 33.4 µM (zanamivir: 58.3 µM). The active compounds were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the total amount of compounds 1-7 made up about 0.592 g/100 g bee pollen, contributing a rich resource of a natural antiviral product. PMID:26848705

  10. CYP82Y1 Is N-Methylcanadine 1-Hydroxylase, a Key Noscapine Biosynthetic Enzyme in Opium Poppy*

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Noscapine is a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid investigated for its potent pharmacological properties. Although structurally elucidated more than a century ago, the biosynthesis of noscapine has not been established. Radiotracer studies have shown that noscapine is derived from the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine and has been proposed to proceed through (S)-N-methylcanadine. However, pathway intermediates involved in the conversion of N-methylcanadine to noscapine have not been identified. We report the isolation and characterization of the cytochrome P-450 CYP82Y1, which catalyzes the 1-hydroxylation of N-methylcanadine to 1-hydroxy-N-methylcanadine. Comparison of transcript and metabolite profiles of eight opium poppy chemotypes revealed four cytochrome P-450s, three from the CYP82 and one from the CYP719 families, that were tightly correlated with noscapine accumulation. Recombinant CYP82Y1 was the only enzyme that accepted (R,S)-N-methylcanadine as a substrate with strict specificity and high affinity. As expected, CYP82Y1 was abundantly expressed in opium poppy stems where noscapine accumulation is highest among plant organs. Suppression of CYP82Y1 using virus-induced gene silencing caused a significant reduction in the levels of noscapine, narcotoline, and a putative downstream secoberbine intermediate and also resulted in increased accumulation of the upstream pathway intermediates scoulerine, tetrahydrocolum-bamine, canadine, and N-methylcanadine. The combined biochemical and physiological data support the 1-hydroxylation of (S)-N-methylcanadine catalyzed by CYP82Y1 as the first committed step in the formation of noscapine in opium poppy. PMID:24324259

  11. Nocardioides flava sp. nov., isolated from rhizosphere of poppy plant, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hina; Yin, Chang Shik

    2016-04-01

    Phylogenetic and taxonomic characterization was performed for bacterium, designated strain THG-DN5.4(T), isolated from the rhizosphere of poppy plant collected from Gyeryongsan, Republic of Korea. Strain THG-DN5.4(T) consists of Gram-stain-positive, aerobic, non-motile rods. The bacteria grow optimally at 18-30 °C, at pH 7.0 and in the presence of 0.5-1.0 % NaCl. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain THG-DN5.4(T) was found to be most closely related to Nocardioides nitrophenolicus KCTC 047BP(T), followed by Nocardioides ginsengisoli KCTC 19135(T), Nocardioides kongjuensis KCTC 19054(T), Nocardioides simplex KACC 20620(T), Nocardioides aromaticivorans KACC 20613(T), Nocardioides daeguensis KCTC 19799(T) and Nocardioides caeni KCTC 19600(T). The DNA-DNA relatedness between strain THG-DN5.4(T) and closely related phylogenetic neighbors was below 45.0 %, and the DNA G+C content of strain THG-DN5.4(T) was 70.8 mol%. An isoprenoid quinone was identified as MK-8(H4). Strain THG-DN5.4(T) was characterized chemotaxonomically as having LL-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The polar lipids were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, some unidentified aminolipids and some unidentified polar lipids. iso-C16:0 and C18:1 ω9c were identified as the major fatty acids present in THG-DN5.4(T). On the basis of a polyphasic taxonomic study, strain THG-DN5.4(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Nocardioides, for which the name Nocardioides flava sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is THG-DN5.4(T) (=KCTC 39606(T)=CCTCC AB 2015298(T)). PMID:26802009

  12. Dioxygenases Catalyze O-Demethylation and O,O-Demethylenation with Widespread Roles in Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Metabolism in Opium Poppy*

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Scott C.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    In opium poppy, the antepenultimate and final steps in morphine biosynthesis are catalyzed by the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases, thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM) and codeine O-demethylase (CODM). Further investigation into the biochemical functions of CODM and T6ODM revealed extensive and unexpected roles for such enzymes in the metabolism of protopine, benzo[c]phenanthridine, and rhoeadine alkaloids. When assayed with a wide range of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, CODM, T6ODM, and the functionally unassigned paralog DIOX2, renamed protopine O-dealkylase, showed novel and efficient dealkylation activities, including regio- and substrate-specific O-demethylation and O,O-demethylenation. Enzymes catalyzing O,O-demethylenation, which cleave a methylenedioxy bridge leaving two hydroxyl groups, have previously not been reported in plants. Similar cleavage of methylenedioxy bridges on substituted amphetamines is catalyzed by heme-dependent cytochromes P450 in mammals. Preferred substrates for O,O-demethylenation by CODM and protopine O-dealkylase were protopine alkaloids that serve as intermediates in the biosynthesis of benzo[c]phenanthridine and rhoeadine derivatives. Virus-induced gene silencing used to suppress the abundance of CODM and/or T6ODM transcripts indicated a direct physiological role for these enzymes in the metabolism of protopine alkaloids, and they revealed their indirect involvement in the formation of the antimicrobial benzo[c]phenanthridine sanguinarine and certain rhoeadine alkaloids in opium poppy. PMID:23928311

  13. SYSTEMATICS AND MATING SYSTEMS OF FUNGAL PATHOGENS OF OPIUM POPPY: CRIVELLIA PAPAVERACEA WITH A BRACHYCLADIUM PENICILLATUM ASEXUAL STATE AND A HOMOTHALLIC SPECIES B. PAPAVERIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The systematics of the fungal opium poppy pathogens formerly known as Pleospora papaveracea, along with allied asexual states formerly placed in Dendryphion, is revised based on analysis of phylogenetic relationships, comparative morphology, and analysis of mating systems. Using morphology, 18S and ...

  14. Medicinal aspects of opium as described in Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Mojtaba; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Zargaran, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, opium has been used as a base for the opioid class of drugs used to suppress the central nervous system. Opium is a substance extracted from the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.). Its consumption and medicinal application date back to antiquity. In the medieval period, Avicenna, a famous Persian scholar (980-1037 AD) described poppy under the entry Afion of his medical encyclopedia Canon of Medicine. Various effects of opium consumption, both wanted and unwanted are discussed in the encyclopedia. The text mentions the effects of opioids such as analgesic, hypnotic, antitussive, gastrointestinal, cognitive, respiratory depression, neuromuscular disturbance, and sexual dysfunction. It also refers to its potential as a poison. Avicenna describes several methods of delivery and recommendations for doses of the drug. Most of opioid effects described by Avicenna have subsequently been confirmed by modern research, and other references to opium use in medieval texts call for further investigation. This article highlights an important aspect of the medieval history of medicine. PMID:23883087

  15. Role of the phloem in the biochemistry and ecophysiology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Hagel, Jillian M.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a diverse group of biologically active specialized metabolites produced mainly in four plant families. BIA metabolism is likely of monophyletic origin and involves multiple enzymes yielding structurally diverse compounds. Several BIAs possess defensive properties against pathogenic microorganisms and herbivores. Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum: Papaveraceae) has emerged as a model system to investigate the cellular localization of BIA biosynthesis. Although alkaloids accumulate in the laticifer cytoplasm (latex) of opium poppy, corresponding biosynthetic enzymes and gene transcripts are localized to proximal sieve elements and companion cells, respectively. In contrast, BIA metabolism in the non-laticiferous meadow rue (Thalictrum flavum; Ranunculaceae) occurs independent of the phloem. Evidence points toward the adoption of diverse strategies for the biosynthesis and accumulation of alkaloids as defensive compounds. Recruitment of cell types involved in BIA metabolism, both within and external to the phloem, was likely driven by selection pressures unique to different taxa. The biochemistry, cell biology, ecophysiology, and evolution of BIA metabolism are considered in this context. PMID:23781223

  16. Phloem-Specific Expression of Tyrosine/Dopa Decarboxylase Genes and the Biosynthesis of Isoquinoline Alkaloids in Opium Poppy.

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, P. J.; De Luca, V.

    1995-01-01

    Tyrosine/dopa decarboxylase (TYDC) catalyzes the formation of tyramine and dopamine and represents the first steps in the biosynthesis of the large and diverse group of tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids. Opium poppy accumulates morphine in aerial organs and roots, whereas sanguinarine, which is derived from a distinct branch pathway, accumulates only in roots. Expression of the TYDC gene family in opium poppy was investigated in relation to the organ-specific biosynthesis of these different types of alkaloids. Members of the TYDC gene family are classified into two groups (represented by TYDC1 and TYDC2) and are differentially expressed. In the mature plant, TYDC2-like transcripts are predominant in stems and are also present in roots, whereas TYDC1-like transcripts are abundant only in roots. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that the expression of TYDC genes is developmentally regulated. TYDC transcripts are associated with vascular tissue in mature roots and stems but are also expressed in cortical tissues at earlier stages of development. Expression of TYDC genes is restricted to metaphloem and to protoxylem in the vascular bundles of mature aerial organs. Localization of TYDC transcripts in the phloem is consistent with the expected developmental origin of laticifers, which are specialized internal secretory cells that accompany vascular tissues in all organs of select species and that contain the alkaloid-rich latex in aerial organs. The differential expression of TYDC genes and the organ-dependent accumulation of different alkaloids suggest a coordinated regulation of specific alkaloid biosynthetic genes that are ultimately controlled by specific developmental programs. PMID:12242361

  17. Unsupervised multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis-based detection of opium poppy fields from an EO-1 Hyperion image in Helmand, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Yun; Bussink, Coen

    2014-04-01

    Since 1992, Afghanistan has gradually become the primary illicit opium producer in the entire world. To efficiently eradicate the opium poppy, it is crucial for the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Ministry of Counter Narcotics of Afghanistan to monitor opium poppy cultivation timely. In situ detection of opium fields, however, is often expensive, time-consuming and dangerous in Afghanistan. To overcome the constraints of inaccessibility of opium fields, high-resolution (≤1 m) images, like pan-sharpened IKONOS, have been applied in previous studies. Unfortunately, these high-resolution images are expensive when monitoring a large area. In contrast, EO-1 Hyperion imagery, the only source of spaceborne hyperspectral data, has a coarse resolution (30 m), but it is free of charge. Moreover, Hyperion's large number of channels may increase the detection capability of subpixel size targets. Until now, however, little research has been found that identified opium fields from spaceborne or aerial hyperspectral images. Therefore, this study attempts to detect opium fields from a Hyperion image covering a study area in Southwest Afghanistan in a situation where training samples were not available. A proposed methodology based on unsupervised endmember-selection and multiple-endmember spectral mixture analysis can detect opium fields directly from the Hyperion image. The number of poppy pixels was overestimated by 12%. PMID:24463021

  18. [Determination of poppy ingredients in chafing dish materials by isotopic internal standard coupled with multiple reaction monitoring and online full scan mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weixia; Sun, Zhuanlian; Yuan, Ping; Yang, Jizhou; Liu, Yafeng; Sun, Wuyong

    2014-12-01

    A confirmative method was developed for determining five poppy alkaloids including morphine, codeine, papaverine, tibane, noscapine in chafing dish ingredients by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q Trap MS). The sample was extracted with dilute HCl solution under heating condition. The removal of lipid procedure was performed with hexane. The purification was carried out on a mixed-cation solid-phase extraction column (MCX) and ethyl acetate-methanol containing 5% aqueous ammonia was used for elution. A PAK ST column was used to separate the analytes, and 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate methanol and 10 mmol/L ammonium acetate (pH 3. 6) were used as mobile phases. The five alkaloids was detected in the positive mode simultaneously by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and online enhanced product ion full scan (EPI). The LODs were 0.05-0.5 µg/kg and the LOQs were 0. 2-2 µg/kg for the five poppy alkaloids. The overall recoveries of the method varied from 64. 2% to 110. 6%, and the RSD were between 4. 2% and 12. 5%. The EPI mass spectra of positive samples were searched through standard library for qualitative confirmation. The detection of real hot pot material samples showed this method can be used for the simple and accurate determination of the five poppy alkaloid residues in chafing dish. PMID:25902640

  19. Shotgun proteomic analysis of yeast-elicited California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) suspension cultures producing enhanced levels of benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Oldham, John T; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Wall, P Kerr; Carlson, John E; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2010-09-01

    The California poppy, Eschscholzia californica, produces benzophenanthridine alkaloids (BPAs), an important class of biologically active compounds. Cell cultures of E. californica were investigated as an alternative and scalable method for producing these valuable compounds; treatment with yeast extract increased production from low levels to 23 mg/g dry weight (DW) of BPAs. A shotgun proteomic analysis of E. californica cell cultures was undertaken to explore changes in metabolism associated with enhanced BPA production. We implemented differential centrifugation and then shotgun proteomics based on nanoliquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) for peptide separation and analysis. A unigene database available for E. californica was translated and utilized for protein identification. Approximately 646 proteins (3% false discovery rate at the protein level) were identified. Differentially abundant proteins observed with elicitation included enzymes involved in (S)-adenosyl methionine (SAM) biosynthesis and BPA biosynthesis. These results demonstrate (1) the identification of proteins from a medicinal plant using shotgun proteomics combined with a well-annotated, translated unigene database and (2) the potential utility of proteomics for exploring changes in metabolism associated with enhanced secondary metabolite production. PMID:20690678

  20. Growth of Pollen Tubes of Papaver rhoeas Is Regulated by a Slow-Moving Calcium Wave Propagated by Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin-Tong, V. E.; Drobak, B. K.; Allan, A. C.; Watkins, PAC.; Trewavas, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A signaling role for cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in regulating Papaver rhoeas pollen tube growth during the self-incompatibility response has been demonstrated previously. In this article, we investigate the involvement of the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in Ca2+-mediated pollen tube inhibition. We demonstrate that P. rhoeas pollen tubes have a Ca2+-dependent polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity that is inhibited by neomycin. [Ca2+]i imaging after photolysis of caged inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate (Ins[1,4,5]P3) in pollen tubes demonstrated that Ins(1,4,5)P3 could induce Ca2+ release, which was inhibited by heparin and neomycin. Mastoparan, which stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 production, also induced a rapid increase in Ca2+, which was inhibited by neomycin. These data provide direct evidence for the involvement of a functional phosphoinositide signal-transducing system in the regulation of pollen tube growth. We suggest that the observed Ca2+ increases are mediated, at least in part, by Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced Ca2+ release. Furthermore, we provide data suggesting that Ca2+ waves, which have not previously been reported in plant cells, can be induced in pollen tubes. PMID:12239415

  1. Plant Reproduction: Self-Incompatibility to Go.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Mendez, Alejandro; McClure, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    In a new study, the Papaver rhoeas (poppy family) self-incompatibility system has been transferred into Arabidopsis thaliana, a distantly related plant with a very different floral structure. The simple poppy self-incompatibility system may finally make it possible to introduce this potentially valuable trait into any plant. PMID:26859267

  2. Cell Type–Specific Localization of Transcripts Encoding Nine Consecutive Enzymes Involved in Protoberberine Alkaloid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Samanani, Nailish; Park, Sang-Un; Facchini, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular clones encoding nine consecutive biosynthetic enzymes that catalyze the conversion of l-dopa to the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-canadine were isolated from meadow rue (Thalictrum flavum ssp glaucum). The predicted proteins showed extensive sequence identity with corresponding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of related benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in other species, such as opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). RNA gel blot hybridization analysis showed that gene transcripts for each enzyme were most abundant in rhizomes but were also detected at lower levels in roots and other organs. In situ RNA hybridization analysis revealed the cell type–specific expression of protoberberine alkaloid biosynthetic genes in roots and rhizomes. In roots, gene transcripts for all nine enzymes were localized to immature endodermis, pericycle, and, in some cases, adjacent cortical cells. In rhizomes, gene transcripts encoding all nine enzymes were restricted to the protoderm of leaf primordia. The localization of biosynthetic gene transcripts was in contrast with the tissue-specific accumulation of protoberberine alkaloids. In roots, protoberberine alkaloids were restricted to mature endodermal cells upon the initiation of secondary growth and were distributed throughout the pith and cortex in rhizomes. Thus, the cell type–specific localization of protoberberine alkaloid biosynthesis and accumulation are temporally and spatially separated in T. flavum roots and rhizomes, respectively. Despite the close phylogeny between corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, distinct and different cell types are involved in the biosynthesis and accumulation of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in T. flavum and P. somniferum. Our results suggest that the evolution of alkaloid metabolism involves not only the recruitment of new biosynthetic enzymes, but also the migration of established pathways between cell types. PMID:15722473

  3. Blind column selection protocol for two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Burns, Niki K; Andrighetto, Luke M; Conlan, Xavier A; Purcell, Stuart D; Barnett, Neil W; Denning, Jacquie; Francis, Paul S; Stevenson, Paul G

    2016-07-01

    The selection of two orthogonal columns for two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (LC×LC) separation of natural product extracts can be a labour intensive and time consuming process and in many cases is an entirely trial-and-error approach. This paper introduces a blind optimisation method for column selection of a black box of constituent components. A data processing pipeline, created in the open source application OpenMS®, was developed to map the components within the mixture of equal mass across a library of HPLC columns; LC×LC separation space utilisation was compared by measuring the fractional surface coverage, fcoverage. It was found that for a test mixture from an opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) extract, the combination of diphenyl and C18 stationary phases provided a predicted fcoverage of 0.48 and was matched with an actual usage of 0.43. OpenMS®, in conjunction with algorithms designed in house, have allowed for a significantly quicker selection of two orthogonal columns, which have been optimised for a LC×LC separation of crude extractions of plant material. PMID:27154652

  4. Co-morbidity and self medication in schizophrenia: involvement of endogenous morphine signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kream, Richard M; Kuzelova, Hana; Kralickova, Milena; Ptacek, Radek; Stefano, George B

    2012-10-01

    For over 30 years, empirical studies have demonstrated expression of chemically authentic morphine by diverse animal tissues and organs systems. De novo biosynthesis of endogenous morphine by animal cells displays striking similarities to the multi-enzyme mediated biosynthetic pathway previously characterized in great biochemical and molecular detail in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). The committed enzyme step within this pathway involves an asymmetric Pictet-Spengler condensation of dopamine (DA) and 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), the oxidation product of L- 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), to form the essential intermediate precursor tetrahydropapaveroline (THP). We have hypothesized that endogenous morphine is synthesized within peripheral sites via conversion of THP in a regulated biosynthetic pathway, or conversely, THP may be directly transported into the CNS and converted to endogenous morphine within a similar biosynthetic pathway. The fundamental chemical relationship of the prototype catecholamine DA and its immediate precursor L-DOPA to endogenous morphine expression indicates a novel reciprocally interactive mechanism that links catecholamine and "morphinergic" pathways in the activation and inhibition of key physiological responses, including higher order neural integration. Dysregulation of interactive DAergic and "morphinergic" signaling pathways within CNS foci may contribute to the etiological factors driving co-morbid behavioral syndromes in major psychiatric disorders. Our short review is designed to provide insights on comorbidity and self-medication in schizophrenia from a novel perspective involving endogenous morphine signaling mechanisms. PMID:22876887

  5. Plug-and-Play Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Biosynthetic Gene Discovery in Engineered Yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dastmalchi, M; Li, J; Chang, L; Chen, X; Hagel, J M; Facchini, P J

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) metabolism has been the focus of a considerable research effort over the past half-century, primarily because of the pharmaceutical importance of several compounds produced by opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Advancements in genomics technologies have substantially accelerated the rate of gene discovery over the past decade, such that most biosynthetic enzymes involved in the formation of the major alkaloids of opium poppy have now been isolated and partially characterized. Not unexpectedly, the availability of all perceived biosynthetic genes has facilitated the reconstitution of several BIA pathways in microbial hosts, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Product yields are currently insufficient to consider the commercial production of high-value BIAs, such as morphine. However, the rudimentary success demonstrated by the uncomplicated and routine assembly of a multitude of characterized BIA biosynthetic genes provides a valuable gene discovery tool for the rapid functional identification of the plethora of gene candidates available through increasingly accessible genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic databases. BIA biosynthetic gene discovery represents a substantial research opportunity largely owing to the wealth of existing enzyme data mostly obtained from a single plant species. Functionally novel enzymes and variants with potential metabolic engineering applications can be considered the primary targets. Selection of candidates from sequence repositories is facilitated by the monophyletic relationship among biosynthetic genes belonging to a wide range of enzyme families, such as the numerous cytochromes P450 and AdoMet-dependent O- and N-methyltransferases that operate in BIA metabolism. We describe methods for the rapid functional screening of uncharacterized gene candidates encoding potential BIA biosynthetic enzymes using yeast strains engineered to perform selected metabolic conversions. As an initial

  6. Cytochrome P450 3A Enzymes Catalyze the O6-Demethylation of Thebaine, a Key Step in Endogenous Mammalian Morphine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kramlinger, Valerie M; Alvarado Rojas, Mónica; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Guengerich, F Peter

    2015-08-14

    Morphine, first characterized in opium from the poppy Papaver somniferum, is one of the strongest known analgesics. Endogenous morphine has been identified in several mammalian cells and tissues. The synthetic pathway of morphine in the opium poppy has been elucidated. The presence of common intermediates in plants and mammals suggests that biosynthesis occurs through similar pathways (beginning with the amino acid L-tyrosine), and the pathway has been completely delineated in plants. Some of the enzymes in the mammalian pathway have been identified and characterized. Two of the latter steps in the morphine biosynthesis pathway are demethylation of thebaine at the O(3)- and the O(6)-positions, the latter of which has been difficult to demonstrate. The plant enzymes responsible for both the O(3)-demethylation and the O(6)-demethylation are members of the Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family. Previous studies showed that human cytochrome P450 (P450) 2D6 can catalyze thebaine O(3)-demethylation. We report that demethylation of thebaine at the O(6)-position is selectively catalyzed by human P450s 3A4 and 3A5, with the latter being more efficient, and rat P450 3A2. Our results do not support O(6)-demethylation of thebaine by an Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase. In rat brain microsomes, O(6)-demethylation was inhibited by ketoconazole, but not sulfaphenazole, suggesting that P450 3A enzymes are responsible for this activity in the brain. An alternate pathway to morphine, oripavine O(6)-demethylation, was not detected. The major enzymatic steps in mammalian morphine synthesis have now been identified. PMID:26157146

  7. Highly Efficient Virus-induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) in California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica): An Evaluation of VIGS as a Strategy to Obtain Functional Data from Non-model Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wege, Stefanie; Scholz, Andrea; Gleissberg, Stefan; Becker, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Eschscholzia californica (California poppy) is an emerging model plant for ‘evo–devo’ studies from the basal eudicot clade of Papaveraceae. California poppy has a relatively small genome, a short life cycle and, most importantly, it is amenable for transformation. However, since this transformation protocol is time consuming, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) was evaluated as a fast method to obtain functional data for California poppy genes. Methods Commercially available California poppy plants were infiltrated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the tobacco rattle virus plasmids pTRV1 and pTRV2. pTRV2 contained part of the eschscholzia Phytoene Desaturase (EcPDS) gene whose loss of function results in photobleaching of the green parts of the plant and in a lack of floral coloration. The degree and duration of these symptoms was evaluated for vegetative rosettes and plants in flower. Key Results It is shown that VIGS is able to effectively down-regulate the EcPDS gene in eschscholzia. Various degrees of silencing were observed starting <2 weeks after infiltration with Agrobacterium tumefaciens in 92 % of the plants. Tissue with silencing symptoms also showed complete or strong reduction of EcPDS transcripts. Strong silencing resulted in almost completely white petals, fruits, shoots and leaves. Plants with a strong degree of silencing will eventually die off; however, others are able to produce EcPDS gene product even after a strong initial silencing and will recover. Silencing was found to be not always systemic, but was often restricted to certain organs or parts of organs. Conclusions VIGS is an effective, fast and transient method to down-regulate gene expression in eschscholzia. It serves well to detect prominent phenotypes which may become obvious even if some target gene transcript remains in the plant tissue. However, subtle phenotypes will be more difficult to detect, as extremely strong silencing effects occur in <10 % of

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium sp. Strain R89-1, a Morphine Alkaloid-Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kyslíková, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium sp. strain R89-1 isolated from composted wastes of Papaver somniferum can effectively biotransform codeine/morphine into 14-OH-derivatives. Here, we present a 4.7-Mb assembly of the R89-1 strain genome. The draft shows that the strain R89-1 represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage within the genus Agrobacterium. PMID:27056219

  9. The seirena B Class Floral Homeotic Mutant of California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) Reveals a Function of the Enigmatic PI Motif in the Formation of Specific Multimeric MADS Domain Protein Complexes[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Orashakova, Svetlana; Lange, Sabrina; Melzer, Rainer; Theißen, Günter; Smyth, David R.; Becker, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The products of B class floral homeotic genes specify petal and stamen identity, and loss of B function results in homeotic conversions of petals into sepals and stamens into carpels. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of seirena-1 (sei-1), a mutant from the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) that shows homeotic changes characteristic of floral homeotic B class mutants. SEI has been previously described as EScaGLO, one of four B class–related MADS box genes in California poppy. The C terminus of SEI, including the highly conserved PI motif, is truncated in sei-1 proteins. Nevertheless, like the wild-type SEI protein, the sei-1 mutant protein is able to bind CArG-boxes and can form homodimers, heterodimers, and several higher order complexes with other MADS domain proteins. However, unlike the wild type, the mutant protein is not able to mediate higher order complexes consisting of specific B, C, and putative E class related proteins likely involved in specifying stamen identity. Within the PI motif, five highly conserved N-terminal amino acids are specifically required for this interaction. Several families lack this short conserved sequence, including the Brassicaceae, and we propose an evolutionary scenario to explain these functional differences. PMID:23444328

  10. Functional Characterization of 4′OMT and 7OMT Genes in BIA Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gurkok, Tugba; Ozhuner, Esma; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Özcan, Sebahattin; Turktas, Mine; İpek, Arif; Demirtas, Ibrahim; Okay, Sezer; Unver, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Alkaloids are diverse group of secondary metabolites generally found in plants. Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), the only commercial source of morphinan alkaloids, has been used as a medicinal plant since ancient times. It produces benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIA) including the narcotic analgesic morphine, the muscle relaxant papaverine, and the anti-cancer agent noscapine. Though BIAs play crucial roles in many biological mechanisms their steps in biosynthesis and the responsible genes remain to be revealed. In this study, expressions of 3-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4′–methyltransferase (4′OMT) and reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (7OMT) genes were subjected to manipulation to functionally characterize their roles in BIA biosynthesis. Measurements of alkaloid accumulation were performed in leaf, stem, and capsule tissues accordingly. Suppression of 4′OMT expression caused reduction in the total alkaloid content in stem tissue whereas total alkaloid content was significantly induced in the capsule. Silencing of the 7OMT gene also caused repression in total alkaloid content in the stem. On the other hand, over-expression of 4′OMT and 7OMT resulted in higher morphine accumulation in the stem but suppressed amount in the capsule. Moreover, differential expression in several BIA synthesis genes (CNMT, TYDC, 6OMT, SAT, COR, 4′OMT, and 7OMT) were observed upon manipulation of 4′OMT and 7OMT expression. Upon silencing and overexpression applications, tissue specific effects of these genes were identified. Manipulation of 4′OMT and 7OMT genes caused differentiated accumulation of BIAs including morphine and noscapine in capsule and stem tissues. PMID:26909086

  11. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism: a century of discovery and a brave new world.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Jillian M; Facchini, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a structurally diverse group of plant specialized metabolites with a long history of investigation. Although the ecophysiological functions of most BIAs are unknown, the medicinal properties of many compounds have been exploited for centuries. These include the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, the antimicrobial agents sanguinarine and berberine, and the antitussive and anticancer drug noscapine. BIA biosynthesis involves a restricted number of enzyme types that catalyze landmark coupling reactions and subsequent functional group modifications. A pathogenesis-related (PR)10/Bet v1 'Pictet-Spenglerase', several O-methyl-, N-methyl- and O-acetyltransferases, cytochromes P450, FAD-dependent oxidases, non-heme dioxygenases and NADPH-dependent reductases have been implicated in the multistep pathways leading to structurally diverse alkaloids. A small number of plant species, including opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and other members of the Ranunculales, have emerged as model systems to study BIA metabolism. The expansion of resources to include a wider range of plant species is creating an opportunity to investigate previously uncharacterized BIA pathways. Contemporary knowledge of BIA metabolism reflects over a century of research coupled with the development of key innovations such as radioactive tracing, enzyme isolation and molecular cloning, and functional genomics approaches such as virus-induced gene silencing. Recently, the emergence of transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics has expedited the discovery of new BIA biosynthetic genes. The growing repository of BIA biosynthetic genes is providing the parts required to apply emerging synthetic biology platforms to the development of production systems in microbes as an alternative to plants as a commecial source of valuable BIAs. PMID:23385146

  12. Functional Characterization of 4'OMT and 7OMT Genes in BIA Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gurkok, Tugba; Ozhuner, Esma; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Özcan, Sebahattin; Turktas, Mine; İpek, Arif; Demirtas, Ibrahim; Okay, Sezer; Unver, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Alkaloids are diverse group of secondary metabolites generally found in plants. Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), the only commercial source of morphinan alkaloids, has been used as a medicinal plant since ancient times. It produces benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIA) including the narcotic analgesic morphine, the muscle relaxant papaverine, and the anti-cancer agent noscapine. Though BIAs play crucial roles in many biological mechanisms their steps in biosynthesis and the responsible genes remain to be revealed. In this study, expressions of 3-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-methyltransferase (4'OMT) and reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (7OMT) genes were subjected to manipulation to functionally characterize their roles in BIA biosynthesis. Measurements of alkaloid accumulation were performed in leaf, stem, and capsule tissues accordingly. Suppression of 4'OMT expression caused reduction in the total alkaloid content in stem tissue whereas total alkaloid content was significantly induced in the capsule. Silencing of the 7OMT gene also caused repression in total alkaloid content in the stem. On the other hand, over-expression of 4'OMT and 7OMT resulted in higher morphine accumulation in the stem but suppressed amount in the capsule. Moreover, differential expression in several BIA synthesis genes (CNMT, TYDC, 6OMT, SAT, COR, 4'OMT, and 7OMT) were observed upon manipulation of 4'OMT and 7OMT expression. Upon silencing and overexpression applications, tissue specific effects of these genes were identified. Manipulation of 4'OMT and 7OMT genes caused differentiated accumulation of BIAs including morphine and noscapine in capsule and stem tissues. PMID:26909086

  13. In vitro conservation of twenty-three overexploited medicinal plants belonging to the Indian sub continent.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Mathur, Ajay Kumar; Jain, Sheetal Prasad; Mathur, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-three pharmaceutically important plants, namely, Elaeocarpus spharicus, Rheum emodi, Indigofera tinctoria, Picrorrhiza kurroa, Bergenia ciliata, Lavandula officinalis, Valeriana wallichii, Coleus forskohlii, Gentiana kurroo, Saussurea lappa, Stevia rebaudiana, Acorus calamus, Pyrethrum cinerariaefolium, Aloe vera, Bacopa monnieri, Salvia sclarea, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Swertia cordata, Psoralea corylifolia, Jurinea mollis, Ocimum sanctum, Paris polyphylla, and Papaver somniferum, which are at the verge of being endangered due to their overexploitation and collection from the wild, were successfully established in vitro. Collections were made from the different biodiversity zones of India including Western Himalaya, Northeast Himalaya, Gangetic plain, Western Ghats, Semiarid Zone, and Central Highlands. Aseptic cultures were raised at the morphogenic level of callus, suspension, axillary shoot, multiple shoot, and rooted plants. Synseeds were also produced from highly proliferating shoot cultures of Bacopa monnieri, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Stevia rebaudiana, Valeriana wallichii, Gentiana kurroo, Lavandula officinalis, and Papaver somniferum. In vitro flowering was observed in Papaver somniferum, Psoralea corylifolia, and Ocimum sanctum shoots cultures. Out of 23 plants, 18 plants were successfully hardened under glasshouse conditions. PMID:22593711

  14. Light microscopy can reveal the consumption of a mixture of psychotropic plant and fungal material in suspicious death.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Patricia E J; Hawksworth, David L; Edwards, Kevin J

    2015-08-01

    Light microscopical examination of plant and fungal remains in the post mortem gut may be capable of demonstrating the ingestion of unexpected natural psychotropic materials. This is demonstrated here in a case in which a 'shaman' was accused of causing the death of a young man. The deceased had participated in a ceremony which involved the drinking of ayahuasca in order to induce a psychotropic experience. Ayahuasca is an infusion of Banisteriopsis caapi (ayahuasca vine), which produces a monoamine oxidase inhibitor, and one or more additional tropical plants, generally Psychotria viridis (chacruna) which produces dimethyltryptamine (DMT). The monoamine oxidase inhibitor prevents DMT from being broken down in the gut, so enabling its passage into the bloodstream and across the blood/brain barrier. Toxicological tests for DMT demonstrated the presence of this compound in the body. The deceased was reported to be in the habit of using Psilocybe semilanceata (liberty cap). This fungus (popularly called magic mushroom) contains psilocybin which is hydrolysed in the gut to psilocin; this compound mimics a serotonin uptake inhibitor, and also invokes psychotropic experiences. Microscopical examination established that the ileum and colon contained spores of Psilocybe and, in addition, pollen of Cannabis sativa and seeds of Papaver cf. somniferum (opium poppy). Both the plant species yield psychotropic substances. Palynological and mycological analysis of containers from the deceased person's dwelling also yielded abundant trace evidence of pertinent pollen and spores. The police had requested analysis for DMT but there was no screening for other psychotropic substances. Investigators were surprised that a mixture of hallucinogenic materials had been consumed by the deceased. The charge was modified from manslaughter to possession of a 'Class A' drug as the deceased had been consuming psychotropic substances not administered by the 'shaman'. Where death involving drugs

  15. Assortment of the plants in the Medieval diet in Czech countries (based on archaeobotanical finds).

    PubMed

    Culíková, V

    2000-01-01

    The finds of remains of useful plants in archaeological objects were drawing attention already in the last century. However, it was not until after the World War II, in relation with renovation of historical cores of the towns, when a separate branch of the botany--archaeobotany constituted. In the Czech Republic it was E. Opravil who was the first to become engaged in a systematic archaeobotanical research at the beginning of the 60's. All the vegetal remains--fruits and seeds on the first place as well as pollen grains from prehistoric times to the post-medieval period, are the subjects of archaeobotany. The medieval waste pits are the richest sources of the vegetal remains. They contain a lot of diasporas of cultural as well as wild plants. The remains of useful plants are an authentic document of the vegetal component of diet. Even though some vegetal species, such as for example garlic, onion or stalk-plants, about whose cultivation we are informed from literature, occur only seldom, there appeared also the species not mentioned in literature. All the basic cereals have been known in our country already since the early Middle Ages. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rye (Secale cereale), as well as millet (Panicum miliaceum) that, along with buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), were replaced by potatoes in the modern times were the most important. Also leguminous plants were of great importance in the diet even though their charred seeds seldom preserved. Remains of oil plants such as hemp (Cannabis sativa), flax (Linum usitatissimum) and poppy (Papaver somniferum) preserved well. It was successfully proved that cucumber (Cucumis sativus), among other numerous kinds of vegetables, was introduced by the Slavs already in the 8th century in Moravia and in the 9th century in Bohemia. The assortment of fruit was rich--especially the assortment of cultivated fruit. Among the imported kinds of fruit the first place occupied figs (Ficus carica), from the numerous finds it can

  16. Cutting Down the Tall Poppies: Horizontal Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Carole

    Many women in educational leadership positions experience negative treatment from female teachers and female superintendents. This phenomenon is known as horizontal violence, "the curious behavior of members of oppressed groups who often lash out at their peers in response to oppression instead of attacking their oppressors." This paper explores…

  17. Small Poppies: Highly Gifted Children in the Early Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Miraca U. M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the underidentification of young highly-gifted children and describes the developmental differences in highly-gifted children. Issues in the identification of young highly-gifted children are addressed, along with suggestions for teacher nomination, parent nomination, ability and achievement testing, and appropriate placements of…

  18. Plant remains from an Early Iron Age well at Hajndl, Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Sostarić, Renata; Alegro, Antun; Hrsak, Vladimir; Stancić, Zvjezdana; Küster, Hansjörg

    2009-12-01

    The archaeobotanical samples analysed derive from a well-preserved well dated to the Early Iron Age (Hallstatt) according to pottery found in the sampled layers and on a radiocarbon dating (720-520 cal B.C.) of the wooden construction of the well. Cultivated plants (Panicum miliaceum, Linum usitatissimum, Papaver somniferum and Camelina sativa) were recorded in relatively small numbers whereas primary cereals are lacking. Together with quite a large number of accompanied weeds they suggest agriculture activities, but a mixture of weeds and ruderal plants was probably also growing inside the relatively large settlement complex and could have been included in the assemblages just by chance. The plant species composition indicates local vegetation developed under strong anthropogenic influence and on mainly moist and nitrogen-rich soils. Grassland plants and an almost complete lacking of tree and shrub species characteristic for the climax vegetation (deciduous mesophilous mixed forests) of the region also indicate at least local human activity. PMID:20102084

  19. [Papaver bracteatum, influence of cold treatment and cloning on Thebaine content of the capsules.].

    PubMed

    Bastart-Malsot, M; Paris, M

    1982-05-01

    A high heterogeneity of thébaïne yields is revealed in capsules of plants obtained from seeds cultivated in a phytotron. Clonage methods could be used to perform culture. Heterogeneity of plants hides influence of low temperature on thebaïne production. With clone this influence appears to be slight but appreciable. PMID:17396776

  20. Unprecedented Utilization of Pelargonidin and Indole for the Biosynthesis of Plant Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Warskulat, Anne‐Christin; Tatsis, Evangelos C.; Dudek, Bettina; Kai, Marco; Lorenz, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nudicaulins are a group of indole alkaloid glycosides responsible for the color of yellow petals of Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy). The unique aglycone scaffold of these alkaloids attracted our interest as one of the most unusual flavonoid‐indole hybrid structures that occur in nature. Stable isotope labeling experiments with sliced petals identified free indole, but not tryptamine or l‐tryptophan, as one of the two key biosynthetic precursors of the nudicaulin aglycone. Pelargonidin was identified as the second key precursor, contributing the polyphenolic unit to the nudicaulin molecule. This finding was inferred from the temporary accumulation of pelargonidin glycosides in the petals during flower bud development and a drop at the point in time when nudicaulin levels start to increase. The precursor‐directed incorporation of cyanidin into a new 3′‐hydroxynudicaulin strongly supports the hypothesis that anthocyanins are involved in the biosynthesis of nudicaulins. PMID:26670055

  1. Unprecedented Utilization of Pelargonidin and Indole for the Biosynthesis of Plant Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Dudek, Bettina; Kai, Marco; Lorenz, Sybille; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-02-15

    Nudicaulins are a group of indole alkaloid glycosides responsible for the color of yellow petals of Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy). The unique aglycone scaffold of these alkaloids attracted our interest as one of the most unusual flavonoid-indole hybrid structures that occur in nature. Stable isotope labeling experiments with sliced petals identified free indole, but not tryptamine or l-tryptophan, as one of the two key biosynthetic precursors of the nudicaulin aglycone. Pelargonidin was identified as the second key precursor, contributing the polyphenolic unit to the nudicaulin molecule. This finding was inferred from the temporary accumulation of pelargonidin glycosides in the petals during flower bud development and a drop at the point in time when nudicaulin levels start to increase. The precursor-directed incorporation of cyanidin into a new 3'-hydroxynudicaulin strongly supports the hypothesis that anthocyanins are involved in the biosynthesis of nudicaulins. PMID:26670055

  2. Pharmacology of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Barkin, Robert L; Wang, Victor C

    2011-01-01

    The perpetual pursuit of pain elimination has been constant throughout human history and pervades human cultures. In some ways it is as old as medicine itself. Cultures throughout history have practiced the art of pain management through remedies such as oral ingestion of herbs or techniques believed to have special properties. In fact, even Hippocrates wrote about the practice of trepanation, the cutting of holes in the body to release pain. Current therapies for management of pain include the pervasive utilization of opioids, which have an extensive history, spanning centuries. There is general agreement about the appropriateness of opioids for the treatment of acute and cancer pain, but the long-term use of these drugs for treatment of chronic non-malignant pain remains controversial. The pros and cons regarding these issues are beyond the scope of this review. Instead, the purpose of this review will be directed towards the pharmacology of commonly prescribed opioids in the treatment of various chronic pain syndromes. Opium, derived from the Greek word for "juice," is extracted from the latex sap of the opium poppy (Papaverum somniferum). The juice of the poppy is the source of some 20 different alkaloids of opium. These alkaloids of opioids can be divided into 2 chemical classes: phenanthrenes (morphine, codeine, and thebaine) and benzylisoquinolines (agents that do not interact with opioid receptors). PMID:21785485

  3. Molecular phylogeny of Asian Meconopsis based on nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Ya-Nan; Yang, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The taxonomy and phylogeny of Asian Meconopsis (Himalayan blue poppy) remain largely unresolved. We used the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) and the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) trnL-F region for phylogenetic reconstruction of Meconopsis and its close relatives Papaver, Roemeria, and Stylomecon. We identified five main clades, which were well-supported in the gene trees reconstructed with the nrDNA ITS and cpDNA trnL-F sequences. We found that 41 species of Asian Meconopsis did not constitute a monophyletic clade, but formed two solid clades (I and V) separated in the phylogenetic tree by three clades (II, III and IV) of Papaver and its allies. Clade V includes only four Asian Meconopsis species, with the remaining 90 percent of Asian species included in clade I. In this core Asian Meconopsis clade, five subclades (Ia-Ie) were recognized in the nrDNA ITS tree. Three species (Meconopsis discigera, M. pinnatifolia, and M. torquata) of subgenus Discogyne were imbedded in subclade Ia, indicating that the present definition of subgenera in Meconopsis should be rejected. These subclades are inconsistent with any series or sections of the present classifications, suggesting that classifications of the genus should be completely revised. Finally, proposals for further revision of the genus Meconopsis were put forward based on molecular, morphological, and biogeographical evidences. PMID:25118100

  4. The In vitro anti-acne activity of two unani drugs

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shahid Shah; Tariq, Mohd.; Zaman, Roohi; Imtiyaz, Shaikh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acne is the most common disorder treated by dermatologists. As many as 80-90% of all adolescents have some type of acne and 30% of them require medical treatment. It is an inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit characterized by the formation of open and closed comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts. Aims: The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro anti-acne activity of two Unani single drugs Darchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bl.) and Tukhm Khashkhash (Papaver somniferum L. seeds). Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic and hydroalcoholic extracts of both drugs were investigated against two acne causing bacteria, i.e., Propionibacterium acne and Staphylococcus epidermidis using well diffusion method. Results: The result showed that both drugs were active against the two bacteria. Against P. acne aqueous and ethanolic extract of Darchini and Tukhm Khashkhash showed the zone of inhibition of 18 ± 1.02 mm and 18 ± 1.6 mm and 13 ± 1.04 mm and 14 ± 1.8 mm, respectively. Against S. epidermidis aqueous, hydroalcoholic and ethanolic extracts of Darchini showed 22 ± 1.7 mm, 22 ± 1.2 mm and 15 ± 1.8 mm zone of inhibition respectively. Hydroalcoholic and ethanolic extracts of Tukhm Khashkhash showed 15 ± 1.09 mm and 13 ± 1.6 mm zone of inhibition respectively. Conclusion: This suggests that C. zeylanicum and P. somniferum have potential against acne causing bacteria and hence they can be used in topical anti-acne preparations and may address the antibiotic resistance of the bacteria. PMID:25161328

  5. Identification of a unique 2-oxoglutarate-dependent flavone 7-O-demethylase completes the elucidation of the lipophilic flavone network in basil.

    PubMed

    Berim, Anna; Kim, Min-Jeong; Gang, David R

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule demethylation is considered unusual in plants. Of the studied instances, the N-demethylation of nicotine is catalyzed by a Cyt P450 monooxygenase, while the O-dealkylation of alkaloids in Papaver somniferum is mediated by 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODDs). This report describes a 2-ODD regiospecifically catalyzing the 7-O-demethylation of methoxylated flavones in peltate trichomes of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). Three candidate 2-ODDs were identified in the basil trichome transcriptome database. Only the candidate designated ObF7ODM1 was found to be active with and highly specific for the proposed natural substrates, gardenin B and 8-hydroxysalvigenin. Of the characterized 2-ODDs, ObF7ODM1 is most closely related to O-demethylases from Papaver. The demethylase activity in trichomes from four basil chemotypes matches well with the abundance of ObF7ODM1 peptides and transcripts in the same trichome preparations. Treatment of basil plants with a 2-ODD inhibitor prohexadione-calcium significantly reduced the accumulation of 7-O-demethylated flavone nevadensin, confirming the involvement of a 2-ODD in its formation. Notably, the full-length open reading frame of ObF7ODM1 contains a second in-frame AUG codon 57 nucleotides downstream of the first translation initiation codon. Both AUG codons are recognized by bacterial translation machinery during heterologous gene expression. The N-truncated ObF7ODM1 is nearly inactive. The N-terminus essential for activity is unique to ObF7ODM1 and does not align with the sequences of other 2-ODDs. Further studies will reveal whether alternative translation initiation plays a role in regulating the O-demethylase activity in planta. Molecular identification of the flavone 7-O-demethylase completes the biochemical elucidation of the lipophilic flavone network in basil. PMID:25378691

  6. The POPPY Research Programme protocol: investigating opioid utilisation, costs and patterns of extramedical use in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Blanch, Bianca; Gisev, Natasa; Larance, Briony; Pearson, Sallie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Opioid prescribing is increasing in many countries. In Australia, there is limited research on patterns of prescribing and access, or the outcomes associated with this use. The aim of this research programme is to use national dispensing data to estimate opioid use and costs, including problematic or extramedical use in the Australian population. Methods and analysis In a cohort of persons dispensed at least one opioid in 2013, we will estimate monthly utilisation and costs of prescribed opioids, overall and according to individual opioid formulations and strengths. In a cohort of new opioid users, commencing therapy between 1 July 2009 and 31 December 2013, we will examine patterns of opioid use including initiation of therapy, duration of treatment and concomitant use of opioids and other prescribed medicines. We will also examine patterns of extramedical opioid use based on indicators including excess dosing, use of more than one opioid concomitantly, doctor/pharmacy shopping and accelerated time to prescription refill. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the NSW Population and Health Services Ethics Committee (March 2014) and data access approved by the Department of Human Services External Review Evaluation Committee (June 2014). This will be one of the first comprehensive Australian studies with the capability to investigate individual patterns of use and track extramedical use. In the first instance our analysis will be based on 5 years of dispensing data but will be expanded with ongoing annual data updates. This research has the capability to contribute significantly to pharmaceutical policy within Australia and globally. In particular, the trajectory of extramedical prescription-opioid use has been the subject of limited research to date. The results of this research will be published widely in general medical, pharmacoepidemiology, addiction and psychiatry journals. PMID:25631315

  7. Modulation of CYPs, P-gp, and PXR by Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy) and Its Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Manda, Vamshi K; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Dale, Olivia R; Kumarihamy, Mallika; Cutler, Stephen J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Muhammad, Ilias; Khan, Shabana I

    2016-04-01

    Eschscholzia californica, a native US plant, is traditionally used as a sedative, analgesic, and anxiolytic herb. With the rapid rise in the use of herbal supplements together with over-the-counter and prescription drugs, the risk for potential herb-drug interactions is also increasing. Most of the clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions occur due to modulation of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs), P-glycoprotein, and the pregnane X receptor by concomitantly used herbs. This study aimed to determine the effects of an EtOH extract, aqueous extract (tea), basic CHCl3 fractions, and isolated major alkaloids, namely protopine (1), escholtzine (2), allocryptopine (3), and californidine (4), of E. californica on the activity of cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein and the pregnane X receptor. The EtOH extract and fractions showed strong time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19, and reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6. Among the alkaloids, escholtzine (2) and allocryptopine (3) exhibited time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19 (IC50 shift ratio > 2), while protopine (1) and allocryptopine (3) showed reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6 enzyme. A significant activation of the pregnane X receptor (> 2-fold) was observed with the EtOH extract, basic CHCl3 fraction, and alkaloids (except protopine), which resulted into an increased expression of mRNA and the activity of CYP 3A4 and CYP 1A2. The expression of P-glycoprotein was unaffected. However, aqueous extract (tea) and its main alkaloid californidine (4) did not affect cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein, or the pregnane X receptor. This data suggests that EtOH extract of E. californica and its major alkaloids have a potential of causing interactions with drugs that are metabolized by cytochrome P450s, while the tea seems to be safer. PMID:27054913

  8. Modulation of CYPs, P-gp, and PXR by Eschscholzia californica (California poppy) and its alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eschscholzia californica Cham., a native US plant, is traditionally used as a sedative, analgesic and anxiolytic herb. With the rapid rise in the use of herbal supplements together with over the counter (OTC) and prescription drugs, the risk for potential herb-drug interactions is also increasing. M...

  9. Pain and Poppies: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Opioid Analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Salvemini, Daniela; Salter, Michael W.; Gutstein, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Treating pain is one of the most difficult challenges in medicine and a key facet of disease management. The isolation of morphine by Friedrich Sertürner in 1804 added an essential pharmacological tool in the treatment of pain and spawned the discovery of a new class of drugs known collectively as opioid analgesics. Revered for their potent pain-relieving effects, even Morpheus the god of dreams could not have dreamt that his opium tincture would be both a gift and a burden to humankind. To date, morphine and other opioids remain essential analgesics for alleviating pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as analgesic tolerance (diminished pain-relieving effects), hyperalgesia (increased pain sensitivity), and drug dependence. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the effect of chronic pain on opioid reward. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain is pervasive and afflicts >100 million Americans. Treating pain in these individuals is notoriously difficult and often requires opioids, one of the most powerful and effective classes of drugs used for controlling pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as a loss of pain-relieving effects (analgesic tolerance), paradoxical pain (hyperalgesia), and addiction. Despite the potential side effects, opioids remain the pharmacological cornerstone of modern pain therapy. This review highlights recent breakthroughs in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the cellular control of opioid systems in reward and aversion. The findings will challenge traditional views of the good, the bad, and the ugly of opioids. PMID:26468188

  10. The Noscapine Chronicle: A Pharmaco-Historic Biography of the Opiate Alkaloid Family and its Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Rida, Padmashree C G; LiVecche, Dillon; Ogden, Angela; Zhou, Jun; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-09-01

    Given its manifold potential therapeutic applications and amenability to modification, noscapine is a veritable "Renaissance drug" worthy of commemoration. Perhaps the only facet of noscapine's profile more astounding than its versatility is its virtual lack of side effects and addictive properties, which distinguishes it from other denizens of Papaver somniferum. This review intimately chronicles the rich intellectual and pharmacological history behind the noscapine family of compounds, the length of whose arms was revealed over decades of patient scholarship and experimentation. We discuss the intriguing story of this family of nontoxic alkaloids, from noscapine's purification from opium at the turn of the 19th century in Paris to the recent torrent of rationally designed analogs with tremendous anticancer potential. In between, noscapine's unique pharmacology; impact on cellular signaling pathways, the mitotic spindle, and centrosome clustering; use as an antimalarial drug and cough suppressant; and exceptional potential as a treatment for polycystic ovarian syndrome, strokes, and diverse malignancies are catalogued. Seminal experiments involving some of its more promising analogs, such as amino-noscapine, 9-nitronoscapine, 9-bromonoscapine, and reduced bromonoscapine, are also detailed. Finally, the bright future of these oftentimes even more exceptional derivatives is described, rounding out a portrait of a truly remarkable family of compounds. PMID:26179481

  11. The Noscapine Chronicle: A Pharmaco-Historic Biography of the Opiate Alkaloid Family and its Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rida, Padmashree C. G.; LiVecche, Dillon; Ogden, Angela; Zhou, Jun; Aneja, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Given its manifold potential therapeutic applications and amenability to modification, noscapine is a veritable “Renaissance drug” worthy of commemoration. Perhaps the only facet of noscapine’s profile more astounding than its versatility is its virtual lack of side effects and addictive properties, which distinguishes it from other denizens of Papaver somniferum. This review intimately chronicles the rich intellectual and pharmacological history behind the noscapine family of compounds, the length of whose arms was revealed over decades of patient scholarship and experimentation. We discuss the intriguing story of this family of nontoxic alkaloids, from noscapine’s purification from opium at the turn of the 19th century in Paris to the recent torrent of rationally designed analogs with tremendous anticancer potential. In between, noscapine’s unique pharmacology; impact on cellular signaling pathways, the mitotic spindle, and centrosome clustering; use as an antimalarial drug and cough suppressant; and exceptional potential as a treatment for polycystic ovarian syndrome, strokes, and diverse malignancies are catalogued. Seminal experiments involving some of its more promising analogs, such as amino-noscapine, 9-nitronoscapine, 9-bromonoscapine, and reduced bromonoscapine, are also detailed. Finally, the bright future of these oftentimes even more exceptional derivatives is described, rounding out a portrait of a truly remarkable family of compounds. PMID:26179481

  12. Progress Toward the Development of Noscapine and Derivatives as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    DeBono, Aaron; Capuano, Ben; Scammells, Peter J

    2015-08-13

    Many nitrogen-moiety containing alkaloids derived from plant origins are bioactive and play a significant role in human health and emerging medicine. Noscapine, a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid derived from Papaver somniferum, has been used as a cough suppressant since the mid 1950s, illustrating a good safety profile. Noscapine has since been discovered to arrest cells at mitosis, albeit with moderately weak activity. Immunofluorescence staining of microtubules after 24 h of noscapine exposure at 20 μM elucidated chromosomal abnormalities and the inability of chromosomes to complete congression to the equatorial plane for proper mitotic separation ( Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 1998 , 95 , 1601 - 1606 ). A number of noscapine analogues possessing various modifications have been described within the literature and have shown significantly improved antiprolific profiles for a large variety of cancer cell lines. Several semisynthetic antimitotic alkaloids are emerging as possible candidates as novel anticancer therapies. This perspective discusses the advancing understanding of noscapine and related analogues in the fight against malignant disease. PMID:25811651

  13. Laūq: A Sustained-Release Dosage Form for Respiratory Disorders in Traditional Persian Medicine.

    PubMed

    Karegar-Borzi, Hossein; Salehi, Mehdi; Rahimi, Roja

    2016-01-01

    Laūq is a pharmaceutical dosage form that had been mainly used for the treatment of various respiratory disorders in traditional Persian medicine. It is important from 2 aspects: a dosage form with efficient and optimum delivery of drugs to the respiratory tract and biological effects of its ingredients. Natural medicine in laūq has been demonstrated to act in respiratory disorders by their antitussive, antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, spasmolytic, and antibacterial activities. Some of these natural remedies act by most of the mentioned mechanisms such as Cydonia oblonga, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Crocus sativus, Hyssopus officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare, and honey. However, the evidence is limited including Cassia fistula, Papaver somniferum, and Drimia maritima. According to positive pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of laūqs, they may be considered as efficient dosage forms for delivery of drugs to the respiratory tract. For better compatibility of patients, it could be substituted laūqs with newer drug delivery systems like lozenges. PMID:26008751

  14. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  15. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  16. Taking one for the team: self-recognition and cell suicide in pollen.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Poulter, Natalie S; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2014-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important genetically controlled mechanism used by many angiosperms to prevent self-fertilization and inbreeding. A multiallelic S-locus allows discrimination between 'self' (incompatible) pollen from 'nonself' pollen at the pistil. Interaction of matching pollen and pistil S-determinants allows 'self' recognition and triggers rejection of incompatible pollen. The S-determinants for Papaver rhoeas (poppy) are PrsS and PrpS. PrsS is a small secreted protein that acts as a signalling ligand to interact with its cognate pollen S-determinant PrpS, a small novel transmembrane protein. Interaction of PrsS with incompatible pollen stimulates increases in cytosolic free Ca(2+) and involves influx of Ca(2+) and K(+). Data implicate involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signalling in the SI response. Downstream targets include the cytoskeleton, a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase, Pr-p26.1, and a MAP kinase, PrMPK9-1. A major focus for SI-induced signalling is to initiate programmed cell death (PCD). In this review we provide an overview of our understanding of SI, with focus on how the signals and components are integrated, in particular, how reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and the actin cytoskeleton feed into a PCD network. We also discuss our recent functional expression of PrpS in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen in the context of understanding how PCD signalling systems may have evolved. PMID:24449385

  17. Pollen foraging: learning a complex motor skill by bumblebees (Bombus terrestris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raine, Nigel E.; Chittka, Lars

    2007-06-01

    To investigate how bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) learn the complex motor skills involved in pollen foraging, we observed naïve workers foraging on arrays of nectarless poppy flowers (Papaver rhoeas) in a greenhouse. Foraging skills were quantified by measuring the pollen load collected during each foraging bout and relating this to the number of flowers visited and bout duration on two consecutive days. The pollen standing crop (PSC) in each flower decreased drastically from 0530 to 0900 hours. Therefore, we related foraging performance to the changing levels of pollen available (per flower) and found that collection rate increased over the course of four consecutive foraging bouts (comprising between 277 and 354 individual flower visits), suggesting that learning to forage for pollen represents a substantial time investment for individual foragers. The pollen collection rate and size of pollen loads collected at the start of day 2 were markedly lower than at the end of day 1, suggesting that components of pollen foraging behaviour could be subject to imperfect overnight retention. Our results suggest that learning the necessary motor skills to collect pollen effectively from morphologically simple flowers takes three times as many visits as learning how to handle the most morphologically complex flowers to extract nectar, potentially explaining why bees are more specialised in their choice of pollen flowers.

  18. Biochemical Evaluation of the Decarboxylation and Decarboxylation-Deamination Activities of Plant Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P.; Liu, Pingyang; Ding, Haizhen; Harich, Kim; Gillaspy, Glenda; Li, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) enzymes are capable of catalyzing either decarboxylation or decarboxylation-deamination on various combinations of aromatic amino acid substrates. These two different activities result in the production of arylalkylamines and the formation of aromatic acetaldehydes, respectively. Variations in product formation enable individual enzymes to play different physiological functions. Despite these catalytic variations, arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs are indistinguishable without protein expression and characterization. In this study, extensive biochemical characterization of plant AAADs was performed to identify residues responsible for differentiating decarboxylation AAADs from aldehyde synthase AAADs. Results demonstrated that a tyrosine residue located on a catalytic loop proximal to the active site of plant AAADs is primarily responsible for dictating typical decarboxylase activity, whereas a phenylalanine at the same position is primarily liable for aldehyde synthase activity. Mutagenesis of the active site phenylalanine to tyrosine in Arabidopsis thaliana and Petroselinum crispum aromatic acetaldehyde synthases primarily converts the enzymes activity from decarboxylation-deamination to decarboxylation. The mutation of the active site tyrosine to phenylalanine in the Catharanthus roseus and Papaver somniferum aromatic amino acid decarboxylases changes the enzymes decarboxylation activity to a primarily decarboxylation-deamination activity. Generation of these mutant enzymes enables the production of unusual AAAD enzyme products including indole-3-acetaldehyde, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethylamine. Our data indicates that the tyrosine and phenylalanine in the catalytic loop region could serve as a signature residue to reliably distinguish plant arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs. Additionally, the resulting data enables further insights into the mechanistic roles of active site

  19. Phylogenomic and structural analyses of 18 complete plastomes across nearly all families of early-diverging eudicots, including an angiosperm-wide analysis of IR gene content evolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanxia; Moore, Michael J; Zhang, Shoujun; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Zhao, Tingting; Meng, Aiping; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Jianqiang; Wang, Hengchang

    2016-03-01

    The grade of early-diverging eudicots includes five major lineages: Ranunculales, Trochodendrales, Buxales, Proteales and Sabiaceae. To examine the evolution of plastome structure in early-diverging eudicots, we determined the complete plastome sequences of eight previously unsequenced early-diverging eudicot taxa, Pachysandra terminalis (Buxaceae), Meliosma aff. cuneifolia (Sabiaceae), Sabia yunnanensis (Sabiaceae), Epimedium sagittatum (Berberidaceae), Euptelea pleiosperma (Eupteleaceae), Akebia trifoliata (Lardizabalaceae), Stephania japonica (Menispermaceae) and Papaver somniferum (Papaveraceae), and compared them to previously published plastomes of the early-diverging eudicots Buxus, Tetracentron, Trochodendron, Nelumbo, Platanus, Nandina, Megaleranthis, Ranunculus, Mahonia and Macadamia. All of the newly sequenced plastomes share the same 79 protein-coding genes, 4 rRNA genes, and 30 tRNA genes, except for that of Epimedium, in which infA is pseudogenized and clpP is highly divergent and possibly a pseudogene. The boundaries of the plastid Inverted Repeat (IR) were found to vary significantly across early-diverging eudicots; IRs ranged from 24.3 to 36.4kb in length and contained from 18 to 33 genes. Based on gene content, the IR was classified into six types, with shifts among types characterized by high levels of homoplasy. Reconstruction of ancestral IR gene content suggested that 18 genes were likely present in the IR region of the ancestor of eudicots. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of a 79-gene, 97-taxon data set that included all available early-diverging eudicots and representative sampling of remaining angiosperm diversity largely agreed with previous estimates of early-diverging eudicot relationships, but resolved Trochodendrales rather than Buxales as sister to Gunneridae, albeit with relatively weak bootstrap support, conflicting with what has been found for these three clades in most previous analyses. In addition, Proteales was

  20. Late Neolithic vegetation history at the pile-dwelling site of Palù di Livenza (northeastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Roberta

    2004-12-01

    The Late Neolithic pile-dwelling of Palù di Livenza yielded archaeological remains typical of the Square Mouth Pottery and Lagozza Cultures. A palynological investigation reveals important changes in the vegetation due to anthropogenic pressure. Between ca. 6590 and 5960 cal. yr BP, dense oak wood forests with deciduous Quercus, Fagus and Corylus extended around the mire, with no signs of human impact. The establishment of the pile-dwelling, dated to ca. 5960 cal. yr BP, led to a strong reduction of forests, reclamation of wetlands, and expansion of herbaceous communities, with cultivated species, infestant weeds, nitrophilous and ruderal herbs, pastures and meadows. According to AMS dates and previous archaeological chronologies, the pile-dwelling persisted for about 700 years (from ca. 5960 to 5260 cal. yr BP). The history of the pile-dwelling after ca. 5260 cal. yr BP cannot be reconstructed because of recent contamination of the top part of the section. Rarefaction analysis was applied to estimate changes of palynological richness through time: the highest E(Tn) (between 56 and 69 taxa) are contemporaneous with the local development of the pile-dwelling. The comparison of pollen data with archaeobotanical evidence indicates that Fragaria vesca, Malus sylvestris, Papaver somniferum and Physalis alkekengi were gathered at some distance from the site and that Linum usitatissimum is strongly under-represented in pollen samples. Crop cultivation can be estimated for a radius of several hundred metres around the mire. Palù di Livenza is significant in the context of Neolithic archaeobotany of northern Italy and neighbouring countries. Copyright

  1. Reproduction and pollination of the endangered dwarf bear-poppy Arctomecon humilis (Papaveraceae)across a quarter century: unraveling of a pollination web?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT.—Arctomecon humilis, a rare gypsophile of the extreme northeastern Mojave Desert, is restricted to a few isolated populations in Washington County, Utah, USA. At several times in the past quarter century, we have studied the breeding system and reproductive success of this endangered specie...

  2. 78 FR 46372 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Ampac Fine Chemicals, LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Methylphenidate (1724) II Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will...

  3. 76 FR 32225 - Manufacturer Of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company...

  4. 77 FR 30026 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Application, Ampac Fine Chemicals LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will manufacture Thebaine intermediates for sale to...

  5. 21 CFR 1312.13 - Issuance of import permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., poppy straw and concentrate of poppy straw) having as its source: (1) Turkey, (2) India, (3) Spain, (4... material imported into the United States shall have as its original source Turkey and India. Except...

  6. 21 CFR 1312.13 - Issuance of import permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., poppy straw and concentrate of poppy straw) having as its source: (1) Turkey, (2) India, (3) Spain, (4... material imported into the United States shall have as its original source Turkey and India. Except...

  7. 21 CFR 1312.13 - Issuance of import permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., poppy straw and concentrate of poppy straw) having as its source: (1) Turkey, (2) India, (3) Spain, (4... material imported into the United States shall have as its original source Turkey and India. Except...

  8. 21 CFR 1312.13 - Issuance of import permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., poppy straw and concentrate of poppy straw) having as its source: (1) Turkey, (2) India, (3) Spain, (4... material imported into the United States shall have as its original source Turkey and India. Except...

  9. 21 CFR 1312.13 - Issuance of import permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., poppy straw and concentrate of poppy straw) having as its source: (1) Turkey, (2) India, (3) Spain, (4... material imported into the United States shall have as its original source Turkey and India. Except...

  10. 76 FR 18576 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... humilis (Dwarf bear-poppy), Astragalus holmgreniorum (Holmgren milk-vetch), and Astragalus ampullarioides (Shivwitz milk- vetch) in conjunction with recovery activities throughout the species' range for the...

  11. 78 FR 64014 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Penick Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). As noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745, all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any... (9040) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw (9650) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company...

  12. 76 FR 81979 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... 25, 2011, and published in the Federal Register on June 3, 2011, 76 FR 32225, AMPAC Fine Chemicals... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will manufacture...

  13. 75 FR 9614 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... 16, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on October 28, 2009 (74 FR 55584), Clinical Supplies... Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670), a basic class of... wounds which contains trace amounts of controlled substances normally found in poppy straw...

  14. 75 FR 22844 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007), comments and requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw... 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745), all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled... Opium (9600) II Poppy Straw (9650) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to...

  15. 77 FR 24983 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Penick Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... not appropriate. 72 FR 3417(2007). As noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745, all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled... Opium (9600) II Poppy Straw (9650) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to...

  16. 75 FR 9613 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... 20, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on November 30, 2009 (74 FR 62598), Aptuit, 10245... (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670), a basic class of controlled... contain trace amounts of the controlled substance normally found in poppy straw concentrate for...

  17. 77 FR 31389 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Penick Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Notice dated April 17, 2012 and published in the Federal Register on April 26, 2012, 77 FR 24983, Penick... applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007) DEA has considered the... substances: Drug Schedule Coca Leaves (9040) II Raw Opium (9600) II Poppy Straw (9650) II Poppy...

  18. 3 CFR - Presidential Determination on Major Illicit Drug Transit or Major Illicit Drug Producing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... producer of opium poppy and a major source of heroin. Primary trafficking routes from Afghanistan, where... precursor chemicals illegally smuggled to Afghanistan, where they are used to process heroin....

  19. 49 CFR 40.293 - What is the SAP's function in conducting the initial evaluation of an employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... violation of a DOT drug or alcohol regulation (e.g., related to assertions of use of hemp oil, “medical marijuana” use, “contact positives,” poppy seed ingestion, job stress); or (3) Personal opinions you...

  20. 49 CFR 40.293 - What is the SAP's function in conducting the initial evaluation of an employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... violation of a DOT drug or alcohol regulation (e.g., related to assertions of use of hemp oil, “medical marijuana” use, “contact positives,” poppy seed ingestion, job stress); or (3) Personal opinions you...

  1. 49 CFR 40.293 - What is the SAP's function in conducting the initial evaluation of an employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... violation of a DOT drug or alcohol regulation (e.g., related to assertions of use of hemp oil, “medical marijuana” use, “contact positives,” poppy seed ingestion, job stress); or (3) Personal opinions you...

  2. 49 CFR 40.293 - What is the SAP's function in conducting the initial evaluation of an employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... violation of a DOT drug or alcohol regulation (e.g., related to assertions of use of hemp oil, “medical marijuana” use, “contact positives,” poppy seed ingestion, job stress); or (3) Personal opinions you...

  3. 49 CFR 40.293 - What is the SAP's function in conducting the initial evaluation of an employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... violation of a DOT drug or alcohol regulation (e.g., related to assertions of use of hemp oil, “medical marijuana” use, “contact positives,” poppy seed ingestion, job stress); or (3) Personal opinions you...

  4. 78 FR 64020 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried USA, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... The Notice dated July 23, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on August 1, 2013, 78 FR 46613... registration as a Bulk Manufacturer of drug codes Opium, raw (9600), and Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670)....

  5. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a white or brown powder or a black, sticky goo. It's made from morphine, a natural substance in the seedpod of the Asian poppy plant. It can be mixed with water and injected with a needle. Heroin can also ...

  6. 76 FR 41808 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Draft Habitat Conservation Plan for Oncor Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... published in the Federal Register on September 22, 2009 (74 FR 48285). A summary of comments provided during...): Large-fruited sand-verbena (Abronia macrocarpa), Texas poppy-mallow (Callirhoe scabriuscula),...

  7. 75 FR 14187 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ..., 2010, and published in the Federal Register on January 13, 2010 (75 FR 1812), Mallinckrodt Inc., 3600... schedule II: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy...

  8. 76 FR 30969 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... 18, 2011, and published in the Federal Register on February 2, 2011, 76 FR 5827, Mallinckrodt Inc... substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy...

  9. 75 FR 69461 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ..., 2010, and published in the Federal Register on ] September 1, 2010 (75 FR 53719), Noramco Inc., 1440... (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670), a basic class of...

  10. 75 FR 69462 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ..., 2010, and published in the Federal Register on September 1, 2010 (75 FR 53718), Cambrex Charles City... schedule II: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans...

  11. 76 FR 7233 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... 1, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on November 15, 2010, 75 FR 69705, Chattem Chemicals..., raw (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to import the listed...

  12. 75 FR 10312 - Importer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... 23, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on December 2, 2009 (74 FR 63155), Cambrex Charles... listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium sp. Strain R89-1, a Morphine Alkaloid-Biotransforming Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zahradník, Jiří; Kyslíková, Eva; Kyslík, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacteriumsp. strain R89-1 isolated from composted wastes ofPapaver somniferumcan effectively biotransform codeine/morphine into 14-OH-derivatives. Here, we present a 4.7-Mb assembly of the R89-1 strain genome. The draft shows that the strain R89-1 represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage within the genusAgrobacterium. PMID:27056219

  14. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Share Print Home » Drugs of Abuse » Heroin Heroin Email Facebook Twitter Brief Description Heroin is an opioid drug that is synthesized from ... seed pod of the Asian opium poppy plant. Heroin usually appears as a white or brown powder ...

  15. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a white or brown powder or a black, sticky goo. It's made from morphine, a natural substance in the seedpod of the Asian poppy plant. It can be mixed with water and injected with a needle. Heroin can also be smoked or snorted up the nose. All of these ways of taking heroin send ...

  16. 77 FR 55503 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ..., Inc. By Notice dated June 18, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on June 26, 2012, 77 FR... to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). DEA has considered the... Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import...

  17. 78 FR 64015 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Noramco, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417(2007...). As noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw...

  18. 77 FR 40086 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Chattem Chemicals Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). Any bulk manufacturer who is...). As noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46... Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The...

  19. 76 FR 586 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... 19, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on October 26, 2010, 75 FR 65658, Noramco, Inc... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company plans to import the Raw Opium (9600) and Concentrate of...

  20. 76 FR 35241 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... explained in the Correction to Notice of Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007... (f). As noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR... (8501) II Raw Opium (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to import...

  1. 77 FR 55505 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; AMPAC Fine Chemicals LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... LLC By Notice dated May 11, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on May 21, 2012, 77 FR 30026... FR 3417 (2007). DEA has considered the factors in 21 USC Sec. 823(a) and determined that the... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw...

  2. 77 FR 64142 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Noramco, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007...). As noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw...

  3. 75 FR 65658 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    .... As explained in the Correction to Notice of Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR 3417... Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745-46), all applicants for registration to import a basic class... controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Raw Opium (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy...

  4. 78 FR 64015 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Notice dated August 2, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on ] August 14, 2013, 78 FR 49546... appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). DEA has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a) and 952(a), and determined... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II...

  5. 75 FR 14186 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... 23, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on December 3, 2009 (74 FR 63411), Noramco, Inc... of controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw... background and history. Therefore, pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 952(a) and 958(a), and in accordance with 21...

  6. 75 FR 14186 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ..., 2009, and published in the Federal Register on July 9, 2009 (74 FR 32954) and by a second Notice (Correction) dated August 21, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on September 8, 2009 (74 FR 46229... controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Raw Opium (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy...

  7. Wet solids flow enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Caram, H.S.; Agrawal, D.K.; Foster, N.

    1997-07-01

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in the silo using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. This was done by introducing traces. Mustard seeds and poppy seeds were used as trace particles. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128 by 128 to 256 by 256 pixels were generated for each image.

  8. Healthy food trends -- chia seeds

    MedlinePlus

    ... small as poppy seeds. They come from a plant in the mint family. Chia seeds are considered to be a "super food" by many, delivering several important nutrients in just a few calories. You can eat this nutty-flavored seed in many ways.

  9. Mexican Folkart for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Graciela; And Others

    Directions, suggested materials, and illustrations are given for making paper mache pinatas and masks, cascarones, Ojos de Dios, maracas, dresser scarf embroidery, burlap murals, yarn designs, paper plate trays, paper cut designs, the poppy, sarape aprons, and paper Mexican dolls. Filled with candy and broken, the pinata is used on most Mexican…

  10. My General Education: "'Discovering" Amitav Ghosh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Asked to recommend a faculty reading that might counteract our habits of overspecialization, I nominate Amitav Ghosh's "Sea of Poppies" (2008), the first novel in his "Ibis" trilogy. Reading Ghosh has offered me not only a fascinating introduction to the Indian Ocean world but also an occasion to reflect upon the dynamics of a…

  11. La Artesania Mexicana (Mexican Handicrafts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Bettina

    This booklet contains instructions in English and Spanish for making eleven typical Mexican craft articles. The instructions are accompanied by pen-and-ink drawings. The objects are (1) "La Rosa" (The Rose); (2) "El Crisantemo" (The Chrysanthemum); (3) "La Amapola" (The Poppy); (4) "Ojos de Dios" (God's Eyes); (5) "Ojitos con dos caras" (Two-Sided…

  12. 78 FR 64013 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). Any bulk manufacturer who is presently, or is applying to be, registered with... published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745, all applicants for registration to... Cocaine (9041) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import...

  13. 77 FR 2993 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision on Oncor Electric Delivery Company's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Delivery Company's Habitat Conservation Plan for 100 Texas Counties AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Large-fruited sand-verbena (Abronia macrocarpa) Texas poppy-mallow (Callirhoe scabriuscula) Navasota... the HCP and to evaluate alternatives, along with the draft HCP (76 FR 41808). We included...

  14. 75 FR 69705 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Notice of Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007), comments and requests for... a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745-46), all...) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled...

  15. 76 FR 25374 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... of Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007), comments and requests for... published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745, all applicants for registration to... Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled substances in order...

  16. 78 FR 35052 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Noramco, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... dated March 12, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2013, 78 FR 17230, Noramco, Inc... raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). DEA has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a... Phenylacetone (8501) II Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II ] The...

  17. 77 FR 31388 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Noramco, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). In regard to the non-narcotic raw material, any bulk manufacturer who is... September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw...

  18. 75 FR 53719 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007), comments and requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw... 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745), all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled... Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration as an importer of Poppy Straw Concentrate...

  19. 76 FR 51398 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007), comments and requests for hearings on...). As noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745...: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II...

  20. 78 FR 39337 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Registration; Mallinckrodt, LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... Notice dated February 8, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on February 21, 2013, 78 FR 12101... hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate, 72 FR 3417 (2007). Regarding... Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled substances for...

  1. 76 FR 62447 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ..., 2011, and published in the Federal Register on June 16, 2011, 76 FR 35241, Chattem Chemicals, Inc... customers. As explained in the Correction to Notice of Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR...)... II Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company...

  2. 77 FR 43862 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Noramco, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... dated May 15, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on May 25, 2012, 77 FR 31388, Noramco, Inc... requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007...: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II...

  3. 77 FR 5846 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ..., 2011, and published in the Federal Register on August 18, 2011, 76 FR 51398, Cambrex Charles City, Inc... are not appropriate, in accordance with 72 FR 3417 (2007). DEA has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C...: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II...

  4. 76 FR 5827 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007), comments and requests for hearings on... notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, (40 FR 43745), all applicants for...: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy...

  5. 78 FR 69132 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Noramco, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... dated August 14, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on August 21, 2013, 78 FR 51747, Noramco... import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417(2007). In reference to the non-narcotic raw...: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II...

  6. 75 FR 64743 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Notice of Application pertaining to Rhodes Technologies, 72 FR 3417 (2007), comments and requests for..., (40 FR 43745), all applicants for registration to import a basic classes of any controlled substances... Thebaine (9333) II Opium, raw (9600) II Noroxymorphone (9668) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II...

  7. 77 FR 38085 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007... September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745, all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled... Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import the listed...

  8. 78 FR 17230 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Noramco, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... dated October 9, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on October 18, 2012, 77 FR 64142, Noramco... requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw ] material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw...

  9. 78 FR 17230 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Noramco Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... request for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007... Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all applicants for registration to import a basic... schedule II: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Thebaine (9333) II Noroxymorphone (9668) II Poppy...

  10. Instructional Resources. The Significance of Form: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawatsky, Carole; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents four lesson plans designed to teach K-12 students about ceramics and the artists using the medium. Each lesson is centered around one ceramic piece: (1) "Wall Clock," by the Chantilly Porcelain Factory; (2) "Poppy Vase," by Adelaide Robineau; (3) "Laughing Eyes," by Pablo Picasso; and (4) "Ceramic Drum Jar," by Tsayutitsa. (GEA)